Science.gov

Sample records for 3d rendering approach

  1. The rendering context for stereoscopic 3D web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qinshui; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang

    2014-03-01

    3D technologies on the Web has been studied for many years, but they are basically monoscopic 3D. With the stereoscopic technology gradually maturing, we are researching to integrate the binocular 3D technology into the Web, creating a stereoscopic 3D browser that will provide users with a brand new experience of human-computer interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to apply stereoscopy technologies to the CSS3 3D Transforms. Under our model, each element can create or participate in a stereoscopic 3D rendering context, in which 3D Transforms such as scaling, translation and rotation, can be applied and be perceived in a truly 3D space. We first discuss the underlying principles of stereoscopy. After that we discuss how these principles can be applied to the Web. A stereoscopic 3D browser with backward compatibility is also created for demonstration purposes. We take advantage of the open-source WebKit project, integrating the 3D display ability into the rendering engine of the web browser. For each 3D web page, our 3D browser will create two slightly different images, each representing the left-eye view and right-eye view, both to be combined on the 3D display to generate the illusion of depth. And as the result turns out, elements can be manipulated in a truly 3D space.

  2. Hardware-accelerated autostereogram rendering for interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Christoph; Goldluecke, Bastian; Magnor, Marcus

    2003-05-01

    Single Image Random Dot Stereograms (SIRDS) are an attractive way of depicting three-dimensional objects using conventional display technology. Once trained in decoupling the eyes' convergence and focusing, autostereograms of this kind are able to convey the three-dimensional impression of a scene. We present in this work an algorithm that generates SIRDS at interactive frame rates on a conventional PC. The presented system allows rotating a 3D geometry model and observing the object from arbitrary positions in real-time. Subjective tests show that the perception of a moving or rotating 3D scene presents no problem: The gaze remains focused onto the object. In contrast to conventional SIRDS algorithms, we render multiple pixels in a single step using a texture-based approach, exploiting the parallel-processing architecture of modern graphics hardware. A vertex program determines the parallax for each vertex of the geometry model, and the graphics hardware's texture unit is used to render the dot pattern. No data has to be transferred between main memory and the graphics card for generating the autostereograms, leaving CPU capacity available for other tasks. Frame rates of 25 fps are attained at a resolution of 1024x512 pixels on a standard PC using a consumer-grade nVidia GeForce4 graphics card, demonstrating the real-time capability of the system.

  3. A Volume Rendering Framework for Visualizing 3D Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsien-Hsi; Li, Liya; Shen, Han-Wei; Tai, Wen-Kai

    In this paper, we present a volume rendering framework for visualizing 3D flow fields. We introduce the concept of coherence field which evaluates the representativeness of a given streamline set for the underlying 3D vector field. Visualization of the coherence field can provide effective visual feedback to the user for incremental insertion of more streamline seeds. Given an initial set of streamlines, a coherence volume is constructed from a distance field to measure the similarity between the existing streamlines and those in their nearby regions based on the difference between the approximate and the actual vector directions. With the visual feedback obtained from rendering the coherence volume, new streamline seeds can be selected by the user or by a heuristic seed selection algorithm to adaptively improve the coherence volume. An improved volume rendering technique that can render user-defined appearance textures is proposed to facilitate macro-visualization of 3D vector fields.

  4. Algorithms for Haptic Rendering of 3D Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay; Ho, Chih-Hao; Srinavasan, Mandayam

    2003-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed to provide haptic rendering of three-dimensional (3D) objects in virtual (that is, computationally simulated) environments. The goal of haptic rendering is to generate tactual displays of the shapes, hardnesses, surface textures, and frictional properties of 3D objects in real time. Haptic rendering is a major element of the emerging field of computer haptics, which invites comparison with computer graphics. We have already seen various applications of computer haptics in the areas of medicine (surgical simulation, telemedicine, haptic user interfaces for blind people, and rehabilitation of patients with neurological disorders), entertainment (3D painting, character animation, morphing, and sculpting), mechanical design (path planning and assembly sequencing), and scientific visualization (geophysical data analysis and molecular manipulation).

  5. Inverse rendering of faces with a 3D morphable model.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Oswald; Smith, William A P

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a complete framework to inverse render faces with a 3D Morphable Model (3DMM). By decomposing the image formation process into geometric and photometric parts, we are able to state the problem as a multilinear system which can be solved accurately and efficiently. As we treat each contribution as independent, the objective function is convex in the parameters and a global solution is guaranteed. We start by recovering 3D shape using a novel algorithm which incorporates generalization error of the model obtained from empirical measurements. We then describe two methods to recover facial texture, diffuse lighting, specular reflectance, and camera properties from a single image. The methods make increasingly weak assumptions and can be solved in a linear fashion. We evaluate our findings on a publicly available database, where we are able to outperform an existing state-of-the-art algorithm. We demonstrate the usability of the recovered parameters in a recognition experiment conducted on the CMU-PIE database. PMID:23520253

  6. A rendering approach for stereoscopic web pages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianlong; Wang, Wenmin; Wang, Ronggang; Chen, Qinshui

    2014-03-01

    Web technology provides a relatively easy way to generate contents for us to recognize the world, and with the development of stereoscopic display technology, the stereoscopic devices will become much more popular. The combination of web technology and stereoscopic display technology will bring revolutionary visual effect. The Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) web pages, in which text, image and video may have different depth, can be displayed on stereoscopic display devices. This paper presents the approach about how to render two viewing S3D web pages including text, images, widgets: first, an algorithm should be developed in order to display stereoscopic elements like text, widgets by using 2D graphic library; second, a method should be presented to render stereoscopic web page based on current framework of the browser; third, a rough solution is invented to fix the problem that comes out in the method.

  7. Real-time volume rendering of 4D image using 3D texture mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jinwoo; Kim, June-Sic; Kim, Jae Seok; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun Il

    2001-05-01

    Four dimensional image is 3D volume data that varies with time. It is used to express deforming or moving object in virtual surgery of 4D ultrasound. It is difficult to render 4D image by conventional ray-casting or shear-warp factorization methods because of their time-consuming rendering time or pre-processing stage whenever the volume data are changed. Even 3D texture mapping is used, repeated volume loading is also time-consuming in 4D image rendering. In this study, we propose a method to reduce data loading time using coherence between currently loaded volume and previously loaded volume in order to achieve real time rendering based on 3D texture mapping. Volume data are divided into small bricks and each brick being loaded is tested for similarity to one which was already loaded in memory. If the brick passed the test, it is defined as 3D texture by OpenGL functions. Later, the texture slices of the brick are mapped into polygons and blended by OpenGL blending functions. All bricks undergo this test. Continuously deforming fifty volumes are rendered in interactive time with SGI ONYX. Real-time volume rendering based on 3D texture mapping is currently available on PC.

  8. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.T.C.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  9. A direct multi-volume rendering method aiming at comparisons of 3-D images and models.

    PubMed

    Jacq, J J; Roux, C J

    1997-03-01

    We present a new method for direct volume rendering of multiple three-dimensional (3-D) functions using a density emitter model. This work aims at obtaining visual assessment of the results of a 3-D image registration algorithm which operates on anisotropic and non segmented medical data. We first discuss the fundamentals associated with direct, simultaneous rendering of such datasets. Then, we recall the fuzzy classification and fuzzy surface rendering theory within the density emitter model terminology, and propose an extension of standard direct volume rendering that can handle the rendering of two or more 3-D functions; this consists of the definition of merging rules that are applied on emitter clouds. The included rendering applications are related on one hand, to volume-to-volume registration, and on the other hand, to surface-to-volume registration: the first case is concerned with global elastic registration of CT data, and the second one presents fitting of an implicit surface over a CT data subset. In these two medical imaging application cases, our rendering scheme offers a comprehensive appreciation of the relative position of structural information.

  10. Points based reconstruction and rendering of 3D shapes from large volume dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingchang; Tian, Jie; He, Huiguang; Li, Guangming

    2003-05-01

    In the field of medical imaging, researchers often need visualize lots of 3D datasets to get the informaiton contained in these datasets. But the huge data genreated by modern medical imaging device challenge the real time processing and rendering algorithms at all the time. Spurring by the great achievement of Points Based Rendering (PBR) in the fields of computer graphics to render very large meshes, we propose a new algorithm to use the points as basic primitive of surface reconstruction and rendering to interactively reconstruct and render very large volume dataset. By utilizing the special characteristics of medical image datasets, we obtain a fast and efficient points-based reconstruction and rendering algorithm in common PC. The experimental results show taht this algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  11. TractRender: a new generalized 3D medical image visualization and output platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Darryl H.; Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Law, Meng; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI allows us not only voxelized diffusion characteristics but also the potential to delineate neuronal fiber path through tractography. There is a dearth of flexible open source tractography software programs for visualizing these complicated 3D structures. Moreover, rendering these structures using various shading, lighting, and representations will result in vastly different graphical feel. In addition, the ability to output these objects in various formats increases the utility of this platform. We have created TractRender that leverages openGL features through Matlab, allowing for maximum ease of use but still maintain the flexibility of custom scene rendering.

  12. Complex adaptation-based LDR image rendering for 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Hyuk-Ju; Sohng, Kyu-Ik

    2014-07-01

    A low-dynamic tone-compression technique is developed for realistic image rendering that can make three-dimensional (3D) images similar to realistic scenes by overcoming brightness dimming in the 3D display mode. The 3D surround provides varying conditions for image quality, illuminant adaptation, contrast, gamma, color, sharpness, and so on. In general, gain/offset adjustment, gamma compensation, and histogram equalization have performed well in contrast compression; however, as a result of signal saturation and clipping effects, image details are removed and information is lost on bright and dark areas. Thus, an enhanced image mapping technique is proposed based on space-varying image compression. The performance of contrast compression is enhanced with complex adaptation in a 3D viewing surround combining global and local adaptation. Evaluating local image rendering in view of tone and color expression, noise reduction, and edge compensation confirms that the proposed 3D image-mapping model can compensate for the loss of image quality in the 3D mode.

  13. 3D colour visualization of label images using volume rendering techniques.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, R; Kottenhoff, R; Grebe, R

    1995-01-01

    Volume rendering methods for the visualization of 3D image data sets have been developed and collected in a C library. The core algorithm consists of a perspective ray casting technique for a natural and realistic view of the 3D scene. New edge operator shading methods are employed for a fast and information preserving representation of surfaces. Control parameters of the algorithm can be tuned to have either smoothed surfaces or a very detailed rendering of the geometrical structure. Different objects can be distinguished by different colours. Shadow ray tracing has been implemented to improve the realistic impression of the 3D image. For a simultaneous representation of objects in different depths, hiding each other, two types of transparency mode are used (wireframe and glass transparency). Single objects or groups of objects can be excluded from the rendering (peeling). Three orthogonal cutting planes or one arbitrarily placed cutting plane can be applied to the rendered objects in order to get additional information about inner structures, contours, and relative positions.

  14. On-the-sphere block-based 3D terrain rendering using a wavelet-encoded terrain database for SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxes, Gregory A.; Linger, Tim

    2006-05-01

    Successful integration and the ultimate adoption of 3D Synthetic Vision (SV) systems into the flight environment as a cockpit aid to pilot situational awareness (SA) depends highly on overcoming two primary engineering obstacles: 1) storing on-board terrain databases with sufficient accuracy, resolution and coverage areas; and 2) achieving real-time, deterministic, accurate and artifact-free 3D terrain rendering. These combined elements create a significant, inversely-compatible challenge to deployable SV systems that has not been adequately addressed in the realm of proliferous VisSim terrain-rendering approaches. Safety-critical SV systems for flight-deployed use, ground-control of flight systems such as UAVs and accurate mission rehearsal systems require a solution to these challenges. This paper describes the TerraMetrics TerraBlocks method of storing wavelet-encoded terrain datasets and a tightly-coupled 3D terrain-block rendering approach. Large-area terrain datasets are encoded using a wavelet transform, producing a hierarchical quadtree, powers-of-2 structure of the original terrain data at numerous levels of detail (LODs). The entire original raster terrain mesh (e.g., DTED) is transformed using either lossless or lossy wavelet transformation and is maintained in an equirectangular projection. The lossless form retains all original terrain mesh data integrity in the flight dataset. A side-effect benefit of terrain data compression is also achieved. The TerraBlocks run-time 3D terrain-block renderer accesses arbitrary, uniform-sized blocks of terrain data at varying LODs, depending on scene composition, from the wavelet-transformed terrain dataset. Terrain data blocks retain a spatially-filtered depiction of the original mesh data at the retrieved LOD. Terrain data blocks are processed as discrete objects and placed into spherical world space, relative to the viewpoint. Rendering determinacy is achieved through terrain-block LOD management and spherical

  15. An improved scheduling algorithm for 3D cluster rendering with platform LSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenli; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Liping

    2013-10-01

    High-quality photorealistic rendering of 3D modeling needs powerful computing systems. On this demand highly efficient management of cluster resources develops fast to exert advantages. This paper is absorbed in the aim of how to improve the efficiency of 3D rendering tasks in cluster. It focuses research on a dynamic feedback load balance (DFLB) algorithm, the work principle of load sharing facility (LSF) and optimization of external scheduler plug-in. The algorithm can be applied into match and allocation phase of a scheduling cycle. Candidate hosts is prepared in sequence in match phase. And the scheduler makes allocation decisions for each job in allocation phase. With the dynamic mechanism, new weight is assigned to each candidate host for rearrangement. The most suitable one will be dispatched for rendering. A new plugin module of this algorithm has been designed and integrated into the internal scheduler. Simulation experiments demonstrate the ability of improved plugin module is superior to the default one for rendering tasks. It can help avoid load imbalance among servers, increase system throughput and improve system utilization.

  16. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  17. On Alternative Approaches to 3D Image Perception: Monoscopic 3D Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2015-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.

  18. 3D chromosome rendering from Hi-C data using virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yixin; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Weber, Philip; Fang, Jennifer; Schulze, Jürgen P.; Ren, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Most genome browsers display DNA linearly, using single-dimensional depictions that are useful to examine certain epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. However, these representations are insufficient to visualize intrachromosomal interactions and relationships between distal genome features. Relationships between DNA regions may be difficult to decipher or missed entirely if those regions are distant in one dimension but could be spatially proximal when mapped to three-dimensional space. For example, the visualization of enhancers folding over genes is only fully expressed in three-dimensional space. Thus, to accurately understand DNA behavior during gene expression, a means to model chromosomes is essential. Using coordinates generated from Hi-C interaction frequency data, we have created interactive 3D models of whole chromosome structures and its respective domains. We have also rendered information on genomic features such as genes, CTCF binding sites, and enhancers. The goal of this article is to present the procedure, findings, and conclusions of our models and renderings.

  19. Comparative analysis of video processing and 3D rendering for cloud video games using different virtualization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Adedayo; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive empirical performance evaluation of 3D video processing employing the physical/virtual architecture implemented in a cloud environment. Different virtualization technologies, virtual video cards and various 3D benchmarks tools have been utilized in order to analyse the optimal performance in the context of 3D online gaming applications. This study highlights 3D video rendering performance under each type of hypervisors, and other factors including network I/O, disk I/O and memory usage. Comparisons of these factors under well-known virtual display technologies such as VNC, Spice and Virtual 3D adaptors reveal the strengths and weaknesses of the various hypervisors with respect to 3D video rendering and streaming.

  20. Hyoid bone development: An assessment of optimal CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Meghan M.; Whyms, Brian J.; Kelly, Michael P.; Doherty, Benjamin M.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Bersu, Edward T.; Vorperian, Houri K.

    2015-01-01

    The hyoid bone anchors and supports the vocal tract. Its complex shape is best studied in three dimensions, but it is difficult to capture on computed tomography (CT) images and three-dimensional volume renderings. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning and rendering parameters to accurately measure the growth and developmental anatomy of the hyoid and to determine whether it is feasible and necessary to use these parameters in the measurement of hyoids from in vivo CT scans. Direct linear and volumetric measurements of skeletonized hyoid bone specimens were compared to corresponding CT images to determine the most accurate scanning parameters and three-dimensional rendering techniques. A pilot study was undertaken using in vivo scans from a retrospective CT database to determine feasibility of quantifying hyoid growth. Scanning parameters and rendering technique affected accuracy of measurements. Most linear CT measurements were within 10% of direct measurements; however, volume was overestimated when CT scans were acquired with a slice thickness greater than 1.25 mm. Slice-by-slice thresholding of hyoid images decreased volume overestimation. The pilot study revealed that the linear measurements tested correlate with age. A fine-tuned rendering approach applied to small slice thickness CT scans produces the most accurate measurements of hyoid bones. However, linear measurements can be accurately assessed from in vivo CT scans at a larger slice thickness. Such findings imply that investigation into the growth and development of the hyoid bone, and the vocal tract as a whole, can now be performed using these techniques. PMID:25810349

  1. Efficient 3D rendering for web-based medical imaging software: a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Medical Imaging Software (MIS) found in research and in clinical practice, such as in Picture and Archiving Communication Systems (PACS) and Radiology Information Systems (RIS), has not been able to take full advantage of the Internet as a deployment platform. MIS is usually tightly coupled to algorithms that have substantial hardware and software requirements. Consequently, MIS is deployed on thick clients which usually leads project managers to allocate more resources during the deployment phase of the application than the resources that would be allocated if the application were deployed through a web interface.To minimize the costs associated with this scenario, many software providers use or develop plug-ins to provide the delivery platform (internet browser) with the features to load, interact and analyze medical images. Nevertheless there has not been a successful standard means to achieve this goal so far. This paper presents a study of WebGL as an alternative to plug-in development for efficient rendering of 3D medical models and DICOM images. WebGL is a technology that enables the internet browser to have access to the local graphics hardware in a native fashion. Because it is based in OpenGL, a widely accepted graphic industry standard, WebGL is being implemented in most of the major commercial browsers. After a discussion on the details of the technology, a series of experiments are presented to determine the operational boundaries in which WebGL is adequate for MIS. A comparison with current alternatives is also addressed. Finally conclusions and future work are discussed.

  2. 3D in the Fast Lane: Render as You Go with the Latest OpenGL Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Jeff; Murphy, Sam

    1997-01-01

    NT OpenGL hardware allows modelers and animators to work at relatively inexpensive NT workstations in their own offices or homes previous to shared space and workstation time in expensive studios. Rates seven OpenGL boards and two QuickDraw 3D accelerator boards for Mac users on overall value, wireframe and texture rendering, 2D acceleration, and…

  3. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  4. Free segmentation in rendered 3D images through synthetic impulse response in integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Corral, M.; Llavador, A.; Sánchez-Ortiga, E.; Saavedra, G.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Integral Imaging is a technique that has the capability of providing not only the spatial, but also the angular information of three-dimensional (3D) scenes. Some important applications are the 3D display and digital post-processing as for example, depth-reconstruction from integral images. In this contribution we propose a new reconstruction method that takes into account the integral image and a simplified version of the impulse response function (IRF) of the integral imaging (InI) system to perform a two-dimensional (2D) deconvolution. The IRF of an InI system has a periodic structure that depends directly on the axial position of the object. Considering different periods of the IRFs we recover by deconvolution the depth information of the 3D scene. An advantage of our method is that it is possible to obtain nonconventional reconstructions by considering alternative synthetic impulse responses. Our experiments show the feasibility of the proposed method.

  5. Defining vascular signatures of benign hepatic masses: role of MDCT with 3D rendering.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sameer; Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-08-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) provides new opportunities for hepatic tumor characterization. By coupling high-resolution isotropic datasets with advanced post-processing tools, maps of tumor vascularity can be generated to elucidate characteristic findings. This two-part review describes a range of benign and malignant liver masses, with emphasis on IV contrast-enhanced MDCT features and vascular signatures that can be identified on 3D vascular mapping.

  6. 3D Geo: An Alternative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, A.

    2016-10-01

    The expression GEO is mostly used to denote relation to the earth. However it should not be confined to what is related to the earth's surface, as other objects also need three dimensional representation and documentation, like cultural heritage objects. They include both tangible and intangible ones. In this paper the 3D data acquisition and 3D modelling of cultural heritage assets are briefly described and their significance is also highlighted. Moreover the organization of such information, related to monuments and artefacts, into relational data bases and its use for various purposes, other than just geometric documentation is also described and presented. In order to help the reader understand the above, several characteristic examples are presented and their methodology explained and their results evaluated.

  7. Showing their true colors: a practical approach to volume rendering from serial sections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In comparison to more modern imaging methods, conventional light microscopy still offers a range of substantial advantages with regard to contrast options, accessible specimen size, and resolution. Currently, tomographic image data in particular is most commonly visualized in three dimensions using volume rendering. To date, this method has only very rarely been applied to image stacks taken from serial sections, whereas surface rendering is still the most prevalent method for presenting such data sets three-dimensionally. The aim of this study was to develop standard protocols for volume rendering of image stacks of serial sections, while retaining the benefits of light microscopy such as resolution and color information. Results Here we provide a set of protocols for acquiring high-resolution 3D images of diverse microscopic samples through volume rendering based on serial light microscopical sections using the 3D reconstruction software Amira (Visage Imaging Inc.). We overcome several technical obstacles and show that these renderings are comparable in quality and resolution to 3D visualizations using other methods. This practical approach for visualizing 3D micro-morphology in full color takes advantage of both the sub-micron resolution of light microscopy and the specificity of histological stains, by combining conventional histological sectioning techniques, digital image acquisition, three-dimensional image filtering, and 3D image manipulation and visualization technologies. Conclusions We show that this method can yield "true"-colored high-resolution 3D views of tissues as well as cellular and sub-cellular structures and thus represents a powerful tool for morphological, developmental, and comparative investigations. We conclude that the presented approach fills an important gap in the field of micro-anatomical 3D imaging and visualization methods by combining histological resolution and differentiation of details with 3D rendering of whole

  8. Exploring Brushlet Based 3D Textures in Transfer Function Specification for Direct Volume Rendering of Abdominal Organs.

    PubMed

    Alper Selver, M

    2015-02-01

    Intuitive and differentiating domains for transfer function (TF) specification for direct volume rendering is an important research area for producing informative and useful 3D images. One of the emerging branches of this research is the texture based transfer functions. Although several studies in two, three, and four dimensional image processing show the importance of using texture information, these studies generally focus on segmentation. However, TFs can also be built effectively using appropriate texture information. To accomplish this, methods should be developed to collect wide variety of shape, orientation, and texture of biological tissues and organs. In this study, volumetric data (i.e., domain of a TF) is enhanced using brushlet expansion, which represents both low and high frequency textured structures at different quadrants in transform domain. Three methods (i.e., expert based manual, atlas and machine learning based automatic) are proposed for selection of the quadrants. Non-linear manipulation of the complex brushlet coefficients is also used prior to the tiling of selected quadrants and reconstruction of the volume. Applications to abdominal data sets acquired with CT, MR, and PET show that the proposed volume enhancement effectively improves the quality of 3D rendering using well-known TF specification techniques. PMID:26357028

  9. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets.

  10. MAP3D: a media processor approach for high-end 3D graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsa, Lucia; Stadnicki, Steven; Basoglu, Chris

    1999-12-01

    Equator Technologies, Inc. has used a software-first approach to produce several programmable and advanced VLIW processor architectures that have the flexibility to run both traditional systems tasks and an array of media-rich applications. For example, Equator's MAP1000A is the world's fastest single-chip programmable signal and image processor targeted for digital consumer and office automation markets. The Equator MAP3D is a proposal for the architecture of the next generation of the Equator MAP family. The MAP3D is designed to achieve high-end 3D performance and a variety of customizable special effects by combining special graphics features with high performance floating-point and media processor architecture. As a programmable media processor, it offers the advantages of a completely configurable 3D pipeline--allowing developers to experiment with different algorithms and to tailor their pipeline to achieve the highest performance for a particular application. With the support of Equator's advanced C compiler and toolkit, MAP3D programs can be written in a high-level language. This allows the compiler to successfully find and exploit any parallelism in a programmer's code, thus decreasing the time to market of a given applications. The ability to run an operating system makes it possible to run concurrent applications in the MAP3D chip, such as video decoding while executing the 3D pipelines, so that integration of applications is easily achieved--using real-time decoded imagery for texturing 3D objects, for instance. This novel architecture enables an affordable, integrated solution for high performance 3D graphics.

  11. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  12. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  13. 3D SAR approach to IF SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Doug

    2000-08-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super- resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  14. A new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing day to day for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally three main image based approaches are using for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling and third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete solution available to create complete 3D city model by using images. These image based methods also have limitations This paper gives a new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry. This approach is divided into three sections. First, data acquisition process, second is 3D data processing, and third is data combination process. In data acquisition process, a multi-camera setup developed and used for video recording of an area. Image frames created from video data. Minimum required and suitable video image frame selected for 3D processing. In second section, based on close range photogrammetric principles and computer vision techniques, 3D model of area created. In third section, this 3D model exported to adding and merging of other pieces of large area. Scaling and alignment of 3D model was done. After applying the texturing and rendering on this model, a final photo-realistic textured 3D model created. This 3D model transferred into walk-through model or in movie form. Most of the processing steps are automatic. So this method is cost effective and less laborious. Accuracy of this model is good. For this research work, study area is the campus of department of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. This campus acts as a prototype for city. Aerial photography is restricted in many country

  15. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  16. A 3D Approach to First Year English Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeegers, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the suggestive possibilities of an approach to undergraduate English teacher education that the author has called the 3D Approach--Develop professional knowledge, Display professional knowledge, Disseminate professional knowledge--in relation to a number of groups of first year pre-service teachers…

  17. Approach to Constructing 3d Virtual Scene of Irrigation Area Using Multi-Source Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, S.; Dou, M.; Wang, J.; Zhang, S.; Chen, X.

    2015-10-01

    For an irrigation area that is often complicated by various 3D artificial ground features and natural environment, disadvantages of traditional 2D GIS in spatial data representation, management, query, analysis and visualization is becoming more and more evident. Building a more realistic 3D virtual scene is thus especially urgent for irrigation area managers and decision makers, so that they can carry out various irrigational operations lively and intuitively. Based on previous researchers' achievements, a simple, practical and cost-effective approach was proposed in this study, by adopting3D geographic information system (3D GIS), remote sensing (RS) technology. Based on multi-source data such as Google Earth (GE) high-resolution remote sensing image, ASTER G-DEM, hydrological facility maps and so on, 3D terrain model and ground feature models were created interactively. Both of the models were then rendered with texture data and integrated under ArcGIS platform. A vivid, realistic 3D virtual scene of irrigation area that has a good visual effect and possesses primary GIS functions about data query and analysis was constructed.Yet, there is still a long way to go for establishing a true 3D GIS for the irrigation are: issues of this study were deeply discussed and future research direction was pointed out in the end of the paper.

  18. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  19. The New Approach to Sport Medicine: 3-D Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Alparslan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a new approach to sport medicine. Comparative analysis of the Vertebrae Lumbales was done in sedentary group and Muay Thai athletes. It was done by acquiring three dimensional (3-D) data and models through photogrammetric methods from the Multi-detector Computerized Tomography (MDCT) images of the Vertebrae…

  20. Geospatial Modelling Approach for 3d Urban Densification Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziatek, O.; Dragićević, S.; Li, S.

    2016-06-01

    With growing populations, economic pressures, and the need for sustainable practices, many urban regions are rapidly densifying developments in the vertical built dimension with mid- and high-rise buildings. The location of these buildings can be projected based on key factors that are attractive to urban planners, developers, and potential buyers. Current research in this area includes various modelling approaches, such as cellular automata and agent-based modelling, but the results are mostly linked to raster grids as the smallest spatial units that operate in two spatial dimensions. Therefore, the objective of this research is to develop a geospatial model that operates on irregular spatial tessellations to model mid- and high-rise buildings in three spatial dimensions (3D). The proposed model is based on the integration of GIS, fuzzy multi-criteria evaluation (MCE), and 3D GIS-based procedural modelling. Part of the City of Surrey, within the Metro Vancouver Region, Canada, has been used to present the simulations of the generated 3D building objects. The proposed 3D modelling approach was developed using ESRI's CityEngine software and the Computer Generated Architecture (CGA) language.

  1. Lattice percolation approach to 3D modeling of tissue aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Vyacheslav; Privman, Vladimir; Libert, Sergiy

    2016-11-01

    We describe a 3D percolation-type approach to modeling of the processes of aging and certain other properties of tissues analyzed as systems consisting of interacting cells. Lattice sites are designated as regular (healthy) cells, senescent cells, or vacancies left by dead (apoptotic) cells. The system is then studied dynamically with the ongoing processes including regular cell dividing to fill vacant sites, healthy cells becoming senescent or dying, and senescent cells dying. Statistical-mechanics description can provide patterns of time dependence and snapshots of morphological system properties. The developed theoretical modeling approach is found not only to corroborate recent experimental findings that inhibition of senescence can lead to extended lifespan, but also to confirm that, unlike 2D, in 3D senescent cells can contribute to tissue's connectivity/mechanical stability. The latter effect occurs by senescent cells forming the second infinite cluster in the regime when the regular (healthy) cell's infinite cluster still exists.

  2. Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies

  3. Right approach to 3D modeling using CAD tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddam, Mounica Reddy

    The thesis provides a step-by-step methodology to enable an instructor dealing with CAD tools to optimally guide his/her students through an understandable 3D modeling approach which will not only enhance their knowledge about the tool's usage but also enable them to achieve their desired result in comparatively lesser time. In the known practical field, there is particularly very little information available to apply CAD skills to formal beginners' training sessions. Additionally, advent of new software in 3D domain cumulates updating into a more difficult task. Keeping up to the industry's advanced requirements emphasizes the importance of more skilled hands in the field of CAD development, rather than just prioritizing manufacturing in terms of complex software features. The thesis analyses different 3D modeling approaches specified to the varieties of CAD tools currently available in the market. Utilizing performance-time databases, learning curves have been generated to measure their performance time, feature count etc. Based on the results, improvement parameters have also been provided for (Asperl, 2005).

  4. FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Space Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2013-01-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists’ demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. PMID:23584131

  5. FluoRender: An Application of 2D Image Space Methods for 3D and 4D Confocal Microscopy Data Visualization in Neurobiology Research.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Hansen, Charles

    2012-01-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists' demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data.

  6. Silicon-Embedding Approaches to 3-D Toroidal Inductor Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, XH; Kim, M; Herrault, F; Ji, CH; Kim, J; Allen, MG

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible silicon-embedding techniques for on-chip integration of microelectromechanical-system devices with 3-D complex structures. By taking advantage of the "dead volume" within the bulk of the silicon wafer, functional devices with large profile can be embedded into the substrate without consuming valuable die area on the wafer surface or increasing the packaging complexity. Furthermore, through-wafer interconnects can be implemented to connect the device to the circuitry on the wafer surface. The key challenge of embedding structures within the wafer volume is processing inside deep trenches. To achieve this goal in an area-efficient manner, straight-sidewall trenches are desired, adding additional difficulty to the embedding process. Two approaches to achieve this goal are presented in this paper, i.e., a lithography-based process and a shadow-mask-based process. The lithography-based process utilizes a spray-coating technique and proximity lithography in combination with thick epoxy processing and laminated dry-film lithography. The shadow-mask-based process employs a specially designed 3-D silicon shadow mask to enable simultaneous metal patterning on both the vertical sidewall and the bottom surface of the trench during deposition, eliminating multiple lithography steps and reducing the process time. Both techniques have been demonstrated through the embedding of the topologically complex 3-D toroidal inductors into the silicon substrate for power supply on-chip (PwrSoC) applications. Embedded 3-D inductors that possess 25 turns and a diameter of 6 mm in a silicon trench of 300-mu m depth achieve overall inductances of 45-60 nH, dc resistances of 290-400 m Omega, and quality factors of 16-17.5 at 40-70 MHz.

  7. Urbanisation and 3d Spatial - a Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, E. E.; Rahman, A. Abdul

    2013-09-01

    Urbanisation creates immense competition for space, this may be attributed to an increase in population owing to domestic and external tourism. Most cities are constantly exploring all avenues in maximising its limited space. Hence, urban or city authorities need to plan, expand and use such three dimensional (3D) space above, on and below the city space. Thus, difficulties in property ownership and the geometric representation of the 3D city space is a major challenge. This research, investigates the concept of representing a geometric topological 3D spatial model capable of representing 3D volume parcels for man-made constructions above and below the 3D surface volume parcel. A review of spatial data models suggests that the 3D TIN (TEN) model is significant and can be used as a unified model. The concepts, logical and physical models of 3D TIN for 3D volumes using tetrahedrons as the base geometry is presented and implemented to show man-made constructions above and below the surface parcel within a user friendly graphical interface. Concepts for 3D topology and 3D analysis are discussed. Simulations of this model for 3D cadastre are implemented. This model can be adopted by most countries to enhance and streamline geometric 3D property ownership for urban centres. 3D TIN concept for spatial modelling can be adopted for the LA_Spatial part of the Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO/TC211, 2012), this satisfies the concept of 3D volumes.

  8. Objective 3D face recognition: Evolution, approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Dirk; Claes, Peter; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Clement, John Gerald

    2010-09-10

    Face recognition is a natural human ability and a widely accepted identification and authentication method. In modern legal settings, a lot of credence is placed on identifications made by eyewitnesses. Consequently these are based on human perception which is often flawed and can lead to situations where identity is disputed. Therefore, there is a clear need to secure identifications in an objective way based on anthropometric measures. Anthropometry has existed for many years and has evolved with each advent of new technology and computing power. As a result of this, face recognition methodology has shifted from a purely 2D image-based approach to the use of 3D facial shape. However, one of the main challenges still remaining is the non-rigid structure of the face, which can change permanently over varying time-scales and briefly with facial expressions. The majority of face recognition methods have been developed by scientists with a very technical background such as biometry, pattern recognition and computer vision. This article strives to bridge the gap between these communities and the forensic science end-users. A concise review of face recognition using 3D shape is given. Methods using 3D shape applied to data embodying facial expressions are tabulated for reference. From this list a categorization of different strategies to deal with expressions is presented. The underlying concepts and practical issues relating to the application of each strategy are given, without going into technical details. The discussion clearly articulates the justification to establish archival, reference databases to compare and evaluate different strategies. PMID:20395086

  9. Objective 3D face recognition: Evolution, approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Dirk; Claes, Peter; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Clement, John Gerald

    2010-09-10

    Face recognition is a natural human ability and a widely accepted identification and authentication method. In modern legal settings, a lot of credence is placed on identifications made by eyewitnesses. Consequently these are based on human perception which is often flawed and can lead to situations where identity is disputed. Therefore, there is a clear need to secure identifications in an objective way based on anthropometric measures. Anthropometry has existed for many years and has evolved with each advent of new technology and computing power. As a result of this, face recognition methodology has shifted from a purely 2D image-based approach to the use of 3D facial shape. However, one of the main challenges still remaining is the non-rigid structure of the face, which can change permanently over varying time-scales and briefly with facial expressions. The majority of face recognition methods have been developed by scientists with a very technical background such as biometry, pattern recognition and computer vision. This article strives to bridge the gap between these communities and the forensic science end-users. A concise review of face recognition using 3D shape is given. Methods using 3D shape applied to data embodying facial expressions are tabulated for reference. From this list a categorization of different strategies to deal with expressions is presented. The underlying concepts and practical issues relating to the application of each strategy are given, without going into technical details. The discussion clearly articulates the justification to establish archival, reference databases to compare and evaluate different strategies.

  10. 3D imaging of soil pore network: two different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrecano, M.; Di Matteo, B.; Mele, G.; Terribile, F.

    2009-04-01

    system but on less noisy images. SSAT system showed more flexibility in terms of sample size although both techniques allowed investigation on REVs (Representative Elementary Volumes) for most of macroscopic properties describing soil processes. Morover, undoubted advantages of not destructivity and ease sample preparation for the Skysan 1172 are balanced by lower overall costs for the SSAT and its potential of producing 3D representation of soil features different from the simple solid/porous phases. Both approaches allow to use exactly the same image analysis procedures on the reconstructed 3D images although require some specific pre-processing treatments.

  11. Coarse integral holography approach for real 3D color video displays.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Smithwick, Q Y J; Chu, D P

    2016-03-21

    A colour holographic display is considered the ultimate apparatus to provide the most natural 3D viewing experience. It encodes a 3D scene as holographic patterns that then are used to reproduce the optical wavefront. The main challenge at present is for the existing technologies to cope with the full information bandwidth required for the computation and display of holographic video. We have developed a dynamic coarse integral holography approach using opto-mechanical scanning, coarse integral optics and a low space-bandwidth-product high-bandwidth spatial light modulator to display dynamic holograms with a large space-bandwidth-product at video rates, combined with an efficient rendering algorithm to reduce the information content. This makes it possible to realise a full-parallax, colour holographic video display with a bandwidth of 10 billion pixels per second, and an adequate image size and viewing angle, as well as all relevant 3D cues. Our approach is scalable and the prototype can achieve even better performance with continuing advances in hardware components. PMID:27136858

  12. Coarse integral holography approach for real 3D color video displays.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Smithwick, Q Y J; Chu, D P

    2016-03-21

    A colour holographic display is considered the ultimate apparatus to provide the most natural 3D viewing experience. It encodes a 3D scene as holographic patterns that then are used to reproduce the optical wavefront. The main challenge at present is for the existing technologies to cope with the full information bandwidth required for the computation and display of holographic video. We have developed a dynamic coarse integral holography approach using opto-mechanical scanning, coarse integral optics and a low space-bandwidth-product high-bandwidth spatial light modulator to display dynamic holograms with a large space-bandwidth-product at video rates, combined with an efficient rendering algorithm to reduce the information content. This makes it possible to realise a full-parallax, colour holographic video display with a bandwidth of 10 billion pixels per second, and an adequate image size and viewing angle, as well as all relevant 3D cues. Our approach is scalable and the prototype can achieve even better performance with continuing advances in hardware components.

  13. Console-integrated stereoscopic OsiriX 3D volume-rendered images for da Vinci colorectal robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Volonté, Francesco; Pugin, Francois; Buchs, Nicolas Christian; Spaltenstein, Joël; Hagen, Monika; Ratib, Osman; Morel, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    The increased distance between surgeon and surgical field is a significant problem in laparoscopic surgery. Robotic surgery, although providing advantages for the operator, increases this gap by completely removing force feedback. Enhancement with visual tools can therefore be beneficial. The goal of this preliminary work was to create a custom plugin for OsiriX to display volume-rendered images in the da Vinci surgeon's console. The TilePro multi-input display made the generated stereoscopic pairs appear to have depth. Tumor position, vascular supply, spatial location, and relationship between organs appear directly within the surgeon's field of view. This study presents a case of totally robotic right colectomy for cancer using this new technology. Sight diversion was no longer necessary. Depth perception was subjectively perceived as profitable. Total immersion in the operative field helped compensate for the lack of tactile feedback specific to robotic intervention. This innovative tool is a step forward toward augmented-reality robot-assisted surgery. PMID:22549904

  14. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  15. Sphere-Enhanced Microwave Ablation (sMWA) Versus Bland Microwave Ablation (bMWA): Technical Parameters, Specific CT 3D Rendering and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gockner, T. L.; Zelzer, S.; Mokry, T. Gnutzmann, D. Bellemann, N.; Mogler, C.; Beierfuß, A. Köllensperger, E. Germann, G.; Radeleff, B. A. Stampfl, U. Kauczor, H. U.; Pereira, P. L.; Sommer, C. M.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare technical parameters during ablation as well as CT 3D rendering and histopathology of the ablation zone between sphere-enhanced microwave ablation (sMWA) and bland microwave ablation (bMWA).MethodsIn six sheep-livers, 18 microwave ablations were performed with identical system presets (power output: 80 W, ablation time: 120 s). In three sheep, transarterial embolisation (TAE) was performed immediately before microwave ablation using spheres (diameter: 40 ± 10 μm) (sMWA). In the other three sheep, microwave ablation was performed without spheres embolisation (bMWA). Contrast-enhanced CT, sacrifice, and liver harvest followed immediately after microwave ablation. Study goals included technical parameters during ablation (resulting power output, ablation time), geometry of the ablation zone applying specific CT 3D rendering with a software prototype (short axis of the ablation zone, volume of the largest aligned ablation sphere within the ablation zone), and histopathology (hematoxylin-eosin, Masson Goldner and TUNEL).ResultsResulting power output/ablation times were 78.7 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for bMWA and 78.4 ± 1.0 W/120 ± 0.0 s for sMWA (n.s., respectively). Short axis/volume were 23.7 ± 3.7 mm/7.0 ± 2.4 cm{sup 3} for bMWA and 29.1 ± 3.4 mm/11.5 ± 3.9 cm{sup 3} for sMWA (P < 0.01, respectively). Histopathology confirmed the signs of coagulation necrosis as well as early and irreversible cell death for bMWA and sMWA. For sMWA, spheres were detected within, at the rim, and outside of the ablation zone without conspicuous features.ConclusionsSpecific CT 3D rendering identifies a larger ablation zone for sMWA compared with bMWA. The histopathological signs and the detectable amount of cell death are comparable for both groups. When comparing sMWA with bMWA, TAE has no effect on the technical parameters during ablation.

  16. Metrological verification of 3D scanners: a preliminary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchini, R.; Di Leo, G.; Liguori, C.; Paolillo, A.; Pietrosanto, A.; Strazzullo, G.

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the metrological characterization of 3D scanners, and proposes a procedure for their experimental verification in accord with the suggestions of the ISO GUM. The procedure is based on the application of a statistical method for the evaluation of the standard uncertainty to the results of a comparison with a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM). Finally the results of the experimental verification of a fringe pattern system are reported and discussed in detail.

  17. Diagonal Slices of 3D Young Diagrams in the Approach of Maya Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Li-Qiang; Wang, Li-Fang; Wu, Ke; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-01

    According to the correspondence between 2D Young diagrams and Maya diagrams and the relation between 2D and 3D Young diagrams, we construct 3D Young diagrams in the approach of Maya diagrams. Moreover, we formulate the generating function of 3D Young diagrams, which is the MacMahon function in terms of Maya diagrams.

  18. 3D Simulation of terrestrial morphological analogues of hermean surface to evaluate SIMBIO-SYS STereo Camera rendering capacity for geological purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massironi, M.; Giacomini, L.; Cremonese, G.; Forlani, G.; Capria, M. T.; Pasquare, G.; da Deppo, V.; Naletto, G.; Flamini, E.

    BepiColombo is the next 5th ESA's cornerstone. It has been selected in the fall 2000 and it is planned for a launch in 2013. It will reach Mercury after a 6 years trip and will perform 1 year observation with two S/C (Mercury Planetary Orbiter and Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter). The SIMBIO-SYS (Spectrometers and Imagers for MPO BepiColombo Integrated Observatory SYStem) instrument is a system integrating a STereoscopic imaging Channel (STC), a High spatial Resolution Imaging Channel (HRIC) and a Visual and Infrared Hyper-spectral Imager channel (VIHI). SIMBIO-SYS has been selected by ESA in the payload of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) of the BepiColombo mission. The main scientific objective is the global mapping of the entire surface of Mercury in 3D and colors with a maximum spatial resolution of 50 m per pixel. It will allow to generate the Digital Terrain Model of the entire surface improving the interpretation of morphological features at different scales and topographic relationships. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the STC 3D rendering for geological purpose the xy pixel ground size and the z error has been estimated at apoherm and periherm. These data were used for 3D simulation on Earth geological feautures likely representative of the hermean surface and small enough to be near the detection limit of the STC. In particular we have analyzed the Tenoumer (Mauritania) and Roter Kamm (Namibia) craters with dimension similar to the Hun Kal crater on Mercury, defining its 20° meridian . In addition a small lava volcano from the volcanic complex of Michoacan-Guanajuato 1 (Messico), an endogenic dome of the Meseta de Somuncara volcanic district (Argentina) and the long basaltic lava flows related the M. Payun volcano (Argentina) were considered. One of the main objective of the study of the hermean surface is the volcanic-vs-ejecta origin of the inter-crater and smooth plains and the detection of these volcanic features will be of paramount

  19. Lightning Modelling: From 3D to Circuit Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, H.; Abdi, M.; Issac, F.; Prost, D.

    2012-05-01

    The topic of this study is electromagnetic environment and electromagnetic interferences (EMI) effects, specifically the modelling of lightning indirect effects [1] on aircraft electrical systems present on deported and highly exposed equipments, such as nose landing gear (NLG) and nacelle, through a circuit approach. The main goal of the presented work, funded by a French national project: PREFACE, is to propose a simple equivalent electrical circuit to represent a geometrical structure, taking into account mutual, self inductances, and resistances, which play a fundamental role in the lightning current distribution. Then this model is intended to be coupled to a functional one, describing a power train chain composed of: a converter, a shielded power harness and a motor or a set of resistors used as a load for the converter. The novelty here, is to provide a pre-sizing qualitative approach allowing playing on integration in pre-design phases. This tool intends to offer a user-friendly way for replying rapidly to calls for tender, taking into account the lightning constraints. Two cases are analysed: first, a NLG that is composed of tubular pieces that can be easily approximated by equivalent cylindrical straight conductors. Therefore, passive R, L, M elements of the structure can be extracted through analytical engineer formulas such as those implemented in the partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC) [2] technique. Second, the same approach is intended to be applied on an electrical de-icing nacelle sub-system.

  20. 3D Lorentzian loop quantum gravity and the spinor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girelli, Florian; Sellaroli, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We consider the generalization of the "spinor approach" to the Lorentzian case, in the context of three-dimensional loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant Λ =0 . The key technical tool that allows this generalization is the recoupling theory between unitary infinite-dimensional representations and nonunitary finite-dimensional ones, obtained in the process of generalizing the Wigner-Eckart theorem to SU(1,1). We use SU(1,1) tensor operators to build observables and a solvable quantum Hamiltonian constraint, analogous to the one introduced by V. Bonzom and his collaborators in the Euclidean case (with both Λ =0 and Λ ≠0 ). We show that the Lorentzian Ponzano-Regge amplitude is the solution of the quantum Hamiltonian constraint by recovering the Biedenharn-Elliott relation [generalized to the case where unitary and nonunitary SU(1,1) representations are coupled to each other]. Our formalism is sufficiently general that both the Lorentzian and the Euclidean case can be recovered (with Λ =0 ).

  1. Rapid hologram generation utilizing layer-based approach and graphic rendering for realistic three-dimensional image reconstruction by angular tiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jhen-Si; Chu, Daping; Smithwick, Quinn

    2014-03-01

    An approach of rapid hologram generation for the realistic three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction based on the angular tiling concept is proposed, using a new graphic rendering approach integrated with a previously developed layer-based method for hologram calculation. A 3-D object is simplified as layered cross-sectional images perpendicular to a chosen viewing direction, and our graphics rendering approach allows the incorporation of clear depth cues, occlusion, and shading in the generated holograms for angular tiling. The combination of these techniques together with parallel computing reduces the computation time of a single-view hologram for a 3-D image of extended graphics array resolution to 176 ms using a single consumer graphics processing unit card.

  2. A Featureless Approach to 3D Polyhedral Building Modeling from Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  3. A featureless approach to 3D polyhedral building modeling from aerial images.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  4. Framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms in conjunction with 3D landmark localization and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Hoegen, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms. Phantoms are designed using a CAD system and created with a 3D printer, and comprise realistic shapes including branches and pathologies such as abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). To transfer ground truth information to the 3D image coordinate system, we use a landmark-based registration scheme utilizing fiducial markers integrated in the phantom design. For accurate 3D localization of the markers we developed a novel 3D parametric intensity model that is directly fitted to the markers in the images. We also performed a quantitative evaluation of different vessel segmentation approaches for a phantom of an AAA.

  5. Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets

    SciTech Connect

    Patchett, John M; Ahrens, James P; Lo, Li - Ta; Browniee, Carson S; Mitchell, Christopher J; Hansen, Chuck

    2010-10-15

    Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

  6. A simple approach for 3D reconstruction of the spine from biplanar radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhua; Shi, Xinling; Lv, Liang; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Yufeng

    2014-04-01

    This paper proposed a simple approach for 3D spinal reconstruction from biplanar radiography. The proposed reconstruction consisted in reconstructing the 3D central curve of the spine based on the epipolar geometry and automatically aligning vertebrae under the constraint of this curve. The vertebral orientations were adjusted by matching the projections of the 3D pedicles with the 2D pedicles in biplanar radiographs. The user interaction time was within one minute for a thoracic spine. Sixteen pairs of radiographs of a thoracic spinal model were used to evaluate the precision and accuracy. The precision was within 3.1 mm for the location and 3.5° for the orientation. The accuracy was within 3.5 mm for the location and 3.9° for the orientation. These results demonstrate that this approach can be a promising tool to obtain the 3D spinal geometry with acceptable user interactions in scoliotic clinics.

  7. A new neural net approach to robot 3D perception and visuo-motor coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel neural network approach to robot hand-eye coordination is presented. The approach provides a true sense of visual error servoing, redundant arm configuration control for collision avoidance, and invariant visuo-motor learning under gazing control. A 3-D perception network is introduced to represent the robot internal 3-D metric space in which visual error servoing and arm configuration control are performed. The arm kinematic network performs the bidirectional association between 3-D space arm configurations and joint angles, and enforces the legitimate arm configurations. The arm kinematic net is structured by a radial-based competitive and cooperative network with hierarchical self-organizing learning. The main goal of the present work is to demonstrate that the neural net representation of the robot 3-D perception net serves as an important intermediate functional block connecting robot eyes and arms.

  8. General Purpose 2D and 3D Similarity Approach to Identify hERG Blockers.

    PubMed

    Schyman, Patric; Liu, Ruifeng; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-25

    Screening compounds for human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel inhibition is an important component of early stage drug development and assessment. In this study, we developed a high-confidence (p-value < 0.01) hERG prediction model based on a combined two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling approach. We developed a 3D similarity conformation approach (SCA) based on examining a limited fixed number of pairwise 3D similarity scores between a query molecule and a set of known hERG blockers. By combining 3D SCA with 2D similarity ensemble approach (SEA) methods, we achieved a maximum sensitivity in hERG inhibition prediction with an accuracy not achieved by either method separately. The combined model achieved 69% sensitivity and 95% specificity on an independent external data set. Further validation showed that the model correctly picked up documented hERG inhibition or interactions among the Food and Drug Administration- approved drugs with the highest similarity scores-with 18 of 20 correctly identified. The combination of ascertaining 2D and 3D similarity of compounds allowed us to synergistically use 2D fingerprint matching with 3D shape and chemical complementarity matching. PMID:26718126

  9. General Purpose 2D and 3D Similarity Approach to Identify hERG Blockers.

    PubMed

    Schyman, Patric; Liu, Ruifeng; Wallqvist, Anders

    2016-01-25

    Screening compounds for human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel inhibition is an important component of early stage drug development and assessment. In this study, we developed a high-confidence (p-value < 0.01) hERG prediction model based on a combined two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling approach. We developed a 3D similarity conformation approach (SCA) based on examining a limited fixed number of pairwise 3D similarity scores between a query molecule and a set of known hERG blockers. By combining 3D SCA with 2D similarity ensemble approach (SEA) methods, we achieved a maximum sensitivity in hERG inhibition prediction with an accuracy not achieved by either method separately. The combined model achieved 69% sensitivity and 95% specificity on an independent external data set. Further validation showed that the model correctly picked up documented hERG inhibition or interactions among the Food and Drug Administration- approved drugs with the highest similarity scores-with 18 of 20 correctly identified. The combination of ascertaining 2D and 3D similarity of compounds allowed us to synergistically use 2D fingerprint matching with 3D shape and chemical complementarity matching.

  10. A hybrid approach for addressing ring flexibility in 3D database searching.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, J

    1997-01-01

    A hybrid approach for flexible 3D database searching is presented that addresses the problem of ring flexibility. It combines the explicit storage of up to 25 multiple conformations of rings, with up to eight atoms, generated by the 3D structure generator CORINA with the power of a torsional fitting technique implemented in the 3D database system UNITY. A comparison with the original UNITY approach, using a database with about 130,000 entries and five different pharmacophore queries, was performed. The hybrid approach scored, on an average, 10-20% more hits than the reference run. Moreover, specific problems with unrealistic hit geometries produced by the original approach can be excluded. In addition, the influence of the maximum number of ring conformations per molecule was investigated. An optimal number of 10 conformations per molecule is recommended.

  11. Hybrid atlas-based and image-based approach for segmenting 3D brain MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Gloria; Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2001-07-01

    This work is a contribution to the problem of localizing key cerebral structures in 3D MRIs and its quantitative evaluation. In pursuing it, the cooperation between an image-based segmentation method and a hierarchical deformable registration approach has been considered. The segmentation relies on two main processes: homotopy modification and contour decision. The first one is achieved by a marker extraction stage where homogeneous 3D regions of an image, I(s), from the data set are identified. These regions, M(I), are obtained combining information from deformable atlas, achieved by the warping of eight previous labeled maps on I(s). Then, the goal of the decision stage is to precisely locate the contours of the 3D regions set by the markers. This contour decision is performed by a 3D extension of the watershed transform. The anatomical structures taken into consideration and embedded into the atlas are brain, ventricles, corpus callosum, cerebellum, right and left hippocampus, medulla and midbrain. The hybrid method operates fully automatically and in 3D, successfully providing segmented brain structures. The quality of the segmentation has been studied in terms of the detected volume ratio by using kappa statistic and ROC analysis. Results of the method are shown and validated on a 3D MRI phantom. This study forms part of an on-going long term research aiming at the creation of a 3D probabilistic multi-purpose anatomical brain atlas.

  12. New approach to the perception of 3D shape based on veridicality, complexity, symmetry and volume.

    PubMed

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Sawada, Tadamasa; Li, Yunfeng; Kropatsch, Walter G; Steinman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress towards understanding 3D shape perception made possible by appreciating the significant role that veridicality and complexity play in the natural visual environment. The ability to see objects as they really are "out there" is derived from the complexity inherent in the 3D object's shape. The importance of both veridicality and complexity was ignored in most prior research. Appreciating their importance made it possible to devise a computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from only one of its 2D images. This model uses a simplicity principle consisting of only four a priori constraints representing properties of 3D shapes, primarily their symmetry and volume. The model recovers 3D shapes from a single 2D image as well, and sometimes even better, than a human being. In the rare recoveries in which errors are observed, the errors made by the model and human subjects are very similar. The model makes no use of depth, surfaces or learning. Recent elaborations of this model include: (i) the recovery of the shapes of natural objects, including human and animal bodies with limbs in varying positions (ii) providing the model with two input images that allowed it to achieve virtually perfect shape constancy from almost all viewing directions. The review concludes with a comparison of some of the highlights of our novel, successful approach to the recovery of 3D shape from a 2D image with prior, less successful approaches. PMID:19800910

  13. Mobile 3D quality of experience evaluation: a hybrid data collection and analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utriainen, Timo; Häyrynen, Jyrki; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Boev, Atanas; Gotchev, Atanas; Hannuksela, Miska M.

    2011-02-01

    The paper presents a hybrid approach to study the user's experienced quality of 3D visual content on mobile autostereoscopic displays. It combines extensive subjective tests with collection and objective analysis of eye-tracked data. 3D cues which are significant for mobiles are simulated in the generated 3D test content. The methodology for conducting subjective quality evaluation includes hybrid data-collection of quantitative quality preferences, qualitative impressions, and binocular eye-tracking. We present early results of the subjective tests along with eye movement reaction times, areas of interest and heatmaps obtained from raw eye-tracked data after statistical analysis. The study contributes to the question what is important to be visualized on portable auto-stereoscopic displays and how to maintain and visually enhance the quality of 3D content for such displays.

  14. Comparison Between Two Generic 3d Building Reconstruction Approaches - Point Cloud Based VS. Image Processing Based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, D.; Linkiewicz, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares two generic approaches for the reconstruction of buildings. Synthesized and real oblique and vertical aerial imagery is transformed on the one hand into a dense photogrammetric 3D point cloud and on the other hand into photogrammetric 2.5D surface models depicting a scene from different cardinal directions. One approach evaluates the 3D point cloud statistically in order to extract the hull of structures, while the other approach makes use of salient line segments in 2.5D surface models, so that the hull of 3D structures can be recovered. With orders of magnitudes more analyzed 3D points, the point cloud based approach is an order of magnitude more accurate for the synthetic dataset compared to the lower dimensioned, but therefor orders of magnitude faster, image processing based approach. For real world data the difference in accuracy between both approaches is not significant anymore. In both cases the reconstructed polyhedra supply information about their inherent semantic and can be used for subsequent and more differentiated semantic annotations through exploitation of texture information.

  15. Standards-based approaches to 3D and multiview video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Gary J.

    2009-08-01

    The extension of video applications to enable 3D perception, which typically is considered to include a stereo viewing experience, is emerging as a mass market phenomenon, as is evident from the recent prevalence of 3D major cinema title releases. For high quality 3D video to become a commonplace user experience beyond limited cinema distribution, adoption of an interoperable coded 3D digital video format will be needed. Stereo-view video can also be studied as a special case of the more general technologies of multiview and "free-viewpoint" video systems. The history of standardization work on this topic is actually richer than people may typically realize. The ISO/IEC Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG), in particular, has been developing interoperability standards to specify various such coding schemes since the advent of digital video as we know it. More recently, the ITU-T Visual Coding Experts Group (VCEG) has been involved as well in the Joint Video Team (JVT) work on development of 3D features for H.264/14496-10 Advanced Video Coding, including Multiview Video Coding (MVC) extensions. This paper surveys the prior, ongoing, and anticipated future standardization efforts on this subject to provide an overview and historical perspective on feasible approaches to 3D and multiview video coding.

  16. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d8 and 3d2 ions in a trigonal crystal field - perturbation theory methods versus complete diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czeslaw; Yeung, Yau-yuen; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Qin, Jian

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, we critically review the existing microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approaches, namely the complete diagonalization method (CDM) and the perturbation theory method (PTM), for 3d8(3d2) ions in a trigonal (C3v, D3, D3d) symmetry crystal field (CF). A new CDM is presented and a CFA/MSH computer package based on our crystal-field analysis (CFA) package for 3dN ions is developed for numerical calculations. Our method takes into account the contribution to the SH parameters (D, g∥ and g⊥) from all 45 CF states for 3d8(3d2) ions and is based on the complete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian including the electrostatic interactions, the CF terms (in the intermediate CF scheme) and the spin-orbit coupling. The CFA/MSH package enables us to study not only the CF energy levels and wavefunctions but also the SH parameters as functions of the CF parameters (B20, B40 and B43 or alternatively Dq, v and v') for 3d8(3d2) ions in trigonal symmetry. Extensive comparative studies of other MSH approaches are carried out using the CFA/MSH package. First, we check the accuracy of the approximate PTM based on the `quasi-fourth-order' perturbation formulae developed by Petrosyan and Mirzakhanyan (PM). The present investigations indicate that the PM formulae for the g-factors (g∥ and g⊥) indeed work well, especially for the cases of small v and v' and large Dq, whereas the PM formula for the zero-field splitting (ZFS) exhibits serious shortcomings. Earlier criticism of the PM approach by Zhou et al (Zhou K W, Zhao S B, Wu P F and Xie J K 1990 Phys. Status Solidi b 162 193) is then revisited. Second, we carry out an extensive comparison of the results of the present CFA/MSH package and those of other CDMs based on the strong- and weak-CF schemes. The CF energy levels and the SH parameters for 3d2 and 3d8 ions at C3v symmetry sites in several crystals are calculated and analysed. Our investigations reveal serious inconsistencies in the CDM results of Zhou et al and Li

  17. Linear programming approach to optimize 3D data obtained from multiple view angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Peter B.; Xu, Jinhui; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Singh, Vikas; Schafer, Sebastian; Walczak, Alan M.

    2007-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) vessel data from CTA or MRA are not always available prior to or during endovascular interventional procedures, whereas multiple 2D projection angiograms often are. Unfortunately, patient movement, table movement, and gantry sag during angiographic procedures can lead to large errors in gantry-based imaging geometries and thereby incorrect 3D. Therefore, we are developing methods for combining vessel data from multiple 2D angiographic views obtained during interventional procedures to provide 3D vessel data during these procedures. Multiple 2D projection views of carotid vessels are obtained, and the vessel centerlines are indicated. For each pair of views, endpoints of the 3D centerlines are reconstructed using triangulation based on the provided gantry geometry. Previous investigations indicated that translation errors were the primary source of error in the reconstructed 3D. Therefore, the errors in the translations relating the imaging systems are corrected by minimizing the L1 distance between the reconstructed endpoints, after which the 3D centerlines are reconstructed using epipolar constraints for every pair of views. Evaluations were performed using simulations, phantom data, and clinical cases. In simulation and phantom studies, the RMS error decreased from 6.0 mm obtained with biplane approaches to 0.5 mm with our technique. Centerlines in clinical cases are smoother and more consistent than those calculated from individual biplane pairs. The 3D centerlines are calculated in about 2 seconds. These results indicate that reliable 3D vessel data can be generated for treatment planning or revision during interventional procedures.

  18. Individualized Surgical Approach Planning for Petroclival Tumors Using a 3D Printer.

    PubMed

    Muelleman, Thomas John; Peterson, Jeremy; Chowdhury, Naweed Iffat; Gorup, Jason; Camarata, Paul; Lin, James

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) printed models in individualized petroclival tumor resection planning by measuring the fidelity of printed anatomical structures and comparing tumor exposure afforded by different approaches. Design Case series and review of the literature. Setting Tertiary care center. Participants Three patients with petroclival lesions. Main Outcome Measures Subjective opinion of access by neuro-otologists and neurosurgeons as well as surface area of tumor exposure. Results Surgeons found the 3D models of each patient's skull and tumor useful for preoperative planning. Limitations of individual surgical approaches not identified through preoperative imaging were apparent after 3D models were evaluated. Significant variability in exposure was noted between models for similar or identical approaches. A notable drawback is that our printing process did not replicate mastoid air cells. Conclusions We found that 3D modeling is useful for individualized preoperative planning for approaching petroclival tumors. Our printing techniques did produce authentic replicas of the tumors in relation to bony structures. PMID:27175320

  19. Individualized Surgical Approach Planning for Petroclival Tumors Using a 3D Printer.

    PubMed

    Muelleman, Thomas John; Peterson, Jeremy; Chowdhury, Naweed Iffat; Gorup, Jason; Camarata, Paul; Lin, James

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) printed models in individualized petroclival tumor resection planning by measuring the fidelity of printed anatomical structures and comparing tumor exposure afforded by different approaches. Design Case series and review of the literature. Setting Tertiary care center. Participants Three patients with petroclival lesions. Main Outcome Measures Subjective opinion of access by neuro-otologists and neurosurgeons as well as surface area of tumor exposure. Results Surgeons found the 3D models of each patient's skull and tumor useful for preoperative planning. Limitations of individual surgical approaches not identified through preoperative imaging were apparent after 3D models were evaluated. Significant variability in exposure was noted between models for similar or identical approaches. A notable drawback is that our printing process did not replicate mastoid air cells. Conclusions We found that 3D modeling is useful for individualized preoperative planning for approaching petroclival tumors. Our printing techniques did produce authentic replicas of the tumors in relation to bony structures.

  20. Re-thinking 3D printing: A novel approach to guided facial contouring.

    PubMed

    Darwood, Alastair; Collier, Jonathan; Joshi, Naresh; Grant, William E; Sauret-Jackson, Veronique; Richards, Robin; Dawood, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Niall

    2015-09-01

    Rapid prototyped or three dimensional printed (3D printed) patient specific guides are of great use in many craniofacial and maxillofacial procedures and are extensively described in the literature. These guides are relatively easy to produce and cost effective. However existing designs are limited in that they are unable to be used in procedures requiring the 3D contouring of patient tissues. This paper presents a novel design and approach for the use of three dimensional printing in the production of a patient specific guide capable of fully guiding intraoperative 3D tissue contouring based on a pre-operative plan. We present a case where the technique was used on a patient suffering from an extensive osseous tumour as a result of fibrous dysplasia with encouraging results. PMID:26165757

  1. A new approach of building 3D visualization framework for multimodal medical images display and computed assisted diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    As more and more CT/MR studies are scanning with larger volume of data sets, more and more radiologists and clinician would like using PACS WS to display and manipulate these larger data sets of images with 3D rendering features. In this paper, we proposed a design method and implantation strategy to develop 3D image display component not only with normal 3D display functions but also with multi-modal medical image fusion as well as compute-assisted diagnosis of coronary heart diseases. The 3D component has been integrated into the PACS display workstation of Shanghai Huadong Hospital, and the clinical practice showed that it is easy for radiologists and physicians to use these 3D functions such as multi-modalities' (e.g. CT, MRI, PET, SPECT) visualization, registration and fusion, and the lesion quantitative measurements. The users were satisfying with the rendering speeds and quality of 3D reconstruction. The advantages of the component include low requirements for computer hardware, easy integration, reliable performance and comfortable application experience. With this system, the radiologists and the clinicians can manipulate with 3D images easily, and use the advanced visualization tools to facilitate their work with a PACS display workstation at any time.

  2. Virtual Boutique: a 3D modeling and content-based management approach to e-commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquet, Eric; El-Hakim, Sabry F.

    2000-12-01

    The Virtual Boutique is made out of three modules: the decor, the market and the search engine. The decor is the physical space occupied by the Virtual Boutique. It can reproduce any existing boutique. For this purpose, photogrammetry is used. A set of pictures of a real boutique or space is taken and a virtual 3D representation of this space is calculated from them. Calculations are performed with software developed at NRC. This representation consists of meshes and texture maps. The camera used in the acquisition process determines the resolution of the texture maps. Decorative elements are added like painting, computer generated objects and scanned objects. The objects are scanned with laser scanner developed at NRC. This scanner allows simultaneous acquisition of range and color information based on white laser beam triangulation. The second module, the market, is made out of all the merchandises and the manipulators, which are used to manipulate and compare the objects. The third module, the search engine, can search the inventory based on an object shown by the customer in order to retrieve similar objects base don shape and color. The items of interest are displayed in the boutique by reconfiguring the market space, which mean that the boutique can be continuously customized according to the customer's needs. The Virtual Boutique is entirely written in Java 3D and can run in mono and stereo mode and has been optimized in order to allow high quality rendering.

  3. Extended 3D Approach for Quantification of Abnormal Ascending Aortic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sigovan, Monica; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Wrenn, Jarrett; Tseng, Elaine E.; Saloner, David; Hope, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Flow displacement quantifies eccentric flow, a potential risk factor for aneurysms in the ascending aorta, but only at a single anatomic location. The aim of this study is to extend flow displacement analysis to 3D in patients with aortic and aortic valve pathologies. Methods 43 individuals were studied with 4DFlow MRI in 6 groups: healthy, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) with aortic stenosis (AS) but no dilatation, TAV with dilatation but no AS, and TAV with both AS and dilatation, BAV without AS or dilatation, BAV without AS but with dilation. The protocol was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained. Flow displacement was calculated for multiple planes along the ascending aorta, and 2D and 3D analyses were compared. Results Good correlation was found between 2D flow displacement and both maximum and average 3D values (r>0.8). Healthy controls had significantly lower flow displacement values with all approaches (p<0.05). The highest flow displacement was seen with stenotic TAV and aortic dilation (0.24±0.02 with maximum flow displacement). The 2D approach underestimated the maximum flow displacement by more than 20% in 13 out of 36 patients (36%). Conclusions The extended 3D flow displacement analysis offers a more comprehensive quantitative evaluation of abnormal systolic flow in the ascending aorta than 2D analysis. Differences between patient subgroups are better demonstrated, and maximum flow displacement is more reliable assessed. PMID:25721998

  4. A new approach for salt dome detection using a 3D multidirectional edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asjad, Amin; Mohamed, Deriche

    2015-09-01

    Accurate salt dome detection from 3D seismic data is crucial to different seismic data analysis applications. We present a new edge based approach for salt dome detection in migrated 3D seismic data. The proposed algorithm overcomes the drawbacks of existing edge-based techniques which only consider edges in the x (crossline) and y (inline) directions in 2D data and the x (crossline), y (inline), and z (time) directions in 3D data. The algorithm works by combining 3D gradient maps computed along diagonal directions and those computed in x, y, and z directions to accurately detect the boundaries of salt regions. The combination of x, y, and z directions and diagonal edges ensures that the proposed algorithm works well even if the dips along the salt boundary are represented only by weak reflectors. Contrary to other edge and texture based salt dome detection techniques, the proposed algorithm is independent of the amplitude variations in seismic data. We tested the proposed algorithm on the publicly available Netherlands offshore F3 block. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm can detect salt bodies with high accuracy than existing gradient based and texture-based techniques when used separately. More importantly, the proposed approach is shown to be computationally efficient allowing for real time implementation and deployment.

  5. DC-Electrical Resistivity Imaging for embankment dike investigation: A 3D extended normalisation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargier, Yannick; Lopes, Sérgio Palma; Fauchard, Cyrille; François, Daniel; Côte, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Levee, dike and earth embankment dam structures are difficult to assess because of their length and complexity. Managers often include geophysical investigations in the overall dike condition assessment and the DC-Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) method is particularly applicable owing to its cost-effectiveness and its potential sensitivity to internal erosion. However, due to the truly 3D nature of embankment dikes, implementing inline longitudinal tomographies along with conventional 2D inversion is likely to yield image artefacts. 3D effects from external causes (geometry, water reservoir) can be predicted and therefore we present a new approach based on redefining the normalisation principle to derive apparent resistivities from the measured data. The aim is to provide a set of pre-processed apparent resistivities that are not contaminated by external 3D effects and that yield more reliable results when processed within a 2D conventional inversion scheme. The presented approach is successfully applied to synthetic and real data sets, proving superior to the conventional 2D approach, although data acquisition approach is the same thus keeping the same cost-effectiveness.

  6. Does shape co-variation between the skull and the mandible have functional consequences? A 3D approach for a 3D problem.

    PubMed

    Cornette, Raphaël; Baylac, Michel; Souter, Thibaud; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    Morpho-functional patterns are important drivers of phenotypic diversity given their importance in a fitness-related context. Although modularity of the mandible and skull has been studied extensively in mammals, few studies have explored shape co-variation between these two structures. Despite being developmentally independent, the skull and mandible form a functionally integrated unit. In the present paper we use 3D surface geometric morphometric methods allowing us to explore the form of both skull and mandible in its 3D complexity using the greater white-toothed shrew as a model. This approach allows an accurate 3D description of zones devoid of anatomical landmarks that are functionally important. Two-block partial least-squares approaches were used to describe the co-variation of form between skull and mandible. Moreover, a 3D biomechanical model was used to explore the functional consequences of the observed patterns of co-variation. Our results show the efficiency of the method in investigations of complex morpho-functional patterns. Indeed, the description of shape co-variation between the skull and the mandible highlighted the location and the intensity of their functional relationships through the jaw adductor muscles linking these two structures. Our results also demonstrated that shape co-variation in form between the skull and mandible has direct functional consequences on the recruitment of muscles during biting.

  7. Does shape co-variation between the skull and the mandible have functional consequences? A 3D approach for a 3D problem

    PubMed Central

    Cornette, Raphaël; Baylac, Michel; Souter, Thibaud; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Morpho-functional patterns are important drivers of phenotypic diversity given their importance in a fitness-related context. Although modularity of the mandible and skull has been studied extensively in mammals, few studies have explored shape co-variation between these two structures. Despite being developmentally independent, the skull and mandible form a functionally integrated unit. In the present paper we use 3D surface geometric morphometric methods allowing us to explore the form of both skull and mandible in its 3D complexity using the greater white-toothed shrew as a model. This approach allows an accurate 3D description of zones devoid of anatomical landmarks that are functionally important. Two-block partial least-squares approaches were used to describe the co-variation of form between skull and mandible. Moreover, a 3D biomechanical model was used to explore the functional consequences of the observed patterns of co-variation. Our results show the efficiency of the method in investigations of complex morpho-functional patterns. Indeed, the description of shape co-variation between the skull and the mandible highlighted the location and the intensity of their functional relationships through the jaw adductor muscles linking these two structures. Our results also demonstrated that shape co-variation in form between the skull and mandible has direct functional consequences on the recruitment of muscles during biting. PMID:23964811

  8. A novel approach for global lung registration using 3D Markov-Gibbs appearance model.

    PubMed

    El-Baz, Ayman; Khalifa, Fahmi; Elnakib, Ahmed; Nitzken, Matthew; Soliman, Ahmed; McClure, Patrick; Abou El-Ghar, Mohamed; Gimel'farb, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to align 3D CT data of a segmented lung object with a given prototype (reference lung object) using an affine transformation is proposed. Visual appearance of the lung from CT images, after equalizing their signals, is modeled with a new 3D Markov-Gibbs random field (MGRF) with pairwise interaction model. Similarity to the prototype is measured by a Gibbs energy of signal co-occurrences in a characteristic subset of voxel pairs derived automatically from the prototype. An object is aligned by an affine transformation maximizing the similarity by using an automatic initialization followed by a gradient search. Experiments confirm that our approach aligns complex objects better than popular conventional algorithms.

  9. 3D deformable image matching: a hierarchical approach over nested subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a fast hierarchical method to perform dense deformable inter-subject matching of 3D MR Images of the brain. To recover the complex morphological variations in neuroanatomy, a hierarchy of 3D deformations fields is estimated, by minimizing a global energy function over a sequence of nested subspaces. The nested subspaces, generated from a single scaling function, consist of deformation fields constrained at different scales. The highly non linear energy function, describing the interactions between the target and the source images, is minimized using a coarse-to-fine continuation strategy over this hierarchy. The resulting deformable matching method shows low sensitivity to local minima and is able to track large non-linear deformations, with moderate computational load. The performances of the approach are assessed both on simulated 3D transformations and on a real data base of 3D brain MR Images from different individuals. The method has shown efficient in putting into correspondence the principle anatomical structures of the brain. An application to atlas-based MRI segmentation, by transporting a labeled segmentation map on patient data, is also presented.

  10. Combined approach of shell and shear-warp rendering for efficient volume visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Alexandre X.; Rocha, Leonardo M.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2003-05-01

    In Medical Imaging, shell rendering (SR) and shear-warp rendering (SWR) are two ultra-fast and effective methods for volume visualization. We have previously shown that, typically, SWR can be on the average 1.38 times faster than SR, but it requires from 2 to 8 times more memory space than SR. In this paper, we propose an extension of the compact shell data structure utilized in SR to allow shear-warp factorization of the viewing matrix in order to obtain speed up gains for SR, without paying the high storage price of SWR. The new approach is called shear-warp shell rendering (SWSR). The paper describes the methods, points out their major differences in the computational aspects, and presents a comparative analysis of them in terms of speed, storage, and image quality. The experiments involve hard and fuzzy boundaries of 10 different objects of various sizes, shapes, and topologies, rendered on a 1GHz Pentium-III PC with 512MB RAM, utilizing surface and volume rendering strategies. The results indicate that SWSR offers the best speed and storage characteristics compromise among these methods. We also show that SWSR improves the rendition quality over SR, and provides renditions similar to those produced by SWR.

  11. A reduced-coordinate approach to modeling RNA 3-D structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chang-Shung

    1997-09-01

    With the realization of RNA molecules capable of performing very specific functions (e.g., catalytic RNAs and RNAs that bind ligand with affinity and specificity of an anti-body) and contrary to the traditional view that structure of RNA molecules being functionally passive, it has become clear that studying the 3-dimensional (3-D) folding of RNA molecules is a very important task. In the absence of sufficient number of experimentally determined RNA structures available up-to-date, folding of RNA structures computationally provides an alternative approach in studying the 3-D structure of RNA molecules. We have developed a computational approach for folding RNA 3-D structures. The method is conceptually simple and general. It consists of two major components. The first being the arrangement of all helices in space. Once the helices are positioned and oriented in space, structures of the connecting loops are modeled and inserted between the helices. Any number of structural constraints derived either experimentally or theoretically can be used to guide the folding processes. A conformational sampling approach is developed with structural equilibration using the Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation. The lengths of various loop sizes (ranging from 1 base to 7 bases) are calculated based on a set of RNA structures deposited in PDB as well as a set of loop structures constructed using our method. The validity of using the averaged loop lengths of the connecting loops as distance constraints for arranging the helices in space is studied.

  12. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes combining ICP with a graph-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Lee, Kyungmoo; Garvin, Mona K.; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The introduction of spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) scanners has enabled acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D-OCT is used to detect and manage eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. To follow-up patients over time, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. In this work we present a 3D registrationmethod based on a two-step approach. In the first step we register both scans in the XY domain using an Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based algorithm. This algorithm is applied to vessel segmentations obtained from the projection image of each scan. The distance minimized in the ICP algorithm includes measurements of the vessel orientation and vessel width to allow for a more robust match. In the second step, a graph-based method is applied to find the optimal translation along the depth axis of the individual A-scans in the volume to match both scans. The cost image used to construct the graph is based on the mean squared error (MSE) between matching A-scans in both images at different translations. We have applied this method to the registration of Optic Nerve Head (ONH) centered 3D-OCT scans of the same patient. First, 10 3D-OCT scans of 5 eyes with glaucoma imaged in vivo were registered for a qualitative evaluation of the algorithm performance. Then, 17 OCT data set pairs of 17 eyes with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness.

  13. A simple approach for the fabrication of 3D microelectrodes for impedimetric sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahsin Guler, Mustafa; Bilican, Ismail; Agan, Sedat; Elbuken, Caglar

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a very simple method to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) microelectrodes integrated with microfluidic devices. We form the electrodes by etching a microwire placed across a microchannel. For precise control of the electrode spacing, we employ a hydrodynamic focusing microfluidic device and control the width of the etching solution stream. The focused widths of the etchant solution and the etching time determine the gap formed between the electrodes. Using the same microfluidic device, we can fabricate integrated 3D electrodes with different electrode gaps. We have demonstrated the functionality of these electrodes using an impedimetric particle counting setup. Using 3D microelectrodes with a diameter of 25 μm, we have detected 6 μm-diameter polystyrene beads in a buffer solution as well as erythrocytes in a PBS solution. We study the effect of electrode spacing on the signal-to-noise ratio of the impedance signal and we demonstrate that the smaller the electrode spacing the higher the signal obtained from a single microparticle. The sample stream is introduced to the system using the same hydrodynamic focusing device, which ensures the alignment of the sample in between the electrodes. Utilising a 3D hydrodynamic focusing approach, we force all the particles to go through the sensing region of the electrodes. This fabrication scheme not only provides a very low-cost and easy method for rapid prototyping, but which can also be used for applications requiring 3D electric field focused through a narrow section of the microchannel.

  14. A Generalized Approach to the Modeling and Analysis of 3D Surface Morphology in Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Janice L.; Miller, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface geometry of an organism represents the boundary of its three-dimensional (3D) form and can be used as a proxy for the phenotype. A mathematical approach is presented that describes surface morphology using parametric 3D equations with variables expressed as x, y, z in terms of parameters u, v. Partial differentiation of variables with respect to parameters yields elements of the Jacobian representing tangent lines and planes of every point on the surface. Jacobian elements provide a compact size-free summary of the entire surface, and can be used as variables in principal components analysis to produce a morphospace. Mollusk and echinoid models are generated to demonstrate that whole organisms can be represented in a common morphospace, regardless of differences in size, geometry, and taxonomic affinity. Models can be used to simulate theoretical forms, novel morphologies, and patterns of phenotypic variation, and can also be empirically-based by designing them with reference to actual forms using reverse engineering principles. Although this study uses the Jacobian to summarize models, they can also be analyzed with 3D methods such as eigensurface, spherical harmonics, wavelet analysis, and geometric morphometrics. This general approach should prove useful for exploring broad questions regarding morphological evolution and variation. PMID:24204866

  15. Towards the design of 3D multiscale instructive tissue engineering constructs: Current approaches and trends.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara M; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2015-11-01

    The design of 3D constructs with adequate properties to instruct and guide cells both in vitro and in vivo is one of the major focuses of tissue engineering. Successful tissue regeneration depends on the favorable crosstalk between the supporting structure, the cells and the host tissue so that a balanced matrix production and degradation are achieved. Herein, the major occurring events and players in normal and regenerative tissue are overviewed. These have been inspiring the selection or synthesis of instructive cues to include into the 3D constructs. We further highlight the importance of a multiscale perception of the range of features that can be included on the biomimetic structures. Lastly, we focus on the current and developing tissue-engineering approaches for the preparation of such 3D constructs: top-down, bottom-up and integrative. Bottom-up and integrative approaches present a higher potential for the design of tissue engineering devices with multiscale features and higher biochemical control than top-down strategies, and are the main focus of this review.

  16. Sustainable approach toward synthesis of green functional carbonaceous 3-D micro/nanostructures from biomass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a novel technique to synthesize functional carbonaceous three-dimensional (3-D) micro/nanocompounds from agricultural by-products using femtosecond laser irradiation. Biowastes of rice husk and wheat straw are value-engineered to carbonaceous structures in a single-step process under ambient conditions. Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved. Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures. This sustainable approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3-D micro/nanofibrous compounds from biowaste materials. These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications. PMID:23924310

  17. Sustainable approach toward synthesis of green functional carbonaceous 3-D micro/nanostructures from biomass.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a novel technique to synthesize functional carbonaceous three-dimensional (3-D) micro/nanocompounds from agricultural by-products using femtosecond laser irradiation. Biowastes of rice husk and wheat straw are value-engineered to carbonaceous structures in a single-step process under ambient conditions. Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved. Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures. This sustainable approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3-D micro/nanofibrous compounds from biowaste materials. These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications. PMID:23924310

  18. Sustainable approach toward synthesis of green functional carbonaceous 3-D micro/nanostructures from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-08-01

    This study proposes a novel technique to synthesize functional carbonaceous three-dimensional (3-D) micro/nanocompounds from agricultural by-products using femtosecond laser irradiation. Biowastes of rice husk and wheat straw are value-engineered to carbonaceous structures in a single-step process under ambient conditions. Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved. Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures. This sustainable approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3-D micro/nanofibrous compounds from biowaste materials. These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications.

  19. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  20. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Fritz, S.; Vollherbst, D.; Zelzer, S.; Wachter, M. F. Bellemann, N. Gockner, T. Mokry, T. Schmitz, A.; Aulmann, S.; Stampfl, U.; Pereira, P.; Kauczor, H. U.; Werner, J.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  1. An approach to 3D model fusion in GIS systems and its application in a future ECDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhao, Depeng; Pan, Mingyang

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics technology is widely used in various areas and causes profound changes. As an information carrier, 3D models are becoming increasingly important. The use of 3D models greatly helps to improve the cartographic expression and design. 3D models are more visually efficient, quicker and easier to understand and they can express more detailed geographical information. However, it is hard to efficiently and precisely fuse 3D models in local systems. The purpose of this study is to propose an automatic and precise approach to fuse 3D models in geographic information systems (GIS). It is the basic premise for subsequent uses of 3D models in local systems, such as attribute searching, spatial analysis, and so on. The basic steps of our research are: (1) pose adjustment by principal component analysis (PCA); (2) silhouette extraction by simple mesh silhouette extraction and silhouette merger; (3) size adjustment; (4) position matching. Finally, we implement the above methods in our system Automotive Intelligent Chart (AIC) 3D Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). The fusion approach we propose is a common method and each calculation step is carefully designed. This approach solves the problem of cross-platform model fusion. 3D models can be from any source. They may be stored in the local cache or retrieved from Internet, or may be manually created by different tools or automatically generated by different programs. The system can be any kind of 3D GIS system.

  2. Multiplex acquisition approach for high speed 3D measurements with a chromatic confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taphanel, Miro; Zink, Ralf; Längle, Thomas; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    A technical realization of a multispectral camera is proposed, by multiplexing a light source with six different spectra. A monochrome line scan camera with six pixel rows is used as detector. The special feature of this acquisition approach is its high speed capability. The scan speed is as high as the frame rate of the line scan camera and not affected by the multiplexing. As application a chromatic confocal microscope was build up. From a data acquisition perspective up to 284 million 3D points per second can be measured. A real time signal processing is proposed, too.

  3. Novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D volume rendering toward improving the resolution of the fossil record of charcoal.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Claire M; Punyasena, Surangi W; Sivaguru, Mayandi

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the abundance of fossil charcoals between rocks and sediments are assumed to reflect changes in fire activity in Earth's past. These variations in fire activity are often considered to be in response to environmental, ecological or climatic changes. The role that fire plays in feedbacks to such changes is becoming increasingly important to understand and highlights the need to create robust estimates of variations in fossil charcoal abundance. The majority of charcoal based fire reconstructions quantify the abundance of charcoal particles and do not consider the changes in the morphology of the individual particles that may have occurred due to fragmentation as part of their transport history. We have developed a novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to image processing that enables the 3-dimensional reconstruction of individual charcoal particles. This method is able to measure the volume of both microfossil and mesofossil charcoal particles and allows the abundance of charcoal in a sample to be expressed as total volume of charcoal. The method further measures particle surface area and shape allowing both relationships between different size and shape metrics to be analysed and full consideration of variations in particle size and size sorting between different samples to be studied. We believe application of this new imaging approach could allow significant improvement in our ability to estimate variations in past fire activity using fossil charcoals.

  4. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials-Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing.

    PubMed

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing.

  5. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing. PMID:24956301

  6. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    displacements between 3 and 8 cm on 1% of the middle terrace wall. High displacement values (> 8-10 cm) were associated with presence or removal of vegetation and/or data gaps. On the second site, the 3D models indicated that the collapsed terrace had lost a volume of 1.9 m3, which was restored during the communal terrace building event. This digital 3D documentation approach is more economical than laser scanning and it is a promising method for assessment of terrace wall displacement and changes after terrace wall restoration.

  7. Digital breast tomosynthesis: computerized detection of microcalcifications in reconstructed breast volume using a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Heang-Ping; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Zhou, Chuan; Helvie, Mark A.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this preliminary study, we investigated the approach of detecting microcalcifications in the tomosynthesized volume. The DBT volume is first enhanced by 3D multi-scale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices with a calcification response function and signal-to-noise ratio enhancement filtering. Potential signal sites are identified in the enhanced volume and local analysis is performed to further characterize each object. A 3D dynamic clustering procedure is designed to locate potential clusters using hierarchical criteria. We collected a pilot data set of two-view DBT mammograms of 39 breasts containing microcalcification clusters (17 malignant, 22 benign) with IRB approval. A total of 74 clusters were identified by an experienced radiologist in the 78 DBT views. Our prototype CAD system achieved view-based sensitivity of 90% and 80% at an average FP rate of 7.3 and 2.0 clusters per volume, respectively. At the same levels of case-based sensitivity, the FP rates were 3.6 and 1.3 clusters per volume, respectively. For the subset of malignant clusters, the view-based detection sensitivity was 94% and 82% at an average FP rate of 6.0 and 1.5 FP clusters per volume, respectively. At the same levels of case-based sensitivity, the FP rates were 1.2 and 0.9 clusters per volume, respectively. This study demonstrated that computerized microcalcification detection in 3D is a promising approach to the development of a CAD system for DBT. Study is underway to further improve the computer-vision methods and to optimize the processing parameters using a larger data set.

  8. Virtual bronchoscopic approach for combining 3D CT and endoscopic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Austin, Allen L.; Helferty, James P.; Wan, Shu-Yen; Turlington, Janice Z.; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Higgins, William E.

    2000-04-01

    To improve the care of lung-cancer patients, we are devising a diagnostic paradigm that ties together three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution computed-tomographic (CT) imaging and bronchoscopy. The system expands upon the new concept of virtual endoscopy that has seen recent application to the chest, colon, and other anatomical regions. Our approach applies computer-graphics and image-processing tools to the analysis of 3D CT chest images and complementary bronchoscopic video. It assumes a two-stage assessment of a lung-cancer patient. During Stage 1 (CT assessment), the physician interacts with a number of visual and quantitative tools to evaluate the patient's 'virtual anatomy' (3D CT scan). Automatic analysis gives navigation paths through major airways and to pre-selected suspect sites. These paths provide useful guidance during Stage-1 CT assessment. While interacting with these paths and other software tools, the user builds a multimedia Case Study, capturing telling snapshot views, movies, and quantitative data. The Case Study contains a report on the CT scan and also provides planning information for subsequent bronchoscopic evaluation. During Stage 2 (bronchoscopy), the physician uses (1) the original CT data, (2) software graphical tools, (3) the Case Study, and (4) a standard bronchoscopy suite to have an augmented vision for bronchoscopic assessment and treatment. To use the two data sources (CT and bronchoscopic video) simultaneously, they must be registered. We perform this registration using both manual interaction and an automated matching approach based on mutual information. We demonstrate our overall progress to date using human CT cases and CT-video from a bronchoscopy- training device.

  9. Probabilistic Modeling of Conformational Space for 3D Machine Learning Approaches.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Andreas; Hinselmann, Georg; Fechner, Nikolas; Henneges, Carsten; Zell, Andreas

    2010-05-17

    We present a new probabilistic encoding of the conformational space of a molecule that allows for the integration into common similarity calculations. The method uses distance profiles of flexible atom-pairs and computes generative models that describe the distance distribution in the conformational space. The generative models permit the use of probabilistic kernel functions and, therefore, our approach can be used to extend existing 3D molecular kernel functions, as applied in support vector machines, to build QSAR models. The resulting kernels are valid 4D kernel functions and reduce the dependency of the model quality on suitable conformations of the molecules. We showed in several experiments the robust performance of the 4D kernel function, which was extended by our approach, in comparison to the original 3D-based kernel function. The new method compares the conformational space of two molecules within one kernel evaluation. Hence, the number of kernel evaluations is significantly reduced in comparison to common kernel-based conformational space averaging techniques. Additionally, the performance gain of the extended model correlates with the flexibility of the data set and enables an a priori estimation of the model improvement.

  10. Characterization of impact craters in 3D meshes using a feature lines approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorda, L.; Mari, J.; Viseur, S.; Bouley, S.

    2013-12-01

    Impact craters are observed at the surface of most solar system bodies: terrestrial planets, satellites and asteroids.The measurement of their size-frequency distribution (SFD) is the only method available to estimate the age of the observed geological units, assuming a rate and velocity distributions of impactors and a crater scaling law. The age of the geological units is fundamental to establish a chronology of events explaining the global evolution of the surface. In addition, the detailed characterization of the crater properties (depth-to-diameter ratio and radial profile) yields a better understanding of the geological processes which altered the observed surfaces. Crater detection is usually performed manually directly from the acquired images. However, this method can become prohibitive when dealing with small craters extracted from very large data sets. A large number of solar system objects is being mapped at a very high spatial resolution by space probes since a few decades, emphasizing the need for new automatic methods of crater detection. Powerful computers are now available to produce and analyze huge 3D models of the surface in the form of 3D meshes containing tens to hundreds of billions of facets. This motivates the development of a new family of automatic crater detection algorithms (CDAs). The automatic CDAs developed so far were mainly based on morphological analyses and pattern recognition techniques on 2D images. Since a few years, new CDAs based on 3D models are being developed. Our objective is to develop and test against existing methods an automatic CDA using a new approach based on the discrete differential properties of 3D meshes. The method produces the feature lines (the crest and the ravine lines) lying on the surface. It is based on a double step algorithm: first, the regions of interest are flagged according to curvature properties, and then an original skeletonization approach is applied to extract the feature lines. This new

  11. 3D imaging provides a high-resolution, volumetric approach for analyzing biofouling.

    PubMed

    First, Matthew R; Policastro, Steven A; Strom, Matthew J; Riley, Scott C; Robbins-Wamsley, Stephanie H; Drake, Lisa A

    2014-01-01

    A volumetric approach for determining the fouling burden on surfaces is presented, consisting of a 3D camera imaging system with fine (5 μm) resolution. Panels immersed in an estuary on the southwest coast of Florida, USA were imaged and the data were used to quantify seasonal changes in the biofouling community. Test panels, which were submerged in seawater for up to one year, were analyzed before and after gentle scrubbing to quantify the biovolume of the total fouling community (ie soft and hard organisms) and the hard fouling community. Total biofouling ranged from 0.01 to 1.16 cm(3) cm(-2) throughout the immersion period; soft fouling constituted 22-87% of the total biovolume. In the future, this approach may be used to inform numerical models of fluid-surface interfaces and to evaluate, with high resolution, the morphology of fouling organisms in response to antifouling technologies.

  12. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis: A 3D approach

    PubMed Central

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Lu, Yao

    2012-01-01

    cluster shape were used to reduce the number of FPs. Results: The prescreening stage detected a cluster seed object in 94% of the biopsied microcalcification clusters at a threshold of 100 cluster seed objects per DBT volume. After clustering, the detection sensitivity was 90% at 15 marks per DBT volume. After FP reduction, at 85% sensitivity, the average number of FPs estimated using the data set containing microcalcification clusters was 3.8 per DBT volume, and that estimated using the data set free of microcalcification clusters was 3.4. The detection performance for malignant microcalcification clusters was superior to that for benign clusters. Conclusions: Our study indicates the feasibility of the 3D approach to the detection of clustered microcalcifications in DBT and that the newly designed enhancement-modulated 3D calcification response function is promising for prescreening. Further work is needed to assess the generalizability of our approach and to improve its performance. PMID:22225272

  13. Reduced integral order 3D scalar wave integral equation Derivation and BEM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, HyunSuk

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is a numerical method to solve partial differential equations (PDEs), which is derived from the integral equation (IE) that can be developed from certain PDEs. Among IEs, the 3D transient wave integral equation has a very special property which makes it distinguished from other integral equations; Dirac-delta and its derivative delta‧ appear in the fundamental-solution (or kernel-function). These delta and delta‧ generalized functions have continuity C-2 and C-3, respectively, and become a major hurdle for BEM implementation, because many numerical methods including BEM are based on the idea of continuity. More specifically, the integrands (kernel - shape function products) in the 3D transient wave IE become discontinuous (C-2 and C-3) and make numerical integration difficult. There are several existing approaches to overcome the delta difficulty, but none use the character of the Dirac-delta to cancel the integral. In this dissertation, a new method called the "Reduced order wave integral equation (Reduced IE)" is developed to deal with the difficulty in the 3D transient wave problem. In this approach, the sifting properties of delta and delta‧ are used to cancel an integration. As a result, smooth integrands are derived and the integral orders are reduced by one. Smooth integrands result in the more efficient and accurate numerical integration. In addition, there is no more coupling between the space-element size and time-step size. Non-zero initial condition (IC) can be considered also. Furthermore, space integrals need to be performed once, not per time-step. All of this reduces dramatically the computational requirement. As a result, the computation order for both time and space are reduced by 1 and one obtains an O(M N2) method, where M is the number of time steps and N is the number of spatial nodes on the boundary of the problem domain. A numerical approach to deal with the reduced IE is also suggested, and a simple

  14. 3D inversion based on multi-grid approach of magnetotelluric data from Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T. J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the geoelectrical structure of the cratonic margin of Fennoscandian Shield by means of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements carried out in Northern Norway and Sweden during summer 2011-2012. The project Magnetotellurics in the Scandes (MaSca) focuses on the investigation of the crust, upper mantle and lithospheric structure in a transition zone from a stable Precambrian cratonic interior to a passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian Orogen and the Scandes Mountains in western Fennoscandia. Recent MT profiles in the central and southern Scandes indicated a large contrast in resistivity between Caledonides and Precambrian basement. The alum shales as a highly conductive layers between the resistive Precambrian basement and the overlying Caledonian nappes are revealed from this profiles. Additional measurements in the Northern Scandes were required. All together data from 60 synchronous long period (LMT) and about 200 broad band (BMT) sites were acquired. The array stretches from Lofoten and Bodo (Norway) in the west to Kiruna and Skeleftea (Sweden) in the east covering an area of 500x500 square kilometers. LMT sites were occupied for about two months, while most of the BMT sites were measured during one day. We have used new multi-grid approach for 3D electromagnetic (EM) inversion and modelling. Our approach is based on the OcTree discretization where the spatial domain is represented by rectangular cells, each of which might be subdivided (recursively) into eight sub-cells. In this simplified implementation the grid is refined only in the horizontal direction, uniformly in each vertical layer. Using multi-grid we manage to have a high grid resolution near the surface (for instance, to tackle with galvanic distortions) and lower resolution at greater depth as the EM fields decay in the Earth according to the diffusion equation. We also have a benefit in computational costs as number of unknowns decrease. The multi-grid forward

  15. High performance computing approaches for 3D reconstruction of complex biological specimens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M Laura; Roca-Piera, Javier; Fernández, José-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of specimens is crucial to determine the role that they play in cellular and molecular biology. To yield the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction by means of tomographic reconstruction algorithms, we need the use of large projection images and high processing time. Therefore, we propose the use of the high performance computing (HPC) to cope with the huge computational demands of this problem. We have implemented a HPC strategy where the distribution of tasks follows the master-slave paradigm. The master processor distributes a slab of slices, a piece of the final 3D structure to reconstruct, among the slave processors and receives reconstructed slices of the volume. We have evaluated the performance of our HPC approach using different sizes of the slab. We have observed that it is possible to find out an optimal size of the slab for the number of processor used that minimize communications time while maintaining a reasonable grain of parallelism to be exploited by the set of processors.

  16. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach.

    PubMed

    Guerfi, Y; Doucet, J B; Larrieu, G

    2015-10-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  17. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach.

    PubMed

    Guerfi, Y; Doucet, J B; Larrieu, G

    2015-10-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness. PMID:26422697

  18. High performance computing approaches for 3D reconstruction of complex biological specimens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, M Laura; Roca-Piera, Javier; Fernández, José-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the structure of specimens is crucial to determine the role that they play in cellular and molecular biology. To yield the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction by means of tomographic reconstruction algorithms, we need the use of large projection images and high processing time. Therefore, we propose the use of the high performance computing (HPC) to cope with the huge computational demands of this problem. We have implemented a HPC strategy where the distribution of tasks follows the master-slave paradigm. The master processor distributes a slab of slices, a piece of the final 3D structure to reconstruct, among the slave processors and receives reconstructed slices of the volume. We have evaluated the performance of our HPC approach using different sizes of the slab. We have observed that it is possible to find out an optimal size of the slab for the number of processor used that minimize communications time while maintaining a reasonable grain of parallelism to be exploited by the set of processors. PMID:20865517

  19. Thin-dielectric-layer engineering for 3D nanostructure integration using an innovative planarization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, Y.; Doucet, J. B.; Larrieu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures are emerging as promising building blocks for a large spectrum of applications. One critical issue in integration regards mastering the thin, flat, and chemically stable insulating layer that must be implemented on the nanostructure network in order to build striking nano-architectures. In this letter, we report an innovative method for nanoscale planarization on 3D nanostructures by using hydrogen silesquioxane as a spin-on-glass (SOG) dielectric material. To decouple the thickness of the final layer from the height of the nanostructure, we propose to embed the nanowire network in the insulator layer by exploiting the planarizing properties of the SOG approach. To achieve the desired dielectric thickness, the structure is chemically etched back with a highly diluted solution to control the etch rate precisely. The roughness of the top surface was less than 2 nm. There were no surface defects and the planarity was excellent, even in the vicinity of the nanowires. This newly developed process was used to realize a multilevel stack architecture with sub-deca-nanometer-range layer thickness.

  20. New Approach for 3D Local Structure Refinement Using Non-Muffin-Tin XANES Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Feiters, Martin C.

    2007-02-02

    A new technique of 3D local structure refinement using full-potential X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis is proposed and demonstrated in application to metalloorganic complexes of Ni. It can be applied to determine local structure in those cases where the muffin-tin approximation used in most full multiple scattering schemes fails. The method is based on the fitting of experimental XANES data using multidimensional interpolation of spectra as a function of structural parameters, recently proposed by us, and ab-initio full potential calculations of XANES using finite difference method. The small number of required ab-initio calculations is the main advantage of the approach, which allows one to use computationally time-expensive non-muffin-tin finite-difference method. The possibility to extract information on bond angles in addition to bond-lengths accessible to standard EXAFS is demonstrated and it opens new perspectives of quantitative XANES analysis as a 3D local structure probe.

  1. Morpho-geometrical approach for 3D segmentation of pulmonary vascular tree in multi-slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise J.

    2009-02-01

    The analysis of pulmonary vessels provides better insights into the lung physio-pathology and offers the basis for a functional investigation of the respiratory system. In order to be performed in clinical routine, such analysis has to be compatible with the general protocol for thorax imaging based on multi-slice CT (MSCT), which does not involve the use of contrast agent for vessels enhancement. Despite the fact that a visual assessment of the pulmonary vascular tree is facilitated by the natural contrast existing between vessels and lung parenchyma, a quantitative analysis becomes quickly tedious due to the high spatial density and subdivision complexity of these anatomical structures. In this paper, we develop an automated 3D approach for the segmentation of the pulmonary vessels in MSCT allowing further quantification facilities for the lung function. The proposed approach combines mathematical morphology and discrete geometry operators in order to reach distal small caliber blood vessels and to preserve the border with the wall of the bronchial tree which features identical intensity values. In this respect, the pulmonary field is first roughly segmented using thresholding, and the trachea and the main bronchi removed. The lung shape is then regularized by morphological alternate filtering and the high opacities (vessels, bronchi, and other eventual pathologic features) selected. After the attenuation of the bronchus wall for large and medium airways, the set of vessel candidates are obtained by morphological grayscale reconstruction and binarization. The residual bronchus wall components are then removed by means of a geometrical shape filtering which includes skeletonization and cylindrical shape estimation. The morphology of the reconstructed pulmonary vessels can be visually investigated with volume rendering, by associating a specific color code with the local vessel caliber. The complement set of the vascular tree among the high intensity structures in

  2. A multi-stage 3-D stress field modelling approach exemplified in the Bavarian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz O.; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the contemporary in situ stress state is a key issue for safe and sustainable subsurface engineering. However, information on the orientation and magnitudes of the stress state is limited and often not available for the areas of interest. Therefore 3-D geomechanical-numerical modelling is used to estimate the in situ stress state and the distance of faults from failure for application in subsurface engineering. The main challenge in this approach is to bridge the gap in scale between the widely scattered data used for calibration of the model and the high resolution in the target area required for the application. We present a multi-stage 3-D geomechanical-numerical approach which provides a state-of-the-art model of the stress field for a reservoir-scale area from widely scattered data records. Therefore, we first use a large-scale regional model which is calibrated by available stress data and provides the full 3-D stress tensor at discrete points in the entire model volume. The modelled stress state is used subsequently for the calibration of a smaller-scale model located within the large-scale model in an area without any observed stress data records. We exemplify this approach with two-stages for the area around Munich in the German Molasse Basin. As an example of application, we estimate the scalar values for slip tendency and fracture potential from the model results as measures for the criticality of fault reactivation in the reservoir-scale model. The modelling results show that variations due to uncertainties in the input data are mainly introduced by the uncertain material properties and missing SHmax magnitude estimates needed for a more reliable model calibration. This leads to the conclusion that at this stage the model's reliability depends only on the amount and quality of available stress information rather than on the modelling technique itself or on local details of the model geometry. Any improvements in modelling and increases

  3. An adaptive learning approach for 3-D surface reconstruction from point clouds.

    PubMed

    Junior, Agostinho de Medeiros Brito; Neto, Adrião Duarte Dória; de Melo, Jorge Dantas; Goncalves, Luiz Marcos Garcia

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a multiresolution approach for surface reconstruction from clouds of unorganized points representing an object surface in 3-D space. The proposed method uses a set of mesh operators and simple rules for selective mesh refinement, with a strategy based on Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM). Basically, a self-adaptive scheme is used for iteratively moving vertices of an initial simple mesh in the direction of the set of points, ideally the object boundary. Successive refinement and motion of vertices are applied leading to a more detailed surface, in a multiresolution, iterative scheme. Reconstruction was experimented on with several point sets, including different shapes and sizes. Results show generated meshes very close to object final shapes. We include measures of performance and discuss robustness.

  4. 3D MR imaging in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2001-05-01

    A system has been developed to produce live 3D volume renderings from an MR scanner. Whereas real-time 2D MR imaging has been demonstrated by several groups, 3D volumes are currently rendered off-line to gain greater understanding of anatomical structures. For example, surgical planning is sometimes performed by viewing 2D images or 3D renderings from previously acquired image data. A disadvantage of this approach is misregistration which could occur if the anatomy changes due to normal muscle contractions or surgical manipulation. The ability to produce volume renderings in real-time and present them in the magnet room could eliminate this problem, and enable or benefit other types of interventional procedures. The system uses the data stream generated by a fast 2D multi- slice pulse sequence to update a volume rendering immediately after a new slice is available. We demonstrate some basic types of user interaction with the rendering during imaging at a rate of up to 20 frames per second.

  5. FRACTURED RESERVOIR E&P IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BASINS: A 3-D RTM MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    P. Ortoleva; J. Comer; A. Park; D. Payne; W. Sibo; K. Tuncay

    2001-11-26

    Key natural gas reserves in Rocky Mountain and other U.S. basins are in reservoirs with economic producibility due to natural fractures. In this project, we evaluate a unique technology for predicting fractured reservoir location and characteristics ahead of drilling based on a 3-D basin/field simulator, Basin RTM. Recommendations are made for making Basin RTM a key element of a practical E&P strategy. A myriad of reaction, transport, and mechanical (RTM) processes underlie the creation, cementation and preservation of fractured reservoirs. These processes are often so strongly coupled that they cannot be understood individually. Furthermore, sedimentary nonuniformity, overall tectonics and basement heat flux histories make a basin a fundamentally 3-D object. Basin RTM is the only 3-D, comprehensive, fully coupled RTM basin simulator available for the exploration of fractured reservoirs. Results of Basin RTM simulations are presented, that demonstrate its capabilities and limitations. Furthermore, it is shown how Basin RTM is a basis for a revolutionary automated methodology for simultaneously using a range of remote and other basin datasets to locate reservoirs and to assess risk. Characteristics predicted by our model include reserves and composition, matrix and fracture permeability, reservoir rock strength, porosity, in situ stress and the statistics of fracture aperture, length and orientation. Our model integrates its input data (overall sedimentation, tectonic and basement heat flux histories) via the laws of physics and chemistry that describe the RTM processes to predict reservoir location and characteristics. Basin RTM uses 3-D, finite element solutions of the equations of rock mechanics, organic and inorganic diagenesis and multi-phase hydrology to make its predictions. As our model predicts reservoir characteristics, it can be used to optimize production approaches (e.g., assess the stability of horizontal wells or vulnerability of fractures to

  6. Viewing effects of 3-D images synthesized from a series of 2-D tomograms by VAP and HAP approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, H. C.; Wang, M. W.; Liu, F. M.; Hsu, Ken Y.

    We report, for the first time, the experimental result and its analysis of synthesizing a series of simulating 2-D tomograms into a 3-D monochromatic image. Our result shows clearly the advantage in monochromaticity of a vertical area-partition (VAP) approach over a horizontal area-partition (HAP) approach during the final white-light reconstruction. This monochromaticity will ensure a 3-D image synthesis without any distortion in gray level or positional recovery.

  7. Joint 3D inversion of gravity and magnetic data with geological constraints - an alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, Ilya; Vajda, Peter; Jentzsch, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Quite a popular approach now by interpretation of gravity data is a linear one - an attempt is made to find a density distribution d(x,y,z) below the Earth's surface. This approach has clear disadvantages. First, we face the problem of dimensionality: one looks for 3D function based on 2D data set (measurements on the Earth's surface), the degree of non-uniqueness is extremely high, and no regularization can save the situation. The number of unknowns is many times higher than the number of observations; otherwise, we obtain a very rough model of the lower half-space. Second, the linear approach is not reasonable from the geological point of view. It implies that density varies from one point to another. Usually, we assume big volumes with nearly homogeneous density - layers, blocks, intrusions. It looks more understandable, to search for geometry of density interfaces: 3D topography of contact surfaces and shapes of restricted bodies (intrusions). Third, in the framework of the linear approach even for a synthetic field of two separate objects we obtain clouds of points with slightly increased density. It is hardly ever possible, to isolate objects, particularly when one of them is located above another one. We suggest an alternative approach for the linear one. Our approach has been successfully applied for several case histories including a local gravity anomaly Kolarovo and a bigger area of the Thuringian Basin, where both gravity and magnetic data are inverted. First, we separate sources into deep, intermediate and shallow ones, using subsequent upward and downward continuation. All components are inverted separately. We address a problem which we name the problem of low frequencies: deep objects generate long wavelengths, but the converse implication is not necessarily true. For instance, the effect of the basin structure contributes substantially into low frequencies, though it is caused by shallow sources. However, our numerical experiments with intermediate

  8. Linear stratified approach using full geometric constraints for 3D scene reconstruction and camera calibration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hean; Koo, Bon-Ki

    2013-02-25

    This paper presents a new linear framework to obtain 3D scene reconstruction and camera calibration simultaneously from uncalibrated images using scene geometry. Our strategy uses the constraints of parallelism, coplanarity, colinearity, and orthogonality. These constraints can be obtained in general man-made scenes frequently. This approach can give more stable results with fewer images and allow us to gain the results with only linear operations. In this paper, it is shown that all the geometric constraints used in the previous works performed independently up to now can be implemented easily in the proposed linear method. The study on the situations that cannot be dealt with by the previous approaches is also presented and it is shown that the proposed method being able to handle the cases is more flexible in use. The proposed method uses a stratified approach, in which affine reconstruction is performed first and then metric reconstruction. In this procedure, the additional constraints newly extracted in this paper have an important role for affine reconstruction in practical situations.

  9. STXM goes 3D: digital reconstruction of focal stacks as novel approach towards confocal soft x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Späth, Andreas; Scho Ll, Simon; Riess, Christian; Schmidtel, Daniel; Paradossi, Gaio; Raabe, Jo Rg; Hornegger, Joachim; Fink, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Fresnel zone plate based soft x-ray transmission microspectroscopy has developed into a routine technique for high-resolution elemental or chemical 2D imaging of thin film specimens. The availability of high resolution Fresnel lenses with short depth of focus offers the possibility of optical slicing (in the third dimension) by focus series with resolutions in the submicron regime. We introduce a 3D reconstruction algorithm that uses a variance-based metric to assign a focus measure as basis for volume rendering. The algorithm is applied to simulated geometries and opaque soft matter specimens thus enabling 3D visualization. These studies with z-resolution of few 100nm serve as important step towards the vision of a confocal transmission x-ray microscope.

  10. A fast slam approach to freehand 3-d ultrasound reconstruction for catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for real-time, freehand 3D ultrasound (3D-US) reconstruction of moving anatomy, with specific application towards guiding the catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) catheter with a pose (position/orientation) sensor mounted to its tip, we continually mosaic 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom model to form a 3D-US volume. Our mosaicing strategy employs a probabilistic framework based on simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), a technique commonly used in mobile robotics for creating maps of unexplored environments. The measured ICE catheter tip pose provides an initial estimate for compounding 2D-ICE image data into the 3D-US volume. However, we simultaneously consider the overlap-consistency shared between 2D-ICE images and the 3D-US volume, computing a "corrected" tip pose if need be to ensure spatially-consistent reconstruction. This allows us to compensate for anatomic movement and sensor drift that would otherwise cause motion artifacts in the 3D-US volume. Our approach incorporates 2D-ICE data immediately after acquisition, allowing us to continuously update the registration parameters linking sensor coordinates to 3D-US coordinates. This, in turn, enables real-time localization and display of sensorized therapeutic catheters within the 3D-US volume for facilitating procedural guidance.

  11. A fast slam approach to freehand 3-d ultrasound reconstruction for catheter ablation guidance in the left atrium.

    PubMed

    Koolwal, Aditya B; Barbagli, Federico; Carlson, Christopher R; Liang, David H

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for real-time, freehand 3D ultrasound (3D-US) reconstruction of moving anatomy, with specific application towards guiding the catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium. Using an intracardiac echo (ICE) catheter with a pose (position/orientation) sensor mounted to its tip, we continually mosaic 2D-ICE images of a left atrium phantom model to form a 3D-US volume. Our mosaicing strategy employs a probabilistic framework based on simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), a technique commonly used in mobile robotics for creating maps of unexplored environments. The measured ICE catheter tip pose provides an initial estimate for compounding 2D-ICE image data into the 3D-US volume. However, we simultaneously consider the overlap-consistency shared between 2D-ICE images and the 3D-US volume, computing a "corrected" tip pose if need be to ensure spatially-consistent reconstruction. This allows us to compensate for anatomic movement and sensor drift that would otherwise cause motion artifacts in the 3D-US volume. Our approach incorporates 2D-ICE data immediately after acquisition, allowing us to continuously update the registration parameters linking sensor coordinates to 3D-US coordinates. This, in turn, enables real-time localization and display of sensorized therapeutic catheters within the 3D-US volume for facilitating procedural guidance. PMID:22014856

  12. New approach for the modeling and smoothing of scattered 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbacher, Stefan; Haeusler, Gerd

    1998-03-01

    In order to digitize the whole surface of a three-dimensional object by means of an optical range sensor, usually multiple range images are acquired from different viewpoints and merged into a single surface description. The simplest and most accurate way is to generate a polyhedral surface. The data are usually distorted by measuring errors like noise, aliasing, outliers, calibration and registration errors, etc., so that they have to be filtered. Calibration and registration errors first appear after merging of different views. As the merged data are no longer represented on a grid, conventional filters for digital signal processing are not applicable. We introduce a new approach for modeling and smoothing scattered data based on an approximation of a mesh of circular arcs. This new method enables interpolation of curved surfaces using solely the vertex position and the associated vertex normals of a polyhedral mesh. The new smoothing filter is specifically adapted to the requirements of geometric data, as it minimizes curvature variations. In contrast to linear filters, undesired surface undulations are avoided, which is an important pre- condition for NC milling and rendering.

  13. Embedding SAS approach into conjugate gradient algorithms for asymmetric 3D elasticity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsin-Chu; Warsi, N.A.; Sameh, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we present two strategies to embed the SAS (symmetric-and-antisymmetric) scheme into conjugate gradient (CG) algorithms to make solving 3D elasticity problems, with or without global reflexive symmetry, more efficient. The SAS approach is physically a domain decomposition scheme that takes advantage of reflexive symmetry of discretized physical problems, and algebraically a matrix transformation method that exploits special reflexivity properties of the matrix resulting from discretization. In addition to offering large-grain parallelism, which is valuable in a multiprocessing environment, the SAS scheme also has the potential for reducing arithmetic operations in the numerical solution of a reasonably wide class of scientific and engineering problems. This approach can be applied directly to problems that have global reflexive symmetry, yielding smaller and independent subproblems to solve, or indirectly to problems with partial symmetry, resulting in loosely coupled subproblems. The decomposition is achieved by separating the reflexive subspace from the antireflexive one, possessed by a special class of matrices A, A {element_of} C{sup n x n} that satisfy the relation A = PAP where P is a reflection matrix (symmetric signed permutation matrix).

  14. A Novel Multiparametric Approach to 3D Quantitative MRI of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giuseppe; Tedeschi, Enrico; Borrelli, Pasquale; Cocozza, Sirio; Russo, Carmela; Liu, Saifeng; Ye, Yongquan; Comerci, Marco; Alfano, Bruno; Salvatore, Marco; Haacke, E. Mark; Mancini, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance properties of tissues can be quantified in several respects: relaxation processes, density of imaged nuclei, magnetism of environmental molecules, etc. In this paper, we propose a new comprehensive approach to obtain 3D high resolution quantitative maps of arbitrary body districts, mainly focusing on the brain. The theory presented makes it possible to map longitudinal (R1), pure transverse (R2) and free induction decay (R2*) rates, along with proton density (PD) and magnetic susceptibility (χ), from a set of fast acquisition sequences in steady-state that are highly insensitive to flow phenomena. A novel denoising scheme is described and applied to the acquired datasets to enhance the signal to noise ratio of the derived maps and an information theory approach compensates for biases from radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneities, if no direct measure of the RF field is available. Finally, the results obtained on sample brain scans of healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients are presented and discussed. PMID:26284778

  15. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C.; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  16. Personalized Medicine Approaches in Prostate Cancer Employing Patient Derived 3D Organoids and Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Bartucci, Monica; Ferrari, Anna C; Kim, Isaac Yi; Ploss, Alexander; Yarmush, Martin; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death in Western men. Despite its prevalence, PCa has proven very difficult to propagate in vitro. PCa represents a complex organ-like multicellular structure maintained by the dynamic interaction of tumoral cells with parenchymal stroma, endothelial and immune cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The lack of PCa models that recapitulate this intricate system has hampered progress toward understanding disease progression and lackluster therapeutic responses. Tissue slices, monolayer cultures and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) fail to mimic the complexities of the PCa microenvironment or reproduce the diverse mechanisms of therapy resistance. Moreover, patient derived xenografts (PDXs) are expensive, time consuming, difficult to establish for prostate cancer, lack immune cell-tumor regulation, and often tumors undergo selective engraftments. Here, we describe an interdisciplinary approach using primary PCa and tumor initiating cells (TICs), three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering, genetic and morphometric profiling, and humanized mice to generate patient-derived organoids for examining personalized therapeutic responses in vitro and in mice co-engrafted with a human immune system (HIS), employing adaptive T-cell- and chimeric antigen receptor- (CAR) immunotherapy. The development of patient specific therapies targeting the vulnerabilities of cancer, when combined with antiproliferative and immunotherapy approaches could help to achieve the full transformative power of cancer precision medicine. PMID:27446916

  17. Efficient hardware accelerated rendering of multiple volumes by data dependent local render functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Helko; Geller, Dieter; Weese, Jürgen; Kiefer, Gundolf

    2007-03-01

    The inspection of a patient's data for diagnostics, therapy planning or therapy guidance involves an increasing number of 3D data sets, e.g. acquired by different imaging modalities, with different scanner settings or at different times. To enable viewing of the data in one consistent anatomical context fused interactive renderings of multiple 3D data sets are desirable. However, interactive fused rendering of typical medical data sets using standard computing hardware remains a challenge. In this paper we present a method to render multiple 3D data sets. By introducing local rendering functions, i.e. functions that are adapted to the complexity of the visible data contained in the different regions of a scene, we can ensure that the overall performance for fused rendering of multiple data sets depends on the actual amount of visible data. This is in contrast to other approaches where the performance depends mainly on the number of rendered data sets. We integrate the method into a streaming rendering architecture with brick-based data representations of the volume data. This enables efficient handling of data sets that do not fit into the graphics board memory and a good utilization of the texture caches. Furthermore, transfer and rendering of volume data that does not contribute to the final image can be avoided. We illustrate the benefits of our method by experiments with clinical data.

  18. The modular approach enables a fully ab initio simulation of the contacts between 3D and 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-10-01

    Up to now, the electrical properties of the contacts between 3D metals and 2D materials have never been computed at a fully ab initio level due to the huge number of atomic orbitals involved in a current path from an electrode to a pristine 2D material. As a result, there are still numerous open questions and controversial theories on the electrical properties of systems with 3D/2D interfaces—for example, the current path and the contact length scalability. Our work provides a first-principles solution to this long-standing problem with the use of the modular approach, a method which rigorously combines a Green function formalism with the density functional theory (DFT) for this particular contact type. The modular approach is a general approach valid for any 3D/2D contact. As an example, we apply it to the most investigated among 3D/2D contacts—metal/graphene contacts—and show its abilities and consistency by comparison with existing experimental data. As it is applicable to any 3D/2D interface, the modular approach allows the engineering of 3D/2D contacts with the pre-defined electrical properties.

  19. The modular approach enables a fully ab initio simulation of the contacts between 3D and 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-10-01

    Up to now, the electrical properties of the contacts between 3D metals and 2D materials have never been computed at a fully ab initio level due to the huge number of atomic orbitals involved in a current path from an electrode to a pristine 2D material. As a result, there are still numerous open questions and controversial theories on the electrical properties of systems with 3D/2D interfaces-for example, the current path and the contact length scalability. Our work provides a first-principles solution to this long-standing problem with the use of the modular approach, a method which rigorously combines a Green function formalism with the density functional theory (DFT) for this particular contact type. The modular approach is a general approach valid for any 3D/2D contact. As an example, we apply it to the most investigated among 3D/2D contacts-metal/graphene contacts-and show its abilities and consistency by comparison with existing experimental data. As it is applicable to any 3D/2D interface, the modular approach allows the engineering of 3D/2D contacts with the pre-defined electrical properties.

  20. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    SciTech Connect

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to the MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.

  1. An edge-from-focus approach to 3D inspection and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fuqin; Chen, Jia; Liu, Jianyang; Zhang, Zhijun; Deng, Jiangwen; Fung, Kenneth S. M.; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2015-02-01

    We propose an edge-based depth-from-focus technique for high-precision non-contact industrial inspection and metrology applications. In our system, an objective lens with a large numerical aperture is chosen to resolve the edge details of the measured object. By motorizing this imaging system, we capture the high-resolution edges within every narrow depth of field. We can therefore extend the measured range and keep a high resolution at the same time. Yet, on the surfaces with a large depth variation, a significant amount of data around each measured point are out of focus within the captured images. Then, it is difficult to extract the valuable information from these out-of-focus data due to the depth-variant blur. Moreover, these data impede the extraction of continuous contours for the measurement objects in high-level machine vision applications. The proposed approach however makes use of the out-of-focus data to synthesize a depth-invariant smoothed image, and then robustly locates the positions of high contrast edges based on non-maximum suppression and hysteresis thresholding. Furthermore, by focus analysis of both the in-focus and the out-of-focus data, we reconstruct the high-precision 3D edges for metrology applications.

  2. Soft computing approach to 3D lung nodule segmentation in CT.

    PubMed

    Badura, P; Pietka, E

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel, multilevel approach to the segmentation of various types of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography studies. It is based on two branches of computational intelligence: the fuzzy connectedness (FC) and the evolutionary computation. First, the image and auxiliary data are prepared for the 3D FC analysis during the first stage of an algorithm - the masks generation. Its main goal is to process some specific types of nodules connected to the pleura or vessels. It consists of some basic image processing operations as well as dedicated routines for the specific cases of nodules. The evolutionary computation is performed on the image and seed points in order to shorten the FC analysis and improve its accuracy. After the FC application, the remaining vessels are removed during the postprocessing stage. The method has been validated using the first dataset of studies acquired and described by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and by its latest release - the LIDC-IDRI (Image Database Resource Initiative) database.

  3. Approaches of National 3d Mapping: Research Results and Standardisation in Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoter, J. E.; Streilein, A.; Pla, M.; Baella, B.; Capstick, D.; Home, R.; Roensdorf, C.; Lagrange, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Over the past ten years technologies for generating, maintaining and using 3D geo-information have matured. For national mapping agencies one of the challenges is how to best extend 2D data into 3D data, making best use of research results and available technologies. Some mapping organisations are making serious progress. The question addressed in this paper is how research results achieved in the past ten years are applied in practice and what research problems remain. In addition, the paper explores the potentials of the OGC 3D standard (i.e. CityGML) for 3D national mapping and what developments are further required to make the standard better fit for this purpose. The main conclusions of the paper are that 3D data is more and more available but still suffers from a low level of usage (mainly visualisation) and standards and formats based on CityGML have been stabilised although software support is still in the early stage. Several recommendations are made to meet these problems, including the definition of European CityGML profiles (as the INSPIRE Building profile) to harmonise 3D needs and standardise 3D implementations at international level.

  4. Metabolic alteration of HepG2 in scaffold-based 3-D culture: proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Subhasitanont, Pantipa; Chiablaem, Khajeelak; Svasti, Jisnuson; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2010-11-01

    3-D cell culture models are important in cancer biology since they provide improved understanding of tumor microenvironment. We have established a 3-D culture model using HepG2 in natural collagen-based scaffold to mimic the development of small avascular tumor in vivo. Morphological characterization showed that HepG2 colonies grew within the interior of the scaffold and showed enhanced extracellular matrix deposition. High levels of cell proliferation in the outermost regions of the scaffold created a hypoxic microenvironment in the 3-D culture system, as indicated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stabilization, detectable by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Proteomic studies showed decreased expression of several mitochondrial proteins and increased expression of proteins in anaerobic glycolysis under 3-D culture compared to monolayer culture. Creatine kinase was also upregulated in 3-D culture, indicating its possible role as an important energy buffer system under hypoxic microenvironment. Increased levels of proteins in nucleotide metabolism may relate to cellular energy. Thus, our results suggest that HepG2 cells under 3-D culture adapt their energy metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions. Metabolic alterations in the 3-D culture model may relate to physiological changes relevant to development of small avascular tumor in vivo and their study may improve future therapeutic strategies.

  5. A correlative approach for combining microCT, light and transmission electron microscopy in a single 3D scenario

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In biomedical research, a huge variety of different techniques is currently available for the structural examination of small specimens, including conventional light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), microscopic X-ray computed tomography (microCT), and many others. Since every imaging method is physically limited by certain parameters, a correlative use of complementary methods often yields a significant broader range of information. Here we demonstrate the advantages of the correlative use of microCT, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy for the analysis of small biological samples. Results We used a small juvenile bivalve mollusc (Mytilus galloprovincialis, approximately 0.8 mm length) to demonstrate the workflow of a correlative examination by microCT, LM serial section analysis, and TEM-re-sectioning. Initially these three datasets were analyzed separately, and subsequently they were fused in one 3D scene. This workflow is very straightforward. The specimen was processed as usual for transmission electron microscopy including post-fixation in osmium tetroxide and embedding in epoxy resin. Subsequently it was imaged with microCT. Post-fixation in osmium tetroxide yielded sufficient X-ray contrast for microCT imaging, since the X-ray absorption of epoxy resin is low. Thereafter, the same specimen was serially sectioned for LM investigation. The serial section images were aligned and specific organ systems were reconstructed based on manual segmentation and surface rendering. According to the region of interest (ROI), specific LM sections were detached from the slides, re-mounted on resin blocks and re-sectioned (ultrathin) for TEM. For analysis, image data from the three different modalities was co-registered into a single 3D scene using the software AMIRA®. We were able to register both the LM section series volume and TEM slices neatly to the microCT dataset, with

  6. A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  7. A 2D range Hausdorff approach to 3D facial recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  8. Machine learning and synthetic aperture refocusing approach for more accurate masking of fish bodies in 3D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Logan; Bajpayee, Abhishek; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is becoming a popular technique to study biological flows. PIV images that contain fish or other animals around which flow is being studied, need to be appropriately masked in order to remove the animal body from the 3D reconstructed volumes prior to calculating particle displacement vectors. Presented here is a machine learning and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing based approach for more accurate masking of fish from reconstructed intensity fields for 3D PIV purposes. Using prior knowledge about the 3D shape and appearance of the fish along with SA refocused images at arbitrarily oriented focal planes, the location and orientation of a fish in a reconstructed volume can be accurately determined. Once the location and orientation of a fish in a volume is determined, it can be masked out.

  9. New Two-stage Approach For 3d Potential Field Data Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, I. L.

    From the author's viewpoint the main challenges for a geophysicist dealing with po- tential field data inversion are following: 1) to make really three-dimensional inversion (to avoid the assumption that the object sought is an infinite cylinder); 2) to leave the simplest bodies (prisms, ellipsoids, cylinders of finite length) for the objects of more complex geometry, 3) to take into account the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. In our investigation we've made an attempt to solve the above-mentioned problems. We take into account the non- uniqueness of the inverse problem in the framework of the equivalence theory developed by A.V. Tsyrulsky. We have reduced 3D grav- ity and magnetic inverse problems to the non-linear integral equations of the 1st kind relative to the function determining geometry of the object sought. They include a physical parameter as a numerical factor. Substituting different values of it, we obtain the opportunity to construct the whole equivalent family of the solutions. New inte- gral equations have been derived, which integrands are algebraic relative the function sought and don't contain its derivatives. The method of local corrections has been suggested, which makes it possible to curtail the time required to solve an inverse problem approximately by an order of magnitude. The parameterization of the solu- tion sought and regularization of an inverse problem were studied. On the base of his equivalence theory A.V. Tsyrulsky had suggested two-stage approach for 2D gravity and magnetic anomalies interpretation. The aim of the first stage is to approximate the observed field by the field of a sum of the simplest sources (point sources, thin layers, etc.) of no geological sense. On the second stage the field of a sum of some sources is regarded as a field of the object sought, we are able to try different variants to unite sources and to construct the equivalent family of solutions. Sole member of the family should be chosen with taking

  10. Tracking of cracks in bridges using GPR: a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, A.

    2012-04-01

    Corrosion associated with reinforcing bars is the most significant contributor to bridge deficiencies. The corrosion is usually caused by moisture and chloride ion exposure. In particular, corrosion products FeO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and other oxides along reinforcement bars. The reinforcing bars are attacked by corrosion and yield expansive corrosion products. These oxidation products occupy a larger volume than the original intact steel and internal expansive stresses lead to cracking and debonding. There are some conventional inspection methods for detection of reinforcing bar corrosion but they can be invasive and destructive, often laborious, lane closures is required and it is difficult or unreliable any quantification of corrosion. For these reasons, bridge engineers are always more preferring to use the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique. In this work a novel numerical approach for three dimensional tracking and mapping of cracks in the bridge is proposed. The work starts from some interesting results based on the use of the 3D imaging technique in order to improve the potentiality of GPR to detect voids, cracks or buried object. The numerical approach has been tested on data acquired on some bridges using a pulse GPR system specifically designed for bridge deck and pavement inspection that is called RIS Hi Bright. The equipment integrates two arrays of Ultra Wide Band ground coupled antennas, having a main working frequency of 2 GHz. The two arrays within the RIS Hi Bright are using antennas arranged with different polarization. One array includes sensors with parallel polarization with respect to the scanning direction (VV array), the other has sensors in orthogonal polarization (HH array). Overall the system collects 16 profiles within a single scan (8 HH + 8 VV). The cracks, associated often to moisture increasing and higher values of the dielectric constant, produce a not negligible increasing of the signal amplitude. Following this, the algorithm

  11. TOBAGO — a semi-automated approach for the generation of 3-D building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Armin

    3-D city models are in increasing demand for a great number of applications. Photogrammetry is a relevant technology that can provide an abundance of geometric, topologic and semantic information concerning these models. The pressure to generate a large amount of data with high degree of accuracy and completeness poses a great challenge to phtogrammetry. The development of automated and semi-automated methods for the generation of those data sets is therefore a key issue in photogrammetric research. We present in this article a strategy and methodology for an efficient generation of even fairly complex building models. Within this concept we request the operator to measure the house roofs from a stereomodel in form of an unstructured point cloud. According to our experience this can be done very quickly. Even a non-experienced operator can measure several hundred roofs or roof units per day. In a second step we fit generic building models fully automatically to these point clouds. The structure information is inherently included in these building models. In such a way geometric, topologic and even semantic data can be handed over to a CAD-system, in our case AutoCad, for further visualization and manipulation. The structuring is achieved in three steps. In a first step a classifier is initiated which recognizes the class of houses a particular roof point cloud belongs to. This recognition step is primarily based on the analysis of the number of ridge points. In the second and third steps the concrete topological relations between roof points are investigated and generic building models are fitted to the point clouds. Based on the technique of constraint-based reasoning two geometrical parsers are solving this problem. We have tested the methodology under a variety of different conditions in several pilot projects. The results will indicate the good performance of our approach. In addition we will demonstrate how the results can be used for visualization (texture

  12. [A new approach to the tricuspid valve in Ebstein's anomaly by real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Taktak, A; Acar, P; Dulac, Y; Abadir, S; Chilon, T; Roux, D; Glock, Y; Fournial, G

    2005-05-01

    Ebstein's anomaly affects the tricuspid valve with a large range of anatomical forms. Successful tricuspid valvuloplasty depends mainly on the ability to mobilise the leaflets. Evaluation of the leaflet surface is difficult with 2D echocardiography whereas 3D echocardiography provides intracardiac views of the valve. The authors used this method in 10 patients with 3 modes of imaging: biplane, real time and total volume. The study population (age: 1 day to 30 years) included: 1 prenatal diagnosis, 1 neonate with refractory cyanosis, 5 patients with mild tricuspid regurgitation, 3 patients with severe tricuspid regurgitation, 2 of whom underwent valvuloplasty. 3D echocardiography was disappointing in the foetus and neonate because of poor spatial resolution. The ventricular view of the tricuspid valve in older children and adults allowed analysis of tricuspid leaflet coaptation and of the mechanism of regurgitation. The commissures and leaflet surfaces were assessed. The results of surgical valvuloplasty could be evaluated by 3D echocardiography. 3D echocardiography is now transthoracic and a real time investigation. Technical advances are required before it comes into routine usage: a more manoeuvrable matricial probe (integrating pulsed and continuous wave Doppler) and larger volume real time 3D imaging with better resolution. Its role in the assessment of Ebstein's anomaly should be evaluated in a larger series of patients. PMID:15966604

  13. LayTracks3D: A new approach for meshing general solids using medial axis transform

    DOE PAGES

    Quadros, William Roshan

    2015-08-22

    This study presents an extension of the all-quad meshing algorithm called LayTracks to generate high quality hex-dominant meshes of general solids. LayTracks3D uses the mapping between the Medial Axis (MA) and the boundary of the 3D domain to decompose complex 3D domains into simpler domains called Tracks. Tracks in 3D have no branches and are symmetric, non-intersecting, orthogonal to the boundary, and the shortest path from the MA to the boundary. These properties of tracks result in desired meshes with near cube shape elements at the boundary, structured mesh along the boundary normal with any irregular nodes restricted to themore » MA, and sharp boundary feature preservation. The algorithm has been tested on a few industrial CAD models and hex-dominant meshes are shown in the Results section. Work is underway to extend LayTracks3D to generate all-hex meshes.« less

  14. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  15. Heads-up 3D Microscopy: An Ergonomic and Educational Approach to Microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Bernardino M; Chiodo, Michael V; Vandevender, Darl; Patel, Parit A

    2016-05-01

    Traditional microsurgery can lead surgeons to use postures that cause musculoskeletal fatigue, leaving them more prone to work-related injuries. A new technology from TrueVision transmits the microscopic image onto a 3-dimensional (3D) monitor, allowing surgeons to operate while sitting/standing in a heads-up position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing heads-up 3D microscopy as a more ergonomic alternative to traditional microsurgery. A feasibility study was conducted comparing heads-up 3D microscopy and traditional microscopy by performing femoral artery anastomoses on 8 Sprague-Dawley rats. Operative times and patency rates for each technology were compared. The 8 microsurgeons completed a questionnaire comparing image quality, comfort, technical feasibility, and educational value of the 2 technologies. Rat femoral artery anastomoses were successfully carried out by all 8 microsurgeons with each technology. There was no significant difference in anastomosis time between heads-up 3D and traditional microscopy (average times, 34.5 and 33.8 minutes, respectively; P = 0.66). Heads-up 3D microscopy was rated superior in neck and back comfort by 75% of participants. Image resolution, field of view, and technical feasibility were found to be superior or equivalent in 75% of participants, whereas 63% evaluated depth perception to be superior or equivalent. Heads-up 3D microscopy is a new technology that improves comfort for the microsurgeon without compromising image quality or technical feasibility. Its use has become prevalent in the field of ophthalmology and may also have utility in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:27579241

  16. Heads-up 3D Microscopy: An Ergonomic and Educational Approach to Microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Bernardino M; Chiodo, Michael V; Vandevender, Darl; Patel, Parit A

    2016-05-01

    Traditional microsurgery can lead surgeons to use postures that cause musculoskeletal fatigue, leaving them more prone to work-related injuries. A new technology from TrueVision transmits the microscopic image onto a 3-dimensional (3D) monitor, allowing surgeons to operate while sitting/standing in a heads-up position. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing heads-up 3D microscopy as a more ergonomic alternative to traditional microsurgery. A feasibility study was conducted comparing heads-up 3D microscopy and traditional microscopy by performing femoral artery anastomoses on 8 Sprague-Dawley rats. Operative times and patency rates for each technology were compared. The 8 microsurgeons completed a questionnaire comparing image quality, comfort, technical feasibility, and educational value of the 2 technologies. Rat femoral artery anastomoses were successfully carried out by all 8 microsurgeons with each technology. There was no significant difference in anastomosis time between heads-up 3D and traditional microscopy (average times, 34.5 and 33.8 minutes, respectively; P = 0.66). Heads-up 3D microscopy was rated superior in neck and back comfort by 75% of participants. Image resolution, field of view, and technical feasibility were found to be superior or equivalent in 75% of participants, whereas 63% evaluated depth perception to be superior or equivalent. Heads-up 3D microscopy is a new technology that improves comfort for the microsurgeon without compromising image quality or technical feasibility. Its use has become prevalent in the field of ophthalmology and may also have utility in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  17. An approach in developing 3D fiber-deposited magnetic scaffolds for tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    De Santis, R.; Gloria, A.; D'Amora, U.; Zeppetelli, S.; Ambrosio, L.; Russo, T.

    2010-06-02

    Scaffolds should possess suitable properties to play their specific role. In this work, the potential of 3D fiber deposition technique to develop multifunctional and well-defined magnetic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/iron oxide scaffolds has been highlighted, and the effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on the biological and mechanical performances has been assessed.

  18. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  19. Magnetic interactions and microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d 3 ions at trigonal symmetry sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hao; Zi-Yuan, Yang

    2006-04-01

    The spin-Hamiltonian (SH) parameters ( D, g //, and g ⊥) for 4A2(3d 3)-state ions at trigonal symmetry sites, taking into account the spin-spin (SS), the spin-other-orbit (SOO), the orbit-orbit (OO) magnetic interactions besides the well-known spin-orbit (SO) magnetic interaction, are studied in the intermediate-field coupling scheme using the CDM/MSH (Complete Diagonalization Method/ Microscopic Spin Hamiltonian) program recently developed. It is shown that the SH parameters arise from five microscopic mechanisms including SO coupling mechanism, SS coupling mechanism, SOO coupling mechanism, OO coupling mechanism, and SO-SS-SOO-OO combined coupling mechanism. The relative importance of the five (SO, SS, SOO, OO and combined SO-SS-SOO-OO) contributions to the SH parameters is investigated. It is shown that the SO coupling mechanism in these coupling mechanisms is the most important one. The effect of the OO coupling mechanism on the energy levels is appreciable whereas that on the SH parameters is negligible. The contribution from the SS coupling mechanism to the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameter D is appreciable but is quite small to g-factors: g // and g ⊥. In contrast, the contribution from the SOO coupling mechanism to the ZFS parameter D is quite small but is appreciable to g-factors. Two perturbation theory method approaches have been examined using CDM/MSH program. It is found that the analytical expressions developed by Macfarlane for D, g //, and g ⊥ work well in most of the CF ranges considered whereas those developed by Zdansky for D do not work well in almost all the CF ranges considered. The illustrative evaluation is performed for typical laser material Cr 3+: Al 2O 3. The good agreements between the theoretical values and the experimental finding are obtained. It is found that the percentage difference δ (=|D-D|/|D|×100%) reaches 20.9% for laser material Cr 3+: Al 2O 3. The investigation indicates that the contribution to the ZFS parameter

  20. Intraoperative neuronavigation for transoral surgical approach: use of frameless stereotaxy with 3D rotational C-arm for image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Garrett J; Sedney, Cara L; Fancy, Tanya; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    The transoral route is a standard surgical approach to the anterior craniovertebral junction, where neuronavigation is difficult secondary to the mobility of the cervical spine in relation to the cranium. We describe the use of neuronavigation combined with intraoperative 3D C-arm to direct our approach and resection of two lesions of the craniovertebral junction. Neuronavigation was employed in planning of incision, bony resection, and assessment of lesion resection. Both patients underwent transoral approach without complication using this method. Frameless stereotaxy with BrainLab VectorVision and 3D C-arm is an effective method of neuronavigated approach to the anterior craniocervical junction, which may contribute to the safety of this approach.

  1. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution.

  2. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution. PMID:26193484

  3. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cari, C. Suparmi, A.

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  4. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  5. Multiple 3D reference system analyses for Phobos grooves, a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, Emanuele; Pajola, Maurizio; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Grooves analysis has represented in the last decade a robust method for geomorphological study of small bodies, as is the case for asteroids 951 Gaspra (Veverka et al., 1994), 243 Ida (Belton et al., 1994), 433 Eros (Thomas et al., (2002), Buczkowski et al., 2008), 21 Lutetia (Massironi et al., 2011, *Besse et al., 2014*) and 4 Vesta (Buczkowski et al., 2*012). Hence, such source of information can be deeper used for a novel approach presented on Phobos with the aim of providing more hints on its harshly debated origin. Stereo-plots and cyclographs represent two methods, unified under the name of stereographic projections, commonly used to describe the statistic of the orientations (dip-angle and dip-direction) of different planes with respect to cardinal points and a reference horizontal plane (Bucher, 1944; Phillips, 1954; Ragan, 1985). However this reference system is ambiguous for any applications on small irregular bodies such as asteroids or comets since it does not permit to highlight systems of parallel anisotropies and to have an idea of their distribution with respect to a given surface feature (for example an impact crater). In this work we show a novel approach for stereographic projections focusing to a multi-reference system. The multi-reference system can be centered on a specific surface feature such as a crater and can alternatively use an absolute reference plane containing the center of figure of the body (to retrieve systems of parallel anisotropies) or a relative horizontal plane (to understand the distribution of the anisotropies with respect to the central feature). In this way we are able to well define the distribution of the grooves expected to be originated from a impact cratering event in a small body. Following this methodology, we have extracted 352 3D fracture planes from the attitudes of the grooves over the surface topography of Phobos and, for each plane, the local surface versor has been defined. Consequently, stereo-plots on

  6. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J.; de Verdiere, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  7. An approach to quantifying 3D responses of cells to extreme strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuhui; Huang, Guoyou; Li, Moxiao; Wang, Lin; Elson, Elliot L.; Jian Lu, Tian; Genin, Guy M.; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The tissues of hollow organs can routinely stretch up to 2.5 times their length. Although significant pathology can arise if relatively large stretches are sustained, the responses of cells are not known at these levels of sustained strain. A key challenge is presenting cells with a realistic and well-defined three-dimensional (3D) culture environment that can sustain such strains. Here, we describe an in vitro system called microscale, magnetically-actuated synthetic tissues (micro-MASTs) to quantify these responses for cells within a 3D hydrogel matrix. Cellular strain-threshold and saturation behaviors were observed in hydrogel matrix, including strain-dependent proliferation, spreading, polarization, and differentiation, and matrix adhesion retained at strains sufficient for apoptosis. More broadly, the system shows promise for defining and controlling the effects of mechanical environment upon a broad range of cells. PMID:26887698

  8. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Kelly; de Jesus, Karla; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Machado, Leandro José

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500 mm) with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points--with 8 common points at water surface--and 92 validation points) was positioned on a 25 m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.). Root Mean Square (RMS) error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P ≤ 0.03). With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P ≥ 0.47). Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P ≤ 0.04) and the opposite was observed for validation points (P ≤ 0.04). It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy.

  9. Parallel rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    This article provides a broad introduction to the subject of parallel rendering, encompassing both hardware and software systems. The focus is on the underlying concepts and the issues which arise in the design of parallel rendering algorithms and systems. We examine the different types of parallelism and how they can be applied in rendering applications. Concepts from parallel computing, such as data decomposition, task granularity, scalability, and load balancing, are considered in relation to the rendering problem. We also explore concepts from computer graphics, such as coherence and projection, which have a significant impact on the structure of parallel rendering algorithms. Our survey covers a number of practical considerations as well, including the choice of architectural platform, communication and memory requirements, and the problem of image assembly and display. We illustrate the discussion with numerous examples from the parallel rendering literature, representing most of the principal rendering methods currently used in computer graphics.

  10. Analysis of Approximations and Aperture Distortion for 3D Migration of Bistatic Radar Data with the Two-Step Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzi, Luigi; Lualdi, Maurizio

    2010-12-01

    The two-step approach is a fast algorithm for 3D migration originally introduced to process zero-offset seismic data. Its application to monostatic GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) data is straightforward. A direct extension of the algorithm for the application to bistatic radar data is possible provided that the TX-RX azimuth is constant. As for the zero-offset case, the two-step operator is exactly equivalent to the one-step 3D operator for a constant velocity medium and is an approximation of the one-step 3D operator for a medium where the velocity varies vertically. Two methods are explored for handling a heterogeneous medium; both are suitable for the application of the two-step approach, and they are compared in terms of accuracy of the final 3D operator. The aperture of the two-step operator is discussed, and a solution is proposed to optimize its shape. The analysis is of interest for any NDT application where the medium is expected to be heterogeneous, or where the antenna is not in direct contact with the medium (e.g., NDT of artworks, humanitarian demining, radar with air-launched antennas).

  11. A novel and stable approach to anatomical structure morphing for enhanced intraoperative 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Kumar T.; Gonzalez Ballester, Miguel A.; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Styner, Martin

    2005-04-01

    The use of three dimensional models in planning and navigating computer assisted surgeries is now well established. These models provide intuitive visualization to the surgeons contributing to significantly better surgical outcomes. Models obtained from specifically acquired CT scans have the disadvantage that they induce high radiation dose to the patient. In this paper we propose a novel and stable method to construct a patient-specific model that provides an appropriate intra-operative 3D visualization without the need for a pre or intra-operative imaging. Patient specific data consists of digitized landmarks and surface points that are obtained intra-operatively. The 3D model is reconstructed by fitting a statistical deformable model to the minimal sparse digitized data. The statistical model is constructed using Principal Component Analysis from training objects. Our morphing scheme efficiently and accurately computes a Mahalanobis distance weighted least square fit of the deformable model to the 3D data model by solving a linear equation system. Relaxing the Mahalanobis distance term as additional points are incorporated enables our method to handle small and large sets of digitized points efficiently. Our novel incorporation of M-estimator based weighting of the digitized points enables us to effectively reject outliers and compute stable models. Normalization of the input model data and the digitized points makes our method size invariant and hence applicable directly to any anatomical shape. The method also allows incorporation of non-spatial data such as patient height and weight. The predominant applications are hip and knee surgeries.

  12. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-07-17

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (n{theta}) or cos (n{theta}) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B{sub z} of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A{sub n}(z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B{sub r,n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} sin (n{theta}),B{sub {theta},n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} cos (n{theta}), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed.

  13. A 3D DEM-LBM approach for the assessment of the quick condition for sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, M.; Delenne, J.-Y.; El Youssoufi, M. S.; Seridi, A.

    2009-09-01

    We present a 3D numerical model to assess the quick condition (the onset of the boiling phenomenon) in a saturated polydisperse granular material. We use the Discrete Element Method (DEM) to study the evolution of the vertical intergranular stress in a granular sample subjected to an increasing hydraulic gradient. The hydrodynamic forces on the grains of the sample are computed using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The principal assumption used is that grains remain at rest until the boiling onset. We show that the obtained critical hydraulic gradient is close to that defined in classical soil mechanics. To cite this article: M. Mansouri et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  14. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D ‘glass brain’ rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study’s findings. PMID:26594340

  15. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 . PMID:26306875

  16. Optimizing 3D image quality and performance for stereoscopic gaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Julien; Sanderson, Hugh; Pegg, Steven; Kwok, Simon; Paterson, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    The successful introduction of stereoscopic TV systems, such as Samsung's 3D Ready Plasma, requires high quality 3D content to be commercially available to the consumer. Console and PC games provide the most readily accessible source of high quality 3D content. This paper describes innovative developments in a generic, PC-based game driver architecture that addresses the two key issues affecting 3D gaming: quality and speed. At the heart of the quality issue are the same considerations that studios face producing stereoscopic renders from CG movies: how best to perform the mapping from a geometric CG environment into the stereoscopic display volume. The major difference being that for game drivers this mapping cannot be choreographed by hand but must be automatically calculated in real-time without significant impact on performance. Performance is a critical issue when dealing with gaming. Stereoscopic gaming has traditionally meant rendering the scene twice with the associated performance overhead. An alternative approach is to render the scene from one virtual camera position and use information from the z-buffer to generate a stereo pair using Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR). We analyze this trade-off in more detail and provide some results relating to both 3D image quality and render performance.

  17. 3D finite element model of the diabetic neuropathic foot: a gait analysis driven approach.

    PubMed

    Guiotto, Annamaria; Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-09-22

    Diabetic foot is an invalidating complication of diabetes that can lead to foot ulcers. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) allows characterizing the loads developed in the different anatomical structures of the foot in dynamic conditions. The aim of this study was to develop a subject specific 3D foot FE model (FEM) of a diabetic neuropathic (DNS) and a healthy (HS) subject, whose subject specificity can be found in term of foot geometry and boundary conditions. Kinematics, kinetics and plantar pressure (PP) data were extracted from the gait analysis trials of the two subjects with this purpose. The FEM were developed segmenting bones, cartilage and skin from MRI and drawing a horizontal plate as ground support. Materials properties were adopted from previous literature. FE simulations were run with the kinematics and kinetics data of four different phases of the stance phase of gait (heel strike, loading response, midstance and push off). FEMs were then driven by group gait data of 10 neuropathic and 10 healthy subjects. Model validation focused on agreement between FEM-simulated and experimental PP. The peak values and the total distribution of the pressures were compared for this purpose. Results showed that the models were less robust when driven from group data and underestimated the PP in each foot subarea. In particular in the case of the neuropathic subject's model the mean errors between experimental and simulated data were around the 20% of the peak values. This knowledge is crucial in understanding the aetiology of diabetic foot.

  18. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2016-10-01

    Geological-geochemical evidence point towards higher mantle potential temperature and a different type of tectonics (global plume-lid tectonics) in the early Earth (>3.2 Ga) compared to the present day (global plate tectonics). In order to investigate tectono-magmatic processes associated with plume-lid tectonics and crustal growth under hotter mantle temperature conditions, we conduct a series of 3D high-resolution magmatic-thermomechanical models with the finite-difference code I3ELVIS. No external plate tectonic forces are applied to isolate 3D effects of various plume-lithosphere and crust-mantle interactions. Results of the numerical experiments show two distinct phases in coupled crust-mantle evolution: (1) a longer (80-100 Myr) and relatively quiet 'growth phase' which is marked by growth of crust and lithosphere, followed by (2) a short (∼20 Myr) and catastrophic 'removal phase', where unstable parts of the crust and mantle lithosphere are removed by eclogitic dripping and later delamination. This modelling suggests that the early Earth plume-lid tectonic regime followed a pattern of episodic growth and removal also called episodic overturn with a periodicity of ∼100 Myr.

  19. Automated Segmentation of the Right Ventricle in 3D Echocardiography: A Kalman Filter State Estimation Approach.

    PubMed

    Bersvendsen, Jorn; Orderud, Fredrik; Massey, Richard John; Fosså, Kristian; Gerard, Olivier; Urheim, Stig; Samset, Eigil

    2016-01-01

    As the right ventricle's (RV) role in cardiovascular diseases is being more widely recognized, interest in RV imaging, function and quantification is growing. However, there are currently few RV quantification methods for 3D echocardiography presented in the literature or commercially available. In this paper we propose an automated RV segmentation method for 3D echocardiographic images. We represent the RV geometry by a Doo-Sabin subdivision surface with deformation modes derived from a training set of manual segmentations. The segmentation is then represented as a state estimation problem and solved with an extended Kalman filter by combining the RV geometry with a motion model and edge detection. Validation was performed by comparing surface-surface distances, volumes and ejection fractions in 17 patients with aortic insufficiency between the proposed method, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and a manual echocardiographic reference. The algorithm was efficient with a mean computation time of 2.0 s. The mean absolute distances between the proposed and manual segmentations were 3.6 ± 0.7 mm. Good agreements of end diastolic volume, end systolic volume and ejection fraction with respect to MRI ( -26±24 mL , -16±26 mL and 0 ± 10%, respectively) and a manual echocardiographic reference (7 ± 30 mL, 13 ± 17 mL and -5±7% , respectively) were observed.

  20. 3D visual presentation of shoulder joint motion.

    PubMed

    Totterman, S; Tamez-Pena, J; Kwok, E; Strang, J; Smith, J; Rubens, D; Parker, K

    1998-01-01

    The 3D visual presentation of biodynamic events of human joints is a challenging task. Although the 3D reconstruction of high contrast structures from CT data has been widely explored, then there is much less experience in reconstructing the small low contrast soft tissue structures from inhomogeneous and sometimes noisy MR data. Further, there are no algorithms for tracking the motion of moving anatomic structures through MR data. We represent a comprehensive approach to 3D musculoskeletal imagery that addresses these challenges. Specific imaging protocols, segmentation algorithms and rendering techniques are developed and applied to render complex 3D musculoskeletal systems for their 4D visual presentation. Applications of our approach include analysis of rotational motion of the shoulder, the knee flexion, and other complex musculoskeletal motions, and the development of interactive virtual human joints.

  1. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  2. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  3. The role of mechanical heterogeneities during continental breakup: a 3D lithospheric-scale modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclaux, Guillaume; Huismans, Ritske S.; May, Dave

    2015-04-01

    How and why do continents break? More than two decades of analogue and 2D plane-strain numerical experiments have shown that despite the origin of the forces driving extension, the geometry of continental rifts falls into three categories - or modes: narrow rift, wide rift, or core complex. The mode of extension itself is strongly influenced by the rheology (and rheological behaviour) of the modelled layered system. In every model, an initial thermal or mechanical heterogeneity, such as a weak seed or a notch, is imposed to help localise the deformation and avoid uniform stretching of the lithosphere by pure shear. While it is widely accepted that structural inheritance is a key parameter for controlling rift localisation - as implied by the Wilson Cycle - modelling the effect of lithospheric heterogeneities on the long-term tectonic evolution of an extending plate in full 3D remains challenging. Recent progress in finite-element methods applied to computational tectonics along with the improved accessibility to high performance computers, now enable to switch from plane strain thermo-mechanical experiments to full 3D high-resolution experiments. Here we investigate the role of mechanical heterogeneities on rift opening, linkage and propagation during extension of a layered lithospheric systems with pTatin3d, a geodynamics modeling package utilising the material-point-method for tracking material composition, combined with a multigrid finite-element method to solve heterogeneous, incompressible visco-plastic Stokes problems. The initial model setup consists in a box of 1200 km horizontally by 250 km deep. It includes a 35 km layer of continental crust, underlaid by 85 km of sub-continental lithospheric mantle, and an asthenospheric mantle. Crust and mantle have visco-plastic rheologies with a pressure dependent yielding, which includes strain weakening, and a temperature, stress, strain-rate-dependent viscosity based on wet quartzite rheology for the crust, and wet

  4. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  5. Engineering approaches to study fibrosis in 3-D in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Porras, Ana M; Hutson, Heather N; Berger, Anthony J; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-08-01

    Fibrotic diseases occur in virtually every tissue of the body and are a major cause of mortality, yet they remain largely untreatable and poorly understood on a mechanistic level. The development of anti-fibrotic agents has been hampered, in part, by the insufficient fibrosis biomimicry provided by traditional in vitro platforms. This review focuses on recent advancements toward creating 3-D platforms that mimic key features of fibrosis, as well as the application of novel imaging and sensor techniques to analyze dynamic extracellular matrix remodeling. Several opportunities are highlighted to apply new tools from the fields of biomaterials, imaging, and systems biology to yield pathophysiologically relevant in vitro platforms that improve our understanding of fibrosis and may enable identification of potential treatment targets.

  6. Size-Controlled Fabrication of Polyaniline Microfibers Based on 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Imsung; Song, Simon; Uh, Kyungchan; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the relatively high conductivity and unique redox behavior, polyaniline (PANI) has been one of the most technologically promising conducting polymers. Although various methodologies have been developed, fabrication of PANI microfibers has been a challenging task owing to the poor solubility in most organic solvents. By taking advantage of a microfluidic technology and organic soluble acid labile t-Boc-protected PANI (t-Boc-PANI) as the conducting polymer precursor, fabrication of PANI microfibers in a size-controlled manner is possible. Introduction of a THF solution containing t-Boc-PANI, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as a core flow, and water as a sheath flow into a microfluidic channel with a 3D hydrodynamic focusing effect results in crystallization of the polymer fiber. By changing the flow rate, linear PANI microfibers that range from 16.2 to 39.4 μm in diameter are readily obtained.

  7. Engineering approaches to study fibrosis in 3-D in vitro systems.

    PubMed

    Porras, Ana M; Hutson, Heather N; Berger, Anthony J; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-08-01

    Fibrotic diseases occur in virtually every tissue of the body and are a major cause of mortality, yet they remain largely untreatable and poorly understood on a mechanistic level. The development of anti-fibrotic agents has been hampered, in part, by the insufficient fibrosis biomimicry provided by traditional in vitro platforms. This review focuses on recent advancements toward creating 3-D platforms that mimic key features of fibrosis, as well as the application of novel imaging and sensor techniques to analyze dynamic extracellular matrix remodeling. Several opportunities are highlighted to apply new tools from the fields of biomaterials, imaging, and systems biology to yield pathophysiologically relevant in vitro platforms that improve our understanding of fibrosis and may enable identification of potential treatment targets. PMID:26926460

  8. Morphological study of surgical approach by superior temporal sulcus-temporal horn of lateral ventricle approach using volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Jia, Linpei; Dong, Yidian; Zhao, Hang; Liu, Haoyuan; Yang, Kerong; Li, Youqiong

    2014-03-01

    In this research, we acquired the length of the superior temporal sulcus, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, and the approach angle between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle measuring 98 specimens by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the point of the superior temporal sulcus, which is closest to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle, aimed at finding out the best entrance point of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus to the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle and reducing the damage to optic radiation as well as other nerve fibers during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 3/5 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point, and there is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  9. 3D geometry analysis of the medial meniscus--a statistical shape modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, A C T; Crijns, S P M; Ploegmakers, M J M; O'Kane, C; van Tienen, T G; Janssen, D; Buma, P; Verdonschot, N

    2014-10-01

    The geometry-dependent functioning of the meniscus indicates that detailed knowledge on 3D meniscus geometry and its inter-subject variation is essential to design well functioning anatomically shaped meniscus replacements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify 3D meniscus geometry and to determine whether variation in medial meniscus geometry is size- or shape-driven. Also we performed a cluster analysis to identify distinct morphological groups of medial menisci and assessed whether meniscal geometry is gender-dependent. A statistical shape model was created, containing the meniscus geometries of 35 subjects (20 females, 15 males) that were obtained from MR images. A principal component analysis was performed to determine the most important modes of geometry variation and the characteristic changes per principal component were evaluated. Each meniscus from the original dataset was then reconstructed as a linear combination of principal components. This allowed the comparison of male and female menisci, and a cluster analysis to determine distinct morphological meniscus groups. Of the variation in medial meniscus geometry, 53.8% was found to be due to primarily size-related differences and 29.6% due to shape differences. Shape changes were most prominent in the cross-sectional plane, rather than in the transverse plane. Significant differences between male and female menisci were only found for principal component 1, which predominantly reflected size differences. The cluster analysis resulted in four clusters, yet these clusters represented two statistically different meniscal shapes, as differences between cluster 1, 2 and 4 were only present for principal component 1. This study illustrates that differences in meniscal geometry cannot be explained by scaling only, but that different meniscal shapes can be distinguished. Functional analysis, e.g. through finite element modeling, is required to assess whether these distinct shapes actually influence

  10. 3D models mapping optimization through an integrated parameterization approach: cases studies from Ravenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, L.; Fantini, F.; Bertacchi, S.

    2014-06-01

    Image-based modelling tools based on SfM algorithms gained great popularity since several software houses provided applications able to achieve 3D textured models easily and automatically. The aim of this paper is to point out the importance of controlling models parameterization process, considering that automatic solutions included in these modelling tools can produce poor results in terms of texture utilization. In order to achieve a better quality of textured models from image-based modelling applications, this research presents a series of practical strategies aimed at providing a better balance between geometric resolution of models from passive sensors and their corresponding (u,v) map reference systems. This aspect is essential for the achievement of a high-quality 3D representation, since "apparent colour" is a fundamental aspect in the field of Cultural Heritage documentation. Complex meshes without native parameterization have to be "flatten" or "unwrapped" in the (u,v) parameter space, with the main objective to be mapped with a single image. This result can be obtained by using two different strategies: the former automatic and faster, while the latter manual and time-consuming. Reverse modelling applications provide automatic solutions based on splitting the models by means of different algorithms, that produce a sort of "atlas" of the original model in the parameter space, in many instances not adequate and negatively affecting the overall quality of representation. Using in synergy different solutions, ranging from semantic aware modelling techniques to quad-dominant meshes achieved using retopology tools, it is possible to obtain a complete control of the parameterization process.

  11. Mass Movement Susceptibility in the Western San Juan Mountains, Colorado: A Preliminary 3-D Mapping Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, K. A.; Giardino, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Mass movement is a major activity that impacts lives of humans and their infrastructure. Human activity in steep, mountainous regions is especially at risk to this potential hazard. Thus, the identification and quantification of risk by mapping and determining mass movement susceptibility are fundamental in protecting lives, resources and ensuring proper land use regulation and planning. Specific mass-movement processes including debris flows, rock falls, snow avalanches and landslides continuously modify the landscape of the San Juan Mountains. Historically, large-magnitude slope failures have repeatedly occurred in the region. Common triggers include intense, long-duration precipitation, freeze-thaw processes, human activity and various volcanic lithologies overlying weaker sedimentary formations. Predicting mass movement is challenging because of its episodic and spatially, discontinuous occurrence. Landslides in mountain terrain are characterized as widespread, highly mobile and have a long duration of activity. We developed a 3-D model for landslide susceptibility using Geographic Information Systems Technology (GIST). The study area encompasses eight USGS quadrangles: Ridgway, Dallas, Mount Sneffels, Ouray, Telluride, Ironton, Ophir and Silverton. Fieldwork consisted of field reconnaissance mapping at 1:5,000 focusing on surficial geomorphology. Field mapping was used to identify potential locations, which then received additional onsite investigation and photographic documentation of features indicative of slope failure. A GIS module was created using seven terrain spatial databases: geology, surficial geomorphology (digitized), slope aspect, slope angle, vegetation, soils and distance to infrastructure to map risk. The GIS database will help determine risk zonation for the study area. Correlations between terrain parameters leading to slope failure were determined through the GIS module. This 3-D model will provide a spatial perspective of the landscape to

  12. 3D topography measurements on correlation cells—a new approach to forensic ballistics identifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, John; Chu, Wei; Tong, Mingsi; Soons, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Based on three-dimensional (3D) topography measurements on correlation cells, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed the ‘NIST Ballistics Identification System (NBIS)’ aimed at accurate ballistics identifications and fast ballistics evidence searches. The 3D topographies are divided into arrays of correlation cells to identify ‘valid correlation areas’ and eliminate ‘invalid correlation areas’ from the matching and identification procedure. A ‘congruent matching cells’ (CMC)’ method using three types of identification parameters of the paired correlation cells (cross correlation function maximum CCFmax, spatial registration position in x-y and registration angle θ) is used for high accuracy ballistics identifications. ‘Synchronous processing’ is proposed for correlating multiple cell pairs at the same time to increase the correlation speed. The proposed NBIS can be used for correlations of both geometrical topographies and optical intensity images. All the correlation parameters and algorithms are in the public domain and subject to open tests. An error rate reporting procedure has been developed that can greatly add to the scientific support for the firearm and toolmark identification specialty, and give confidence to the trier of fact in court proceedings. The NBIS is engineered to employ transparent identification parameters and criteria, statistical models and correlation algorithms. In this way, interoperability between different ballistics identification systems can be more easily achieved. This interoperability will make the NBIS suitable for ballistics identifications and evidence searches with large national databases, such as the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network in the United States.

  13. 5D Modelling: An Efficient Approach for Creating Spatiotemporal Predictive 3D Maps of Large-Scale Cultural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulamis, A.; Doulamis, N.; Ioannidis, C.; Chrysouli, C.; Grammalidis, N.; Dimitropoulos, K.; Potsiou, C.; Stathopoulou, E.-K.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    Outdoor large-scale cultural sites are mostly sensitive to environmental, natural and human made factors, implying an imminent need for a spatio-temporal assessment to identify regions of potential cultural interest (material degradation, structuring, conservation). On the other hand, in Cultural Heritage research quite different actors are involved (archaeologists, curators, conservators, simple users) each of diverse needs. All these statements advocate that a 5D modelling (3D geometry plus time plus levels of details) is ideally required for preservation and assessment of outdoor large scale cultural sites, which is currently implemented as a simple aggregation of 3D digital models at different time and levels of details. The main bottleneck of such an approach is its complexity, making 5D modelling impossible to be validated in real life conditions. In this paper, a cost effective and affordable framework for 5D modelling is proposed based on a spatial-temporal dependent aggregation of 3D digital models, by incorporating a predictive assessment procedure to indicate which regions (surfaces) of an object should be reconstructed at higher levels of details at next time instances and which at lower ones. In this way, dynamic change history maps are created, indicating spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Using these maps, predictive assessment can be made, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 5D Digital Cultural Heritage Model (5D-DCHM) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework, which also allows the description of additional semantic metadata information. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 5D-DCHM geometry and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCity

  14. Novel 3D Approach to Flare Modeling via Interactive IDL Widget Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, and soon-to-be, available sophisticated 3D models of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares require a new level of user-friendly visualization and analysis tools allowing quick and easy adjustment of the model parameters and computation of realistic radiation patterns (images, spectra, polarization, etc). We report the current state of the art of these tools in development, already proved to be highly efficient for the direct flare modeling. We present an interactive IDL widget application intended to provide a flexible tool that allows the user to generate spatially resolved radio and X-ray spectra. The object-based architecture of this application provides full interaction with imported 3D magnetic field models (e.g., from an extrapolation) that may be embedded in a global coronal model. Various tools provided allow users to explore the magnetic connectivity of the model by generating magnetic field lines originating in user-specified volume positions. Such lines may serve as reference lines for creating magnetic flux tubes, which are further populated with user-defined analytical thermal/non thermal particle distribution models. By default, the application integrates IDL callable DLL and Shared libraries containing fast GS emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++ and soft and hard X-ray codes developed in IDL. However, the interactive interface allows interchanging these default libraries with any user-defined IDL or external callable codes designed to solve the radiation transfer equation in the same or other wavelength ranges of interest. To illustrate the tool capacity and generality, we present a step-by-step real-time computation of microwave and X-ray images from realistic magnetic structures obtained from a magnetic field extrapolation preceding a real event, and compare them with the actual imaging data obtained by NORH and RHESSI instruments. We discuss further anticipated developments of the tools needed to accommodate

  15. Unequal-period combination approach of gray code and phase-shifting for 3-D visual measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Xiaoming; Wu, Haibin

    2016-09-01

    Combination of Gray code and phase-shifting is the most practical and advanced approach for the structured light 3-D measurement so far, which is able to measure objects with complex and discontinuous surface. However, for the traditional combination of the Gray code and phase-shifting, the captured Gray code images are not always sharp cut-off in the black-white conversion boundaries, which may lead to wrong decoding analog code orders. Moreover, during the actual measurement, there also exists local decoding error for the wrapped analog code obtained with the phase-shifting approach. Therefore, for the traditional approach, the wrong analog code orders and the local decoding errors will consequently introduce the errors which are equivalent to a fringe period when the analog code is unwrapped. In order to avoid one-fringe period errors, we propose an approach which combines Gray code with phase-shifting according to unequal period. With theoretical analysis, we build the measurement model of the proposed approach, determine the applicable condition and optimize the Gray code encoding period and phase-shifting fringe period. The experimental results verify that the proposed approach can offer a reliable unwrapped analog code, which can be used in 3-D shape measurement.

  16. A group center overlap based approach for "3D QSAR" studies on TIBO derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sapre, Nitin S; Gupta, Swagata; Pancholi, Nilanjana; Sapre, Neelima

    2009-04-30

    Current challenges in drug designing and lead optimization has reached a bottle neck where the main onus lies on rigorous validation to afford robust and predictive models. In the present study, we have suggested that predictive structure-activity relationship (SAR) models based on robust statistical analyses can serve as effective screening tools for large volume of compounds present either in chemical databases or in virtual libraries. 3D descriptors derived from the similarity-based alignment of molecules with respect to group center overlap from each individual template point and other "alignment averaged," but significant descriptors (ClogP, molar refractivity, connolly accessible area) were used to generate QSAR models. The results indicated that the artificial neural network method (r(2) = 0.902) proved to be superior to the multiple linear regression method (r(2) = 0.810). Cross validation of the models with an external set was reasonably satisfactory. Screening PubChem compound database based on the models obtained, yielded 14 newer modified compounds belonging to the TIBO class of inhibitors, as well as, two novel scaffolds, with enhanced binding efficacy as hits. These hits may be targeted toward potent lead-optimization and help in designing and synthesizing new compounds with potential therapeutic utility. PMID:18785154

  17. A quasi-Monte Carlo approach to efficient 3-D migration: Field data test

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Chen, J.; Schuster, G.T.; Smith, B.A.

    1999-10-01

    The quasi-Monte Carlo migration algorithm is applied to a 3-D seismic data set from West Texas. The field data were finely sampled at approximately 220-ft intervals in the in-line direction but were sampled coarsely at approximately 1,320-ft intervals in the cross-line direction. The traces at the quasi-Monte Carlo points were obtained by an interpolation of the regularly sampled traces. The subsampled traces at the quasi-Monte Carlo points were migrated, and the resulting images were compared to those obtained by migrating both regular and uniform grids of traces. Results show that, consistent with theory, the quasi-Monte Carlo migration images contain fewer migration aliasing artifacts than the regular or uniform grid images. For these data, quasi-Monte Carlo migration apparently requires fewer than half the number of the traces needed by regular-grid or uniform-grid migration to give images of comparable quality. These results agree with related migration tests on synthetic data computed for point scatterer models. Results suggest that better migration images might result from data recorded on a coarse quasi-random grid compared to regular or uniform coarse grids.

  18. Automated Analysis of Barley Organs Using 3D Laser Scanning: An Approach for High Throughput Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R2 = 0.99 for the leaf area and R2 = 0.98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored. PMID:25029283

  19. A Chemical Approach to 3-D Lithographic Patterning of Si and GeNanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yi, D.O.; Liao, C.Y.; Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Robinson, J.T.; Dubon, O.D.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-12-12

    Ion implantation into silica followed by thermal annealingis an established growth method for Si and Ge nanocrystals. Wedemonstrate that growth of Group IV semiconductor nanocrystals can besuppressed by co-implantation of oxygen prior to annealing. For Sinanocrystals, at low Si/O dose ratios, oxygen co-implantation leads to areduction of the average nanocrystal size and a blue-shift of thephotoluminescence emission energy. For both Si and Ge nanocrystals, atlarger Si/O or Ge/O dose ratios, the implanted specie is oxidized andnanocrystals do not form. This chemical deactivation was utilized toachieve patterned growth of Si and Ge nanocrystals. Si was implanted intoa thin SiO2 film on a Si substrate followed by oxygen implantationthrough an electron beam lithographically defined stencil mask. Thermalannealing of the co-implanted structure yields two-dimensionallypatterned growth of Si nanocrystals under the masked regions. We applieda previously developed process to obtain exposed nanocrystals byselective HF etching of the silica matrix to these patterned structures.Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of etched structures revealed that exposednanocrystals are not laterally displaced from their original positionsduring the etching process. Therefore, this process provides a means ofachieving patterned structures of exposed nanocrystals. The possibilitiesfor scaling this chemical-based lithography process to smaller featuresand for extending it to 3-D patterning is discussed.

  20. 3D template fabrication process for the dual damascene NIL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Resnick, Douglas; Sailer, Holger; Thompson, Ecron

    2007-05-01

    NIL technique enables an easy replication of three dimensional patterns. Combined with a UV printable low-k material the NIL lithography can dramatically simplify the dual damascene process. Goal of this work was to develop a template process scheme which enables the generation of high resolution pillars on top of corresponding lines for direct printing of later vias and metal lines. The process flow is based on conventional 6025 photomask blanks. Exposure was done on a variable shaped e-beam writer Vistec SB350 using a sample of an advanced negative tone CAR and Fujifilm pCAR FEP171 for the first and the second layer, respectively. Chrome and quartz etching was accomplished in an Oerlikon mask etcher Gen III and Gen IV. Assessment of the developed template process was done in terms of overlay accuracy, feature profile and resolution capability depending on aspect ratio and line duty cycle. Finally the printability of 3D templates fabricated according the developed process scheme was proved.

  1. A thermographic approach for surface crack depth evaluation through 3D finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, Mohammed; PV, Nithin; Ravindran, Parag; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    Laser Thermography has been reported earlier by several researchers as a tool for detecting surface breaking cracks in metals. A high energy laser (pulsed Nd-YAG) was used to produce a highly localized thermal spot from which heat diffuses (predominantly) in the radial direction. The crack that is perpendicular to the surface and close to this thermal spot will perturb the lateral heat flow and this disturbance can be observed by an IR camera. The laser spot is then scanned over a region to map the crack; this allows remote imaging of crack morphology even in elevated temperatures. The present study involves a 3D finite element simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics as a tool to simulate the thermal flow from a pulsed laser source in the proximity of a crack. The modeling helped to understand the various parameters affecting the thermal images of laser heated spots. The influence of depth of the crack on temperature changes across the crack and the relationship between crack depth and temperature changes due to the crack was simulated and subsequently validated experimentally.

  2. Stage acoustics for musicians: A multidimensional approach using 3D ambisonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Anne

    In this research, a method was outlined and tested for the use of 3D Ambisonic technology to inform stage acoustics research and design. Stage acoustics for musicians as a field has yet to benefit from recent advancements in auralization and spatial acoustic analysis. This research attempts to address common issues in stage acoustics: subjective requirements for performers in relation to feelings of support, quality of sound, and ease of ensemble playing in relation to measurable, objective characteristics that can be used to design better stage enclosures. While these issues have been addressed in previous work, this research attempts to use technological advancements to improve the resolution and realism of the testing and analysis procedures. Advancements include measurement of spatial impulse responses using a spherical microphone array, higher-order ambisonic encoding and playback for real-time performer auralization, high-resolution spatial beamforming for analysis of onstage impulse responses, and multidimensional scaling procedures to determine subjective musician preferences. The methodology for implementing these technologies into stage acoustics research is outlined in this document and initial observations regarding implications for stage enclosure design are proposed. This research provides a robust method for measuring and analyzing performer experiences on multiple stages without the costly and time-intensive process of physically surveying orchestras on different stages, with increased repeatability while maintaining a high level of immersive realism and spatial resolution. Along with implications for physical design, this method provides possibilities for virtual teaching and rehearsal, parametric modeling and co-located performance.

  3. Openwebglobe 2: Visualization of Complex 3D-GEODATA in the (mobile) Webbrowser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, M.

    2016-06-01

    Providing worldwide high resolution data for virtual globes consists of compute and storage intense tasks for processing data. Furthermore, rendering complex 3D-Geodata, such as 3D-City models with an extremely high polygon count and a vast amount of textures at interactive framerates is still a very challenging task, especially on mobile devices. This paper presents an approach for processing, caching and serving massive geospatial data in a cloud-based environment for large scale, out-of-core, highly scalable 3D scene rendering on a web based virtual globe. Cloud computing is used for processing large amounts of geospatial data and also for providing 2D and 3D map data to a large amount of (mobile) web clients. In this paper the approach for processing, rendering and caching very large datasets in the currently developed virtual globe "OpenWebGlobe 2" is shown, which displays 3D-Geodata on nearly every device.

  4. Mathematical analysis of the accordion grating illusion: a differential geometry approach to introduce the 3D aperture problem.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Gori, Simone

    2011-12-01

    When an observer moves towards a square-wave grating display, a non-rigid distortion of the pattern occurs in which the stripes bulge and expand perpendicularly to their orientation; these effects reverse when the observer moves away. Such distortions present a new problem beyond the classical aperture problem faced by visual motion detectors, one we describe as a 3D aperture problem as it incorporates depth signals. We applied differential geometry to obtain a closed form solution to characterize the fluid distortion of the stripes. Our solution replicates the perceptual distortions and enabled us to design a nulling experiment to distinguish our 3D aperture solution from other candidate mechanisms (see Gori et al. (in this issue)). We suggest that our approach may generalize to other motion illusions visible in 2D displays. PMID:21782387

  5. Mathematical analysis of the accordion grating illusion: a differential geometry approach to introduce the 3D aperture problem.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Gori, Simone

    2011-12-01

    When an observer moves towards a square-wave grating display, a non-rigid distortion of the pattern occurs in which the stripes bulge and expand perpendicularly to their orientation; these effects reverse when the observer moves away. Such distortions present a new problem beyond the classical aperture problem faced by visual motion detectors, one we describe as a 3D aperture problem as it incorporates depth signals. We applied differential geometry to obtain a closed form solution to characterize the fluid distortion of the stripes. Our solution replicates the perceptual distortions and enabled us to design a nulling experiment to distinguish our 3D aperture solution from other candidate mechanisms (see Gori et al. (in this issue)). We suggest that our approach may generalize to other motion illusions visible in 2D displays.

  6. A 3-D skeleton model & SEMG approach for integrated neck and low back pain analysis test batteries.

    PubMed

    D'amico, M; D'amico, G; Frascarello, M; Paniccia, M; Roncoletta, P; Vallasciani, M

    2008-01-01

    Since several years our group is working on a project to merge into a full 3D reliable and detailed human skeleton representation various segmental biomechanical models presented in literature. The obtained 3D skeleton model is fully parametric and can be fitted to each subject anthropometric characteristics. A non-ionising approach based on 3D opto-electronic measurements of body landmarks labelled by passive markers has been chosen to build the 3D parametric biomechanical skeleton model. A special focus has been devoted to identify and model the spine with a correct degree of accuracy and reliability. In spine pain related pathologies is of major importance the evaluation of functional limitations associated. This requires to integrate morphological characteristics with information deriving from other measurements devices as force platform data, surface EMG, foot pressure maps. The aim of this study is to present a multi-factorial approach which integrates rachis morphological characteristics with full skeleton kinematic, dynamic and SEMG measurements to quantify spine function and mobility in particular for neck and low back pain. A set of clinical-biomechanical tests have been implemented. Static posture characteristics are first evaluated. After that, patient is asked to perform specific motion test batteries in order to fully measure the whole ROMs (spine angles ranges and spine shape modifications) for Axial rotations, forward-backward flexion-extension, lateral bendings per each spine functional units (Skull and neck, thoracic and lumbar districts). During forward bending also a digital Schober test is performed. Such data are correlated to simultaneous SEMG muscle activities recording to investigate motor co-ordination/dysfunction as well as the presence absence of flexion-relaxation phenomena associated to pain.

  7. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 ‑ 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  8. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 - 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  9. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    the L 2 distance, in 2D and 3D contexts.

  10. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2014-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. For a minor increase in temperature ΔTp < 175 K a subduction-collision style ensues which is largely similar to present day plate tectonics. For a moderate increase in ΔTp = 175-250 K subduction can still occur, however plates are strongly weakened and buckling, delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor style dripping of the plate is observed in addition. For higher temperatures ΔTp > 250 K no subduction can be observed anymore and tectonics is dominated by delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions and a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a thermal anomaly in the bottom temperature boundary introduces a plume. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic over dacitic to granitic depending on its source rock. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of new formed crust which in turn influences the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped plutons of mafic or felsic composition can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of upper crust, volcanics and sediments are formed. These structures look similar to, for example, the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton

  11. Analyzing Remodeling of Cardiac Tissue: A Comprehensive Approach Based on Confocal Microscopy and 3D Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Thomas; Edelmann, J-C; Sachse, Frank B

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural characterization of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease is a crucial step in many basic research projects. We present a comprehensive approach for three-dimensional characterization of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. We developed a compression-free mounting method as well as labeling and imaging protocols that facilitate acquisition of three-dimensional image stacks with scanning confocal microscopy. We evaluated the approach with normal and infarcted ventricular tissue. We used the acquired image stacks for segmentation, quantitative analysis and visualization of important tissue components. In contrast to conventional mounting, compression-free mounting preserved cell shapes, capillary lumens and extracellular laminas. Furthermore, the new approach and imaging protocols resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios at depths up to 60 µm. This allowed extensive analyzes revealing major differences in volume fractions and distribution of cardiomyocytes, blood vessels, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and extracellular space in control vs. infarct border zone. Our results show that the developed approach yields comprehensive data on microstructure of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease. In contrast to other approaches, it allows quantitative assessment of all major tissue components. Furthermore, we suggest that the approach will provide important data for physiological models of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. PMID:26399990

  12. Analyzing Remodeling of Cardiac Tissue: A Comprehensive Approach Based on Confocal Microscopy and 3D Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Thomas; Edelmann, J-C; Sachse, Frank B

    2016-05-01

    Microstructural characterization of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease is a crucial step in many basic research projects. We present a comprehensive approach for three-dimensional characterization of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale. We developed a compression-free mounting method as well as labeling and imaging protocols that facilitate acquisition of three-dimensional image stacks with scanning confocal microscopy. We evaluated the approach with normal and infarcted ventricular tissue. We used the acquired image stacks for segmentation, quantitative analysis and visualization of important tissue components. In contrast to conventional mounting, compression-free mounting preserved cell shapes, capillary lumens and extracellular laminas. Furthermore, the new approach and imaging protocols resulted in high signal-to-noise ratios at depths up to 60 µm. This allowed extensive analyzes revealing major differences in volume fractions and distribution of cardiomyocytes, blood vessels, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and extracellular space in control vs. infarct border zone. Our results show that the developed approach yields comprehensive data on microstructure of cardiac tissue and its remodeling in disease. In contrast to other approaches, it allows quantitative assessment of all major tissue components. Furthermore, we suggest that the approach will provide important data for physiological models of cardiac tissue at the submicrometer scale.

  13. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  14. A general approach for time-supersampling of 3D-PIV data by the vortex-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarano, Fulvio; Schneiders, Jan; Dwight, Richard; Aerospace Engineering/Aerodynamics Team

    2013-11-01

    Advancements of tomographic PIV [1] have led into 3D time-resolved experiments to study the dynamical evolution of 3D turbulent flows [2]. The known bottleneck of Tomo-PIV is the high laser power required to illuminate large volumes in airflows, which becomes critical beyond 10 kHz. Time-super-sampling is an approach to reduce the sampling rate, proven for frozen turbulence where the advection model yields a significant increase of temporal resolution [3]. Instead, in separated flows, the advection principle yields unacceptable distortions. The use of Navier-Stokes numerical calculations with the vortex-in-cell (VIC) method is proposed herein. The assumption is made of inviscid incompressible flow [4]. The spatial-resolution of the data is exploited to increase the temporal resolution. The dynamical evolution of the vorticity and velocity field between subsequent snapshots in the 3D domain is numerically evaluated. The verification with fully time resolved data of a circular jet indicates a substantial increase of temporal resolution. Interestingly, data sampled below the Nyquist limit could be reconstructed faithfully, indicating the potential of VIC in alleviating requirements on PIV measurement rate. Work supported by the European Research Council grant 202887.

  15. A Survey on Model Based Approaches for 2D and 3D Visual Human Pose Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Sala, Xavier; Escalera, Sergio; Angulo, Cecilio; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Human Pose Recovery has been studied in the field of Computer Vision for the last 40 years. Several approaches have been reported, and significant improvements have been obtained in both data representation and model design. However, the problem of Human Pose Recovery in uncontrolled environments is far from being solved. In this paper, we define a general taxonomy to group model based approaches for Human Pose Recovery, which is composed of five main modules: appearance, viewpoint, spatial relations, temporal consistence, and behavior. Subsequently, a methodological comparison is performed following the proposed taxonomy, evaluating current SoA approaches in the aforementioned five group categories. As a result of this comparison, we discuss the main advantages and drawbacks of the reviewed literature. PMID:24594613

  16. Fully automated 3D prostate central gland segmentation in MR images: a LOGISMOS based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yin; Fotin, Sergei V.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2012-02-01

    One widely accepted classification of a prostate is by a central gland (CG) and a peripheral zone (PZ). In some clinical applications, separating CG and PZ from the whole prostate is useful. For instance, in prostate cancer detection, radiologist wants to know in which zone the cancer occurs. Another application is for multiparametric MR tissue characterization. In prostate T2 MR images, due to the high intensity variation between CG and PZ, automated differentiation of CG and PZ is difficult. Previously, we developed an automated prostate boundary segmentation system, which tested on large datasets and showed good performance. Using the results of the pre-segmented prostate boundary, in this paper, we proposed an automated CG segmentation algorithm based on Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation of Multiple Objects and Surfaces (LOGISMOS). The designed LOGISMOS model contained both shape and topology information during deformation. We generated graph cost by training classifiers and used coarse-to-fine search. The LOGISMOS framework guarantees optimal solution regarding to cost and shape constraint. A five-fold cross-validation approach was applied to training dataset containing 261 images to optimize the system performance and compare with a voxel classification based reference approach. After the best parameter settings were found, the system was tested on a dataset containing another 261 images. The mean DSC of 0.81 for the test set indicates that our approach is promising for automated CG segmentation. Running time for the system is about 15 seconds.

  17. A new approach for magnetic curves in 3D Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkurt, Zehra Gök, Ismail Yaylı, Yusuf Ekmekci, F. Nejat

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic field is defined by the property that its divergence is zero in a three-dimensional oriented Riemannian manifold. Each magnetic field generates a magnetic flow whose trajectories are curves called as magnetic curves. In this paper, we give a new variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with the Killing magnetic field in a three-dimensional oriented Riemann manifold, (M{sup 3}, g). And then, we investigate the trajectories of the magnetic fields called as N-magnetic and B-magnetic curves.

  18. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte–tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  19. Separation efficiency of a hydrodynamic separator using a 3D computational fluid dynamics multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Vivien; Dufresne, Matthieu; Vazquez, Jose; Fischer, Martin; Morin, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict the solid separation efficiency of a hydrodynamic separator. The numerical difficulty concerns the discretization of the geometry to simulate both the global behavior and the local phenomena that occur near the screen. In this context, a CFD multiscale approach was used: a global model (at the scale of the device) is used to observe the hydrodynamic behavior within the device; a local model (portion of the screen) is used to determine the local phenomena that occur near the screen. The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach was used to model the particle trajectories in both models. The global model shows the influence of the particles' characteristics on the trapping efficiency. A high density favors the sedimentation. In contrast, particles with small densities (1,040 kg/m(3)) are steered by the hydrodynamic behavior and can potentially be trapped by the separator. The use of the local model allows us to observe the particle trajectories near the screen. A comparison between two types of screens (perforated plate vs expanded metal) highlights the turbulent effects created by the shape of the screen.

  20. CROSS DRIVE: A New Interactive and Immersive Approach for Exploring 3D Time-Dependent Mars Atmospheric Data in Distributed Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerndt, Andreas M.; Engelke, Wito; Giuranna, Marco; Vandaele, Ann C.; Neary, Lori; Aoki, Shohei; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Garcia, Arturo; Fernando, Terrence; Roberts, David; CROSS DRIVE Team

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric phenomena of Mars can be highly dynamic and have daily and seasonal variations. Planetary-scale wavelike disturbances, for example, are frequently observed in Mars' polar winter atmosphere. Possible sources of the wave activity were suggested to be dynamical instabilities and quasi-stationary planetary waves, i.e. waves that arise predominantly via zonally asymmetric surface properties. For a comprehensive understanding of these phenomena, single layers of altitude have to be analyzed carefully and relations between different atmospheric quantities and interaction with the surface of Mars have to be considered. The CROSS DRIVE project tries to address the presentation of those data with a global view by means of virtual reality techniques. Complex orbiter data from spectrometer and observation data from Earth are combined with global circulation models and high-resolution terrain data and images available from Mars Express or MRO instruments. Scientists can interactively extract features from those dataset and can change visualization parameters in real-time in order to emphasize findings. Stereoscopic views allow for perception of the actual 3D behavior of Mars's atmosphere. A very important feature of the visualization system is the possibility to connect distributed workspaces together. This enables discussions between distributed working groups. The workspace can scale from virtual reality systems to expert desktop applications to web-based project portals. If multiple virtual environments are connected, the 3D position of each individual user is captured and used to depict the scientist as an avatar in the virtual world. The appearance of the avatar can also scale from simple annotations to complex avatars using tele-presence technology to reconstruct the users in 3D. Any change of the feature set (annotations, cutplanes, volume rendering, etc.) within the VR is immediately exchanged between all connected users. This allows that everybody is always

  1. High-throughput morphometric analysis of pulmonary airways in MSCT via a mixed 3D/2D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, Margarete; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Pr"teux, Françoise; Grenier, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    Asthma and COPD are complex airway diseases with an increased incidence estimated for the next decade. Today, the mechanisms and relationships between airway structure/physiology and the clinical phenotype and genotype are not completely understood. We thus lack the tools to predict disease progression or therapeutic responses. One of the main causes is our limited ability to assess the complexity of airway diseases in large populations of patients with appropriate controls. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) imaging opened the way to the non-invasive assessment of airway physiology and structure, but the use of such technology in large cohorts requires a high degree of automation of the measurements. This paper develops an investigation framework and the associated image quantification tools for high-throughput analysis of airways in MSCT. A mixed approach is proposed, combining 3D and cross-section measurements of the airway tree where the user-interaction is limited to the choice of the desired analysis patterns. Such approach relies on the fully-automated segmentation of the 3D airway tree, caliber estimation and visualization based on morphologic granulometry, central axis computation and tree segment selection, cross-section morphometry of airway lumen and wall, and bronchus longitudinal shape analysis for stenosis/bronciectasis detection and measure validation. The developed methodology has been successfully applied to a cohort of 96 patients from a multi-center clinical study of asthma control in moderate and persistent asthma.

  2. A new approach to the learning of dental morphology, function, and esthetics: the "2D-3D-4D" concept.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    A concept is proposed for an approach to the learning of dental morphology and occlusion. Dental morphology, function, and esthetics should reflect a fundamental driving force, that is, the faithful emulation of the natural dentition's structural (functional, mechanical) and esthetic properties. The innovative part of the proposed approach is the emphasis on visual arts and the 2D-3D-4D aspect that starts with drawing (2D/3D) and continues with partial wax-up exercises that are followed by labial waxups and, finally, full wax-ups using innovative technical aids (electric waxers, prefabricated wax patterns, etc). Finally, the concept of layers (4D) and the histoanatomy of enamel/dentin and optical depth are taught through the realization of layering exercises (advanced acrylic mock-ups and composite resin restorations). All these techniques and materials are not only used to teach morphology and occlusion, but also constitute essential tools that will be of significant use for the student dentists and dental technologists in their future daily practice. The clinical significance of the presented methodology should allow not only students but also practicing dentists and dental technologists to help their youngest collaborators to develop a deep sense of morphology, function, and esthetics.

  3. One-eyed stereo: a general approach to modeling 3-d scene geometry.

    PubMed

    Strat, T M; Fischler, M A

    1986-06-01

    A single two-dimensional image is an ambiguous representation of the three-dimensional world¿many different scenes could have produced the same image¿yet the human visual system is ex-tremely successful at recovering a qualitatively correct depth model from this type of representation. Workers in the field of computational vision have devised a number of distinct schemes that attempt to emulate this human capability; these schemes are collectively known as ``shape from...'' methods (e.g., shape from shading, shape from texture, or shape from contour). In this paper we contend that the distinct assumptions made in each of these schemes is tantamount to providing a second (virtual) image of the original scene, and that each of these approaches can be translated into a conventional stereo formalism. In particular, we show that it is frequently possible to structure the problem as one of recovering depth from a stereo pair consisting of the supplied perspective image (the original image) and an hypothesized orthographic image (the virtual image). We present a new algorithm of the form required to accomplish this type of stereo reconstruction task. PMID:21869368

  4. Electrical conductivity of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes: a 3D multiscale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Zbyrad, Paulina; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Wiatr, Kazimierz; Packo, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Remarkable electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have lead to increased interest in studying CNT- based devices. Many of current researches are devoted to using all kinds of carbon nanomaterials in the con- struction of sensory elements. One of the most common applications is the development of high performance, large scale sensors. Due to the remarkable conductivity of CNT's such devices represent very high sensitivity. However, there are no sufficient tools for studying and designing such sensors. The main objective of this paper is to develop and validate a multiscale numerical model for a carbon nanotubes based sensor. The device utilises the change of electrical conductivity of a nanocomposite material under applied deformation. The nanocomposite consists of a number of CNTs dispersed in polymer matrix. The paper is devoted to the analysis of the impact of spatial distribution of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix on electrical conductivity of the sensor. One of key elements is also to examine the impact of strain on electric charge ow in such anisotropic composite structures. In the following work a multiscale electro-mechanical model for CNT - based nanocomposites is proposed. The model comprises of two length scales, namely the meso- and the macro-scale for mechanical and electrical domains. The approach allows for evaluation of macro-scale mechanical response of a strain sensor. Electrical properties of polymeric material with certain CNT fractions were derived considering electrical properties of CNTs, their contact and the tunnelling effect.

  5. Urban Energy Simulation Based on 3d City Models: a Service-Oriented Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wate, P.; Rodrigues, P.; Duminil, E.; Coors, V.

    2016-09-01

    Recent advancements in technology has led to the development of sophisticated software tools revitalizing growth in different domains. Taking advantage of this trend, urban energy domain have developed several compute intensive physical and data driven models. These models are used in various distinct simulation softwares to simulate the whole life-cycle of energy flow in cities from supply, distribution, conversion, storage and consumption. Since some simulation software target a specific energy system, it is necessary to integrate them to predict present and future urban energy needs. However, a key drawback is that, these tools are not compatible with each other as they use custom or propriety formats. Furthermore, they are designed as desktop applications and cannot be easily integrated with third-party tools (open source or commercial). Thereby, missing out on potential model functionalities which are required for sustainable urban energy management. In this paper, we propose a solution based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Our approach relies on open interfaces to offer flexible integration of modelling and computational functionality as loosely coupled distributed services.

  6. A robust and efficient approach to detect 3D rectal tubes from CT colonography

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoyun; Slabaugh, Greg

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The rectal tube (RT) is a common source of false positives (FPs) in computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for CT colonography. A robust and efficient detection of RT can improve CAD performance by eliminating such ''obvious'' FPs and increase radiologists' confidence in CAD. Methods: In this paper, we present a novel and robust bottom-up approach to detect the RT. Probabilistic models, trained using kernel density estimation on simple low-level features, are employed to rank and select the most likely RT tube candidate on each axial slice. Then, a shape model, robustly estimated using random sample consensus (RANSAC), infers the global RT path from the selected local detections. Subimages around the RT path are projected into a subspace formed from training subimages of the RT. A quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) provides a classification of a subimage as RT or non-RT based on the projection. Finally, a bottom-top clustering method is proposed to merge the classification predictions together to locate the tip position of the RT. Results: Our method is validated using a diverse database, including data from five hospitals. On a testing data with 21 patients (42 volumes), 99.5% of annotated RT paths have been successfully detected. Evaluated with CAD, 98.4% of FPs caused by the RT have been detected and removed without any loss of sensitivity. Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates a high detection rate of the RT path, and when tested in a CAD system, reduces FPs caused by the RT without the loss of sensitivity.

  7. Transferring Multi-Scale Approaches from 3d City Modeling to Ifc-Based Tunnel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrmann, A.; Kolbe, T. H.; Donaubauer, A.; Steuer, H.; Jubierre, J. R.

    2013-09-01

    A multi-scale representation of the built environment is required to provide information with the adequate level of detail (LoD) for different use cases and objectives. This applies not only to the visualization of city and building models, but in particular to their use in the context of planning and analysis tasks. While in the field of Geographic Information Systems, the handling of multi-scale representations is well established and understood, no formal approaches for incorporating multi-scale methods exist in the field of Building Information Modeling (BIM) so far. However, these concepts are much needed to better support highly dynamic planning processes that make use of very rough information about the facility under design in the early stages and provide increasingly detailed and fine-grained information in later stages. To meet these demands, this paper presents a comprehensive concept for incorporating multi-scale representations with infrastructural building information models, with a particular focus on the representation of shield tunnels. Based on a detailed analysis of the data modeling methods used in CityGML for capturing multiscale representations and the requirements present in the context of infrastructure planning projects, we discuss potential extensions to the BIM data model Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Particular emphasis is put on providing means for preserving the consistency of the representation across the different Levels-of-Detail (LoD). To this end we make use of a procedural geometry description which makes it possible to define explicit dependencies between geometric entities on different LoDs. The modification of an object on a coarse level consequently results in an automated update of all dependent objects on the finer levels. Finally we discuss the transformation of the IFC-based multi-scale tunnel model into a CityGML compliant tunnel representation.

  8. Quantum rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  9. The AERO system: a 3D-like approach for recording gene expression patterns in the whole mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hirohito; Kubo, Atsushi; Uchibe, Kenta; Hashimoto, Megumi; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Takada, Shuji; Mitsuoka, Kazuhiko; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html). To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases. PMID:24146773

  10. Sliding slice: A novel approach for high accuracy and automatic 3D localization of seeds from CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tubic, Dragan; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-01-01

    We present a conceptually novel principle for 3D reconstruction of prostate seed implants. Unlike existing methods for implant reconstruction, the proposed algorithm uses raw CT data (sinograms) instead of reconstructed CT slices. Using raw CT data solves several inevitable problems related to the reconstruction from CT slices. First, the sinograms are not affected by reconstruction artifacts in the presence of metallic objects and seeds in the patient body. Second, the scanning axis is not undersampled as in the case of CT slices; as a matter of fact the scanning axis is the most densely sampled and each seed is typically represented by several hundred samples. Moreover, the shape of a single seed in a sinogram can be modeled exactly, thus facilitating the detection. All this allows very accurate 3D reconstruction of both position and the orientation of the seeds. Preliminary results indicate that the seed position can be estimated with 0.15 mm accuracy (average), while the orientation estimate accuracy is within 3 deg. on average. Although the main contribution of the paper is to present a new principle of reconstruction, a preliminary implementation is also presented as a proof of concept. The implemented algorithm has been tested on a phantom and the obtained results are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  11. Target Based Designing of Anthracenone Derivatives as Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Agents: 3D QSAR and Docking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Moawiah M.; Bakht, Mohammed Afroz; Malhotra, Manav; Ganaie, Majid A.

    2014-01-01

    Novel anthracenone derivatives were designed through in silico studies including 3D QSAR, pharmacophore mapping, and molecular docking approaches. Tubulin protein was explored for the residues imperative for activity by analyzing the binding pattern of colchicine and selected compounds of anthracenone derivatives in the active domain. The docking methodology applied in the study was first validated by comparative evaluation of the predicted and experimental inhibitory activity. Furthermore, the essential features responsible for the activity were established by carrying out pharmacophore mapping studies. 3D QSAR studies were carried out for a series of 1,5- and 1,8-disubstituted10-benzylidene-10H-anthracen-9-ones and 10-(2-oxo-2-phenylethylidene)-10H-anthracen-9-one derivatives for their antiproliferation activity. Based on the pattern recognition studies obtained from QSAR results, ten novel compounds were designed and docked in the active domain of tubulin protein. One of the novel designed compounds “N1” exhibited binding energy −9.69 kcal/mol and predicted Ki 78.32 nM which was found to be better than colchicine. PMID:25383219

  12. 3d-modelling workflows for trans-nationally shared geological models - first approaches from the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupf, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    To meet the EU's ambitious targets for carbon emission reduction, renewable energy production has to be strongly upgraded and made more efficient for grid energy storage. Alpine Foreland Basins feature a unique geological inventory which can contribute substantially to tackle these challenges. They offer a geothermal potential and storage capacity for compressed air, as well as space for underground storage of CO2. Exploiting these natural subsurface resources will strongly compete with existing oil and gas claims and groundwater issues. The project GeoMol will provide consistent 3-dimensional subsurface information about the Alpine Foreland Basins based on a holistic and transnational approach. Core of the project GeoMol is a geological framework model for the entire Northern Molasse Basin, complemented by five detailed models in pilot areas, also in the Po Basin, which are dedicated to specific questions of subsurface use. The models will consist of up to 13 litho-stratigraphic horizons ranging from the Cenozoic basin fill down to Mesozoic and late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and the crystalline basement. More than 5000 wells and 28 000 km seismic lines serve as input data sets for the geological subsurface model. The data have multiple sources and various acquisition dates, and their interpretations have gone through several paradigm changes. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the data with regards to technical parameters and content prior to further analysis (cf. Capar et al. 2013, EGU2013-5349). Each partner will build its own geological subsurface model with different software solutions for seismic interpretation and 3d-modelling. Therefore, 3d-modelling follows different software- and partner-specific workflows. One of the main challenges of the project is to ensure a seamlessly fitting framework model. It is necessary to define several milestones for cross border checks during the whole modelling process. Hence, the main input data set of the

  13. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, François

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3-D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and a experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to a state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function. PMID:24108711

  14. Genetic approach to reconstruct complex regional geological setting of the Baltic basin in 3D geological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovs, K.; Saks, T.; Ukass, J.; Jatnieks, J.

    2012-04-01

    Interpretation of geological structures in 3D geological models is a relatively new research topic that is already standardized in many geological branches. Due to its wide practical application, these models are indispensable and become one of the dominant interpretation methods in reducing geological uncertainties in many geology fields. Traditionally, geological concepts complement quantitative as much as qualitative data to obtain a model deemed acceptable, however, available data very often is insufficient and modeling methods primarily focus on spatial data but geological history usually is mostly neglected for the modeling of large sedimentary basins. A need to better integrate the long and often complex geological history and geological knowledge into modeling procedure is very acute to gain geological insight and improve the quality of geological models. During this research, 3D geological model of the Baltic basin (BB) was created. Because of its complex regional geological setting - wide range of the data sources with multiple scales, resolution and density as well as its various source formats, the study area provides a challenge for the 3D geological modeling. In order to create 3D regional geometrical model for the study area algorithmic genetic approach for model geometry reconstruction was applied. The genetic approach is based on the assumption that post-depositional deformation produce no significant change in sedimentary strata volume, assuming that the strata thickness and its length in a cross sectional plane remains unchanged except as a result of erosion. Assuming that the tectonic deformation occurred in sequential cycles and subsequent tectonic stage strata is separated by regional unconformity as is the case of the BB, there is an opportunity for algorithmic approach in reconstructing these conditions by sequentially reconstructing the layer original thickness. Layer thicknesses were sliced along fault lines, where applicable layer

  15. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper. PMID:23201976

  16. 3D Face Modeling Using the Multi-Deformable Method

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper. PMID:23201976

  17. Architecture of web services in the enhancement of real-time 3D video virtualization in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, Adedayo; Wang, Qi; Alcaraz-Calero, Jose M.; Grecos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to improving the application of 3D video rendering and streaming by jointly exploring and optimizing both cloud-based virtualization and web-based delivery. The proposed web service architecture firstly establishes a software virtualization layer based on QEMU (Quick Emulator), an open-source virtualization software that has been able to virtualize system components except for 3D rendering, which is still in its infancy. The architecture then explores the cloud environment to boost the speed of the rendering at the QEMU software virtualization layer. The capabilities and inherent limitations of Virgil 3D, which is one of the most advanced 3D virtual Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) available, are analyzed through benchmarking experiments and integrated into the architecture to further speed up the rendering. Experimental results are reported and analyzed to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach.

  18. A 3D clustering approach for point clouds to detect and quantify changes at a rock glacier front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Natan; Tonini, Marj; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) are extensively used in geomorphology to remotely-sense landforms and surfaces of any type and to derive digital elevation models (DEMs). Modern devices are able to collect many millions of points, so that working on the resulting dataset is often troublesome in terms of computational efforts. Indeed, it is not unusual that raw point clouds are filtered prior to DEM creation, so that only a subset of points is retained and the interpolation process becomes less of a burden. Whilst this procedure is in many cases necessary, it implicates a considerable loss of valuable information. First, and even without eliminating points, the common interpolation of points to a regular grid causes a loss of potentially useful detail. Second, it inevitably causes the transition from 3D information to only 2.5D data where each (x,y) pair must have a unique z-value. Vector-based DEMs (e.g. triangulated irregular networks) partially mitigate these issues, but still require a set of parameters to be set and a considerable burden in terms of calculation and storage. Because of the reasons above, being able to perform geomorphological research directly on point clouds would be profitable. Here, we propose an approach to identify erosion and deposition patterns on a very active rock glacier front in the Swiss Alps to monitor sediment dynamics. The general aim is to set up a semiautomatic method to isolate mass movements using 3D-feature identification directly from LiDAR data. An ultra-long range LiDAR RIEGL VZ-6000 scanner was employed to acquire point clouds during three consecutive summers. In order to isolate single clusters of erosion and deposition we applied the Density-Based Scan Algorithm with Noise (DBSCAN), previously successfully employed by Tonini and Abellan (2014) in a similar case for rockfall detection. DBSCAN requires two input parameters, strongly influencing the number, shape and size of the detected clusters: the minimum number of

  19. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  20. Numerical Simulation of 3D Thermo-Elastic Fatigue Crack Growth Problems Using Coupled FE-EFG Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Himanshu; Singh, Akhilendra; Singh, Indra Vir

    2016-06-01

    In this work, finite element method (FEM) and element free Galerkin method (EFGM) are coupled for solving 3D crack domains subjected to cyclic thermal load of constant amplitude. Crack growth contours and fatigue life have been obtained for each of the considered numerical examples. Thermo-elastic problems are decoupled into thermal and elastic problems . Firstly, the unknown temperature field is obtained by solving heat conduction equation, then, it is used as the input load in the elastic problem to calculate the displacement and stress fields. The geometrical discontinuity across crack surface is modelled by extrinsically enriched EFGM and the remaining part of the domain is approximated by standard finite element method. At the crack interface, a ramp function based interpolation scheme has been implemented. This coupled approach combines the advantages of both EFGM and FEM. A linear successive crack increment approach is used to model crack growth. The growing crack surface is traced by level set function. Standard Paris law is used for life estimation of the three-dimensional crack models. Different cases of planar and non-planar crack problems have been solved and their results are compared with the results obtained using extended finite element method to check accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the coupled FE-EFG approach implemented in this study.

  1. Hierarchical Statistical 3D ' Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs: Drift-Diffusion, Hydrodynamic and Quantum Mechanical Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, A. R.; Slavcheva, G.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    When MOSFETs are scaled to deep submicron dimensions the discreteness and randomness of the dopant charges in the channel region introduces significant fluctuations in the device characteristics. This effect, predicted 20 year ago, has been confirmed experimentally and in simulation studies. The impact of the fluctuations on the functionality, yield, and reliability of the corresponding systems shifts the paradigm of the numerical device simulation. It becomes insufficient to simulate only one device representing one macroscopical design in a continuous charge approximation. An ensemble of macroscopically identical but microscopically different devices has to be characterized by simulation of statistically significant samples. The aims of the numerical simulations shift from predicting the characteristics of a single device with continuous doping towards estimating the mean values and the standard deviations of basic design parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, transconductance, drive current, etc. for the whole ensemble of 'atomistically' different devices in the system. It has to be pointed out that even the mean values obtained from 'atomistic' simulations are not identical to the values obtained from continuous doping simulations. In this paper we present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled decanano MOSFETs. A full scale 3D drift-diffusion'atomostic' simulation approach is first described and used for verification of the more economical, but also more restricted, options. To reduce the processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage we have developed a self-consistent option based on a thin slab solution of the current continuity equation only in the channel region. This is coupled to the Poisson's equation solution in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison with the full self-consistent solution. At low drain

  2. An approach for the calibration of a combined RGB-sensor and 3D-camera device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, M.

    2011-07-01

    The elds of application for 3d cameras are very dierent, because high image frequency and determination of 3d data. Often, 3d cameras are used for mobile robotic. They are used for obstacle detection or object recognition. So they also are interesting for applications in agriculture, in combination with mobile robots. Here, in addition to 3d data, there is often a necessity to get color information for each 3d point. Unfortunately, 3d cameras do not capture any color information. Therefore, an additional sensor is necessary, such as RGB plus possibly NIR. To combine data of two dierent sensors a reference to each other, via calibration, is important. This paper presents several calibration methods and discuss their accuracy potential. Based on a spatial resection, the algorithm determines the translation and rotation between the two sensors and the inner orientation of the used sensor.

  3. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  4. Automated 3D vascular segmentation in CT hepatic venography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Lucidarme, Olivier; Preteux, Francoise

    2005-08-01

    In the framework of preoperative evaluation of the hepatic venous anatomy in living-donor liver transplantation or oncologic rejections, this paper proposes an automated approach for the 3D segmentation of the liver vascular structure from 3D CT hepatic venography data. The developed segmentation approach takes into account the specificities of anatomical structures in terms of spatial location, connectivity and morphometric properties. It implements basic and advanced morphological operators (closing, geodesic dilation, gray-level reconstruction, sup-constrained connection cost) in mono- and multi-resolution filtering schemes in order to achieve an automated 3D reconstruction of the opacified hepatic vessels. A thorough investigation of the venous anatomy including morphometric parameter estimation is then possible via computer-vision 3D rendering, interaction and navigation capabilities.

  5. Modeling Semantic Emotion Space Using a 3D Hypercube-Projection: An Innovative Analytical Approach for the Psychology of Emotions.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Radek; Lačev, Alek; Balcar, Karel; Kuška, Martin; Tavel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm. The main goal was to map and project semantic emotion space in terms of mutual positions of various emotion prototypical categories. Participants (N = 187; 54.5% females) judged 16 discrete emotions in terms of valence, intensity, controllability and utility. The results revealed that these four dimensional input measures were uncorrelated. This implies that valence, intensity, controllability and utility represented clearly different qualities of discrete emotions in the judgments of the participants. Based on this data, we constructed a 3D hypercube-projection and compared it with various two-dimensional projections. This contrasting enabled us to detect several sources of bias when working with the traditional, two-dimensional analytical approach. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections revealed that the 2D models provided biased insights about how emotions are conceptually related to one another along multiple dimensions. The results of the present study point out the reductionist nature of the two-dimensional paradigm in the psychological theory of emotions and challenge the widely accepted circumplex model.

  6. Modeling Semantic Emotion Space Using a 3D Hypercube-Projection: An Innovative Analytical Approach for the Psychology of Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Radek; Lačev, Alek; Balcar, Karel; Kuška, Martin; Tavel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm. The main goal was to map and project semantic emotion space in terms of mutual positions of various emotion prototypical categories. Participants (N = 187; 54.5% females) judged 16 discrete emotions in terms of valence, intensity, controllability and utility. The results revealed that these four dimensional input measures were uncorrelated. This implies that valence, intensity, controllability and utility represented clearly different qualities of discrete emotions in the judgments of the participants. Based on this data, we constructed a 3D hypercube-projection and compared it with various two-dimensional projections. This contrasting enabled us to detect several sources of bias when working with the traditional, two-dimensional analytical approach. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections revealed that the 2D models provided biased insights about how emotions are conceptually related to one another along multiple dimensions. The results of the present study point out the reductionist nature of the two-dimensional paradigm in the psychological theory of emotions and challenge the widely accepted circumplex model. PMID:27148130

  7. A methodological approach for 3-D Vs inversion from ambient noise tomography in a very heterogeneous crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macquet, M.; Paul, A.; Pedersen, H.

    2013-12-01

    A 3-D Vs model is the output of ambient noise tomography with the greatest add-on value. Computing this model is however difficult, especially in regions with very heterogeneous crustal structure. We propose here a new approach to invert group velocity data from ambient noise tomography for 3-D Vs structure, which gives good result even with strong lateral variations of the seismic structure. The study region is the Pyrenees mountain range s.l., at the border between France and Spain, as it includes 2 thick sedimentary basins surrounded by crystalline outcrops in the Pyrenees and the Massif Central. We use data of a dense temporary seismic broadband array of 49 stations installed in southwestern France at the end of 2010 in the framework of the PYROPE (PYRenean Observational Portable Experiment) project. The dataset also includes records of 70 broadband stations of the third leg of the IberArray project installed at the same time period in northern Spain. The two dense arrays with 60 km average inter-station distance make it possible to obtain high-resolution images of the lithosphere of the Pyrenees, the Ebro and Aquitaine basins and the Bay of Biscay. To complement the two temporary arrays and avoid smearing effects along their edges, we also used records of the French and Catalan permanent broadband networks. As a whole, the dataset includes records of 158 broadband stations. Using one year of data, we computed 12324 two-station correlations of ambient seismic noise records. We applied the processing in two overlapping period intervals: 5s-50s and 30s-75s, the latter to extend the subsequent measurement of group velocities to periods outside the first and secondary microseismic peak. We merged the common part of the 2 dispersion curves using a linear weighting to obtain, for each station pair, a single dispersion curve in the 5-75s period range. These group velocity curves are subsequently used to obtain 2-D group velocity maps using the tomographic method of

  8. Representing surface and subsurface hydrology at hyperresolution for Earth system models: Development of a hybrid 3-D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P. D.; Brunke, M.; Gochis, D. J.; Lawrence, D. M.; Niu, G. Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Zeng, X.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, LSMs for use in Earth system models (ESMs) only account for one-dimensional (1-D) vertical hydrological processes at very coarse resolutions (~100 km). Recently, there has been interest in simulating lateral exchange of surface and subsurface water, as the grid resolution of ESMs increases (currently towards ~20 km) due to advances in computational power.In the current work, we present a new physically-based hydrological model capable of simulating lateral flow at a hyperresolution (1 km pixels) coupled with the vertical soil column of the Community Land Model (CLM), which has a much coarser resolution. Our new approach also uses sub-pixel topographic information to represent small scale lateral-flow processes. As input to our model, we use 1 km data of required surface and subsurface information, such depth to bedrock, hillslope width functions, fractional coverage of hillslopes/wetlands/riparian zones within each 1 km pixel, and a river network. Such data are largely derived from higher-resolution (30 m) topographic data, and will be made available to the community as global products.We have tested our model against measurements over a well instrumented, artificial hillslope at the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 and found that both our approach and a full 3-D physically-based hydrological model can realistically simulate hydrological states and fluxes. However, computationally, our approach is 2 - 3 orders of magnitude faster than the latter. We are currently testing it for an ESM grid box that covers much of southeastern New York State, which includes the headwaters of the Delaware River, the Susquehana River, and parts of the Mohawk River Basin. Our approach improves upon the 1-D hydrological representation in CLM by representing the subgrid topographic and geomorphological variability in the grid box. The impact of representing such subgrid variability on surface water and energy fluxes will be discussed in our presentation.

  9. 3D Visualisation and Artistic Imagery to Enhance Interest in "Hidden Environments"--New Approaches to Soil Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilford, J.; Falconer, R. E.; Wade, R.; Scott-Brown, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive Virtual Environments (VEs) have the potential to increase student interest in soil science. Accordingly a bespoke "soil atlas" was created using Java3D as an interactive 3D VE, to show soil information in the context of (and as affected by) the over-lying landscape. To display the below-ground soil characteristics, four sets…

  10. A New Approach to Sap Flow Measurement Using 3D Printed Gauges and Open-source Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Miner, G. L.; Kluitenberg, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new type of sap flow gauge was developed to measure transpiration from herbaceous plants using a modified heat pulse technique. Gauges were fabricated using 3D-printing technology and low-cost electronics to keep the materials cost under $20 (U.S.) per sensor. Each gauge consisted of small-diameter needle probes fastened to a 3D-printed frame. One needle contained a resistance heater to provide a 6 to 8 second heat pulse while the other probes measured the resultant temperature increase at two distances from the heat source. The data acquisition system for the gauges was built from a low-cost Arduino microcontroller. The system read the gauges every 10 minutes and stored the results on a SD card. Different numerical techniques were evaluated for estimating sap velocity from the heat pulse data - including analytical solutions and parameter estimation approaches . Prototype gauges were tested in the greenhouse on containerized corn and sunflower. Sap velocities measured by the gauges were compared to independent gravimetric measurements of whole plant transpiration. Results showed the system could measure daily transpiration to within 3% of the gravimetric measurements. Excellent agreement was observed when two gauges were attached the same stem. Accuracy was not affected by rapidly changing transpiration rates observed under partly cloudy conditions. The gauge-based estimates of stem thermal properties suggested the system may also detect the onset of water stress. A field study showed the gauges could run for 1 to 2 weeks on a small battery pack. Sap flow measurements on multiple corn stems were scaled up by population to estimate field-scale transpiration. During full canopy cover, excellent agreement was observed between the scaled-up sap flow measurements and reference crop evapotranspiration calculated from weather data. Data also showed promise as a way to estimate real-time canopy resistance required for model verification and development. Given the low

  11. A coupled wave-3-D hydrodynamics model of the Taranto Sea (Italy): a multiple-nesting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeta, Maria Gabriella; Samaras, Achilleas G.; Federico, Ivan; Archetti, Renata; Maicu, Francesco; Lorenzetti, Giuliano

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes an operational strategy for the development of a multiscale modeling system, based on a multiple-nesting approach and open-source numerical models. The strategy was applied and validated for the Gulf of Taranto in southern Italy, scaling large-scale oceanographic model results to high-resolution coupled wave-3-D hydrodynamics simulations for the area of Mar Grande in the Taranto Sea. The spatial and temporal high-resolution simulations were performed using the open-source TELEMAC suite, forced by wind data from the COSMO-ME database, boundary wave spectra from the RON buoy at Crotone and results from the Southern Adriatic Northern Ionian coastal Forecasting System (SANIFS) regarding sea levels and current fields. Model validation was carried out using data collected in the Mar Grande basin from a fixed monitoring station and during an oceanographic campaign in October 2014. The overall agreement between measurements and model results in terms of waves, sea levels, surface currents, circulation patterns and vertical velocity profiles is deemed to be satisfactory, and the methodology followed in the process can constitute a useful tool for both research and operational applications in the same field and as support of decisions for management and design of infrastructures.

  12. Free isocentric 3d imaging and a novel approach for wobble trajectories using a modified standard c-arm.

    PubMed

    Tita, Ralf; Lueth, Tim C

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors describes the modifications of an standard c-arm for free isocentric 3d imaging. To provide an isocentric movement of the x-ray source and the x-ray detector the passive mechanism of a standard c-arm was equipped with additional motors and encoders. A robot control system moves the imaging system on an isocentric path around the patient. The acquired x-ray images are then processed with a reconstruction algorithm using the algebraic reconstruction technique. For speed issues the reconstruction algorithm is implemented on a modern PC-graphics board. To overcome the known artifacts produced by the c-arm's limited rotation of 135 degrees , the use of a novel wobble trajectory is proposed for theses systems. The presented robotic approach for the motion of the c-arm's mechanism allows it to expand the isocentric movement to the surface of a sphere. With the new wobble trajectory the reconstruction artifacts can be significantly reduced. PMID:18002984

  13. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudo-spectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-09-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34s down to 11s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  14. Electron microscopy renders the diagnostic capabilities of cytopathology more precise: an approach to everyday practice.

    PubMed

    Turbat-Herrera, Elba A; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2005-01-01

    Cytology is a powerful diagnostic tool but to make definitive diagnoses, the use of ancillary techniques is imperative. By combining immunohistochemistry (IHC) and electron microscopy (EM), cytologic diagnoses can be as precise as those of surgical pathology. In the authors' daily practice of cytopathology they use all ancillary techniques available to them: histochemistry, IHC, EM, flow cytometry, and molecular pathology. IHC is frequently used as an ancillary technique in their daily practice but EM is many times their technique of choice. By the use of EM the authors can make specific final diagnoses, make the diagnosis more definitive, narrow the differential diagnosis, or determine the origin of a neoplasm with unknown primary site. Specimens obtained by fine-needle aspiration as well as all body fluids are suitable for EM. The limiting factor is to obtain the appropriate material with the diagnostic cells for ultrastructural examination. The common diagnostic dilemmas in the everyday practice of cytology are the following: mesothelioma vs. adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine differentiation or not, the distinction of melanoma from adenocarcinoma and sarcoma, hepatocellular carcinoma vs. adenocarcinoma, and the origin of adenocarcinomas of unknown primary. The authors discuss how they approach these diagnostic problems in their everyday practice and how they incorporate EM in solving them.

  15. A Novel Multi-Purpose Matching Representation of Local 3D Surfaces: A Rotationally Invariant, Efficient, and Highly Discriminative Approach With an Adjustable Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Osaimi, Faisal R

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to local 3D surface matching representation suitable for a range of 3D vision applications is introduced. Local 3D surface patches around key points on the 3D surface are represented by 2D images such that the representing 2D images enjoy certain characteristics which positively impact the matching accuracy, robustness, and speed. First, the proposed representation is complete, in the sense, there is no information loss during their computation. Second, the 3DoF 2D representations are strictly invariant to all the 3DoF rotations. To optimally avail surface information, the sensitivity of the representations to surface information is adjustable. This also provides the proposed matching representation with the means to optimally adjust to a particular class of problems/applications or an acquisition technology. Each 2D matching representation is a sequence of adjustable integral kernels, where each kernel is efficiently computed from a triple of precise 3D curves (profiles) formed by intersecting three concentric spheres with the 3D surface. Robust techniques for sampling the profiles and establishing correspondences among them were devised. Based on the proposed matching representation, two techniques for the detection of key points were presented. The first is suitable for static images, while the second is suitable for 3D videos. The approach was tested on the face recognition grand challenge v2.0, the 3D twins expression challenge, and the Bosphorus data sets, and a superior face recognition performance was achieved. In addition, the proposed approach was used in object class recognition and tested on a Kinect data set. PMID:26513787

  16. A Novel Multi-Purpose Matching Representation of Local 3D Surfaces: A Rotationally Invariant, Efficient, and Highly Discriminative Approach With an Adjustable Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Osaimi, Faisal R

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to local 3D surface matching representation suitable for a range of 3D vision applications is introduced. Local 3D surface patches around key points on the 3D surface are represented by 2D images such that the representing 2D images enjoy certain characteristics which positively impact the matching accuracy, robustness, and speed. First, the proposed representation is complete, in the sense, there is no information loss during their computation. Second, the 3DoF 2D representations are strictly invariant to all the 3DoF rotations. To optimally avail surface information, the sensitivity of the representations to surface information is adjustable. This also provides the proposed matching representation with the means to optimally adjust to a particular class of problems/applications or an acquisition technology. Each 2D matching representation is a sequence of adjustable integral kernels, where each kernel is efficiently computed from a triple of precise 3D curves (profiles) formed by intersecting three concentric spheres with the 3D surface. Robust techniques for sampling the profiles and establishing correspondences among them were devised. Based on the proposed matching representation, two techniques for the detection of key points were presented. The first is suitable for static images, while the second is suitable for 3D videos. The approach was tested on the face recognition grand challenge v2.0, the 3D twins expression challenge, and the Bosphorus data sets, and a superior face recognition performance was achieved. In addition, the proposed approach was used in object class recognition and tested on a Kinect data set.

  17. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  18. RenderMan design principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  19. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  20. Highly efficient semitransparent polymer solar cells with color rendering index approaching 100 using one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjuan; Jia, Xu; Long, Yongbing; Shen, Liang; Liu, Yan; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-05-13

    Window application is the important aim for semitransparent solar cells (STPSC) investigation. Here, we demonstrate a method to achieve significantly improved color rendering index (CRI), depressed chromaticity difference (DC), and enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) simultaneously by introducing the one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) Bragg reflector structure onto the STPSC. The device performance is studied from aspects of color perception, electrical properties, and theoretical optical simulations. The STPSCs exhibit achromatic transparency nature color perceptions, especially for the STPSCs with 1DPCs (pairs ≥ 3) under AM 1.5G illumination light source, standard illuminant D65, and standard illuminant A. The excellent CRI is approaching 97 with lower DC about 0.0013 for the device with 5 pairs of 1DPC illumined by AM 1.5G illumination light source. At the same time, the PCE of STPSC devices with 5 pairs of 1DPC was improved from 4.87 ± 0.14% to 5.31 ± 0.13% compared to without. This method provides a facilitative approach to realizing excellent SPTSC window application.

  1. A constraint logic programming approach to associate 1D and 3D structural components for large protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Dal Palù, Alessandro; Pontelli, Enrico; He, Jing; Lu, Yonggang

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a novel framework, constructed using Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) and parallelism, to determine the association between parts of the primary sequence of a protein and alpha-helices extracted from 3D low-resolution descriptions of large protein complexes. The association is determined by extracting constraints from the 3D information, regarding length, relative position and connectivity of helices, and solving these constraints with the guidance of a secondary structure prediction algorithm. Parallelism is employed to enhance performance on large proteins. The framework provides a fast, inexpensive alternative to determine the exact tertiary structure of unknown proteins.

  2. Immersive volume rendering of blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gregory; Kim, Han Suk; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method of visualizing flow in blood vessels. Our approach reads unstructured tetrahedral data, resamples it, and uses slice based 3D texture volume rendering. Due to the sparse structure of blood vessels, we utilize an octree to efficiently store the resampled data by discarding empty regions of the volume. We use animation to convey time series data, wireframe surface to give structure, and utilize the StarCAVE, a 3D virtual reality environment, to add a fully immersive element to the visualization. Our tool has great value in interdisciplinary work, helping scientists collaborate with clinicians, by improving the understanding of blood flow simulations. Full immersion in the flow field allows for a more intuitive understanding of the flow phenomena, and can be a great help to medical experts for treatment planning.

  3. Massively parallel visualization: Parallel rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.D.; Krogh, M.; White, W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume renderer use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Machines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  4. Gesture Interaction Browser-Based 3D Molecular Viewer.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an open source system that allows the user to interact with a 3D molecular viewer using associated hand gestures for rotating, scaling and panning the rendered model. The novelty of this approach is that the entire application is browser-based and doesn't require installation of third party plug-ins or additional software components in order to visualize the supported chemical file formats. This kind of solution is suitable for instruction of users in less IT oriented environments, like medicine or chemistry. For rendering various molecular geometries our team used GLmol (a molecular viewer written in JavaScript). The interaction with the 3D models is made with Leap Motion controller that allows real-time tracking of the user's hand gestures. The first results confirmed that the resulting application leads to a better way of understanding various types of translational bioinformatics related problems in both biomedical research and education. PMID:27350455

  5. Gesture Interaction Browser-Based 3D Molecular Viewer.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an open source system that allows the user to interact with a 3D molecular viewer using associated hand gestures for rotating, scaling and panning the rendered model. The novelty of this approach is that the entire application is browser-based and doesn't require installation of third party plug-ins or additional software components in order to visualize the supported chemical file formats. This kind of solution is suitable for instruction of users in less IT oriented environments, like medicine or chemistry. For rendering various molecular geometries our team used GLmol (a molecular viewer written in JavaScript). The interaction with the 3D models is made with Leap Motion controller that allows real-time tracking of the user's hand gestures. The first results confirmed that the resulting application leads to a better way of understanding various types of translational bioinformatics related problems in both biomedical research and education.

  6. A Bayesian 3D data fusion and unsupervised joint segmentation approach for stochastic geological modelling using Hidden Markov random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Wellmann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    It is generally accepted that 3D geological models inferred from observed data will contain a certain amount of uncertainties. The uncertainty quantification and stochastic sampling methods are essential for gaining the insight into the geological variability of subsurface structures. In the community of deterministic or traditional modelling techniques, classical geo-statistical methods using boreholes (hard data sets) are still most widely accepted although suffering certain drawbacks. Modern geophysical measurements provide us regional data sets in 2D or 3D spaces either directly from sensors or indirectly from inverse problem solving using observed signal (soft data sets). We propose a stochastic modelling framework to extract subsurface heterogeneity from multiple and complementary types of data. In the presented work, subsurface heterogeneity is considered as the "hidden link" among multiple spatial data sets as well as inversion results. Hidden Markov random field models are employed to perform 3D segmentation which is the representation of the "hidden link". Finite Gaussian mixture models are adopted to characterize the statistical parameters of the multiple data sets. The uncertainties are quantified via a Gibbs sampling process under the Bayesian inferential framework. The proposed modelling framework is validated using two numerical examples. The model behavior and convergence are also well examined. It is shown that the presented stochastic modelling framework is a promising tool for the 3D data fusion in the communities of geological modelling and geophysics.

  7. A multiscale approach for the reconstruction of the fiber architecture of the human brain based on 3D-PLI

    PubMed Central

    Reckfort, Julia; Wiese, Hendrik; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Structural connectivity of the brain can be conceptionalized as a multiscale organization. The present study is built on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI), a neuroimaging technique targeting the reconstruction of nerve fiber orientations and therefore contributing to the analysis of brain connectivity. Spatial orientations of the fibers are derived from birefringence measurements of unstained histological sections that are interpreted by means of a voxel-based analysis. This implies that a single fiber orientation vector is obtained for each voxel, which reflects the net effect of all comprised fibers. We have utilized two polarimetric setups providing an object space resolution of 1.3 μm/px (microscopic setup) and 64 μm/px (macroscopic setup) to carry out 3D-PLI and retrieve fiber orientations of the same tissue samples, but at complementary voxel sizes (i.e., scales). The present study identifies the main sources which cause a discrepancy of the measured fiber orientations observed when measuring the same sample with the two polarimetric systems. As such sources the differing optical resolutions and diverging retardances of the implemented waveplates were identified. A methodology was implemented that enables the compensation of measured different systems' responses to the same birefringent sample. This opens up new ways to conduct multiscale analysis in brains by means of 3D-PLI and to provide a reliable basis for the transition between different scales of the nerve fiber architecture. PMID:26388744

  8. A multiscale approach for the reconstruction of the fiber architecture of the human brain based on 3D-PLI.

    PubMed

    Reckfort, Julia; Wiese, Hendrik; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Structural connectivity of the brain can be conceptionalized as a multiscale organization. The present study is built on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI), a neuroimaging technique targeting the reconstruction of nerve fiber orientations and therefore contributing to the analysis of brain connectivity. Spatial orientations of the fibers are derived from birefringence measurements of unstained histological sections that are interpreted by means of a voxel-based analysis. This implies that a single fiber orientation vector is obtained for each voxel, which reflects the net effect of all comprised fibers. We have utilized two polarimetric setups providing an object space resolution of 1.3 μm/px (microscopic setup) and 64 μm/px (macroscopic setup) to carry out 3D-PLI and retrieve fiber orientations of the same tissue samples, but at complementary voxel sizes (i.e., scales). The present study identifies the main sources which cause a discrepancy of the measured fiber orientations observed when measuring the same sample with the two polarimetric systems. As such sources the differing optical resolutions and diverging retardances of the implemented waveplates were identified. A methodology was implemented that enables the compensation of measured different systems' responses to the same birefringent sample. This opens up new ways to conduct multiscale analysis in brains by means of 3D-PLI and to provide a reliable basis for the transition between different scales of the nerve fiber architecture. PMID:26388744

  9. Sexual dimorphism in human browridge volume measured from 3D models of dry crania: a new digital morphometrics approach.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Brian M; Sholts, Sabrina B; Garvin, Heather M; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S

    2012-10-10

    Sex estimation from the human skull is often a necessary step when constructing a biological profile from unidentified human remains. Traditional methods for determining the sex of a skull require observers to rank the expression of sexually dimorphic skeletal traits by subjectively assessing their qualitative differences. One of these traits is the prominence of the glabellar region above the browridge. In this paper, the volume of the browridge region was measured from digital 3D models of 128 dry crania (65 female, 63 male). The 3D models were created with a desktop laser scanner, and the browridge region of each 3D model was isolated using geometric planes defined by cranial landmarks. Statistical analysis of browridge-to-cranium volume ratios revealed significant differences between male and female crania. Differences were also observed between geographically distinct populations, and between temporally distinct populations from the same locale. The results suggest that in the future, sex determination of human crania may be assisted by quantitative computer-based volume calculations from 3D models, which can provide increased objectivity and repeatability when compared to traditional forensic techniques. The method presented in this paper can easily be extended to other volumetric regions of the human cranium.

  10. A linear programming approach to reconstructing subcellular structures from confocal images for automated generation of representative 3D cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Scott T.; Dean, Brian C.; Dean, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel computer vision algorithm to analyze 3D stacks of confocal images of fluorescently stained single cells. The goal of the algorithm is to create representative in silico model structures that can be imported into finite element analysis software for mechanical characterization. Segmentation of cell and nucleus boundaries is accomplished via standard thresholding methods. Using novel linear programming methods, a representative actin stress fiber network is generated by computing a linear superposition of fibers having minimum discrepancy compared with an experimental 3D confocal image. Qualitative validation is performed through analysis of seven 3D confocal image stacks of adherent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) grown in 2D culture. The presented method is able to automatically generate 3D geometries of the cell's boundary, nucleus, and representative F-actin network based on standard cell microscopy data. These geometries can be used for direct importation and implementation in structural finite element models for analysis of the mechanics of a single cell to potentially speed discoveries in the fields of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology, and drug discovery. PMID:23395283

  11. Future Mission Concept for 3-D Aerosol Monitoring From Space Based on Fusion of Remote Sensing Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, D. J.; Kahn, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Cairns, B.; Torres, O.

    2006-05-01

    extinction independently along with vertically resolved estimates of microphysical properties, thus representing a significant advance relative to simpler backscatter systems such as GLAS and CALIPSO. This fusion of satellite-based approaches is aimed at observing the 3-D distribution of aerosol abundances, sizes, shapes, and absorption, and would represent a major technological advance in our ability to monitor and characterize near-surface particulate matter from space.

  12. A discriminative model-constrained EM approach to 3D MRI brain tissue classification and intensity non-uniformity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wels, Michael; Zheng, Yefeng; Huber, Martin; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-06-01

    We describe a fully automated method for tissue classification, which is the segmentation into cerebral gray matter (GM), cerebral white matter (WM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and intensity non-uniformity (INU) correction in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumes. It combines supervised MRI modality-specific discriminative modeling and unsupervised statistical expectation maximization (EM) segmentation into an integrated Bayesian framework. While both the parametric observation models and the non-parametrically modeled INUs are estimated via EM during segmentation itself, a Markov random field (MRF) prior model regularizes segmentation and parameter estimation. Firstly, the regularization takes into account knowledge about spatial and appearance-related homogeneity of segments in terms of pairwise clique potentials of adjacent voxels. Secondly and more importantly, patient-specific knowledge about the global spatial distribution of brain tissue is incorporated into the segmentation process via unary clique potentials. They are based on a strong discriminative model provided by a probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) for classifying image voxels. It relies on the surrounding context and alignment-based features derived from a probabilistic anatomical atlas. The context considered is encoded by 3D Haar-like features of reduced INU sensitivity. Alignment is carried out fully automatically by means of an affine registration algorithm minimizing cross-correlation. Both types of features do not immediately use the observed intensities provided by the MRI modality but instead rely on specifically transformed features, which are less sensitive to MRI artifacts. Detailed quantitative evaluations on standard phantom scans and standard real-world data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. They also demonstrate relative superiority in comparison to other state-of-the-art approaches to this kind of computational task: our method achieves average

  13. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  14. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  15. An efficient quasi-3D particle tracking-based approach for transport through fractures with application to dynamic dispersion calculation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichun; Cardenas, M Bayani

    2015-08-01

    The quantitative study of transport through fractured media has continued for many decades, but has often been constrained by observational and computational challenges. Here, we developed an efficient quasi-3D random walk particle tracking (RWPT) algorithm to simulate solute transport through natural fractures based on a 2D flow field generated from the modified local cubic law (MLCL). As a reference, we also modeled the actual breakthrough curves (BTCs) through direct simulations with the 3D advection-diffusion equation (ADE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The RWPT algorithm along with the MLCL accurately reproduced the actual BTCs calculated with the 3D ADE. The BTCs exhibited non-Fickian behavior, including early arrival and long tails. Using the spatial information of particle trajectories, we further analyzed the dynamic dispersion process through moment analysis. From this, asymptotic time scales were determined for solute dispersion to distinguish non-Fickian from Fickian regimes. This analysis illustrates the advantage and benefit of using an efficient combination of flow modeling and RWPT. PMID:26042625

  16. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  17. 3D visualisation and artistic imagery to enhance interest in `hidden environments' - new approaches to soil science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilford, J.; Falconer, R. E.; Wade, R.; Scott-Brown, K. C.

    2014-09-01

    Interactive Virtual Environments (VEs) have the potential to increase student interest in soil science. Accordingly a bespoke 'soil atlas' was created using Java3D as an interactive 3D VE, to show soil information in the context of (and as affected by) the over-lying landscape. To display the below-ground soil characteristics, four sets of artistic illustrations were produced, each set showing the effects of soil organic-matter density and water content on fungal density, to determine potential for visualisations and interactivity in stimulating interest in soil and soil illustrations, interest being an important factor in facilitating learning. The illustrations were created using 3D modelling packages, and a wide range of styles were produced. This allowed a preliminary study of the relative merits of different artistic styles, scientific-credibility, scale, abstraction and 'realism' (e.g. photo-realism or realism of forms), and any relationship between these and the level of interest indicated by the study participants in the soil visualisations and VE. The study found significant differences in mean interest ratings for different soil illustration styles, as well as in the perception of scientific-credibility of these styles, albeit for both measures there was considerable difference of attitude between participants about particular styles. There was also found to be a highly significant positive correlation between participants rating styles highly for interest and highly for scientific-credibility. There was furthermore a particularly high interest rating among participants for seeing temporal soil processes illustrated/animated, suggesting this as a particularly promising method for further stimulating interest in soil illustrations and soil itself.

  18. Platelet lysate 3D scaffold supports mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis: an improved approach in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Andrei; Bittencourt, Renata Aparecida Camargo; Almeida, Renan Padron; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Deffune, Elenice

    2013-01-01

    Articular lesions are still a major challenge in orthopedics because of cartilage's poor healing properties. A major improvement in therapeutics was the development of autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI), a biotechnology-derived technique that delivers healthy autologous chondrocytes after in vitro expansion. To obtain cartilage-like tissue, 3D scaffolds are essential to maintain chondrocyte differentiated status. Currently, bioactive 3D scaffolds are promising as they can deliver growth factors, cytokines, and hormones to the cells, giving them a boost to attach, proliferate, induce protein synthesis, and differentiate. Using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiated into chondrocytes, one can avoid cartilage harvesting. Thus, we investigated the potential use of a platelet-lysate-based 3D bioactive scaffold to support chondrogenic differentiation and maintenance of MSCs. The MSCs from adult rabbit bone marrow (n = 5) were cultivated and characterized using three antibodies by flow cytometry. MSCs (1 × 10(5)) were than encapsulated inside 60 µl of a rabbit platelet-lysate clot scaffold and maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium Nutrient Mixture F-12 supplemented with chondrogenic inductors. After 21 days, the MSCs-seeded scaffolds were processed for histological analysis and stained with toluidine blue. This scaffold was able to maintain round-shaped cells, typical chondrocyte metachromatic extracellular matrix deposition, and isogenous group formation. Cells accumulated inside lacunae and cytoplasm lipid droplets were other observed typical chondrocyte features. In conclusion, the usage of a platelet-lysate bioactive scaffold, associated with a suitable chondrogenic culture medium, supports MSCs chondrogenesis. As such, it offers an alternative tool for cartilage engineering research and ACI.

  19. A multi-resolution approach for an automated fusion of different low-cost 3D sensors.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jan; Paulus, Stefan; Behmann, Jan; Plümer, Lutz; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The 3D acquisition of object structures has become a common technique in many fields of work, e.g., industrial quality management, cultural heritage or crime scene documentation. The requirements on the measuring devices are versatile, because spacious scenes have to be imaged with a high level of detail for selected objects. Thus, the used measuring systems are expensive and require an experienced operator. With the rise of low-cost 3D imaging systems, their integration into the digital documentation process is possible. However, common low-cost sensors have the limitation of a trade-off between range and accuracy, providing either a low resolution of single objects or a limited imaging field. Therefore, the use of multiple sensors is desirable. We show the combined use of two low-cost sensors, the Microsoft Kinect and the David laserscanning system, to achieve low-resolved scans of the whole scene and a high level of detail for selected objects, respectively. Afterwards, the high-resolved David objects are automatically assigned to their corresponding Kinect object by the use of surface feature histograms and SVM-classification. The corresponding objects are fitted using an ICP-implementation to produce a multi-resolution map. The applicability is shown for a fictional crime scene and the reconstruction of a ballistic trajectory. PMID:24763255

  20. A direct approach for instantaneous 3D density field reconstruction from background-oriented schlieren (BOS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, F.; Todoroff, V.; Plyer, A.; Le Besnerais, G.; Donjat, D.; Micheli, F.; Champagnat, F.; Cornic, P.; Le Sant, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new numerical method for reconstruction of instantaneous density volume from 3D background-oriented schlieren (3DBOS) measurements, with a validation on a dedicated flexible experimental BOS bench. In contrast to previous works, we use a direct formulation where density is estimated from measured deviation fields without the intermediate step of density gradient reconstruction. Regularization techniques are implemented to deal with the ill-posed problem encountered. The resulting high-dimensional optimization is conducted by conjugate gradient techniques. A parallel algorithm, implemented on graphics processing unit, helps to speed up the calculation. The resulting software is validated on synthetic BOS images of a 3D density field issued from a numerical simulation. Then, we describe a dedicated 3DBOS experimental facility which has been built to study various BOS settings and to assess the performance of the proposed numerical reconstruction process. Results on various datasets illustrate the potential of the method for flow characterization and measurement in real-world conditions.

  1. Aorta segmentation with a 3D level set approach and quantification of aortic calcifications in non-contrast chest CT.

    PubMed

    Kurugol, Sila; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Ross, James; Washko, George R

    2012-01-01

    Automatic aorta segmentation in thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans is important for aortic calcification quantification and to guide the segmentation of other central vessels. We propose an aorta segmentation algorithm consisting of an initial boundary detection step followed by 3D level set segmentation for refinement. Our algorithm exploits aortic cross-sectional circularity: we first detect aorta boundaries with a circular Hough transform on axial slices to detect ascending and descending aorta regions, and we apply the Hough transform on oblique slices to detect the aortic arch. The centers and radii of circles detected by Hough transform are fitted to smooth cubic spline functions using least-squares fitting. From these center and radius spline functions, we reconstruct an initial aorta surface using the Frenet frame. This reconstructed tubular surface is further refined with 3D level set evolutions. The level set framework we employ optimizes a functional that depends on both edge strength and smoothness terms and evolves the surface to the position of nearby edge location corresponding to the aorta wall. After aorta segmentation, we first detect the aortic calcifications with thresholding applied to the segmented aorta region. We then filter out the false positive regions due to nearby high intensity structures. We tested the algorithm on 45 CT scans and obtained a closest point mean error of 0.52 ± 0.10 mm between the manually and automatically segmented surfaces. The true positive detection rate of calcification algorithm was 0.96 over all CT scans. PMID:23366394

  2. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  3. A multi-resolution approach for an automated fusion of different low-cost 3D sensors.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jan; Paulus, Stefan; Behmann, Jan; Plümer, Lutz; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The 3D acquisition of object structures has become a common technique in many fields of work, e.g., industrial quality management, cultural heritage or crime scene documentation. The requirements on the measuring devices are versatile, because spacious scenes have to be imaged with a high level of detail for selected objects. Thus, the used measuring systems are expensive and require an experienced operator. With the rise of low-cost 3D imaging systems, their integration into the digital documentation process is possible. However, common low-cost sensors have the limitation of a trade-off between range and accuracy, providing either a low resolution of single objects or a limited imaging field. Therefore, the use of multiple sensors is desirable. We show the combined use of two low-cost sensors, the Microsoft Kinect and the David laserscanning system, to achieve low-resolved scans of the whole scene and a high level of detail for selected objects, respectively. Afterwards, the high-resolved David objects are automatically assigned to their corresponding Kinect object by the use of surface feature histograms and SVM-classification. The corresponding objects are fitted using an ICP-implementation to produce a multi-resolution map. The applicability is shown for a fictional crime scene and the reconstruction of a ballistic trajectory.

  4. A Multi-Resolution Approach for an Automated Fusion of Different Low-Cost 3D Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Jan; Paulus, Stefan; Behmann, Jan; Plümer, Lutz; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The 3D acquisition of object structures has become a common technique in many fields of work, e.g., industrial quality management, cultural heritage or crime scene documentation. The requirements on the measuring devices are versatile, because spacious scenes have to be imaged with a high level of detail for selected objects. Thus, the used measuring systems are expensive and require an experienced operator. With the rise of low-cost 3D imaging systems, their integration into the digital documentation process is possible. However, common low-cost sensors have the limitation of a trade-off between range and accuracy, providing either a low resolution of single objects or a limited imaging field. Therefore, the use of multiple sensors is desirable. We show the combined use of two low-cost sensors, the Microsoft Kinect and the David laserscanning system, to achieve low-resolved scans of the whole scene and a high level of detail for selected objects, respectively. Afterwards, the high-resolved David objects are automatically assigned to their corresponding Kinect object by the use of surface feature histograms and SVM-classification. The corresponding objects are fitted using an ICP-implementation to produce a multi-resolution map. The applicability is shown for a fictional crime scene and the reconstruction of a ballistic trajectory. PMID:24763255

  5. Seasonal dynamics and stoichiometry of the planktonic community in the NW Mediterranean Sea: a 3D modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Raybaud, Virginie; Espinasse, Boris; Carlotti, François; Queguiner, Bernard; Thouvenin, Bénédicte; Garreau, Pierre; Baklouti, Melika

    2014-01-01

    The 3D hydrodynamic Model for Applications at Regional Scale (MARS3D) was coupled with a biogeochemical model developed with the Ecological Modular Mechanistic Modelling (Eco3M) numerical tool. The three-dimensional coupled model was applied to the NW Mediterranean Sea to study the dynamics of the key biogeochemical processes in the area in relation with hydrodynamic constraints. In particular, we focused on the temporal and spatial variability of intracellular contents of living and non-living compartments. The conceptual scheme of the biogeochemical model accounts for the complex food web of the NW Mediterranean Sea (34 state variables), using flexible plankton stoichiometry. We used mechanistic formulations to describe most of the biogeochemical processes involved in the dynamics of marine pelagic ecosystems. Simulations covered the period from September 1, 2009 to January 31, 2011 (17 months), which enabled comparison of model outputs with situ measurements made during two oceanographic cruises in the region (Costeau-4: April 27-May 2, 2010 and Costeau-6: January 23-January 27, 2011).

  6. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  7. Three Dimensional Rover/Lander/Orbiter Mission-Planning (3D-ROMPS) System: A Modern Approach to Mission Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfe, Nathan D.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's current mission planning system is based on point design, two-dimensional display, spread sheets, and report technology. This technology does not enable engineers to analyze the results of parametric studies of missions plans. This technology will not support the increased observational complexity and data volume of missions like Cassini, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), and Mars Sample Return (MSR). The goal of the 3D-ROMPS task has been to establish a set of operational mission planning and analysis tools in the Image Processing Laboratory (IPL) Mission Support Area (MSA) that will respond to engineering requirements for planning future Solar System Exploration (SSE) missions using a three-dimensional display.

  8. A Compressive Sensing Approach for 3D Breast Cancer Microwave Imaging With Magnetic Nanoparticles as Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, Martina T; Scapaticci, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    In microwave breast cancer imaging magnetic nanoparticles have been recently proposed as contrast agent. Due to the non-magnetic nature of human tissues, magnetic nanoparticles make possible the overcoming of some limitations of conventional microwave imaging techniques, thus providing reliable and specific diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a Compressive Sensing inspired inversion technique is introduced for the reconstruction of the magnetic contrast induced within the tumor. The applicability of Compressive Sensing theory is guaranteed by the fact that the underlying inverse scattering problem is linear and the searched magnetic perturbation is sparse. From the numerical analysis, performed in realistic conditions in 3D geometry, it has been pointed out that the adoption of this new tool allows improving resolution and accuracy of the reconstructions, as well as reducing the number of required measurements.

  9. Automatic left-atrial segmentation from cardiac 3D ultrasound: a dual-chamber model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Sarvari, Sebastian I.; Orderud, Fredrik; Gérard, Olivier; D'hooge, Jan; Samset, Eigil

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic solution for segmentation and quantification of the left atrium (LA) from 3D cardiac ultrasound. A model-based framework is applied, making use of (deformable) active surfaces to model the endocardial surfaces of cardiac chambers, allowing incorporation of a priori anatomical information in a simple fashion. A dual-chamber model (LA and left ventricle) is used to detect and track the atrio-ventricular (AV) plane, without any user input. Both chambers are represented by parametric surfaces and a Kalman filter is used to fit the model to the position of the endocardial walls detected in the image, providing accurate detection and tracking during the whole cardiac cycle. This framework was tested in 20 transthoracic cardiac ultrasound volumetric recordings of healthy volunteers, and evaluated using manual traces of a clinical expert as a reference. The 3D meshes obtained with the automatic method were close to the reference contours at all cardiac phases (mean distance of 0.03+/-0.6 mm). The AV plane was detected with an accuracy of -0.6+/-1.0 mm. The LA volumes assessed automatically were also in agreement with the reference (mean +/-1.96 SD): 0.4+/-5.3 ml, 2.1+/-12.6 ml, and 1.5+/-7.8 ml at end-diastolic, end-systolic and pre-atrial-contraction frames, respectively. This study shows that the proposed method can be used for automatic volumetric assessment of the LA, considerably reducing the analysis time and effort when compared to manual analysis.

  10. A 3-D tomographic retrieval approach with advection compensation for the air-borne limb-imager GLORIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Blank, J.; Lotz, J.; Leppkes, K.; Hoffmann, L.; Guggenmoser, T.; Kaufmann, M.; Preusse, P.; Naumann, U.; Riese, M.

    2011-11-01

    Infrared limb sounding from aircraft can provide 2-D curtains of multiple trace gas species. However, conventional limb sounders view perpendicular to the aircraft axis and are unable to resolve the observed airmass along their line-of-sight. GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) is a new remote sensing instrument that is able to adjust its horizontal view angle with respect to the aircraft flight direction from 45° to 135°. This will allow for tomographic measurements of mesoscale structures for a wide variety of atmospheric constituents. Many flights of the GLORIA instrument will not follow closed curves that allow measuring an airmass from all directions. Consequently, it is examined by means of simulations, what spatial resolution can be expected under ideal conditions from tomographic evaluation of measurements made during a straight flight. It is demonstrated that the achievable horizontal resolution in the line-of-sight direction could be reduced from over 200 km to around 70 km compared to conventional retrievals and that the tomographic retrieval is also more robust against horizontal gradients in retrieved quantities in this direction. In a second step, it is shown that the incorporation of channels exhibiting different optical depth can further enhance the spatial resolution of 3-D retrievals enabling the exploitation of spectral samples usually not used for limb sounding due to their opacity. A second problem for tomographic retrievals is that advection, which can be neglected for conventional retrievals, plays an important role for the time-scales involved in a tomographic measurement flight. This paper presents a method to diagnose the effect of a time-varying atmosphere on a 3-D retrieval and demonstrates an effective way to compensate for effects of advection by incorporating wind-fields from meteorological datasets as a priori information.

  11. Rendering for machine vision prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Jacek

    2008-09-01

    Machine Vision systems for manufacturing quality inspection are interdisciplinary solutions including lighting, optics, cameras, image processing, segmentation, feature analysis, classification as well as integration with manufacturing process. The design and optimization of the above systems, especially image acquisition setup is mainly driven by experiment. This requires deep know-how and well equipped laboratory, which does not guarantee the optimal development process and results. This paper proposes novel usage of rendering, originating from 3D computer graphics, for machine vision prototyping and optimization. The invented technique and physically-based rendering aids selection or optimization of luminaires, tolerancing of mechanical construction and object handling, robustness predetermination or surface flaw simulation. The rendering setup utilizes mesh modeling, bump and normal mapping and light distribution sharpening with IES data files. The performed light simulation experiments for metal surfaces (face surface of bearing rollers) are validated.

  12. Rendering the Topological Spines

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Rivera, D.

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  13. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  14. General fusion approaches for the age determination of latent fingerprint traces: results for 2D and 3D binary pixel feature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-03-01

    Determining the age of latent fingerprint traces found at crime scenes is an unresolved research issue since decades. Solving this issue could provide criminal investigators with the specific time a fingerprint trace was left on a surface, and therefore would enable them to link potential suspects to the time a crime took place as well as to reconstruct the sequence of events or eliminate irrelevant fingerprints to ensure privacy constraints. Transferring imaging techniques from different application areas, such as 3D image acquisition, surface measurement and chemical analysis to the domain of lifting latent biometric fingerprint traces is an upcoming trend in forensics. Such non-destructive sensor devices might help to solve the challenge of determining the age of a latent fingerprint trace, since it provides the opportunity to create time series and process them using pattern recognition techniques and statistical methods on digitized 2D, 3D and chemical data, rather than classical, contact-based capturing techniques, which alter the fingerprint trace and therefore make continuous scans impossible. In prior work, we have suggested to use a feature called binary pixel, which is a novel approach in the working field of fingerprint age determination. The feature uses a Chromatic White Light (CWL) image sensor to continuously scan a fingerprint trace over time and retrieves a characteristic logarithmic aging tendency for 2D-intensity as well as 3D-topographic images from the sensor. In this paper, we propose to combine such two characteristic aging features with other 2D and 3D features from the domains of surface measurement, microscopy, photography and spectroscopy, to achieve an increase in accuracy and reliability of a potential future age determination scheme. Discussing the feasibility of such variety of sensor devices and possible aging features, we propose a general fusion approach, which might combine promising features to a joint age determination scheme

  15. 3-D numerical approach to simulate the overtopping volume caused by an impulse wave comparable to avalanche impact in a reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabl, R.; Seibl, J.; Gems, B.; Aufleger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of an avalanche in a reservoir induces impulse waves, which pose a threat to population and infrastructure. For a good approximation of the generated wave height and length as well as the resulting overtopping volume over structures and dams, formulas, which are based on different simplifying assumptions, can be used. Further project-specific investigations by means of a scale model test or numerical simulations are advisable for complex reservoirs as well as the inclusion of hydraulic structures such as spillways. This paper presents a new approach for a 3-D numerical simulation of the avalanche impact in a reservoir. In this model concept the energy and mass of the avalanche are represented by accelerated water on the actual hill slope. Instead of snow, only water and air are used to simulate the moving avalanche with the software FLOW-3D. A significant advantage of this assumption is the self-adaptation of the model avalanche onto the terrain. In order to reach good comparability of the results with existing research at ETH Zürich, a simplified reservoir geometry is investigated. Thus, a reference case has been analysed including a variation of three geometry parameters (still water depth in the reservoir, freeboard of the dam and reservoir width). There was a good agreement of the overtopping volume at the dam between the presented 3-D numerical approach and the literature equations. Nevertheless, an extended parameter variation as well as a comparison with natural data should be considered as further research topics.

  16. The SF3M approach to 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users: application to a gully network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, C.; James, M. R.; Redel-Macías, M. D.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    3-D photo-reconstruction (PR) techniques have been successfully used to produce high resolution elevation models for different applications and over different spatial scales. However, innovative approaches are required to overcome some limitations that this technique may present in challenging scenarios. Here, we evaluate SF3M, a new graphical user interface for implementing a complete PR workflow based on freely available software (including external calls to VisualSFM and CloudCompare), in combination with a low-cost survey design for the reconstruction of a several-hundred-meters-long gully network. SF3M provided a semi-automated workflow for 3-D reconstruction requiring ~ 49 h (of which only 17% required operator assistance) for obtaining a final gully network model of > 17 million points over a gully plan area of 4230 m2. We show that a walking itinerary along the gully perimeter using two light-weight automatic cameras (1 s time-lapse mode) and a 6 m-long pole is an efficient method for 3-D monitoring of gullies, at a low cost (about EUR 1000 budget for the field equipment) and time requirements (~ 90 min for image collection). A mean error of 6.9 cm at the ground control points was found, mainly due to model deformations derived from the linear geometry of the gully and residual errors in camera calibration. The straightforward image collection and processing approach can be of great benefit for non-expert users working on gully erosion assessment.

  17. Facilitating the 3D Indoor Search and Rescue Problem: An Overview of the Problem and an Ant Colony Solution Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashakkori, H.; Rajabifard, A.; Kalantari, M.

    2016-10-01

    Search and rescue procedures for indoor environments are quite complicated due to the fact that much of the indoor information is unavailable to rescuers before physical entrance to the incident scene. Thus, decision making regarding the number of crew required and the way they should be dispatched in the building considering the various access points and complexities in the buildings in order to cover the search area in minimum time is dependent on prior knowledge and experience of the emergency commanders. Hence, this paper introduces the Search and Rescue Problem (SRP) which aims at finding best search and rescue routes that minimize the overall search time in the buildings. 3D BIM-oriented indoor GIS is integrated in the indoor route graph to find accurate routes based on the building geometric and semantic information. An Ant Colony Based Algorithm is presented that finds the number of first responders required and their individual routes to search all rooms and points of interest inside the building to minimize the overall time spent by all rescuers inside the disaster area. The evaluation of the proposed model for a case study building shows a significant improve in search and rescue time which will lead to a higher chance of saving lives and less exposure of emergency crew to danger.

  18. Global 3-D imaging of mantle electrical conductivity based on inversion of observatory C-responses - I. An approach and its verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Semenov, Alexey

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel frequency-domain inverse solution to recover the 3-D electrical conductivity distribution in the mantle. The solution is based on analysis of local C-responses. It exploits an iterative gradient-type method - limited-memory quasi-Newton method - for minimizing the penalty function consisting of data misfit and regularization terms. The integral equation code is used as a forward engine to calculate responses and data misfit gradients during inversion. An adjoint approach is implemented to compute misfit gradients efficiently. Further improvements in computational load come from parallelizing the scheme with respect to frequencies, and from setting the most time-consuming part of the forward calculations - calculation of Green's tensors - apart from the inversion loop. Convergence, performance, and accuracy of our 3-D inverse solution are demonstrated with a synthetic numerical example. A companion paper applies the strategy set forth here to real data.

  19. Development of 3D-QSAR Model for Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Using a Combination of Fingerprint, Molecular Docking, and Structure-Based Pharmacophore Approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sehan; Barron, Mace G

    2015-11-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a serine hydrolase vital for regulating the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in animals, has been used as a target for drugs and pesticides. With the increasing availability of AChE crystal structures, with or without ligands bound, structure-based approaches have been successfully applied to AChE inhibitors (AChEIs). The major limitation of these approaches has been the small applicability domain due to the lack of structural diversity in the training set. In this study, we developed a 3 dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for inhibitory activity of 89 reversible and irreversible AChEIs including drugs and insecticides. A 3D-fingerprint descriptor encoding protein-ligand interactions was developed using molecular docking and structure-based pharmacophore to rationalize the structural requirements responsible for the activity of these compounds. The obtained 3D-QSAR model exhibited high correlation value (R(2) = 0.93) and low mean absolute error (MAE = 0.32 log units) for the training set (n = 63). The model was predictive across a range of structures as shown by the leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (Q(2) = 0.89) and external validation results (n = 26, R(2) = 0.89, and MAE = 0.38 log units). The model revealed that the compounds with high inhibition potency had proper conformation in the active site gorge and interacted with key amino acid residues, in particular Trp84 and Phe330 at the catalytic anionic site, Trp279 at the peripheral anionic site, and Gly118, Gly119, and Ala201 at the oxyanion hole. The resulting universal 3D-QSAR model provides insight into the multiple molecular interactions determining AChEI potency that may guide future chemical design and regulation of toxic AChEIs.

  20. Development of 3D-QSAR Model for Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Using a Combination of Fingerprint, Molecular Docking, and Structure-Based Pharmacophore Approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sehan; Barron, Mace G

    2015-11-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a serine hydrolase vital for regulating the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in animals, has been used as a target for drugs and pesticides. With the increasing availability of AChE crystal structures, with or without ligands bound, structure-based approaches have been successfully applied to AChE inhibitors (AChEIs). The major limitation of these approaches has been the small applicability domain due to the lack of structural diversity in the training set. In this study, we developed a 3 dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for inhibitory activity of 89 reversible and irreversible AChEIs including drugs and insecticides. A 3D-fingerprint descriptor encoding protein-ligand interactions was developed using molecular docking and structure-based pharmacophore to rationalize the structural requirements responsible for the activity of these compounds. The obtained 3D-QSAR model exhibited high correlation value (R(2) = 0.93) and low mean absolute error (MAE = 0.32 log units) for the training set (n = 63). The model was predictive across a range of structures as shown by the leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient (Q(2) = 0.89) and external validation results (n = 26, R(2) = 0.89, and MAE = 0.38 log units). The model revealed that the compounds with high inhibition potency had proper conformation in the active site gorge and interacted with key amino acid residues, in particular Trp84 and Phe330 at the catalytic anionic site, Trp279 at the peripheral anionic site, and Gly118, Gly119, and Ala201 at the oxyanion hole. The resulting universal 3D-QSAR model provides insight into the multiple molecular interactions determining AChEI potency that may guide future chemical design and regulation of toxic AChEIs. PMID:26202430

  1. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    Soft materials and structured polymers are extremely useful nanotechnology building blocks. Block copolymers, in particular, have served as 2D masks for nanolithography and 3D scaffolds for photonic crystals, nanoparticle fabrication, and solar cells. F or many of these applications, the precise 3 dimensional structure and the number and type of defects in the polymer is important for ultimate function. However, directly visualizing the 3D structure of a soft material from the nanometer to millimeter length scales is a significant technical challenge. Here, we propose to develop the instrumentation needed for direct 3D structure determination at near nanometer resolution throughout a nearly millimeter-cubed volume of a soft, potentially heterogeneous, material. This new capability will be a valuable research tool for LANL missions in chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience. Our approach to soft materials visualization builds upon exciting developments in super-resolution optical microscopy that have occurred over the past two years. To date, these new, truly revolutionary, imaging methods have been developed and almost exclusively used for biological applications. However, in addition to biological cells, these super-resolution imaging techniques hold extreme promise for direct visualization of many important nanostructured polymers and other heterogeneous chemical systems. Los Alamos has a unique opportunity to lead the development of these super-resolution imaging methods for problems of chemical rather than biological significance. While these optical methods are limited to systems transparent to visible wavelengths, we stress that many important functional chemicals such as polymers, glasses, sol-gels, aerogels, or colloidal assemblies meet this requirement, with specific examples including materials designed for optical communication, manipulation, or light-harvesting Our Research Goals are: (1) Develop the instrumentation necessary for imaging materials

  2. Scalable rendering on PC clusters

    SciTech Connect

    WYLIE,BRIAN N.; LEWIS,VASILY; SHIRLEY,DAVID NOYES; PAVLAKOS,CONSTANTINE

    2000-04-25

    This case study presents initial results from research targeted at the development of cost-effective scalable visualization and rendering technologies. The implementations of two 3D graphics libraries based on the popular sort-last and sort-middle parallel rendering techniques are discussed. An important goal of these implementations is to provide scalable rendering capability for extremely large datasets (>> 5 million polygons). Applications can use these libraries for either run-time visualization, by linking to an existing parallel simulation, or for traditional post-processing by linking to an interactive display program. The use of parallel, hardware-accelerated rendering on commodity hardware is leveraged to achieve high performance. Current performance results show that, using current hardware (a small 16-node cluster), they can utilize up to 85% of the aggregate graphics performance and achieve rendering rates in excess of 20 million polygons/second using OpenGL{reg_sign} with lighting, Gouraud shading, and individually specified triangles (not t-stripped).

  3. Joint 3d Estimation of Vehicles and Scene Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menze, M.; Heipke, C.; Geiger, A.

    2015-08-01

    driving. While much progress has been made in recent years, imaging conditions in natural outdoor environments are still very challenging for current reconstruction and recognition methods. In this paper, we propose a novel unified approach which reasons jointly about 3D scene flow as well as the pose, shape and motion of vehicles in the scene. Towards this goal, we incorporate a deformable CAD model into a slanted-plane conditional random field for scene flow estimation and enforce shape consistency between the rendered 3D models and the parameters of all superpixels in the image. The association of superpixels to objects is established by an index variable which implicitly enables model selection. We evaluate our approach on the challenging KITTI scene flow dataset in terms of object and scene flow estimation. Our results provide a prove of concept and demonstrate the usefulness of our method.

  4. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  5. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  6. A 3D nanoscale approach to nebular paleomagnetism in the Semarkona LL3.0 ordinary chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsle, J. F.; Fu, R. R.; Weiss, B. P.; Kasama, T.; Midgley, P. A.; Harrison, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Solar nebular models suggest that magnetic fields are central to the redistribution of mass and angular momentum in the protoplanetary disk. Using individual chondrules with patches of dusty olivine the strength of these magnetic fields can be measured due to presence of nanoscale Fe inclusions. Since chondrules formed by rapid heating and cooling in the early solar nebula, individual chondrules have the potential to record the magnetic field that was present during their formation, and retain this signal for several billion years. Recently the first robust paleointensity measurement of nebular fields was compleated by measureing dusty olivine grains from the Semarkona LL3.0 ordinary chondrite meteorite in a SQUID microscope. (Fu et al. this meeting) Extracting quantitative information from the paleomagnetic meaurements requires a full understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms producing the measured magnetic signal. Here we characterise the magnetic behaviour of the same dusty olivine chondrules, using a variety of electron microscopy techniques. Electron holography and Lorentz imaging confirm the dominance of single vortex (SV) states in the majority of the remanence carriers. In-field measurements demonstrate the high stability of this SV state, making them suitable carriers of paleomagnetic information. We present a 3D volume reconstruction of the dusty olivine using Focussed-Ion-Beam (FIB) slice-and-view tomography. Combining the selective milling properties of FIB with the high spatial resolution of the Scanning Electron Microscope we are able to capture images as we make successive slices through a selected region of the sample. For this initial study we present a collection of 400 images taken every 10 nm as we slice through an 10 μm x 10 μm x 4 μm volume of the dusty olivine patch within a single chondrule. Each image possesses resolution around 10 nm allowing us to resolve particles in both the single domain and single vortex size ranges. Once

  7. The collaboratory for MS3D: a new cyberinfrastructure for the structural elucidation of biological macromolecules and their assemblies using mass spectrometry-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eizadora T; Hawkins, Arie; Kuntz, Irwin D; Rahn, Larry A; Rothfuss, Andrew; Sale, Kenneth; Young, Malin M; Yang, Christine L; Pancerella, Carmen M; Fabris, Daniele

    2008-11-01

    Modern biomedical research is evolving with the rapid growth of diverse data types, biophysical characterization methods, computational tools and extensive collaboration among researchers spanning various communities and having complementary backgrounds and expertise. Collaborating researchers are increasingly dependent on shared data and tools made available by other investigators with common interests, thus forming communities that transcend the traditional boundaries of the single research laboratory or institution. Barriers, however, remain to the formation of these virtual communities, usually due to the steep learning curve associated with becoming familiar with new tools, or with the difficulties associated with transferring data between tools. Recognizing the need for shared reference data and analysis tools, we are developing an integrated knowledge environment that supports productive interactions among researchers. Here we report on our current collaborative environment, which focuses on bringing together structural biologists working in the area of mass spectrometric based methods for the analysis of tertiary and quaternary macromolecular structures (MS3D) called the Collaboratory for MS3D (C-MS3D). C-MS3D is a Web-portal designed to provide collaborators with a shared work environment that integrates data storage and management with data analysis tools. Files are stored and archived along with pertinent meta data in such a way as to allow file handling to be tracked (data provenance) and data files to be searched using keywords and modification dates. While at this time the portal is designed around a specific application, the shared work environment is a general approach to building collaborative work groups. The goal of this is to not only provide a common data sharing and archiving system, but also to assist in the building of new collaborations and to spur the development of new tools and technologies. PMID:18817429

  8. Spatial Visualization by Realistic 3D Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the popular Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization by Rotations (PSVT-R) in isometric drawings was recreated with CAD software that allows 3D solid modeling and rendering to provide more realistic pictorial views. Both the original and the modified PSVT-R tests were given to students and their scores on the two tests were…

  9. Entropy, color, and color rendering.

    PubMed

    Price, Luke L A

    2012-12-01

    The Shannon entropy [Bell Syst. Tech J.27, 379 (1948)] of spectral distributions is applied to the problem of color rendering. With this novel approach, calculations for visual white entropy, spectral entropy, and color rendering are proposed, indices that are unreliant on the subjectivity inherent in reference spectra and color samples. The indices are tested against real lamp spectra, showing a simple and robust system for color rendering assessment. The discussion considers potential roles for white entropy in several areas of color theory and psychophysics and nonextensive entropy generalizations of the entropy indices in mathematical color spaces.

  10. Does fluid infiltration affect the motion of sediment grains? - A 3-D numerical modelling approach using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Rogers, Benedict D.; Fourtakas, Georgios; Mokos, Athanasios; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The processes that cause the creation of a variety of sediment morphological features, e.g. laminated beds, ripples, or dunes, are based on the initial motion of individual sediment grains. However, with experimental techniques it is difficult to measure the flow characteristics, i.e., the velocity of the pore water flow in sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-intrusive way. As a result, the role of fluid infiltration at the surface and in the interior affecting the initiation of motion of a sediment bed is not yet fully understood. Consequently, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid driven sediment transport processes of complex sediment beds composed of irregular shapes. The numerical method Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) satisfies this need. As a meshless and Lagrangian technique, SPH is ideally suited to simulating flows in sediment beds composed of various grain shapes, but also flow around single grains at a high temporal and spatial resolution. The solver chosen is DualSPHysics (www.dual.sphysics.org) since this is validated for a range of flow conditions. For the present investigation a 3-D numerical flume model was generated using SPH with a length of 4.0 cm, a width of 0.05 cm and a height of 0.2 cm where mobile sediment particles were deposited in a recess. An experimental setup was designed to test sediment configurations composed of irregular grain shapes (grain diameter, D50=1000 μm). Each bed consisted of 3500 mobile objects. After the bed generation process, the entire domain was flooded with 18 million fluid particles. To drive the flow, an oscillating motion perpendicular to the bed was applied to the fluid, reaching a peak value of 0.3 cm/s, simulating 4 seconds of real time. The model results showed that flow speeds decreased logarithmically from the top of the domain towards the surface of the beds, indicating a fully developed boundary layer. Analysis of the fluid

  11. 3D Geovisualization & Stylization to Manage Comprehensive and Participative Local Urban Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasebin, M.; Christophe, S.; Jacquinod, F.; Vinesse, A.; Mahon, H.

    2016-10-01

    3D geo-visualization is more and more used and appreciated to support public participation, and is generally used to present predesigned planned projects. Nevertheless, other participatory processes may benefit from such technology such as the elaboration of urban planning documents. In this article, we present one of the objectives of the PLU++ project: the design of a 3D geo-visualization system that eases the participation concerning local urban plans. Through a pluridisciplinary approach, it aims at covering the different aspects of such a system: the simulation of built configurations to represent regulation information, the efficient stylization of these objects to make people understand their meanings and the interaction between 3D simulation and stylization. The system aims at being adaptive according to the participation context and to the dynamic of the participation. It will offer the possibility to modify simulation results and the rendering styles of the 3D representations to support participation. The proposed 3D rendering styles will be used in a set of practical experiments in order to test and validate some hypothesis from past researches of the project members about 3D simulation, 3D semiotics and knowledge about uses.

  12. Faster, higher quality volume visualization for 3D medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Ting

    2008-03-01

    The two major volume visualization methods used in biomedical applications are Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and Volume Rendering (VR), both of which involve the process of creating sets of 2D projections from 3D images. We have developed a new method for very fast, high-quality volume visualization of 3D biomedical images, based on the fact that the inverse of this process (transforming 2D projections into a 3D image) is essentially equivalent to tomographic image reconstruction. This new method uses the 2D projections acquired by the scanner, thereby obviating the need for the two computationally expensive steps currently required in the complete process of biomedical visualization, that is, (i) reconstructing the 3D image from 2D projection data, and (ii) computing the set of 2D projections from the reconstructed 3D image As well as improvements in computation speed, this method also results in improvements in visualization quality, and in the case of x-ray CT we can exploit this quality improvement to reduce radiation dosage. In this paper, demonstrate the benefits of developing biomedical visualization techniques by directly processing the sensor data acquired by body scanners, rather than by processing the image data reconstructed from the sensor data. We show results of using this approach for volume visualization for tomographic modalities, like x-ray CT, and as well as for MRI.

  13. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  14. 3D Multi-Object Segmentation of Cardiac MSCT Imaging by using a Multi-Agent Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fleureau, Julien; Garreau, Mireille; Boulmier, Dominique; Hernandez, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new technique for general purpose, semi-interactive and multi-object segmentation in N-dimensional images, applied to the extraction of cardiac structures in MultiSlice Computed Tomography (MSCT) imaging. The proposed approach makes use of a multi-agent scheme combined with a supervised classification methodology allowing the introduction of a priori information and presenting fast computing times. The multi-agent system is organised around a communicating agent which manages a population of situated agents which segment the image through cooperative and competitive interactions. The proposed technique has been tested on several patient data sets. Some typical results are finally presented and discussed. PMID:18003382

  15. Nd break-up process with considering 3NF at intermediate energies in a 3D approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, M.; Ghasemi, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we have applied a three-dimensional approach to solve the three-nucleon Faddeev equation in the Jacobi momenta space. To this end, we have considered the inhomogeneous part of the Faddeev equation as an appropriate approximation for projectile intermediate energies. As an application the Bonn-B and the Tucson-Melbourne two- and three-nucleon forces have been used for calculating the differential cross section for proton-deuteron break-up process. Finally, comparing our results with the experimental data has been performed for 197 MeV and 346 MeV projectile energies.

  16. RGB Color Calibration for Quantitative Image Analysis: The “3D Thin-Plate Spline” Warping Approach

    PubMed Central

    Menesatti, Paolo; Angelini, Claudio; Pallottino, Federico; Antonucci, Francesca; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Costa, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    In the last years the need to numerically define color by its coordinates in n-dimensional space has increased strongly. Colorimetric calibration is fundamental in food processing and other biological disciplines to quantitatively compare samples' color during workflow with many devices. Several software programmes are available to perform standardized colorimetric procedures, but they are often too imprecise for scientific purposes. In this study, we applied the Thin-Plate Spline interpolation algorithm to calibrate colours in sRGB space (the corresponding Matlab code is reported in the Appendix). This was compared with other two approaches. The first is based on a commercial calibration system (ProfileMaker) and the second on a Partial Least Square analysis. Moreover, to explore device variability and resolution two different cameras were adopted and for each sensor, three consecutive pictures were acquired under four different light conditions. According to our results, the Thin-Plate Spline approach reported a very high efficiency of calibration allowing the possibility to create a revolution in the in-field applicative context of colour quantification not only in food sciences, but also in other biological disciplines. These results are of great importance for scientific color evaluation when lighting conditions are not controlled. Moreover, it allows the use of low cost instruments while still returning scientifically sound quantitative data. PMID:22969337

  17. Computed tomography quantification of pulmonary vessels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as identified by 3D automated approach

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nan; Wei, Xia; Li, Yan; Deng, Lei; Jin, Chen-wang; Guo, Youmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular alteration of the whole lung and individual lobes in patients with COPD, and assess the association between pulmonary vessels and the extent and distribution of emphysema as well as pulmonary function by a 3-dimensional automated approach. A total of 83 computed tomography images from COPD patients were analyzed. Automated computerized approach was used to measure the total number of vessels at the fifth generation. The extent of emphysema (%LAA-950) in the whole lung and individual lobes were also calculated automatically. The association between the vascular number and the extent and distribution of emphysema, as well as the pulmonary function were assessed. Both the vascular number of fifth generation in the upper lobe and in the lower lobe were significantly negatively correlated with %LAA-950 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there were significant, yet weak correlations between the vascular number and FEV1% predicted (R = 0.556, P = 0.039) and FEV1/FVC (R = 0.538, P = 0.047). In contrast, the vascular numbers were strongly correlated with DLco (R = 0.770, P = 0.003). Finally, the vascular number correlated closer with %LAA-950 of upper lobes than with %LAA-950 of lower lobes. Pulmonary vessel alteration can be measured; it is related to the extent of emphysema rather than the distribution of emphysema. PMID:27749587

  18. A Sparsity-Based Approach to 3D Binaural Sound Synthesis Using Time-Frequency Array Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, Maximo; Lopez, JoseJ; Spors, Sascha

    2010-12-01

    Localization of sounds in physical space plays a very important role in multiple audio-related disciplines, such as music, telecommunications, and audiovisual productions. Binaural recording is the most commonly used method to provide an immersive sound experience by means of headphone reproduction. However, it requires a very specific recording setup using high-fidelity microphones mounted in a dummy head. In this paper, we present a novel processing framework for binaural sound recording and reproduction that avoids the use of dummy heads, which is specially suitable for immersive teleconferencing applications. The method is based on a time-frequency analysis of the spatial properties of the sound picked up by a simple tetrahedral microphone array, assuming source sparseness. The experiments carried out using simulations and a real-time prototype confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  19. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  20. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  1. A topology-oriented and tissue-specific approach to detect pleural thickenings from 3D CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerger, C.; Chaisaowong, K.; Knepper, A.; Kraus, T.; Aach, T.

    2009-02-01

    Pleural thickenings are caused by asbestos exposure and may evolve into malignant pleural mesothelioma. The detection of pleural thickenings is today mostly done by a visual inspection of CT data, which is time-consuming and underlies the physician's subjective judgment. We propose a new detection algorithm within our computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system to automatically detect pleural thickenings within CT data. First, pleura contours are identified by thresholding and contour relaxation with a probabilistic model. Subsequently, the approach to automatically detect pleural thickenings is proposed as a two-step procedure. Step one; since pleural thickenings appear as fine-scale occurrences on the rather large-scale pleura contour, a surface-based smoothing algorithm is developed. Pleural thickenings are initially detected as the difference between the original contours and the resulting "healthy" model of the pleura. Step two; as pleural thickenings can expand into the surrounding thoracic tissue, a subsequent tissue-specific segmentation for the initially detected pleural thickenings is performed in order to separate pleural thickenings from the surrounding thoracic tissue. For this purpose, a probabilistic Hounsfield model for pleural thickenings as a mixture of Gaussian distributions has been constructed. The parameters were estimated by applying the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. A model fitting technique in combination with the application of a Gibbs-Markov random field (GMRF) model then allows the tissuespecific segmentation of pleural thickenings with high precision. With these methods, a new approach is presented in order to assure a precise and reproducible detection of pleural mesothelioma in its early stage.

  2. A multiscale 0-D/3-D approach to patient-specific adaptation of a cerebral autoregulation model for computational fluid dynamics studies of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Kaufmann, Tim A S

    2014-06-01

    Neurological complication often occurs during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One of the main causes is hypoperfusion of the cerebral tissue affected by the position of the cannula tip and diminished cerebral autoregulation (CA). Recently, a lumped parameter approach could describe the baroreflex, one of the main mechanisms of cerebral autoregulation, in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of CPB. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF) was overestimated and the physiological meaning of the variables and their impact on the model was unknown. In this study, we use a 0-D control circuit representation of the Baroreflex mechanism, to assess the parameters with respect to their physiological meaning and their influence on CBF. Afterwards the parameters are transferred to 3D-CFD and the static and dynamic behavior of cerebral autoregulation is investigated. The parameters of the baroreflex mechanism can reproduce normotensive, hypertensive and impaired autoregulation behavior. Further on, the proposed model can mimic the effects of anesthetic agents and other factors controlling dynamic CA. The CFD simulations deliver similar results of static and dynamic CBF as the 0-D control circuit. This study shows the feasibility of a multiscale 0-D/3-D approach to include patient-specific cerebral autoregulation into CFD studies. PMID:24746017

  3. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  4. 3D integration approaches for MEMS and CMOS sensors based on a Cu through-silicon-via technology and wafer level bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, L.; Dempwolf, S.; Reuter, D.; Ecke, R.; Gottfried, K.; Schulz, S. E.; Knechtel, R.; Geßner, T.

    2015-05-01

    Technologies for the 3D integration are described within this paper with respect to devices that have to retain a specific minimum wafer thickness for handling purposes (CMOS) and integrity of mechanical elements (MEMS). This implies Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs) with large dimensions and high aspect ratios (HAR). Moreover, as a main objective, the aspired TSV technology had to be universal and scalable with the designated utilization in a MEMS/CMOS foundry. Two TSV approaches are investigated and discussed, in which the TSVs were fabricated either before or after wafer thinning. One distinctive feature is an incomplete TSV Cu-filling, which avoids long processing and complex process control, while minimizing the thermomechanical stress between Cu and Si and related adverse effects in the device. However, the incomplete filling also includes various challenges regarding process integration. A method based on pattern plating is described, in which TSVs are metalized at the same time as the redistribution layer and which eliminates the need for additional planarization and patterning steps. For MEMS, the realization of a protective hermetically sealed capping is crucial, which is addressed in this paper by glass frit wafer level bonding and is discussed for hermetic sealing of MEMS inertial sensors. The TSV based 3D integration technologies are demonstrated on CMOS like test vehicle and on a MEMS device fabricated in Air Gap Insulated Microstructure (AIM) technology.

  5. Left-ventricle segmentation in real-time 3D echocardiography using a hybrid active shape model and optimal graph search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Abiose, Ademola K.; Campbell, Dwayne N.; Sonka, Milan; Martins, James B.; Wahle, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the left ventricular shape and motion patterns associated with left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) is essential for diagnosis and treatment planning in congestive heart failure. Real-time 3D echocardiography (RT3DE) used for LVMD analysis is frequently limited by heavy speckle noise or partially incomplete data, thus a segmentation method utilizing learned global shape knowledge is beneficial. In this study, the endocardial surface of the left ventricle (LV) is segmented using a hybrid approach combining active shape model (ASM) with optimal graph search. The latter is used to achieve landmark refinement in the ASM framework. Optimal graph search translates the 3D segmentation into the detection of a minimum-cost closed set in a graph and can produce a globally optimal result. Various information-gradient, intensity distributions, and regional-property terms-are used to define the costs for the graph search. The developed method was tested on 44 RT3DE datasets acquired from 26 LVMD patients. The segmentation accuracy was assessed by surface positioning error and volume overlap measured for the whole LV as well as 16 standard LV regions. The segmentation produced very good results that were not achievable using ASM or graph search alone.

  6. 3-D CFD Simulation and Validation of Oxygen-Rich Hydrocarbon Combustion in a Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injector using a Flamelet-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Brian; Kenny, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Injector design is a critical part of the development of a rocket Thrust Chamber Assembly (TCA). Proper detailed injector design can maximize propulsion efficiency while minimizing the potential for failures in the combustion chamber. Traditional design and analysis methods for hydrocarbon-fuel injector elements are based heavily on empirical data and models developed from heritage hardware tests. Using this limited set of data produces challenges when trying to design a new propulsion system where the operating conditions may greatly differ from heritage applications. Time-accurate, Three-Dimensional (3-D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of combusting flows inside of injectors has long been a goal of the fluid analysis group at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the larger CFD modeling community. CFD simulation can provide insight into the design and function of an injector that cannot be obtained easily through testing or empirical comparisons to existing hardware. However, the traditional finite-rate chemistry modeling approach utilized to simulate combusting flows for complex fuels, such as Rocket Propellant-2 (RP-2), is prohibitively expensive and time consuming even with a large amount of computational resources. MSFC has been working, in partnership with Streamline Numerics, Inc., to develop a computationally efficient, flamelet-based approach for modeling complex combusting flow applications. In this work, a flamelet modeling approach is used to simulate time-accurate, 3-D, combusting flow inside a single Gas Centered Swirl Coaxial (GCSC) injector using the flow solver, Loci-STREAM. CFD simulations were performed for several different injector geometries. Results of the CFD analysis helped guide the design of the injector from an initial concept to a tested prototype. The results of the CFD analysis are compared to data gathered from several hot-fire, single element injector tests performed in the Air Force Research Lab EC-1 test facility

  7. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  8. Automatic detection of artifacts in converted S3D video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokov, Alexander; Vatolin, Dmitriy; Zachesov, Anton; Belous, Alexander; Erofeev, Mikhail

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present algorithms for automatically detecting issues specific to converted S3D content. When a depth-image-based rendering approach produces a stereoscopic image, the quality of the result depends on both the depth maps and the warping algorithms. The most common problem with converted S3D video is edge-sharpness mismatch. This artifact may appear owing to depth-map blurriness at semitransparent edges: after warping, the object boundary becomes sharper in one view and blurrier in the other, yielding binocular rivalry. To detect this problem we estimate the disparity map, extract boundaries with noticeable differences, and analyze edge-sharpness correspondence between views. We pay additional attention to cases involving a complex background and large occlusions. Another problem is detection of scenes that lack depth volume: we present algorithms for detecting at scenes and scenes with at foreground objects. To identify these problems we analyze the features of the RGB image as well as uniform areas in the depth map. Testing of our algorithms involved examining 10 Blu-ray 3D releases with converted S3D content, including Clash of the Titans, The Avengers, and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. The algorithms we present enable improved automatic quality assessment during the production stage.

  9. Unified framework for generation of 3D web visualization for mechatronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severa, O.; Goubej, M.; Konigsmarkova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with development of a unified framework for generation of 3D visualizations of complex mechatronic systems. It provides a high-fidelity representation of executed motion by allowing direct employment of a machine geometry model acquired from a CAD system. Open-architecture multi-platform solution based on latest web standards is achieved by utilizing a web browser as a final 3D renderer. The results are applicable both for simulations and development of real-time human machine interfaces. Case study of autonomous underwater vehicle control is provided to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach.

  10. patGPCR: A Multitemplate Approach for Improving 3D Structure Prediction of Transmembrane Helices of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongjie; Lü, Qiang; Quan, Lijun; Qian, Peide; Xia, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    The structures of the seven transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors are critically involved in many aspects of these receptors, such as receptor stability, ligand docking, and molecular function. Most of the previous multitemplate approaches have built a “super” template with very little merging of aligned fragments from different templates. Here, we present a parallelized multitemplate approach, patGPCR, to predict the 3D structures of transmembrane helices of G-protein-coupled receptors. patGPCR, which employs a bundle-packing related energy function that extends on the RosettaMem energy, parallelizes eight pipelines for transmembrane helix refinement and exchanges the optimized helix structures from multiple templates. We have investigated the performance of patGPCR on a test set containing eight determined G-protein-coupled receptors. The results indicate that patGPCR improves the TM RMSD of the predicted models by 33.64% on average against a single-template method. Compared with other homology approaches, the best models for five of the eight targets built by patGPCR had a lower TM RMSD than that obtained from SWISS-MODEL; patGPCR also showed lower average TM RMSD than single-template and multiple-template MODELLER. PMID:23554839

  11. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  12. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Thomas; Post, Frits H.; Botha, Charl P.

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT), coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR). With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license. PMID:22768292

  13. Exposure render: an interactive photo-realistic volume rendering framework.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Thomas; Post, Frits H; Botha, Charl P

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT), coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR). With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license.

  14. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  15. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26562233

  16. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  17. Non-photorealistic rendering for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Jens; Schäfer, Henry; Brost, Alexander; Stamminger, Marc; Pfister, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms are a common disease of the aorta which are treated minimally invasive in about 33 % of the cases. Treatment is done by placing a stent graft in the aorta to prevent the aneurysm from growing. Guidance during the procedure is facilitated by fluoroscopic imaging. Unfortunately, due to low soft tissue contrast in X-ray images, the aorta itself is not visible without the application of contrast agent. To overcome this issue, advanced techniques allow to segment the aorta from pre-operative data, such as CT or MRI. Overlay images are then subsequently rendered from a mesh representation of the segmentation and fused to the live fluoroscopic images with the aim of improving the visibility of the aorta during the procedure. The current overlay images typically use forward projections of the mesh representation. This fusion technique shows deficiencies in both the 3-D information of the overlay and the visibility of the fluoroscopic image underneath. We present a novel approach to improve the visualization of the overlay images using non-photorealistic rendering techniques. Our method preserves the visibility of the devices in the fluoroscopic images while, at the same time, providing 3-D information of the fused volume. The evaluation by clinical experts shows that our method is preferred over current state-of-the-art overlay techniques. We compared three visualization techniques to the standard visualization. Our silhouette approach was chosen by clinical experts with 67 %, clearly showing the superiority of our new approach.

  18. 2D to 3D conversion implemented in different hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Huitron, Victor; Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Hernandez-Fragoso, Araceli

    2015-02-01

    Conversion of available 2D data for release in 3D content is a hot topic for providers and for success of the 3D applications, in general. It naturally completely relies on virtual view synthesis of a second view given by original 2D video. Disparity map (DM) estimation is a central task in 3D generation but still follows a very difficult problem for rendering novel images precisely. There exist different approaches in DM reconstruction, among them manually and semiautomatic methods that can produce high quality DMs but they demonstrate hard time consuming and are computationally expensive. In this paper, several hardware implementations of designed frameworks for an automatic 3D color video generation based on 2D real video sequence are proposed. The novel framework includes simultaneous processing of stereo pairs using the following blocks: CIE L*a*b* color space conversions, stereo matching via pyramidal scheme, color segmentation by k-means on an a*b* color plane, and adaptive post-filtering, DM estimation using stereo matching between left and right images (or neighboring frames in a video), adaptive post-filtering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. Novel technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7, and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode. The time values needed, mean Similarity Structural Index Measure (SSIM) and Bad Matching Pixels (B) values for different hardware implementations (GPU, Single CPU, and DSP) are exposed in this paper.

  19. On detailed 3D reconstruction of large indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Egor

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present techniques for highly detailed 3D reconstruction of extra large indoor environments. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of low-range, far-range and hybrid sensing and reconstruction approaches. The proposed techniques for low-range and hybrid reconstruction, enabling the reconstruction density of 125 points/cm3 on large 100.000 m3 models, are presented in detail. The techniques tackle the core challenges for the above requirements, such as a multi-modal data fusion (fusion of a LIDAR data with a Kinect data), accurate sensor pose estimation, high-density scanning and depth data noise filtering. Other important aspects for extra large 3D indoor reconstruction are the point cloud decimation and real-time rendering. In this paper, we present a method for planar-based point cloud decimation, allowing for reduction of a point cloud size by 80-95%. Besides this, we introduce a method for online rendering of extra large point clouds enabling real-time visualization of huge cloud spaces in conventional web browsers.

  20. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  1. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  2. Self consistent particles dynamics in/out of the cusp region by using back tracking technics; a global 3D PIC simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Cai, D.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale three dimensionbal PIC (particle in cell) simulations are presently used in order to analyze the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere intreraction within a full self-consistent approach, and where both electrons and ions are treated as an assembly of individual particles. This 3D kinetic approach allows us to analyze in particular the dynamics and the fine structures of the cusp region when including self consistently not only its whole neighborhood (in the terrestrial magnetosphere) but also the impact of the solar wind and the interplanetary field (IMF) features. Herein, we focuss our attention on the cusp region and in particular on the acceleration and precipitation of particles (both ions and electrons) within the cusp. In present simulations, the IMF is chosen northward, (i.e. where the X -reconnection region is just above the cusp, in the meridian plane). Back-trackings of self-consistent particles are analyzed in details in order to determine (i) which particles (just above the cusp) are precipitated deeply into the cusp, (ii) which populations are injected from the cusp into the nearby tail, (iii) where the particles suffer the largest energisation along their self-consistent trajectories, (iv) where these populations accumulate, and (v) where the most energetic particles are originally coming from. This approach allows to make a traking of particles within the scenario "solar wind-magnetosheath- cusp -nearbytail"; moreover it strongly differs from the standard test particles technics and allows to provide informations not accessible when using full MHD approach. Keywords: Tracing Particles, Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation, double cusp, test particles method, IMF, Solar wind, Magnetosphere

  3. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  4. Fast volume rendering for medical image.

    PubMed

    Ying, Hu; Xin-He, Xu

    2005-01-01

    In orders to improve the rendering speed of ray casting and make this technique a practical routine in medical applications, two new and improved techniques are described in this paper. First, an integrated method using "proximity clouds" technique is applied to speed up ray casting. The second technique for speeding up the 3D rendering is done through a parallel implementation based on "single computer multi CPU" model Four groups of CT data sets have been used to validate the improvement of the rendering speed. The result shown that the interactive rendering speed is up to 6-10 fps, which is almost real-time making our algorithm practical in medical visualization routine.

  5. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Attili, A; Vignati, A; Giordanengo, S; Kraan, A; Dalmasso, F; Battistoni, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET

  6. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  7. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  8. The CIFIST 3D model atmosphere grid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Bonifacio, P.; Kučinskas, A.

    Grids of stellar atmosphere models and associated synthetic spectra are numerical products which have a large impact in astronomy due to their ubiquitous application in the interpretation of radiation from individual stars and stellar populations. 3D model atmospheres are now on the verge of becoming generally available for a wide range of stellar atmospheric parameters. We report on efforts to develop a grid of 3D model atmospheres for late-type stars within the CIFIST Team at Paris Observatory. The substantial demands in computational and human labor for the model production and post-processing render this apparently mundane task a challenging logistic exercise. At the moment the CIFIST grid comprises 77 3D model atmospheres with emphasis on dwarfs of solar and sub-solar metallicities. While the model production is still ongoing, first applications are already worked upon by the CIFIST Team and collaborators.

  9. Morphologic Study of Superior Temporal Sulcus-Amygdaloid Body and Lateral Fissure-Amygdaloid Body Surgical Approach by Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volume Rendering.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yuan; Ren, Bichen; Chang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jinnan; Li, Youqiong; Duan, Haobo; Cheng, Kailiang; Wang, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    In this research, 83 patients were measured by magnetic resonance imaging volume rendering technique. The authors acquired the curve length of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure on the cerebral hemisphere, the shortest distance from the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the center of amygdaloid body separately, the vertical diameter, the transversal diameter, and the anteroposterior diameter of the amygdaloid body and the 2 approach angles between the median sagittal plane and the shortest segment from the superior temporal sulcus to the center of amygdaloid body and the shortest segment from lateral fissure to the center of the amygdaloid body. At the same time, we preliminarily oriented the 2 points of the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure, which are closest to the center of amygdaloid body, aimed at finding out the best entrance points of surgical approach through the superior temporal sulcus and the lateral fissure to the amygdaloid body and reducing the damage to the nerve fibers or blood vessels during the operation. The results indicate that the point at the front side 1/4 of the superior temporal sulcus may be the ideal surgical approach entrance point and the point at the front side 1/3 of the lateral fissure. There is no difference between 2 cerebral hemispheres (P < 0.05).

  10. Computer-aided 3D-shape construction of hearts from CT images for rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kato, Yutaro; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Ozawa, Seiichiro; Shiraishi, Isao

    2012-03-01

    By developing a computer-aided modeling system, the 3D shapes of infant's heart have been constructed interactively from quality-limited CT images for rapid prototyping of biomodels. The 3D model was obtained by following interactive steps: (1) rough region cropping, (2) outline extraction in each slice with locally-optimized threshold, (3) verification and correction of outline overlap, (4) 3D surface generation of inside wall, (5) connection of inside walls, (6) 3D surface generation of outside wall, (7) synthesis of self-consistent 3D surface. The manufactured biomodels revealed characteristic 3D shapes of heart such as left atrium and ventricle, aortic arch and right auricle. Their real shape of cavity and vessel is suitable for surgery planning and simulation. It is a clear advantage over so-called "blood-pool" model which is massive and often found in 3D visualization of CT images as volume rendering perspective. The developed system contributed both to quality improvement and to modeling-time reduction, which may suggest a practical approach to establish a routine process for manufacturing heart biomodels. Further study on the system performance is now still in progress.

  11. Discovery of new inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA enzyme using virtual screening and a 3D-pharmacophore-based approach.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Ivani; dos Santos, Ricardo N; Rostirolla, Diana C; Martinelli, Leonardo K; Ducati, Rodrigo G; Timmers, Luís F S M; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S; Guido, Rafael V C; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar

    2013-09-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA (MtInhA) is an attractive enzyme to drug discovery efforts due to its validation as an effective biological target for tuberculosis therapy. In this work, two different virtual-ligand-screening approaches were applied in order to identify new InhA inhibitors' candidates from a library of ligands selected from the ZINC database. First, a 3-D pharmacophore model was built based on 36 available MtInhA crystal structures. By combining structure-based and ligand-based information, four pharmacophoric points were designed to select molecules able to satisfy the binding features of MtInhA substrate-binding cavity. The second approach consisted of using four well established docking programs, with different search algorithms, to compare the binding mode and score of the selected molecules from the aforementioned library. After detailed analyses of the results, six ligands were selected for in vitro analysis. Three of these molecules presented a satisfactory inhibitory activity with IC50 values ranging from 24 (±2) μM to 83 (±5) μM. The best compound presented an uncompetitive inhibition mode to NADH and 2-trans-dodecenoyl-CoA substrates, with Ki values of 24 (±3) μM and 20 (±2) μM, respectively. These molecules were not yet described as antituberculars or as InhA inhibitors, making its novelty interesting to start efforts on ligand optimization in order to identify new effective drugs against tuberculosis having InhA as a target. More studies are underway to dissect the discovered uncompetitive inhibitor interactions with MtInhA.

  12. Human in vitro 3D co-culture model to engineer vascularized bone-mimicking tissues combining computational tools and statistical experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Arrigoni, Chiara; Talò, Giuseppe; Zamai, Moreno; Zagra, Luigi; Caiolfa, Valeria; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functional, vascularized tissues is a key challenge for both tissue engineering applications and the development of advanced in vitro models analyzing interactions among circulating cells, endothelium and organ-specific microenvironments. Since vascularization is a complex process guided by multiple synergic factors, it is critical to analyze the specific role that different experimental parameters play in the generation of physiological tissues. Our goals were to design a novel meso-scale model bridging the gap between microfluidic and macro-scale studies, and high-throughput screen the effects of multiple variables on the vascularization of bone-mimicking tissues. We investigated the influence of endothelial cell (EC) density (3-5 Mcells/ml), cell ratio among ECs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteo-differentiated MSCs (1:1:0, 10:1:0, 10:1:1), culture medium (endothelial, endothelial + angiopoietin-1, 1:1 endothelial/osteo), hydrogel type (100%fibrin, 60%fibrin+40%collagen), tissue geometry (2 × 2 × 2, 2 × 2 × 5 mm(3)). We optimized the geometry and oxygen gradient inside hydrogels through computational simulations and we analyzed microvascular network features including total network length/area and vascular branch number/length. Particularly, we employed the "Design of Experiment" statistical approach to identify key differences among experimental conditions. We combined the generation of 3D functional tissue units with the fine control over the local microenvironment (e.g. oxygen gradients), and developed an effective strategy to enable the high-throughput screening of multiple experimental parameters. Our approach allowed to identify synergic correlations among critical parameters driving microvascular network development within a bone-mimicking environment and could be translated to any vascularized tissue.

  13. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  14. Interactive 3-D graphics workstations in stereotaxy: clinical requirements, algorithms, and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehricke, Hans-Heino; Daiber, Gerhard; Sonntag, Ralf; Strasser, Wolfgang; Lochner, Mathias; Rudi, Lothar S.; Lorenz, Walter J.

    1992-09-01

    In stereotactic treatment planning the spatial relationships between a variety of objects has to be taken into account in order to avoid destruction of vital brain structures and rupture of vasculature. The visualization of these highly complex relations may be supported by 3-D computer graphics methods. In this context the three-dimensional display of the intracranial vascular tree and additional objects, such as neuroanatomy, pathology, stereotactic devices, or isodose surfaces, is of high clinical value. We report an advanced rendering method for a depth-enhanced maximum intensity projection from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a walk-through approach to the analysis of MRA volume data. Furthermore, various methods for a multiple-object 3-D rendering in stereotaxy are discussed. The development of advanced applications in medical imaging can hardly be successful if image acquisition problems are disregarded. We put particular emphasis on the use of conventional MRI and MRA for stereotactic guidance. The problem of MR distortion is discussed and a novel three- dimensional approach to the quantification and correction of the distortion patterns is presented. Our results suggest that the sole use of MR for stereotactic guidance is highly practical. The true three-dimensionality of the acquired datasets opens up new perspectives to stereotactic treatment planning. For the first time it is possible now to integrate all the necessary information into 3-D scenes, thus enabling an interactive 3-D planning.

  15. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  16. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  17. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models.

  18. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  19. Comparison of volume-rendered and surface-rendered MR colonography.

    PubMed

    Heuschmid, Martin; Luz, Oliver; Schaefer, Juergen F; Stuecker, Dietmar; Vonthein, Reinhard; Luboldt, Wolfgang; Claussen, Claus D; Seemann, Marcus D

    2003-02-01

    In the United States and Europe, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. It is well known that colorectal carcinomas may originate from preexisting adenomas. For the visualization of colorectal cancer and other pathologic changes such as polyps, two 3D methods (volume-rendering (VR) and surface-rendering (SR)) in MR colonography were compared in our study. MR colonography was carried out in 17 patients on a 1.5 T MR scanner using a 10 mmolar gadolinium water solution enema. Coronal as well as rotated VR and SR views were compared in order to examine the technical quality (TQ) of the visualization model and grade of confidence (GC) in the pathological findings. Colonoscopic findings revealed 8 colorectal carcinoma, 10 patients with polyps, 4 diverticular disease, and 2 with redundant bowel loops. Based on a total of 248 colonic segments for both visualization methods, volume rendering were significantly superior to surface rendering for both, TQ (p<0.0001) and GC (p<0.0001). Volume rendering and surface rendering were not dependent on individual colon segments (p=0.13 for TQ and p=0.18 for GC) or on image rotation (p=0.06 for TQ and p=0.062 for GC). It is also independent of the type of pathology (p=0.31 for TQ and p=0.42 for GC) and the reviewers (p=0.62 for TQ and p=0.88 for GC). This indicates, that for the purpose of interpreting the technical quality and pathological findings, volume rendering is superior to surface rendering in MR colonography. Volume rendering could be used as an 3D visualization tool, enabling MR colonography examinations to be completed sooner in cases where colon distension is sufficient, and it would also provide an overview of potential mass lesions. PMID:12625749

  20. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  1. Interactive rendering of dynamic geometry.

    PubMed

    Ponchio, Federico; Hormann, Kai

    2008-01-01

    Fluid simulations typically produce complex three-dimensional (3D) isosurfaces whose geometry and topology change over time. The standard way of representing such "dynamic geometry" is by a set of isosurfaces that are extracted individually at certain time steps. An alternative strategy is to represent the whole sequence as a four-dimensional (4D) tetrahedral mesh. The iso-surface at a specific time step can then be computed by intersecting the tetrahedral mesh with a 3D hyperplane. This not only allows the animation of the surface continuously over time without having to worry about the topological changes, but also enables simplification algorithms to exploit temporal coherence. We show how to interactively render such 4D tetrahedral meshes by improving previous GPU-accelerated techniques and building an out-of-core multi-resolution structure based on quadric error simplification. As a second application, we apply our framework to time-varying surfaces that result from morphing one triangle mesh into another. PMID:18467764

  2. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  3. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  4. Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

    1995-07-01

    As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

  5. DspaceOgreTerrain 3D Terrain Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    DspaceOgreTerrain is an extension to the DspaceOgre 3D visualization tool that supports real-time visualization of various terrain types, including digital elevation maps, planets, and meshes. DspaceOgreTerrain supports creating 3D representations of terrains and placing them in a scene graph. The 3D representations allow for a continuous level of detail, GPU-based rendering, and overlaying graphics like wheel tracks and shadows. It supports reading data from the SimScape terrain- modeling library. DspaceOgreTerrain solves the problem of displaying the results of simulations that involve very large terrains. In the past, it has been used to visualize simulations of vehicle traverses on Lunar and Martian terrains. These terrains were made up of billions of vertices and would not have been renderable in real-time without using a continuous level of detail rendering technique.

  6. High-quality slab-based intermixing method for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Joon; Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Juneseuk; Kim, Kyoung Won; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of multiple 3D objects has been increasingly required for recent applications in medical fields. Due to the heterogeneity in data representation or data configuration, it is difficult to efficiently render multiple medical objects in high quality. In this paper, we present a novel intermixing scheme for fusion rendering of multiple medical objects while preserving the real-time performance. First, we present an in-slab visibility interpolation method for the representation of subdivided slabs. Second, we introduce virtual zSlab, which extends an infinitely thin boundary (such as polygonal objects) into a slab with a finite thickness. Finally, based on virtual zSlab and in-slab visibility interpolation, we propose a slab-based visibility intermixing method with the newly proposed rendering pipeline. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method delivers more effective multiple-object renderings in terms of rendering quality, compared to conventional approaches. And proposed intermixing scheme provides high-quality intermixing results for the visualization of intersecting and overlapping surfaces by resolving aliasing and z-fighting problems. Moreover, two case studies are presented that apply the proposed method to the real clinical applications. These case studies manifest that the proposed method has the outstanding advantages of the rendering independency and reusability.

  7. A Learner-Centered Approach for Training Science Teachers through Virtual Reality and 3D Visualization Technologies: Practical Experience for Sharing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Yau-Yuen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presentation will report on how some science educators at the Science Department of The Hong Kong Institute of Education have successfully employed an array of innovative learning media such as three-dimensional (3D) and virtual reality (VR) technologies to create seven sets of resource kits, most of which are being placed on the…

  8. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-01

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds.

  9. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds. PMID:26758780

  10. A synergistic approach to the design, fabrication and evaluation of 3D printed micro and nano featured scaffolds for vascularized bone tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Benjamin; Bulusu, Kartik; Plesniak, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-02-12

    3D bioprinting has begun to show great promise in advancing the development of functional tissue/organ replacements. However, to realize the true potential of 3D bioprinted tissues for clinical use requires the fabrication of an interconnected and effective vascular network. Solving this challenge is critical, as human tissue relies on an adequate network of blood vessels to transport oxygen, nutrients, other chemicals, biological factors and waste, in and out of the tissue. Here, we have successfully designed and printed a series of novel 3D bone scaffolds with both bone formation supporting structures and highly interconnected 3D microvascular mimicking channels, for efficient and enhanced osteogenic bone regeneration as well as vascular cell growth. Using a chemical functionalization process, we have conjugated our samples with nano hydroxyapatite (nHA), for the creation of novel micro and nano featured devices for vascularized bone growth. We evaluated our scaffolds with mechanical testing, hydrodynamic measurements and in vitro human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) adhesion (4 h), proliferation (1, 3 and 5 d) and osteogenic differentiation (1, 2 and 3 weeks). These tests confirmed bone-like physical properties and vascular-like flow profiles, as well as demonstrated enhanced hMSC adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Additional in vitro experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells also demonstrated improved vascular cell growth, migration and organization on micro-nano featured scaffolds.

  11. Brandenburg 3D - a comprehensive 3D Subsurface Model, Conception of an Infrastructure Node and a Web Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, Dorit; Schilling, Maik; Simon, Andreas; Wächter, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    The Energiewende and the increasing scarcity of raw materials will lead to an intensified utilization of the subsurface in Germany. Within this context, geological 3D modeling is a fundamental approach for integrated decision and planning processes. Initiated by the development of the European Geospatial Infrastructure INSPIRE, the German State Geological Offices started digitizing their predominantly analog archive inventory. Until now, a comprehensive 3D subsurface model of Brandenburg did not exist. Therefore the project B3D strived to develop a new 3D model as well as a subsequent infrastructure node to integrate all geological and spatial data within the Geodaten-Infrastruktur Brandenburg (Geospatial Infrastructure, GDI-BB) and provide it to the public through an interactive 2D/3D web application. The functionality of the web application is based on a client-server architecture. Server-sided, all available spatial data is published through GeoServer. GeoServer is designed for interoperability and acts as the reference implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Service (WFS) standard that provides the interface that allows requests for geographical features. In addition, GeoServer implements, among others, the high performance certified compliant Web Map Service (WMS) that serves geo-referenced map images. For publishing 3D data, the OGC Web 3D Service (W3DS), a portrayal service for three-dimensional geo-data, is used. The W3DS displays elements representing the geometry, appearance, and behavior of geographic objects. On the client side, the web application is solely based on Free and Open Source Software and leans on the JavaScript API WebGL that allows the interactive rendering of 2D and 3D graphics by means of GPU accelerated usage of physics and image processing as part of the web page canvas without the use of plug-ins. WebGL is supported by most web browsers (e.g., Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Opera). The web

  12. 3D Visualization of Astronomical Data with Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, B. R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the innovative use of Blender, a 3D graphics package, for astronomical visualization. With a Python API and feature rich interface, Blender lends itself well to many 3D data visualization scenarios including data cube rendering, N-body simulations, catalog displays, and surface maps. We focus on the aspects of the software most useful to astronomers such as visual data exploration, applying data to Blender object constructs, and using graphics processing units (GPUs) for rendering. We share examples from both observational data and theoretical models to illustrate how the software can fit into an astronomer's toolkit.

  13. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Docchio, Franco

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D) shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a “sensor fusion” approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications. PMID:22389618

  14. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  15. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent important sources of geological information. The granitic rocks of the Haslital valley (Switzerland) show very good outcrop conditions to study these mechanical anisotropies. Furthermore, they permit a quantitative characterisation of the above-mentioned deformation structures on the large-scale, in terms of their 3D orientation, 3D spatial distribution, kinematics and evolution in 3D. A key problem while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. That is especially true in regions, where only little or even no "hard" underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismics) is available. In the study area, many subsurface data are available (e.g. cross sections, tunnel and pipeline mappings, bore holes etc.). Therefore, two methods dealing with the problems mentioned are developed: (1) A data acquisition, processing and visualisation method, (2) A methodology to improve the reliability of 3D models regarding the spatial trend of geological structures with increasing depth: 1) Using aerial photographs and a high-resolution digital elevation model, a GIS-based remote-sensing structural map of large-scale structural elements (shear zones, faults) of the study area was elaborated. Based on that lineament map, (i) a shear zone map was derived and (ii) a geostatistical analysis was applied to identify sub regions applicable for serving as field areas to test the methodology presented above. During fieldwork, the shear zone map was evaluated by verifying the occurrence and spatial distribution of the structures designated by remote sensing. Additionally, the geometry of the structures (e.g. 3D orientation, width, kinematics) was characterised and parameterised accordingly. These tasks were partially done using a GPS based Slate

  16. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  17. 3D whiteboard: collaborative sketching with 3D-tracked smart phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, James; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2014-02-01

    We present the results of our investigation of the feasibility of a new approach for collaborative drawing in 3D, based on Android smart phones. Our approach utilizes a number of fiduciary markers, placed in the working area where they can be seen by the smart phones' cameras, in order to estimate the pose of each phone in the room. Our prototype allows two users to draw 3D objects with their smart phones by moving their phones around in 3D space. For example, 3D lines are drawn by recording the path of the phone as it is moved around in 3D space, drawing line segments on the screen along the way. Each user can see the virtual drawing space on their smart phones' displays, as if the display was a window into this space. Besides lines, our prototype application also supports 3D geometry creation, geometry transformation operations, and it shows the location of the other user's phone.

  18. 3D Exploration of Meteorological Data: Facing the challenges of operational forecasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutek, Michal; Debie, Frans; van der Neut, Ian

    2016-04-01

    In the past years the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) has been working on innovation in the field of meteorological data visualization. We are dealing with Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model data and observational data, i.e. satellite images, precipitation radar, ground and air-borne measurements. These multidimensional multivariate data are geo-referenced and can be combined in 3D space to provide more intuitive views on the atmospheric phenomena. We developed the Weather3DeXplorer (W3DX), a visualization framework for processing and interactive exploration and visualization using Virtual Reality (VR) technology. We managed to have great successes with research studies on extreme weather situations. In this paper we will elaborate what we have learned from application of interactive 3D visualization in the operational weather room. We will explain how important it is to control the degrees-of-freedom during interaction that are given to the users: forecasters/scientists; (3D camera and 3D slicing-plane navigation appear to be rather difficult for the users, when not implemented properly). We will present a novel approach of operational 3D visualization user interfaces (UI) that for a great deal eliminates the obstacle and the time it usually takes to set up the visualization parameters and an appropriate camera view on a certain atmospheric phenomenon. We have found our inspiration in the way our operational forecasters work in the weather room. We decided to form a bridge between 2D visualization images and interactive 3D exploration. Our method combines WEB-based 2D UI's, pre-rendered 3D visualization catalog for the latest NWP model runs, with immediate entry into interactive 3D session for selected visualization setting. Finally, we would like to present the first user experiences with this approach.

  19. 3D Lasers Increase Efficiency, Safety of Moving Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Canadian company Neptec Design Group Ltd. developed its Laser Camera System, used by shuttles to render 3D maps of their hulls for assessing potential damage. Using NASA funding, the firm incorporated LiDAR technology and created the TriDAR 3D sensor. Its commercial arm, Neptec Technologies Corp., has sold the technology to Orbital Sciences, which uses it to guide its Cygnus spacecraft during rendezvous and dock operations at the International Space Station.

  20. Novel irregular mesh tagging algorithm for wound synthesis on a 3D face.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangyong; Chin, Seongah

    2015-01-01

    Recently, advanced visualizing techniques in computer graphics have considerably enhanced the visual appearance of synthetic models. To realize enhanced visual graphics for synthetic medical effects, the first step followed by rendering techniques involves attaching albedo textures to the region where a certain graphic is to be rendered. For instance, in order to render wound textures efficiently, the first step is to recognize the area where the user wants to attach a wound. However, in general, face indices are not stored in sequential order, which makes sub-texturing difficult. In this paper, we present a novel mesh tagging algorithm that utilizes a task for mesh traversals and level extension in the general case of a wound sub-texture mapping and a selected region deformation in a three-dimensional (3D) model. This method works automatically on both regular and irregular mesh surfaces. The approach consists of mesh selection (MS), mesh leveling (ML), and mesh tagging (MT). To validate our approach, we performed experiments for synthesizing wounds on a 3D face model and on a simulated mesh. PMID:26405904

  1. [Chaotic artificial bee colony algorithm: a new approach to the problem of minimization of energy of the 3D protein structure].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Guo, G D; Chen, L F

    2013-01-01

    Frediction of the three-dimensional structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence can be considered as a global optimization problem. In this paper, the Chaotic Artificial Bee Colony (CABC) algorithm was introduced and applied to 3D protein structure prediction. Based on the 3D off-lattice AB model, the CABC algorithm combines global search and local search of the Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm with the Chaotic search algorithm to avoid the problem of premature convergence and easily trapping the local optimum solution. The experiments carried out with the popular Fibonacci sequences demonstrate that the proposed algorithm provides an effective and high-performance method for protein structure prediction. PMID:25509864

  2. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  3. Full Three-Dimensional Approach: Seismic Structure of the Mantle Beneath Western Pacific Using 3-D Fréchet Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Zhao, L.; Jordan, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a full three-dimensional (3-D) model of the shear-speed structure for the mantle beneath western Pacific Ocean. Over 800 three-component recordings of earthquakes (Mw > 5.5) from the seismic zones around the western Pacific rim to station HON/KIP in Hawaii, MIDW in Midway, MAT/MAJO and ERM in Japan, and GUMO in Mariana Island were processed to obtain ~20,000 frequency-dependent phase delays for various of seismic waves, including S, SS, upper-mantle guided and surface waves, and ScS reverberations. The 3-D Fréchet kernels for these delay times are computed by the coupled normal mode theory described by Zhao, Jordan, and Chapman (2000), and the measurements were inverted for a 3-D radially anisotropic shear-speed model using a linear Gaussian-Bayesian scheme. The model parameters include shear-speed variations throughout the mantle and perturbations to radial shear-wave anisotropy in the uppermost mantle. The resolving power of the inversion has been investigated through a series of checkerboard and other tests, which indicate that the horizontal and vertical resolving lengths of about 700 and 200 km or less in the upper mantle. Our results for the large-scale variations in the isotropic shear speeds are generally consistent with published global tomographic models. For example, the uppermost mantle (< 200 km depth) shows fast anomalies in the interior of the Pacific plate and slow anomalies in the marginal basins along the Pacific rim, while this pattern is reversed in the transition zone (400-700 km). Our model reveals greater lateral heterogeneity than the global models, especially in the 200-400 km depth range, suggesting a complex 3-D mantle flow in the western Pacific upper mantle.

  4. Application of innovative rendering techniques for the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) scene generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, Thomas P.

    2003-09-01

    A revolution is underway within commercial PC video graphics, driven mainly by the 3-D gaming community and its demands for customizable lighting effects and realistic, visually appealing, 3-D rendering. This revolution is bringing about a configurable transformation and lighting (T&L) engine within modern PC video graphics hardware. The results of these technological advancements will profoundly impact the way computer-based rendering is done. Although PC graphics hardware continues to change rapidly, it has evolved to the point where it can be made to address most of the Hardware-In-the-Loop (HWIL) scene generation demands which historically could be accomplished only on costly graphics workstations. With the ability to control how operations are performed within the hardware rendering process, it is possible to implement customized per-pixel spatial and lighting effects. To illustrate how these capabilities can be applied to solve certain HWIL scene generation problems. A graphics hardware approach will be implemented to demonstrate a method of achieving increased monochrome intensity resolution and a user-defined spatial distortion. There is great potential in modern graphics hardware. The limits are becoming less a function of the hardware capabilities and more a function of the ability of engineers and scientists to exploit the functionality of this rapidly advancing hardware rendering technology.

  5. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  6. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  7. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  9. Comparative analysis of shell rendering and shear-warp rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Alexandre X.; Rocha, Leonardo M.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2002-05-01

    In Medical Imaging, shell rendering and shear-warp rendering are two of the most efficient and effective voxel-based techniques for volume visualization. This work presents a comparative analysis of shell rendering and shear-warp rendering in terms of storage, speed, and image quality. We have chosen 10 different objects of various sizes, shapes and topologies and one 1-GHz Pentium-III PC with 512 MB RAM for our experiments. Hard and fuzzy boundaries of up to 2,833 K voxels in size have been created to test both methods in surface and volume rendering, respectively. Hard surface shell rendering and surface shear-warp rendering required less than 0.5 second. In the worst case, volume shell rendering required 1.45 second, while volume shear-warp rendering spent 0.65 second for the same task. Shear-warp rendering uses on average from 3 to 6 times more memory space than shell rendering, but it can be up to 2.79 times faster than shell rendering. On average, shear-warp rendering is as fast as shell rendering for hard boundaries and 1.7 times faster than shell rendering for fuzzy boundaries. We have also observed that both can produce similar high-quality images.

  10. Efficient streaming of stereoscopic depth-based 3D videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Dogancan; Aabed, Mohammed; Solh, Mashhour; AlRegib, Ghaassan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to extract depth from motion, texture and intensity. We first analyze the depth map to extract a set of depth cues. Then, based on these depth cues, we process the colored reference video, using texture, motion, luminance and chrominance content, to extract the depth map. The processing of each channel in the YCRCB-color space is conducted separately. We tested this approach on different video sequences with different monocular properties. The results of our simulations show that the extracted depth maps generate a 3D video with quality close to the video rendered using the ground truth depth map. We report objective results using 3VQM and subjective analysis via comparison of rendered images. Furthermore, we analyze the savings in bitrate as a consequence of eliminating the need for two video codecs, one for the reference color video and one for the depth map. In this case, only the depth cues are sent as a side information to the color video.

  11. New approach to mudflow formation as a 3D-process of interaction for surface water and groundwater due to base alimentation in the river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Arakelian, Mileta; Arakelian, Sergei

    2013-04-01

    ). Ground water is accumulated in the crack area; the mechanism of this 3D-process is connected with the inner (deep) pressure, as well as with capillary forces. For that, a certain area, called a mudflow gate, is being created in the river channel. This zone is the origin of an intensive ground feeding of the mudflow pulse (due to the pressure difference). It results in a sudden release of the ground water bringing in essential contribution to the surface phenomena. These processes are basic for forming a river basin, and have a permanent influence on the drainage network functioning. 4. Within the framework of this conception, as an example, we give a brief analysis of the possible reasons for the recent catastrophic flood in the town of Krimsk, Russia (July, 2012).

  12. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  13. From Voxels to Knowledge: A Practical Guide to the Segmentation of Complex Electron Microscopy 3D-Data

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Ting; Hassan, Ahmed; Sarkar, Purbasha; Correa, Joaquin; Metlagel, Zoltan; Jorgens, Danielle M.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Modern 3D electron microscopy approaches have recently allowed unprecedented insight into the 3D ultrastructural organization of cells and tissues, enabling the visualization of large macromolecular machines, such as adhesion complexes, as well as higher-order structures, such as the cytoskeleton and cellular organelles in their respective cell and tissue context. Given the inherent complexity of cellular volumes, it is essential to first extract the features of interest in order to allow visualization, quantification, and therefore comprehension of their 3D organization. Each data set is defined by distinct characteristics, e.g., signal-to-noise ratio, crispness (sharpness) of the data, heterogeneity of its features, crowdedness of features, presence or absence of characteristic shapes that allow for easy identification, and the percentage of the entire volume that a specific region of interest occupies. All these characteristics need to be considered when deciding on which approach to take for segmentation. The six different 3D ultrastructural data sets presented were obtained by three different imaging approaches: resin embedded stained electron tomography, focused ion beam- and serial block face- scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM, SBF-SEM) of mildly stained and heavily stained samples, respectively. For these data sets, four different segmentation approaches have been applied: (1) fully manual model building followed solely by visualization of the model, (2) manual tracing segmentation of the data followed by surface rendering, (3) semi-automated approaches followed by surface rendering, or (4) automated custom-designed segmentation algorithms followed by surface rendering and quantitative analysis. Depending on the combination of data set characteristics, it was found that typically one of these four categorical approaches outperforms the others, but depending on the exact sequence of criteria, more than one approach may be successful. Based on these data

  14. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  15. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  16. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  17. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  18. Object-oriented parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Heiland, R.W.

    1994-09-01

    Since many scientific datasets can be visualized using some polygonal representation, a polygon renderer has broad use for scientific visualization. With today`s high performance computing applications producing very large datasets, a parallel polygon renderer is a necessary tool for keeping the compute-visualize cycle at a minimum. This paper presents a DOIV on renderer that combines the shared-memory and message-passing models of parallel programming. It uses the Global Arrays library, a shared-memory programming toolkit for distributed memory machines. The experience of using an object oriented approach for software design and development is also discussed.

  19. A New Approach to Improve Cognition, Muscle Strength, and Postural Balance in Community-Dwelling Elderly with a 3-D Virtual Reality Kayak Program.

    PubMed

    Park, Junhyuck; Yim, JongEun

    2016-01-01

    Aging is usually accompanied with deterioration of physical abilities, such as muscular strength, sensory sensitivity, and functional capacity. Recently, intervention methods with virtual reality have been introduced, providing an enjoyable therapy for elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 3-D virtual reality kayak program could improve the cognitive function, muscle strength, and balance of community-dwelling elderly. Importantly, kayaking involves most of the upper body musculature and needs the balance control. Seventy-two participants were randomly allocated into the kayak program group (n = 36) and the control group (n = 36). The two groups were well matched with respect to general characteristics at baseline. The participants in both groups performed a conventional exercise program for 30 min, and then the 3-D virtual reality kayak program was performed in the kayak program group for 20 min, two times a week for 6 weeks. Cognitive function was measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Muscle strength was measured using the arm curl and handgrip strength tests. Standing and sitting balance was measured using the Good Balance system. The post-test was performed in the same manner as the pre-test; the overall outcomes such as cognitive function (p < 0.05), muscle strength (p < 0.05), and balance (standing and sitting balance, p < 0.05) were significantly improved in kayak program group compared to the control group. We propose that the 3-D virtual reality kayak program is a promising intervention method for improving the cognitive function, muscle strength, and balance of elderly.

  20. The Neighboring Column Approximation (NCA) - A fast approach for the calculation of 3D thermal heating rates in cloud resolving models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Carolin; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Due to computational costs, radiation is usually neglected or solved in plane parallel 1D approximation in today's numerical weather forecast and cloud resolving models. We present a fast and accurate method to calculate 3D heating and cooling rates in the thermal spectral range that can be used in cloud resolving models. The parameterization considers net fluxes across horizontal box boundaries in addition to the top and bottom boundaries. Since the largest heating and cooling rates occur inside the cloud, close to the cloud edge, the method needs in first approximation only the information if a grid box is at the edge of a cloud or not. Therefore, in order to calculate the heating or cooling rates of a specific grid box, only the directly neighboring columns are used. Our so-called Neighboring Column Approximation (NCA) is an analytical consideration of cloud side effects which can be considered a convolution of a 1D radiative transfer result with a kernel or radius of 1 grid-box (5 pt stencil) and which does usually not break the parallelization of a cloud resolving model. The NCA can be easily applied to any cloud resolving model that includes a 1D radiation scheme. Due to the neglect of horizontal transport of radiation further away than one model column, the NCA works best for model resolutions of about 100 m or lager. In this paper we describe the method and show a set of applications of LES cloud field snap shots. Correction terms, gains and restrictions of the NCA are described. Comprehensive comparisons to the 3D Monte Carlo Model MYSTIC and a 1D solution are shown. In realistic cloud fields, the full 3D simulation with MYSTIC shows cooling rates up to -150 K/d (100 m resolution) while the 1D solution shows maximum coolings of only -100 K/d. The NCA is capable of reproducing the larger 3D cooling rates. The spatial distribution of the heating and cooling is improved considerably. Computational costs are only a factor of 1.5-2 higher compared to a 1D

  1. Integrated VR platform for 3D and image-based models: a step toward interactive image-based virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jayoung; Kim, Gerard J.

    2003-04-01

    Traditionally, three dimension models have been used for building virtual worlds, and a data structure called the "scene graph" is often employed to organize these 3D objects in the virtual space. On the other hand, image-based rendering has recently been suggested as a probable alternative VR platform for its photo-realism, however, due to limited interactivity, it has only been used for simple navigation systems. To combine the merits of these two approaches to object/scene representations, this paper proposes for a scene graph structure in which both 3D models and various image-based scenes/objects can be defined, traversed, and rendered together. In fact, as suggested by Shade et al., these different representations can be used as different LOD's for a given object. For instance, an object might be rendered using a 3D model at close range, a billboard at an intermediate range, and as part of an environment map at far range. The ultimate objective of this mixed platform is to breath more interactivity into the image based rendered VE's by employing 3D models as well. There are several technical challenges in devising such a platform: designing scene graph nodes for various types of image based techniques, establishing criteria for LOD/representation selection, handling their transitions, implementing appropriate interaction schemes, and correctly rendering the overall scene. Currently, we have extended the scene graph structure of the Sense8's WorldToolKit, to accommodate new node types for environment maps billboards, moving textures and sprites, "Tour-into-the-Picture" structure, and view interpolated objects. As for choosing the right LOD level, the usual viewing distance and image space criteria are used, however, the switching between the image and 3D model occurs at a distance from the user where the user starts to perceive the object's internal depth. Also, during interaction, regardless of the viewing distance, a 3D representation would be used, it if

  2. Texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow by real-time advection and volumetric illumination.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Daniel; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive technique for the dense texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow, taking into account issues of computational efficiency and visual perception. High efficiency is achieved by a 3D graphics processing unit (GPU)-based texture advection mechanism that implements logical 3D grid structures by physical memory in the form of 2D textures. This approach results in fast read and write access to physical memory, independent of GPU architecture. Slice-based direct volume rendering is used for the final display. We investigate two alternative methods for the volumetric illumination of the result of texture advection: First, gradient-based illumination that employs a real-time computation of gradients, and, second, line-based lighting based on illumination in codimension 2. In addition to the Phong model, perception-guided rendering methods are considered, such as cool/warm shading, halo rendering, or color-based depth cueing. The problems of clutter and occlusion are addressed by supporting a volumetric importance function that enhances features of the flow and reduces visual complexity in less interesting regions. GPU implementation aspects, performance measurements, and a discussion of results are included to demonstrate our visualization approach.

  3. Cell-based approach for 3D reconstruction of lymphatic capillaries in vitro reveals distinct functions of HGF and VEGF-C in lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gibot, Laure; Galbraith, Todd; Kloos, Bryan; Das, Suvendu; Lacroix, Dan A; Auger, François A; Skobe, Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Regeneration of lymphatic vessels is important for treatment of various disorders of lymphatic system and for restoration of lymphatic function after surgery. We have developed a method for generating a human 3D lymphatic vascular construct. In this system, human lymphatic endothelial cells, co-cultured with fibroblasts, spontaneously organized into a stable 3D lymphatic capillary network without the use of any exogenous factors. In vitro-generated lymphatic capillaries exhibited the major molecular and ultra-structural features of native, human lymphatic microvasculature: branches in the three dimensions, wide lumen, blind ends, overlapping borders, adherens and tight junctions, anchoring filaments, lack of mural cells, and poorly developed basement membrane. Furthermore, we show that fibroblast-derived VEGF-C and HGF cooperate in the formation of lymphatic vasculature by activating ERK1/2 signaling, and demonstrate distinct functions of HGF/c-Met and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 in lymphangiogenesis. This lymphatic vascular construct is expected to facilitate studies of lymphangiogenesis in vitro and it holds promise as a strategy for regeneration of lymphatic vessels and treatment of lymphatic disorders in various conditions.

  4. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  5. Inflammation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2012-06-14

    Our view of the response to infection is limited by current methodologies, which provide minimal spatial information on the systemic inflammatory response. In this issue, Attia et al. (2012) describe a cutting-edge approach to image the inflammatory response to infection, which includes identification of host proteins in three dimensions. PMID:22704615

  6. Real-time depth map manipulation for 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideses, Ianir; Fishbain, Barak; Yaroslavsky, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    One of the key aspects of 3D visualization is computation of depth maps. Depth maps enables synthesis of 3D video from 2D video and use of multi-view displays. Depth maps can be acquired in several ways. One method is to measure the real 3D properties of the scene objects. Other methods rely on using two cameras and computing the correspondence for each pixel. Once a depth map is acquired for every frame, it can be used to construct its artificial stereo pair. There are many known methods for computing the optical flow between adjacent video frames. The drawback of these methods is that they require extensive computation power and are not very well suited to high quality real-time 3D rendering. One efficient method for computing depth maps is extraction of motion vector information from standard video encoders. In this paper we present methods to improve the 3D visualization quality acquired from compression CODECS by spatial/temporal and logical operations and manipulations. We show how an efficient real time implementation of spatial-temporal local order statistics such as median and local adaptive filtering in 3D-DCT domain can substantially improve the quality of depth maps and consequently 3D video while retaining real-time rendering. Real-time performance is achived by utilizing multi-core technology using standard parallelization algorithms and libraries (OpenMP, IPP).

  7. Adaptive image warping for hole prevention in 3D view synthesis.

    PubMed

    Plath, Nils; Knorr, Sebastian; Goldmann, Lutz; Sikora, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Increasing popularity of 3D videos calls for new methods to ease the conversion process of existing monocular video to stereoscopic or multi-view video. A popular way to convert video is given by depth image-based rendering methods, in which a depth map that is associated with an image frame is used to generate a virtual view. Because of the lack of knowledge about the 3D structure of a scene and its corresponding texture, the conversion of 2D video, inevitably, however, leads to holes in the resulting 3D image as a result of newly-exposed areas. The conversion process can be altered such that no holes become visible in the resulting 3D view by superimposing a regular grid over the depth map and deforming it. In this paper, an adaptive image warping approach as an improvement to the regular approach is proposed. The new algorithm exploits the smoothness of a typical depth map to reduce the complexity of the underlying optimization problem that is necessary to find the deformation, which is required to prevent holes. This is achieved by splitting a depth map into blocks of homogeneous depth using quadtrees and running the optimization on the resulting adaptive grid. The results show that this approach leads to a considerable reduction of the computational complexity while maintaining the visual quality of the synthesized views. PMID:23782807

  8. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  9. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  10. Sorting and hardware assisted rendering for volume visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.; Becker, B.; Max, N.

    1994-03-01

    We present some techniques for volume rendering unstructured data. Interpolation between vertex colors and opacities is performed using hardware assisted texture mapping, and color is integrated for use with a volume rendering system. We also present an O(n{sup 2}) method for sorting n arbitrarily shaped convex polyhedra prior to visualization. It generalizes the Newell, Newell and Sancha sort for polygons to 3-D volume elements.

  11. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  12. Electron Tomography of Cryo-Immobilized Plant Tissue: A Novel Approach to Studying 3D Macromolecular Architecture of Mature Plant Cell Walls In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G.; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  13. Electron tomography of cryo-immobilized plant tissue: a novel approach to studying 3D macromolecular architecture of mature plant cell walls in situ.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Yap, Edgar G; Das, Jyotirmoy; Tsai, Wen-Ting; Cabal, Angelo; Neuhaus, Erica; Maji, Dolonchampa; Kumar, Shailabh; Joo, Michael; Yakovlev, Sergey; Csencsits, Roseann; Yu, Zeyun; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Downing, Kenneth H; Auer, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuel requires efficient breakdown of cell walls present in plant biomass to retrieve the wall polysaccharides for fermentation. In-depth knowledge of plant cell wall composition is therefore essential for improving the fuel production process. The precise spatial three-dimensional (3D) organization of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and lignin within plant cell walls remains unclear to date since the microscopy techniques used so far have been limited to two-dimensional, topographic or low-resolution imaging, or required isolation or chemical extraction of the cell walls. In this paper we demonstrate that by cryo-immobilizing fresh tissue, then either cryo-sectioning or freeze-substituting and resin embedding, followed by cryo- or room temperature (RT) electron tomography, respectively, we can visualize previously unseen details of plant cell wall architecture in 3D, at macromolecular resolution (∼ 2 nm), and in near-native state. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that wall organization of cryo-immobilized samples were preserved remarkably better than conventionally prepared samples that suffer substantial extraction. Lignin-less primary cell walls were well preserved in both self-pressurized rapidly frozen (SPRF), cryo-sectioned samples as well as high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted and resin embedded (HPF-FS-resin) samples. Lignin-rich secondary cell walls appeared featureless in HPF-FS-resin sections presumably due to poor stain penetration, but their macromolecular features could be visualized in unprecedented details in our cryo-sections. While cryo-tomography of vitreous tissue sections is currently proving to be instrumental in developing 3D models of lignin-rich secondary cell walls, here we confirm that the technically easier method of RT-tomography of HPF-FS-resin sections could be used immediately for routine study of low-lignin cell walls. As a proof of principle, we characterized the

  14. Depth-fused 3D imagery on an immaterial display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cha; Diverdi, Stephen; Höllerer, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    We present an immaterial display that uses a generalized form of depth-fused 3D (DFD) rendering to create unencumbered 3D visuals. To accomplish this result, we demonstrate a DFD display simulator that extends the established depth-fused 3D principle by using screens in arbitrary configurations and from arbitrary viewpoints. The feasibility of the generalized DFD effect is established with a user study using the simulator. Based on these results, we developed a prototype display using one or two immaterial screens to create an unencumbered 3D visual that users can penetrate, examining the potential for direct walk-through and reach-through manipulation of the 3D scene. We evaluate the prototype system in formative and summative user studies and report the tolerance thresholds discovered for both tracking and projector errors.

  15. An Approach to 3d Digital Modeling of Surfaces with Poor Texture by Range Imaging Techniques. `SHAPE from Stereo' VS. `SHAPE from Silhouette' in Digitizing Jorge Oteiza's Sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Fernández, J.; Álvaro Tordesillas, A.; Barba, S.

    2015-02-01

    Despite eminent development of digital range imaging techniques, difficulties persist in the virtualization of objects with poor radiometric information, in other words, objects consisting of homogeneous colours (totally white, black, etc.), repetitive patterns, translucence, or materials with specular reflection. This is the case for much of the Jorge Oteiza's works, particularly in the sculpture collection of the Museo Fundación Jorge Oteiza (Navarra, Spain). The present study intend to analyse and asses the performance of two digital 3D-modeling methods based on imaging techniques, facing cultural heritage in singular cases, determined by radiometric characteristics as mentioned: Shape from Silhouette and Shape from Stereo. On the other hand, the text proposes the definition of a documentation workflow and presents the results of its application in the collection of sculptures created by Oteiza.

  16. A task-based parallelism and vectorized approach to 3D Method of Characteristics (MOC) reactor simulation for high performance computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramm, John R.; Gunow, Geoffrey; He, Tim; Smith, Kord S.; Forget, Benoit; Siegel, Andrew R.

    2016-05-01

    In this study we present and analyze a formulation of the 3D Method of Characteristics (MOC) technique applied to the simulation of full core nuclear reactors. Key features of the algorithm include a task-based parallelism model that allows independent MOC tracks to be assigned to threads dynamically, ensuring load balancing, and a wide vectorizable inner loop that takes advantage of modern SIMD computer architectures. The algorithm is implemented in a set of highly optimized proxy applications in order to investigate its performance characteristics on CPU, GPU, and Intel Xeon Phi architectures. Speed, power, and hardware cost efficiencies are compared. Additionally, performance bottlenecks are identified for each architecture in order to determine the prospects for continued scalability of the algorithm on next generation HPC architectures.

  17. Identification of novel histone deacetylase 1 inhibitors by combined pharmacophore modeling, 3D-QSAR analysis, in silico screening and Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sanjay K.; Mariadasse, Richard; Rajendran, Santhosh; Jeyaraman, Jeyakanthan

    2016-12-01

    Overexpression of HDAC1, a member of Class I histone deacetylase is reported to be implicated in breast cancer. Epigenetic alteration in carcinogenesis has been the thrust of research for few decades. Increased deacetylation leads to accelerated cell proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis and invasion. HDAC1 is pronounced as the potential drug target towards the treatment of breast cancer. In this study, the biochemical potential of 6-aminonicotinamide derivatives was rationalized. Five point pharmacophore model with one hydrogen-bond acceptor (A3), two hydrogen-bond donors (D5, D6), one ring (R12) and one hydrophobic group (H8) was developed using 6-aminonicotinamide derivatives. The pharmacophore hypothesis yielded a 3D-QSAR model with correlation-coefficient (r2 = 0.977, q2 = 0.801) and it was externally validated with (r2pred = 0.929, r2cv = 0.850 and r2m = 0.856) which reveals the statistical significance of the model having high predictive power. The model was then employed as 3D search query for virtual screening against compound libraries (Zinc, Maybridge, Enamine, Asinex, Toslab, LifeChem and Specs) in order to identify novel scaffolds which can be experimentally validated to design future drug molecule. Density Functional Theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G* level was employed to explore the electronic features of the ligands involved in charge transfer reaction during receptor ligand interaction. Binding free energy (ΔGbind) calculation was done using MM/GBSA which defines the affinity of ligands towards the receptor.

  18. Cognitive MMN and P300 in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: A high density EEG-3D vector field tomography approach.

    PubMed

    Papadaniil, Chrysa D; Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Tsolaki, Magda; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis Yiannis; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-10-01

    Precise preclinical detection of dementia for effective treatment and stage monitoring is of great importance. Miscellaneous types of biomarkers, e.g., biochemical, genetic, neuroimaging, and physiological, have been proposed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), the usual suspect behind manifested cognitive decline, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a neuropathology prior to AD that does not affect cognitive functions. Event related potential (ERP) methods constitute a non-invasive, inexpensive means of analysis and have been proposed as sensitive biomarkers of cognitive impairment; besides, various ERP components are strongly linked with working memory, attention, sensory processing and motor responses. In this study, an auditory oddball task is employed, to acquire high density electroencephalograhy recordings from healthy elderly controls, MCI and AD patients. The mismatch negativity (MMN) and P300 ERP components are then extracted and their relationship with neurodegeneration is examined. Then, the neural activation at these components is reconstructed using the 3D vector field tomography (3D-VFT) inverse solution. The results reveal a decline of both ERPs amplitude, and a statistically significant prolongation of their latency as cognitive impairment advances. For the MMN, higher brain activation is usually localized in the inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri in the controls. However, in AD, parietal sites exhibit strong activity. Stronger P300 generators are mostly found in the frontal lobe for the controls, but in AD they often shift to the temporal lobe. Reduction in inferior frontal source strength and the switch of the maximum intensity area to parietal and superior temporal sites suggest that these areas, especially the former, are of particular significance when neurodegenerative disorders are investigated. The modulation of MMN and P300 can serve to produce biomarkers of dementia and its progression, and brain imaging can further contribute

  19. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  20. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  1. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  2. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  3. DataViewer3D: An Open-Source, Cross-Platform Multi-Modal Neuroimaging Data Visualization Tool.

    PubMed

    Gouws, André; Woods, Will; Millman, Rebecca; Morland, Antony; Green, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Integration and display of results from multiple neuroimaging modalities [e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography, EEG] relies on display of a diverse range of data within a common, defined coordinate frame. DataViewer3D (DV3D) is a multi-modal imaging data visualization tool offering a cross-platform, open-source solution to simultaneous data overlay visualization requirements of imaging studies. While DV3D is primarily a visualization tool, the package allows an analysis approach where results from one imaging modality can guide comparative analysis of another modality in a single coordinate space. DV3D is built on Python, a dynamic object-oriented programming language with support for integration of modular toolkits, and development of cross-platform software for neuroimaging. DV3D harnesses the power of the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) for two-dimensional (2D) and 3D rendering, calling VTK's low level C++ functions from Python. Users interact with data via an intuitive interface that uses Python to bind wxWidgets, which in turn calls the user's operating system dialogs and graphical user interface tools. DV3D currently supports NIfTI-1, ANALYZE and DICOM formats for MRI data display (including statistical data overlay). Formats for other data types are supported. The modularity of DV3D and ease of use of Python allows rapid integration of additional format support and user development. DV3D has been tested on Mac OSX, RedHat Linux and Microsoft Windows XP. DV3D is offered for free download with an extensive set of tutorial resources and example data. PMID:19352444

  4. 3D fast wavelet network model-assisted 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Salwa; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    In last years, the emergence of 3D shape in face recognition is due to its robustness to pose and illumination changes. These attractive benefits are not all the challenges to achieve satisfactory recognition rate. Other challenges such as facial expressions and computing time of matching algorithms remain to be explored. In this context, we propose our 3D face recognition approach using 3D wavelet networks. Our approach contains two stages: learning stage and recognition stage. For the training we propose a novel algorithm based on 3D fast wavelet transform. From 3D coordinates of the face (x,y,z), we proceed to voxelization to get a 3D volume which will be decomposed by 3D fast wavelet transform and modeled after that with a wavelet network, then their associated weights are considered as vector features to represent each training face . For the recognition stage, an unknown identity face is projected on all the training WN to obtain a new vector features after every projection. A similarity score is computed between the old and the obtained vector features. To show the efficiency of our approach, experimental results were performed on all the FRGC v.2 benchmark.

  5. Elasticity-based three dimensional ultrasound real-time volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Matinfar, Mohammad; Ahmad, Omar; Rivaz, Hassan; Choti, Michael; Taylor, Russell H.

    2009-02-01

    Volumetric ultrasound imaging has not gained wide recognition, despite the availability of real-time 3D ultrasound scanners and the anticipated potential of 3D ultrasound imaging in diagnostic and interventional radiology. Their use, however, has been hindered by the lack of real-time visualization methods that are capable of producing high quality 3D rendering of the target/surface of interest. Volume rendering is a known visualization method, which can display clear surfaces out of the acquired volumetric data, and has an increasing number of applications utilizing CT and MRI data. The key element of any volume rendering pipeline is the ability to classify the target/surface of interest by setting an appropriate opacity function. Practical and successful real-time 3D ultrasound volume rendering can be achieved in Obstetrics and Angio applications where setting these opacity functions can be done rapidly, and reliably. Unfortunately, 3D ultrasound volume rendering of soft tissues is a challenging task due to the presence of significant amount of noise and speckle. Recently, several research groups have shown the feasibility of producing 3D elasticity volume from two consecutive 3D ultrasound scans. This report describes a novel volume rendering pipeline utilizing elasticity information. The basic idea is to compute B-mode voxel opacity from the rapidly calculated strain values, which can also be mixed with conventional gradient based opacity function. We have implemented the volume renderer using GPU unit, which gives an update rate of 40 volume/sec.

  6. A multi-model approach to simultaneous segmentation and classification of heterogeneous populations of cell nuclei in 3D confocal microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gang; Chawla, Monica K; Olson, Kathy; Barnes, Carol A; Guzowski, John F; Bjornsson, Christopher; Shain, William; Roysam, Badrinath

    2007-09-01

    Automated segmentation and morphometry of fluorescently labeled cell nuclei in batches of 3D confocal stacks is essential for quantitative studies. Model-based segmentation algorithms are attractive due to their robustness. Previous methods incorporated a single nuclear model. This is a limitation for tissues containing multiple cell types with different nuclear features. Improved segmentation for such tissues requires algorithms that permit multiple models to be used simultaneously. This requires a tight integration of classification and segmentation algorithms. Two or more nuclear models are constructed semiautomatically from user-provided training examples. Starting with an initial over-segmentation produced by a gradient-weighted watershed algorithm, a hierarchical fragment merging tree rooted at each object is built. Linear discriminant analysis is used to classify each candidate using multiple object models. On the basis of the selected class, a Bayesian score is computed. Fragment merging decisions are made by comparing the score with that of other candidates, and the scores of constituent fragments of each candidate. The overall segmentation accuracy was 93.7% and classification accuracy was 93.5%, respectively, on a diverse collection of images drawn from five different regions of the rat brain. The multi-model method was found to achieve high accuracy on nuclear segmentation and classification by correctly resolving ambiguities in clustered regions containing heterogeneous cell populations.

  7. Modeling of mass and charge transport in a solid oxide fuel cell anode structure by a 3D lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Hedvig; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    A 3D model at microscale by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for part of an anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to analyze the interaction between the transport and reaction processes and structural parameters. The equations of charge, momentum, heat and mass transport are simulated in the model. The modeling geometry is created with randomly placed spheres to resemble the part of the anode structure close to the electrolyte. The electrochemical reaction processes are captured at specific sites where spheres representing Ni and YSZ materials are present with void space. This work focuses on analyzing the effect of structural parameters such as porosity, and percentage of active reaction sites on the ionic current density and concentration of H2 using LBM. It is shown that LBM can be used to simulate an SOFC anode at microscale and evaluate the effect of structural parameters on the transport processes to improve the performance of the SOFC anode. It was found that increasing the porosity from 30 to 50 % decreased the ionic current density due to a reduction in the number of reaction sites. Also the consumption of H2 decreased with increasing porosity. When the percentage of active reaction sites was increased while the porosity was kept constant, the ionic current density increased. However, the H2 concentration was slightly reduced when the percentage of active reaction sites was increased. The gas flow tortuosity decreased with increasing porosity.

  8. Characterization of exudates released by the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum exposed to copper stress: a 3D-fluorescence spectroscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Herzi, Faouzi; Hlaili, Asma Sakka; Le Poupon, Christophe; Mabrouk, Hassine Hadj; Mounier, Stéphane

    2013-10-01

    In a laboratory study, metal contamination experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of two free copper concentrations (10(-9) and 10(-8) M) on cell growth and on dissolved organic matter exudation by a marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. Throughout incubation, the growth kinetics and exudation of extracellular molecules (i.e. dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the fluorescent organic matter) were determined. Results revealed an inhibition of S. costatum growth when the free copper level increased (from 10(-9) to 10(-8)). Furthermore, DOC release was more significant in cultures contaminated by 10(-9) M Cu(2+) than in control, suggesting a coping mechanism developed by this species. In this study, samples were daily analysed by 3D-fluorescence and PARAFAC algorithm, in order to compare the fluorescent material produced during growth under different contaminations. PARAFAC treatment revealed two main contributions: one related to the biological activity (C1), the other linked to the marine organic matter (C2). The third component C3 was typically protein-like. This fluorophore was considered as a tryptophan-like fluorophore, whereas the C1 and the C2 components were associated to marine production such as humic matter. PMID:23868094

  9. Morphological affinities of the proximal humerus of Epipliopithecus vindobonensis and Pliopithecus antiquus: suspensory inferences based on a 3D geometric morphometrics approach.

    PubMed

    Arias-Martorell, Julia; Alba, David M; Potau, Josep M; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Suspension plays a major adaptive role in shaping primate postcranial morphology, which therefore enables this positional behavior to be inferred in extinct taxa. The proximal humerus stands as a key region for inferring forelimb suspensory capabilities because its morphology can be effectively linked, from a functional viewpoint, to differences in suspension use between primate taxa. Here we provide an assessment of the suspensory capabilities of two pliopithecoids (Epipliopithecus vindobonensis and Pliopithecus antiquus) by means of a 3D geometric morphometric analysis of proximal humeral shape. The comparative sample includes proximal humeri from eight extant anthropoid genera, as well as other extinct catarrhines (the propliopithecoid Aegyptopithecus zeuxis, the stem hominoid Nyanzapithecus vancouveringorum, and an unascribed small catarrhine, GSP 28062, from the Middle Miocene of Pakistan). Body mass estimates based on allometric regressions of humeral head superoinferior diameter are also provided. Our results support some degree of forelimb suspensory behaviors for Epipliopithecus and GSP 28062. In contrast, and unlike previous qualitative assessments, our analysis shows that P. antiquus has a distinct glenohumeral morphology, much closer to that displayed by generalized arboreal quadrupeds with no evidence of suspensory adaptations (as in Aegyptopithecus and stem hominoids from Africa).

  10. First-principles modeling of 3d-transition-metal-atom adsorption on silicene: a linear-response DFT + U approach.

    PubMed

    Le, Hung M; Pham, Tan-Tien; Dinh, Thach S; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Nguyen-Manh, Duc

    2016-04-01

    By employing DFT  +  U calculations with the linear response method, we investigate the interactions between various 3d transition-metal atoms (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) and silicene. In the cases of two-dimensional (2D) FeSi2 and CoSi2, the metal atoms tend to penetrate into the silicene layer. While CoSi2 is non-magnetic, FeSi2 exhibits a total magnetic moment of 2.21 μ(B)/cell. Upon the examination of 2D MSi6, a trend in anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) favorability in the z-direction is observed according to our DFT  +  U calculations. In the ferromagnetic (FM) states (less stable), each primary unit cell of CrSi6, MnSi6, and FeSi6 possesses different levels of total magnetization (4.01, 5.18, and 2.00 μ B/cell, respectively). The absolute magnetization given by AFM MSi6 structures varies in the range of 5.33-5.84 μ(B)/cell. A direct band gap in AFM MnSi6 (0.2 eV) is predicted, while the metastable FM FeSi6 structure has a wider band gap (0.85 eV). Interestingly, there are superexchange interactions between metal atoms in the MSi6 systems, which result in the AFM alignments. PMID:26940978

  11. SB3D User Manual, Santa Barbara 3D Radiative Transfer Model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William

    1999-01-01

    SB3D is a three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic radiative transfer model for the Solar spectrum. The microphysics employed in the model are the same as used in the model SBDART. It is assumed that the user of SB3D is familiar with SBDART and IDL. SB3D differs from SBDART in that computations are conducted on media in three-dimensions rather than a single column (i.e. plane-parallel), and a stochastic method (Monte Carlo) is employed instead of a numerical approach (Discrete Ordinates) for estimating a solution to the radiative transfer equation. Because of these two differences between SB3D and SBDART, the input and running of SB3D is more unwieldy and requires compromises between model performance and computational expense. Hence, there is no one correct method for running the model and the user must develop a sense to the proper input and configuration of the model.

  12. Direct Volume Rendering with Shading via Three-Dimensional Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Gelder, Allen; Kim, Kwansik

    1996-01-01

    A new and easy-to-implement method for direct volume rendering that uses 3D texture maps for acceleration, and incorporates directional lighting, is described. The implementation, called Voltx, produces high-quality images at nearly interactive speeds on workstations with hardware support for three-dimensional texture maps. Previously reported methods did not incorporate a light model, and did not address issues of multiple texture maps for large volumes. Our research shows that these extensions impact performance by about a factor of ten. Voltx supports orthographic, perspective, and stereo views. This paper describes the theory and implementation of this technique, and compares it to the shear-warp factorization approach. A rectilinear data set is converted into a three-dimensional texture map containing color and opacity information. Quantized normal vectors and a lookup table provide efficiency. A new tesselation of the sphere is described, which serves as the basis for normal-vector quantization. A new gradient-based shading criterion is described, in which the gradient magnitude is interpreted in the context of the field-data value and the material classification parameters, and not in isolation. In the rendering phase, the texture map is applied to a stack of parallel planes, which effectively cut the texture into many slabs. The slabs are composited to form an image.

  13. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  14. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  15. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  16. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  17. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  18. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  19. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  20. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  1. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  2. 3D dynamic roadmapping for abdominal catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Frederik; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Wein, Wolfgang; Heibel, Tim Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in interventional imaging, the navigation of a guide wire through abdominal vasculature remains, not only for novice radiologists, a difficult task. Since this navigation is mostly based on 2D fluoroscopic image sequences from one view, the process is slowed down significantly due to missing depth information and patient motion. We propose a novel approach for 3D dynamic roadmapping in deformable regions by predicting the location of the guide wire tip in a 3D vessel model from the tip's 2D location, respiratory motion analysis, and view geometry. In a first step, the method compensates for the apparent respiratory motion in 2D space before backprojecting the 2D guide wire tip into three dimensional space, using a given projection matrix. To countervail the error connected to the projection parameters and the motion compensation, as well as the ambiguity caused by vessel deformation, we establish a statistical framework, which computes a reliable estimate of the guide wire tip location within the 3D vessel model. With this 2D-to-3D transfer, the navigation can be performed from arbitrary viewing angles, disconnected from the static perspective view of the fluoroscopic sequence. Tests on a realistic breathing phantom and on synthetic data with a known ground truth clearly reveal the superiority of our approach compared to naive methods for 3D roadmapping. The concepts and information presented in this paper are based on research and are not commercially available. PMID:18982662

  3. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies.

  4. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  5. Molecular modeling studies on series of Btk inhibitors using docking, structure-based 3D-QSAR and molecular dynamics simulation: a combined approach.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Pavithra K; Balupuri, Anand; Cho, Seung Joo

    2016-03-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase. It is a crucial component in BCR pathway and expressed only in hematopoietic cells except T cells and Natural killer cells. BTK is a promising target because of its involvement in signaling pathways and B cell diseases such as autoimmune disorders and lymphoma. In this work, a combined molecular modeling study of molecular docking, 3D-QSAR and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation were performed on a series of 2,5-diaminopyrimidine compounds as inhibitors targeting Btk kinase to understand the interaction and key residues involved in the inhibition. A structure based CoMFA (q (2) = 0.675, NOC = 5, r (2) = 0.961) and COMSIA (q (2) = 0.704, NOC = 6, r (2) = 0.962) models were developed from the conformation obtained by docking. The developed models were subjected to various validation techniques such as leave-five-out, external test set, bootstrapping, progressive sampling and rm (2) metrics and found to have a good predictive ability in both internal and external validation. Our docking results showed the important residues that interacts in the active site residues in inhibition of Btk kinase. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation was employed to study the stability of the docked conformation and to investigate the binding interactions in detail. The MD simulation analyses identified several important hydrogen bonds with Btk, including the gatekeeper residue Thr474 and Met477 at the hinge region. Hydrogen bond with active site residues Leu408 and Arg525 were also recognized. A good correlation between the MD results, docking studies and the contour map analysis are observed. This indicates that the developed models are reliable. Our results from this study can provide insights in the designing and development of more potent Btk kinase inhibitors.

  6. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. Mapping high-fidelity volume rendering for medical imaging to CPU, GPU and many-core architectures.

    PubMed

    Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Holmes, David; Chhugani, Jatin; Larson, Alan; Carmean, Douglas M; Hanson, Dennis; Dubey, Pradeep; Augustine, Kurt; Kim, Daehyun; Kyker, Alan; Lee, Victor W; Nguyen, Anthony D; Seiler, Larry; Robb, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Medical volumetric imaging requires high fidelity, high performance rendering algorithms. We motivate and analyze new volumetric rendering algorithms that are suited to modern parallel processing architectures. First, we describe the three major categories of volume rendering algorithms and confirm through an imaging scientist-guided evaluation that ray-casting is the most acceptable. We describe a thread- and data-parallel implementation of ray-casting that makes it amenable to key architectural trends of three modern commodity parallel architectures: multi-core, GPU, and an upcoming many-core Intel architecture code-named Larrabee. We achieve more than an order of magnitude performance improvement on a number of large 3D medical datasets. We further describe a data compression scheme that significantly reduces data-transfer overhead. This allows our approach to scale well to large numbers of Larrabee cores.

  10. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    PubMed

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci.

  11. CFL3D, FUN3d, and NSU3D Contributions to the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Chaffin, Mark S.; Powell, Nicholas; Levy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Results presented at the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop using CFL3D, FUN3D, and NSU3D are described. These are calculations on the workshop provided grids and drag adapted grids. The NSU3D results have been updated to reflect an improvement to skin friction calculation on skewed grids. FUN3D results generated after the workshop are included for custom participant generated grids and a grid from a previous workshop. Uniform grid refinement at the design condition shows a tight grouping in calculated drag, where the variation in the pressure component of drag is larger than the skin friction component. At this design condition, A fine-grid drag value was predicted with a smaller drag adjoint adapted grid via tetrahedral adaption to a metric and mixed-element subdivision. The buffet study produced larger variation than the design case, which is attributed to large differences in the predicted side-of-body separation extent. Various modeling and discretization approaches had a strong impact on predicted side-of-body separation. This large wing root separation bubble was not observed in wind tunnel tests indicating that more work is necessary in modeling wing root juncture flows to predict experiments.

  12. Deformable M-Reps for 3D Medical Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pizer, Stephen M; Fletcher, P Thomas; Joshi, Sarang; Thall, Andrew; Chen, James Z; Fridman, Yonatan; Fritsch, Daniel S; Gash, Graham; Glotzer, John M; Jiroutek, Michael R; Lu, Conglin; Muller, Keith E; Tracton, Gregg; Yushkevich, Paul; Chaney, Edward L

    2003-11-01

    M-reps (formerly called DSLs) are a multiscale medial means for modeling and rendering 3D solid geometry. They are particularly well suited to model anatomic objects and in particular to capture prior geometric information effectively in deformable models segmentation approaches. The representation is based on figural models, which define objects at coarse scale by a hierarchy of figures - each figure generally a slab representing a solid region and its boundary simultaneously. This paper focuses on the use of single figure models to segment objects of relatively simple structure. A single figure is a sheet of medial atoms, which is interpolated from the model formed by a net, i.e., a mesh or chain, of medial atoms (hence the name m-reps), each atom modeling a solid region via not only a position and a width but also a local figural frame giving figural directions and an object angle between opposing, corresponding positions on the boundary implied by the m-rep. The special capability of an m-rep is to provide spatial and orientational correspondence between an object in two different states of deformation. This ability is central to effective measurement of both geometric typicality and geometry to image match, the two terms of the objective function optimized in segmentation by deformable models. The other ability of m-reps central to effective segmentation is their ability to support segmentation at multiple levels of scale, with successively finer precision. Objects modeled by single figures are segmented first by a similarity transform augmented by object elongation, then by adjustment of each medial atom, and finally by displacing a dense sampling of the m-rep implied boundary. While these models and approaches also exist in 2D, we focus on 3D objects. The segmentation of the kidney from CT and the hippocampus from MRI serve as the major examples in this paper. The accuracy of segmentation as compared to manual, slice-by-slice segmentation is reported.

  13. Software for Acoustic Rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Joel D.

    2003-01-01

    SLAB is a software system that can be run on a personal computer to simulate an acoustic environment in real time. SLAB was developed to enable computational experimentation in which one can exert low-level control over a variety of signal-processing parameters, related to spatialization, for conducting psychoacoustic studies. Among the parameters that can be manipulated are the number and position of reflections, the fidelity (that is, the number of taps in finite-impulse-response filters), the system latency, and the update rate of the filters. Another goal in the development of SLAB was to provide an inexpensive means of dynamic synthesis of virtual audio over headphones, without need for special-purpose signal-processing hardware. SLAB has a modular, object-oriented design that affords the flexibility and extensibility needed to accommodate a variety of computational experiments and signal-flow structures. SLAB s spatial renderer has a fixed signal-flow architecture corresponding to a set of parallel signal paths from each source to a listener. This fixed architecture can be regarded as a compromise that optimizes efficiency at the expense of complete flexibility. Such a compromise is necessary, given the design goal of enabling computational psychoacoustic experimentation on inexpensive personal computers.

  14. Sea modeling and rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2010-10-01

    More and more defence and civil applications require simulation of marine synthetic environment. Currently, the "Future Anti-Surface-Guided-Weapon" (FASGW) or "anti-navire léger" (ANL) missile needs this kind of modelling. This paper presents a set of technical enhancement of the SE-Workbench that aim at better representing the sea profile and the interaction with targets. The operational scenario variability is a key criterion: the generic geographical area (e.g. Persian Gulf, coast of Somalia,...), the type of situation (e.g. peace keeping, peace enforcement, anti-piracy, drug interdiction,...)., the objectives (political, strategic, or military objectives), the description of the mission(s) (e.g. antipiracy) and operation(s) (e.g. surveillance and reconnaissance, escort, convoying) to achieve the objectives, the type of environment (Weather, Time of day, Geography [coastlines, islands, hills/mountains]). The paper insists on several points such as the dual rendering using either ray tracing [and the GP GPU optimization] or rasterization [and GPU shaders optimization], the modelling of sea-surface based on hypertextures and shaders, the wakes modelling, the buoyancy models for targets, the interaction of coast and littoral, the dielectric infrared modelling of water material.

  15. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  16. Real-time stereographic rendering and display of medical images with programmable GPUs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Hui; Good, Walter F

    2008-03-01

    The study was to explore the power and feasibility of using programmable graphics processing units (GPUs) for real-time rendering and displaying large 3D medical datasets for stereoscopic display workstation. Lung cancer screening CT images were used for developing GPU-based stereo rendering and displaying. The study was run on a personal computer with a 128 MB NVIDIA Quadro FX 1100 graphics card. The performance of rendering and displaying was measured and compared between GPU-based and central processing unit (CPU)-based programming. The results indicate that GPU-based programming was capable of rendering large 3D datasets at real-time interactive rates with stereographic displays.

  17. FIT3D toolbox: multiple view geometry and 3D reconstruction for Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Isaac; Dijk, Judith; Groen, Frans

    2010-10-01

    FIT3D is a Toolbox built for Matlab that aims at unifying and distributing a set of tools that will allow the researcher to obtain a complete 3D model from a set of calibrated images. In this paper we motivate and present the structure of the toolbox in a tutorial and example based approach. Given its flexibility and scope we believe that FIT3D represents an exciting opportunity for researchers that want to apply one particular method with real data without the need for extensive additional programming.

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    calculations on a supercomputer, the Supercomputer/IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers advanced 3-D, view manipulation, and animation capabilities. Shading and hidden line/surface removal can be used to enhance depth perception and other aspects of the graphical displays. A mouse can be used to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. Files for several types of output can be produced. Two animation options are available. Simple animation sequences can be created on the IRIS, or,if an appropriately modified version of ARCGRAPH (ARC-12350) is accesible on the supercomputer, files can be created for use in GAS (Graphics Animation System, ARC-12379), an IRIS program which offers more complex rendering and animation capabilities and options for recording images to digital disk, video tape, or 16-mm film. The version 3.6b+ Supercomputer/IRIS implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12779) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12784) are suitable for use on CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and ALLIANT computers with a remote Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstation. These programs are distributed on .25 inch magnetic tape cartridges in IRIS TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782); (2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC12777, ARC-12781); (3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 - which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, UNIX SUPERCOMPUTER AND SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    calculations on a supercomputer, the Supercomputer/IRIS implementation of PLOT3D offers advanced 3-D, view manipulation, and animation capabilities. Shading and hidden line/surface removal can be used to enhance depth perception and other aspects of the graphical displays. A mouse can be used to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. Files for several types of output can be produced. Two animation options are available. Simple animation sequences can be created on the IRIS, or,if an appropriately modified version of ARCGRAPH (ARC-12350) is accesible on the supercomputer, files can be created for use in GAS (Graphics Animation System, ARC-12379), an IRIS program which offers more complex rendering and animation capabilities and options for recording images to digital disk, video tape, or 16-mm film. The version 3.6b+ Supercomputer/IRIS implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12779) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12784) are suitable for use on CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and ALLIANT computers with a remote Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstation. These programs are distributed on .25 inch magnetic tape cartridges in IRIS TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations (ARC-12783, ARC-12782); (2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC12777, ARC-12781); (3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 - which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates

  20. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  2. Incorporation of learned shape priors into a graph-theoretic approach with application to the 3D segmentation of intraretinal surfaces in SD-OCT volumes of mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Song, Qi; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sohn, Eliott; Wu, Xiaodong; Garvin, Mona K.

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) finds widespread use clinically for the detection and management of ocular diseases. This non-invasive imaging modality has also begun to find frequent use in research studies involving animals such as mice. Numerous approaches have been proposed for the segmentation of retinal surfaces in SD-OCT images obtained from human subjects; however, the segmentation of retinal surfaces in mice scans is not as well-studied. In this work, we describe a graph-theoretic segmentation approach for the simultaneous segmentation of 10 retinal surfaces in SD-OCT scans of mice that incorporates learned shape priors. We compared the method to a baseline approach that did not incorporate learned shape priors and observed that the overall unsigned border position errors reduced from 3.58 +/- 1.33 μm to 3.20 +/- 0.56 μm.

  3. Design for a real-time high-quality volume-rendering work station

    SciTech Connect

    Levoy, M.

    1989-05-01

    A design is presented for a workstation capable of rendering arbitrary mixtures of analytically defined geometry and sampled scalar fields of three spatial dimensions in real-time or near real-time. The design is based on volumetric compositing, a relatively new approach to visualizing scalar fields by computing 2D projections of a colored semi-transparent volume. Geometric primitives are added by filtering and 3D scan-converting them into the data set prior to rendering. Speedups totaling four orders of magnitude over published volumetric compositing techniques are obtained through a combination of algorithmic improvements and hardware implementation of Pixel-planes 5, a massively parallel raster display engine incorporating custom logic-enhanced memory chips. A preliminary design is also presented for a two-handed volume-of-interest data exploration tool.

  4. GPU-Based Volume Rendering of Noisy Multi-Spectral Astronomical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. H.; Fluke, C. J.; Barnes, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    Traditional analysis techniques may not be sufficient for astronomers to make the best use of the data sets that current and future instruments, such as the Square Kilometre Array and its Pathfinders, will produce. By utilizing the incredible pattern-recognition ability of the human mind, scientific visualization provides an excellent opportunity for astronomers to gain valuable new insight and understanding of their data, particularly when used interactively in 3D. The goal of our work is to establish the feasibility of a real-time 3D monitoring system for data going into the Australian SKA Pathfinder archive. Based on CUDA, an increasingly popular development tool, our work utilizes the massively parallel architecture of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to provide astronomers with an interactive 3D volume rendering for multi-spectral data sets. Unlike other approaches, we are targeting real time interactive visualization of datasets larger than GPU memory while giving special attention to data with low signal to noise ratio - two critical aspects for astronomy that are missing from most existing scientific visualization software packages. Our framework enables the astronomer to interact with the geometrical representation of the data, and to control the volume rendering process to generate a better representation of their datasets.

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    advanced features which aid visualization efforts. Shading and hidden line/surface removal can be used to enhance depth perception and other aspects of the graphical displays. A mouse can be used to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. Files for several types of output can be produced. Two animation options are even offered: creation of simple animation sequences without the need for other software; and, creation of files for use in GAS (Graphics Animation System, ARC-12379), an IRIS program which offers more complex rendering and animation capabilities and can record images to digital disk, video tape, or 16-mm film. The version 3.6b+ SGI implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12783) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12782) were developed for use on Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations. These programs are each distributed on one .25 inch magnetic tape cartridge in IRIS TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); (2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777,ARC-12781); (3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, SGI IRIS VERSION (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    advanced features which aid visualization efforts. Shading and hidden line/surface removal can be used to enhance depth perception and other aspects of the graphical displays. A mouse can be used to translate, rotate, or zoom in on views. Files for several types of output can be produced. Two animation options are even offered: creation of simple animation sequences without the need for other software; and, creation of files for use in GAS (Graphics Animation System, ARC-12379), an IRIS program which offers more complex rendering and animation capabilities and can record images to digital disk, video tape, or 16-mm film. The version 3.6b+ SGI implementations of PLOT3D (ARC-12783) and PLOT3D/TURB3D (ARC-12782) were developed for use on Silicon Graphics IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D workstations. These programs are each distributed on one .25 inch magnetic tape cartridge in IRIS TAR format. Customers purchasing one implementation version of PLOT3D or PLOT3D/TURB3D will be given a $200 discount on each additional implementation version ordered at the same time. Version 3.6b+ of PLOT3D and PLOT3D/TURB3D are also supported for the following computers and graphics libraries: (1) generic UNIX Supercomputer and IRIS, suitable for CRAY 2/UNICOS, CONVEX, and Alliant with remote IRIS 2xxx/3xxx or IRIS 4D (ARC-12779, ARC-12784); (2) VAX computers running VMS Version 5.0 and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12777,ARC-12781); (3) generic UNIX and DISSPLA Version 11.0 (ARC-12788, ARC-12778); and (4) Apollo computers running UNIX and GMR3D Version 2.0 (ARC-12789, ARC-12785 which have no capabilities to put text on plots). Silicon Graphics Iris, IRIS 4D, and IRIS 2xxx/3xxx are trademarks of Silicon Graphics Incorporated. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Electronics Corporation. DISSPLA is a trademark of Computer Associates. CRAY 2 and UNICOS are trademarks of CRAY Research, Incorporated. CONVEX is a trademark of Convex Computer Corporation. Alliant is a trademark of Alliant. Apollo and GMR3D are

  7. Incorporation of texture-based features in optimal graph-theoretic approach with application to the 3D segmentation of intraretinal surfaces in SD-OCT volumes

    NASA Astro