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Sample records for 3d scanning laser

  1. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  2. Pavement cracking measurements using 3D laser-scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, W.; Xu, B.

    2013-10-01

    Pavement condition surveying is vital for pavement maintenance programs that ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper first introduces an automated pavement inspection system which uses a three-dimensional (3D) camera and a structured laser light to acquire dense transverse profiles of a pavement lane surface when it carries a moving vehicle. After the calibration, the 3D system can yield a depth resolution of 0.5 mm and a transverse resolution of 1.56 mm pixel-1 at 1.4 m camera height from the ground. The scanning rate of the camera can be set to its maximum at 5000 lines s-1, allowing the density of scanned profiles to vary with the vehicle's speed. The paper then illustrates the algorithms that utilize 3D information to detect pavement distress, such as transverse, longitudinal and alligator cracking, and presents the field tests on the system's repeatability when scanning a sample pavement in multiple runs at the same vehicle speed, at different vehicle speeds and under different weather conditions. The results show that this dedicated 3D system can capture accurate pavement images that detail surface distress, and obtain consistent crack measurements in repeated tests and under different driving and lighting conditions.

  3. An omnidirectional 3D sensor with line laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Gao, Bingtuan; Liu, Chuande; Wang, Peng; Gao, Shuanglei

    2016-09-01

    An active omnidirectional vision owns the advantages of the wide field of view (FOV) imaging, resulting in an entire 3D environment scene, which is promising in the field of robot navigation. However, the existing omnidirectional vision sensors based on line laser can measure points only located on the optical plane of the line laser beam, resulting in the low-resolution reconstruction. Whereas, to improve resolution, some other omnidirectional vision sensors with the capability of projecting 2D encode pattern from projector and curved mirror. However, the astigmatism property of curve mirror causes the low-accuracy reconstruction. To solve the above problems, a rotating polygon scanning mirror is used to scan the object in the vertical direction so that an entire profile of the observed scene can be obtained at high accuracy, without of astigmatism phenomenon. Then, the proposed method is calibrated by a conventional 2D checkerboard plate. The experimental results show that the measurement error of the 3D omnidirectional sensor is approximately 1 mm. Moreover, the reconstruction of objects with different shapes based on the developed sensor is also verified.

  4. Effects of scanning orientation on outlier formation in 3D laser scanning of reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutao; Feng, Hsi-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Inspecting objects with reflective surfaces using 3D laser scanning is a demanded but challenging part inspection task due to undesirable specular reflections, which produce extensive outliers in the scanned point cloud. These outliers need to be removed in order to alleviate subsequent data processing issues. Many existing automatic outlier removal methods do not detect outliers according to the outlier formation properties. As a result, these methods only offer limited capabilities in removing extensive and complex outliers from scanning objects with reflective surfaces. This paper reports an empirical study which experimentally investigates the outlier formation characteristics in relation to the scanning orientation of the laser probe. The objective is to characterize the scanning orientation effects on outlier formation in order to facilitate the development of an effective outlier detection and removal method. Such an experimental investigation was hardly done before. It has been found in this work that scanning orientation can directly affect outlier extensity and occurrence in 3D laser scanning. A general guidance on proper scan path planning can then be provided with an aim to reduce the occurrence of outliers. Further, the observed dependency of outlier formation on scanning orientation can be exploited to facilitate effective and automatic outlier detection and removal.

  5. Filtering method for 3D laser scanning point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Wang, Li; Hao, Yuncai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the hardware and software of the three-dimensional model acquisition, three-dimensional laser scanning technology is utilized in various aspects, especially in space exploration. The point cloud filter is very important before using the data. In the paper, considering both the processing quality and computing speed, an improved mean-shift point cloud filter method is proposed. Firstly, by analyze the relevance of the normal vector between the upcoming processing point and the near points, the iterative neighborhood of the mean-shift is selected dynamically, then the high frequency noise is constrained. Secondly, considering the normal vector of the processing point, the normal vector is updated. Finally, updated position is calculated for each point, then each point is moved in the normal vector according to the updated position. The experimental results show that the large features are retained, at the same time, the small sharp features are also existed for different size and shape of objects, so the target feature information is protected precisely. The computational complexity of the proposed method is not high, it can bring high precision results with fast speed, so it is very suitable for space application. It can also be utilized in civil, such as large object measurement, industrial measurement, car navigation etc. In the future, filter with the help of point strength will be further exploited.

  6. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  7. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  8. Application to monitoring of tailings dam based on 3D laser scanning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2011-06-01

    This paper presented a new method of monitoring of tailing dam based on 3D laser scanning technology and gave the method flow of acquiring and processing the tailing dam data. Taking the measured data for example, the author analyzed the dam deformation by generating the TIN, DEM and the curvature graph, and proved that it's feasible to global monitor the tailing dam using 3D laser scanning technology from the theory and method.

  9. The fast and accurate 3D-face scanning technology based on laser triangle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjiang; Chang, Tianyu; Ge, Baozhen; Tian, Qingguo; Chen, Yang; Kong, Bin

    2013-08-01

    A laser triangle scanning method and the structure of 3D-face measurement system were introduced. In presented system, a liner laser source was selected as an optical indicated signal in order to scanning a line one times. The CCD image sensor was used to capture image of the laser line modulated by human face. The system parameters were obtained by system calibrated calculated. The lens parameters of image part of were calibrated with machine visual image method and the triangle structure parameters were calibrated with fine wire paralleled arranged. The CCD image part and line laser indicator were set with a linear motor carry which can achieve the line laser scanning form top of the head to neck. For the nose is ledge part and the eyes are sunk part, one CCD image sensor can not obtain the completed image of laser line. In this system, two CCD image sensors were set symmetric at two sides of the laser indicator. In fact, this structure includes two laser triangle measure units. Another novel design is there laser indicators were arranged in order to reduce the scanning time for it is difficult for human to keep static for longer time. The 3D data were calculated after scanning. And further data processing include 3D coordinate refine, mesh calculate and surface show. Experiments show that this system has simply structure, high scanning speed and accurate. The scanning range covers the whole head of adult, the typical resolution is 0.5mm.

  10. Comparison of 3d Reconstruction Services and Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasztovits, S.; Dorninger, P.

    2013-07-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is an established method to reconstruct the geometrical surface of given objects. Current systems allow for fast and efficient determination of 3D models with high accuracy and richness in detail. Alternatively, 3D reconstruction services are using images to reconstruct the surface of an object. While the instrumental expenses for laser scanning systems are high, upcoming free software services as well as open source software packages enable the generation of 3D models using digital consumer cameras. In addition, processing TLS data still requires an experienced user while recent web-services operate completely automatically. An indisputable advantage of image based 3D modeling is its implicit capability for model texturing. However, the achievable accuracy and resolution of the 3D models is lower than those of laser scanning data. Within this contribution, we investigate the results of automated web-services for image based 3D model generation with respect to a TLS reference model. For this, a copper sculpture was acquired using a laser scanner and using image series of different digital cameras. Two different webservices, namely Arc3D and AutoDesk 123D Catch were used to process the image data. The geometric accuracy was compared for the entire model and for some highly structured details. The results are presented and interpreted based on difference models. Finally, an economical comparison of the generation of the models is given considering the interactive and processing time costs.

  11. Angle extended linear MEMS scanning system for 3D laser vision sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yajun; Zhang, Yinxin; Yang, Huaidong; Zhu, Pan; Gai, Ye; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Zhanhua

    2016-09-01

    Scanning system is often considered as the most important part for 3D laser vision sensor. In this paper, we propose a method for the optical system design of angle extended linear MEMS scanning system, which has features of huge scanning degree, small beam divergence angle and small spot size for 3D laser vision sensor. The principle of design and theoretical formulas are derived strictly. With the help of software ZEMAX, a linear scanning optical system based on MEMS has been designed. Results show that the designed system can extend scanning angle from ±8° to ±26.5° with a divergence angle small than 3.5 mr, and the spot size is reduced for 4.545 times.

  12. 3-D ice shape measurements using mid-infrared laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoliang; Bansmer, Stephan

    2015-02-23

    A general approach based on mid-infrared (MIR) laser scanning is proposed to measure the 3-D ice shape no matter whether the ice is composed of clear ice, rime ice, mixed ice, or even supercooled water droplets or films. This is possible because MIR radiation penetrates ice and water only within a depth of less than 10 micrometers. First, an MIR laser point scanning technique is implemented and verified on transparent glass and clear ice. Then, to improve efficiency, an MIR laser line scanning method is developed and validated on different models. At last, several sequential MIR laser line scans are applied to trace the 3-D shape evolution of the continuous ice accretion on an airfoil in an icing wind tunnel. The ice growth process can be well observed in the results. The MIR scan shows a good agreement with the traditional visible laser scan on a plastic replication of the final ice shape made by the mold and casting method. PMID:25836526

  13. Remote z-scanning with a macroscopic voice coil motor for fast 3D multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prendergast, Andrew; Wyart, Claire; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2016-01-01

    There is a high demand for 3D multiphoton imaging in neuroscience and other fields but scanning in axial direction presents technical challenges. We developed a focusing technique based on a remote movable mirror that is conjugate to the specimen plane and translated by a voice coil motor. We constructed cost-effective z-scanning modules from off-the-shelf components that can be mounted onto standard multiphoton laser scanning microscopes to extend scan patterns from 2D to 3D. Systems were designed for large objectives and provide high resolution, high speed and a large z-scan range (>300 μm). We used these systems for 3D multiphoton calcium imaging in the adult zebrafish brain and measured odor-evoked activity patterns across >1500 neurons with single-neuron resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27231612

  14. Remote z-scanning with a macroscopic voice coil motor for fast 3D multiphoton laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Peter; Prendergast, Andrew; Wyart, Claire; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2016-05-01

    There is a high demand for 3D multiphoton imaging in neuroscience and other fields but scanning in axial direction presents technical challenges. We developed a focusing technique based on a remote movable mirror that is conjugate to the specimen plane and translated by a voice coil motor. We constructed cost-effective z-scanning modules from off-the-shelf components that can be mounted onto standard multiphoton laser scanning microscopes to extend scan patterns from 2D to 3D. Systems were designed for large objectives and provide high resolution, high speed and a large z-scan range (>300 μm). We used these systems for 3D multiphoton calcium imaging in the adult zebrafish brain and measured odor-evoked activity patterns across >1500 neurons with single-neuron resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27231612

  15. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  16. 3-D reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    PubMed

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. PMID:24723320

  17. 3D laser scanning and modelling of the Dhow heritage for the Qatar National Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetherelt, A.; Cooper, J. P.; Zazzaro, C.

    2014-08-01

    Curating boats can be difficult. They are complex structures, often demanding to conserve whether in or out of the water; they are usually large, difficult to move on land, and demanding of gallery space. Communicating life on board to a visiting public in the terra firma context of a museum can be difficult. Boats in their native environment are inherently dynamic artifacts. In a museum they can be static and divorced from the maritime context that might inspire engagement. New technologies offer new approaches to these problems. 3D laser scanning and digital modeling offers museums a multifaceted means of recording, monitoring, studying and communicating watercraft in their care. In this paper we describe the application of 3D laser scanning and subsequent digital modeling. Laser scans were further developed using computer-generated imagery (CGI) modeling techniques to produce photorealistic 3D digital models for development into interactive, media-based museum displays. The scans were also used to generate 2D naval lines and orthographic drawings as a lasting curatorial record of the dhows held by the National Museum of Qatar.

  18. Error analysis of 3D laser scanning system for gangue monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shaoxing; Xia, Yuyang; Zhang, Aiwu

    2012-01-01

    The paper put forward the system error evaluation method of 3D scanning system for gangue monitoring; analyzed system errors including integrated error which can be avoided, and measurement error which needed whole analysis; firstly established the system equation after understanding the relationship of each structure. Then, used error independent effect and spread law to set up the entire error analysis system, and simulated the trend of error changing along X, Y, Z directions. At last, it is analytic that the laser rangefinder carries some weight in system error, and the horizontal and vertical scanning angles have some influences on system error in the certain vertical and horizontal scanning parameters.

  19. An efficient solid modeling system based on a hand-held 3D laser scan device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The hand-held 3D laser scanner sold in the market is appealing for its port and convenient to use, but price is expensive. To develop such a system based cheap devices using the same principles as the commercial systems is impossible. In this paper, a simple hand-held 3D laser scanner is developed based on a volume reconstruction method using cheap devices. Unlike convenient laser scanner to collect point cloud of an object surface, the proposed method only scan few key profile curves on the surface. Planar section curve network can be generated from these profile curves to construct a volume model of the object. The details of design are presented, and illustrated by the example of a complex shaped object.

  20. Development of scanning laser sensor for underwater 3D imaging with the coaxial optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochimizu, Hideaki; Imaki, Masaharu; Kameyama, Shumpei; Saito, Takashi; Ishibashi, Shoujirou; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    We have developed the scanning laser sensor for underwater 3-D imaging which has the wide scanning angle of 120º (Horizontal) x 30º (Vertical) with the compact size of 25 cm diameter and 60 cm long. Our system has a dome lens and a coaxial optics to realize both the wide scanning angle and the compactness. The system also has the feature in the sensitivity time control (STC) circuit, in which the receiving gain is increased according to the time of flight. The STC circuit contributes to detect a small signal by suppressing the unwanted signals backscattered by marine snows. We demonstrated the system performance in the pool, and confirmed the 3-D imaging with the distance of 20 m. Furthermore, the system was mounted on the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and demonstrated the seafloor mapping at the depth of 100 m in the ocean.

  1. 3D Laser Scanning Modeling and Application on Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, M.; Zhang, X.; Wu, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue is located at Baoding Mountain in Chongqing. It has the reputation as "the Gem of World's Rock Carving Art". At present,the Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue is basically well conserved, while the local damage is already very serious. However, the Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue is a three-dimensional caved statue, the present plane surveying and mapping device cannot reflect the preservation situation completely. Therefore, the documentation of the Dazu Thousand-hand Bodhisattva Statue using terrestrial laser scanning is of great significance. This paper will introduce a new method for superfine 3D modeling of Thousand-hand Bodhisattva based on the high-resolution 3D cloud points. By analyzing these 3D cloud points and 3D models, some useful information, such as several 3D statistics, 3D thematic map and 3D shape restoration suggestion of Thousand-hand Bodhisattva will be revealed, which are beneficial to restoration work and some other application.

  2. 3D camera assisted fully automated calibration of scanning laser Doppler vibrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sels, Seppe; Ribbens, Bart; Mertens, Luc; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Scanning laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV) are used to measure full-field vibration shapes of products and structures. In most commercially available scanning laser Doppler vibrometer systems the user manually draws a grid of measurement locations on a 2D camera image of the product. The determination of the correct physical measurement locations can be a time consuming and diffcult task. In this paper we present a new methodology for product testing and quality control that integrates 3D imaging techniques with vibration measurements. This procedure allows to test prototypes in a shorter period because physical measurements locations will be located automatically. The proposed methodology uses a 3D time-of-flight camera to measure the location and orientation of the test-object. The 3D image of the time-of-flight camera is then matched with the 3D-CAD model of the object in which measurement locations are pre-defined. A time of flight camera operates strictly in the near infrared spectrum. To improve the signal to noise ratio in the time-of-flight measurement, a time-of-flight camera uses a band filter. As a result of this filter, the laser spot of most laser vibrometers is invisible in the time-of-flight image. Therefore a 2D RGB-camera is used to find the laser-spot of the vibrometer. The laser spot is matched to the 3D image obtained by the time-of-flight camera. Next an automatic calibration procedure is used to aim the laser at the (pre)defined locations. Another benefit from this methodology is that it incorporates automatic mapping between a CAD model and the vibration measurements. This mapping can be used to visualize measurements directly on a 3D CAD model. Secondly the orientation of the CAD model is known with respect to the laser beam. This information can be used to find the direction of the measured vibration relatively to the surface of the object. With this direction, the vibration measurements can be compared more precisely with numerical

  3. Scanning cross-correlator for monitoring uniform 3D ellipsoidal laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenogorskii, V V; Andrianov, A V; Gacheva, E I; Gelikonov, G V; Mironov, S Yu; Potemkin, A K; Khazanov, E A; Krasilnikov, M; Stephan, F; Mart'yanov, M A; Syresin, E M

    2014-01-31

    The specific features of experimental implementation of a cross-correlator with a scan rate above 1600 cm s{sup -1} and a spatial delay amplitude of more than 15 mm are considered. The possibility of measuring the width of femtosecond pulses propagating in a train 300 μs in duration with a repetition rate of 1 MHz is demonstrated. A time resolution of 300 fs for the maximum time window of 50 ps is attained. The cross-correlator is aimed at testing 3D pulses of a laser driver of an electron photo-injector. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Geomorphometric analysis of cave ceiling channels mapped with 3-D terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallay, Michal; Hochmuth, Zdenko; Kaňuk, Ján; Hofierka, Jaroslav

    2016-05-01

    The change of hydrological conditions during the evolution of caves in carbonate rocks often results in a complex subterranean geomorphology, which comprises specific landforms such as ceiling channels, anastomosing half tubes, or speleothems organized vertically in different levels. Studying such complex environments traditionally requires tedious mapping; however, this is being replaced with terrestrial laser scanning technology. Laser scanning overcomes the problem of reaching high ceilings, providing new options to map underground landscapes with unprecedented level of detail and accuracy. The acquired point cloud can be handled conveniently with dedicated software, but applying traditional geomorphometry to analyse the cave surface is limited. This is because geomorphometry has been focused on parameterization and analysis of surficial terrain. The theoretical and methodological concept has been based on two-dimensional (2-D) scalar fields, which are sufficient for most cases of the surficial terrain. The terrain surface is modelled with a bivariate function of altitude (elevation) and represented by a raster digital elevation model. However, the cave is a 3-D entity; therefore, a different approach is required for geomorphometric analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate the benefits of high-resolution cave mapping and 3-D modelling to better understand the palaeohydrography of the Domica cave in Slovakia. This methodological approach adopted traditional geomorphometric methods in a unique manner and also new methods used in 3-D computer graphics, which can be applied to study other 3-D geomorphological forms.

  5. An enhanced method for registration of dental surfaces partially scanned by a 3D dental laser scanning.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjin; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Juneseuk; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the fast and accurate registration method of partially scanned dental surfaces in a 3D dental laser scanning. To overcome the multiple point correspondence problems of conventional surface registration methods, we propose the novel depth map-based registration method to register 3D surface models. First, we convert a partially scanned 3D dental surface into a 2D image by generating the 2D depth map image of the surface model by applying a 3D rigid transformation into this model. Then, the image-based registration method using 2D depth map images accurately estimates the initial transformation between two consequently acquired surface models. To further increase the computational efficiency, we decompose the 3D rigid transformation into out-of-plane (i.e. x-, y-rotation, and z-translation) and in-plane (i.e. x-, y-translation, and z-rotation) transformations. For the in-plane transformation, we accelerate the transformation process by transforming the 2D depth map image instead of transforming the 3D surface model. For the more accurate registration of 3D surface models, we enhance iterative closest point (ICP) method for the subsequent fine registration. Our initial depth map-based registration well aligns each surface model. Therefore, our subsequent ICP method can accurately register two surface models since it is highly probable that the closest point pairs are the exact corresponding point pairs. The experimental results demonstrated that our method accurately registered partially scanned dental surfaces. Regarding the computational performance, our method delivered about 1.5 times faster registration than the conventional method. Our method can be successfully applied to the accurate reconstruction of 3D dental objects for orthodontic and prosthodontic treatment. PMID:25453381

  6. Determining the 3-D structure and motion of objects using a scanning laser range sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandhakumar, N.; Smith, Philip W.

    1993-01-01

    In order for the EVAHR robot to autonomously track and grasp objects, its vision system must be able to determine the 3-D structure and motion of an object from a sequence of sensory images. This task is accomplished by the use of a laser radar range sensor which provides dense range maps of the scene. Unfortunately, the currently available laser radar range cameras use a sequential scanning approach which complicates image analysis. Although many algorithms have been developed for recognizing objects from range images, none are suited for use with single beam, scanning, time-of-flight sensors because all previous algorithms assume instantaneous acquisition of the entire image. This assumption is invalid since the EVAHR robot is equipped with a sequential scanning laser range sensor. If an object is moving while being imaged by the device, the apparent structure of the object can be significantly distorted due to the significant non-zero delay time between sampling each image pixel. If an estimate of the motion of the object can be determined, this distortion can be eliminated; but, this leads to the motion-structure paradox - most existing algorithms for 3-D motion estimation use the structure of objects to parameterize their motions. The goal of this research is to design a rigid-body motion recovery technique which overcomes this limitation. The method being developed is an iterative, linear, feature-based approach which uses the non-zero image acquisition time constraint to accurately recover the motion parameters from the distorted structure of the 3-D range maps. Once the motion parameters are determined, the structural distortion in the range images is corrected.

  7. 3D laser scanning microscopy of hypervelocity impact features in metal and aerogel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, J. K.; Postberg, F.; Price, M. C.; Trieloff, M.; Li, Y. W.; Srama, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a study into the mapping of hypervelocity impact features using a Keyence VK-X200 3D laser scanning microscope. The impact features observed are impact craters in a variety of different metal targets (Al, Au and Cu) and impact tracks in aerogel targets, similar to those used in the Stardust mission. Differences in crater morphology between different target materials and impact velocities, as well as differences in track depth and diameter in aerogel, for particles of known constant dimensions, are discussed.

  8. Long-range laser scanning and 3D imaging for the Gneiss quarries survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Filippo Luca; Spataro, Alessio; Pozzoni, Maurizio; Ambrosi, Christian; Cannata, Massimiliano; Günther, Felix; Corboud, Federico

    2016-04-01

    In Canton Ticino (Southern Switzerland), the exploitation of natural stone, mostly gneisses, is an important activity of valley's economies. Nowadays, these economic activities are menaced by (i) the exploitation costs related to geological phenomena such as fractures, faults and heterogeneous rocks that hinder the processing of the stone product, (ii) continuously changing demand because of the evolving natural stone fashion and (iii) increasing administrative limits and rules acting to protect the environment. Therefore, the sustainable development of the sector for the next decades needs new and effective strategies to regulate and plan the quarries. A fundamental step in this process is the building of a 3D geological model of the quarries to constrain the volume of commercial natural stone and the volume of waste. In this context, we conducted Terrestrial Laser Scanning surveys of the quarries in the Maggia Valley to obtain a detailed 3D topography onto which the geological units were mapped. The topographic 3D model was obtained with a long-range laser scanning Riegl VZ4000 that can measure from up to 4 km of distance with a speed of 147,000 points per second. It operates with the new V-line technology, which defines the surface relief by sensing differentiated signals (echoes), even in the presence of obstacles such as vegetation. Depending on the esthetics of the gneisses, we defined seven types of natural stones that, together with faults and joints, were mapped onto the 3D models of the exploitation sites. According to the orientation of the geological limits and structures, we projected the different rock units and fractures into the excavation front. This way, we obtained a 3D geological model from which we can quantitatively estimate the volume of the seven different natural stones (with different commercial value) and waste (with low commercial value). To verify the 3D geological models and to quantify exploited rock and waste volumes the same

  9. Grammar-based Automatic 3D Model Reconstruction from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.; West, G.

    2014-04-01

    The automatic reconstruction of 3D buildings has been an important research topic during the last years. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to automatically reconstruct the 3D building models from segmented data based on pre-defined formal grammar and rules. Such segmented data can be extracted e.g. from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning devices. Two steps are considered in detail. The first step is to transform the segmented data into 3D shapes, for instance using the DXF (Drawing Exchange Format) format which is a CAD data file format used for data interchange between AutoCAD and other program. Second, we develop a formal grammar to describe the building model structure and integrate the pre-defined grammars into the reconstruction process. Depending on the different segmented data, the selected grammar and rules are applied to drive the reconstruction process in an automatic manner. Compared with other existing approaches, our proposed method allows the model reconstruction directly from 3D shapes and takes the whole building into account.

  10. Topographical surveys: Classical method versus 3D laser scanning. Case study - An application in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoraş, I.-R.; Covăsnianu, A.; Pleşu, G.; Benedict, B.

    2009-04-01

    The paper describes an experiment which took place in Iasi town, Romania, consisted in two different topographical survey techniques applied for one and the same objective placed in a block within the city (western part) - a thermal power station. The purpose was to compare those methods and to determine which one is proper to be used in this domain in terms of fastness, optimization and speed of data processing. First technique applied for our survey was the classical one, with a total station. Using the CAD technique, we obtained a final product (a dwg file) and a list of coordinates (a text file). The second method, which we focused our attention more, was the measurement with a very precise 3D laser scanstation, also very suitable in archeology. The data obtained were processed with special software. Result was a 3D model of the thermal power plant composed of measurable cloud point data. Finally, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of each method, we came to the conclusion that the 3D laser scanning which we used matches well the application, in this case civil engineering, but the future of accepting and implementing this technique is in the hands of Romanian authorities.

  11. Application of a Hybrid 3D-2D Laser Scanning System to the Characterization of Slate Slabs

    PubMed Central

    López, Marcos; Martínez, Javier; Matías, José María; Vilán, José Antonio; Taboada, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Dimensional control based on 3D laser scanning techniques is widely used in practice. We describe the application of a hybrid 3D-2D laser scanning system to the characterization of slate slabs with structural defects that are difficult for the human eye to characterize objectively. Our study is based on automating the process using a 3D laser scanner and a 2D camera. Our results demonstrate that the application of this hybrid system optimally characterizes slate slabs in terms of the defects described by the Spanish UNE-EN 12326-1 standard. PMID:22219696

  12. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-05-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  13. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  14. Laser Scanning for 3D Object Characterization: Infrastructure for Exploration and Analysis of Vegetation Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, K.; Höfle, B.

    2012-04-01

    Mapping and characterization of the three-dimensional nature of vegetation is increasingly gaining in importance. Deeper insight is required for e.g. forest management, biodiversity assessment, habitat analysis, precision agriculture, renewable energy production or the analysis of interaction between biosphere and atmosphere. However the potential of 3D vegetation characterization has not been exploited so far and new technologies are needed. Laser scanning has evolved into the state-of-the-art technology for highly accurate 3D data acquisition. By now several studies indicated a high value of 3D vegetation description by using laser data. The laser sensors provide a detailed geometric presentation (geometric information) of scanned objects as well as a full profile of laser energy that was scattered back to the sensor (radiometric information). In order to exploit the full potential of these datasets, profound knowledge on laser scanning technology for data acquisition, geoinformation technology for data analysis and object of interest (e.g. vegetation) for data interpretation have to be joined. A signature database is a collection of signatures of reference vegetation objects acquired under known conditions and sensor parameters and can be used to improve information extraction from unclassified vegetation datasets. Different vegetation elements (leaves, branches, etc.) at different heights above ground with different geometric composition contribute to the overall description (i.e. signature) of the scanned object. The developed tools allow analyzing tree objects according to single features (e.g. echo width and signal amplitude) and to any relation of features and derived statistical values (e.g. ratio of laser point attributes). For example, a single backscatter cross section value does not allow for tree species determination, whereas the average echo width per tree segment can give good estimates. Statistical values and/or distributions (e.g. Gaussian

  15. Optimization of 3D laser scanning speed by use of combined variable step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cruz, X. M.; Sergiyenko, O. Yu.; Tyrsa, Vera; Rivas-Lopez, M.; Hernandez-Balbuena, D.; Rodriguez-Quiñonez, J. C.; Basaca-Preciado, L. C.; Mercorelli, P.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of 3D TVS slow functioning caused by constant small scanning step becomes its solution in the presented research. It can be achieved by combined scanning step application for the fast search of n obstacles in unknown surroundings. Such a problem is of keynote importance in automatic robot navigation. To maintain a reasonable speed robots must detect dangerous obstacles as soon as possible, but all known scanners able to measure distances with sufficient accuracy are unable to do it in real time. So, the related technical task of the scanning with variable speed and precise digital mapping only for selected spatial sectors is under consideration. A wide range of simulations in MATLAB 7.12.0 of several variants of hypothetic scenes with variable n obstacles in each scene (including variation of shapes and sizes) and scanning with incremented angle value (0.6° up to 15°) is provided. The aim of such simulation was to detect which angular values of interval still permit getting the maximal information about obstacles without undesired time losses. Three of such local maximums were obtained in simulations and then rectified by application of neuronal network formalism (Levenberg-Marquradt Algorithm). The obtained results in its turn were applied to MET (Micro-Electro-mechanical Transmission) design for practical realization of variable combined step scanning on an experimental prototype of our previously known laser scanner.

  16. Error Analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data by Means of Spherical Statistics and 3D Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Cuartero, Aurora; Armesto, Julia; Rodríguez, Pablo G.; Arias, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a complete analysis of the positional errors of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data based on spherical statistics and 3D graphs. Spherical statistics are preferred because of the 3D vectorial nature of the spatial error. Error vectors have three metric elements (one module and two angles) that were analyzed by spherical statistics. A study case has been presented and discussed in detail. Errors were calculating using 53 check points (CP) and CP coordinates were measured by a digitizer with submillimetre accuracy. The positional accuracy was analyzed by both the conventional method (modular errors analysis) and the proposed method (angular errors analysis) by 3D graphics and numerical spherical statistics. Two packages in R programming language were performed to obtain graphics automatically. The results indicated that the proposed method is advantageous as it offers a more complete analysis of the positional accuracy, such as angular error component, uniformity of the vector distribution, error isotropy, and error, in addition the modular error component by linear statistics. PMID:22163461

  17. 3D change detection at street level using mobile laser scanning point clouds and terrestrial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Gruen, Armin

    2014-04-01

    Automatic change detection and geo-database updating in the urban environment are difficult tasks. There has been much research on detecting changes with satellite and aerial images, but studies have rarely been performed at the street level, which is complex in its 3D geometry. Contemporary geo-databases include 3D street-level objects, which demand frequent data updating. Terrestrial images provides rich texture information for change detection, but the change detection with terrestrial images from different epochs sometimes faces problems with illumination changes, perspective distortions and unreliable 3D geometry caused by the lack of performance of automatic image matchers, while mobile laser scanning (MLS) data acquired from different epochs provides accurate 3D geometry for change detection, but is very expensive for periodical acquisition. This paper proposes a new method for change detection at street level by using combination of MLS point clouds and terrestrial images: the accurate but expensive MLS data acquired from an early epoch serves as the reference, and terrestrial images or photogrammetric images captured from an image-based mobile mapping system (MMS) at a later epoch are used to detect the geometrical changes between different epochs. The method will automatically mark the possible changes in each view, which provides a cost-efficient method for frequent data updating. The methodology is divided into several steps. In the first step, the point clouds are recorded by the MLS system and processed, with data cleaned and classified by semi-automatic means. In the second step, terrestrial images or mobile mapping images at a later epoch are taken and registered to the point cloud, and then point clouds are projected on each image by a weighted window based z-buffering method for view dependent 2D triangulation. In the next step, stereo pairs of the terrestrial images are rectified and re-projected between each other to check the geometrical

  18. The study of craniofacial growth patterns using 3D laser scanning and geometric morphometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friess, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Throughout childhood, braincase and face grow at different rates and therefore exhibit variable proportions and positions relative to each other. Our understanding of the direction and magnitude of these growth patterns is crucial for many ergonomic applications and can be improved by advanced 3D morphometrics. The purpose of this study is to investigate this known growth allometry using 3D imaging techniques. The geometry of the head and face of 840 children, aged 2 to 19, was captured with a laser surface scanner and analyzed statistically. From each scan, 18 landmarks were extracted and registered using General Procrustes Analysis (GPA). GPA eliminates unwanted variation due to position, orientation and scale by applying a least-squares superimposition algorithm to individual landmark configurations. This approach provides the necessary normalization for the study of differences in size, shape, and their interaction (allometry). The results show that throughout adolescence, boys and girls follow a different growth trajectory, leading to marked differences not only in size but also in shape, most notably in relative proportions of the braincase. These differences can be observed during early childhood, but become most noticeable after the age of 13 years, when craniofacial growth in girls slows down significantly, whereas growth in boys continues for at least 3 more years.

  19. Building a 3d Reference Model for Canal Tunnel Surveying Using Sonar and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, E.; Charbonnier, P.; Foucher, P.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Koehl, M.

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining canal tunnels is not only a matter of cultural and historical preservation, but also a commercial necessity and a security issue. This contribution adresses the problem of building a full 3D reference model of a canal tunnel by merging SONAR (for underwater data recording) and LASER data (for the above-water parts). Although both scanning devices produce point clouds, their properties are rather different. In particular, SONAR data are very noisy and their processing raises several issues related to the device capacities, the acquisition setup and the tubular shape of the tunnel. The proposed methodology relies on a denoising step by meshing, followed by the registration of SONAR data with the geo-referenced LASER data. Since there is no overlap between point clouds, a 3-step procedure is proposed to robustly estimate the registration parameters. In this paper, we report a first experimental survey, which concerned the entrance of a canal tunnel. The obtained results are promising and the analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated fashion, in the limits of the involved technology.

  20. Automated analysis of barley organs using 3D laser scanning: an approach for high throughput phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R(2) = 0:99 for the leaf area and R(2) = 0:98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored. PMID:25029283

  1. Automated Analysis of Barley Organs Using 3D Laser Scanning: An Approach for High Throughput Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Stefan; Dupuis, Jan; Riedel, Sebastian; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rise of laser scanning the 3D geometry of plant architecture is easy to acquire. Nevertheless, an automated interpretation and, finally, the segmentation into functional groups are still difficult to achieve. Two barley plants were scanned in a time course, and the organs were separated by applying a histogram-based classification algorithm. The leaf organs were represented by meshing algorithms, while the stem organs were parameterized by a least-squares cylinder approximation. We introduced surface feature histograms with an accuracy of 96% for the separation of the barley organs, leaf and stem. This enables growth monitoring in a time course for barley plants. Its reliability was demonstrated by a comparison with manually fitted parameters with a correlation R2 = 0.99 for the leaf area and R2 = 0.98 for the cumulated stem height. A proof of concept has been given for its applicability for the detection of water stress in barley, where the extension growth of an irrigated and a non-irrigated plant has been monitored. PMID:25029283

  2. Fusion of image and laser-scanning data in a large-scale 3D virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jhih-Syuan; Lin, Ta-Te

    2013-05-01

    Construction of large-scale 3D virtual environment is important in many fields such as robotic navigation, urban planning, transportation, and remote sensing, etc. Laser scanning approach is the most common method used in constructing 3D models. This paper proposes an automatic method to fuse image and laser-scanning data in a large-scale 3D virtual environment. The system comprises a laser-scanning device installed on a robot platform and the software for data fusion and visualization. The algorithms of data fusion and scene integration are presented. Experiments were performed for the reconstruction of outdoor scenes to test and demonstrate the functionality of the system. We also discuss the efficacy of the system and technical problems involved in this proposed method.

  3. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems. PMID:26922872

  4. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems. PMID:26922872

  5. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems.

  6. Permanent 3D laser scanning system for an active landslide in Gresten (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canli, Ekrem; Höfle, Bernhard; Hämmerle, Martin; Benni, Thiebes; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have widely been used for high spatial resolution data acquisition of topographic features and geomorphic analyses. Existing applications encompass different landslides including rockfall, translational or rotational landslides, debris flow, but also coastal cliff erosion, braided river evolution or river bank erosion. The main advantages of TLS are (a) the high spatial sampling density of XYZ-measurements (e.g. 1 point every 2-3 mm at 10 m distance), particularly in comparison with the low data density monitoring techniques such as GNSS or total stations, (b) the millimeter accuracy and precision of the range measurement to centimeter accuracy of the final DEM, and (c) the highly dense area-wide scanning that enables to look through vegetation and to measure bare ground. One of its main constraints is the temporal resolution of acquired data due to labor costs and time requirements for field campaigns. Thus, repetition measurements are generally performed only episodically. However, for an increased scientific understanding of the processes as well as for early warning purposes, we present a novel permanent 3D monitoring setup to increase the temporal resolution of TLS measurements. This accounts for different potential monitoring deliverables such as volumetric calculations, spatio-temporal movement patterns, predictions and even alerting. This system was installed at the active Salcher landslide in Gresten (Austria) that is situated in the transition zone of the Gresten Klippenbelt (Helvetic) and the Flyschzone (Penninic). The characteristic lithofacies are the Gresten Beds of Early Jurassic age that are covered by a sequence of marly and silty beds with intercalated sandy limestones. Permanent data acquisition can be implemented into our workflow with any long-range TLS system offering fully automated capturing. We utilize an Optech ILRIS-3D scanner. The time interval between two scans is currently set to 24 hours, but can be

  7. Multi-frequency, 3D ODS measurement by continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Ben; Ewins, David

    2015-06-01

    Continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique which has been described and explored in the literature for over two decades, but remains niche compared to SLDV inspection by a series of discrete-point measurements. This is in part because of the unavoidable phenomenon of laser speckle, which deteriorates signal quality when velocity data is captured from a moving spot measurement. Further, applicability of CSLDV has typically been limited to line scans and rectangular areas by the application of sine, step, or ramp functions to the scanning mirrors which control the location of the measurement laser spot. In this paper it is shown that arbitrary functions to scan any area can easily be derived from a basic calibration routine, equivalent to the calibration performed in conventional discrete-point laser vibrometry. This is extended by performing the same scan path upon a test surface from three independent locations of the laser head, and decomposing the three sets of one-dimensional deflection shapes into a single set of three-dimensional deflection shapes. The test was performed with multi-sine excitation, yielding 34 operating deflection shapes from each scan.

  8. Documentation and Instructions for Running Two Python Scripts that Aid in Setting up 3D Measurements using the Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, Daniel Peter

    2015-08-24

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently purchased a Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for vibration measurement. This device has proven to be a very nice tool for making vibration measurements, and has a number of advantages over traditional sensors such as accelerometers. The non-contact nature of the laser vibrometer means there is no mass loading due to measuring the response. Additionally, the laser scanning heads can position the laser spot much more quickly and accurately than placing an accelerometer or performing a roving hammer impact. The disadvantage of the system is that a significant amount of time must be invested to align the lasers with each other and the part so that the laser spots can be accurately positioned. The Polytec software includes a number of nice tools to aid in this procedure; however, certain portions are still tedious. Luckily, the Polytec software is readily extensible by programming macros for the system, so tedious portions of the procedure can be made easier by automating the process. The Polytec Software includes a WinWrap (similar to Visual Basic) editor and interface to run macros written in that programming language. The author, however, is much more proficient in Python, and the latter also has a much larger set of libraries that can be used to create very complex macros, while taking advantage of Python’s inherent readability and maintainability.

  9. Development, Calibration and Evaluation of a Portable and Direct Georeferenced Laser Scanning System for Kinematic 3D Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Erik; Eling, Christian; Wieland, Markus; Klingbeil, Lasse; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, kinematic laser scanning has become increasingly popular because it offers many benefits compared to static laser scanning. The advantages include both saving of time in the georeferencing and a more favorable scanning geometry. Often mobile laser scanning systems are installed on wheeled platforms, which may not reach all parts of the object. Hence, there is an interest in the development of portable systems, which remain operational even in inaccessible areas. The development of such a portable laser scanning system is presented in this paper. It consists of a lightweight direct georeferencing unit for the position and attitude determination and a small low-cost 2D laser scanner. This setup provides advantages over existing portable systems that employ heavy and expensive 3D laser scanners in a profiling mode. A special emphasis is placed on the system calibration, i. e. the determination of the transformation between the coordinate frames of the direct georeferencing unit and the 2D laser scanner. To this end, a calibration field is used, which consists of differently orientated georeferenced planar surfaces, leading to estimates for the lever arms and boresight angles with an accuracy of mm and one-tenth of a degree. Finally, point clouds of the mobile laser scanning system are compared with georeferenced point clouds of a high-precision 3D laser scanner. Accordingly, the accuracy of the system is in the order of cm to dm. This is in good agreement with the expected accuracy, which has been derived from the error propagation of previously estimated variance components.

  10. Continuous-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: Extensions to arbitrary areas, multi-frequency and 3D capture

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, B.; Ewins, D.; Acciavatti, F.

    2014-05-27

    To date, differing implementations of continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry have been demonstrated by various academic institutions, but since the scan paths were defined using step or sine functions from function generators, the paths were typically limited to 1D line scans or 2D areas such as raster paths or Lissajous trajectories. The excitation was previously often limited to a single frequency due to the specific signal processing performed to convert the scan data into an ODS. In this paper, a configuration of continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry is demonstrated which permits scanning of arbitrary areas, with the benefit of allowing multi-frequency/broadband excitation. Various means of generating scan paths to inspect arbitrary areas are discussed and demonstrated. Further, full 3D vibration capture is demonstrated by the addition of a range-finding facility to the described configuration, and iteratively relocating a single scanning laser head. Here, the range-finding facility was provided by a Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive piece of consumer electronics.

  11. Continuous-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: Extensions to arbitrary areas, multi-frequency and 3D capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, B.; Ewins, D.; Acciavatti, F.

    2014-05-01

    To date, differing implementations of continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry have been demonstrated by various academic institutions, but since the scan paths were defined using step or sine functions from function generators, the paths were typically limited to 1D line scans or 2D areas such as raster paths or Lissajous trajectories. The excitation was previously often limited to a single frequency due to the specific signal processing performed to convert the scan data into an ODS. In this paper, a configuration of continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry is demonstrated which permits scanning of arbitrary areas, with the benefit of allowing multi-frequency/broadband excitation. Various means of generating scan paths to inspect arbitrary areas are discussed and demonstrated. Further, full 3D vibration capture is demonstrated by the addition of a range-finding facility to the described configuration, and iteratively relocating a single scanning laser head. Here, the range-finding facility was provided by a Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive piece of consumer electronics.

  12. Increase of Readability and Accuracy of 3d Models Using Fusion of Close Range Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gašparović, M.; Malarić, I.

    2012-07-01

    The development of laser scanning technology has opened a new page in geodesy and enabled an entirely new way of presenting data. Products obtained by the method of laser scanning are used in many sciences, as well as in archaeology. It should be noted that 3D models of archaeological artefacts obtained by laser scanning are fully measurable, written in 1:1 scale and have high accuracy. On the other hand, texture and RGB values of the surface of the object obtained by a laser scanner have lower resolution and poorer radiometric characteristics in relation to the textures captured with a digital camera. Scientific research and the goal of this paper are to increase the accuracy and readability of the 3D model with textures obtained with a digital camera. Laser scanning was performed with triangulation scanner of high accuracy, Vivid 9i (Konica Minolta), while for photogrammetric recording digital camera Nikon D90 with a lens of fixed focal length 20 mm, was used. It is important to stress that a posteriori accuracy score of the global registration of point clouds in the form of the standard deviation was ± 0.136 mm while the average distance was only ± 0.080 mm. Also research has proven that the quality projection texture model increases readability. Recording of archaeological artefacts and making their photorealistic 3D model greatly contributes to archaeology as a science, accelerates processing and reconstruction of the findings. It also allows the presentation of findings to the general public, not just to the experts.

  13. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  14. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  15. Application of 3D laser scanning technology in historical building preservation: a case study of a Chinese temple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu Min; Lu, Nien Hua; Wu, Tsung Chiang

    2005-06-01

    This study applies 3D Laser scanning technology to develop a high-precision measuring system for digital survey of historical building. It outperformed other methods in obtaining abundant high-precision measuring points and computing data instantly. In this study, the Pei-tien Temple, a Chinese Taoism temple in southern Taiwan famous for its highly intricate architecture and more than 300-year history, was adopted as the target to proof the high accuracy and efficiency of this system. By using French made MENSI GS-100 Laser Scanner, numerous measuring points were precisely plotted to present the plane map, vertical map and 3D map of the property. Accuracies of 0.1-1 mm in the digital data have consistently been achieved for the historical heritage measurement.

  16. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  17. 3D-Laser-Scanning Technique Applied to Bulk Density Measurements of Apollo Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macke, R. J.; Kent, J. J.; Kiefer, W. S.; Britt, D. T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better interpret gravimetric data from orbiters such as GRAIL and LRO to understand the subsurface composition and structure of the lunar crust, it is import to have a reliable database of the density and porosity of lunar materials. To this end, we have been surveying these physical properties in both lunar meteorites and Apollo lunar samples. To measure porosity, both grain density and bulk density are required. For bulk density, our group has historically utilized sub-mm bead immersion techniques extensively, though several factors have made this technique problematic for our work with Apollo samples. Samples allocated for measurement are often smaller than optimal for the technique, leading to large error bars. Also, for some samples we were required to use pure alumina beads instead of our usual glass beads. The alumina beads were subject to undesirable static effects, producing unreliable results. Other investigators have tested the use of 3d laser scanners on meteorites for measuring bulk volumes. Early work, though promising, was plagued with difficulties including poor response on dark or reflective surfaces, difficulty reproducing sharp edges, and large processing time for producing shape models. Due to progress in technology, however, laser scanners have improved considerably in recent years. We tested this technique on 27 lunar samples in the Apollo collection using a scanner at NASA Johnson Space Center. We found it to be reliable and more precise than beads, with the added benefit that it involves no direct contact with the sample, enabling the study of particularly friable samples for which bead immersion is not possible

  18. Parallel deconvolution of large 3D images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pawliczek, Piotr; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna; Soltys, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    Various deconvolution algorithms are often used for restoration of digital images. Image deconvolution is especially needed for the correction of three-dimensional images obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Such images suffer from distortions, particularly in the Z dimension. As a result, reliable automatic segmentation of these images may be difficult or even impossible. Effective deconvolution algorithms are memory-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, we propose a parallel version of the well-known Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm developed for a system with distributed memory and implemented with the use of Message Passing Interface (MPI). It enables significantly more rapid deconvolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional images by efficiently splitting the computation across multiple computers. The implementation of this algorithm can be used on professional clusters provided by computing centers as well as on simple networks of ordinary PC machines. PMID:19725070

  19. 3D imaging of biofilms on implants by detection of scattered light with a scanning laser optical tomograph

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, Marko; Kühnel, Mark P.; Kellner, Manuela; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Lange, Tineke; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms – communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces – are a constant threat for long-term success in modern implantology. The application of laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has increased the knowledge about microscopic properties of biofilms, whereas a 3D imaging technique for the large scale visualization of bacterial growth and migration on curved and non-transparent surfaces is not realized so far. Towards this goal, we built a scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) setup detecting scattered laser light to image biofilm on dental implant surfaces. SLOT enables the visualization of living biofilms in 3D by detecting the wavelength-dependent absorption of non-fluorescent stains like e.g. reduced triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) accumulated within metabolically active bacterial cells. Thus, the presented system allows the large scale investigation of vital biofilm structure and in vitro development on cylindrical and non-transparent objects without the need for fluorescent vital staining. We suggest SLOT to be a valuable tool for the structural and volumetric investigation of biofilm formation on implants with sizes up to several millimeters. PMID:22076261

  20. A system for high resolution 3D mapping using laser radar and requiring no beam scanning mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Paul

    1988-06-01

    The inherently high angular and range resolution capabilities associated with radar systems operating at optical frequencies are at once a blessing and a curse. Standard implementations consist of very narrow field of view optical receivers operating in conjunction with laser transmitters or even narrower illumination beamwidth. While high angular resolution is thus achieved, mechanical scanning is required to gather data over extended fields of view. The many laser pulse transmissions necessary to cover the entire field of view increase the detectability of the system by enemy sensors. A system concept is proposed which, through the use of a single laser transmitter and multiple optical receivers, largely eliminate these deficiencies. Complete 3D data over a broad angular field of view and depth of field can be gathered based upon the reflections from a single transmitted laser pulse. Covert operation is enhanced as a result of the sparse laser transmissions required. The eye safety characteristics of the system are also enhanced. Proprietary coding of optical shutters in each of the multiple optical receivers permits the number of such receivers to be reduced to a very practical few. An alternative configuration of the system reduces the number of receivers required to one, at the expense of increased data acquisition time. The multiple receiver configuration is simply a parallel processing implementation of the single receiver approach. While data rate is reduced by the single receiver configuration, it still greatly exceeds that of scanning systems, and hardware complexity is also reduced significantly.

  1. Analysis of thin baked-on silicone layers by FTIR and 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Funke, Stefanie; Matilainen, Julia; Nalenz, Heiko; Bechtold-Peters, Karoline; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Friess, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Pre-filled syringes (PFS) and auto-injection devices with cartridges are increasingly used for parenteral administration. To assure functionality, silicone oil is applied to the inner surface of the glass barrel. Silicone oil migration into the product can be minimized by applying a thin but sufficient layer of silicone oil emulsion followed by thermal bake-on versus spraying-on silicone oil. Silicone layers thicker than 100nm resulting from regular spray-on siliconization can be characterized using interferometric profilometers. However, the analysis of thin silicone layers generated by bake-on siliconization is more challenging. In this paper, we have evaluated Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy after solvent extraction and a new 3D-Laser Scanning Microscopy (3D-LSM) to overcome this challenge. A multi-step solvent extraction and subsequent FTIR spectroscopy enabled to quantify baked-on silicone levels as low as 21-325μg per 5mL cartridge. 3D-LSM was successfully established to visualize and measure baked-on silicone layers as thin as 10nm. 3D-LSM was additionally used to analyze the silicone oil distribution within cartridges at such low levels. Both methods provided new, highly valuable insights to characterize the siliconization after processing, in order to achieve functionality. PMID:26316044

  2. Semi-automated extraction and delineation of 3D roads of street scene from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Fang, Lina; Li, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Accurate 3D road information is important for applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D modeling. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is an efficient technique for capturing dense point clouds that can be used to construct detailed road models for large areas. This paper presents a method for extracting and delineating roads from large-scale MLS point clouds. The proposed method partitions MLS point clouds into a set of consecutive "scanning lines", which each consists of a road cross section. A moving window operator is used to filter out non-ground points line by line, and curb points are detected based on curb patterns. The detected curb points are tracked and refined so that they are both globally consistent and locally similar. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, experiments were conducted using two types of street-scene point clouds captured by Optech's Lynx Mobile Mapper System. The completeness, correctness, and quality of the extracted roads are over 94.42%, 91.13%, and 91.3%, respectively, which proves the proposed method is a promising solution for extracting 3D roads from MLS point clouds.

  3. Development of Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning System for Indoor Mapping and As-Built BIM Using Constrained SLAM

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy. PMID:26501292

  4. Development of kinematic 3D laser scanning system for indoor mapping and as-built BIM using constrained SLAM.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy. PMID:26501292

  5. Body mass estimations for Plateosaurus engelhardti using laser scanning and 3D reconstruction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Suthau, Tim; Bellmann, Anke; Friedrich, Andreas; Schwanebeck, Thomas; Stoinski, Stefan; Trippel, Tobias; Kirsch, Karl; Hellwich, Olaf

    2007-08-01

    Both body mass and surface area are factors determining the essence of any living organism. This should also hold true for an extinct organism such as a dinosaur. The present report discusses the use of a new 3D laser scanner method to establish body masses and surface areas of an Asian elephant (Zoological Museum of Copenhagen, Denmark) and of Plateosaurus engelhardti, a prosauropod from the Upper Triassic, exhibited at the Paleontological Museum in Tübingen (Germany). This method was used to study the effect that slight changes in body shape had on body mass for P. engelhardti. It was established that body volumes varied between 0.79 m3 (slim version) and 1.14 m3 (robust version), resulting in a presumable body mass of 630 and 912 kg, respectively. The total body surface areas ranged between 8.8 and 10.2 m2, of which, in both reconstructions of P. engelhardti, ˜33% account for the thorax area alone. The main difference between the two models is in the tail and hind limb reconstruction. The tail of the slim version has a surface area of 1.98 m2, whereas that of the robust version has a surface area of 2.73 m2. The body volumes calculated for the slim version were as follows: head 0.006 m3, neck 0.016 m3, fore limbs 0.020 m3, hind limbs 0.08 m3, thoracic cavity 0.533 m3, and tail 0.136 m3. For the robust model, the following volumes were established: 0.01 m3 head, neck 0.026 m3, fore limbs 0.025 m3, hind limbs 0.18 m3, thoracic cavity 0.616 m3, and finally, tail 0.28 m3. Based on these body volumes, scaling equations were used to assess the size that the organs of this extinct dinosaur have.

  6. Multitemporal 3D data capturing and GIS analysis of fluvial processes and geomorphological changes with terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hämmerle, Martin; Forbriger, Markus; Höfle, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    LiDAR is a state of the art method for directly capturing 3D geodata. A laser beam is emitted in a known direction. The time of flight of the laser pulse is recorded and transformed into the distance between sensor and scanned object. The result of the scanning process is a 3D laser point cloud densely covering the surveyed area. LiDAR is used in a vast variety of research fields. In this study, the focus is on the application of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), the static and ground-based LiDAR operation, in a multitemporal analysis of fluvial geomorphology. Within the framework of two study projects in 2011/2012, two TLS surveys were carried out. The surveys covered a gravel bar of about 150 m × 25 m size in a side branch of the Neckar River near Heidelberg (49°28'36''N, 8°34'32''E) located in a nature reserve with natural river characteristics. The first survey was performed in November 2011, the second in June 2012. Due to seasonally changing water levels, the gravel bar was flooded and the morphology changed. For the field campaigns, a Riegl VZ-400 was available. Height control points and tie points for registration and georeferencing were obtained with a total station and GPS equipment. The first survey was done from 6 scan positions (77 million points) and the second from 5 positions (89 million points). The point spacing for each single scan was set to 3 mm at 10 m distance. Co-registration of the individual campaigns was done via an Iterative Closest Point algorithm. Thereafter, co-registration and fine georeferencing of both epochs was performed using manually selected tie points and least-squares adjustment. After filtering of vegetation in the 3D point cloud in the software OPALS, a digital terrain model (DTM) with 0.25 m by 0.25 m cell size was generated for each epoch. A difference raster model of the two DTMs for assessing the changes was derived excluding water surface areas using the signal amplitude recorded for each echo. From the mean

  7. Terrestrial and Aerial Laser Scanning Data Integration Using Wavelet Analysis for the Purpose of 3D Building Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kedzierski, Michal; Fryskowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Visualization techniques have been greatly developed in the past few years. Three-dimensional models based on satellite and aerial imagery are now being enhanced by models generated using Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data. The most modern of such scanning systems have the ability to acquire over 50 points per square meter and to register a multiple echo, which allows the reconstruction of the terrain together with the terrain cover. However, ALS data accuracy is less than 10 cm and the data is often incomplete: there is no information about ground level (in most scanning systems), and often around the facade or structures which have been covered by other structures. However, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) not only acquires higher accuracy data (1–5 cm) but is also capable of registering those elements which are incomplete or not visible using ALS methods (facades, complicated structures, interiors, etc.). Therefore, to generate a complete 3D model of a building in high Level of Details, integration of TLS and ALS data is necessary. This paper presents the wavelet-based method of processing and integrating data from ALS and TLS. Methods of choosing tie points to combine point clouds in different datum will be analyzed. PMID:25004157

  8. Photo-Based 3d Scanning VS. Laser Scanning - Competitive Data Acquisition Methods for Digital Terrain Modelling of Steep Mountain Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolecka, N.

    2011-09-01

    The paper presents how terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and terrestrial digital photogrammetry were used to create a 3D model of a steep mountain wall. Terrestrial methods of data acquisition are the most suitable for such relief, as the most effective registration is perpendicular to the surface. First, various aspects of photo-based scanning and laser scanning were discussed. The general overview of both technologies was followed by the description of a case study of the western wall of the Kościelec Mountain (2155 m). The case study area is one of the most interesting and popular rock climbing areas in the Polish High Tatra Mts. The wall is about 300 meters high, has varied relief and some parts are overhung. Triangular irregular mesh was chosen to represent the true- 3D surface with its complicated relief. To achieve a more smooth result for visualization NURBS curves and surfaces were utilized. Both 3D models were then compared to the standard DTM of the Tatra Mountains in TIN format, obtained from aerial photographs (0.2 m ground pixel size). The results showed that both TLS and terrestrial photogrammetry had similar accuracy and level of detail and could effectively supplement very high resolution DTMs of the mountain areas.

  9. Guided-wave-based damage detection in a composite T-joint using 3D scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolappan Geetha, Ganesh; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Srinivasan, Gopalakrishnan

    2012-04-01

    Composite T-joints are commonly used in modern composite airframe, pressure vessels and piping structures, mainly to increase the bending strength of the joint and prevents buckling of plates and shells, and in multi-cell thin-walled structures. Here we report a detailed study on the propagation of guided ultrasonic wave modes in a composite T-joint and their interactions with delamination in the co-cured co-bonded flange. A well designed guiding path is employed wherein the waves undergo a two step mode conversion process, one is due to the web and joint filler on the back face of the flange and the other is due to the delamination edges close to underneath the accessible surface of the flange. A 3D Laser Doppler Vibrometer is used to obtain the three components of surface displacements/velocities of the accessible face of the flange of the T-joint. The waves are launched by a piezo ceramic wafer bonded on to the back surface of the flange. What is novel in the proposed method is that the location of any change in material/geometric properties can be traced by computing a frequency domain power flow along a scan line. The scan line can be chosen over a grid either during scan or during post-processing of the scan data off-line. The proposed technique eliminates the necessity of baseline data and disassembly of structure for structural interrogation.

  10. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-07-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3-D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This article proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3-D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3-D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm.

  11. Axial-Stereo 3-D Optical Metrology for Inner Profile of Pipes Using a Scanning Laser Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Johnston, Richard S.; Melville, C. David; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    As the rapid progress in the development of optoelectronic components and computational power, 3D optical metrology becomes more and more popular in manufacturing and quality control due to its flexibility and high speed. However, most of the optical metrology methods are limited to external surfaces. This paper proposed a new approach to measure tiny internal 3D surfaces with a scanning fiber endoscope and axial-stereo vision algorithm. A dense, accurate point cloud of internally machined threads was generated to compare with its corresponding X-ray 3D data as ground truth, and the quantification was analyzed by Iterative Closest Points algorithm. PMID:26640425

  12. Integrating visible light 3D scanning into the everyday world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    Visible light 3D scanning offers the potential to non-invasively and nearly non-perceptibly incorporate 3D imaging into the everyday world. This paper considers the various possible uses of visible light 3D scanning technology. It discusses multiple possible usage scenarios including in hospitals, security perimeter settings and retail environments. The paper presents a framework for assessing the efficacy of visible light 3D scanning for a given application (and compares this to other scanning approaches such as those using blue light or lasers). It also discusses ethical and legal considerations relevant to real-world use and concludes by presenting a decision making framework.

  13. Reconstruction, Quantification, and Visualization of Forest Canopy Based on 3d Triangulations of Airborne Laser Scanning Point Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauhkonen, J.

    2015-03-01

    Reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) forest canopy is described and quantified using airborne laser scanning (ALS) data with densities of 0.6-0.8 points m-2 and field measurements aggregated at resolutions of 400-900 m2. The reconstruction was based on computational geometry, topological connectivity, and numerical optimization. More precisely, triangulations and their filtrations, i.e. ordered sets of simplices belonging to the triangulations, based on the point data were analyzed. Triangulating the ALS point data corresponds to subdividing the underlying space of the points into weighted simplicial complexes with weights quantifying the (empty) space delimited by the points. Reconstructing the canopy volume populated by biomass will thus likely require filtering to exclude that volume from canopy voids. The approaches applied for this purpose were (i) to optimize the degree of filtration with respect to the field measurements, and (ii) to predict this degree by means of analyzing the persistent homology of the obtained triangulations, which is applied for the first time for vegetation point clouds. When derived from optimized filtrations, the total tetrahedral volume had a high degree of determination (R2) with the stem volume considered, both alone (R2=0.65) and together with other predictors (R2=0.78). When derived by analyzing the topological persistence of the point data and without any field input, the R2 were lower, but the predictions still showed a correlation with the field-measured stem volumes. Finally, producing realistic visualizations of a forested landscape using the persistent homology approach is demonstrated.

  14. Effect of defocusing distance on the contaminated surface of brass ring with nanosecond laser in a 3D laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mali; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Meng

    2014-08-01

    Defocusing distance plays a key role in laser cleaning result and can be either positive or negative, depending on the focus position relative to the sample surface. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the defocusing distance on the cleaning efficiency of oxidized brass surface. The oxide layer from the surface of a brass ring was processed with a three dimensional (3-D) dynamically focused laser galvanometer scanning system. The relationship between removal efficiency of the oxide layer and the defocusing distance was analyzed. The sample surface topography, element content before and after the laser cleaning were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the surface quality after laser cleaning was analyzed by a Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the chemical constituents of the oxide layer on the sample surface after being processed with different defocusing distances were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that the ratios of Cu/O and Zn/O reach the maximum of 53.2 and 27.78 respectively when the defocusing distance is +0.5 mm. The laser pulses will lose the ability to remove the oxide layer from the substrate surface when the defocusing distance is larger than ±2 mm.

  15. Ground Deformation Analysis of Blast-Induced Liquefaction at a Simulated Airport Infrastructure Using High Resolution 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasian, D.; Kayen, R.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Sugano, T.

    2008-12-01

    In October 2007, the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) of the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation conducted a large-scale blast-induced liquefaction experiment in Ishikari, Hokkaido, Japan. Approximately 24,000 m2 of ground was liquefied using controlled blasting techniques to investigate the performance of airport infrastructure. The USGS and Oregon State University participated in the study and measured topographic changes in ground level using 3D laser scanning techniques (terrestrial lidar), as well as changes in shear wave velocity of the between the pre- and post-liquefied soil. This poster focuses on the lidar results. The overall objective of the PARI experiment is to assess the performance of airport infrastructure subjected to liquefaction. Specifically, the performance of pipelines and large concrete utility raceways located beneath runway pavements is of interest, as well as the performance of pavements and embankments with and without soil improvement techniques. At the site, 5-7 m of loose silty sand was placed as hydraulic fill on natural alluvial sand as an expansion of the Ishikari port facility. On a portion of the liquefied site, three 20 m by 50 m test sections were constructed to investigate the performance of improved ground beneath asphalt runways, concrete runway aprons, and open areas. Pipelines and concrete utility conduits were also buried in each section. The three ground improvement techniques investigated were sand-cement mixing, vertical drains, and colloidal silica injection. The PARI experiment provided an excellent opportunity to conduct terrestrial lidar measurements - a revolutionary tool for accurate characterization of fine-scale changes of topography and identification of subtle deformations. Lidar was used for characterizing post-blast deformations both immediately after the charges were used, and subsequently over time at intervals of 2 days, 4 days, and 5 months after blasting. Settlement

  16. A multinational deployment of 3D laser scanning to study craniofacial dysmorphology in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jeff; Wernert, Eric; Moore, Elizabeth; Ward, Richard; Wetherill, Leah F.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    Craniofacial anthropometry (the measurement and analysis of head and face dimensions) has been used to assess and describe abnormal craniofacial variation (dysmorphology) and the facial phenotype in many medical syndromes. Traditionally, anthropometry measurements have been collected by the direct application of calipers and tape measures to the subject's head and face, and can suffer from inaccuracies due to restless subjects, erroneous landmark identification, clinician variability, and other forms of human error. Three-dimensional imaging technologies promise a more effective alternative that separates the acquisition and measurement phases to reduce these variabilities while also enabling novel measurements and longitudinal analysis of subjects. Indiana University (IU) is part of an international consortium of researchers studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Fetal alcohol exposure results in predictable craniofacial dysmorphologies, and anthropometry has been proven to be an effective diagnosis tool for the condition. IU is leading a project to study the use of 3D surface scanning to acquire anthropometry data in order to more accurately diagnose FASD, especially in its milder forms. This paper describes our experiences in selecting, verifying, supporting, and coordinating a set of 3D scanning systems for use in collecting facial scans and anthropometric data from around the world.

  17. The use of 3D-laser scanning in assessing the safety of masonry vaults—A case study on the church of Saint-Jacobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueremans, Luc; Van Genechten, Bjorn

    2009-03-01

    Safety and stability of historical structures are of key importance when dealing with a restoration project. The stability of masonry vaults very much depends on its overall geometry and the analysis results strongly depend on the accuracy in which this geometry can be measured in practice. To obtain an accurate estimate of the geometry of the vaults, 3D-laser scanning was performed. Based on the 3D-point cloud, a 3D-model of the vaults allows determining the lines of thrust in the structure as well as the reaction forces (application point and magnitude) at the abutments. This contribution gives a critical appraisal of the process used in the preliminary research phase: gathering the point clouds, 3D-modelling, structural analysis calculating thrust lines and the consolidation requirements that are obtained. The focus is on the added value of the methodology, its applicability, cost-effectiveness, overall advantages and drawbacks.

  18. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ≈90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria. PMID:25483987

  19. Standing-wave-excited multiplanar fluorescence in a laser scanning microscope reveals 3D information on red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, Rumelo; Mahajan, Sumeet; Amos, William Bradshaw; McConnell, Gail

    2014-12-01

    Standing-wave excitation of fluorescence is highly desirable in optical microscopy because it improves the axial resolution. We demonstrate here that multiplanar excitation of fluorescence by a standing wave can be produced in a single-spot laser scanning microscope by placing a plane reflector close to the specimen. We report here a variation in the intensity of fluorescence of successive planes related to the Stokes shift of the dye. We show by the use of dyes specific for the cell membrane how standing-wave excitation can be exploited to generate precise contour maps of the surface membrane of red blood cells, with an axial resolution of ~90 nm. The method, which requires only the addition of a plane mirror to an existing confocal laser scanning microscope, may well prove useful in studying diseases which involve the red cell membrane, such as malaria.

  20. Documenting a Complex Modern Heritage Building Using Multi Image Close Range Photogrammetry and 3d Laser Scanned Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianna Baptista, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers' intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry) were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  1. Polish Experience with Advanced Digital Heritage Recording Methodology, including 3D Laser Scanning, CAD, and GIS Application, as the Most Accurate and Flexible Response for Archaeology and Conservation Needs at Jan III Sobieski's Residence in Wilanów

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, P.; Czajkowski, K.; Gładki, M.; Morysiński, T.; Szambelan, R.; Rzonca, A.

    Review of recent critical points for introduction of laser technology into the field of heritage documentation, management, conservation, and archaeology will be discussed. The relationship of benefit versus cost of 3D laser scanning technique for complex multitask heritage recording project at Wilanow is presented. Definition of basic criteria for the successful use of such heritage detailed record as laser scanning is given.

  2. 3D Imaging of Porous Media Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy with Application to Microscale Transport Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrich, J.T.

    1999-02-10

    We present advances in the application of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the microgeometry of porous geologic and engineering materials. We discuss technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including both its advantages and limitations. Confocal imaging can be used to optically section a material, with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes. The resultant volumetric image data, consisting of fluorescence intensities for typically {approximately}50 million voxels in XYZ space, can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the two-phase medium. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in sandstone, characterizing brittle failure processes in low-porosity rock deformed under triaxial loading conditions in the laboratory, and analyzing the microstructure of porous ceramic insulations. We then describe approaches to extract statistical microgeometric descriptions from volumetric image data, and present results derived from confocal volumetric data sets. Finally, we develop the use of confocal image data to automatically generate a three-dimensional mesh for numerical pore-scale flow simulations.

  3. Back Analysis of the 2014 San Leo Landslide Using Combined Terrestrial Laser Scanning and 3D Distinct Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreafico, Margherita Cecilia; Francioni, Mirko; Cervi, Federico; Stead, Doug; Bitelli, Gabriele; Ghirotti, Monica; Girelli, Valentina Alena; Lucente, Claudio Corrado; Tini, Maria Alessandra; Borgatti, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Landslides of the lateral spreading type, involving brittle geological units overlying ductile terrains, are a common occurrence in the sandstone and limestone plateaux of the northern Apennines of Italy. The edges of these plateaux are often the location of rapid landslide phenomena, such as rock slides, rock falls and topples. In this paper, we present a back analysis of a recent landslide (February 2014), involving the north-eastern sector of the San Leo rock slab (northern Apennines, Emilia-Romagna Region) which is a representative example of this type of phenomena. The aquifer hosted in the fractured slab, due to its relatively higher secondary permeability in comparison to the lower clayey units leads to the development of perennial and ephemeral springs at the contact between the two units. The related piping erosion phenomena, together with slope processes in the clay-shales have led to the progressive undermining of the slab, eventually predisposing large-scale landslides. Stability analyses were conducted coupling terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and distinct element methods (DEMs). TLS point clouds were analysed to determine the pre- and post-failure geometry, the extension of the detachment area and the joint network characteristics. The block dimensions in the landslide deposit were mapped and used to infer the spacing of the discontinuities for insertion into the numerical model. Three-dimensional distinct element simulations were conducted, with and without undermining of the rock slab. The analyses allowed an assessment of the role of the undermining, together with the presence of an almost vertical joint set, striking sub-parallel to the cliff orientation, on the development of the slope instability processes. Based on the TLS and on the numerical simulation results, an interpretation of the landslide mechanism is proposed.

  4. 3D digital image processing for biofilm quantification from confocal laser scanning microscopy: Multidimensional statistical analysis of biofilm modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Jerzy S.

    The dramatic increase in number and volume of digital images produced in medical diagnostics, and the escalating demand for rapid access to these relevant medical data, along with the need for interpretation and retrieval has become of paramount importance to a modern healthcare system. Therefore, there is an ever growing need for processed, interpreted and saved images of various types. Due to the high cost and unreliability of human-dependent image analysis, it is necessary to develop an automated method for feature extraction, using sophisticated mathematical algorithms and reasoning. This work is focused on digital image signal processing of biological and biomedical data in one- two- and three-dimensional space. Methods and algorithms presented in this work were used to acquire data from genomic sequences, breast cancer, and biofilm images. One-dimensional analysis was applied to DNA sequences which were presented as a non-stationary sequence and modeled by a time-dependent autoregressive moving average (TD-ARMA) model. Two-dimensional analyses used 2D-ARMA model and applied it to detect breast cancer from x-ray mammograms or ultrasound images. Three-dimensional detection and classification techniques were applied to biofilm images acquired using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Modern medical images are geometrically arranged arrays of data. The broadening scope of imaging as a way to organize our observations of the biophysical world has led to a dramatic increase in our ability to apply new processing techniques and to combine multiple channels of data into sophisticated and complex mathematical models of physiological function and dysfunction. With explosion of the amount of data produced in a field of biomedicine, it is crucial to be able to construct accurate mathematical models of the data at hand. Two main purposes of signal modeling are: data size conservation and parameter extraction. Specifically, in biomedical imaging we have four key problems

  5. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  6. 3D mapping of geological contacts by coupling Aerial Laser Scanning, Gigapixel photography and open access pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Liliane; Guerin, Antoine; Abellán, Antonio; Carrea, Dario; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sources of geological data exist nowadays, most of them are in 2D (e.g. geological maps, geological panoramic sketch), and only a few are in 3D (e.g. block diagram). One of the current challenges in geological mapping consists not only in providing a more consistent 3D data, but also in pursuing a gathering and a harmonisation of the geological information in order to obtain a more consistent interpretations of the 3D geological models. New remote sensing techniques have significantly improved the representation of three-dimensional surfaces during the last decade, especially for steep and inaccessible rockcliffs. Therefore, we present an exploratory study aiming to find a reliable method for carrying out a three-dimensional mapping of geological contacts using a High Resolution Digital Elevation Model (HRDEM) with a 1 meter cell size. To this end, we selected the "Scex Rouge Mountain" as pilot study area. This outcrop, which is located in the Diablerets Massif (Vaud, Swiss Alps), has the particularity to present very distinguishable folded geological boundaries on its Southern face. The Southern slope belongs to the Wildhorn nappe, which is mainly composed of sedimentary rocks. The top-layer is composed of siliceous limestones, the well-visible fold layer is the "Pygurus layer" and consist of sandy limestone. Finally the bottom-layer includes marly schist and clayey limestones. At first, different sources of information has been draped on the HRDEM of the Scex Rouge Mountain, including not only classical geological maps (1:25 000) but also different sources of imagery (e.g. gigapixel panoramas, open access images, etc.). In a second step, several three-dimensional polylines have been drawn following the geological limit on each drapped HRDEM. Then we investigated the accuracy of 2D classical geological maps by comparing these geological limits with the drawn 3D polylines. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the accuracy of the method, a ground truth needs

  7. FELIX: a volumetric 3D laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Detlef; Langhans, Knut; Gerken, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach of a true 3D image presentation in a space filling, volumetric laser display will be described. The introduced prototype system is based on a moving target screen that sweeps the display volume. Net result is the optical equivalent of a 3D array of image points illuminated to form a model of the object which occupies a physical space. Wireframe graphics are presented within the display volume which a group of people can walk around and examine simultaneously from nearly any orientation and without any visual aids. Further to the detailed vector scanning mode, a raster scanned system and a combination of both techniques are under development. The volumetric 3D laser display technology for true reproduction of spatial images can tremendously improve the viewers ability to interpret data and to reliably determine distance, shape and orientation. Possible applications for this development range from air traffic control, where moving blips of light represent individual aircrafts in a true to scale projected airspace of an airport, to various medical applications (e.g. electrocardiography, computer-tomography), to entertainment and education visualization as well as imaging in the field of engineering and Computer Aided Design.

  8. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  9. The Application of 3D Laser Scanning in the Survey and Measuring of Guyue Bridge of Song Dynasty in Yiwu City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, N.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S.; Zhang, R.

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that folding-arch is the transitional form from beam to curved arch. Guyue Bridge, built in JiaDing 6year (A.D 1213) of Southern Song Dynasty, located in Yiwu City, Zhejiang Province in China, is one of typical objective examples for this transition. It possesses high historical, scientific, artistic, cultural and social values. Facing severe environmental problems and deteriorated heritage situation, our conservation team selected 3D laser scanning as basic recording method, then acquired the precise threedimensional model. Measured the fundamental dimension and components' sizes, we analysed its stable state. Moreover, combined with historic documents, we reasonably speculated and calculated the original sizes and important scales at the building time. These findings have significant research values as well as evidential meanings for future conservation.

  10. The Benefit of 3D Laser Scanning Technology in the Generation and Calibration of FEM Models for Health Assessment of Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Xu, Xiangyang; Neumann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology (TLS) is a new technique for quickly getting three-dimensional information. In this paper we research the health assessment of concrete structures with a Finite Element Method (FEM) model based on TLS. The goal focuses on the benefits of 3D TLS in the generation and calibration of FEM models, in order to build a convenient, efficient and intelligent model which can be widely used for the detection and assessment of bridges, buildings, subways and other objects. After comparing the finite element simulation with surface-based measurement data from TLS, the FEM model is determined to be acceptable with an error of less than 5%. The benefit of TLS lies mainly in the possibility of a surface-based validation of results predicted by the FEM model. PMID:25414968

  11. The Structure of the Kaali Impact Crater (Estonia) based on 3D Laser Scanning, Photogrammetric Modelling and Strike and Dip Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, Michael; Wilk, Jakob; Joeleht, Argo; Välja, Rudolf; Losiak, Anna; Wisniowski, Tomek; Huber, Matthew; Pavel, Kristiina; Kriiska, Aivar; Plado, Jüri; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri

    2015-04-01

    Introduction: The Kaali Impact Crater on the island of Saaremaa, Estonia (58.37° N, 22.67° E) is part of a crater-strewn-field consisting of nine identified craters, ranging in size from 110m (Kaali Main) to a few meters in diameter [1-3]. The strewn field was formed by the breakup of an IAB iron meteorite during atmospheric entry [4]. The main crater is due to its size an important crater to study the effects of small asteroidal impacts on terrestrial planets. Despite some anthropomorphic changes, the crater is well preserved. During a scientific expedition in August 2014, we mapped the crater in unprecedented detail using 3D laser scanning tools and made detailed strike and dip measurements of all outcrops. Additional measurements using ground-penetrating radar and electro-resistivity tomography we also conducted to further refine the subsurface crater morphology. The results include a high resolution topographic map of the crater, previously unreported observations of overturned ejecta, and refined morphometric estimates of the crater. Additionally, research conducted as part of the expedition has provided a new, best-estimate for the formation of the crater (3200a +/- 30 BP) based on 14C AMS dating of charcoal from within the ejecta blanket [Losiak et al., 2015, this conference]. Structural Mapping: Although Kaali Main has been the subject of previous investigation (e.g. [2,5,6]), most of the structural descriptions of the crater pre-date modern crater investigations. Strongly inclined blocks were previously considered being affected by erosion and slope processes, our new observations show that most high dip-angle features fit well with overall dip-angle systematics. The existence of the overturned flap can be demonstrated in at least four areas around the crater. 3D Laser Scanning: A point cloud containing 16 million data points was created using 43 individual scans from a tripod mounted Faro 3D 330x laser scanner. Scans were processed using Trimble

  12. Forest Inventory Attribute Estimation Using Airborne Laser Scanning, Aerial Stereo Imagery, Radargrammetry and Interferometry-Finnish Experiences of the 3d Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, M.; Vastaranta, M.; Karjalainen, M.; Karila, K.; Kaasalainen, S.; Honkavaara, E.; Hyyppä, J.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) remote sensing has enabled detailed mapping of terrain and vegetation heights. Consequently, forest inventory attributes are estimated more and more using point clouds and normalized surface models. In practical applications, mainly airborne laser scanning (ALS) has been used in forest resource mapping. The current status is that ALS-based forest inventories are widespread, and the popularity of ALS has also raised interest toward alternative 3D techniques, including airborne and spaceborne techniques. Point clouds can be generated using photogrammetry, radargrammetry and interferometry. Airborne stereo imagery can be used in deriving photogrammetric point clouds, as very-high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used in radargrammetry and interferometry. ALS is capable of mapping both the terrain and tree heights in mixed forest conditions, which is an advantage over aerial images or SAR data. However, in many jurisdictions, a detailed ALS-based digital terrain model is already available, and that enables linking photogrammetric or SAR-derived heights to heights above the ground. In other words, in forest conditions, the height of single trees, height of the canopy and/or density of the canopy can be measured and used in estimation of forest inventory attributes. In this paper, first we review experiences of the use of digital stereo imagery and spaceborne SAR in estimation of forest inventory attributes in Finland, and we compare techniques to ALS. In addition, we aim to present new implications based on our experiences.

  13. The effect of near-infrared laser beam on the surface modification of metal complex based on 3D laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mali; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Meng

    2014-11-01

    High-precision 3-dimensional metallization is difficult to realize in specific nonmetallic areas by using the traditional methods such as wet-chemical and mechanical methods because of the disadvantage that usually they cannot achieve selective modification. In this paper, 3-dimensional laser scanning system was applied to achieve the modification of specific regions of the sample surface. In 3-dimensional laser scanning system, the laser beam, after going through dynamic focusing system, was reflected by galvanometers and then focused by f-theta lens on the sample surface. The changes in surface characteristics of the blends of polycarbonate and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene copolymers (PC/ABS) mixed with Cu-Cr complex by the laser irradiation with the wavelength of 1064nm were investigated. Through analysis it was found that the smooth surface of the original samples was changed to a micro-hole structure accompanied by an increased surface roughness as well as an increased water contact angle. The chemical composition percentage had changed and the metal components of copper and chromium were detected after the laser irradiation. The irradiated areas were degraded into organic ligand fragments, volatile gas and reducing metal ions of copper and chromium. Besides, the thickness of the deposited metal layer and the adhesive force between the metal layer and the substrate after electroless plating varied according to the laser parameters such as frequency and scanning speed. As shown in the experiment, the thickness of deposited copper layer exceeded 11μm and the deposited nickel layer exceeded 2μm respectively.

  14. 3D scene reconstruction based on 3D laser point cloud combining UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiyun; Yan, Yangyang; Zhang, Xitong; Wu, Zhenzhen

    2016-03-01

    It is a big challenge capturing and modeling 3D information of the built environment. A number of techniques and technologies are now in use. These include GPS, and photogrammetric application and also remote sensing applications. The experiment uses multi-source data fusion technology for 3D scene reconstruction based on the principle of 3D laser scanning technology, which uses the laser point cloud data as the basis and Digital Ortho-photo Map as an auxiliary, uses 3DsMAX software as a basic tool for building three-dimensional scene reconstruction. The article includes data acquisition, data preprocessing, 3D scene construction. The results show that the 3D scene has better truthfulness, and the accuracy of the scene meet the need of 3D scene construction.

  15. Using genetic algorithms to optimize an active sensor network on a stiffened aerospace panel with 3D scanning laser vibrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, R.; Clarke, A.; Featherston, C.; Kawashita, L.; Paget, C.; Pullin, R.

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of aircraft structures and materials there is an essential need to continually monitor the structure for damage. This also drives the requirement for optimizing the location of sensors for damage detection to ensure full damage detection coverage of the structure whilst minimizing the number of sensors required, hence reducing costs, weight and data processing. An experiment was carried out to investigate the optimal sensor locations of an active sensor network for detecting adhesive disbonds of a stiffened panel. A piezoelectric transducer was coupled to two different stiffened aluminium panels; one healthy and one with a 25.4mm long disbond. The transducer was positioned at five individual locations to assess the effectiveness of damage detection at different transmission locations. One excitation frequency of 100kHz was used for this study. The panels were scanned with a 3D scanning laser vibrometer which represented a network of ‘ideal’ receiving transducers. The responses measured on the disbonded panel were cross- correlated with those measured on the healthy panel at a large number of potential sensor locations. This generated a cost surface which a genetic algorithm could interrogate in order to find the optimal sensor locations for a given size of sensor network. Probabilistic techniques were used to consider multiple disbond location scenarios, in order to optimise the sensor network for maximum probability of detection across a range of disbond locations.

  16. 3D scanning and printing skeletal tissues for anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel B; Hiscox, Jessica D; Dixon, Blair J; Potgieter, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Detailed anatomical models can be produced with consumer-level 3D scanning and printing systems. 3D replication techniques are significant advances for anatomical education as they allow practitioners to more easily introduce diverse or numerous specimens into classrooms. Here we present a methodology for producing anatomical models in-house, with the chondrocranium cartilage from a spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and the skeleton of a cane toad (Rhinella marina) as case studies. 3D digital replicas were produced using two consumer-level scanners and specimens were 3D-printed with selective laser sintering. The fidelity of the two case study models was determined with respect to key anatomical features. Larger-scale features of the dogfish chondrocranium and frog skeleton were all well-resolved and distinct in the 3D digital models, and many finer-scale features were also well-resolved, but some more subtle features were absent from the digital models (e.g. endolymphatic foramina in chondrocranium). All characters identified in the digital chondrocranium could be identified in the subsequent 3D print; however, three characters in the 3D-printed frog skeleton could not be clearly delimited (palatines, parasphenoid and pubis). Characters that were absent in the digital models or 3D prints had low-relief in the original scanned specimen and represent a minor loss of fidelity. Our method description and case studies show that minimal equipment and training is needed to produce durable skeletal specimens. These technologies support the tailored production of models for specific classes or research aims. PMID:27146106

  17. Image-Based 3d Modeling VS Laser Scanning for the Analysis of Medieval Architecture: the Case of ST. Croce Church in Bergamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardaci, A.; Versaci, A.

    2013-07-01

    The Church of St. Croce in Bergamo (second half of the 11th century), is a small four-sided building consisting of two overlapping volumes located in the courtyard adjacent to the Bishop's Palace. In the last years, archaeological excavations have unearthed parts of the edifice, until that time hidden because buried during the construction of the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore and now restored its original form. Due to the recent discoveries, a critical review of all the existing documentation in order to clarify the relationship of the various building components has been considered necessary. A quick, well-timed, chromatically characterized and accurate survey aimed at the complete digital reconstruction of this interesting example of medieval Italian architecture was then needed. This has suggested simultaneously testing two of the most innovative technologies: the 3D laser scanning survey ensuring high-resolution and complete models within a short time, and the photogrammetric automatic image-based modelling, allowing a three-dimensional reconstruction of the architectural objects. This paper intends to show the results achieved by the analytical comparison between the two methodologies, and thus analyse their differences, the advantages and the deficiencies of both of them and the opportunities for future enhancements and developments.

  18. From 3D Scanning to Analytical Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, M.

    During the last few years, the number of historical and archaeological items recorded using innovative, three dimensional surveying technologies has increased considerably. Comprehensive digital, photo-realistic 3D recording and modelling yields a huge range of new possibilities for documenting, analysing and safeguarding items of cultural importance. ArcTron GmbH has specialised in electronic surveying and the development of CAD and database information systems for heritage and archaeology for over 12 years employing total stations, laser pantographs and photogrammetry, as well as a variety of laser scanning systems, to generate 3D recordings. Innovative complementary combinations of these technologies allow their respective strengths to be fully exploited. The data resulting from recording techniques of these kinds can be used as a basis for producing documentation of outstanding quality. 3D digital models with photo-realistic texturing, orthophotos, coloured point clouds, 3D damage mapping, rapid prototyping models and multi-media presentations are just some of the potential resulting forms of documentation. Historical monuments and items ranging from huge sections of terrain down to the smallest artefact can be reproduced with such accuracy and to such a high level of realism that documentation of this kind is not only extremely useful for archaeologists, conservators and architectural historians etc. but practically indispensable.

  19. Characterizing targets and backgrounds for 3D laser radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Larsson, Hakan; Gustafsson, Frank; Chevalier, Tomas R.; Persson, Asa; Klasen, Lena M.

    2004-12-01

    Exciting development is taking place in 3 D sensing laser radars. Scanning systems are well established for mapping from airborne and ground sensors. 3 D sensing focal plane arrays (FPAs) enable a full range and intensity image can be captured in one laser shot. Gated viewing systems also produces 3 D target information. Many applications for 3 D laser radars are found in robotics, rapid terrain visualization, augmented vision, reconnaissance and target recognition, weapon guidance including aim point selection and others. The net centric warfare will demand high resolution geo-data for a common description of the environment. At FOI we have a measurement program to collect data relevant for 3 D laser radars using airborne and tripod mounted equipment for data collection. Data collection spans from single pixel waveform collection (1 D) over 2 D using range gated imaging to full 3 D imaging using scanning systems. This paper will describe 3 D laser data from different campaigns with emphasis on range distribution and reflections properties for targets and background during different seasonal conditions. Example of the use of the data for system modeling, performance prediction and algorithm development will be given. Different metrics to characterize the data set will also be discussed.

  20. 3D range scan enhancement using image-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbort, Steffen; Gerken, Britta; Schugk, Daniel; Wöhler, Christian

    2013-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3D surface scan refinement, which is desirable due to noise, outliers, and missing measurements being present in the 3D surfaces obtained with a laser scanner. We present a novel algorithm for the fusion of absolute laser scanner depth profiles and photometrically estimated surface normal data, which yields a noise-reduced and highly detailed depth profile with large scale shape robustness. In contrast to other approaches published in the literature, the presented algorithm (1) regards non-Lambertian surfaces, (2) simultaneously computes surface reflectance (i.e. BRDF) parameters required for 3D reconstruction, (3) models pixelwise incident light and viewing directions, and (4) accounts for interreflections. The algorithm as such relies on the minimization of a three-component error term, which penalizes intensity deviations, integrability deviations, and deviations from the known large-scale surface shape. The solution of the error minimization is obtained iteratively based on a calculus of variations. BRDF parameters are estimated by initially reducing and then iteratively refining the optical resolution, which provides the required robust data basis. The 3D reconstruction of concave surface regions affected by interreflections is improved by compensating global illumination in the image data. The algorithm is evaluated based on eight objects with varying albedos and reflectance behaviors (diffuse, specular, metallic). The qualitative evaluation shows a removal of outliers and a strong reduction of noise, while the large scale shape is preserved. Fine surface details Which are previously not contained in the surface scans, are incorporated through using image data. The algorithm is evaluated with respect to its absolute accuracy using two caliper objects of known shape, and based on synthetically generated data. The beneficial effect of interreflection compensation on the reconstruction accuracy is evaluated quantitatively in a

  1. Body image, shape, and volumetric assessments using 3D whole body laser scanning and 2D digital photography in females with a diagnosed eating disorder: preliminary novel findings.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Arthur D; Klein, Susan; Young, Julie; Simpson, Susan; Lee, Amanda J; Harrild, Kirstin; Crockett, Philip; Benson, Philip J

    2012-05-01

    We piloted three-dimensional (3D) body scanning in eating disorder (ED) patients. Assessments of 22 ED patients (including nine anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, 12 bulimia nervosa (BN) patients, and one patient with eating disorder not otherwise specified) and 22 matched controls are presented. Volunteers underwent visual screening, two-dimensional (2D) digital photography to assess perception and dissatisfaction (via computerized image distortion), and adjunctive 3D full-body scanning. Patients and controls perceived themselves as bigger than their true shape (except in the chest region for controls and anorexia patients). All participants wished to be smaller across all body regions. Patients had poorer veridical perception and greater dissatisfaction than controls. Perception was generally poorer and dissatisfaction greater in bulimia compared with anorexia patients. 3D-volume:2D-area relationships showed that anorexia cases had least tissue on the torso and most on the arms and legs relative to frontal area. The engagement of patients with the scanning process suggests a validation study is viable. This would enable mental constructs of body image to be aligned with segmental volume of body areas, overcoming limitations, and errors associated with 2D instruments restricted to frontal (coronal) shapes. These novel data could inform the design of clinical trials in adjunctive treatments for eating disorders. PMID:22506746

  2. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  3. 3D scanning modeling method application in ancient city reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Pu; Zhou, Mingquan; Du, Guoguang; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Pengbo

    2015-07-01

    With the development of optical engineering technology, the precision of 3D scanning equipment becomes higher, and its role in 3D modeling is getting more distinctive. This paper proposed a 3D scanning modeling method that has been successfully applied in Chinese ancient city reconstruction. On one hand, for the existing architectures, an improved algorithm based on multiple scanning is adopted. Firstly, two pieces of scanning data were rough rigid registered using spherical displacers and vertex clustering method. Secondly, a global weighted ICP (iterative closest points) method is used to achieve a fine rigid registration. On the other hand, for the buildings which have already disappeared, an exemplar-driven algorithm for rapid modeling was proposed. Based on the 3D scanning technology and the historical data, a system approach was proposed for 3D modeling and virtual display of ancient city.

  4. Optical laser scanning of a leucodye micelle gel: preliminary results of a 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment for a brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    In the present study an in-house developed leucodye micelle gel was used in combination with an in-house developed optical laser scanner for the 3D dose verification of an IMRT treatment of a pituitary adenoma. In an initial prospective study, a gel measured depth dose distribution of a square 6 MV photon beam was compared with an ion chamber measurement. In a second experiment, the gel and scanner were used to verify a clinical dose distribution on a recently installed linear accelerator. The calibration procedure is identified as the major source of dose deviations.

  5. Laser 3D micro-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-based materials processing techniques are gaining widespread use in micro-manufacturing applications. The use of laser microfabrication techniques enables the processing of micro- and nanostructures from a wide range of materials and geometries without the need for masking and etching steps commonly associated with photolithography. This review aims to describe the broad applications space covered by laser-based micro- and nanoprocessing techniques and the benefits offered by the use of lasers in micro-manufacturing processes. Given their non-lithographic nature, these processes are also referred to as laser direct-write and constitute some of the earliest demonstrations of 3D printing or additive manufacturing at the microscale. As this review will show, the use of lasers enables precise control of the various types of processing steps—from subtractive to additive—over a wide range of scales with an extensive materials palette. Overall, laser-based direct-write techniques offer multiple modes of operation including the removal (via ablative processes) and addition (via photopolymerization or printing) of most classes of materials using the same equipment in many cases. The versatility provided by these multi-function, multi-material and multi-scale laser micro-manufacturing processes cannot be matched by photolithography nor with other direct-write microfabrication techniques and offer unique opportunities for current and future 3D micro-manufacturing applications.

  6. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications.

    PubMed

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  7. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kuş, Abdil

    2009-01-01

    Reverse engineering (RE) is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings) model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters. PMID:22573995

  8. Array servo scanning micro EDM of 3D micro cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao; Li, Yong; Yi, Futing

    2010-12-01

    Micro electro discharge machining (Micro EDM) is a non-traditional processing technology with the special advantages of low set-up cost and few cutting force in machining any conductive materials regardless of their hardness. As well known, die-sinking EDM is unsuitable for machining the complex 3D micro cavity less than 1mm due to the high-priced fabrication of 3D microelectrode itself and its serous wear during EDM process. In our former study, a servo scanning 3D micro-EDM (3D SSMEDM) method was put forward, and our experiments showed it was available to fabricate complex 3D micro-cavities. In this study, in order to improve machining efficiency and consistency accuracy for array 3D micro-cavities, an array-servo-scanning 3D micro EDM (3D ASSMEDM) method is presented considering the complementary advantages of the 3D SSMEDM and the array micro electrodes with simple cross-section. During 3D ASSMEDM process, the array cavities designed by CAD / CAM system can be batch-manufactured by servo scanning layer by layer using array-rod-like micro tool electrodes, and the axial wear of the array electrodes is compensated in real time by keeping discharge gap. To verify the effectiveness of the 3D ASSMEDM, the array-triangle-micro cavities (side length 630 μm) are batch-manufactured on P-doped silicon by applying the array-micro-electrodes with square-cross-section fabricated by LIGA process. Our exploratory experiment shows that the 3D ASSMEDM provides a feasible approach for the batch-manufacture of 3D array-micro-cavities of conductive materials.

  9. Array servo scanning micro EDM of 3D micro cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao; Li, Yong; Yi, Futing

    2011-05-01

    Micro electro discharge machining (Micro EDM) is a non-traditional processing technology with the special advantages of low set-up cost and few cutting force in machining any conductive materials regardless of their hardness. As well known, die-sinking EDM is unsuitable for machining the complex 3D micro cavity less than 1mm due to the high-priced fabrication of 3D microelectrode itself and its serous wear during EDM process. In our former study, a servo scanning 3D micro-EDM (3D SSMEDM) method was put forward, and our experiments showed it was available to fabricate complex 3D micro-cavities. In this study, in order to improve machining efficiency and consistency accuracy for array 3D micro-cavities, an array-servo-scanning 3D micro EDM (3D ASSMEDM) method is presented considering the complementary advantages of the 3D SSMEDM and the array micro electrodes with simple cross-section. During 3D ASSMEDM process, the array cavities designed by CAD / CAM system can be batch-manufactured by servo scanning layer by layer using array-rod-like micro tool electrodes, and the axial wear of the array electrodes is compensated in real time by keeping discharge gap. To verify the effectiveness of the 3D ASSMEDM, the array-triangle-micro cavities (side length 630 μm) are batch-manufactured on P-doped silicon by applying the array-micro-electrodes with square-cross-section fabricated by LIGA process. Our exploratory experiment shows that the 3D ASSMEDM provides a feasible approach for the batch-manufacture of 3D array-micro-cavities of conductive materials.

  10. The dimension added by 3D scanning and 3D printing of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vet, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview for the 3D photodocumentation of meteorites is presented, focussing on two 3D scanning methods in relation to 3D printing. The 3D photodocumention of meteorites provides new ways for the digital preservation of culturally, historically or scientifically unique meteorites. It has the potential for becoming a new documentation standard of meteorites that can exist complementary to traditional photographic documentation. Notable applications include (i.) use of physical properties in dark flight-, strewn field-, or aerodynamic modelling; (ii.) collection research of meteorites curated by different museum collections, and (iii.) public dissemination of meteorite models as a resource for educational users. The possible applications provided by the additional dimension of 3D illustrate the benefits for the meteoritics community.

  11. Confocal scanning laser microscopy with complementary 3D image analysis allows quantitative studies of functional state of ionoregulatory cells in the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) following salinity challenge.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Sophie; Rana, Krishen J; Bron, James E

    2013-04-01

    The development of a novel three-dimensional image analysis technique of stacks generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy is described allowing visualization of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) in the seawater-adapted Nile tilapia in relation to their spatial location. This method permits the assessment and classification of both active and nonactive MRCs based on the distance of the top of the immunopositive cell from the epithelial surface. In addition, this technique offers the potential for informative and quantitative studies, for example, densitometric and morphometric measurements based on MRC functional state. Confocal scanning laser microscopy used with triple staining whole-mount immunohistochemistry was used to detect integumental MRCs in the yolk-sac larvae tail of the Nile tilapia following transfer from freshwater to elevated salinities, that is, 12.5 and 20 ppt. Mean active MRC volume was always significantly larger and displayed a greater staining intensity (GLM; P<0.05) than nonactive MRCs. Following transfer, the percentage of active MRCs was seen to increase as did MRC volume (GLM; P<0.05). PMID:23390074

  12. Concept and Practice of Teaching Technical University Students to Modern Technologies of 3d Data Acquisition and Processing: a Case Study of Close-Range Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, Iulia; Luhmann, Thomas; Shults, Roman

    2016-06-01

    For the preparation of modern specialists in the acquisition and processing of three-dimensional data, a broad and detailed study of related modern methods and technologies is necessary. One of the most progressive and effective methods of acquisition and analyzing spatial data is terrestrial laser scanning. The study of methods and technologies for terrestrial laser scanning is of great importance not only for GIS specialists, but also for surveying engineers who make decisions in traditional engineering tasks (monitoring, executive surveys, etc.). The understanding and formation of the right approach in preparing new professionals need to develop a modern and variable educational program. This educational program must provide effective practical and laboratory work and the student's coursework. The resulting knowledge of the study should form the basis for practical or research of young engineers. In 2014, the Institute of Applied Sciences (Jade University Oldenburg, Germany) and Kyiv National University of Construction and Architecture (Kiev, Ukraine) had launched a joint educational project for the introduction of terrestrial laser scanning technology for collection and processing of spatial data. As a result of this project practical recommendations have been developed for the organization of educational processes in the use of terrestrial laser scanning. An advanced project-oriented educational program was developed which is presented in this paper. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the program a 3D model of the big and complex main campus of Kyiv National University of Construction and Architecture has been generated.

  13. Steering knuckle diameter measurement based on optical 3D scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Li, Da-peng; Chang, Yu-lan; Xi, Jiang-tao; Guo, Qing-hua

    2014-11-01

    To achieve accurate measurements, the creating a fitting hole for internal diameter (CFHID) measurement method and the establishing multi-sectional curve for external diameter (EMCED) measurement method are proposed in this paper, which are based on computer vision principle and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. The methods are able to highlight the 3D characteristics of the scanned object and to achieve the accurate measurement of 3D data. It can create favorable conditions for realizing the reverse design and 3D reconstruction of scanned object. These methods can also be applied to dangerous work environment or the occasion that traditional contact measurement can not meet the demands, and they can improve the security in measurement.

  14. 3D body scanning technology for fashion and apparel industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 3D body scanning technologies with applications to the fashion and apparel industry. Complete systems for the digitization of the human body exist since more than fifteen years. One of the main users of this technology with application in the textile field was the military industry. In fact, body scanning technology is being successfully employed since many years in military bases for a fast selection of the correct size of uniforms for the entire staff. Complete solutions were especially developed for this field of application. Many different research projects were issued for the exploitation of the same technology in the commercial field. Experiments were performed and start-up projects are to time running in different parts of the world by installing full body scanning systems in various locations such as shopping malls, boutiques or dedicated scanning centers. Everything is actually ready to be exploited and all the required hardware, software and solutions are available: full body scanning systems, software for the automatic and reliable extraction of body measurements, e-kiosk and web solutions for the presentation of garments, high-end and low-end virtual-try-on systems. However, complete solutions in this area have still not yet found the expected commercial success. Today, with the on-going large cost reduction given by the appearance of new competitors, methods for digitization of the human body becomes more interesting for the fashion and apparel industry. Therefore, a large expansion of these technologies is expected in the near future. To date, different methods are used commercially for the measurement of the human body. These can be divided into three major distinguished groups: laser-scanning, projection of light patterns, combination modeling and image processing. The different solutions have strengths and weaknesses that profile their suitability for specific applications. This paper gives an overview of their

  15. On averaging multiview relations for 3D scan registration.

    PubMed

    Govindu, Venu Madhav; Pooja, A

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present an extension of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm that simultaneously registers multiple 3D scans. While ICP fails to utilize the multiview constraints available, our method exploits the information redundancy in a set of 3D scans by using the averaging of relative motions. This averaging method utilizes the Lie group structure of motions, resulting in a 3D registration method that is both efficient and accurate. In addition, we present two variants of our approach, i.e., a method that solves for multiview 3D registration while obeying causality and a transitive correspondence variant that efficiently solves the correspondence problem across multiple scans. We present experimental results to characterize our method and explain its behavior as well as those of some other multiview registration methods in the literature. We establish the superior accuracy of our method in comparison to these multiview methods with registration results on a set of well-known real datasets of 3D scans. PMID:23412615

  16. 3D laser scanning as a new tool of assessment of erosion rates in forested loess gullies (case study: Kolonia Celejów, Lublin Upland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kociuba, Waldemar; Janicki, Grzegorz; Rodzik, Jan

    2014-06-01

    The gully network existing in a number of loess areas under agricultural use in the Lublin Upland has been subject to secondary vegetation succession. The dense plant cover makes the application of remote sensing methods difficult. As a result, topographic maps frequently present the general outlines of the gullies, and in the case of a considerable dissection of the badlands type - only the boundaries between the occurring forest assemblages and cultivated fields. Aerial photographs do not permit tracing the modern development of the lateral branches of the gully, or the qualitative assessment of material transported in the gully system. The application of satellite geodesy tools is also problematic due to weak penetration of tree crowns by the signal. The application of traditional geodesic tools, including laser total stations, is time-consuming and strenuous, particularly in the case of measurement of microforms. Moreover, measurements by means of total stations require relevant preparation of the polygon, and frequently the removal of bushes and high perennials. Such measurement problems can be solved by the application of the modern Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) technology. The primary objective of the paper is to develop a strategy of measurement of active gully landforms, and the application of the TLS technology for geomorphological mapping in forested and branched gully systems. Moreover, detailed measurements of the geometry of the secondary landforms permit the monitoring of tendencies and the determination of the rate of development of gullies

  17. 3D scanning and 3D printing as innovative technologies for fabricating personalized topical drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Det-Amornrat, Usanee; Wang, Jie; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2016-07-28

    Acne is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease with high prevalence. In this work, the potential of 3D printing to produce flexible personalised-shape anti-acne drug (salicylic acid) loaded devices was demonstrated by two different 3D printing (3DP) technologies: Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA). 3D scanning technology was used to obtain a 3D model of a nose adapted to the morphology of an individual. In FDM 3DP, commercially produced Flex EcoPLA™ (FPLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) filaments were loaded with salicylic acid by hot melt extrusion (HME) (theoretical drug loading - 2% w/w) and used as feedstock material for 3D printing. Drug loading in the FPLA-salicylic acid and PCL-salicylic acid 3D printed patches was 0.4% w/w and 1.2% w/w respectively, indicating significant thermal degradation of drug during HME and 3D printing. Diffusion testing in Franz cells using a synthetic membrane revealed that the drug loaded printed samples released <187μg/cm(2) within 3h. FPLA-salicylic acid filament was successfully printed as a nose-shape mask by FDM 3DP, but the PCL-salicylic acid filament was not. In the SLA printing process, the drug was dissolved in different mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) that were solidified by the action of a laser beam. SLA printing led to 3D printed devices (nose-shape) with higher resolution and higher drug loading (1.9% w/w) than FDM, with no drug degradation. The results of drug diffusion tests revealed that drug diffusion was faster than with the FDM devices, 229 and 291μg/cm(2) within 3h for the two formulations evaluated. In this study, SLA printing was the more appropriate 3D printing technology to manufacture anti-acne devices with salicylic acid. The combination of 3D scanning and 3D printing has the potential to offer solutions to produce personalised drug loaded devices, adapted in shape and size to individual patients. PMID:27189134

  18. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  19. Novel Application of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and 3D Volume Rendering toward Improving the Resolution of the Fossil Record of Charcoal

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Claire M.; Punyasena, Surangi W.; Sivaguru, Mayandi

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the abundance of fossil charcoals between rocks and sediments are assumed to reflect changes in fire activity in Earth’s past. These variations in fire activity are often considered to be in response to environmental, ecological or climatic changes. The role that fire plays in feedbacks to such changes is becoming increasingly important to understand and highlights the need to create robust estimates of variations in fossil charcoal abundance. The majority of charcoal based fire reconstructions quantify the abundance of charcoal particles and do not consider the changes in the morphology of the individual particles that may have occurred due to fragmentation as part of their transport history. We have developed a novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to image processing that enables the 3-dimensional reconstruction of individual charcoal particles. This method is able to measure the volume of both microfossil and mesofossil charcoal particles and allows the abundance of charcoal in a sample to be expressed as total volume of charcoal. The method further measures particle surface area and shape allowing both relationships between different size and shape metrics to be analysed and full consideration of variations in particle size and size sorting between different samples to be studied. We believe application of this new imaging approach could allow significant improvement in our ability to estimate variations in past fire activity using fossil charcoals. PMID:23977267

  20. 3D Participatory Sensing with Low-Cost Mobile Devices for Crop Height Assessment – A Comparison with Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Sabrina; Hämmerle, Martin; Klonner, Carolin; Höfle, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    The integration of local agricultural knowledge deepens the understanding of complex phenomena such as the association between climate variability, crop yields and undernutrition. Participatory Sensing (PS) is a concept which enables laymen to easily gather geodata with standard low-cost mobile devices, offering new and efficient opportunities for agricultural monitoring. This study presents a methodological approach for crop height assessment based on PS. In-field crop height variations of a maize field in Heidelberg, Germany, are gathered with smartphones and handheld GPS devices by 19 participants. The comparison of crop height values measured by the participants to reference data based on terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) results in R2 = 0.63 for the handheld GPS devices and R2 = 0.24 for the smartphone-based approach. RMSE for the comparison between crop height models (CHM) derived from PS and TLS data is 10.45 cm (GPS devices) and 14.69 cm (smartphones). Furthermore, the results indicate that incorporating participants’ cognitive abilities in the data collection process potentially improves the quality data captured with the PS approach. The proposed PS methods serve as a fundament to collect agricultural parameters on field-level by incorporating local people. Combined with other methods such as remote sensing, PS opens new perspectives to support agricultural development. PMID:27073917

  1. An automatic approach for 3D registration of CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Saber, Eli; Dianat, Sohail; Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Abhyankar, Vishwas

    2012-03-01

    CT (Computed tomography) is a widely employed imaging modality in the medical field. Normally, a volume of CT scans is prescribed by a doctor when a specific region of the body (typically neck to groin) is suspected of being abnormal. The doctors are required to make professional diagnoses based upon the obtained datasets. In this paper, we propose an automatic registration algorithm that helps healthcare personnel to automatically align corresponding scans from 'Study' to 'Atlas'. The proposed algorithm is capable of aligning both 'Atlas' and 'Study' into the same resolution through 3D interpolation. After retrieving the scanned slice volume in the 'Study' and the corresponding volume in the original 'Atlas' dataset, a 3D cross correlation method is used to identify and register various body parts.

  2. Automated 3D reconstruction of interiors with multiple scan views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Vitor; Ng, Kia C.; Wolfart, Erik; Goncalves, Joao G. M.; Hogg, David C.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents two integrated solutions for realistic 3D model acquisition and reconstruction; an early prototype, in the form of a push trolley, and a later prototype in the form of an autonomous robot. The systems encompass all hardware and software required, from laser and video data acquisition, processing and output of texture-mapped 3D models in VRML format, to batteries for power supply and wireless network communications. The autonomous version is also equipped with a mobile platform and other sensors for the purpose of automatic navigation. The applications for such a system range from real estate and tourism (e.g., showing a 3D computer model of a property to a potential buyer or tenant) or as tool for content creation (e.g., creating 3D models of heritage buildings or producing broadcast quality virtual studios). The system can also be used in industrial environments as a reverse engineering tool to update the design of a plant, or as a 3D photo-archive for insurance purposes. The system is Internet compatible: the photo-realistic models can be accessed via the Internet and manipulated interactively in 3D using a common Web browser with a VRML plug-in. Further information and example reconstructed models are available on- line via the RESOLV web-page at http://www.scs.leeds.ac.uk/resolv/.

  3. Accurate 3D point cloud comparison and volumetric change analysis of Terrestrial Laser Scan data in a hard rock coastal cliff environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earlie, C. S.; Masselink, G.; Russell, P.; Shail, R.; Kingston, K.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of hard rock coastlines is limited due to the episodic nature and ';slow' rate at which changes occur. High-resolution surveying techniques, such as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), have just begun to be adopted as a method of obtaining detailed point cloud data to monitor topographical changes over short periods of time (weeks to months). However, the difficulties involved in comparing consecutive point cloud data sets in a complex three-dimensional plane, such as occlusion due to surface roughness and positioning of data capture point as a result of a consistently changing environment (a beach profile), mean that comparing data sets can lead to errors in the region of 10 - 20 cm. Meshing techniques are often used for point cloud data analysis for simple surfaces, but in surfaces such as rocky cliff faces, this technique has been found to be ineffective. Recession rates of hard rock coastlines in the UK are typically determined using aerial photography or airborne LiDAR data, yet the detail of the important changes occurring to the cliff face and toe are missed using such techniques. In this study we apply an algorithm (M3C2 - Multiscale Model to Model Cloud Comparison), initially developed for analysing fluvial morphological change, that directly compares point to point cloud data using surface normals that are consistent with surface roughness and measure the change that occurs along the normal direction (Lague et al., 2013). The surfaces changes are analysed using a set of user defined scales based on surface roughness and registration error. Once the correct parameters are defined, the volumetric cliff face changes are calculated by integrating the mean distance between the point clouds. The analysis has been undertaken at two hard rock sites identified for their active erosion located on the UK's south west peninsular at Porthleven in south west Cornwall and Godrevy in north Cornwall. Alongside TLS point cloud data, in

  4. Non-destructive 3D Imaging of Extraterrestrial Materials by Synchrotron X-ray Micro- tomography (XR-CMT) and Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM): Beyond Pretty Pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.

    2009-05-01

    We report scientific results made possible only by the use these two non-destructive 3D imaging techniques. XR-CMT provides 3D image reconstructions at spatial resolutions of 1 to 17 micron/voxel edge. We use XR- CMT to locate potential melt-inclusion-bearing phenocrysts in batches of 100-200 micron lunar fire-fountain spherules; to locate and visualize the morphology of 1-2mm size, irregular, unmelted Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and to quantify chondrule/matrix ratios and chondrule size distributions in 6x6x20mm chunks of carbonaceous chondrites; to quantify the modal abundance of opaque phases in similar sized Martian meteorite fragments, and in individual 1-2mm diameter chondrules from chondrites. LCSM provides 3D image stacks at resolutions < 100 nm/pixel. We are the only group creating deconvolved image stacks of 100 to over 1000 micron long comet particle tracks in aerogel keystones from the Stardust mission. We present measurements of track morphology in 3D, and locate high-value particles using complementary synchrotron x- ray fluorescence (XRF) examination. We show that bench-top LCSM extracts maximum information about tracks and particles rapidly and cheaply prior to destructive disassembly. Using XR-CMT we quantify, for the first time, the volumetric abundances of metal grains in 1-2 mm diameter CR chondrite chondrules. Metal abundances vary from 1 to 37 vol.% between 8 chondrules (and more by inspection), in a meteorite with solar (chondritic) Fe/Si ratio, indicating that chondrules formed and accreted locally from bulk solar composition material. They are 'complementary' to each other in Fe/Si ratios. Void spaces in chondritic CAIs and chondrules are shown to be a primary feature, not due to plucking during sectioning. CAI morphology in 3D reveals pre-accretionary impact features, and various types of mineralogical layering, seen in 3D, reveal the formation history of these building blocks of planets and asteroids. We also quantify the x

  5. Optical monitoring of scoliosis by 3D medical laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Quiñonez, Julio C.; Sergiyenko, Oleg Yu.; Preciado, Luis C. Basaca; Tyrsa, Vera V.; Gurko, Alexander G.; Podrygalo, Mikhail A.; Lopez, Moises Rivas; Balbuena, Daniel Hernandez

    2014-03-01

    Three dimensional recording of the human body surface or anatomical areas have gained importance in many medical applications. In this paper, our 3D Medical Laser Scanner is presented. It is based on the novel principle of dynamic triangulation. We analyze the method of operation, medical applications, orthopedically diseases as Scoliosis and the most common types of skin to employ the system the most proper way. It is analyzed a group of medical problems related to the application of optical scanning in optimal way. Finally, experiments are conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system and its method uncertainty.

  6. Automation of 3D scan data capturing and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Robert; Karaszewski, Maciej; Załuski, Wojciech; Rutkiewicz, Jan

    2010-02-01

    In this paper a fully automated 3D shape measurement and processing method is presented. It assumes that positioning of measurement head in relation to measured object can be realized by specialized computer-controlled manipulator. On the base of existing 3D scans, the proposed method calculates "next best view" position for measurement head. All 3D data processing (filtering, ICP based fitting and final views integration) is performed automatically. Final 3D model is created on the base of user specified parameters like accuracy of surface representation or density of surface sampling. Exemplary system that implements all mentioned functionalities will be presented. The goal of this system is to automatically (without any user attention) and rapidly (from days and weeks to hours) measure whole object with some limitations to its properties: maximum measurement volume is described as a cylinder with 2,5m height and 1m radius, maximum object's weight is 2 tons. Measurement head is automatically calibrated by the system and its possible working volume starts from 120mm x 80mm x 60mm and ends up to 1,2m x 0,8m x 0,6m. Exemplary measurement result is presented.

  7. Simulating imaging spectrometer data of a mixed old-growth forest: A parameterization of a 3D radiative transfer model based on airborne and terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F. D.; Leiterer, R.; Morsdorf, F.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.; Lauret, N.; Pfeifer, N.; Schaepman, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing offers unique potential to study forest ecosystems by providing spatially and temporally distributed information that can be linked with key biophysical and biochemical variables. The estimation of biochemical constituents of leaves from remotely sensed data is of high interest revealing insight on photosynthetic processes, plant health, plant functional types, and speciation. However, the scaling of observations at the canopy level to the leaf level or vice versa is not trivial due to the structural complexity of forests. Thus, a common solution for scaling spectral information is the use of physically-based radiative transfer models. The discrete anisotropic radiative transfer model (DART), being one of the most complete coupled canopy-atmosphere 3D radiative transfer models, was parameterized based on airborne and in-situ measurements. At-sensor radiances were simulated and compared with measurements from an airborne imaging spectrometer. The study was performed on the Laegern site, a temperate mixed forest characterized by steep slopes, a heterogeneous spectral background, and deciduous and coniferous trees at different development stages (dominated by beech trees; 47°28'42.0' N, 8°21'51.8' E, 682 m asl, Switzerland). It is one of the few studies conducted on an old-growth forest. Particularly the 3D modeling of the complex canopy architecture is crucial to model the interaction of photons with the vegetation canopy and its background. Thus, we developed two forest reconstruction approaches: 1) based on a voxel grid, and 2) based on individual tree detection. Both methods are transferable to various forest ecosystems and applicable at scales between plot and landscape. Our results show that the newly developed voxel grid approach is favorable over a parameterization based on individual trees. In comparison to the actual imaging spectrometer data, the simulated images exhibit very similar spatial patterns, whereas absolute radiance values are

  8. Using optically scanned 3D data in the restoration of Michelangelo's David

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopigno, Roberto; Cignoni, Paolo; Callieri, Marco; Ganovelli, Fabio; Impoco, G.; Pingi, P.; Ponchio, F.

    2003-10-01

    Modern 3D scanning technologies allow to reconstruct 3D digital representations of Cultural Heritage artifacts in a semi-automatic way, characterized by very high accuracy and wealth of details. The availability of an accurate digital representation opens several possibilities of utilization to experts (restorers, archivists, museum curators), or to ordinary people (students, museum visitors). 3D scanned data are commonly used for the production of animations, interactive visualizations, or virtual reality applications. A much more exciting opportunity is to use these data in the restoration of Cultural Heritage artworks. The integration between 3D graphic and restoration represents an open research field where many new supporting tools are required; the David restoration project has given several starting points and guidelines to the definition and development of innovative solutions. Digital 3D models can be used in two different but not subsidiary modes: as an instrument for the execution of specific investigations and as a supporting media for the archival and integration of all the restoration-related information, gathered with the different studies and analysis performed on the artwork. In this paper we present some recent work done in the framework of the Michelangelo's David restoration project. A 3D model of the David was reconstructed by the Digital Michelangelo Project, using laser-based 3D scanning technology. We have developed some tools to make those data accessible and useful in the restoration. Preliminary results are reported here together with some directions for further research.

  9. Parsing optical scanned 3D data by Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2015-10-01

    Optical devices are always used to digitize complex objects to get their shapes in form of point clouds. The results have no semantic meaning about the objects, and tedious process is indispensable to segment the scanned data to get meanings. The reason for a person to perceive an object correctly is the usage of knowledge, so Bayesian inference is used to the goal. A probabilistic And-Or-Graph is used as a unified framework of representation, learning, and recognition for a large number of object categories, and a probabilistic model defined on this And-Or-Graph is learned from a relatively small training set per category. Given a set of 3D scanned data, the Bayesian inference constructs a most probable interpretation of the object, and a semantic segment is obtained from the part decomposition. Some examples are given to explain the method.

  10. 3D dosimetry by optical-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The need for an accurate, practical, low-cost 3D dosimetry system is becoming ever more critical as modern dose delivery techniques increase in complexity and sophistication. A recent report from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) (1), revealed that 38% of institutions failed the head-and-neck IMRT phantom credentialing test at the first attempt. This was despite generous passing criteria (within 7% dose-difference or 4mm distance-to-agreement) evaluated at a half-dozen points and a single axial plane. The question that arises from this disturbing finding is – what percentage of institutions would have failed if a comprehensive 3D measurement had been feasible, rather than measurements restricted to the central film-plane and TLD points? This question can only be adequately answered by a comprehensive 3D-dosimetry system, which presents a compelling argument for its development as a clinically viable low cost dosimetry solution. Optical-CT dosimetry is perhaps the closest system to providing such a comprehensive solution. In this article, we review the origins and recent developments of optical-CT dosimetry systems. The principle focus is on first generation systems known to have highest accuracy but longer scan times. PMID:17460781

  11. 3D Laser Triangulation for Plant Phenotyping in Challenging Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kjaer, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To increase the understanding of how the plant phenotype is formed by genotype and environmental interactions, simple and robust high-throughput plant phenotyping methods should be developed and considered. This would not only broaden the application range of phenotyping in the plant research community, but also increase the ability for researchers to study plants in their natural environments. By studying plants in their natural environment in high temporal resolution, more knowledge on how multiple stresses interact in defining the plant phenotype could lead to a better understanding of the interaction between plant responses and epigenetic regulation. In the present paper, we evaluate a commercial 3D NIR-laser scanner (PlantEye, Phenospex B.V., Herleen, The Netherlands) to track daily changes in plant growth with high precision in challenging environments. Firstly, we demonstrate that the NIR laser beam of the scanner does not affect plant photosynthetic performance. Secondly, we demonstrate that it is possible to estimate phenotypic variation amongst the growth pattern of ten genotypes of Brassica napus L. (rapeseed), using a simple linear correlation between scanned parameters and destructive growth measurements. Our results demonstrate the high potential of 3D laser triangulation for simple measurements of phenotypic variation in challenging environments and in a high temporal resolution. PMID:26066990

  12. Taking Advantage of Selective Change Driven Processing for 3D Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Vegara, Francisco; Zuccarello, Pedro; Boluda, Jose A.; Pardo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the application of the principles of SCD (Selective Change Driven) vision to 3D laser scanning. Two experimental sets have been implemented: one with a classical CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) sensor, and the other one with a recently developed CMOS SCD sensor for comparative purposes, both using the technique known as Active Triangulation. An SCD sensor only delivers the pixels that have changed most, ordered by the magnitude of their change since their last readout. The 3D scanning method is based on the systematic search through the entire image to detect pixels that exceed a certain threshold, showing the SCD approach to be ideal for this application. Several experiments for both capturing strategies have been performed to try to find the limitations in high speed acquisition/processing. The classical approach is limited by the sequential array acquisition, as predicted by the Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem, and this has been experimentally demonstrated in the case of a rotating helix. These limitations are overcome by the SCD 3D scanning prototype achieving a significantly higher performance. The aim of this article is to compare both capturing strategies in terms of performance in the time and frequency domains, so they share all the static characteristics including resolution, 3D scanning method, etc., thus yielding the same 3D reconstruction in static scenes. PMID:24084110

  13. Whole-body 3D scanner and scan data report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addleman, Stephen R.

    1997-03-01

    With the first whole-body 3D scanner now available the next adventure confronting the user is what to do with all of the data. While the system was built for anthropologists, it has created interest among users from a wide variety of fields. Users with applications in the fields of anthropology, costume design, garment design, entertainment, VR and gaming have a need for the data in formats unique to their fields. Data from the scanner is being converted to solid models for art and design and NURBS for computer graphics applications. Motion capture has made scan data move and dance. The scanner has created a need for advanced application software just as other scanners have in the past.

  14. Automatic determination of trunk diameter, crown base and height of scots pine (Pinus Sylvestris L.) Based on analysis of 3D point clouds gathered from multi-station terrestrial laser scanning. (Polish Title: Automatyczne okreslanie srednicy pnia, podstawy korony oraz wysokosci sosny zwyczajnej (Pinus Silvestris L.) Na podstawie analiz chmur punktow 3D pochodzacych z wielostanowiskowego naziemnego skanowania laserowego)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, M.; Wężyk, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in recent years resulted in its recognition and implementation in many industries, including forestry and nature conservation. The use of the 3D TLS point clouds in the process of inventory of trees and stands, as well as in the determination of their biometric features (trunk diameter, tree height, crown base, number of trunk shapes), trees and lumber size (volume of trees) is slowly becoming a practice. In addition to the measurement precision, the primary added value of TLS is the ability to automate the processing of the clouds of points 3D in the direction of the extraction of selected features of trees and stands. The paper presents the original software (GNOM) for the automatic measurement of selected features of trees, based on the cloud of points obtained by the ground laser scanner FARO. With the developed algorithms (GNOM), the location of tree trunks on the circular research surface was specified and the measurement was performed; the measurement covered the DBH (l: 1.3m), further diameters of tree trunks at different heights of the tree trunk, base of the tree crown and volume of the tree trunk (the selection measurement method), as well as the tree crown. Research works were performed in the territory of the Niepolomice Forest in an unmixed pine stand (Pinussylvestris L.) on the circular surface with a radius of 18 m, within which there were 16 pine trees (14 of them were cut down). It was characterized by a two-storey and even-aged construction (147 years old) and was devoid of undergrowth. Ground scanning was performed just before harvesting. The DBH of 16 pine trees was specified in a fully automatic way, using the algorithm GNOM with an accuracy of +2.1%, as compared to the reference measurement by the DBH measurement device. The medium, absolute measurement error in the cloud of points - using semi-automatic methods "PIXEL" (between points) and PIPE (fitting the cylinder) in the FARO Scene 5.x

  15. Analysis of the Possibilities of Using Low-Cost Scanning System in 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierski, M.; Wierzbickia, D.; Fryskowska, A.; Chlebowska, B.

    2016-06-01

    The laser scanning technique is still a very popular and fast growing method of obtaining information on modeling 3D objects. The use of low-cost miniature scanners creates new opportunities for small objects of 3D modeling based on point clouds acquired from the scan. The same, the development of accuracy and methods of automatic processing of this data type is noticeable. The article presents methods of collecting raw datasets in the form of a point-cloud using a low-cost ground-based laser scanner FabScan. As part of the research work 3D scanner from an open source FabLab project was constructed. In addition, the results for the analysis of the geometry of the point clouds obtained by using a low-cost laser scanner were presented. Also, some analysis of collecting data of different structures (made of various materials such as: glass, wood, paper, gum, plastic, plaster, ceramics, stoneware clay etc. and of different shapes: oval and similar to oval and prism shaped) have been done. The article presents two methods used for analysis: the first one - visual (general comparison between the 3D model and the real object) and the second one - comparative method (comparison between measurements on models and scanned objects using the mean error of a single sample of observations). The analysis showed, that the low-budget ground-based laser scanner FabScan has difficulties with collecting data of non-oval objects. Items built of glass painted black also caused problems for the scanner. In addition, the more details scanned object contains, the lower the accuracy of the collected point-cloud is. Nevertheless, the accuracy of collected data (using oval-straight shaped objects) is satisfactory. The accuracy, in this case, fluctuates between ± 0,4 mm and ± 1,0 mm whereas when using more detailed objects or a rectangular shaped prism the accuracy is much more lower, between 2,9 mm and ± 9,0 mm. Finally, the publication presents the possibility (for the future expansion of

  16. 3D integrated hybrid silicon laser.

    PubMed

    Song, Bowen; Stagarescu, Cristian; Ristic, Sasa; Behfar, Alex; Klamkin, Jonathan

    2016-05-16

    Lasers were realized on silicon by flip-chip bonding of indium phosphide (InP) devices containing total internal reflection turning mirrors for surface emission. Light is coupled to the silicon waveguides through surface grating couplers. With this technique, InP lasers were integrated on silicon. Laser cavities were also formed by coupling InP reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers to microring resonator filters and distributed Bragg reflector mirrors. Single-mode continuous wave lasing was demonstrated with a side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB. Up to 2 mW of optical power was coupled to the silicon waveguide. Thermal simulations were also performed to evaluate the low thermal impedance afforded by this architecture and potential for high wall-plug efficiency. PMID:27409867

  17. Scanning fringe projection for fast 3D inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honegger, Marc; Kahl, Michael; Trunz, Sandra; Rinner, Stefan; Ettemeyer, Andreas; Lambelet, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    In an earlier paper we have described a concept for high speed 3D inspection using fringe projection techniques. We use a special CMOS camera with 300 x 300 px which can calculate the phase on board. The focus of the first step of development had been a fringe projector, which was able to modulate the projected fringes with up to 250 kHz. In the second step the image acquisition part of the system was developed. In case of 3D measurement with a matrix camera, the camera resp. the measuring object has to be moved stepwise in the lateral direction to cover multiple acquisition areas of the measurement object. Between each image the lateral movement has to correspond to the field of view of the camera. At the intended very high image acquisition rates the high acceleration of the system between each image will lead to inacceptable mechanical forces. In order to obtain a continuous scanning procedure and at the same time to use the performance of a matrix camera, a special lens system was developed. A measurement field 120 mm long and 3 mm wide is imaged onto the camera. The width of the measuring field is imaged onto the 300 rows of the camera, giving a lateral resolution of 10 μm. In the longitudinal direction the 120 mm object length is divided into 12'000 lines to reach the same resolution of 10 μm. Due to technical reasons that will be described later only 240 of the 300 pixel rows on the chip were used. Consequently, with each camera shot 240 separated lines are imaged onto the chip. Between each of these 240 lines there is a large empty space, which is not imaged by the camera. In principle, the camera is operating as 240 single line cameras. Therefore, if the camera is shifted in an inclined direction to the camera orientation over the object, the empty spaces can be recorded as well. In an optimum alignment, the complete measuring object can be scanned in a continuous movement, covering the total length of 120 mm. In this paper we will describe this image

  18. 3D laser imaging for concealed object identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berechet, Ion; Berginc, Gérard; Berechet, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    This paper deals with new optical non-conventional 3D laser imaging. Optical non-conventional imaging explores the advantages of laser imaging to form a three-dimensional image of the scene. 3D laser imaging can be used for threedimensional medical imaging, topography, surveillance, robotic vision because of ability to detect and recognize objects. In this paper, we present a 3D laser imaging for concealed object identification. The objective of this new 3D laser imaging is to provide the user a complete 3D reconstruction of the concealed object from available 2D data limited in number and with low representativeness. The 2D laser data used in this paper come from simulations that are based on the calculation of the laser interactions with the different interfaces of the scene of interest and from experimental results. We show the global 3D reconstruction procedures capable to separate objects from foliage and reconstruct a threedimensional image of the considered object. In this paper, we present examples of reconstruction and completion of three-dimensional images and we analyse the different parameters of the identification process such as resolution, the scenario of camouflage, noise impact and lacunarity degree.

  19. Laser profiling of 3D microturbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Andrew S.; Heaton, Mark E.; Hong, Guodong; Pullen, Keith R.; Rumsby, Phil T.

    2003-11-01

    We have used KrF excimer laser ablation in the fabrication of a novel MEMS power conversion device based on an axial-flow turbine with an integral axial-flux electromagnetic generator. The device has a sandwich structure, comprising a pair of silicon stators either side of an SU8 polymer rotor. The curved turbine rotor blades were fabricated by projection ablation of SU8 parts performed by conventional UV lithography. A variable aperture mask, implemented by stepping a moving aperture in front of a fixed one, was used to achieve the desired spatial variation in the ablated depth. An automatic process was set up on a commercial laser workstation, with the laser firing and mask motion being controlled by computer. High quality SU8 rotor parts with diameters of 13 mm and depths of 1 mm were produced at a fluence of 0.7 J/cm2, corresponding to a material removal rate of approximately 0.3 μm per pulse. A similar approach was used to form SU8 guide vane inserts for the stators.

  20. Laser Scanning In Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Patricia; Baker, Lionel R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper is a review of the applications of laser scanning in inspection. The reasons for the choice of a laser in flying spot scanning and the optical properties of a laser beam which are of value in a scanning instrument will be given. The many methods of scanning laser beams in both one and two dimensions will be described. The use of one dimensional laser scanners for automatic surface inspection for transmitting and reflective products will be covered in detail, with particular emphasis on light collection techniques. On-line inspection applications which will be mentioned include: photographic film web, metal strip products, paper web, glass sheet, car body paint surfaces and internal cylinder bores. Two dimensional laser scanning is employed in applications where increased resolution, increased depth of focus, and better contrast are required compared with conventional vidicon TV or solid state array cameras. Such examples as special microscope laser scanning systems and a TV compatible system for use in restricted areas of a nuclear reactor will be described. The technical and economic benefits and limitations of laser scanning video systems will be compared with conventional TV and CCD array devices.

  1. Fast 3D shape measurements using laser speckle projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, Martin; Grosse, Marcus; Harendt, Bastian; Kowarschik, Richard

    2011-05-01

    3D measurement setups based on structured light projection are widely used for many industrial applications. Due to intense research in the past the accuracy is comparably high in connection with relatively low cost of the equipment. But facing higher acquisition rates in industries especially for chain assembling lines there are still hurdles to take when accelerating 3D measurements and at the same time retaining accuracies. We developed a projection technique that uses laser speckles to enable fast 3D measurements with statistically structured light patterns. In combination with a temporal correlation technique dense and accurate 3D reconstructions at nearly video rate can be achieved.

  2. 3D reconstruction with two webcams and a laser line projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Hui, Bingwei; Qiu, Shaohua; Wen, Gongjian

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction is one of the most attractive research topics in photogrammetry and computer vision. Nowadays 3D reconstruction with simple and consumable equipment plays an important role. In this paper, a 3D reconstruction desktop system is built based on binocular stereo vision using a laser scanner. The hardware requirements are a simple commercial hand-held laser line projector and two common webcams for image acquisition. Generally, 3D reconstruction based on passive triangulation methods requires point correspondences among various viewpoints. The development of matching algorithms remains a challenging task in computer vision. In our proposal, with the help of a laser line projector, stereo correspondences are established robustly from epipolar geometry and the laser shadow on the scanned object. To establish correspondences more conveniently, epipolar rectification is employed using Bouguet's method after stereo calibration with a printed chessboard. 3D coordinates of the observed points are worked out with rayray triangulation and reconstruction outliers are removed with the planarity constraint of the laser plane. Dense 3D point clouds are derived from multiple scans under different orientations. Each point cloud is derived by sweeping the laser plane across the object requiring 3D reconstruction. The Iterative Closest Point algorithm is employed to register the derived point clouds. Rigid body transformation between neighboring scans is obtained to get the complete 3D point cloud. Finally polygon meshes are reconstructed from the derived point cloud and color images are used in texture mapping to get a lifelike 3D model. Experiments show that our reconstruction method is simple and efficient.

  3. 3D scanning and imaging for quick documentation of crime and accident scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, L.; Sala, R.; Scaioni, M.; Cattaneo, C.; Gibelli, D.; Giussani, A.; Poppa, P.; Roncoroni, F.; Vandone, A.

    2012-06-01

    Fast documentation of complex scenes where accidents or crimes occurred is fundamental not to lose information for post-event analyses and lesson learning. Today 3D terrestrial laser scanning and photogrammetry offer instruments capable of achieving this task. The former allows the fast geometric reconstruction of complex scenes through dense point clouds. Different kinds of instruments can be used according to the size of the area to survey and to the required level of details. The latter can be used for both geometric reconstruction and for photo-realistic texturing of laser scans. While photogrammetry better focuses on small details, laser scanning gives out a more comprehensive view of geometry of whole crime/accident scene. Both techniques can be used for recording a scene just after a crime or a disaster occurred, before the area is cleared out to recover regular activities. Visualization of results through an easy-to-use 3D environment is another import issue to offer useful data to investigators. Here two experiences of crime scene documentation are proposed.

  4. Shipborne hydrographic laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfennigbauer, Martin; Rieger, Peter; Schaich, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Applications like hydro-archeology, hydrobiology, or hydraulic engineering sometimes require accurate surveying of submerged areas with point densities usually only achieved with mobile or terrestrial laser scanning. For navigable waterbodies, hydrographic laser scanning from a floating platform represents a viable solution. RIEGL's new hydrographic laser scanner VQ-820-G with its exceptionally high measurement rate of up to 110,000 net measurements per second and its small laser footprint is optimally suited for such applications. We present results from a measurement campaign surveying prehistoric lake dwellings at Lake Constance in Germany. While the aim of typical hydrographic laser scanning applications is to roughly acquire the ground's shape and structure, in this case it was tried to determine the exact position, shape, and attitude of the remainders of the piles. The special requirements with respect to mission planning and data processing are discussed and the performance of the laser scanner is assessed.

  5. A real-time 3D scanning system for pavement distortion inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingguang; Yao, Ming; Yao, Xun; Xu, Bugao

    2010-01-01

    Pavement distortions, such as rutting and shoving, are the common pavement distress problems that need to be inspected and repaired in a timely manner to ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper introduces a real-time, low-cost inspection system devoted to detecting these distress features using high-speed 3D transverse scanning techniques. The detection principle is the dynamic generation and characterization of the 3D pavement profile based on structured light triangulation. To improve the accuracy of the system, a multi-view coplanar scheme is employed in the calibration procedure so that more feature points can be used and distributed across the field of view of the camera. A sub-pixel line extraction method is applied for the laser stripe location, which includes filtering, edge detection and spline interpolation. The pavement transverse profile is then generated from the laser stripe curve and approximated by line segments. The second-order derivatives of the segment endpoints are used to identify the feature points of possible distortions. The system can output the real-time measurements and 3D visualization of rutting and shoving distress in a scanned pavement.

  6. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  7. 3D Lasers Increase Efficiency, Safety of Moving Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Canadian company Neptec Design Group Ltd. developed its Laser Camera System, used by shuttles to render 3D maps of their hulls for assessing potential damage. Using NASA funding, the firm incorporated LiDAR technology and created the TriDAR 3D sensor. Its commercial arm, Neptec Technologies Corp., has sold the technology to Orbital Sciences, which uses it to guide its Cygnus spacecraft during rendezvous and dock operations at the International Space Station.

  8. Progress in Tridimensional (3d) Laser Forming of Stainless Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisario, Annamaria; Barletta, Massimiliano; Venettacci, Simone; Veniali, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Achievement of complex shapes with high dimensional accuracy and precision by forming process is a demanding challenge for scientists and practitioners. Available technologies are numerous, with laser forming being progressively emerging because of limited springback, lack of molds and sophisticated auxiliary equipments. However, laser forming finds limited applications, especially when forming of tridimensional (3d) complex shapes is required. In this case, cost savings are often counterbalanced by the need for troublesome forming strategies. Therefore, traditional alternatives based on mechanical devices are usually preferred to laser systems. In the present work, 3d laser forming of stainless steel sheets by high power diode laser is investigated. In particular, the set of scanning patterns to form domes from flat blanks by simple and easy-to-manage radial paths alone was found. Numerous 3d items were also processed by diode laser to manufacture a number of complex shapes with high flexibility and limited efforts to modify the auxiliary forming equipment. Based on the experimental results and analytical data, the high power diode laser was found able to form arbitrary 3d shapes through the implementation of tailored laser scanning patterns and appropriate settings of the operational parameters.

  9. 3D scanning of internal structure in gel engineering materials with visual scanning microscopic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yosuke; Gong, Jing; Masato, Makino; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-04-01

    The 3D printing technology, causing much attention from the beginning of 2013, will be possibly an alternative method to fabricate the biological soft tissues. Recently our group of Yamagata University has developed the world-first 3D Gel Printer to fabricate the complicated gel-materials with high-strength and biocompatibility. However, there are no 3D scanners that collect the data from the internal structure of complicated gel objects such as eye lens. It means that a new system for scanning the internal structure is needed now. In this study, firstly, we have tried to investigate the gel network of synthetic and biological gel with scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS). We calculated the Young's modulus of synthetic gels with the SMILS and with the tensile test, and precisely compared the results between them. The temperature dependences of the inside structure and the transparency are observed in the pig crystalline lens. The quantitative analysis indicates the importance of the internal structure of real object. Secondary, we show the new system named Gel-scanner that can provide the 2-dimentional data of the internal structure. From examining our findings, the scanning of internal structure will enable us to expect physical properties of the real object. We convince that the gelscanner will play major role in the various fields.

  10. Laser Transfer of Metals and Metal Alloys for Digital Microfabrication of 3D Objects.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Sa'ar, Amir; Kotler, Zvi

    2015-09-01

    3D copper logos printed on epoxy glass laminates are demonstrated. The structures are printed using laser transfer of molten metal microdroplets. The example in the image shows letters of 50 µm width, with each letter being taller than the last, from a height of 40 µm ('s') to 190 µm ('l'). The scanning microscopy image is taken at a tilt, and the topographic image was taken using interferometric 3D microscopy, to show the effective control of this technique. PMID:25966320

  11. Development of a 3D printer using scanning projection stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael P.; Cooper, Geoffrey J. T.; Hinkley, Trevor; Gibson, Graham M.; Padgett, Miles J.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a system for the rapid fabrication of low cost 3D devices and systems in the laboratory with micro-scale features yet cm-scale objects. Our system is inspired by maskless lithography, where a digital micromirror device (DMD) is used to project patterns with resolution up to 10 µm onto a layer of photoresist. Large area objects can be fabricated by stitching projected images over a 5cm2 area. The addition of a z-stage allows multiple layers to be stacked to create 3D objects, removing the need for any developing or etching steps but at the same time leading to true 3D devices which are robust, configurable and scalable. We demonstrate the applications of the system by printing a range of micro-scale objects as well as a fully functioning microfluidic droplet device and test its integrity by pumping dye through the channels. PMID:25906401

  12. The use of 3D scanning for sporting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friel, Kevin; Ajjimaporn, Pann; Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the process and research that went into creating a set of 3D models to characterize a golf swing. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how a 3D scanner could be used for assessing athlete performance in sporting applications. In this case, introductory work has been performed to show how the scanner could be used to show the errors a golfer made in a swing. Multiple factors must be taken into account when assessing golfers' swings including the position and movement of the golfer's hands, arms, and foot placement as well as the position of the club head and shaft of the golf club.

  13. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. PMID:23273891

  14. Morphometric Optic Nerve Head Analysis in Glaucoma Patients: A Comparison between the Simultaneous Nonmydriatic Stereoscopic Fundus Camera (Kowa Nonmyd WX3D) and the Heidelberg Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (HRT III).

    PubMed

    Mariacher, Siegfried; Hipp, Stephanie; Wirthky, Robert; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Ziemssen, Focke; Schiefer, Ulrich; Voykov, Bogomil; Januschowski, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the agreement between morphometric optic nerve head parameters assessed with the confocal laser ophthalmoscope HRT III and the stereoscopic fundus camera Kowa nonmyd WX3D retrospectively. Methods. Morphometric optic nerve head parameters of 40 eyes of 40 patients with primary open angle glaucoma were analyzed regarding their vertical cup-to-disc-ratio (CDR). Vertical CDR, disc area, cup volume, rim volume, and maximum cup depth were assessed with both devices by one examiner. Mean bias and limits of agreement (95% CI) were obtained using scatter plots and Bland-Altman analysis. Results. Overall vertical CDR comparison between HRT III and Kowa nonmyd WX3D measurements showed a mean difference (limits of agreement) of -0.06 (-0.36 to 0.24). For the CDR < 0.5 group (n = 24) mean difference in vertical CDR was -0.14 (-0.34 to 0.06) and for the CDR ≥ 0.5 group (n = 16) 0.06 (-0.21 to 0.34). Conclusion. This study showed a good agreement between Kowa nonmyd WX3D and HRT III with regard to widely used optic nerve head parameters in patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy. However, data from Kowa nonmyd WX3D exhibited the tendency to measure larger CDR values than HRT III in the group with CDR < 0.5 group and lower CDR values in the group with CDR ≥ 0.5. PMID:27313870

  15. Morphometric Optic Nerve Head Analysis in Glaucoma Patients: A Comparison between the Simultaneous Nonmydriatic Stereoscopic Fundus Camera (Kowa Nonmyd WX3D) and the Heidelberg Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (HRT III)

    PubMed Central

    Mariacher, Siegfried; Wirthky, Robert; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Ziemssen, Focke; Schiefer, Ulrich; Voykov, Bogomil; Januschowski, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the agreement between morphometric optic nerve head parameters assessed with the confocal laser ophthalmoscope HRT III and the stereoscopic fundus camera Kowa nonmyd WX3D retrospectively. Methods. Morphometric optic nerve head parameters of 40 eyes of 40 patients with primary open angle glaucoma were analyzed regarding their vertical cup-to-disc-ratio (CDR). Vertical CDR, disc area, cup volume, rim volume, and maximum cup depth were assessed with both devices by one examiner. Mean bias and limits of agreement (95% CI) were obtained using scatter plots and Bland-Altman analysis. Results. Overall vertical CDR comparison between HRT III and Kowa nonmyd WX3D measurements showed a mean difference (limits of agreement) of −0.06 (−0.36 to 0.24). For the CDR < 0.5 group (n = 24) mean difference in vertical CDR was −0.14 (−0.34 to 0.06) and for the CDR ≥ 0.5 group (n = 16) 0.06 (−0.21 to 0.34). Conclusion. This study showed a good agreement between Kowa nonmyd WX3D and HRT III with regard to widely used optic nerve head parameters in patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy. However, data from Kowa nonmyd WX3D exhibited the tendency to measure larger CDR values than HRT III in the group with CDR < 0.5 group and lower CDR values in the group with CDR ≥ 0.5. PMID:27313870

  16. 3-D laser patterning process utilizing horizontal and vertical patterning

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process which vastly improves the 3-D patterning capability of laser pantography (computer controlled laser direct-write patterning). The process uses commercially available electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) to pattern 3-D surfaces. The EDPR covers the surface of a metal layer conformally, coating the vertical as well as horizontal surfaces. A laser pantograph then patterns the EDPR, which is subsequently developed in a standard, commercially available developer, leaving patterned trench areas in the EDPR. The metal layer thereunder is now exposed in the trench areas and masked in others, and thereafter can be etched to form the desired pattern (subtractive process), or can be plated with metal (additive process), followed by a resist stripping, and removal of the remaining field metal (additive process). This improved laser pantograph process is simpler, faster, move manufacturable, and requires no micro-machining.

  17. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  18. Precision Control Module For UV Laser 3D Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Hong; Hung, Min-Wei; Chang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    UV laser has been widely used in various micromachining such as micro-scribing or patterning processing. At present, most of the semiconductors, LEDs, photovoltaic solar panels and touch panels industries need the UV laser processing system. However, most of the UV laser processing applications in the industries utilize two dimensional (2D) plane processing. And there are tremendous business opportunities that can be developed, such as three dimensional (3D) structures of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensor or the precision depth control of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films edge insulation in touch panels. This research aims to develop a UV laser 3D micromachining module that can create the novel applications for industries. By special designed beam expender in optical system, the focal point of UV laser can be adjusted quickly and accurately through the optical path control lens of laser beam expender optical system. Furthermore, the integrated software for galvanometric scanner and focal point adjustment mechanism is developed as well, so as to carry out the precise 3D microstructure machining.

  19. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. RESULTS With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. CONCLUSIONS A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  20. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. Material/Methods Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. Results With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. Conclusions A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  1. Analysis of usefulness of airborne laser scanning for preparation of 3D buildings model consistent with inspire specification. (Polish Title: Analiza przydatności lotniczego skaningu laserowego do opracowania modelu budynków 3D zgodnego ze specyfikacją INSPIRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisło-Lesicka, U.; Borowiec, N.; Marmol, U.; Pyka, K.

    2014-12-01

    The inspiration to undertake the subject was the announcement of preparations for project Poland 3D+. First the presentation of background analysis of modelling methods was sketched. Then the principles of buildings modelling, imposed by INSPIRE specification, were recalled. Next the conditions of conversion of 2D spatial database to 3D ones, on the basis of experience acquired thanks to the research project performed in AGH in the years 2009 - 2012, was discussed. The research indicated airborne scanning as the best data source but at the same time indicated that highly detailed models considered for large areas may turn out to be poorly efficient for the GIS technology. Then t he systematization of modelling methods of airborne scanning, with emphasis on advantages and disadvantages of the approach model driven and date driven, was presented. The thesis is concluded with a suggestion of modelling strategy in the context of condition of geo - reference databases in Poland, prospects of their development and demand for spatial data from the social and economic point of view. A gradual solution was suggested, in which, firstly, attempts are made to apply the model driven method and in case of failure, the data driven method is applied, which enables modelling the buildings of complex shapes but doe s not guarantee full automation. Such a procedure, in the opinion of the authors, would be optimal at implementation of project Poland 3D+.

  2. Comparison of quasi-3D and full-3D laser wakefield PIC simulations using azimuthal mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalichaouch, Thamine; Yu, Peicheng; Davidson, Asher; Mori, Warren; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has attracted a lot of interest as a possible compact particle accelerator. However, 3D simulations of plasma-based accelerators are computationally intensive, sometimes taking millions of core hours on today's computers. A quasi-3D particle-In-cell (PIC) approach has been developed to take advantage of azimuthal symmetry in LWFA (and PWFA) simulations by using a particle-in-cell description in r-z and a Fourier description in φ. Quasi-3D simulations of LWFA are computationally more efficient and faster than Full-3D simulations because only first few azimuthal harmonics are needed to capture the physics of the problem. We have developed a cylindrical mode decomposition diagnostic for 3D Cartesian geometry simulations to analyze the agreement between full-3D and quasi-3D PIC simulations of laser and beam-plasma interactions. The diagnostic interpolates field data from Full-3D PIC simulations onto an irregular cylindrical grid (r , φ , z). A Fourier decomposition is then performed on the interpolated 3D simulation data along the azimuthal direction. This diagnostic has the added advantage of separating out the wakefields from the laser field. Preliminary results for this diagnostic of LWFA and PWFA simulations with symmetric and nearly symmetric spot sizes as well as of laser-plasma interactions using lasers with orbital angular momentum (higher order Laguerre-Gaussian modes) will be presented.

  3. State of the art of 3D scanning systems and inspection of textile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, M.; Orjuela-Vargas, S. A.; Philips, W.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid development of hardware and software in the digital image processing field has boosted research in computer vision for applications in industry. The development of new electronic devices and the tendency to decrease their prices makes possible new developments that few decades ago were possible only in the imagination. This is the case of 3D imaging technology which permits to detect failures in industrial products by inspecting aspects on their 3D surface. In search of an optimal solution for scanning textiles we present in this paper a review of existing techniques for digitizing 3D surfaces. Topographic details of textiles can be obtained by digitizing surfaces using laser line triangulation, phase shifting optical triangulation, projected-light, stereo-vision systems and silhouette analysis. Although we are focused on methods that have been used in the textile industry, we also consider potential mechanisms used for other applications. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the evaluated methods and state a summary of potential implementations for the textile industry.

  4. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  5. Miniaturized laser illumination module for 3D areal mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynor, Edwin S.; Blase, W. Paul; Woodward, Kim G.

    1998-01-01

    We report progress towards a miniaturized laser illumination module (LIM) for illuminating objects with structured light for 3D imaging purposes. The module, when combined with an off-axis camera and a PC, will image volumes in near-real- time at a range-dependent resolution using 256 X 256 resolution elements. The miniaturized LIM comprises a red laser diode source, a hologram, a spatial light modulator and a projection lens.We present optical and electronic design features of the device in terms of constraints on size and manufacturability. The miniature LIM can be applied to diverse 3D imaging problems to include industrial reverse engineering and inspection and medical diagnostics and prosthetics design.

  6. 3-D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Michael F.; Carmer, Dwayne C.; Pont, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    A sophisticated 3D laser radar sensor simulation, developed and applied to the task of autonomous hazard detection and avoidance, is presented. This simulation includes a backward ray trace to sensor subpixels, incoherent subpixel integration, range dependent noise, sensor point spread function effects, digitization noise, and AM-CW modulation. Specific sensor parameters, spacecraft lander trajectory, and terrain type have been selected to generate simulated sensor data.

  7. Towards 3-D laser nano patterning in polymer optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Patricia J.; Perrie, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Progress towards 3-D subsurface structuring of polymers using femtosecond lasers is presented. Highly localised refractive index changes can be generated deep in transparent optical polymers without pre doping for photosensitisation or post processing by annealing. Understanding the writing conditions surpasses the limitations of materials, dimensions and chemistry, to facilitate unique structures entirely formed by laser-polymeric interactions to overcome materials, dimensional, refractive index and wavelength constraints.. Numerical aperture, fluence, temporal pulselength, wavelength and incident polarisation are important parameters to be considered, in achieving the desired inscription. Non-linear aspects of multiphoton absorption, plasma generation, filamentation and effects of incident polarisation on the writing conditions will be presented.

  8. 3D laser traking of a particle in 3DFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Kalpit; Welch, Gregory; Bishop, Gary; Taylor, Russell; Superfine, Richard

    2003-11-01

    The principal goal of 3D tracking in our home-built 3D Magnetic Force Microscope is to monitor movement of the particle with respect to laser beam waist and keep the particle at the center of laser beam. The sensory element is a Quadrant Photo Diode (QPD) which captures scattering of light caused by particle motion with bandwidth up to 40 KHz. XYZ translation stage is the driver element which moves particle back in the center of the laser with accuracy of couple of nanometers and with bandwidth up to 300 Hz. Since our particles vary in size, composition and shape, instead of using a priori model we use standard system identification techniques to have optimal approximation to the relationship between particle motion and QPD response. We have developed position feedback control system software that is capable of 3-dimensional tracking of beads that are attached to cilia on living cells which are beating at up to 15Hz. We have also modeled the control system of instrument to simulate performance of 3D particle tracking for different experimental conditions. Given operational level of nanometers, noise poses a great challenge for the tracking system. We propose to use stochastic control theory approaches to increase robustness of tracking.

  9. Laser point cloud diluting and refined 3D reconstruction fusing with digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Jianqing

    2007-06-01

    This paper shows a method to combine the imaged-based modeling technique and Laser scanning data to rebuild a realistic 3D model. Firstly use the image pair to build a relative 3D model of the object, and then register the relative model to the Laser coordinate system. Project the Laser points to one of the images and extract the feature lines from that image. After that fit the 2D projected Laser points to lines in the image and constrain their corresponding 3D points to lines in the 3D Laser space to keep the features of the model. Build TIN and cancel the redundant points, which don't impact the curvature of their neighborhood areas. Use the diluting Laser point cloud to reconstruct the geometry model of the object, and then project the texture of corresponding image onto it. The process is shown to be feasible and progressive proved by experimental results. The final model is quite similar with the real object. This method cuts down the quantity of data in the precondition of keeping the features of model. The effect of it is manifest.

  10. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  11. Study of 3D Laser Cladding for Ni85Al15 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotoban, D.; Grigoriev, S.; Shishkovsky, I.

    Conditions of successful3D laser cladding for Ni based superalloy were studied. A high power Yb-YAG laser was used to create a molten pool on a stainless steel substrate into which Ni85Al15 powder stream was delivered to create 3D samples. The effect of different laser parameters on the structure and the intermetallic phase content of the manufactured samples were explored by optical metallography, microhardness, SEM, X-ray, and EDX analysis. The cladding of the Ni3A1 coating with small dilution into substrate can be obtained at the appropriate power density of about 2-8 J/mm2 under the laser scan velocity of 100-200 mm/min and the powder feed rate ∼ 3.8 g/min.

  12. Reduced Scan Time 3D FLAIR using Modulated Inversion and Repetition Time

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Neville D.; Butman, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design and evaluate a new reduced scan time 3D FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) sequence. Materials and Methods The 3D FLAIR sequence was modified so that the repetition time was modulated in a predetermined smooth fashion (3D mFLAIR). Inversion times were adjusted accordingly to maintain CSF suppression. Simulations were performed to determine SNR for gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and CSF. Fourteen volunteers were imaged using the modified and product sequence. SNR measurements were performed in GM, WM and CSF. Mean value and the 95% confidence interval ([CI]) were assessed. Scan time for the 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR sequences was measured. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the SNR measured in GM (P value = 0.5; mean SNR = 42.8 [CI]: 38.2-45.5 vs 42.2 [CI]: 38.3-46.1 for 3D FLAIR and 3D mFLAIR, respectively) and WM (P value = 0.25; mean SNR = 32.1 [CI]: 30.3-33.8 vs 32.9 [CI]: 31.1-34.7). Scan time reduction greater than 30% was achieved for the given parameter set with the 3D mFLAIR sequence. Conclusion Scan time for 3D FLAIR can be effectively reduced by modulating repetition and inversion time in a predetermined fashion while maintaining the SNR and CNR of a constant TR sequence. PMID:24979311

  13. Triangulation Based 3D Laser Imaging for Fracture Orientation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah, J.; Claire, S.; Steve, M.

    2009-05-01

    Laser imaging has recently been identified as a potential tool for rock mass characterization. This contribution focuses on the application of triangulation based, short-range laser imaging to determine fracture orientation and surface texture. This technology measures the distance to the target by triangulating the projected and reflected laser beams, and also records the reflection intensity. In this study, we acquired 3D laser images of rock faces using the Laser Camera System (LCS), a portable instrument developed by Neptec Design Group (Ottawa, Canada). The LCS uses an infrared laser beam and is immune to the lighting conditions. The maximum image resolution is 1024 x 1024 volumetric image elements. Depth resolution is 0.5 mm at 5 m. An above ground field trial was conducted at a blocky road cut with well defined joint sets (Kingston, Ontario). An underground field trial was conducted at the Inco 175 Ore body (Sudbury, Ontario) where images were acquired in the dark and the joint set features were more subtle. At each site, from a distance of 3 m away from the rock face, a grid of six images (approximately 1.6 m by 1.6 m) was acquired at maximum resolution with 20% overlap between adjacent images. This corresponds to a density of 40 image elements per square centimeter. Polyworks, a high density 3D visualization software tool, was used to align and merge the images into a single digital triangular mesh. The conventional method of determining fracture orientations is by manual measurement using a compass. In order to be accepted as a substitute for this method, the LCS should be capable of performing at least to the capabilities of manual measurements. To compare fracture orientation estimates derived from the 3D laser images to manual measurements, 160 inclinometer readings were taken at the above ground site. Three prominent joint sets (strike/dip: 236/09, 321/89, 325/01) were identified by plotting the joint poles on a stereonet. Underground, two main joint

  14. 3D sensor for indirect ranging with pulsed laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronzi, D.; Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Scarcella, C.; Bahgat Shehata, A.; Tosi, A.; Padovini, G.; Zappa, F.; Tisa, S.; Durini, D.; Weyers, S.; Brockherde, W.

    2012-10-01

    The growing interest for fast, compact and cost-effective 3D ranging imagers for automotive applications has prompted to explore many different techniques for 3D imaging and to develop new system for this propose. CMOS imagers that exploit phase-resolved techniques provide accurate 3D ranging with no complex optics and are rugged and costeffective. Phase-resolved techniques indirectly measure the round-trip return of the light emitted by a laser and backscattered from a distant target, computing the phase delay between the modulated light and the detected signal. Singlephoton detectors, with their high sensitivity, allow to actively illuminate the scene with a low power excitation (less than 10W with diffused daylight illumination). We report on a 4x4 array of CMOS SPAD (Single Photon Avalanche Diodes) designed in a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology, for pulsed modulation, in which each pixel computes the phase difference between the laser and the reflected pulse. Each pixel comprises a high-performance 30 μm diameter SPAD, an analog quenching circuit, two 9 bit up-down counters and memories to store data during the readout. The first counter counts the photons detected by the SPAD in a time window synchronous with the laser pulse and integrates the whole echoed signal. The second counter accumulates the number of photon detected in a window shifted with respect to the laser pulse, and acquires only a portion of the reflected signal. The array is readout with a global shutter architecture, using a 100 MHz clock; the maximal frame rate is 3 Mframe/s.

  15. VIRO 3D: fast three-dimensional full-body scanning for humans and other living objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Norbert; Minge, Bernhard

    1998-03-01

    The development of a family of partial and whole body scanners provides a complete technology for fully three-dimensional and contact-free scans on human bodies or other living objects within seconds. This paper gives insight into the design and the functional principles of the whole body scanner VIRO 3D operating on the basis of the laser split-beam method. The arrangement of up to 24 camera/laser combinations, thus dividing the area into different camera fields and an all- around sensor configuration travelling in vertical direction allow the complete 360-degree-scan of an object within 6 - 20 seconds. Due to a special calibration process the different sensors are matched and the measured data are combined. Up to 10 million 3D measuring points with a resolution of approximately 1 mm are processed in all coordinate axes to generate a 3D model. By means of high-performance processors in combination with real-time image processing chips the image data from almost any number of sensors can be recorded and evaluated synchronously in video real-time. VIRO 3D scanning systems have already been successfully implemented in various applications and will open up new perspectives in different other fields, ranging from industry, orthopaedic medicine, plastic surgery to art and photography.

  16. Edge features extraction from 3D laser point cloud based on corresponding images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-feng; Zhao, Zi-ming; Xu, Guo-qing; Geng, Yan-long

    2013-09-01

    An extraction method of edge features from 3D laser point cloud based on corresponding images was proposed. After the registration of point cloud and corresponding image, the sub-pixel edge can be extracted from the image using gray moment algorithm. Then project the sub-pixel edge to the point cloud in fitting scan-lines. At last the edge features were achieved by linking the crossing points. The experimental results demonstrate that the method guarantees accurate fine extraction.

  17. Sensor fusion of cameras and a laser for city-scale 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bok, Yunsu; Choi, Dong-Geol; Kweon, In So

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensorfor large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on afast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor,and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is doneby estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previousworks. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but estimates free motion(including absolute scale) in 3D space using both laser data and image features. In orderto avoid the degeneration associated with typical three-point algorithms, we present a newalgorithm that selects 3D points from two frames captured by multiple cameras. The problemof error accumulation is solved by loop closing, not by GPS. The experimental resultsshow that the estimated path is successfully overlaid on the satellite images, such that thereconstruction result is very accurate. PMID:25375758

  18. Sensor Fusion of Cameras and a Laser for City-Scale 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Yunsu; Choi, Dong-Geol; Kweon, In So

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensor for large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on a fast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor, and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is done by estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previous works. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but estimates free motion (including absolute scale) in 3D space using both laser data and image features. In order to avoid the degeneration associated with typical three-point algorithms, we present a new algorithm that selects 3D points from two frames captured by multiple cameras. The problem of error accumulation is solved by loop closing, not by GPS. The experimental results show that the estimated path is successfully overlaid on the satellite images, such that the reconstruction result is very accurate. PMID:25375758

  19. Simulated and Real Sheet-of-Light 3D Object Scanning Using a-Si:H Thin Film PSD Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Javier; Tornero, Josep; Ferreira, Isabel; Martins, Rodrigo; Gomes, Luis; Fortunato, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    A MATLAB/SIMULINK software simulation model (structure and component blocks) has been constructed in order to view and analyze the potential of the PSD (Position Sensitive Detector) array concept technology before it is further expanded or developed. This simulation allows changing most of its parameters, such as the number of elements in the PSD array, the direction of vision, the viewing/scanning angle, the object rotation, translation, sample/scan/simulation time, etc. In addition, results show for the first time the possibility of scanning an object in 3D when using an a-Si:H thin film 128 PSD array sensor and hardware/software system. Moreover, this sensor technology is able to perform these scans and render 3D objects at high speeds and high resolutions when using a sheet-of-light laser within a triangulation platform. As shown by the simulation, a substantial enhancement in 3D object profile image quality and realism can be achieved by increasing the number of elements of the PSD array sensor as well as by achieving an optimal position response from the sensor since clearly the definition of the 3D object profile depends on the correct and accurate position response of each detector as well as on the size of the PSD array. PMID:26633403

  20. Simulated and Real Sheet-of-Light 3D Object Scanning Using a-Si:H Thin Film PSD Arrays.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Tornero, Josep; Ferreira, Isabel; Martins, Rodrigo; Gomes, Luis; Fortunato, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    A MATLAB/SIMULINK software simulation model (structure and component blocks) has been constructed in order to view and analyze the potential of the PSD (Position Sensitive Detector) array concept technology before it is further expanded or developed. This simulation allows changing most of its parameters, such as the number of elements in the PSD array, the direction of vision, the viewing/scanning angle, the object rotation, translation, sample/scan/simulation time, etc. In addition, results show for the first time the possibility of scanning an object in 3D when using an a-Si:H thin film 128 PSD array sensor and hardware/software system. Moreover, this sensor technology is able to perform these scans and render 3D objects at high speeds and high resolutions when using a sheet-of-light laser within a triangulation platform. As shown by the simulation, a substantial enhancement in 3D object profile image quality and realism can be achieved by increasing the number of elements of the PSD array sensor as well as by achieving an optimal position response from the sensor since clearly the definition of the 3D object profile depends on the correct and accurate position response of each detector as well as on the size of the PSD array. PMID:26633403

  1. 3D nanotube-based composites produced by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ageeva, S A; Bobrinetskii, I I; Nevolin, Vladimir K; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Selishchev, S V; Simunin, M M; Konov, Vitalii I; Savranskii, V V; Ponomareva, O V

    2009-04-30

    3D nanocomposites have been fabricated through self-assembly under near-IR cw laser irradiation, using four types of multiwalled and single-walled carbon nanotubes produced by chemical vapour deposition, disproportionation on Fe clusters and cathode sputtering in an inert gas. The composites were prepared by laser irradiation of aqueous solutions of bovine serum albumin until the solvent was evaporated off and a homogeneous black material was obtained: modified albumin reinforced with nanotubes. The consistency of the composites ranged from paste-like to glass-like. Atomic force microscopy was used to study the surface morphology of the nanomaterials. The nanocomposites had a 3D quasi-periodic structure formed by almost spherical or toroidal particles 200-500 nm in diameter and 30-40 nm in visible height. Their inner, quasi-periodic structure was occasionally seen through surface microfractures. The density and hardness of the nanocomposites exceed those of microcrystalline albumin powder by 20% and by a factor of 3-5, respectively. (nanostructures)

  2. A real-time 3D scanning system for pavement rutting and pothole detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingguang; Yao, Ming; Yao, Xun; Yu, Wurong; Xu, Bugao

    2009-08-01

    Rutting and pothole are the common pavement distress problems that need to be timely inspected and repaired to ensure ride quality and safe traffic. This paper introduces a real-time, automated inspection system devoted for detecting these distress features using high-speed transverse scanning. The detection principle is based on the dynamic generation and characterization of 3D pavement profiles obtained from structured light measurements. The system implementation mainly involves three tasks: multi-view coplanar calibration, sub-pixel laser stripe location, and pavement distress recognition. The multi-view coplanar scheme was employed in the calibration procedure to increase the feature points and to make the points distributed across the field of view of the camera, which greatly improves the calibration precision. The laser stripe locating method was implemented in four steps: median filtering, coarse edge detection, fine edge adjusting, stripe curve mending and interpolation by cubic splines. The pavement distress recognition algorithms include line segment approximation of the profile, searching for the feature points, and parameters calculations. The parameter data of a curve segment between two feature points, such as width, depth and length, were used to differentiate rutting, pothole, and pothole under different constraints. The preliminary experiment results show that the system is capable of locating these pavement distresses, and meets the needs for real-time and accurate pavement inspection.

  3. Practical Considerations For A Design Of A High Precision 3-D Laser Scanner System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blais, Francois; Rioux, Marc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo

    1988-11-01

    The Laboratory for Intelligent Systems of the Division of Electrical Engineering of the National Research Council of Canada is intensively involved in the development of laser-based three-dimensional vision systems and their applications. Two basic systems have been invented. One, based on a double aperture mask in front of a CCD camera, has been developed for robotic applications and control. The other technique is based on an auto-synchronized scanning principle to provide accurate, fast, and reliable 3-D coordinates. Using the latter method, several prototypes have been developed for the acquisition of 3-D data of objects and for inspection. This paper will describe some practical considerations for the design and implementation of triangulation-based 3-D range sensors with emphasis on the latter triangulation technique. Some applications and results will be presented.

  4. Reconstruction of 3D tree stem models from low-cost terrestrial laser scanner data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbe, Dave; Romanczyk, Paul; van Aardt, Jan; Cawse-Nicholson, Kerry

    2013-05-01

    With the development of increasingly advanced airborne sensing systems, there is a growing need to support sensor system design, modeling, and product-algorithm development with explicit 3D structural ground truth commensurate to the scale of acquisition. Terrestrial laser scanning is one such technique which could provide this structural information. Commercial instrumentation to suit this purpose has existed for some time now, but cost can be a prohibitive barrier for some applications. As such we recently developed a unique laser scanning system from readily-available components, supporting low cost, highly portable, and rapid measurement of below-canopy 3D forest structure. Tools were developed to automatically reconstruct tree stem models as an initial step towards virtual forest scene generation. The objective of this paper is to assess the potential of this hardware/algorithm suite to reconstruct 3D stem information for a single scan of a New England hardwood forest site. Detailed tree stem structure (e.g., taper, sweep, and lean) is recovered for trees of varying diameter, species, and range from the sensor. Absolute stem diameter retrieval accuracy is 12.5%, with a 4.5% overestimation bias likely due to the LiDAR beam divergence.

  5. 3-D laser anemometer measurements in a labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Tatterson, G. B.; Johnson, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field inside a seven cavity labyrinth seal with a 0.00127 m clearance was measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Through the use of this system, the mean velocity vector and the entire Reynolds stress tensor distributions were measured for the first, third, fifth, and seventh cavities of the seal. There was one large recirculation region present in the cavity for the flow condition tested, Re = 28,000 and Ta = 7,000. The axial and radial mean velocities as well as all of the Reynolds stress term became cavity independent by the third cavity. The azimuthal mean velocity varied from cavity to cavity with its magnitude increasing as the flow progressed downstream.

  6. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  7. Multiplatform Mobile Laser Scanning: Usability and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Chen, Yuwei

    2012-01-01

    Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology capable of capturing three-dimensional data from surrounding objects. With state-of-the-art sensors, the achieved point clouds capture object details with good accuracy and precision. Many of the applications involve civil engineering in urban areas, as well as traffic and other urban planning, all of which serve to make 3D city modeling probably the fastest growing market segment in this field. This article outlines multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions such as vehicle- and trolley-operated urban area data acquisition, and boat-mounted equipment for fluvial environments. Moreover, we introduce a novel backpack version of mobile laser scanning equipment for surveying applications in the field of natural sciences where the requirements include precision and mobility in variable terrain conditions. In addition to presenting a technical description of the systems, we discuss the performance of the solutions in the light of various applications in the fields of urban mapping and modeling, fluvial geomorphology, snow-cover characterization, precision agriculture, and in monitoring the effects of climate change on permafrost landforms. The data performance of the mobile laser scanning approach is described by the results of an evaluation of the ROAMER on a permanent MLS test field. Furthermore, an in situ accuracy assessment using a field of spherical 3D targets for the newly-introduced Akhka backpack system is conducted and reported on.

  8. Post-processing of 3D-printed parts using femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Gehlich, Nils; Bonhoff, Tobias; Meiners, Wilhelm; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Biermann, Tim; Richardson, Martin C.

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, is a near-net shape manufacturing approach, delivering part geometry that can be considerably affected by various process conditions, heat-induced distortions, solidified melt droplets, partially fused powders, and surface modifications induced by the manufacturing tool motion and processing strategy. High-repetition rate femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. Different laser scanning approaches were utilized to increase the ablation efficiency and to reduce the surface roughness while preserving the initial part geometry. We studied post-processing of 3D-shaped parts made of Nickel- and Titanium-base alloys by utilizing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) as additive manufacturing techniques. Process parameters such as the pulse energy, the number of layers and their spatial separation were varied. Surface processing in several layers was necessary to remove the excessive material, such as individual powder particles, and to reduce the average surface roughness from asdeposited 22-45 μm to a few microns. Due to the ultrafast laser-processing regime and the small heat-affected zone induced in materials, this novel integrated manufacturing approach can be used to post-process parts made of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials, and to attain complex designed shapes with micrometer precision.

  9. Vessel segmentation in 3D spectral OCT scans of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; van Ginneken, Bram; Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2008-03-01

    The latest generation of spectral optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanners is able to image 3D cross-sectional volumes of the retina at a high resolution and high speed. These scans offer a detailed view of the structure of the retina. Automated segmentation of the vessels in these volumes may lead to more objective diagnosis of retinal vascular disease including hypertensive retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity. Additionally, vessel segmentation can allow color fundus images to be registered to these 3D volumes, possibly leading to a better understanding of the structure and localization of retinal structures and lesions. In this paper we present a method for automatically segmenting the vessels in a 3D OCT volume. First, the retina is automatically segmented into multiple layers, using simultaneous segmentation of their boundary surfaces in 3D. Next, a 2D projection of the vessels is produced by only using information from certain segmented layers. Finally, a supervised, pixel classification based vessel segmentation approach is applied to the projection image. We compared the influence of two methods for the projection on the performance of the vessel segmentation on 10 optic nerve head centered 3D OCT scans. The method was trained on 5 independent scans. Using ROC analysis, our proposed vessel segmentation system obtains an area under the curve of 0.970 when compared with the segmentation of a human observer.

  10. Femtosecond pulsed light polarization induced effects in direct laser writing 3D nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Jonavičius, Tomas; Gailevičius, Darius; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Gamaly, Eugene; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how the coupling between (i) polarization of the writing laser beam, (ii) tight focusing and (iii) heat conduction affects the size, shape and absorption in the laser-affected area and therefore the polymerization process. It is possible to control the sizes of 3D laser-produced structure at the scale of several nanometers. Specifically we were able to tune the aspect ratio of 3D suspended line up to 20% in hybrid SZ2080 resist. The focal spot of tightly focused linearly polarized beam has an elliptical form with the long axis in the field direction. It is shown here that this effect is enhanced by increase in the electronic heat conduction when polarization coincide with temperature gradient along with the absorption. Overlapping of three effects (i- iii) results in the difference of several tens of nanometers between two axes of the focal ellipse. Narrow line appears when polarization and scan direction coincide, while the wide line is produced when these directions are perpendicular to each other. The effect scales with the laser intensity giving a possibility to control the width of the structure on nanometer scale as demonstrated experimentally in this work. These effects are of general nature and can be observed in any laser-matter interaction experiments where plasma produced by using tight focusing of linear-polarized light.

  11. Automatic change detection using mobile laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebel, M.; Hammer, M.; Gordon, M.; Arens, M.

    2014-10-01

    Automatic change detection in 3D environments requires the comparison of multi-temporal data. By comparing current data with past data of the same area, changes can be automatically detected and identified. Volumetric changes in the scene hint at suspicious activities like the movement of military vehicles, the application of camouflage nets, or the placement of IEDs, etc. In contrast to broad research activities in remote sensing with optical cameras, this paper addresses the topic using 3D data acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS). We present a framework for immediate comparison of current MLS data to given 3D reference data. Our method extends the concept of occupancy grids known from robot mapping, which incorporates the sensor positions in the processing of the 3D point clouds. This allows extracting the information that is included in the data acquisition geometry. For each single range measurement, it becomes apparent that an object reflects laser pulses in the measured range distance, i.e., space is occupied at that 3D position. In addition, it is obvious that space is empty along the line of sight between sensor and the reflecting object. Everywhere else, the occupancy of space remains unknown. This approach handles occlusions and changes implicitly, such that the latter are identifiable by conflicts of empty space and occupied space. The presented concept of change detection has been successfully validated in experiments with recorded MLS data streams. Results are shown for test sites at which MLS data were acquired at different time intervals.

  12. Quality control loop for 3D laser beam cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitznagel, Juergen

    1996-08-01

    Existing systems for computer integrated manufacturing are based on the principle of the process chain: The product runs through different production sections as design, work planning and manufacturing in a sequential order. The data generated by a production sequence are transferred via interface to the following production sequence. These tightly-packed production sequences leave little scope for responding to quality deviations. This deficit is highlighted particularly in 3D laser cutting processes. In order to achieve an optimum machining result, a series of preliminary tests is required. Quality control loops play an important role in restricting the scope of necessary testing to a minimum. The represented control loop contains a CAD- system to design the workpiece, an offline-programming system to develop working strategies and NC/RC-programs as well as a shop-floor oriented tool to record quality data of the workpiece. The systems are coupled by an integrated product model. The control loop feeds quality data back to Operations Planning in the form of rules for processing strategies and technological data, so that the quality of the production process is enhanced. It is intended to supply optimum process parameters, so that the number of preliminary tests can be reduced. On the other hand the control loop contributes quality enhancement measures which serve as rules for the designers.

  13. Recent development of 3D imaging laser sensor in Mitsubishi Electric Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaki, M.; Kotake, N.; Tsuji, H.; Hirai, A.; Kameyama, S.

    2013-09-01

    We have been developing 3-D imaging laser sensors for several years, because they can acquire the additional information of the scene, i.e. the range data. It enhances the potential to detect unwanted people and objects, the sensors can be utilized for applications such as safety control and security surveillance, and so forth. In this paper, we focus on two types of our sensors, which are high-frame-rate type and compact-type. To realize the high-frame-rate type system, we have developed two key devices: the linear array receiver which has 256 single InAlAs-APD detectors and the read-out IC (ROIC) array which is fabricated in SiGe-BiCMOS process, and they are connected electrically to each other. Each ROIC measures not only the intensity, but also the distance to the scene by high-speed analog signal processing. In addition, by scanning the mirror mechanically in perpendicular direction to the linear image receiver, we have realized the high speed operation, in which the frame rate is over 30 Hz and the number of pixels is 256 x 256. In the compact-type 3-D imaging laser sensor development, we have succeeded in downsizing the transmitter by scanning only the laser beam with a two-dimensional MEMS scanner. To obtain wide fieldof- view image, as well as the angle of the MEMS scanner, the receiving optical system and the large area receiver are needed. We have developed the large detecting area receiver that consists of 32 rectangular detectors, where the output signals of each detector are summed up. In this phase, our original circuit evaluates each signal level, removes the low-level signals, and sums them, in order to improve the signalto- noise ratio. In the following paper, we describe the system configurations and the recent experimental results of the two types of our 3-D imaging laser sensors.

  14. Finding the displacement of wood structure in heritage building by 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. C.; Tsai, Y. L.; Wang, R. Z.; Lin, M. L.

    2015-08-01

    Heritage buildings are highly prone to long term damage from the microclimate, scourge and vandalism, which can result in damaged materials, structures, painting and cultural heritage items. This study will focus on finding the displacement of wood structural members through the use of a 3D laser scanner and the 4D concept of time. The results will compare the scans from different periods to find the difference (if any) in the structural member position. Wood structures usually consist of numerous wood members connected to form the structure. However, these members can be damaged in various ways such as physical mechanisms, chemical reactions, and biological corrosion. When damage to the wood structure occurs, the structural displacement can be affected, and if affected severely, can lead to a building collapse. Monitoring of the structural displacement is the best way to discover damage immediately and to preserve the heritage building. However, the Cultural Heritage Preservation Law in Taiwan prohibits the installation of monitoring instruments (e.g strain gauge, accelerometer) in historic structures (heritage buildings). Scanning the wood structure with 3D lasers is the most non-intrusive method and quickly achieves displacement through visualization. The displacement scan results can be compared with different periods and different members to analyze the severity of damage. Once the 3D scanner is installed, the whole building is scanned, and point clouds created to build the visual building model. The structural displacement can be checked via the building model and the differences are measured between each member to find the high risk damaged areas or members with large displacement. Early detection of structural damage is the most effective way means of preservation.

  15. Hyperchromatic laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárnok, Attila; Mittag, Anja

    2007-02-01

    In the emerging fields of high-content and high-throughput single cell analysis for Systems Biology and Cytomics multi- and polychromatic analysis of biological specimens has become increasingly important. Combining different technologies and staining methods polychromatic analysis (i.e. using 8 or more fluorescent colors at a time) can be pushed forward to measure anything stainable in a cell, an approach termed hyperchromatic cytometry. For cytometric cell analysis microscope based Slide Based Cytometry (SBC) technologies are ideal as, unlike flow cytometry, they are non-consumptive, i.e. the analyzed sample is fixed on the slide. Based on the feature of relocation identical cells can be subsequently reanalyzed. In this manner data on the single cell level after manipulation steps can be collected. In this overview various components for hyperchromatic cytometry are demonstrated for a SBC instrument, the Laser Scanning Cytometer (Compucyte Corp., Cambridge, MA): 1) polychromatic cytometry, 2) iterative restaining (using the same fluorochrome for restaining and subsequent reanalysis), 3) differential photobleaching (differentiating fluorochromes by their different photostability), 4) photoactivation (activating fluorescent nanoparticles or photocaged dyes), and 5) photodestruction (destruction of FRET dyes). With the intelligent combination of several of these techniques hyperchromatic cytometry allows to quantify and analyze virtually all components of relevance on the identical cell. The combination of high-throughput and high-content SBC analysis with high-resolution confocal imaging allows clear verification of phenotypically distinct subpopulations of cells with structural information. The information gained per specimen is only limited by the number of available antibodies and by sterical hindrance.

  16. A novel high accuracy 3D scanning device for rock-art sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höll, T.; Holler, G.; Pinz, A.

    2014-06-01

    We are currently developing a novel 3D scanning device for rock-art. Within the European project 3D-Pitoti, this scanner shall be used to acquire 3D structure and radiometric surface properties of ancient rock-art sites in Valcamonica. Overall design goals include high spatial accuracy and precision, as well as radiometric quality beyond phototexture. This paper is devoted to the geometric measurement principle of the new scanner. We present a novel scanning scheme based on various constraints to Structure from Motion, that guarantees high accuracy of the resulting scans by combining tachymeter-based tracking of the scanner, stereo, and structure-from-motion. This method provides scale information (by calibrated stereo), and does not require ground control points, because outside-in tracking avoids the typical issues of drift in structure-from-motion. The system is designed for flexibility, high throughput, approx. 0.1 mm precision, and an overall accuracy of the reconstructed 3D structure that conforms with the specifications of the tachymeter.

  17. Mapping gray-scale image to 3D surface scanning data by ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Jones, Peter R. M.

    1997-03-01

    The extraction and location of feature points from range imaging is an important but difficult task in machine vision based measurement systems. There exist some feature points which are not able to be detected from pure geometric characteristics, particularly in those measurement tasks related to the human body. The Loughborough Anthropometric Shadow Scanner (LASS) is a whole body surface scanner based on structured light technique. Certain applications of LASS require accurate location of anthropometric landmarks from the scanned data. This is sometimes impossible from existing raw data because some landmarks do not appear in the scanned data. Identification of these landmarks has to resort to surface texture of the scanned object. Modifications to LASS were made to allow gray-scale images to be captured before or after the object was scanned. Two-dimensional gray-scale image must be mapped to the scanned data to acquire the 3D coordinates of a landmark. The method to map 2D images to the scanned data is based on the colinearity conditions and ray-tracing method. If the camera center and image coordinates are known, the corresponding object point must lie on a ray starting from the camera center and connecting to the image coordinate. By intersecting the ray with the scanned surface of the object, the 3D coordinates of a point can be solved. Experimentation has demonstrated the feasibility of the method.

  18. Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at Azores: Preliminary 3D Cloud Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kollias, P.; Johnson, K.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Giangrande, S.; Widener, K.; Bharadwaj, N.; Mead, J.

    2010-03-15

    The deployment of the Scanning W-Band ARM Cloud Radar (SWACR) during the AMF campaign at Azores signals the first deployment of an ARM Facility-owned scanning cloud radar and offers a prelude for the type of 3D cloud observations that ARM will have the capability to provide at all the ARM Climate Research Facility sites by the end of 2010. The primary objective of the deployment of Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACRs) at the ARM Facility sites is to map continuously (operationally) the 3D structure of clouds and shallow precipitation and to provide 3D microphysical and dynamical retrievals for cloud life cycle and cloud-scale process studies. This is a challenging task, never attempted before, and requires significant research and development efforts in order to understand the radar's capabilities and limitations. At the same time, we need to look beyond the radar meteorology aspects of the challenge and ensure that the hardware and software capabilities of the new systems are utilized for the development of 3D data products that address the scientific needs of the new Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program. The SWACR observations at Azores provide a first look at such observations and the challenges associated with their analysis and interpretation. The set of scan strategies applied during the SWACR deployment and their merit is discussed. The scan strategies were adjusted for the detection of marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus that were frequently observed at the Azores deployment. Quality control procedures for the radar reflectivity and Doppler products are presented. Finally, preliminary 3D-Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Locations (3D-ARSCL) products on a regular grid will be presented, and the challenges associated with their development discussed. In addition to data from the Azores deployment, limited data from the follow-up deployment of the SWACR at the ARM SGP site will be presented. This effort provides a blueprint for the effort required for the

  19. Development of an algorithm to measure defect geometry using a 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilambi, S.; Tipton, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    Current fatigue life prediction models for coiled tubing (CT) require accurate measurements of the defect geometry. Three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging has shown promise toward becoming a nondestructive, non-contacting method of surface defect characterization. Laser imaging provides a detailed photographic image of a flaw, in addition to a detailed 3D surface map from which its critical dimensions can be measured. This paper describes algorithms to determine defect characteristics, specifically depth, width, length and projected cross-sectional area. Curve-fitting methods were compared and implicit algebraic fits have higher probability of convergence compared to explicit geometric fits. Among the algebraic fits, the Taubin circle fit has the least error. The algorithm was able to extract the dimensions of the flaw geometry from the scanned data of CT to within a tolerance of about 0.127 mm, close to the tolerance specified for the laser scanner itself, compared to measurements made using traveling microscopes. The algorithm computes the projected surface area of the flaw, which could previously only be estimated from the dimension measurements and the assumptions made about cutter shape. Although shadows compromised the accuracy of the shape characterization, especially for deep and narrow flaws, the results indicate that the algorithm with laser scanner can be used for non-destructive evaluation of CT in the oil field industry. Further work is needed to improve accuracy, to eliminate shadow effects and to reduce radial deviation.

  20. Effect of random coincidences for quantitative cardiac PET studies using 3D oxygen-15 water scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchareb, Y.; Thielemans, K.; Spinks, T.; Rimoldi, O.; Camici, P. G.

    2006-03-01

    The effect of random coincidences estimation methods on the quantitative accuracy of iterative and analytic reconstruction methods to determine myocardial blood flow (MBF) in PET studies using H II 15O has been investigated. Dynamic scans were acquired on the EXACT3D PET scanner on pigs after H II 15O injection (resting and dipyridamoleinduced stress). Radioactive microspheres (MS) were used to provide a "gold standard" of MBF values. The online subtraction (OS) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods for estimating randoms were combined with (i) 3D-RP, (ii) FORE + attenuation-weighted OSEM, (iii) FORE-FBP and (iv) 3D-OSEM. Factor images were generated and resliced to short axis images; 16 ROIs were defined in the left myocardium and 2 ROIs in the left and right cavities. ROIs were projected onto the dynamic images to extract time-activity-curves, which were then fitted to a single compartment model to estimate absolute MBF. Microsphere measurements were obtained in a similar way and 64 pairs of measurements were made. The ML method improved the SNR of 3D-RP, FORE-FBP, FORE-OSEM, and 3D-OSEM by 8%, 8%, 7% and 3% respectively. Compared to the OS method, the ML method improved the accuracy of coronary flow reserve values of 3DOSEM, 3D-RP, FORE-OSEM and FORE-FBP by 9%, 7%, 1% and 3% respectively. Regression analysis provided better correlation with 3D-OSEM and FORE-OSEM when combined with the ML method. We conclude that the ML method for estimating randoms combined with 3D-OSEM and FORE-OSEM delivers the best performance for absolute quantification of MBF using H II 15O when compared with microsphere measurements.

  1. Boresight alignment method for mobile laser scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, P.; Studnicka, N.; Pfennigbauer, M.; Zach, G.

    2010-06-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is the latest approach towards fast and cost-efficient acquisition of 3-dimensional spatial data. Accurately evaluating the boresight alignment in MLS systems is an obvious necessity. However, recent systems available on the market may lack of suitable and efficient practical workflows on how to perform this calibration. This paper discusses an innovative method for accurately determining the boresight alignment of MLS systems by employing 3D laser scanners. Scanning objects using a 3D laser scanner operating in a 2D line-scan mode from various different runs and scan directions provides valuable scan data for determining the angular alignment between inertial measurement unit and laser scanner. Field data is presented demonstrating the final accuracy of the calibration and the high quality of the point cloud acquired during an MLS campaign.

  2. 3D imaging of the early embryonic chicken heart with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Monique Y.; Gahan, Curran G.; López, Claudia S.; Thornburg, Kent L.; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Early embryonic heart development is a period of dynamic growth and remodeling, with rapid changes occurring at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. A detailed understanding of the events that establish the components of the heart wall has been hampered by a lack of methodologies for three dimensional (3D), high-resolution imaging. Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a novel technology for imaging 3D tissue volumes at the subcellular level. FIB-SEM alternates between imaging the block face with a scanning electron beam and milling away thin sections of tissue with a focused ion beam, allowing for collection and analysis of 3D data. FIB-SEM was used to image the three layers of the day 4 chicken embryo heart: myocardium, cardiac jelly, and endocardium. Individual images obtained with FIB-SEM were comparable in quality and resolution to those obtained with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Up to 1100 serial images were obtained in 4 nm increments at 4.88 nm resolution, and image stacks were aligned to create volumes 800–1500 μm3 in size. Segmentation of organelles revealed their organization and distinct volume fractions between cardiac wall layers. We conclude that FIB-SEM is a powerful modality for 3D subcellular imaging of the embryonic heart wall. PMID:24742339

  3. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarrubia, J. S.; Tondare, V. N.; Vladár, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples—mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  4. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  5. 3D laser gated viewing from a moving submarine platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christnacher, F.; Laurenzis, M.; Monnin, D.; Schmitt, G.; Metzger, Nicolas; Schertzer, Stéphane; Scholtz, T.

    2014-10-01

    Range-gated active imaging is a prominent technique for night vision, remote sensing or vision through obstacles (fog, smoke, camouflage netting…). Furthermore, range-gated imaging not only informs on the scene reflectance but also on the range for each pixel. In this paper, we discuss 3D imaging methods for underwater imaging applications. In this situation, it is particularly difficult to stabilize the imaging platform and these 3D reconstruction algorithms suffer from the motion between the different images in the recorded sequence. To overcome this drawback, we investigated a new method based on a combination between image registration by homography and 3D scene reconstruction through tomography or two-image technique. After stabilisation, the 3D reconstruction is achieved by using the two upper-mentioned techniques. In the different experimental examples given in this paper, a centimetric resolution could be achieved.

  6. Simultaneous 3D-vibration measurement using a single laser beam device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Guralnik, Alexander; Baümler, Stephan

    2012-06-01

    Today's commercial solutions for vibration measurement and modal analysis are 3D-scanning laser doppler vibrometers, mainly used for open surfaces in the automotive and aerospace industries and the classic three-axial accelerometers in civil engineering, for most industrial applications in manufacturing environments, and particularly for partially closed structures. This paper presents a novel measurement approach using a single laser beam device and optical reflectors to simultaneously perform 3D-dynamic measurement as well as geometry measurement of the investigated object. We show the application of this so called laser tracker for modal testing of structures on a mechanical manufacturing shop floor. A holistic measurement method is developed containing manual reflector placement, semi-automated geometric modeling of investigated objects and fully automated vibration measurement up to 1000 Hz and down to few microns amplitude. Additionally the fast set up dynamic measurement of moving objects using a tracking technique is presented that only uses the device's own functionalities and does neither require a predefined moving path of the target nor an electronic synchronization to the moving object.

  7. Compact 3D lidar based on optically coupled horizontal and vertical scanning mechanism for the autonomous navigation of robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Gu; Baeg, Seung-Ho; Lee, Ki-Min; Lee, Hae-Seok; Baeg, Moon-Hong; Park, Jong-Ok; Kim, Hong-Ki

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new 3D LIDAR sensor, named KIDAR-B25, for measuring 3D image information with high range accuracy, high speed and compact size. To measure a distance to the target object, we developed a range measurement unit, which is implemented by the direct Time-Of-Flight (TOF) method using TDC chip, a pulsed laser transmitter as an illumination source (pulse width: 10 ns, wavelength: 905 nm, repetition rate: 30kHz, peak power: 20W), and an Si APD receiver, which has high sensitivity and wide bandwidth. Also, we devised a horizontal and vertical scanning mechanism, climbing in a spiral and coupled with the laser optical path. Besides, control electronics such as the motor controller, the signal processing unit, the power distributor and so on, are developed and integrated in a compact assembly. The key point of the 3D LIDAR design proposed in this paper is to use the compact scanning mechanism, which is coupled with optical module horizontally and vertically. This KIDAR-B25 has the same beam propagation axis for emitting pulse laser and receiving reflected one with no optical interference each other. The scanning performance of the KIDAR-B25 has proven with the stable operation up to 20Hz (vertical), 40Hz (horizontal) and the time is about 1.7s to reach the maximum speed. The range of vertical plane can be available up to +/-10 degree FOV (Field Of View) with a 0.25 degree angular resolution. The whole horizontal plane (360 degree) can be also available with 0.125 degree angular resolution. Since the KIDAR-B25 sensor has been planned and developed to be used in mobile robots for navigation, we conducted an outdoor test for evaluating its performance. The experimental results show that the captured 3D imaging data can be usefully applicable to the navigation of the robot for detecting and avoiding the moving objects with real time.

  8. Laser microbeam CT scanning of dosimetry gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryanski, Marek J.; Ranade, Manisha K.

    2001-06-01

    A novel design of an optical tomographic scanner is described that can be used for 3D mapping of optical attenuation coefficient within translucent cylindrical objects with spatial resolution on the order of 100 microns. Our scanner design utilizes the cylindrical geometry of the imaged object to obtain the desired paths of the scanning light rays. A rotating mirror and a photodetector are placed at two opposite foci of the translucent cylinder that acts as a cylindrical lens. A He-Ne laser beam passes first through a focusing lens and then is reflected by the rotating mirror, so as to scan the interior of the cylinder with focused and parallel paraxial rays that are subsequently collected by the photodetector to produce the projection data, as the cylinder rotates in small angle increments between projections. Filtered backprojection is then used to reconstruct planar distributions of optical attenuation coefficient in the cylinder. Multiplanar scans are used to obtain a complete 3D tomographic reconstruction. Among other applications, the scanner can be used in radiation therapy dosimetry and quality assurance for mapping 3D radiation dose distributions in various types of tissue-equivalent gel phantoms that change their optical attenuation coefficients in proportion to the absorbed radiation dose.

  9. Laser cutting of irregular shape object based on stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Tang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Xuping

    2015-05-01

    Irregular shape objects with different 3-dimensional (3D) appearances are difficult to be shaped into customized uniform pattern by current laser machining approaches. A laser galvanometric scanning system (LGS) could be a potential candidate since it can easily achieve path-adjustable laser shaping. However, without knowing the actual 3D topography of the object, the processing result may still suffer from 3D shape distortion. It is desirable to have a versatile auxiliary tool that is capable of generating 3D-adjusted laser processing path by measuring the 3D geometry of those irregular shape objects. This paper proposed the stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system (SLGS), which takes the advantages of both the stereo vision solution and conventional LGS system. The 3D geometry of the object obtained by the stereo cameras is used to guide the scanning galvanometers for 3D-shape-adjusted laser processing. In order to achieve precise visual-servoed laser fabrication, these two independent components are integrated through a system calibration method using plastic thin film target. The flexibility of SLGS has been experimentally demonstrated by cutting duck feathers for badminton shuttle manufacture.

  10. Software for visualization, analysis, and manipulation of laser scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnsides, Dennis B.

    1997-03-01

    The recent introduction of laser surface scanning to scientific applications presents a challenge to computer scientists and engineers. Full utilization of this two- dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) data requires advances in techniques and methods for data processing and visualization. This paper explores the development of software to support the visualization, analysis and manipulation of laser scan images. Specific examples presented are from on-going efforts at the Air Force Computerized Anthropometric Research and Design (CARD) Laboratory.

  11. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. PMID:26855205

  12. ARCHAEO-SCAN: Portable 3D shape measurement system for archaeological field work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, George K.; Nelson, Andrew J.

    2004-10-01

    Accurate measurement and thorough documentation of excavated artifacts are the essential tasks of archaeological fieldwork. The on-site recording and long-term preservation of fragile evidence can be improved using 3D spatial data acquisition and computer-aided modeling technologies. Once the artifact is digitized and geometry created in a virtual environment, the scientist can manipulate the pieces in a virtual reality environment to develop a "realistic" reconstruction of the object without physically handling or gluing the fragments. The ARCHAEO-SCAN system is a flexible, affordable 3D coordinate data acquisition and geometric modeling system for acquiring surface and shape information of small to medium sized artifacts and bone fragments. The shape measurement system is being developed to enable the field archaeologist to manually sweep the non-contact sensor head across the relic or artifact surface. A series of unique data acquisition, processing, registration and surface reconstruction algorithms are then used to integrate 3D coordinate information from multiple views into a single reference frame. A novel technique for automatically creating a hexahedral mesh of the recovered fragments is presented. The 3D model acquisition system is designed to operate from a standard laptop with minimal additional hardware and proprietary software support. The captured shape data can be pre-processed and displayed on site, stored digitally on a CD, or transmitted via the Internet to the researcher's home institution.

  13. Implementation of 3D prostrate ring-scanning mechanism for NIR diffuse optical imaging phantom validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jhao-Ming; Chen, Liang-Yu; Pan, Min-Cheng; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Pan, Min-Chun

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) providing functional information of tissues has drawn great attention for the last two decades. Near infrared (NIR) DOI systems composed of scanning bench, opt-electrical measurement module, system control, and data processing and image reconstruction schemes are developed for the screening and diagnosis of breast tumors. Mostly, the scanning bench belonging to fixed source-and-detector configuration limits computed image resolution to an extent. To cope with the issue, we propose, design and implement a 3D prostrate ring-scanning equipment for NIR DOI with flexible combinations of illumination and detection, and with the function of radial, circular and vertical movement without hard compression of breast tissue like the imaging system using or incorporating with X-ray mammographic bench. Especially, a rotation-sliding-and-moving mechanism was designed for the guidance of source- and detection-channel movement. Following the previous justification for synthesized image reconstruction, in the paper the validation using varied phantoms is further conducted and 3D image reconstruction for their absorption and scattering coefficients is illustrated through the computation of our in-house coded schemes. The source and detection NIR data are acquired to reconstruct the 3D images through the operation of scanning bench in the movement of vertical, radial and circular directions. Rather than the fixed configuration, the addressed screening/diagnosing equipment has the flexibility for optical-channel expansion with a compromise among construction cost, operation time, and spatial resolution of reconstructed μa and μs' images.

  14. A Tool-Free Calibration Method for Turntable-Based 3D Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xufang; Lau, Rynson W H; Song, Zhan; Li, Yangyan; He, Shengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Turntable-based 3D scanners are popular but require calibration of the turntable axis. Existing methods for turntable calibration typically make use of specially designed tools, such as a chessboard or criterion sphere, which users must manually install and dismount. In this article, the authors propose an automatic method to calibrate the turntable axis without any calibration tools. Given a scan sequence of the input object, they first recover the initial rotation axis from an automatic registration step. Then they apply an iterative procedure to obtain the optimized turntable axis. This iterative procedure alternates between two steps: refining the initial pose of the input scans and approximating the rotation matrix. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on a structured light-based scanning system. PMID:25137724

  15. Mesoscale 3D manufacturing: varying focusing conditions for efficient direct laser writing of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonušauskas, Linas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for efficient fabrication of mesoscale polymer 3D microstructures. It is implemented by direct laser writing varying exposure beam focusing conditions. By carefully optimizing the fabrication parameters (laser intensity, scanning velocity/exposure time, changing objective lens) complex 3D geometries of the microstructures can be obtained rapidly. Additionally, we demonstrate this without the use of the photoinitiator as photosensitizer doped in the pre-polymer material (SZ2080). At femtosecond pulsed irradiation ~TW/cm² intensities the localized free radical polymerization is achieved via avalanche induced bond braking. Such microstructures have unique biocompatibility and optical transparency as well as optical damage threshold value. By creating the bulk part of the structure using low-NA (0.45) objective and subsequently fabricating the fine features using oil immersion high-NA (1.4) objective the manufacturing time is reduced dramatically (30x is demonstrated). Using this two objective method a prototype of functional microdevice was produced: 80 and 85 µm diameter microfluidic tubes with the fine filter consisting of 4 µm period grating structure that has 400 nm wide threads, which corresponds to a feature precision aspect ratio of ~200. Therefore, such method has great potential as a polymer fabrication tool for mesoscale optical, photonic and biomedical applications as well as highly integrated 3D µ-systems. Furthermore, the proposed approach is not limited to lithography and can be implemented in a more general type of laser writing, such as inscription within transparent materials or substractive manufacturing by ablation.

  16. 3D shape measurement for moving scenes using an interlaced scanning colour camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Senpeng; Cao, Yiping; Lu, Mingteng; Zhang, Qican

    2014-12-01

    A Fourier transform deinterlacing algorithm (FTDA) is proposed to eliminate the blurring and dislocation of the fringe patterns on a moving object captured by an interlaced scanning colour camera in phase measuring profilometry (PMP). Every frame greyscale fringe from three colour channels of every colour fringe is divided into even and odd field fringes respectively, each of which is respectively processed by FTDA. All of the six frames deinterlaced fringes from one colour fringe form two sets of three-step phase-shifted greyscale fringes, with which two 3D shapes corresponding to two different moments are reconstructed by PMP within a frame period. The deinterlaced fringe is identical with the exact frame fringe at the same moment theoretically. The simulation and experiments show its feasibility and validity. The method doubles the time resolution, maintains the precision of the traditional phase measurement profilometry, and has potential applications in the moving and online object’s 3D shape measurements.

  17. Analysis of method of 3D shape reconstruction using scanning deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Jiří; Novák, Pavel; Mikš, Antonín.

    2013-04-01

    This work presents a scanning deflectometric approach to solving a 3D surface reconstruction problem, which is based on measurements of a surface gradient of optically smooth surfaces. It is shown that a description of this problem leads to a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) of the first order, from which the surface shape can be reconstructed numerically. The method for effective finding of the solution of this differential equation is proposed, which is based on the transform of the problem of PDE solving to the optimization problem. We describe different types of surface description for the shape reconstruction and a numerical simulation of the presented method is performed. The reconstruction process is analyzed by computer simulations and presented on examples. The performed analysis confirms a robustness of the reconstruction method and a good possibility for measurements and reconstruction of the 3D shape of specular surfaces.

  18. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  19. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  20. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  1. Diagnostic Capability of Peripapillary Retinal Thickness in Glaucoma Using 3D Volume Scans

    PubMed Central

    Simavli, Huseyin; Que, Christian John; Akduman, Mustafa; Rizzo, Jennifer L.; Tsikata, Edem; de Boer, Johannes F.; Chen, Teresa C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the diagnostic capability of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) peripapillary retinal thickness (RT) measurements from 3-dimensional (3D) volume scans for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Design Cross-sectional study. Methods Setting Institutional Study population 156 patients (89 POAG and 67 normal subjects) Observation procedures One eye of each subject was included. SD-OCT peripapillary RT values from 3D volume scans were calculated for four quadrants of three different sized annuli. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness values were also determined. Main outcome measures Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Results The top five RT AUROCs for all glaucoma patients and for a subset of early glaucoma patients were for the inferior quadrant of outer circumpapillary annulus of circular grid (OCA) 1 (0.959, 0.939), inferior quadrant of OCA2 (0.945, 0.921), superior quadrant of OCA1 (0.890, 0.811), inferior quadrant of OCA3 (0.887, 0.854), and superior quadrant of OCA2 (0.879, 0.807). Smaller RT annuli OCA1 and OCA2 consistently showed better diagnostic performance than the larger RT annulus OCA3. For both RNFL and RT measurements, best AUROC values were found for inferior RT OCA1 and OCA2, followed by inferior and overall RNFL thickness. Conclusion Peripapillary RT measurements from 3D volume scans showed excellent diagnostic performance for detecting both glaucoma and early glaucoma patients. Peripapillary RT values have the same or better diagnostic capability compared to peripapillary RNFL thickness measurements, while also having fewer algorithm errors. PMID:25498354

  2. 3D scanning electron microscopy applied to surface characterization of fluorosed dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Limandri, Silvina; Galván Josa, Víctor; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Chena, María Emilia; Castellano, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    The enamel surfaces of fluorotic teeth were studied by scanning electron stereomicroscopy. Different whitening treatments were applied to 25 pieces to remove stains caused by fluorosis and their surfaces were characterized by stereomicroscopy in order to obtain functional and amplitude parameters. The topographic features resulting for each treatment were determined through these parameters. The results obtained show that the 3D reconstruction achieved from the SEM stereo pairs is a valuable potential alternative for the surface characterization of this kind of samples. PMID:26930005

  3. Physics-based Simulation of Human Posture Using 3D Whole Body Scanning Technology for Astronaut Space Suit Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years high precision three-dimensional (3D) full body laser scanners have been developed to be used as a powerful anthropometry tool for quantification of the morphology of the human body. The full body scanner can quickly extract body characteristics in non-contact fashion. It is required for the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) to have capabilities for kinematics simulation of a digital human at various postures whereas the laser scanner only allows capturing a single static posture at each time. During this summer fellowship period a theoretical study has been conducted to estimate an arbitrary posture with a series of example postures through finite element (FE) approximation and found that four-point isoparametric FE approximation would result in reasonable maximum position errors less than 5%. Subsequent pilot scan experiments demonstrated that a bead marker with a nominal size of 6 mm could be used as a marker for digitizing 3-D coordinates of anatomical landmarks for further kinematic analysis. Two sessions of human subject testing were conducted for reconstruction of an arbitrary postures from a set of example postures for each joint motion for the forearm/hand complex and the whole upper extremity.

  4. 3-D micro surface profilometry employing novel Mirau-based lateral scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chia; Le, Manh-Trung; Lin, Yi-Shiuan

    2014-09-01

    An innovative 3-D surface imaging methodology for reconstructing micro surface profiles with a long depth measuring range and a nano-scale resolution was developed using the newly developed Mirau-based lateral scanning interferometry (LSI). The current measuring field of view (FOV) of conventional white light interferometers is limited by microscopic views of the existing interferometric objectives, such as those in Michelson, Mirau or Linnik designs. Moreover, the vertical scanning operation required for acquiring volumetric interferometric data is extremely time-consuming and makes white light vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) infeasible for automatic optical inspection (AOI) of micro 3-D structures. To resolve this, a newly developed white light LSI method based on Mirau’s optical configuration was developed by controlling the tilting angle of the reference mirror in the Mirau interferometric objective. With the proposed optical configuration, the surface is inspected at a tilting angle with respect to the maximum coherence plane of the interferometric system along its lateral scanning direction when the objective lies perpendicular to the tested surface. In addition, a system calibration method was developed to establish an accurate mathematical mapping model between the object depth and the lateral axis. To evaluate the feasibility of the methodology, a calibrated step height was measured for evaluating the accuracy and repeatability. Some industrial samples, such as photon spacers and other microstructures fabricated by nano-imprinting processes, were measured to verify the actual performance on real components. It was found that the measurement repeatability was controlled less than 60 nm within one standard deviation for a maximum measurable depth of 27.21 µm.

  5. Comparison of 3D representations depicting micro folds: overlapping imagery vs. time-of-flight laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaiopoulos, Aristidis D.; Georgopoulos, Andreas; Lozios, Stylianos G.

    2012-10-01

    A relatively new field of interest, which continuously gains grounds nowadays, is digital 3D modeling. However, the methodologies, the accuracy and the time and effort required to produce a high quality 3D model have been changing drastically the last few years. Whereas in the early days of digital 3D modeling, 3D models were only accessible to computer experts in animation, working many hours in expensive sophisticated software, today 3D modeling has become reasonably fast and convenient. On top of that, with online 3D modeling software, such as 123D Catch, nearly everyone can produce 3D models with minimum effort and at no cost. The only requirement is panoramic overlapping images, of the (still) objects the user wishes to model. This approach however, has limitations in the accuracy of the model. An objective of the study is to examine these limitations by assessing the accuracy of this 3D modeling methodology, with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). Therefore, the scope of this study is to present and compare 3D models, produced with two different methods: 1) Traditional TLS method with the instrument ScanStation 2 by Leica and 2) Panoramic overlapping images obtained with DSLR camera and processed with 123D Catch free software. The main objective of the study is to evaluate advantages and disadvantages of the two 3D model producing methodologies. The area represented with the 3D models, features multi-scale folding in a cipollino marble formation. The most interesting part and most challenging to capture accurately, is an outcrop which includes vertically orientated micro folds. These micro folds have dimensions of a few centimeters while a relatively strong relief is evident between them (perhaps due to different material composition). The area of interest is located in Mt. Hymittos, Greece.

  6. High-resolution 3D OCT imaging with a MEMS scanning endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li S.; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Wu, Ming C.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Herz, Paul R.; Chen, Yu; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional imaging is achieved by optical coherence tomography (OCT) integrated with a two-axis MEMS scanner to enable noninvasive volume imaging of biological tissues. The longitudinal scan is obtained by optical coherence interferometry. The transverse scan is obtained by tilting the two-axis MEMS mirror to scan the optical beam across the target. High-resolution OCT imaging has enabled in vivo observation of tissue architectural layers and differentiation of normal from tumor lesions within the human gastrointestinal tract. MEMS scanner based catheters with distal beam scanning can image with higher speed, precision, and repeatability than conventional linear scanning catheters. In this work, a 1-mm diameter MEMS scanning mirror with collimator and focusing optics is integrated into a compact 5-mm diameter package that is compatible with limited space in the endoscope. A large fill factor mirror provides high aperture over large scan angle and frequencies of hundreds of Hz in both axes. Using a broadband femtosecond laser light source, high axial image resolution of ~5 um is achieved at 1.06 um wavelength. Transverse resolution of ~ 12-um is demonstrated for cross-sectional image with the endoscope.

  7. Automated kidney detection for 3D ultrasound using scan line searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Matthias; Nadolny, Anne; Wesarg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) is a fast and non-expensive imaging modality that is used for the examination of various anatomical structures, e.g. the kidneys. One important task for automatic organ tracking or computer-aided diagnosis is the identification of the organ region. During this process the exact information about the transducer location and orientation is usually unavailable. This renders the implementation of such automatic methods exceedingly challenging. In this work we like to introduce a new automatic method for the detection of the kidney in 3D U/S images. This novel technique analyses the U/S image data along virtual scan lines. Here, characteristic texture changes when entering and leaving the symmetric tissue regions of the renal cortex are searched for. A subsequent feature accumulation along a second scan direction produces a 2D heat map of renal cortex candidates, from which the kidney location is extracted in two steps. First, the strongest candidate as well as its counterpart are extracted by heat map intensity ranking and renal cortex size analysis. This process exploits the heat map gap caused by the renal pelvis region. Substituting the renal pelvis detection with this combined cortex tissue feature increases the detection robustness. In contrast to model based methods that generate characteristic pattern matches, our method is simpler and therefore faster. An evaluation performed on 61 3D U/S data sets showed, that in 55 cases showing none or minor shadowing the kidney location could be correctly identified.

  8. 3D surface scan of biological samples with a Push-broom Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Hruska, Zuzana; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2013-08-01

    The food industry is always on the lookout for sensing technologies for rapid and nondestructive inspection of food products. Hyperspectral imaging technology integrates both imaging and spectroscopy into unique imaging sensors. Its application for food safety and quality inspection has made significant progress in recent years. Specifically, hyperspectral imaging has shown its potential for surface contamination detection in many food related applications. Most existing hyperspectral imaging systems use pushbroom scanning which is generally used for flat surface inspection. In some applications it is desirable to be able to acquire hyperspectral images on circular objects such as corn ears, apples, and cucumbers. Past research describes inspection systems that examine all surfaces of individual objects. Most of these systems did not employ hyperspectral imaging. These systems typically utilized a roller to rotate an object, such as an apple. During apple rotation, the camera took multiple images in order to cover the complete surface of the apple. The acquired image data lacked the spectral component present in a hyperspectral image. This paper discusses the development of a hyperspectral imaging system for a 3-D surface scan of biological samples. The new instrument is based on a pushbroom hyperspectral line scanner using a rotational stage to turn the sample. The system is suitable for whole surface hyperspectral imaging of circular objects. In addition to its value to the food industry, the system could be useful for other applications involving 3-D surface inspection.

  9. Calibration algorithm in robotic remanufacturing measurement system based on 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. D.; Zhu, S.; Li, C.; Liang, Y. Y.

    2009-07-01

    In robotic remanufacturing measurement system, the 3D laser scanner is arranged by the robot and the object scanned is mounted on a turntable. This paper deals with the algorithm of calibrating the relationship between the scanner coordinate and the robot Tool0, and furthermore locating the center axis of the turntable. The data of Tool0 can be directly obtained denoting its relationship with the robot base coordinate. So, the coordinate transformation problems are effectively solved and the measuring data which relative to the robot base coordinate could be congruously saved. This paper detailed explains the basic algorithm theory, computing method and the result data analysis, and etc. The calibration algorithm is deduced under the orthogonal coordinate.

  10. Measuring Fracture Properties of Meteorites: 3D Scans and Disruption Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Morris, Melissa A.; Garvie, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    The Arizona State University (ASU) Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) houses over 30,000 specimens that represent almost every known meteorite type. A number of these are available for fragmentation experiments in small samples, but in most cases non-destructive experiments are desired in order to determine the fundamental mechanical properties of meteorites, and by extension, the Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and other planetary bodies they derive from. We present results from an ongoing suite of measurements and experiments, featuring automated 3D topographic scans of a comprehensive suite of meteorites in the CMS collection, basic mechanical studies, and culminating in catastrophic fragmentation of four representative meteorites: Tamdakht (H5), Allende (CV3), Northwest Africa 869 (L3-6) and Chelyabinsk (LL5). Results will include high-resolution 3D color-shape models of meteorites, including specimens such as the 349g oriented and fusion crusted Martian (shergottite) Tissint, and the delicately fusion crusted and oriented 131g Whetstone Mountains (H5) ordinary chondrite. The 3D color-shape models will allow us to obtain basic physical properties (such as volume to derive density) and to derive fractal dimensions of fractured surfaces. Fractal dimension is closely related to the internal structural heterogeneity and fragmentation of the material, to macroscopic optical properties, and to rubble friction and cohesion. Freshly fractured surfaces of fragments that will result from catastrophic hypervelocity impact experiments will be subsequently scanned and analyzed in order to determine whether fractal dimension is preserved or if it changes with surface maturation.

  11. 3-D x-ray mirror metrology with a vertical scanning long trace profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Li, H.; Li, X.; Grindel, M.W.

    1996-09-01

    The long trace profiler (LTP) was originally developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the specific purpose of measuring the surface figure of large cylindrical mirrors used at grazing incidence in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. In its original configuration, it could measure only along one line down the center of the cylinder. A single linear profile is often sufficient to gauge the quality of the optical surface on these kinds of mirrors. For some applications it is necessary to measure the topography of the entire surface, not just along one line but over a grid that covers the entire surface area. We have modified a standard LTP to enable measurement of the complete surface of Wolter telescope optics in a vertical configuration. The vertical scanning LTP (VSLTP) is capable of producing a complete 3-D map of the surface topography errors relative to the ideal desired surface on complete segments of paraboloids and hyperboloids. The instrument uses a penta prism assembly to scan the probe beam in the longitudinal direction parallel to the mirror symmetry axis and uses a precision rotary stage to provide scans in the azimuthal direction. A Risley prism pair and a dove prism are used to orient the probe beam in the proper direction for the azimuthal scans. The repeatability of the prototype instrument is better than 20 nm over trace lengths of 35 mm with a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  13. Fabrication of Conductive 3D Gold-Containing Microstructures via Direct Laser Writing.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Eva; Müller, Jonathan; Müller, Patrick; Trouillet, Vanessa; Schön, Markus; Scherer, Torsten; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wegener, Martin

    2016-05-01

    3D conductive microstructures containing gold are fabricated by simultaneous photopolymerization and photoreduction via direct laser writing. The photoresist employed consists of water-soluble polymers and a gold precursor. The fabricated microstructures show good conductivity and are successfully employed for 3D connections between gold pads. PMID:26953811

  14. Automatic Classification of Trees from Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmacek, B.; Lindenbergh, R.

    2015-08-01

    Development of laser scanning technologies has promoted tree monitoring studies to a new level, as the laser scanning point clouds enable accurate 3D measurements in a fast and environmental friendly manner. In this paper, we introduce a probability matrix computation based algorithm for automatically classifying laser scanning point clouds into 'tree' and 'non-tree' classes. Our method uses the 3D coordinates of the laser scanning points as input and generates a new point cloud which holds a label for each point indicating if it belongs to the 'tree' or 'non-tree' class. To do so, a grid surface is assigned to the lowest height level of the point cloud. The grids are filled with probability values which are calculated by checking the point density above the grid. Since the tree trunk locations appear with very high values in the probability matrix, selecting the local maxima of the grid surface help to detect the tree trunks. Further points are assigned to tree trunks if they appear in the close proximity of trunks. Since heavy mathematical computations (such as point cloud organization, detailed shape 3D detection methods, graph network generation) are not required, the proposed algorithm works very fast compared to the existing methods. The tree classification results are found reliable even on point clouds of cities containing many different objects. As the most significant weakness, false detection of light poles, traffic signs and other objects close to trees cannot be prevented. Nevertheless, the experimental results on mobile and airborne laser scanning point clouds indicate the possible usage of the algorithm as an important step for tree growth observation, tree counting and similar applications. While the laser scanning point cloud is giving opportunity to classify even very small trees, accuracy of the results is reduced in the low point density areas further away than the scanning location. These advantages and disadvantages of two laser scanning point

  15. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S.

    2009-03-19

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  16. Investigation Into the Utilization of 3D Printing in Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Eric; Nelson, Brandon; de Leon, Sam Diaz; Shaw, Jonah

    2016-05-01

    With the advancement of 3D printing new opportunities are abound in many different fields, but with the balance between the precisions of atomic physics experiments and the material properties of current 3D printers the benefit of 3D printing technology needs to be investigated. We report on the progress of two investigations of 3D printing of benefit to atomic physics experiments: laser feedback module and the other being an optical chopper. The first investigation looks into creation of a 3D printed laser diode feedback module. This 3D printed module would allow for the quick realization of an external cavity diode laser that would have an adjustable cavity distance. We will report on the first tests of this system, by looking at Rb spectroscopy and mode-hop free tuning range as well as possibilities of using these lasers for MOT generation. We will also discuss our investigation into a 3D-printed optical chopper that utilizes an Arduino and a computer hard drive motor. By implementing an additional Arduino we create a low cost way to quickly measure laser beam waists.

  17. Investigation Into the Utilization of 3D Printing in Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Eric

    With the advancement of 3D printing new opportunities are abound in many different fields, but with the balance between the precisions of atomic physics experiments and the material properties of current 3D printers the benefit of 3D printing technology needs to be investigated. We report on the progress of two investigations of 3D printing of benefit to atomic physics experiments: laser feedback module and the other being an optical chopper. The first investigation looks into creation of a 3D printed laser diode feedback module. This 3D printed module would allow for the quick realization of an external cavity diode laser that would have an adjustable cavity distance. We will report on the first tests of this system, by looking at Rb spectroscopy and mode-hop free tuning range as well as possibilities of using these lasers for MOT generation. We will also discuss our investigation into a 3D-printed optical chopper that utilizes an Arduino and a computer hard drive motor. By implementing an additional Arduino we create a low cost way to quickly measure laser beam waists

  18. Laser Provides First 3-D View of Mars' North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This first three-dimensional picture of Mars' north pole enables scientists to estimate the volume of its water ice cap with unprecedented precision, and to study its surface variations and the heights of clouds in the region for the first time.

    Approximately 2.6 million of these laser pulse measurements were assembled into a topographic grid of the north pole with a spatial resolution of 0.6 miles (one kilometer) and a vertical accuracy of 15-90 feet (5-30 meters).

    The principal investigator for MOLA is Dr. David E. Smith of Goddard. The MOLA instrument was designed and built by the Laser Remote Sensing Branch of Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics at Goddard. The Mars Global Surveyor Mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for the NASA Office of Space Science.

  19. Laser-assisted direct ink writing of planar and 3D metal architectures

    PubMed Central

    Skylar-Scott, Mark A.; Gunasekaran, Suman; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to pattern planar and freestanding 3D metallic architectures at the microscale would enable myriad applications, including flexible electronics, displays, sensors, and electrically small antennas. A 3D printing method is introduced that combines direct ink writing with a focused laser that locally anneals printed metallic features “on-the-fly.” To optimize the nozzle-to-laser separation distance, the heat transfer along the printed silver wire is modeled as a function of printing speed, laser intensity, and pulse duration. Laser-assisted direct ink writing is used to pattern highly conductive, ductile metallic interconnects, springs, and freestanding spiral architectures on flexible and rigid substrates. PMID:27185932

  20. Laser-assisted direct ink writing of planar and 3D metal architectures.

    PubMed

    Skylar-Scott, Mark A; Gunasekaran, Suman; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2016-05-31

    The ability to pattern planar and freestanding 3D metallic architectures at the microscale would enable myriad applications, including flexible electronics, displays, sensors, and electrically small antennas. A 3D printing method is introduced that combines direct ink writing with a focused laser that locally anneals printed metallic features "on-the-fly." To optimize the nozzle-to-laser separation distance, the heat transfer along the printed silver wire is modeled as a function of printing speed, laser intensity, and pulse duration. Laser-assisted direct ink writing is used to pattern highly conductive, ductile metallic interconnects, springs, and freestanding spiral architectures on flexible and rigid substrates. PMID:27185932

  1. Laser-assisted direct ink writing of planar and 3D metal architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skylar-Scott, Mark A.; Gunasekaran, Suman; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to pattern planar and freestanding 3D metallic architectures at the microscale would enable myriad applications, including flexible electronics, displays, sensors, and electrically small antennas. A 3D printing method is introduced that combines direct ink writing with a focused laser that locally anneals printed metallic features “on-the-fly.” To optimize the nozzle-to-laser separation distance, the heat transfer along the printed silver wire is modeled as a function of printing speed, laser intensity, and pulse duration. Laser-assisted direct ink writing is used to pattern highly conductive, ductile metallic interconnects, springs, and freestanding spiral architectures on flexible and rigid substrates.

  2. Underwater 3D Surface Measurement Using Fringe Projection Based Scanning Devices.

    PubMed

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show the principle of optical 3D surface measurements based on the fringe projection technique for underwater applications. The challenges of underwater use of this technique are shown and discussed in comparison with the classical application. We describe an extended camera model which takes refraction effects into account as well as a proposal of an effective, low-effort calibration procedure for underwater optical stereo scanners. This calibration technique combines a classical air calibration based on the pinhole model with ray-based modeling and requires only a few underwater recordings of an object of known length and a planar surface. We demonstrate a new underwater 3D scanning device based on the fringe projection technique. It has a weight of about 10 kg and the maximal water depth for application of the scanner is 40 m. It covers an underwater measurement volume of 250 mm × 200 mm × 120 mm. The surface of the measurement objects is captured with a lateral resolution of 150 μm in a third of a second. Calibration evaluation results are presented and examples of first underwater measurements are given. PMID:26703624

  3. Underwater 3D Surface Measurement Using Fringe Projection Based Scanning Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show the principle of optical 3D surface measurements based on the fringe projection technique for underwater applications. The challenges of underwater use of this technique are shown and discussed in comparison with the classical application. We describe an extended camera model which takes refraction effects into account as well as a proposal of an effective, low-effort calibration procedure for underwater optical stereo scanners. This calibration technique combines a classical air calibration based on the pinhole model with ray-based modeling and requires only a few underwater recordings of an object of known length and a planar surface. We demonstrate a new underwater 3D scanning device based on the fringe projection technique. It has a weight of about 10 kg and the maximal water depth for application of the scanner is 40 m. It covers an underwater measurement volume of 250 mm × 200 mm × 120 mm. The surface of the measurement objects is captured with a lateral resolution of 150 μm in a third of a second. Calibration evaluation results are presented and examples of first underwater measurements are given. PMID:26703624

  4. Shape Analysis of 3D Head Scan Data for U.S. Respirator Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Slice, DennisE; Benson, Stacey; Lynch, Stephanie; Viscusi, DennisJ

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a head-and-face anthropometric survey of diverse, civilian respirator users. Of the 3,997 subjects measured using traditional anthropometric techniques, surface scans and 26 three-dimensional (3D) landmark locations were collected for 947 subjects. The objective of this study was to report the size and shape variation of the survey participants using the 3D data. Generalized Procrustes Analysis (GPA) was conducted to standardize configurations of landmarks associated with individuals into a common coordinate system. The superimposed coordinates for each individual were used as commensurate variables that describe individual shape and were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify population variation. The first four principal components (PC) account for 49% of the total sample variation. The first PC indicates that overall size is an important component of facial variability. The second PC accounts for long and narrow or short and wide faces. Longer narrow orbits versus shorter wider orbits can be described by PC3, and PC4 represents variation in the degree of ortho/prognathism. Geometric Morphometrics provides a detailed and interpretable assessment of morphological variation that may be useful in assessing respirators and devising new test and certification standards.

  5. Laser safety in design of near-infrared scanning LIDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Elgin, D.

    2015-05-01

    3D LIDARs (Light Detection and Ranging) with 1.5μm nanosecond pulse lasers have been increasingly used in different applications. The main reason for their popularity is that these LIDARs have high performance while at the same time can be made eye-safe. Because the laser hazard effect on eyes or skin at this wavelength region (<1.4μm) is mainly from the thermal effect accumulated from many individual pulses over a period of seconds, scanning can effectively reduce the laser beam hazard effect from the LIDARs. Neptec LIDARs have been used in docking to the International Space Station, military helicopter landing and industrial mining applications. We have incorporated the laser safety requirements in the LIDAR design and conducted laser safety analysis for different operational scenarios. While 1.5μm is normally said to be the eye-safe wavelength, in reality a high performance 3D LIDAR needs high pulse energy, small beam size and high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) to achieve long range, high resolution and high density images. The resulting radiant exposure of its stationary beam could be many times higher than the limit for a Class 1 laser device. Without carefully choosing laser and scanning parameters, including field-of-view, scan speed and pattern, a scanning LIDAR can't be eye- or skin-safe based only on its wavelength. This paper discusses the laser safety considerations in the design of eye-safe scanning LIDARs, including laser pulse energy, PRF, beam size and scanning parameters in two basic designs of scanning mechanisms, i.e. galvanometer based scanner and Risley prism based scanner. The laser safety is discussed in terms of device classification, nominal ocular hazard distance (NOHD) and safety glasses optical density (OD).

  6. Quantifying the Spatial Distribution of Hill Slope Erosion Using a 3-D Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, B. N.; Bogonko, M.; He, Y.; Beighley, R. E.; Milberg, C. T.

    2007-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complicated process involving many interdependent variables including rainfall intensity and duration, drop size, soil characteristics, ground cover, and surface slope. The interplay of these variables produces differing spatial patterns of rill versus inter-rill erosion by changing the effective energy from rain drop impacts and the quantities and timing of sheet and shallow, concentrated flow. The objective of this research is to characterize the spatial patterns of rill and inter-rill erosion produced from simulated rainfall on different soil densities and surface slopes using a 3-D laser scanner. The soil used in this study is a sandy loam with bulk density due to compaction ranging from 1.25-1.65 g/cm3. The surface slopes selected for this study are 25, 33, and 50 percent and represent common slopes used for grading on construction sites. The spatial patterns of soil erosion are measured using a Trimble GX DR 200+ 3D Laser Scanner which employs a time of flight calculation averaged over 4 points using a class 2, pulsed, 532 nm, green laser at a distance of 2 to 11 m from the surface. The scanner measures point locations on an approximately 5 mm grid. The pre- and post-erosion scan surfaces are compared to calculate the change in volume and the dimensions of rills and inter-rill areas. The erosion experiments were performed in the Soil Erosion Research Laboratory (SERL), part of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at San Diego State University. SERL experiments utilize a 3-m by 10-m tilting soil bed with a soil depth of 0.5 meters. Rainfall is applied to the soil surface using two overhead Norton ladder rainfall simulators, which produce realistic rain drop diameters (median = 2.25 mm) and impact velocities. Simulated storm events used in this study consist of rainfall intensities ranging from 5, 10 to 15 cm/hr for durations of 20 to 30 minutes. Preliminary results are presented that illustrate a change in runoff processes and

  7. Line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Ustun, Teoman E.; Bigelow, Chad E.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Webb, Robert H.

    2006-07-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) is a powerful imaging tool with specialized applications limited to research and ophthalmology clinics due in part to instrument size, cost, and complexity. Conversely, low-cost retinal imaging devices have limited capabilities in screening, detection, and diagnosis of diseases. To fill the niche between these two, a hand-held, nonmydriatic line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO) is designed, constructed, and tested on normal human subjects. The LSLO has only one moving part and uses a novel optical approach to produce wide-field confocal fundus images. Imaging modes include multiwavelength illumination and live stereoscopic imaging with a split aperture. Image processing and display functions are controlled with two stacked prototype compact printed circuit boards. With near shot-noise limited performance, the digital LSLO camera requires low illumination power (<500 µW) at near-infrared wavelengths. The line-scanning principle of operation is examined in comparison to SLO and other imaging modes. The line-scanning approach produces high-contrast confocal images with nearly the same performance as a flying-spot SLO. The LSLO may significantly enhance SLO utility for routine use by ophthalmologists, optometrists, general practitioners, and also emergency medical personnel and technicians in the field for retinal disease detection and other diverse applications.

  8. Formation and properties of 3D metamaterial composites fabricated using nanometer scale laser lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokes, Sharka M.; Perkins, Frank K.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials designed for the visible or near IR wavelengths require patterning on the nanometer scale. To achieve this, e-beam lithography is used, but it is extremely difficult and can only produce 2D structures. A new alternative technique to produce 2D and 3D structures involves laser fabrication using the Nanoscribe 3D laser lithography system. This is a direct laser writing technique which can form arbitrary 3D nanostructures on the nanometer scale and is based on multi-photon polymerization. We are creating 2D and 3D metamaterials via this technique, and subsequently conformally coating them using Atomic Layer Deposition of oxides and Ag. We will discuss the optical properties of these novel composite structures and their potential for dual resonant metamaterials.

  9. Terahertz Lasers Reveal Information for 3D Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    After taking off her shoes and jacket, she places them in a bin. She then takes her laptop out of its case and places it in a separate bin. As the items move through the x-ray machine, the woman waits for a sign from security personnel to pass through the metal detector. Today, she was lucky; she did not encounter any delays. The man behind her, however, was asked to step inside a large circular tube, raise his hands above his head, and have his whole body scanned. If you have ever witnessed a full-body scan at the airport, you may have witnessed terahertz imaging. Terahertz wavelengths are located between microwave and infrared on the electromagnetic spectrum. When exposed to these wavelengths, certain materials such as clothing, thin metal, sheet rock, and insulation become transparent. At airports, terahertz radiation can illuminate guns, knives, or explosives hidden underneath a passenger s clothing. At NASA s Kennedy Space Center, terahertz wavelengths have assisted in the inspection of materials like insulating foam on the external tanks of the now-retired space shuttle. "The foam we used on the external tank was a little denser than Styrofoam, but not much," says Robert Youngquist, a physicist at Kennedy. The problem, he explains, was that "we lost a space shuttle by having a chunk of foam fall off from the external fuel tank and hit the orbiter." To uncover any potential defects in the foam covering, such as voids or air pockets, that could keep the material from staying in place, NASA employed terahertz imaging to see through the foam. For many years, the technique ensured the integrity of the material on the external tanks.

  10. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  11. 3D imaging of mammalian cells with ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jurgen A W; Shi, Dan; Kim, Sang; Bliss, Donald; Milne, Jacqueline L S; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the hierarchical organization of molecules and organelles within the interior of large eukaryotic cells is a challenge of fundamental interest in cell biology. We are using ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IA-SEM) to visualize this hierarchical organization in an approach that combines focused ion-beam milling with scanning electron microscopy. Here, we extend our previous studies on imaging yeast cells to image subcellular architecture in human melanoma cells and melanocytes at resolutions as high as approximately 6 and approximately 20 nm in the directions parallel and perpendicular, respectively, to the direction of ion-beam milling. The 3D images demonstrate the striking spatial relationships between specific organelles such as mitochondria and membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, and the distribution of unique cellular components such as melanosomes. We also show that 10nm-sized gold particles and quantum dot particles with 7 nm-sized cores can be detected in single cross-sectional images. IA-SEM is thus a useful tool for imaging large mammalian cells in their entirety at resolutions in the nanometer range. PMID:19116171

  12. 3-D CFD in a day - The laser digitizer project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Marshal; Barth, Tim

    1991-01-01

    The computation of airflow over complex configurations requires a complete description of the geometry. This can be obtained from CAD data, from blueprints, or from actual models. In any case, the time required is currently estimated at 4 to 6 months. It is proposed to shorten this time by a factor of 10 to 100 through the use of automated software, a fast, highly parallel computer and a three-dimensional laser digitizer. This device can provide (x,y,z) coordinates of surface points at rates exceeding 14,500/sec. Thus, it is possible to digitize an entire model in a few minutes. The accuracy of measurement on a flat white surface is better than 0.005 inches. Higher accuracy is available at higher cost. This work discusses the challenges which remain to be addressed. In particular, the surface point data need to be converted into a surface description, the surface description needs to be made into a surface grid, and the surface grid used to make a volume grid for the flow solver. Algorithms are kept in place or in mind for all of these problems. Integration of the more mature flow solution and visualization algorithms then allows generation of solution graphics directly from a wind tunnel model.

  13. Optical 3D laser measurement system for navigation of autonomous mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Básaca-Preciado, Luis C.; Sergiyenko, Oleg Yu.; Rodríguez-Quinonez, Julio C.; García, Xochitl; Tyrsa, Vera V.; Rivas-Lopez, Moises; Hernandez-Balbuena, Daniel; Mercorelli, Paolo; Podrygalo, Mikhail; Gurko, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Starostenko, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    In our current research, we are developing a practical autonomous mobile robot navigation system which is capable of performing obstacle avoiding task on an unknown environment. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a robot navigation system which works using a high accuracy localization scheme by dynamic triangulation. Our two main ideas are (1) integration of two principal systems, 3D laser scanning technical vision system (TVS) and mobile robot (MR) navigation system. (2) Novel MR navigation scheme, which allows benefiting from all advantages of precise triangulation localization of the obstacles, mostly over known camera oriented vision systems. For practical use, mobile robots are required to continue their tasks with safety and high accuracy on temporary occlusion condition. Presented in this work, prototype II of TVS is significantly improved over prototype I of our previous publications in the aspects of laser rays alignment, parasitic torque decrease and friction reduction of moving parts. The kinematic model of the MR used in this work is designed considering the optimal data acquisition from the TVS with the main goal of obtaining in real time, the necessary values for the kinematic model of the MR immediately during the calculation of obstacles based on the TVS data.

  14. Accuracy of 3D white light scanning of abutment teeth impressions: evaluation of trueness and precision

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of digitizing dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner and to compare the findings among teeth types. MATERIALS AND METHODS To assess precision, impressions of the canine, premolar, and molar prepared to receive all-ceramic crowns were repeatedly scanned to obtain five sets of 3-D data (STL files). Point clouds were compared and error sizes were measured (n=10 per type). Next, to evaluate trueness, impressions of teeth were rotated by 10°-20° and scanned. The obtained data were compared with the first set of data for precision assessment, and the error sizes were measured (n=5 per type). The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate precision and trueness among three teeth types, and post-hoc comparisons were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction (α=.05). RESULTS Precision discrepancies for the canine, premolar, and molar were 3.7 µm, 3.2 µm, and 7.3 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest precision for the molar (P<.001). Trueness discrepancies for teeth types were 6.2 µm, 11.2 µm, and 21.8 µm, respectively, indicating the poorest trueness for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION In respect to accuracy the molar showed the largest discrepancies compared with the canine and premolar. Digitizing of dental impressions of abutment teeth using a white light scanner was assessed to be a highly accurate method and provided discrepancy values in a clinically acceptable range. Further study is needed to improve digitizing performance of white light scanning in axial wall. PMID:25551007

  15. Beat the diffraction limit in 3D direct laser writing in photosensitive glass.

    PubMed

    Bellec, Matthieu; Royon, Arnaud; Bousquet, Bruno; Bourhis, Kevin; Treguer, Mona; Cardinal, Thierry; Richardson, Martin; Canioni, Lionel

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) femtosecond laser direct structuring in transparent materials is widely used for photonic applications. However, the structure size is limited by the optical diffraction. Here we report on a direct laser writing technique that produces subwavelength nanostructures independently of the experimental limiting factors. We demonstrate 3D nanostructures of arbitrary patterns with feature sizes down to 80 nm, less than one tenth of the laser processing wavelength. Its ease of implementation for novel nanostructuring, with its accompanying high precision will open new opportunities for the fabrication of nanostructures for plasmonic and photonic devices and for applications in metamaterials. PMID:19506684

  16. Quantification of perspective-induced shape change of clavicles at radiography and 3D scanning to assist human identification.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N; Guyomarc'h, Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Change in perspective between antemortem and postmortem imaging sessions (radiograph to radiograph and surface scan to radiograph) may cause different 2D renderings of the same osseous element complicating comparisons for identification. In this study, clavicle shape changes due to radiographic positioning and 3D laser scanning were examined in 20 right-side specimens, as pertinent to chest radiograph comparisons. Results indicate substantial changes in clavicle form with short source-to-image receptor distance, elevation of the element from the image receptor, and movement of the element away from the center beam (10% mean square for shape). Although quantitative shape differences were small when the clavicle was in close opposition to the image receptor (3% mean square), important qualitative differences remained with large distances from the center beam (e.g., conoid tubercle presence/absence). The significance of these results for image superimposition and computer-automated-shape-based searches of radiographic libraries to find matching candidates is discussed. PMID:24313366

  17. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  18. LATIS3D: The Goal Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, R. A.; Makarewicz, A. M.; Kim, B. M.; Gentile, N. A.; Yang, T. Y. B.

    2000-03-01

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D-the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications. The purpose of this project was to develop and apply a computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling to aid in the development of new instruments and procedures in laser medicine.

  19. Fabrication of dielectric and metallo-dielectric 3D nanostructures by direct laser writing and electroless plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, André; Wolff, Frank; Giessen, Harald; Klotzbücher, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Direct laser writing via two-photon absorption allows the fabrication of three-dimensional dielectric structures with submicron resolution by tightly focusing ultrashort laser pulses into a photo-sensitive material with a high-resolution microscope objective and scanning the laser focus relative to the material. Woodpile photonic crystals fabricated with this method show a characteristic dip in transmission at near-infrared wavelengths. The spectral position of this transmission dip scales with the grating period of the fabricated crystals. Metallo-dielectric structures can be obtained by first fabricating dielectric templates with direct laser writing and subsequently coating the templates with a thin conformal metal film by electroless plating. Contiguous and conducting silver films can be deposited even on convoluted 3D geometries.

  20. Fabrication of 3D microfluidic structures inside glass by femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers have opened up new avenues in materials processing due to their unique characteristics of ultrashort pulse widths and extremely high peak intensities. One of the most important features of femtosecond laser processing is that a femtosecond laser beam can induce strong absorption in even transparent materials due to nonlinear multiphoton absorption. This makes it possible to directly create three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic structures in glass that are of great use for fabrication of biochips. For fabrication of the 3D microfluidic structures, two technical approaches are being attempted. One of them employs femtosecond laser-induced internal modification of glass followed by wet chemical etching using an acid solution (Femtosecond laser-assisted wet chemical etching), while the other one performs femtosecond laser 3D ablation of the glass in distilled water (liquid-assisted femtosecond laser drilling). This paper provides a review on these two techniques for fabrication of 3D micro and nanofluidic structures in glass based on our development and experimental results.

  1. Comparison between 3D model of Pisciarelli area (Campi Flegrei caldera) through Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Teresa; Somma, Renato; Marino, Ermanno; Terracciano, Rosario; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The volcanic/geothermal area of Pisciarelli is located within Campi Flegrei caldera .This last is a densely populated area, including the Pozzuoli town and bordering the western side of the Naples city, this causes a high vulnerability and consequently a high volcanic risk. In the recent decades this area has experienced minor ground uplift episodes accompanied by low magnitude seismicity and by strong intensification of degassing activity in particular localized at Pisciarelli area. We present the results of the Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), using a Reigl VZ1000®, analysis of Pisciarelli area performed in June 2013 and the comparison with the data acquired later in March 2014. We apply the TLS technique based on Time of Flight (TOF) method in order to define an accurate 3D digital model for detailed analysis of this area performing numerous scans from different points of view in the area. In this ways was ensured a good coverage of the whole investigated area in order to avoid shaded portion due to the high soil degassing activity. Such fact limits the capacity of laser penetration is caused by wavelength near infrared range. For each survey was obtained a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from the reconstructed data and both were compared. In particular, we have identified two "critical" areas of interest that will be monitored more frequently. These are: 1) in the lower part of the studied area a major fault line that bounding the Agnano caldera moderately NE-dipping; 2) in the upper part of the study area a zone of depletion with its zone of accumulation. The DTM were georeferenced into the UTM-WGS84 reference frame. The aim of this work is to define a procedure to compare between 3D model applied to monitoring of this area. Also to evaluate of volumetric and morphologic changes and to recognizing unstable masses by comparison of 3D data. For this purpose other TLS surveys will be performed in the upcoming in this active volcanic/geothermal area.

  2. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  3. Laser Scanning Applications in Fluvial Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, P.

    2014-12-01

    During recent decades, the use of high-resolution laser scanning data in fluvial studies has rapidly increased. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) can be used to extensively map riverine topography. Laser scanning data have great potential to improve the effectiveness of topographical data acquisition and the accuracy and resolution of DTMs (Digital Terrain Models) needed in fluvial geomorphology. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is applicable for mapping areas varying from reach to catchment scale and these data are, therefore, particularly suitable, especially for hydraulic modelling, mapping of flood inundation, and the detection of macro-scale fluvial geomorphology. With Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) a spatial resolution of less than 1 mm and a range accuracy of few millimetres can be achieved. Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) enables a remarkably faster survey approach compared to the conventional TLS method. One of the newest applications of MLS approaches involves a boat/cart/backpack -based mobile mapping system. This set-up includes laser scanning and imaging from a platform moving along a river course or floodplain and may be used to expand the spatial extent of terrestrial scanning. Detailed DTMs derived from laser scanning data can be used to improve the recognition of fluvial landforms, the geometric data of hydraulic modelling, and the estimation of flood inundation extents and the associated fluvial processes. Fluvial environments also offer challenges for the application of laser scanning techniques. Factors such as vegetation cover, terrain undulation, coarse surface materials and water surfaces may distort a laser scanning survey.

  4. A primary study of appropriate intraoral scanning frequency of single 3D image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Liang, Xiaoyue

    2015-07-01

    Objective To make a quantitative analysis between sampling frequencies and micro-movement distance of mark points on tooth surfaces, and to provide a reference for sampling frequency settings of intraoral scanning systems. Methods Mark points affixed to the incisors of five subjects. In total, 3600 groups of tracking point coordinates were obtained with frequencies of 60, 150 and 300 Hz using an optical 3D tracking system. The data was then re-sampled to obtain coordinates at lower frequencies (5, 10, 15 and 20 Hz) at equal intervals of groups of tracking point coordinates. Change in distance (Δd) was defined as the change in position of a single v from one sampling time point to another, and was valued by clinical accuracy requirement (20-100μm). The curve equation was fit quantitatively between Δd median (M) and the sampling frequency (f). The difference between upper and lower incisor mark points were analyzed by a non-parametric test; α=0.05. Result When the frequency (f) was 60 Hz, upper jaw Δd median (M) and interquartile (Q) were 14.4 μm and 9.2 μm, respectively, while the lower Δd(M) and (Q) were 6.4 μm and 10.2 μm, respectively. Every Δd value was less than 100 μm, while 74% of Δd vales were less than 20 μm. Δd(M) and f satisfy the power curve equation: Δd(M)=0.526×f-0.979(f∈[5,300]). Significant differences of incisor feature points were noted between upper and lower jaws of the same subject (P<0.01). Conclusion Clinical accuracy can be met when the sampling frequency of the intraoral scanning system is 60 Hz.

  5. Morphologic 3D scanning of fallopian tubes to assist ovarian cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Wendy-Julie; De Montigny, Etienne; Deschênes, Andréanne; Benboujja, Fouzi; Leduc, Mikael; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M.; Rahimi, Kurosh; Boudoux, Caroline; Godbout, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Pathological evaluation of the fallopian tubes is an important diagnostic result but tumors can be missed using routine approaches. As the majority of high-grade serous ovarian cancers are now believed to originate in the fallopian tubes, pathological examination should include in a thorough examination of the excised ovaries and fallopian tubes. We present an dedicated imaging system for diagnostic exploration of human fallopian tubes. This system is based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), a laser imaging modality giving access to sub- epithelial tissue architecture. This system produces cross-sectional images up to 3 mm in depth, with a lateral resolution of ≍15μm and an axial resolution of ≍12μm. An endoscopic single fiber probe was developed to fit in a human fallopian tube. This 1.2 mm probe produces 3D volume data of the entire inner tube within a few minutes. To demonstrate the clinical potential of OCT for lesion identification, we studied 5 different ovarian lesions and healthy fallopian tubes. We imaged 52 paraffin-embedded human surgical specimens with a benchtop system and compared these images with histology slides. We also imaged and compared healthy oviducts from 3 animal models to find one resembling the human anatomy and to develop a functional ex vivo imaging procedure with the endoscopic probe. We also present an update on an ongoing clinical pilot study on women undergoing prophylactic or diagnostic surgery in which we image ex vivo fallopian tubes with the endoscopic probe.

  6. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. PMID:20941016

  7. Studying post depositional damage on Acheulian bifaces using 3-D scanning.

    PubMed

    Grosman, Leore; Sharon, Gonen; Goldman-Neuman, Talia; Smikt, Oded; Smilansky, Uzy

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we explore post-depositional damage observed on Acheulian bifacial tools by comparing two assemblages: a collection of archaeological handaxes which shows pronounced damage marks associated with high energy water accumulation system, and an experimental assemblage that was rolled and battered in a controlled simulation experiment. Scanning the two assemblages with a precise 3-D optical scanner and subjecting the measured surfaces to the same mathematical analysis enabled the development of quantitative measures assessing and comparing the degree of damage observed on archaeological and experimental tools. The method presented here enables the definition of morphological patterns typically resulting from battering and different from intentional controlled knapping. The most important kinds of damage included the formation of deep, random 'notch-like' scars on the lateral edges and substantial degrees of damage to the tip of the tools, but minimal damage to the artifact's butt. Quantifying the degree of damage and its location and morphological characters allows us to present a method by which post depositional damage on archaeological tools can be measured. PMID:20304464

  8. Scanned bi-orthogonal radiographs as a source for 3D cephalometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyan, Krishna; Dean, David

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a visualization environment, CEPH, for the analysis of plain film, biothogonally registered, head x-rays, i.e., cephalograms. Most importantly this program facilitates the collection of 3D landmark data from biorthogonal cephalogram pairs, i.e., correlated frontal and lateral images. To this end we have implemented tools for: contrast enhancement, image compression, morphological feature extraction, and grayscale shape recognition for automatic landmark detection. These data are useful for clinical craniofacial: (1) diagnosis, (2) treatment planning, (3) computed-assisted surgery, and (4) post-procedure follow-up. We are currently using the CEPH visualization environment to produce average landmark sets from the nearly 2000 'Bolton Standards' images. These images were collected for the Bolton-Brush Growth Study at Case Western Reserve University. Two dimensional landmark data captured from these images are universally recognized and used as diagnostic and treatment 'norms.' We are planning to make new three dimensional Bolton Standards data available this year. To this end we have scanned all of the Bolton Standards cephalograms at 2400 by 2400 resolution with 12 bits of grayscale information on a TDI scanner.

  9. Absorption spectrum of the laser-populated 3D metastable levels in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper deals with the details of the absorption spectrum of the 3D metastable term in barium. The 3D term was selectively populated with a tuneable dye laser. The fundamental triplet series (6s5d 3D-6snf 3F) is identified and extended out to n = 32. In addition, the absolute photoionization cross section was measured at 303 nm. The relative cross section from 303 to 250 nm was also measured with the absolute scale set by the measurement at 303 nm and was found to be nearly constant in the wavelength region measured.

  10. Fabrication of 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass by femtosecond laser wet etch and microsolidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a flexible fabrication method for 3D solenoid microcoils in silica glass. The method consists of femtosecond laser wet etching (FLWE) and microsolidics process. The 3D microchannel with high aspect ratio is fabricated by an improved FLWE method. In the microsolidics process, an alloy was chosen as the conductive metal. The microwires are achieved by injecting liquid alloy into the microchannel, and allowing the alloy to cool and solidify. The alloy microwires with high melting point can overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The geometry, the height and diameter of microcoils were flexibly fabricated by the pre-designed laser writing path, the laser power and etching time. The 3D microcoils can provide uniform magnetic field and be widely integrated in many magnetic microsystems.

  11. 3D multiple optical tweezers based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus tunable lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshio

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional controlled manipulation of individual micro-objects requires multiple optical tweezers that can be independently controlled in a 3D working space with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, the author presents 3D multiple optical tweezers based on a time-shared scanning technique with an electrically focus tunable lens for axial steering and a two-axis steering mirror for lateral steering. Four typical examples of 3D controlled manipulation, including the rotation of a single bead on its axis, are demonstrated in real time. The optical system design and the control method are also described.

  12. Burr-like, laser-made 3D microscaffolds for tissue spheroid encagement.

    PubMed

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Rezende, Rodrigo A; Pereira, Frederico D A S; Selimis, Alexandros; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Noritomi, Pedro Y; da Silva, Jorge V L; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Farsari, Maria; Mironov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The modeling, fabrication, cell loading, and mechanical and in vitro biological testing of biomimetic, interlockable, laser-made, concentric 3D scaffolds are presented. The scaffolds are made by multiphoton polymerization of an organic-inorganic zirconium silicate. Their mechanical properties are theoretically modeled using finite elements analysis and experimentally measured using a Microsquisher(®). They are subsequently loaded with preosteoblastic cells, which remain live after 24 and 72 h. The interlockable scaffolds have maintained their ability to fuse with tissue spheroids. This work represents a novel technological platform, enabling the rapid, laser-based, in situ 3D tissue biofabrication. PMID:26104190

  13. 3D printing of weft knitted textile based structures by selective laser sintering of nylon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecroft, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing whereby the building up of layers of material creates objects. The selective laser sintering process (SLS) uses a laser beam to sinter powdered material to create objects. This paper builds upon previous research into 3D printed textile based material exploring the use of SLS using nylon powder to create flexible weft knitted structures. The results show the potential to print flexible textile based structures that exhibit the properties of traditional knitted textile structures along with the mechanical properties of the material used, whilst describing the challenges regarding fineness of printing resolution. The conclusion highlights the potential future development and application of such pieces.

  14. Planar Projection of Mobile Laser Scanning Data in Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, J. A.; Mendes, R.; Araújo, E.; Oliveira, A.; Boavida, J.

    2012-07-01

    Laser scanning is now a common technology in the surveying and monitoring of large engineering infrastructures, such as tunnels, both in motorways and railways. Extended possibilities exist now with the mobile terrestrial laser scanning systems, which produce very large data sets that need efficient processing techniques in order to facilitate their exploitation and usability. This paper deals with the implementation of a methodology for processing and presenting 3D point clouds acquired by laser scanning in tunnels, making use of the approximately cylindrical shape of tunnels. There is a need for a 2D presentation of the 3D point clouds, in order to facilitate the inspection of important features as well as to easily obtain their spatial location. An algorithm was developed to treat automatically point clouds obtained in tunnels in order to produce rectified images that can be analysed. Tests were carried with data acquired with static and mobile Riegl laser scanning systems, by Artescan company, in highway tunnels in Portugal and Spain, with very satisfactory results. The final planar image is an alternative way of data presentation where image analysis tools can be used to analyze the laser intensity in order to detect problems in the tunnel structure.

  15. Reliability of 3D laser-based anthropometry and comparison with classical anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnapfel, Andreas; Ahnert, Peter; Loeffler, Markus; Broda, Anja; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Anthropometric quantities are widely used in epidemiologic research as possible confounders, risk factors, or outcomes. 3D laser-based body scans (BS) allow evaluation of dozens of quantities in short time with minimal physical contact between observers and probands. The aim of this study was to compare BS with classical manual anthropometric (CA) assessments with respect to feasibility, reliability, and validity. We performed a study on 108 individuals with multiple measurements of BS and CA to estimate intra- and inter-rater reliabilities for both. We suggested BS equivalents of CA measurements and determined validity of BS considering CA the gold standard. Throughout the study, the overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) was chosen as indicator of agreement. BS was slightly more time consuming but better accepted than CA. For CA, OCCCs for intra- and inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.8 for all nine quantities studied. For BS, 9 of 154 quantities showed reliabilities below 0.7. BS proxies for CA measurements showed good agreement (minimum OCCC > 0.77) after offset correction. Thigh length showed higher reliability in BS while upper arm length showed higher reliability in CA. Except for these issues, reliabilities of CA measurements and their BS equivalents were comparable. PMID:27225483

  16. Reliability of 3D laser-based anthropometry and comparison with classical anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Kuehnapfel, Andreas; Ahnert, Peter; Loeffler, Markus; Broda, Anja; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Anthropometric quantities are widely used in epidemiologic research as possible confounders, risk factors, or outcomes. 3D laser-based body scans (BS) allow evaluation of dozens of quantities in short time with minimal physical contact between observers and probands. The aim of this study was to compare BS with classical manual anthropometric (CA) assessments with respect to feasibility, reliability, and validity. We performed a study on 108 individuals with multiple measurements of BS and CA to estimate intra- and inter-rater reliabilities for both. We suggested BS equivalents of CA measurements and determined validity of BS considering CA the gold standard. Throughout the study, the overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) was chosen as indicator of agreement. BS was slightly more time consuming but better accepted than CA. For CA, OCCCs for intra- and inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.8 for all nine quantities studied. For BS, 9 of 154 quantities showed reliabilities below 0.7. BS proxies for CA measurements showed good agreement (minimum OCCC > 0.77) after offset correction. Thigh length showed higher reliability in BS while upper arm length showed higher reliability in CA. Except for these issues, reliabilities of CA measurements and their BS equivalents were comparable. PMID:27225483

  17. Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flejmer, Anna M; Edvardsson, Anneli; Dohlmar, Frida; Josefsson, Dan; Nilsson, Mats; Witt Nyström, Petra; Dasu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating. Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student's t-test. Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy  (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) with protons in comparison with photons. Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose. PMID:27027913

  18. Temperature distributions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell from 3-D numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rainey, E. S. G.; Kavner, A.; Hernlund, J. W.

    2013-11-28

    We present TempDAC, a 3-D numerical model for calculating the steady-state temperature distribution for continuous wave laser-heated experiments in the diamond anvil cell. TempDAC solves the steady heat conduction equation in three dimensions over the sample chamber, gasket, and diamond anvils and includes material-, temperature-, and direction-dependent thermal conductivity, while allowing for flexible sample geometries, laser beam intensity profile, and laser absorption properties. The model has been validated against an axisymmetric analytic solution for the temperature distribution within a laser-heated sample. Example calculations illustrate the importance of considering heat flow in three dimensions for the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. In particular, we show that a “flat top” input laser beam profile does not lead to a more uniform temperature distribution or flatter temperature gradients than a wide Gaussian laser beam.

  19. LATIS3D: The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Makarewicz, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Gentile, N.A.; Yang, Y.B.; Brlik, M.; Vincent, L.

    2000-02-29

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  20. Black silicon: substrate for laser 3D micro/nano-polymerization.

    PubMed

    Žukauskas, Albertas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Kadys, Arūnas; Gervinskas, Gediminas; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Kandasamy, Sasikaran; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2013-03-25

    We demonstrate that black silicon (b-Si) made by dry plasma etching is a promising substrate for laser three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano-polymerization. High aspect ratio Si-needles, working as sacrificial support structures, have flexibility required to relax interface stresses between substrate and the polymerized micro-/nano- objects. Surface of b-Si can be made electrically conductive by metal deposition and, at the same time, can preserve low optical reflectivity beneficial for polymerization by direct laser writing. 3D laser polymerization usually performed at the irradiation conditions close to the dielectric breakdown is possible on non-reflective and not metallic surfaces. Here we show that low reflectivity and high metallic conductivity are not counter- exclusive properties for laser polymerization. Electrical conductivity of substrate and its permeability in liquids are promising for bio- and electroplating applications. PMID:23546073

  1. A very low-cost system for capturing 3D motion scans with color and texture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a technique for capturing 3D motion scans using hardware that can be constructed for approximately $5,000 in cost. This hardware-software solution, in addition to capturing the movement of the physical structures also captures color and texture data. The scanner configuration developed at the University of North Dakota is sufficient in size for capturing scans of a group of humans. Scanning starts with synchronization and then requires modeling of each frame. For some applications linking structural elements from frame-to-frame may also be required. The efficacy of this scanning approach is discussed and prospective applications for it are considered.

  2. Web-based 3D digital pathology framework for large-mapping data scanned by FF-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, ChiaKai; Tsai, Chien-Chung; Chien, Meng-Ting; Li, Yu-I.; Shun, Chia-Tung; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2015-03-01

    Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is a high resolution instrument in 3 dimensional (3D) space, including lateral and longitudinal direction. With FF-OCT, we can perform 3D scanning for excised biopsy or cell culture sample to obtain cellular information. In this work, we have set up a high resolution FF-OCT scanning instrument that can perform cellular resolution tomography scanning of skin tissue for histopathology study. In a scan range of 1cm(x), 1cm(y), 106μm(z), for example, digital data occupies 253 GB capacity. Copying these materials is time consuming, not to mention efficient browsing and analyzing of these data. To solve the problem of information delivery, we have established a network service to browse and analyze the huge volume data.

  3. Estimating Mass Properties of Dinosaurs Using Laser Imaging and 3D Computer Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Karl T.; Manning, Phillip L.; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I.

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  4. Estimating mass properties of dinosaurs using laser imaging and 3D computer modelling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Karl T; Manning, Phillip L; Hodgetts, David; Sellers, William I

    2009-01-01

    Body mass reconstructions of extinct vertebrates are most robust when complete to near-complete skeletons allow the reconstruction of either physical or digital models. Digital models are most efficient in terms of time and cost, and provide the facility to infinitely modify model properties non-destructively, such that sensitivity analyses can be conducted to quantify the effect of the many unknown parameters involved in reconstructions of extinct animals. In this study we use laser scanning (LiDAR) and computer modelling methods to create a range of 3D mass models of five specimens of non-avian dinosaur; two near-complete specimens of Tyrannosaurus rex, the most complete specimens of Acrocanthosaurus atokensis and Strutiomimum sedens, and a near-complete skeleton of a sub-adult Edmontosaurus annectens. LiDAR scanning allows a full mounted skeleton to be imaged resulting in a detailed 3D model in which each bone retains its spatial position and articulation. This provides a high resolution skeletal framework around which the body cavity and internal organs such as lungs and air sacs can be reconstructed. This has allowed calculation of body segment masses, centres of mass and moments or inertia for each animal. However, any soft tissue reconstruction of an extinct taxon inevitably represents a best estimate model with an unknown level of accuracy. We have therefore conducted an extensive sensitivity analysis in which the volumes of body segments and respiratory organs were varied in an attempt to constrain the likely maximum plausible range of mass parameters for each animal. Our results provide wide ranges in actual mass and inertial values, emphasizing the high level of uncertainty inevitable in such reconstructions. However, our sensitivity analysis consistently places the centre of mass well below and in front of hip joint in each animal, regardless of the chosen combination of body and respiratory structure volumes. These results emphasize that future

  5. Laser nanolithography and chemical metalization for the manufacturing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonavičius, Tomas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Žukauskas, Albertas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2014-03-01

    We present a developed method based on direct laser writing (DLW) and chemical metallization (CM) for microfabrication of three-dimensional (3D) metallic structures. Such approach enables manufacturing of free­-form electro conductive interconnects which can be used in integrated electric circuits such micro-opto-electro mechanical systems (MOEMS). The proposed technique employing ultrafast high repetition rate laser enables efficient fabrication of 3D microstructures on dielectric as well as conductive substrates. The produced polymer links out of organic-inorganic composite matrix after CM serve as interconnects of separate metallic contacts, their dimensions are: height 15μm, width 5μm, length 35-45 μm and could provide 300 nΩm resistivity measured in a macroscopic way. This proves the techniques potential for creating integrated 3D electric circuits at microscale.

  6. Generation of 3D ellipsoidal laser beams by means of a profiled volume chirped Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, S. Yu; Poteomkin, A. K.; Gacheva, E. I.; Andrianov, A. V.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Vasiliev, R.; Smirnov, V.; Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Khazanov, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for shaping photocathode laser driver pulses into 3D ellipsoidal form has been proposed and implemented. The key idea of the method is to use a chirped Bragg grating recorded within the ellipsoid volume and absent outside it. If a beam with a constant (within the grating reflection band) spectral density and uniform (within the grating aperture) cross-section is incident on such a grating, the reflected beam will be a 3D ellipsoid in space and time. 3D ellipsoidal beams were obtained in experiment for the first time. It is expected that such laser beams will allow the electron bunch emittance to be reduced when applied at R± photo injectors.

  7. Model studies of blood flow in basilar artery with 3D laser Doppler anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, S. V.; Sindeev, S. V.; Liepsch, D.; Balasso, A.; Proskurin, S. G.; Potlov, A. Y.

    2015-03-01

    It is proposed an integrated approach to the study of basilar artery blood flow using 3D laser Doppler anemometer for identifying the causes of the formation and development of cerebral aneurysms. Feature of the work is the combined usage of both mathematical modeling and experimental methods. Described the experimental setup and the method of measurement of basilar artery blood flow, carried out in an interdisciplinary laboratory of Hospital Rechts der Isar of Technical University of Munich. The experimental setup used to simulate the blood flow in the basilar artery and to measure blood flow characteristics using 3D laser Doppler anemometer (3D LDA). Described a method of numerical studies carried out in Tambov State Technical University and the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery. Proposed an approach for sharing experimental and numerical methods of research to identify the causes of the basilar artery aneurysms.

  8. Automated generation of NC part programs for excimer laser ablation micromachining from known 3D surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutapcic, Emir; Iovenitti, Pio G.; Hayes, Jason P.

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this research project is to improve the capability of the laser micromachinning process, so that any desired 3D surface can be produced by taking the 3D information from a CAD system and automatically generating the NC part programs. In addition, surface quality should be able to be controlled by specifying optimised parameters. This paper presents the algorithms and a software system, which processes 3D geometry in an STL file format from a CAD system and produces the NC part program to mill the surface using the Excimer laser ablation process. Simple structures are used to demonstrate the prototype system's part programming capabilities, and an actual surface is machined.

  9. 3D pulsed laser-triggered high-speed microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Yu-Chun; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-11-12

    We report a 3D microfluidic pulsed laser-triggered fluorescence-activated cell sorter capable of sorting at a throughput of 23 000 cells per s with 90% purity in high-purity mode and at a throughput of 45 000 cells per s with 45% purity in enrichment mode in one stage and in a single channel. This performance is realized by exciting laser-induced cavitation bubbles in a 3D PDMS microfluidic channel to generate high-speed liquid jets that deflect detected fluorescent cells and particles focused by 3D sheath flows. The ultrafast switching mechanism (20 μs complete on-off cycle), small liquid jet perturbation volume, and three-dimensional sheath flow focusing for accurate timing control of fast (1.5 m s(-1)) passing cells and particles are three critical factors enabling high-purity sorting at high-throughput in this sorter. PMID:23844418

  10. Laser micromachining of through via interconnects in active die for 3-D multichip module

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Miller, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    One method to increase density in integrated circuits (IC) is to stack die to create a 3-D multichip module (MCM). In the past, special post wafer processing was done to bring interconnects out to the edge of the die. The die were sawed, glued, and stacked. Special processing was done to create interconnects on the edge to provide for interconnects to each of the die. These processes require an IC type fabrication facility (fab) and special processing equipment. In contrast, we have developed packaging assembly methods to created vertical through vias in bond pads of active silicon die, isolate these vias, and metal fill these vias without the use of a special IC fab. These die with through vias can then be joined and stacked to create a 3-D MCM. Vertical through vias in active die are created by laser micromachining using a Nd:YAG laser. Besides the fundamental 1064 nm (infra-red) laser wavelength of a Nd:YAG laser, modifications to our Nd:YAG laser allowed us to generate the second harmonic 532 nm (green) laser wavelength and fourth harmonic 266nm (ultra violet) laser wavelength in laser micromachining for these vias. Experiments were conducted to determine the best laser wavelengths to use for laser micromachining of vertical through vias in order to minimize damage to the active die. Via isolation experiments were done in order to determine the best method in isolating the bond pads of the die. Die thinning techniques were developed to allow for die thickness as thin as 50 {mu}m. This would allow for high 3-D density when the die are stacked. A method was developed to metal fill the vias with solder using a wire bonder with solder wire.

  11. Fusion of laser and image sensory data for 3-D modeling of the free navigation space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mass, M.; Moghaddamzadeh, A.; Bourbakis, N.

    1994-01-01

    A fusion technique which combines two different types of sensory data for 3-D modeling of a navigation space is presented. The sensory data is generated by a vision camera and a laser scanner. The problem of different resolutions for these sensory data was solved by reduced image resolution, fusion of different data, and use of a fuzzy image segmentation technique.

  12. Experimental investigation of 3D scanheads for laser micro-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penchev, Pavel; Dimov, Stefan; Bhaduri, Debajyoti

    2016-07-01

    The broader use of laser micro-processing technology increases the demand for executing complex machining and joining operations on free-from (3D) workpieces. To satisfy these growing requirements it is necessary to utilise 3D scanheads that integrate beam deflectors (X and Y optical axes) and Z modules with high dynamics. The research presented in this communication proposes an experimental technique to quantify the dynamic capabilities of Z modules, also called Dynamic Focusing Modules (DFM), of such 3D scanheads that are essential for efficient, accurate and repeatable laser micro-processing of free form surfaces. The proposed experimental technique is validated on state-of-art laser micro-machining platform and the results show that the DFM dynamic capabilities are substantially inferior than those of X and Y beam deflectors, in particular the maximum speed of the Z module is less than 10% of the maximum speeds achievable with X and Y optical axes of the scanhead. Thus, the DFM dynamics deficiencies can become a major obstacle for the broader use of high frequency laser sources that necessitate high dynamics 3D scanheads for executing cost effectively free-form surface processing operations.

  13. High-resolution 3D imaging laser radar flight test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Richard M.; Davis, W. R.; Rich, G. C.; McLaughlin, J. L.; Lee, E. I.; Stanley, B. M.; Burnside, J. W.; Rowe, G. S.; Hatch, R. E.; Square, T. E.; Skelly, L. J.; O'Brien, M.; Vasile, A.; Heinrichs, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Situation awareness and accurate Target Identification (TID) are critical requirements for successful battle management. Ground vehicles can be detected, tracked, and in some cases imaged using airborne or space-borne microwave radar. Obscurants such as camouflage net and/or tree canopy foliage can degrade the performance of such radars. Foliage can be penetrated with long wavelength microwave radar, but generally at the expense of imaging resolution. The goals of the DARPA Jigsaw program include the development and demonstration of high-resolution 3-D imaging laser radar (ladar) ensor technology and systems that can be used from airborne platforms to image and identify military ground vehicles that may be hiding under camouflage or foliage such as tree canopy. With DARPA support, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed a rugged and compact 3-D imaging ladar system that has successfully demonstrated the feasibility and utility of this application. The sensor system has been integrated into a UH-1 helicopter for winter and summer flight campaigns. The sensor operates day or night and produces high-resolution 3-D spatial images using short laser pulses and a focal plane array of Geiger-mode avalanche photo-diode (APD) detectors with independent digital time-of-flight counting circuits at each pixel. The sensor technology includes Lincoln Laboratory developments of the microchip laser and novel focal plane arrays. The microchip laser is a passively Q-switched solid-state frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser transmitting short laser pulses (300 ps FWHM) at 16 kilohertz pulse rate and at 532 nm wavelength. The single photon detection efficiency has been measured to be > 20 % using these 32x32 Silicon Geiger-mode APDs at room temperature. The APD saturates while providing a gain of typically > 106. The pulse out of the detector is used to stop a 500 MHz digital clock register integrated within the focal-plane array at each pixel. Using the detector in this binary response mode

  14. "High-precision, reconstructed 3D model" of skull scanned by conebeam CT: Reproducibility verified using CAD/CAM data.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Seiko; Sato, Keita; Ikawa, Tomoko; Yamamura, Keiko; Ando, Eriko; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning has recently been introduced into forensic medicine and dentistry. However, the presence of metal restorations in the dentition can adversely affect the quality of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of a "high-precision, reconstructed 3D model" obtained from a conebeam CT scan of dentition, a method that might be particularly helpful in forensic medicine. We took conebeam CT and helical CT images of three dry skulls marked with 47 measuring points; reconstructed three-dimensional images; and measured the distances between the points in the 3D images with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) marker. We found that in comparison with the helical CT, conebeam CT is capable of reproducing measurements closer to those obtained from the actual samples. In conclusion, our study indicated that the image-reproduction from a conebeam CT scan was more accurate than that from a helical CT scan. Furthermore, the "high-precision reconstructed 3D model" facilitates reliable visualization of full-sized oral and maxillofacial regions in both helical and conebeam CT scans. PMID:26832374

  15. Rapid 3D video/laser sensing and digital archiving with immediate on-scene feedback for 3D crime scene/mass disaster data collection and reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, Bruce R.; Oliver, William R.; Altschuler, Martin D.

    1996-02-01

    We describe a system for rapid and convenient video data acquisition and 3-D numerical coordinate data calculation able to provide precise 3-D topographical maps and 3-D archival data sufficient to reconstruct a 3-D virtual reality display of a crime scene or mass disaster area. Under a joint U.S. army/U.S. Air Force project with collateral U.S. Navy support, to create a 3-D surgical robotic inspection device -- a mobile, multi-sensor robotic surgical assistant to aid the surgeon in diagnosis, continual surveillance of patient condition, and robotic surgical telemedicine of combat casualties -- the technology is being perfected for remote, non-destructive, quantitative 3-D mapping of objects of varied sizes. This technology is being advanced with hyper-speed parallel video technology and compact, very fast laser electro-optics, such that the acquisition of 3-D surface map data will shortly be acquired within the time frame of conventional 2-D video. With simple field-capable calibration, and mobile or portable platforms, the crime scene investigator could set up and survey the entire crime scene, or portions of it at high resolution, with almost the simplicity and speed of video or still photography. The survey apparatus would record relative position, location, and instantly archive thousands of artifacts at the site with 3-D data points capable of creating unbiased virtual reality reconstructions, or actual physical replicas, for the investigators, prosecutors, and jury.

  16. Cellular scanning strategy for selective laser melting: Generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2015-03-01

    Selective laser melting is yet to become a standardized industrial manufacturing technique. The process continues to suffer from defects such as distortions, residual stresses, localized deformations and warpage caused primarily due to the localized heating, rapid cooling and high temperature gradients that occur during the process. While process monitoring and control of selective laser melting is an active area of research, establishing the reliability and robustness of the process still remains a challenge. In this paper, a methodology for generating reliable, optimized scanning paths and process parameters for selective laser melting of a standard sample is introduced. The processing of the sample is simulated by sequentially coupling a calibrated 3D pseudo-analytical thermal model with a 3D finite element mechanical model. The optimized processing parameters are subjected to a Monte Carlo method based uncertainty and reliability analysis. The reliability of the scanning paths are established using cumulative probability distribution functions for process output criteria such as sample density, thermal homogeneity, etc. A customized genetic algorithm is used along with the simulation model to generate optimized cellular scanning strategies and processing parameters, with an objective of reducing thermal asymmetries and mechanical deformations. The optimized scanning strategies are used for selective laser melting of the standard samples, and experimental and numerical results are compared.

  17. Fusion of Terrestrial and Airborne Laser Data for 3D modeling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Hani Mahmoud

    This thesis deals with the 3D modeling phase of the as-built large BIM projects. Among several means of BIM data capturing, such as photogrammetric or range tools, laser scanners have been one of the most efficient and practical tool for a long time. They can generate point clouds with high resolution for 3D models that meet nowadays' market demands. The current 3D modeling projects of as-built BIMs are mainly focused on using one type of laser scanner data, such as Airborne or Terrestrial. According to the literatures, no significant (few) efforts were made towards the fusion of heterogeneous laser scanner data despite its importance. The importance of the fusion of heterogeneous data arises from the fact that no single type of laser data can provide all the information about BIM, especially for large BIM projects that are existing on a large area, such as university buildings, or Heritage places. Terrestrial laser scanners are able to map facades of buildings and other terrestrial objects. However, they lack the ability to map roofs or higher parts in the BIM project. Airborne laser scanner on the other hand, can map roofs of the buildings efficiently and can map only small part of the facades. Short range laser scanners can map the interiors of the BIM projects, while long range scanners are used for mapping wide exterior areas in BIM projects. In this thesis the long range laser scanner data obtained in the Stop-and-Go mapping mode, the short range laser scanner data, obtained in a fully static mapping mode, and the airborne laser data are all fused together to bring a complete effective solution for a large BIM project. Working towards the 3D modeling of BIM projects, the thesis framework starts with the registration of the data, where a new fast automatic registration algorithm were developed. The next step is to recognize the different objects in the BIM project (classification), and obtain 3D models for the buildings. The last step is the development of an

  18. Inscription of 3D waveguides in diamond using an ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courvoisier, Arnaud; Booth, Martin J.; Salter, Patrick S.

    2016-07-01

    Three dimensional waveguides within the bulk of diamond are manufactured using ultrafast laser fabrication. High intensities within the focal volume of the laser cause breakdown of the diamond into a graphitic phase leading to a stress induced refractive index change in neighboring regions. Type II waveguiding is thus enabled between two adjacent graphitic tracks, but supporting just a single polarization state. We show that adaptive aberration correction during the laser processing allows the controlled fabrication of more complex structures beneath the surface of the diamond which can be used for 3D waveguide splitters and Type III waveguides which support both polarizations.

  19. 3D modelling of Mt. Talaga Bodas Crater (Indonesia) by using terrestrial laser scanner for volcano hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumilar, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Putra, Andreas D.; Haerani, Nia

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia is a country with many volcanoes. Each volcano in Indonesia typically has its own crater characteristics. One of them is the Mt.Talaga Bodas, located in Garut, West Java. Researches regarding the crater characteristics are necessary for volcanic disaster mitigation process. One of them is the modelling of the shape of the crater. One of the methods that can be used to model the volcanic crater is using Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). This research aims to create a 3 dimensional (3D) model of the crater of the Mt. Talaga Bodas, that hopefully can be utilized for volcanic disaster mitigation. The methodology used in this research is by obtaining the scanning data using TLS and GPS measurements to obtain the coordinates of the reference points. The data processing methods consist of several steps, namely target to target registration, filterization, georeference, meshing point cloud, surface making, drawing, and 3D modelling. These steps were done using the Cyclone 7 software, and also using 3DS MAX for 3D modelling. The result of this data processing is a 3D model of the crater of the Mt. Talaga Bodas which is similar with the real shape. The calculation result shows that the height of the crater is 62.522 m, the diameter of the crater is 467.231 m, and the total area is 2961054.652 m2. The main obstacle in this research is the dense vegetation which becomes the noise and affects the crater model.

  20. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  1. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel †

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  2. 3D Modeling of Laser Propagation in Ionizing Gas and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, J.; Antonsen, T., Jr.; Huang, C.; Mori, W.

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of a high intensity laser with ionizing gas and plasmas is of current interest for both Laser Wakefield Accelerators and x-ray generation. We have developed a 3D fluid simulation code based on the same quasistatic approximation used in the 2D code WAKE [1]. The object oriented structure of the code also allows it to couple to the quickPIC particle code [2]. We will present 3D studies of the ionization scattering instability [3], which occurs when a laser pulse propagates in an ionizing gas. [1] P. Mora and T. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 4(1), January 1997 [2] J. Cooley, T. Antonsen, Jr., C. Huang, etal., Proceedings, Advanced Accelerator Concepts, 2002 [3] Z. Bian and T. Antonsen, Jr., Phys. Plasmas 8(7), July 2001 * work supported by NSF and DOE

  3. Femtosecond laser 3D nanofabrication in glass: enabling direct write of integrated micro/nanofluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya; Liao, Yang; Sugioka, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The creation of complex three-dimensional (3D) fluidic systems composed of hollow micro- and nanostructures embedded in transparent substrates has attracted significant attention from both scientific and applied research communities. However, it is by now still a formidable challenge to build 3D micro- and nanofluidic structures with arbitrary configurations using conventional planar lithographic fabrication methods. As a direct and maskless fabrication technique, femtosecond laser micromachining provides a straightforward approach for high-precision spatial-selective modification inside transparent materials through nonlinear optical absorption. Here, we demonstrate rapid fabrication of high-aspect-ratio micro- and/or nanofluidic structures with various 3D configurations in glass substrates by femtosecond laser direct writing. Based on this approach, we demonstrate several functional micro- and nanofluidic devices including a 3D passive microfluidic mixer, a capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis chip, and an integrated micro-nanofluidic system for single DNA analysis. This technology offers new opportunities to develop novel 3D micro-nanofluidic systems for a variety of lab-on-a-chip applications.

  4. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing and welding for 3D manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Nie, Bai; Wan, Peng; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Due to the unique ultra-short pulse duration and high peak power, femtosecond (fs) laser has emerged as a powerful tool for many applications but has rarely been studied for 3D printing. In this paper, welding of both bulk and powder materials is demonstrated for the first time by using high energy and high repetition rate fs fiber lasers. It opens up new scenarios and opportunities for 3D printing with the following advantages - greater range of materials especially with high melting temperature, greater-than-ever level of precision (sub-micron) and less heat-affected-zone (HAZ). Mechanical properties (strength and hardness) and micro-structures (grain size) of the fabricated parts are investigated. For dissimilar materials bulk welding, good welding quality with over 210 MPa tensile strength is obtained. Also full melting of the micron-sized refractory powders with high melting temperature (above 3000 degree C) is achieved for the first time. 3D parts with shapes like ring and cube are fabricated. Not only does this study explore the feasibility of melting dissimilar and high melting temperature materials using fs lasers, but it also lays out a solid foundation for 3D printing of complex structure with designed compositions, microstructures and properties. This can greatly benefit the applications in automobile, aerospace and biomedical industries, by producing parts like nozzles, engines and miniaturized biomedical devices.

  5. Printing of metallic 3D micro-objects by laser induced forward transfer.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-01-25

    Digital printing of 3D metal micro-structures by laser induced forward transfer under ambient conditions is reviewed. Recent progress has allowed drop on demand transfer of molten, femto-liter, metal droplets with a high jetting directionality. Such small volume droplets solidify instantly, on a nanosecond time scale, as they touch the substrate. This fast solidification limits their lateral spreading and allows the fabrication of high aspect ratio and complex 3D metal structures. Several examples of micron-scale resolution metal objects printed using this method are presented and discussed. PMID:26832524

  6. Scanning afocal laser velocimeter projection lens system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. B. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus for projecting and focusing parallel laser light beams from a laser doppler velocimeter on a target area are described. The system includes three lenses. Two lenses work together as a fixed afocal lens combination. The third lens is a movable scanning lens. Parallel laser beams travel from the velocimeter through the scanning lens and through the afocal lens combination and converge, i.e., are focused, somewhere beyond. Moving the scanning lens relative to the fixed afocal combination results in a scanning of the focus area along the afocal combination's optical axis.

  7. Relativistic Laser Pulse Intensification with 3D Printed Micro-Tube Plasma Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liangliang; Snyder, Joseph; Pukhov, Alexander; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    The potential and applications of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) are restricted by the parameter space of existing lasers and targets. Advancing the laser intensity to the extreme regime is motivated by the production of energetic particle beams and by the quest to explore the exotic regimes of light-matter interaction. Target density and dimensions can always be varied to optimize the outcome. Here, we propose to create another degree of freedom in the parameter space of LPI using recent advances in 3D printing of materials. Fine structures at nm scale with high repetition and accuracy can nowadays be manufactured, allowing for a full precise control of the target. We demonstrate, via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, that 3D-printed micro-tube plasma (MTP) targets yield an intensity enhancement factor of 2-5. The novel MTP targets not only act as a plasma optical device to reach the 1023W/cm2 threshold based on today's intensities, but can also boost the generation of secondary particle and radiation sources. This work demonstrates that the combination of high contrast high power lasers and nano-3D printing techniques opens new paths in the intensity frontier and LPI micro-engineering.

  8. 3D imaging LADAR with linear array devices: laser, detector and ROIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Shumpei; Imaki, Masaharu; Tamagawa, Yasuhisa; Akino, Yosuke; Hirai, Akihito; Ishimura, Eitaro; Hirano, Yoshihito

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduces the recent development of 3D imaging LADAR (LAser Detection And Ranging) in Mitsubishi Electric Corporation. The system consists of in-house-made key devices which are linear array: the laser, the detector and the ROIC (Read-Out Integrated Circuit). The laser transmitter is the high power and compact planar waveguide array laser at the wavelength of 1.5 micron. The detector array consists of the low excess noise Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) using the InAlAs multiplication layer. The analog ROIC array, which is fabricated in the SiGe- BiCMOS process, includes the Trans-Impedance Amplifiers (TIA), the peak intensity detectors, the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detectors, and the multiplexers for read-out. This device has the feature in its detection ability for the small signal by optimizing the peak intensity detection circuit. By combining these devices with the one dimensional fast scanner, the real-time 3D range image can be obtained. After the explanations about the key devices, some 3D imaging results are demonstrated using the single element key devices. The imaging using the developed array devices is planned in the near future.

  9. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    PubMed

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  10. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Symes, D. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-08-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications.

  11. Thermographic system with a laser scanning device

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A; Kirillov, V M

    2007-11-30

    It is shown that laser photothermal radiometry (LPTR) in combination with laser beam scanning within the instantaneous field of view of a single-element photodetector can be used to develop a scanning thermal emission microscope. An expression is derived for estimating its temperature resolution. The results of calculations are presented and the factors influencing the spatial lateral resolution of the technique and the time of image formation with the help of an acousto-optical deflector are analysed. (laser applications)

  12. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures.

    PubMed

    Zenou, M; Sa'ar, A; Kotler, Z

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  13. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    PubMed Central

    Zenou, M.; Sa’ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  14. Multiple-input multiple-output 3D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunbo; Wu, Chao; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    A 3D (angle-angle-range) imaging laser radar (LADAR) based on multiple-input multiple-output structure is proposed. In the LADAR, multiple coherent beams are randomly phased to form the structured light field and an APD array detector is utilized to receive the echoes from target. The sampled signals from each element of APD are correlated with the referenced light to reconstruct the local 3D images of target. The 3D panorama of target can be obtained by stitching the local images of all the elements. The system composition is described first, then the operation principle is presented and numerical simulations are provided to show the validity of the proposed scheme.

  15. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'Ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures.

  16. Fast high-resolution 3D total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy by incidence angle scanning and azimuthal averaging

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jérôme; Gueudry, Charles; Münch, Daniel; Cinquin, Bertrand; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Bardin, Sabine; Guérin, Christophe; Senger, Fabrice; Blanchoin, Laurent; Salamero, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is the method of choice to visualize a variety of cellular processes in particular events localized near the plasma membrane of live adherent cells. This imaging technique not relying on particular fluorescent probes provides a high sectioning capability. It is, however, restricted to a single plane. We present here a method based on a versatile design enabling fast multiwavelength azimuthal averaging and incidence angles scanning to computationally reconstruct 3D images sequences. We achieve unprecedented 50-nm axial resolution over a range of 800 nm above the coverslip. We apply this imaging modality to obtain structural and dynamical information about 3D actin architectures. We also temporally decipher distinct Rab11a-dependent exocytosis events in 3D at a rate of seven stacks per second. PMID:25404337

  17. Structured Light Based 3d Scanning for Specular Surface by the Combination of Gray Code and Phase Shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujia; Yilmaz, Alper

    2016-06-01

    Surface reconstruction using coded structured light is considered one of the most reliable techniques for high-quality 3D scanning. With a calibrated projector-camera stereo system, a light pattern is projected onto the scene and imaged by the camera. Correspondences between projected and recovered patterns are computed in the decoding process, which is used to generate 3D point cloud of the surface. However, the indirect illumination effects on the surface, such as subsurface scattering and interreflections, will raise the difficulties in reconstruction. In this paper, we apply maximum min-SW gray code to reduce the indirect illumination effects of the specular surface. We also analysis the errors when comparing the maximum min-SW gray code and the conventional gray code, which justifies that the maximum min-SW gray code has significant superiority to reduce the indirect illumination effects. To achieve sub-pixel accuracy, we project high frequency sinusoidal patterns onto the scene simultaneously. But for specular surface, the high frequency patterns are susceptible to decoding errors. Incorrect decoding of high frequency patterns will result in a loss of depth resolution. Our method to resolve this problem is combining the low frequency maximum min-SW gray code and the high frequency phase shifting code, which achieves dense 3D reconstruction for specular surface. Our contributions include: (i) A complete setup of the structured light based 3D scanning system; (ii) A novel combination technique of the maximum min-SW gray code and phase shifting code. First, phase shifting decoding with sub-pixel accuracy. Then, the maximum min-SW gray code is used to resolve the ambiguity resolution. According to the experimental results and data analysis, our structured light based 3D scanning system enables high quality dense reconstruction of scenes with a small number of images. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons are performed to extract the advantages of our new

  18. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications. PMID:24225364

  19. Efficient terrestrial laser scan segmentation exploiting data structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudabadi, Hamid; Olsen, Michael J.; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-09-01

    New technologies such as lidar enable the rapid collection of massive datasets to model a 3D scene as a point cloud. However, while hardware technology continues to advance, processing 3D point clouds into informative models remains complex and time consuming. A common approach to increase processing efficiently is to segment the point cloud into smaller sections. This paper proposes a novel approach for point cloud segmentation using computer vision algorithms to analyze panoramic representations of individual laser scans. These panoramas can be quickly created using an inherent neighborhood structure that is established during the scanning process, which scans at fixed angular increments in a cylindrical or spherical coordinate system. In the proposed approach, a selected image segmentation algorithm is applied on several input layers exploiting this angular structure including laser intensity, range, normal vectors, and color information. These segments are then mapped back to the 3D point cloud so that modeling can be completed more efficiently. This approach does not depend on pre-defined mathematical models and consequently setting parameters for them. Unlike common geometrical point cloud segmentation methods, the proposed method employs the colorimetric and intensity data as another source of information. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on several datasets encompassing variety of scenes and objects. Results show a very high perceptual (visual) level of segmentation and thereby the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. The proposed method is also more efficient compared to Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC), which is a common approach for point cloud segmentation.

  20. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée.

  1. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Döpp, A; Guillaume, E; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Ta Phuoc, K; Malka, V

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée. PMID:27475557

  2. 3D Quantitative Confocal Laser Microscopy of Ilmenite Volume Distribution in Alpe Arami Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhilov, K. N.

    2001-12-01

    The deep origin of the Alpe Arami garnet lherzolite massif in the Swiss Alps proposed by Dobrzhinetskaya et al. (Science, 1996) has been a focus of heated debate. One of the lines of evidence supporting an exhumation from more than 200 km depth includes the abundance, distribution, and orientation of magnesian ilmenite rods in the oldest generation of olivine. This argument has been disputed in terms of the abundance of ilmenite and consequently the maximum TiO2 content in the discussed olivine. In order to address this issue, we have directly measured the volume fraction of ilmenite of the oldest generation of olivine by applying confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM is a method which allows for three-dimensional imaging and quantitative volume determination by optical sectioning of the objects. The images for 3D reconstruction and measurements were acquired from petrographic thin sections in reflected laser light with 488 nm wavelength. Measurements of more than 80 olivine grains in six thin sections of our material yielded an average volume fraction of 0.31% ilmenite in the oldest generation of olivine from Alpe Arami. This translates into 0.23 wt.% TiO2 in olivine with error in determination of ±0.097 wt.%, a value significantly different from that of 0.02 to 0.03 wt.% TiO2 determined by Hacker et al. (Science, 1997) by a broad-beam microanalysis technique. During the complex geological history of the Alpe Arami massif, several events of metamorphism are recorded which all could have caused increased mobility of the mineral components. Evidence for loss of TiO2 from olivine is the tendency for high densities of ilmenite to be restricted to cores of old grains, the complete absence of ilmenite inclusions from the younger, recrystallized, generation of olivine, and reduction in ilmenite size and abundance in more serpentinized specimens. These observations suggest that only olivine grains with the highest concentrations of ilmenite are close to the

  3. Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment: Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The main theme for our research is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars, shortwave spectrometers, and microwave radiometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools developed by our group. In particular, we define first a large number of cloudy test cases spanning all 3D possibilities not just the customary uniform-overcast ones. Second, for each case, we define a "Best Estimate of Clouds That Affect Shortwave Radiation" using all relevant ARM instruments, notably the new scanning radars, and contribute this to the ARM Archive. Third, we test the ASR-signature radiative transfer model RRTMG_SW for those cases, focusing on the near-IR because of long-standing problems in this spectral region, and work with the developers to improve RRTMG_SW in order to increase its penetration into the modeling community.

  4. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A.; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  5. Feasibility study on 3-D shape analysis of high-aspect-ratio features using through-focus scanning optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Attota, Ravi Kiran; Weck, Peter; Kramar, John A; Bunday, Benjamin; Vartanian, Victor

    2016-07-25

    In-line metrologies currently used in the semiconductor industry are being challenged by the aggressive pace of device scaling and the adoption of novel device architectures. Metrology and process control of three-dimensional (3-D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) features are becoming increasingly important and also challenging. In this paper we present a feasibility study of through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) for 3-D shape analysis of HAR features. TSOM makes use of 3-D optical data collected using a conventional optical microscope for 3-D shape analysis. Simulation results of trenches and holes down to the 11 nm node are presented. The ability of TSOM to analyze an array of HAR features or a single isolated HAR feature is also presented. This allows for the use of targets with area over 100 times smaller than that of conventional gratings, saving valuable real estate on the wafers. Indications are that the sensitivity of TSOM may match or exceed the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) measurement requirements for the next several years. Both simulations and preliminary experimental results are presented. The simplicity, lowcost, high throughput, and nanometer scale 3-D shape sensitivity of TSOM make it an attractive inspection and process monitoring solution for nanomanufacturing. PMID:27464112

  6. Model based assessment of vestibular jawbone thickness using high frequency 3D ultrasound micro-scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habor, Daniel; Neuhaus, Sarah; Vollborn, Thorsten; Wolfart, Stefan; Radermacher, Klaus; Heger, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Endosseous implants are well-established in modern dentistry. However, without appropriate therapeutic intervention, progressive peri-implant bone loss may lead to failing implants. Conventionally, the particularly relevant vestibular jawbone thickness is monitored using radiographic 3D imaging methods. Ionizing radiation, as well as imaging artifacts caused by metallic implants and superstructures are major drawbacks of these imaging modalities. In this study, a high frequency ultrasound (HFUS) based approach to assess the vestibular jawbone thickness is being introduced. It should be emphasized that the presented method does not require ultrasound penetration of the jawbone. An in-vitro study using two porcine specimens with inserted endosseous implants has been carried out to assess the accuracy of our approach. The implant of the first specimen was equipped with a gingiva former while a polymer superstructure was mounted onto the implant of the second specimen. Ultrasound data has been acquired using a 4 degree of freedom (DOF) high frequency (<50MHz) laboratory ultrasound scanner. The ultrasound raw data has been converted to polygon meshes including the surfaces of bone, gingiva, gingiva former (first specimen) and superstructure (second specimen). The meshes are matched with a-priori acquired 3D models of the implant, the superstructure and the gingiva former using a best-fit algorithm. Finally, the vestibular peri-implant bone thickness has been assessed in the resulting 3D models. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated by comparing the ultrasound based thickness measurement with a reference measurement acquired with an optical extra-oral 3D scanner prior to covering the specimens with gingiva. As a final result, the bone thicknesses of the two specimens were measured yielding an error of -46+/-89μm (first specimen) and 70+/-93μm (second specimen).

  7. Accurate 3d Scanning of Damaged Ancient Greek Inscriptions for Revealing Weathered Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, A. I.; Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.; Prignitz, S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper two non-invasive non-destructive alternative techniques to the traditional and invasive technique of squeezes are presented alongside with specialized developed processing methods, aiming to help the epigraphists to reveal and analyse weathered letters in ancient Greek inscriptions carved in masonry or marble. The resulting 3D model would serve as a detailed basis for the epigraphists to try to decipher the inscription. The data were collected by using a Structured Light scanner. The creation of the final accurate three dimensional model is a complicated procedure requiring large computation cost and human effort. It includes the collection of geometric data in limited space and time, the creation of the surface, the noise filtering and the merging of individual surfaces. The use of structured light scanners is time consuming and requires costly hardware and software. Therefore an alternative methodology for collecting 3D data of the inscriptions was also implemented for reasons of comparison. Hence, image sequences from varying distances were collected using a calibrated DSLR camera aiming to reconstruct the 3D scene through SfM techniques in order to evaluate the efficiency and the level of precision and detail of the obtained reconstructed inscriptions. Problems in the acquisition processes as well as difficulties in the alignment step and mesh optimization are also encountered. A meta-processing framework is proposed and analysed. Finally, the results of processing and analysis and the different 3D models are critically inspected and then evaluated by a specialist in terms of accuracy, quality and detail of the model and the capability of revealing damaged and "hidden" letters.

  8. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    PubMed Central

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface, (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  9. Dental scanning in CAD/CAM technologies: laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Faur, Nicolae; Negru, Radu; Romînu, Mihai; Cozarov, Dalibor

    2008-02-01

    Scanning, also called digitizing, is the process of gathering the requisite data from an object. Many different technologies are used to collect three dimensional data. They range from mechanical and very slow, to radiation-based and highly-automated. Each technology has its advantages and disadvantages, and their applications and specifications overlap. The aims of this study are represented by establishing a viable method of digitally representing artifacts of dental casts, proposing a suitable scanner and post-processing software and obtaining 3D Models for the dental applications. The method is represented by the scanning procedure made by different scanners as the implicated materials. Scanners are the medium of data capture. 3D scanners aim to measure and record the relative distance between the object's surface and a known point in space. This geometric data is represented in the form of point cloud data. The contact and no contact scanners were presented. The results show that contact scanning procedures uses a touch probe to record the relative position of points on the objects' surface. This procedure is commonly used in Reverse engineering applications. Its merits are represented by efficiency for objects with low geometric surface detail. Disadvantages are represented by time consuming, this procedure being impractical for artifacts digitization. The non contact scanning procedure implies laser scanning (laser triangulation technology) and photogrammetry. As a conclusion it can be drawn that different types of dental structure needs different types of scanning procedures in order to obtain a competitive complex 3D virtual model that can be used in CAD/CAM technologies.

  10. Laser processes and analytics for high power 3D battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfleging, W.; Zheng, Y.; Mangang, M.; Bruns, M.; Smyrek, P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processes for cutting, modification and structuring of energy storage materials such as electrodes, separator materials and current collectors have a great potential in order to minimize the fabrication costs and to increase the performance and operational lifetime of high power lithium-ion-batteries applicable for stand-alone electric energy storage devices and electric vehicles. Laser direct patterning of battery materials enable a rather new technical approach in order to adjust 3D surface architectures and porosity of composite electrode materials such as LiCoO2, LiMn2O4, LiFePO4, Li(NiMnCo)O2, and Silicon. The architecture design, the increase of active surface area, and the porosity of electrodes or separator layers can be controlled by laser processes and it was shown that a huge impact on electrolyte wetting, lithium-ion diffusion kinetics, cell life-time and cycling stability can be achieved. In general, the ultrafast laser processing can be used for precise surface texturing of battery materials. Nevertheless, regarding cost-efficient production also nanosecond laser material processing can be successfully applied for selected types of energy storage materials. A new concept for an advanced battery manufacturing including laser materials processing is presented. For developing an optimized 3D architecture for high power composite thick film electrodes electrochemical analytics and post mortem analytics using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy were performed. Based on mapping of lithium in composite electrodes, an analytical approach for studying chemical degradation in structured and unstructured lithium-ion batteries will be presented.

  11. Segment based shape matching in terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, Magnus; Rutzinger, Martin; Wichmann, Volker

    2013-04-01

    Change detection of dynamic surface elements is an important application in geomorphological analysis. In order to be able to investigate such changes, the high spatial resolution and accuracy of the laser scanning technology is exploited. Dealing with laser scanning data, most change detection approaches are aiming at the assessment of volumetric changes due to erosion and deposition by geomorphologic processes. In these cases the areas of erosion and deposition are spatially separated and can be investigated in a cut-and-fill analysis. Where slow changes are controlled by interior deformation of material mixtures due to gravity, surface changes are mostly due to slight movements of objects and not to absolute material losses and gains. In complex terrain an object-based approach for the reconstruction of 3D change vectors is required. Depending on the level of scale, terrain can be subdivided into a large number of small planar patches. Using 3D point cloud data from terrestrial laser scanning, this can be done by a planar segmentation procedure grouping laser points of flat surfaces. Rotating each point cloud segment into its best fit plane, its 2D footprint shows specific local surface characteristics. Thus, each surface patch has a unique fingerprint that can be described by a variety of segment features. In an experimental framework we test the capability of shape based matching for the derivation of change vectors on dynamic surfaces. To consider different data characteristics such as varying point densities and scan perspectives, terrestrial laser scans of a rock glacier are acquired from three positions with an Optech ILRIS3D terrestrial laser scanner. Additionally, the point density is manipulated in order to simulate three different levels of point density. For the matching of surface patches, we test various non-metric shape features such as roundness, concavity and elongation. Besides, we use metric shape features such as patch area, perimeter and the

  12. Deconvolution approach for 3D scanning microscopy with helical phase engineering.

    PubMed

    Roider, Clemens; Heintzmann, Rainer; Piestun, Rafael; Jesacher, Alexander

    2016-07-11

    RESCH (refocusing after scanning using helical phase engineering) microscopy is a scanning technique using engineered point spread functions which provides volumetric information. We present a strategy for processing the collected raw data with a multi-view maximum likelihood deconvolution algorithm, which inherently comprises the resolution gain of pixel-reassignment microscopy. The method, which we term MD-RESCH (for multi-view deconvolved RESCH), achieves in our current implementation a 20% resolution advantage along all three axes compared to RESCH and confocal microscopy. Along the axial direction, the resolution is comparable to that of image scanning microscopy. However, because the method inherently reconstructs a volume from a single 2D scan, a significantly higher optical sectioning becomes directly visible to the user, which would otherwise require collecting multiple 2D scans taken at a series of axial positions. Further, we introduce the use of a single-helical detection PSF to obtain an increased post-acquisition refocusing range. We present data from numerical simulations as well as experiments to confirm the validity of our approach. PMID:27410820

  13. Development of a temporal multiplexed 3D beam-scanning Lissajous trajectory microscope for rapid multimodal volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Justin A.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Dinh, Janny; Sarkar, Sreya; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-03-01

    A beam-scanning microscope is described based on a temporally multiplexed Lissajous trajectory for achieving 1 kHz frame rate 3D imaging. The microscope utilizes two fast-scan resonant mirrors to direct the optical beam on a circuitous, Lissajous trajectory through the field of view. Acquisition of two simultaneous focal planes is achieved by implementation of an optical delay line, producing a second incident beam at a different focal plane relative to the initial incident beam. High frame rates are achieved by separating the full time-domain data into shorter sub-trajectories resulting in undersampling of the field of view. A model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) 3D in-painting algorithm is utilized for interpolating the missing data to recover full images. The MBIR algorithm uses a maximum a posteriori estimation with a generalized Gaussian Markov random field prior model for image interpolation. Because images are acquired using photomultiplier tubes or photodiodes, parallelization for multi-channel imaging is straightforward. Preliminary results obtained using a Lissajous trajectory beam-scanning approach coupled with temporal multiplexing by the implementation of an optical delay line demonstrate the ability to acquire 2 distinct focal planes simultaneously at frame rates >450 Hz for full 512 × 512 images. The use of multi-channel data acquisition cards allows for simultaneous multimodal image acquisition with perfect image registry between all imaging modalities. Also discussed here is the implementation of Lissajous trajectory beam-scanning on commercially available microscope hardware.

  14. Microcapsules and 3D customizable shelled microenvironments from laser direct-written microbeads.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, David M; Dias, Andrew D; Corr, David T

    2016-10-01

    Microcapsules are shelled 3D microenvironments, with a liquid core. These core-shelled structures enable cell-cell contact, cellular proliferation and aggregation within the capsule, and can be utilized for controlled release of encapsulated contents. Traditional microcapsule fabrication methods provide limited control of capsule size, and are unable to control capsule placement. To overcome these limitations, we demonstrate size and spatial control of poly-l-lysine and chitosan microcapsules, using laser direct-write (LDW) printing, and subsequent processing, of alginate microbeads. Additionally, microbeads were used as volume pixels (voxels) to form continuous 3D hydrogel structures, which were processed like capsules, to form custom shelled aqueous-core 3D structures of prescribed geometry; such as strands, rings, and bifurcations. Heterogeneous structures were also created with controlled initial locations of different cell types, to demonstrate the ability to prescribe cell signaling (heterotypic and homotypic) in co-culture conditions. Herein, we demonstrate LDW's ability to fabricate intricate 3D structures, essentially with "printed macroporosity," and to precisely control structural composition by bottom-up fabrication in a bead-by-bead manner. The structural and compositional control afforded by this process enables the creation of a wide range of new constructs, with many potential applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2264-2274. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27070458

  15. Accuracy evaluation of segmentation for high resolution imagery and 3D laser point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Nina; Chen, Ninghua; Chen, Jianyu

    2014-09-01

    High resolution satellite imagery and 3D laser point cloud data provide precise geometry, rich spectral information and clear texture of feature. The segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images and 3D laser point cloud is the basis of object-oriented remote sensing image analysis, for the segmentation results will directly influence the accuracy of subsequent analysis and discrimination. Currently, there still lacks a common segmentation theory to support these algorithms. So when we face a specific problem, we should determine applicability of the segmentation method through segmentation accuracy assessment, and then determine an optimal segmentation. To today, the most common method for evaluating the effectiveness of a segmentation method is subjective evaluation and supervised evaluation. For providing a more objective evaluation result, we have carried out following work. Analysis and comparison previous proposed image segmentation accuracy evaluation methods, which are area-based metrics, location-based metrics and combinations metrics. 3D point cloud data, which was gathered by Reigl VZ1000, was used to make two-dimensional transformation of point cloud data. The object-oriented segmentation result of aquaculture farm, building and farmland polygons were used as test object and adopted to evaluate segmentation accuracy.

  16. Laser 3-D measuring system and real-time visual feedback for teaching and correcting breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povšič, Klemen; Fležar, Matjaž; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel method for real-time 3-D body-shape measurement during breathing based on the laser multiple-line triangulation principle. The laser projector illuminates the measured surface with a pattern of 33 equally inclined light planes. Simultaneously, the camera records the distorted light pattern from a different viewpoint. The acquired images are transferred to a personal computer, where the 3-D surface reconstruction, shape analysis, and display are performed in real time. The measured surface displacements are displayed with a color palette, which enables visual feedback to the patient while breathing is being taught. The measuring range is approximately 400×600×500 mm in width, height, and depth, respectively, and the accuracy of the calibrated apparatus is +/-0.7 mm. The system was evaluated by means of its capability to distinguish between different breathing patterns. The accuracy of the measured volumes of chest-wall deformation during breathing was verified using standard methods of volume measurements. The results show that the presented 3-D measuring system with visual feedback has great potential as a diagnostic and training assistance tool when monitoring and evaluating the breathing pattern, because it offers a simple and effective method of graphical communication with the patient.

  17. The influence of NIR femtosecond laser radiation on the viability of 3D stem cell clusters and tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Gorjup, Erwin; LeHarzic, Ronan; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Adult human and rat pancreas stem cells as well as tumor spheroids were irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range at high transient GW/cm2 and TW/cm2 intensities. The cellular response to the laser exposure was probed by the detection of modifications of NAD(P)H autofluorescence, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA strand breaks (TUNEL-assay), and viability (live/dead test). The results confirm that long-term scanning of stem cells can be performed at appropriate laser exposure parameters without a measurable impact on the cellular metabolism and vitality. In addition, it was proven that a targeted inactivation of a particular single stem cells or a single tumour cell inside a 3D cell cluster using single point illumination at TW/cm2 laser intensities can be performed without affecting neighbouring cells. Therefore multiphoton microscopes can be considered as biosafe tools for long-term analysis of stem cells as well as highly precise optical knocking out of single cells within cell clusters and tissues.

  18. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  19. Design of a VLSI scan conversion processor for high-performance 3-D graphics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.U.

    1988-01-01

    Scan-conversion processing is the bottleneck in the image generation process. To solve the problem of smooth shading and hidden surface elimination, a new processor architecture was invented which has been labeled as a scan-conversion processor architecture (SCP). The SCP is designed to perform hidden surface elimination and scan conversion for 64 pixels. The color intensities are dual-buffered so that when one buffer is being updated the other can be scanned out. Z-depth is used to perform the hidden surface elimination. The key operation performed by the SCP is the evaluation of linear functions of a form like F(X,Y) = A X + B Y + C. The computation is further simplified by using incremental addition. The z-depth buffer and the color buffers are incorporated onto the same chip. The SCP receives from its preprocessor the information for the definition of polygons and the computation of z-depth and RGB color intensities. Many copies of this processor will be used in a high-performance graphics system.

  20. Uncertainty studies of topographical measurements on steel surface corrosion by 3D scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Pereda, M D; Canafoglia, M E; Bilmes, P; Llorente, C; Bonetto, R

    2012-02-01

    Pitting corrosion is a damage mechanism quite serious and dangerous in both carbon steel boiler tubes for power plants which are vital to most industries and stainless steels for orthopedic human implants whose demand, due to the increase of life expectation and rate of traffic accidents, has sharply increased. Reliable methods to characterize this kind of damage are becoming increasingly necessary, when trying to evaluate the advance of damage and to establish the best procedures for component inspection in order to determine remaining lives and failure mitigation. A study about the uncertainties on the topographies of corrosion pits from 3D SEM images, obtained at low magnifications (where errors are greater) and different stage tilt angles were carried out using an in-house software previously developed. Additionally, measurements of pit depths on biomaterial surfaces, subjected to two different surface treatments on stainless steels, were carried out. The different depth distributions observed were in agreement with electrochemical measurements. PMID:22051087

  1. Assessing target design robustness for Shock Ignition using 3D laser raytracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavi, Angelo; Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) is a laser direct-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme in which fuel compression and hot spot formation are separated. Shock ignition shows potential for high gain at laser energy below 1 MJ (see review Ref.), and could be tested on present large scale facilities. We produced an analytical model for SI which allows rescaling of target and laser drive parameters starting from a given point design. The goal is to redefine a laser-target configuration increasing the robustness while preserving its performance. We developed a metric for ignition margins specific to SI. We report on simulations of rescaled targets using 2D hydrodynamic fluid model with 3D laser raytracing. The robustness with respect to target fabrication parameters and laser facility fluctuations will be assessed for an original reference design as well as for a rescaled target, testing the accuracy of the ignition margin predictor just developed. Work supported by the Italian MIUR Project PRIN2012AY5LEL.

  2. 3D real-time measurement system of seam with laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-shuang; Huang, Jun-fen

    2014-02-01

    3-D Real-time Measurement System of seam outline based on Moiré Projection is proposed and designed. The system is composed of LD, grating, CCD, video A/D, FPGA, DSP and an output interface. The principle and hardware makeup of high-speed and real-time image processing circuit based on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) are introduced. Noise generation mechanism in poor welding field conditions is analyzed when Moiré stripes are projected on a welding workpiece surface. Median filter is adopted to smooth the acquired original laser image of seam, and then measurement results of a 3-D outline image of weld groove are provided.

  3. Direct laser writing of 3D polymer micro/nanostructures on metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekštytė, Sima; Žukauskas, Albertas; Purlys, Vytautas; Gordienko, Yuri; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2013-04-01

    Spectra of fields for applications of polymeric 3D micro/nanostructures are rapidly widening thus demanding the development of versatile precise and efficient fabrication methods that can be used to process a variety of materials and could be implemented to form tiny devices on a variety of surfaces without influencing their structural quality. We present the latest results obtained using laser lithography approach: 3D polymeric structures with submicrometer spatial resolution on different opaque surfaces such as semiconductors (Si) and various metals (Cr, Al, Fe and Ti). The photostructuring was performed using a range of photosensitive materials such as acrylate based AKRE23, acrylated biodegradable PEG-DA-258, epoxy based mr-NIL 6000, hybrid organic-inorganic SZ2080 and Ormocore b59.

  4. Direct laser writing of 3D micro/nanostructures on opaque surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekštytė, Sima; Žukauskas, Albertas; Purlys, Vytautas; Gordienko, Yuri; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2012-06-01

    Spectra of fields for applications of polymeric 3D micro/nanostructures is rapidly widening thus demanding the development of versatile precise and efficient fabrication methods that can be used to process a variety of materials and could be implemented to form tiny devices on a variety of surfaces without influencing their structural quality. We present the latest results obtained using laser lithography approach: 3D polymeric structures with submicrometer spatial resolution on different opaque surfaces such as semiconductors (Si) and various metals (Cr, Al, Fe, Ti). The photostructuring was performed using a range of photosensitive materials such as acrylate based AKRE23, acrylated biodegradable PEG-DA-258, epoxy based mr-NIL 6000, hybrid organic-inorganic SZ2080 and Ormocore b59.

  5. 3D Micropatterned Surface Inspired by Salvinia molesta via Direct Laser Lithography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic functional surfaces are attracting increasing attention for their relevant technological applications. Despite these efforts, inherent limitations of microfabrication techniques prevent the replication of complex hierarchical microstructures. Using a 3D laser lithography technique, we fabricated a 3D patterned surface bioinspired to Salvinia molesta leaves. The artificial hairs, with crownlike heads, were reproduced by scaling down (ca. 100 times smaller) the dimensions of natural features, so that microscale hairs with submicrometric resolution were attained. The micropatterned surface, in analogy with the natural model, shows interesting properties in terms of hydrophobicity and air retention when submerged by water, even if realized with a hydrophilic material. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated the capability to promote localized condensation of water droplets from moisture in the atmosphere. PMID:26558410

  6. Experimental comparison of laser speckle projection and array projection for high-speed 3D measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heist, Stefan; Lutzke, Peter; Dietrich, Patrick; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    In many application areas, stereo vision-based active triangulation systems are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3-D) surface shape of measurement objects. Typically, in order to solve the correspondence problem and increase the accuracy of the pixel assignment, a sequence of patterns is projected onto the object's surface and simultaneously recorded by two cameras. Most 3-D measurement systems are limited to static objects. In order to enhance their speed, it is necessary to use fast cameras as well as fast projection systems. Although high-speed camera systems are available, pattern projection at high frame rates is a difficult task and only a few techniques exist at the moment. In this contribution, we compare two different projection approaches, a laser-based speckle projection unit and an LED-based multi-aperture projection system, with regard to the achievable point cloud completeness and accuracy.

  7. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-07-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications.

  8. Digital-Particle-Image-Velocimetry (DPIV) in a scanning light-sheet: 3D starting flow around a short cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.

    1995-08-01

    Scanning-Particle-Image-Velocimetry Technique (SPIV), introduced by Brücker (1992) and Brücker and Althaus (1992), offers the quantitative investigation of three-dimensional vortical structures in unsteady flows. On principle, this technique combines classical Particle-Image-Velocimetry (PIV) with volume scanning using a scanning light-sheet. In our previous studies, single scans obtained from photographic frame series were evaluated to show the instantaneous vortical structure of the respective flow phenomena. Here, continuous video recordings are processed to capture also the temporal information for the study of the set-up of 3D effects in the cylinder wake. The flow is continuously sampled in depth by the scanning light-sheet and in each of the parallel planes frame-to-frame cross-correlation of the video images (DPIV) is applied to obtain the 2D velocity field. Because the scanning frequency and repetition rate is high in comparison with the characteristic time-scale of the flow, the evaluation provides a complete time-record of the 3D flow during the starting process. With use of the continuity concept as described by Robinson and Rockwell (1993), we obtained in addition the out-of-plane component of the velocity in spanwise direction. This in view, the described technique enabled the reconstruction of the three-dimensional time-dependent velocity and vorticity field. The visualization of the dynamical behaviour of these quantities as, e.g. by video, gave a good impression of the spanwise flow showing the “tornado-like” suction effect of the starting vortices.

  9. 3-D patterning of silicon by laser-initiated, liquid-assisted colloidal (LILAC) lithography.

    PubMed

    Ulmeanu, M; Grubb, M P; Jipa, F; Quignon, B; Ashfold, M N R

    2015-06-01

    We report a comprehensive study of laser-initiated, liquid-assisted colloidal (LILAC) lithography, and illustrate its utility in patterning silicon substrates. The method combines single shot laser irradiation (frequency doubled Ti-sapphire laser, 50fs pulse duration, 400nm wavelength) and medium-tuned optical near-field effects around arrays of silica colloidal particles to achieve 3-D surface patterning of silicon. A monolayer (or multilayers) of hexagonal close packed silica colloidal particles act as a mask and offer a route to liquid-tuned optical near field enhancement effects. The resulting patterns are shown to depend on the difference in refractive index of the colloidal particles (ncolloid) and the liquid (nliquid) in which they are immersed. Two different topographies are demonstrated experimentally: (a) arrays of bumps, centred beneath the original colloidal particles, when using liquids with nliquidncolloid - and explained with the aid of complementary Mie scattering simulations. The LILAC lithography technique has potential for rapid, large area, organized 3-D patterning of silicon (and related) substrates. PMID:25465198

  10. Automatic analysis for neuron by confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Kouhei; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Mataga, Nobuko; Hensh, Takao K.; Taki, Katuhiko

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that recognizes both the macro- and microscopic configurations of nerve cells and automatically performs the necessary 3-D measurements and functional classification of spines. The acquisition of 3-D images of cranial nerves has been enabled by the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope, although the highly accurate 3-D measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves and their classification based on their configurations have not yet been accomplished. In this study, in order to obtain highly accurate measurements of the microscopic structures of cranial nerves, existing positions of spines were predicted by the 2-D image processing of tomographic images. Next, based on the positions that were predicted on the 2-D images, the positions and configurations of the spines were determined more accurately by 3-D image processing of the volume data. We report the successful construction of an automatic analysis system that uses a coarse-to-fine technique to analyze the microscopic structures of cranial nerves with high speed and accuracy by combining 2-D and 3-D image analyses.

  11. Study of 3D remote sensing system based on optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihu; Yan, Lei

    2009-06-01

    High-precision and real-time remote sensing imaging system is an important part of remote sensing development. Holography is a method of wave front record and recovery which was presented by Dennis Gabor. As a new kind of holography techniques, Optical scanning holography (OSH) and remote sensing imaging are intended to be combined together and applied in acquisition and interference measurement of remote sensing. The key principles and applicability of OSH are studied and the mathematic relation between Fresnel Zone Plate number, numerical aperture and object distance was deduced, which are proved to be feasible for OSH to apply in large scale remote sensing. At last, a new three-dimensional reflected OSH remote sensing imaging system is designed with the combination of scanning technique to record hologram patterns of large scale remote sensing scenes. This scheme is helpful for expanding OSH technique to remote sensing in future.

  12. Nanoscale 3D cellular imaging by axial scanning transmission electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F.; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Azari, Afrouz A.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Zhang, Guofeng; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Leapman, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional structural information about supramolecular assemblies and organelles in a cellular context but image degradation, caused by scattering of transmitted electrons, limits applicability in specimens thicker than 300 nm. We show that scanning transmission electron tomography of 1000 nm thick samples using axial detection provides resolution comparable to conventional electron tomography. The method is demonstrated by reconstructing a human erythrocyte infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:19718033

  13. Full-color holographic 3D imaging system using color optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hayan; Kim, You Seok; Kim, Taegeun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a full-color holographic three-dimensional imaging system that composes a recording stage, a transmission and processing stage and reconstruction stage. In recording stage, color optical scanning holography (OSH) records the complex RGB holograms of an object. In transmission and processing stage, the recorded complex RGB holograms are transmitted to the reconstruction stage after conversion to off-axis RGB holograms. In reconstruction stage, the off-axis RGB holograms are reconstructed optically.

  14. 3D surface measurement for medical application--technical comparison of two established industrial surface scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Haberstok, J; Kovacs, L; Boerner, B I; Schwenzer, N; Juergens, P; Zeihofer, H F; Holberg, C

    2008-02-01

    In 3D mapping of flexible surfaces (e.g. human faces) measurement errors due to movement or positioning occur. Aggravated by equipment- or researcher-caused mistakes considerable deviations can result. Therefore first the appliances' precision handling and reliability in clinical environment must be established. Aim of this study was to investigate accuracy and precision of two contact-free 3D measurement systems (white light vs. laser). Standard specimens of known diameter for sphere deviation, touch deviation and plane deviation were tested. Both systems are appropriate for medical application acquiring solid data (laser system is superior concerning robustness, while accuracy is poorer and input time (1.5-2.5 s) longer. Due to the clinical demand the white-light system is superior in a laboratory environment, while the laser system is easier to handle under non-laboratory conditions. PMID:18333407

  15. Surface 3D nanostructuring by tightly focused laser pulse: simulations by Lagrangian code and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inogamov, Nail A.; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.

    2016-02-01

    There are many important applications in which the ultrashort diffraction-limited and therefore tightly focused laser pulses irradiates metal films mounted on dielectric substrate. Here we present the detailed picture of laser peeling and 3D structure formation of the thin (relative to a depth of a heat affected zone in the bulk targets) gold films on glass substrate. The underlying physics of such diffraction-limited laser peeling was not well understood previously. Our approach is based on a physical model which takes into consideration the new calculations of the two-temperature (2T) equation of state (2T EoS) and the two-temperature transport coefficients together with the coupling parameter between electron and ion subsystems. The usage of the 2T EoS and the kinetic coefficients is required because absorption of an ultrashort pulse with duration of 10-1000 fs excites electron subsystem of metal and transfers substance into the 2T state with hot electrons (typical electron temperatures 1-3 eV) and much colder ions. It is shown that formation of submicrometer-sized 3D structures is a result of the electron-ion energy transfer, melting, and delamination of film from substrate under combined action of electron and ion pressures, capillary deceleration of the delaminated liquid metal or semiconductor, and ultrafast freezing of molten material. We found that the freezing is going in non-equilibrium regime with strongly overcooled liquid phase. In this case the Stefan approximation is non-applicable because the solidification front speed is limited by the diffusion rate of atoms in the molten material. To solve the problem we have developed the 2T Lagrangian code including all this reach physics in. We also used the high-performance combined Monte- Carlo and molecular dynamics code for simulation of surface 3D nanostructuring at later times after completion of electron-ion relaxation.

  16. Parallel graph search: application to intraretinal layer segmentation of 3D macular OCT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Image segmentation is of paramount importance for quantitative analysis of medical image data. Recently, a 3-D graph search method which can detect globally optimal interacting surfaces with respect to the cost function of volumetric images has been introduced, and its utility demonstrated in several application areas. Although the method provides excellent segmentation accuracy, its limitation is a slow processing speed when many surfaces are simultaneously segmented in large volumetric datasets. Here, we propose a novel method of parallel graph search, which overcomes the limitation and allows the quick detection of multiple surfaces. To demonstrate the obtained performance with respect to segmentation accuracy and processing speedup, the new approach was applied to retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) image data and compared with the performance of the former non-parallel method. Our parallel graph search methods for single and double surface detection are approximately 267 and 181 times faster than the original graph search approach in 5 macular OCT volumes (200 x 5 x 1024 voxels) acquired from the right eyes of 5 normal subjects. The resulting segmentation differences were small as demonstrated by the mean unsigned differences between the non-parallel and parallel methods of 0.0 +/- 0.0 voxels (0.0 +/- 0.0 μm) and 0.27 +/- 0.34 voxels (0.53 +/- 0.66 μm) for the single- and dual-surface approaches, respectively.

  17. Foot roll-over evaluation based on 3D dynamic foot scan.

    PubMed

    Samson, William; Van Hamme, Angèle; Sanchez, Stéphane; Chèze, Laurence; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Feipel, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Foot roll-over is commonly analyzed to evaluate gait pathologies. The current study utilized a dynamic foot scanner (DFS) to analyze foot roll-over. The right feet of ten healthy subjects were assessed during gait trials with a DFS system integrated into a walkway. A foot sole picture was computed by vertically projecting points from the 3D foot shape which were lower than a threshold height of 15 mm. A 'height' value of these projected points was determined; corresponding to the initial vertical coordinates prior to projection. Similar to pedobarographic analysis, the foot sole picture was segmented into anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) to process mean height (average of height data by ROI) and projected surface (area of the projected foot sole by ROI). Results showed that these variables evolved differently to plantar pressure data previously reported in the literature, mainly due to the specificity of each physical quantity (millimeters vs Pascals). Compared to plantar pressure data arising from surface contact by the foot, the current method takes into account the whole plantar aspect of the foot, including the parts that do not make contact with the support surface. The current approach using height data could contribute to a better understanding of specific aspects of foot motion during walking, such as plantar arch height and the windlass mechanism. Results of this study show the underlying method is reliable. Further investigation is required to validate the DFS measurements within a clinical context, prior to implementation into clinical practice. PMID:24119779

  18. A 3D dose model for low level laser / led therapy biostimulation and bioinhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, James D.

    2008-03-01

    There have been numerous reports describing the phenomena of biostimulation and bioinhibition using low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and other light and IR sources within the laboratory and in clinical trials. Stimulation or inhibition employed correctly has been shown clinically to reduce pain, improve tissue repair, resolve inflammation and stimulate the immune system. All these effects are sensitive to different irradiance and / or different energy (sometimes described as dose rate or fluence rate effects). The typical ranges for biostimulation and bioinhibition will be examined and a 3D Arndt Schulz style model proposed to illustrate possible 'dose sweet spots' for the intended clinical effects.

  19. Applications of Non-destructive methods (GPR and 3D Laser Scanner) in Historic Masonry Arch Bridge Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alani, Amir; Banks, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    There exist approximately 70,000 masonry arch bridge spans (brick and stone) in the UK with tens of thousands more throughout Europe. A significant number of these bridges are still in operation and form part of the road and rail network systems in many countries. A great majority of these bridges are in desperate need of repair and maintenance. Applications of non-destructive testing methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), 3D laser scanning, accelerometer sensors and vibration detecting sensors amongst many others have been used to assess and monitor such structures in the past few years. This presentation provides results of the applications of a 2GHz GPR antenna system and a 3D laser scanner on a historic masonry arch bridge (the Old Bridge, Aylesford) located in Kent, in the south east of England. The older part of the bridge (the mid-span) is 860 years old. The bridge was the subject of a major alteration in 1811. This presentation forms part of a larger ongoing study which is using the two above mentioned non-destructive methods for long-term monitoring of the bridge. The adopted survey planning strategy and technique, data acquisition and processing as well as challenges encountered during actual survey and fieldworks have been discussed in this presentation. As a result of this study the position of different layers of the deck structure has been established with the identification of the original stone base of the bridge. This information in addition to the location of a number of structural ties (anchors - remedial work carried out previously) in the absence of reliable and accurate design details proved to be extremely useful for the modelling of the bridge using the finite element method. Results of the 3D laser scanning of the bridge have also been presented which have provided invaluable data essential for the accurate modelling of the bridge as well as the long term monitoring of the bridge. 2014 EGU-GA GI3.1 Session, organised by COST Action

  20. Spectrally encoded confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuankai K.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2010-02-01

    Fundus imaging has become an essential clinical diagnostic tool in ophthalmology. Current generation scanning laser ophthalmoscopes (SLO) offer advantages over conventional fundus photography and indirect ophthalmoscopy in terms of light efficiency and contrast. As a result of the ability of SLO to provide rapid, continuous imaging of retinal structures and its versatility in accommodating a variety of illumination wavelengths, allowing for imaging of both endogenous and exogenous fluorescent contrast agents, SLO has become a powerful tool for the characterization of retinal pathologies. However, common implementations of SLO, such as the confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (CSLO) and line-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO), require imaging or multidimensional scanning elements which are typically implemented in bulk optics placed close to the subject eye. Here, we apply a spectral encoding technique in one dimension combined with single-axis lateral scanning to create a spectrally encoded confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SECSLO) which is fully confocal. This novel implementation of the SLO allows for high contrast, high resolution in vivo human retinal imaging with image transmission through a single-mode optical fiber. Furthermore, the scanning optics are similar and the detection engine is identical to that of current-generation spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) systems, potentially allowing for a simplistic implementation of a joint SECSLO-SDOCT imaging system.

  1. Scanning all-fiber-optic endomicroscopy system for 3D nonlinear optical imaging of biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Leng, Yuxin; Xi, Jiefeng; Li, Xingde

    2009-01-01

    An extremely compact all-fiber-optic scanning endomicroscopy system was developed for two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of biological samples. A conventional double-clad fiber (DCF) was employed in the endomicroscope for single-mode femtosecond pulse delivery, multimode nonlinear optical signals collection and fast two-dimensional scanning. A single photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) with negative group velocity dispersion at two-photon excitation wavelength (i.e. ~810 nm) was used for pulse prechirping in replacement of a bulky grating/lens-based pulse stretcher. The combined use of DCF and PBF in the endomicroscopy system made the endomicroscope basically a plug-and-play unit. The excellent imaging ability of the extremely compact all-fiber-optic nonlinear optical endomicroscopy system was demonstrated by SHG imaging of rat tail tendon and depth-resolved TPF imaging of epithelial tissues stained with acridine orange. The preliminary results suggested the promising potential of this extremely compact all-fiber-optic endomicroscopy system for real-time assessment of both epithelial and stromal structures in luminal organs. PMID:19434122

  2. Correcting for 3D distortion when using backscattered electron detectors in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Jacob M

    2009-01-01

    A variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM) can produce a topographic surface relief of a physical object under examination, in addition to its two-dimensional (2D) image. This topographic surface relief is especially helpful when dealing with porous rock because it may elucidate the pore-space structure as well as grain shape and size. Whether the image accurately reproduces the physical object depends on the management of the hardware, acquisition, and postprocessing. Two problems become apparent during testing: (a) a topographic surface relief of a precision ball bearing is distorted and does not correspond to the physical dimensions of the actual sphere and (b) an image of a topographic surface relief of a Berea sandstone is geometrically tilted and topographically distorted even after standard corrections are applied. The procedure presented here is to ensure the veracity of the image, and includes: (a) adjusting the brightness and contrast levels originally provided by the manufacturer and (b) tuning the amplifiers of the backscatter detector plates to be equal to each other, and producing zero voltage when VPSEM is idle. This procedure is tested and verified on the said two physical samples. SCANNING 31: 59-64, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:19204999

  3. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  4. In vitro and in vivo biocompatibility study on laser 3D microstructurable polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Baltriukiene, Daiva; Kraniauskas, Antanas; Danilevicius, Paulius; Jarasiene, Rasa; Sirmenis, Raimondas; Zukauskas, Albertas; Balciunas, Evaldas; Purlys, Vytautas; Gadonas, Roaldas; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Sirvydis, Vytautas; Piskarskas, Algis

    2012-09-01

    Films and microstructured scaffolds have been fabricated using direct laser writing out of different polymers: hybrid organic-inorganic ORMOCORE b59, acrylate-based AKRE23, novel organic-inorganic Zr containing hybrid SZ2080, and biodegradable PEG-DA-258. Adult myogenic stem cells were grown on these surfaces in vitro. Their adhesion, growth, and viability test results suggest good potential applicability of the materials in biomedical practice. Pieces of these polymers were implanted in rat's paravertebral back tissue. Histological examination of the implants and surrounding tissue ex vivo after 3 weeks of implantation was conducted and results show the materials to be at least as biocompatible as surgical clips or sutures. The applied direct laser writing technique seems to offer good future prospects in a polymeric 3D scaffold design for artificial tissue engineering with autologous stem cells.

  5. Fusion of 3D laser scanner and depth images for obstacle recognition in mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzan, Sebastian; Kasprzyk, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The problem of obstacle detection and recognition or, generally, scene mapping is one of the most investigated problems in computer vision, especially in mobile applications. In this paper a fused optical system using depth information with color images gathered from the Microsoft Kinect sensor and 3D laser range scanner data is proposed for obstacle detection and ground estimation in real-time mobile systems. The algorithm consists of feature extraction in the laser range images, processing of the depth information from the Kinect sensor, fusion of the sensor information, and classification of the data into two separate categories: road and obstacle. Exemplary results are presented and it is shown that fusion of information gathered from different sources increases the effectiveness of the obstacle detection in different scenarios, and it can be used successfully for road surface mapping.

  6. Preliminary study of surface modification of 3D Poly (ɛ - caprolactone) scaffolds by ultrashort laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalova, A.; Bliznakova, I.; Iordanova, E.; Yankov, G.; Grozeva, M.; Ostrowska, B.

    2016-02-01

    Three - dimensional poly (e- caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as suitable biocompatible material for manufacturing tissue replacements are utilized for tissue engineering purposes. The porous structures are fabricated by rapid prototyping method (Bioscaffolder) based on hypodermic dispensing process. The consecution of experiments demonstrated the possibility on creation of surface micro formations, applying different laser fluences, at 1 kHz repetition rate for fixed time of exposure 1 sec at 800 nm central wavelength. The combination of both methods offers possibilities for successful production of 3D matrices with modified surfaces. The obtained results of laser - induced surface modifications of PCL demonstrate the potential of the method to microprocess this kind of material for possible applications in regenerative medicine.

  7. Shaping of light beams by 3D direct laser writing on facets of nonlinear crystals.

    PubMed

    Lightman, Shlomi; Gvishi, Raz; Hurvitz, Gilad; Arie, Ady

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally spatial-mode conversions of light beams generated in a quadratic nonlinear process by micron-scale structures placed on the facets of nonlinear crystals. These structures were printed on the crystal facets using a three-dimensional (3D) direct laser writing system. The functional structures were designed to modify the phase of the beam at specific wavelengths, thereby enabling conversion of a fundamental Gaussian laser beam into different high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes, Laguerre-Gaussian modes, and zeroth-order Bessel beams of the second harmonic. This facet functionalization opens exciting new opportunities for robust and compact beam shaping in a nonlinear interaction without compromising the conversion efficiency. PMID:26421556

  8. Point-to-plane registration of terrestrial laser scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Darion; Bethel, James; Crawford, Melba

    2012-08-01

    The registration of pairs of Terrestrial Laser Scanning data (TLS) is an integral precursor to 3D data analysis. Of specific interest in this research work is the class of approaches that is considered to be fine registration and which does not require any targets or tie points. This paper presents a pairwise fine registration approach called P2P that is formulated using the General Least Squares adjustment model. Given some initial registration parameters, the proposed P2P approach utilizes the scanned points and estimated planar features of both scans, along with their stochastic properties. These quantities are used to determine the optimum registration parameters in the least squares sense. The proposed P2P approach was tested on both simulated and real TLS data, and experimental results showed it to be four times more accurate than the registration approach of Chen and Medioni (1991).

  9. Laser lithography by photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.; Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L.

    1993-06-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using a photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) for laser lithography. A contrast enhancement material (CEM) is coated onto a sample slide and coupled to the prism of a PSTM. The CEM becomes transparent above a laser (HeCd at a wavelength of 442 nm) intensity threshold attained due to the proximity of the probe tip. The same surface can then be inspected using the given experimental configuration by replacing the HeCd laser line with a non-exposing 633-nm HeNe laser line. Direct patterns can be produced by varying the exposure time and the shape of the probe tip.

  10. A new algorithm of laser 3D visualization based on space-slice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Song, Yanfeng; Song, Yong; Cao, Jie; Hao, Qun

    2013-12-01

    Traditional visualization algorithms based on three-dimensional (3D) laser point cloud data consist of two steps: stripe point cloud data into different target objects and establish the 3D surface models of the target objects to realize visualization using interpolation point or surface fitting method. However, some disadvantages, such as low efficiency, loss of image details, exist in most of these algorithms. In order to cope with these problems, a 3D visualization algorithm based on space-slice is proposed in this paper, which includes two steps: data classification and image reconstruction. In the first step, edge detection method is used to check the parametric continuity and extract edges to classify data into different target regions preliminarily. In the second stage, the divided data is split further into space-slice according to coordinates. Based on space-slice of the point cloud data, one-dimensional interpolation methods is adopted to get the curves connected by each group of cloud point data smoother. In the end, these interpolation points obtained from each group are made by the use of getting the fitting surface. As expected, visual morphology of the objects is obtained. The simulation experiment results compared with real scenes show that the final visual images have explicit details and the overall visual result is natural.

  11. Laser-Micro/Nanofabricated 3D Polymers for Tissue Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevičius, P.; Žukauskas, A.; Bičkauskaitė, G.; Purlys, V.; Rutkauskas, M.; Gertus, T.; Paipulas, D.; Matukaitė, J.; Baltriukienė, D.; Malinauskas, M.

    2011-01-01

    A multi-photon polymerization system has been designed based on a pulsed irradiation light source (diode-pumped solid state femtosecond laser Yb:KGW, 300 fs, 1030 nm, 1-200 kHz) in combination with large working area and high precision linear motor driven stages (100×100×50 mm3). The system is intended for high resolution and throughput 3D micro- and nanofabrication and enables manufacturing the polymeric templates up to 1 cm2 areas with sub-micrometer resolution. These can be used for producing 3D artificial polymeric scaffolds to be applied for growing cells, specifically, in the tissue engineering. The bio-compatibility of different acrylate, hybrid organic-inorganic and biodegradable polymeric materials is evaluated experimentally in vitro. Variously sized and shaped polymeric scaffolds of biocompatible photopolymers with intricate 3D geometry were successfully fabricated. Proliferation tests for adult rabbit myogenic stem cells have shown the applicability of artificial scaffolds in biomedicine practice.

  12. Measurement of the photoionization cross section from the laser-populated 3D metastable levels in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of the absolute photoionization cross section from the 6s5d 3D metastable level of barium are presented. The 3D levels were selectively populated with a high-power tuneable dye laser. The number density was determined by observing the resulting depopulation of the ground state when pumping occurred.

  13. Incorporation of 3-D Scanning Lidar Data into Google Earth for Real-time Air Pollution Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, C.; Nee, J.; Das, S.; Sun, S.; Hsu, Y.; Chiang, H.; Chen, S.; Lin, P.; Chu, J.; Su, C.; Lee, W.; Su, L.; Chen, C.

    2011-12-01

    3-D Differential Absorption Scanning Lidar (DIASL) system has been designed with small size, light weight, and suitable for installation in various vehicles and places for monitoring of air pollutants and displays a detailed real-time temporal and spatial variability of trace gases via the Google Earth. The fast scanning techniques and visual information can rapidly identify the locations and sources of the polluted gases and assess the most affected areas. It is helpful for Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to protect the people's health and abate the air pollution as quickly as possible. The distributions of the atmospheric pollutants and their relationship with local metrological parameters measured with ground based instruments will also be discussed. Details will be presented in the upcoming symposium.

  14. Voxel-based 2-D/3-D registration of fluoroscopy images and CT scans for image-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Weese, J; Penney, G P; Desmedt, P; Buzug, T M; Hill, D L; Hawkes, D J

    1997-12-01

    Registration of intraoperative fluoroscopy images with preoperative three-dimensional (3-D) CT images can be used for several purposes in image-guided surgery. On the one hand, it can be used to display the position of surgical instruments, which are being tracked by a localizer, in the preoperative CT scan. On the other hand, the registration result can be used to project preoperative planning information or important anatomical structures visible in the CT image onto the fluoroscopy image. For this registration task, a novel voxel-based method in combination with a new similarity measure (pattern intensity) has been developed. The basic concept of the method is explained at the example of two-dimensional (2-D)/3-D registration of a vertebra in an X-ray fluoroscopy image with a 3-D CT image. The registration method is described, and the results for a spine phantom are presented and discussed. Registration has been carried out repeatedly with different starting estimates to study the capture range. Information about registration accuracy has been obtained by comparing the registration results with a highly accurate "ground-truth" registration, which has been derived from fiducial markers attached to the phantom prior to imaging. In addition, registration results for different vertebrae have been compared. The results show that the rotation parameters and the shifts parallel to the projection plane can accurately be determined from a single projection. Because of the projection geometry, the accuracy of the height above the projection plane is significantly lower. PMID:11020832

  15. Measuring surface topography with scanning electron microscopy. I. EZEImage: a program to obtain 3D surface data.

    PubMed

    Ponz, Ezequiel; Ladaga, Juan Luis; Bonetto, Rita Dominga

    2006-04-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is widely used in the science of materials and different parameters were developed to characterize the surface roughness. In a previous work, we studied the surface topography with fractal dimension at low scale and two parameters at high scale by using the variogram, that is, variance vs. step log-log graph, of a SEM image. Those studies were carried out with the FERImage program, previously developed by us. To verify the previously accepted hypothesis by working with only an image, it is indispensable to have reliable three-dimensional (3D) surface data. In this work, a new program (EZEImage) to characterize 3D surface topography in SEM has been developed. It uses fast cross correlation and dynamic programming to obtain reliable dense height maps in a few seconds which can be displayed as an image where each gray level represents a height value. This image can be used for the FERImage program or any other software to obtain surface topography characteristics. EZEImage also generates anaglyph images as well as characterizes 3D surface topography by means of a parameter set to describe amplitude properties and three functional indices for characterizing bearing and fluid properties. PMID:17481354

  16. Ultra-Rapid 2-D and 3-D Laser Microprinting of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Mark Andrew

    When viewed under the microscope, biological tissues reveal an exquisite microarchitecture. These complex patterns arise during development, as cells interact with a multitude of chemical and mechanical cues in the surrounding extracellular matrix. Tissue engineers have sought for decades to repair or replace damaged tissue, often relying on porous scaffolds as an artificial extracellular matrix to support cell development. However, these grafts are unable to recapitulate the complexity of the in vivo environment, limiting our ability to regenerate functional tissue. Biomedical engineers have developed several methods for printing two- and three-dimensional patterns of proteins for studying and directing cell development. Of these methods, laser microprinting of proteins has shown the most promise for printing sub-cellular resolution gradients of cues, but the photochemistry remains too slow to enable large-scale applications for screening and therapeutics In this work, we demonstrate a novel high-speed photochemistry based on multi-photon photobleaching of fluorescein, and we build the fastest 2-D and 3-D laser microprinter for proteins to date. First, we show that multiphoton photobleaching of a deoxygenated solution of biotin-4-fluorescein onto a PEG monolayer with acrylate end-group can enable print speeds of almost 20 million pixels per second at 600 nanometer resolution. We discovered that the mechanism of fluorescein photobleaching evolves from a 2-photon to 3- and 4-photon regime at higher laser intensities, unlocking faster printing kinetics. Using this 2-D printing system, we develop a novel triangle-ratchet method for directing the polarization of single hippocampal neurons. This ability to determine which neurite becomes an axon, and which neuritis become dendrites is an essential step for developing defined in vitro neural networks. Next, we modify our multiphoton photobleaching system to print in three dimensions. For the first time, we demonstrate 3

  17. Laser scanning by rotating polarization gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Fan, Dapeng; Fan, Shixun; Chen, Ying; Liu, Guangcan

    2016-07-01

    Laser beam scanning can be realized using two independently rotating, inline polarization gratings, termed Risley gratings, in a fashion similar to Risley prisms. The analytical formulas of pointing position as well as their inverse solutions are described. On this basis, the beam scanning is investigated and the performance of scanning imaging is evaluated. It is shown that the scanning function in 1D scanning evolves from a sinusoidal to triangular scan and the duty cycle increases rapidly as the ratio of grating period to wavelength is reduced toward 2. The scan pattern in 2D scanning is determined by the ratio k of the gratings' rotatory frequency. In imaging applications, when k tends toward 1 or -1, the scan pattern becomes dense and is inclined to be spiral or rose-like, respectively, which is desirable for the purpose of enhancing spatial resolution. There is a direct trade-off between spatial resolution and frame rate. The spiral and rose scanning enable multiresolution imaging, providing a preview of the scanned area in a fraction of the overall scan time, which is extremely useful for fast, real-time imaging applications. PMID:27409203

  18. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang; Li, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D) has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS), stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS), non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT) is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  19. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaoyan Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang; Li, Bin Guo, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D) has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS), stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS), non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT) is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  20. Laser 3D micro/nanofabrication of polymers for tissue engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevičius, P.; Rekštytė, S.; Balčiūnas, E.; Kraniauskas, A.; Širmenis, R.; Baltriukienė, D.; Bukelskienė, V.; Gadonas, R.; Sirvydis, V.; Piskarskas, A.; Malinauskas, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we applied a constructed multi-photon polymerization system based on diode-pumped solid state femtosecond Yb:KGW laser used as pulsed irradiation light source (300 fs, 1030 nm, 200 kHz) in combination with large area high sample translation velocity (up to 300 mm/s) linear motor-driven stages (100×100×50 mm3) designed for high resolution and throughput 3D micro/nanofabrication. It enables rapid prototyping out of most polymers up to cm in scale with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. This can be used for production of three-dimensional artificial polymeric scaffolds applied for cell growth and expansion experiments as well as tissue engineering. Biocompatibilities of different acrylate, hybrid organic-inorganic and biodegradable polymeric materials were evaluated experimentally in vitro. Various in size and form scaffolds of biocompatible photopolymers were successfully fabricated having intricate 3D geometry, thus demonstrating the potential of the applied method. Adult rabbit myogenic stem cell proliferation tests show artificial scaffolds to be applicable for biomedical practice. Additionally, a micromolding technique was used for a rapid multiplication of adequate laser manufactured structures.

  1. Mapping Nearby Terrain in 3D by Use of a Grid of Laser Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Curtis; Liebe, Carl; Chang, Johnny; Brown, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic system, to be mounted aboard an exploratory robotic vehicle, would be used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) map of nearby terrain and obstacles for purposes of navigating the vehicle across the terrain and avoiding the obstacles. The difference between this system and the other systems would lie in the details of implementation. In this system, the illumination would be provided by a laser. The beam from the laser would pass through a two-dimensional diffraction grating, which would divide the beam into multiple beams propagating in different, fixed, known directions. These beams would form a grid of bright spots on the nearby terrain and obstacles. The centroid of each bright spot in the image would be computed. For each such spot, the combination of (1) the centroid, (2) the known direction of the light beam that produced the spot, and (3) the known baseline would constitute sufficient information for calculating the 3D position of the spot.

  2. Freeform drop-on-demand laser printing of 3D alginate and cellular constructs.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ruitong; Zhang, Zhengyi; Chai, Wenxuan; Huang, Yong; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2015-12-01

    Laser printing is an orifice-free printing approach and has been investigated for the printing of two-dimensional patterns and simple three-dimensional (3D) constructs. To demonstrate the potential of laser printing as an effective bioprinting technique, both straight and Y-shaped tubes have been freeform printed using two different bioinks: 8% alginate solution and 2% alginate-based mouse fibroblast suspension. It has been demonstrated that 3D cellular tubes, including constructs with bifurcated overhang structures, can be adequately fabricated under optimal printing conditions. The post-printing cell viabilities immediately after printing as well as after 24 h incubation are above 60% for printed straight and Y-shaped fibroblast tubes. During fabrication, overhang and spanning structures can be printed using a dual-purpose crosslinking solution, which also functions as a support material. The advancement distance of gelation reaction front after a cycle time of the receiving platform downward motion should be estimated for experimental planning. The optimal downward movement step size of receiving platform should be chosen to be equal to the height of ungelled portion of a previously printed layer. PMID:26693735

  3. Electromagnetic induction sounding and 3D laser imaging in support of a Mars methane analogue mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, A.; Lai, P.; Samson, C.; Cloutis, E.; Holladay, S.; Monteiro Santos, F. A.

    2013-07-01

    The Mars Methane Analogue Mission simulates a micro-rover mission whose purpose is to detect, analyze, and determine the source of methane emissions on the planet's surface. As part of this project, both an electromagnetic induction sounder (EMIS) and a high-resolution triangulation-based 3D laser scanner were tested at the Jeffrey open-pit asbestos mine to identify and characterize geological environments favourable to the occurrence of methane. The presence of serpentinite in the form of chrysotile (asbestos), magnesium carbonate, and iron oxyhydroxides make the mine a likely location for methane production. The EMIS clearly delineated the contacts between the two geological units found at the mine, peridotite and slate, which are separated by a shear zone. Both the peridotite and slate units have low and uniform apparent electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility, while the shear zone has much higher conductivity and susceptibility, with greater variability. The EMIS data were inverted and the resulting model captured lateral conductivity variations through the different bedrock geological units buried beneath a gravel road. The 3D point cloud data acquired by the laser scanner were fitted with triangular meshes where steeply dipping triangles were plotted in dark grey to accentuate discontinuities. The resulting images were further processed using Sobel edge detection to highlight networks of fractures which are potential pathways for methane seepage.

  4. Improvement of 3d Monte Carlo Localization Using a Depth Camera and Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, S.; Hatakeyama, R.; Date, H.

    2015-05-01

    Effective and accurate localization method in three-dimensional indoor environments is a key requirement for indoor navigation and lifelong robotic assistance. So far, Monte Carlo Localization (MCL) has given one of the promising solutions for the indoor localization methods. Previous work of MCL has been mostly limited to 2D motion estimation in a planar map, and a few 3D MCL approaches have been recently proposed. However, their localization accuracy and efficiency still remain at an unsatisfactory level (a few hundreds millimetre error at up to a few FPS) or is not fully verified with the precise ground truth. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to improve an accuracy and efficiency of 6DOF motion estimation in 3D MCL for indoor localization. Firstly, a terrestrial laser scanner is used for creating a precise 3D mesh model as an environment map, and a professional-level depth camera is installed as an outer sensor. GPU scene simulation is also introduced to upgrade the speed of prediction phase in MCL. Moreover, for further improvement, GPGPU programming is implemented to realize further speed up of the likelihood estimation phase, and anisotropic particle propagation is introduced into MCL based on the observations from an inertia sensor. Improvements in the localization accuracy and efficiency are verified by the comparison with a previous MCL method. As a result, it was confirmed that GPGPU-based algorithm was effective in increasing the computational efficiency to 10-50 FPS when the number of particles remain below a few hundreds. On the other hand, inertia sensor-based algorithm reduced the localization error to a median of 47mm even with less number of particles. The results showed that our proposed 3D MCL method outperforms the previous one in accuracy and efficiency.

  5. Fatigue crack detection in metallic structures with Lamb waves and 3D laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszewski, W. J.; Lee, B. C.; Traynor, R.

    2007-03-01

    The paper presents the application of ultrasonic guided waves for fatigue crack detection in metallic structures. The study involves a simple fatigue test performed to introduce a crack into an aluminium plate. Lamb waves generated by a low-profile, surface-bonded piezoceramic transducer are sensed using a tri-axis, multi-position scanning laser vibrometer. The results demonstrate the potential of laser vibrometry for simple, rapid and robust detection of fatigue cracks in metallic structures. The method could be used in quality inspection and in-service maintenance of metallic structures in aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering industries.

  6. 3D chemical mapping: application of scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) in combination with angle-scan tomography in bio-, geo-, and environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Schmid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The identification of environmental processes and mechanisms often requires information on the organochemical and inorganic composition of specimens at high spatial resolution. X-ray spectroscopy (XAS) performed in the soft X-ray range (100-2,200 eV) provides chemical speciation information for elements that are of high biogeochemical relevance such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen but also includes transition metals such as iron, manganese, or nickel. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combines XAS with high resolution mapping on the 20-nm scale. This provides two-dimensional (2D) quantitative information about the distribution of chemical species such as organic macromolecules, metals, or mineral phases within environmental samples. Furthermore, the combination of STXM with angle-scan tomography allows for three-dimensional (3D) spectromicroscopic analysis of bio-, geo-, or environmental samples. For the acquisition of STXM tomography data, the sample is rotated around an axis perpendicular to the X-ray beam. Various sample preparation approaches such as stripes cut from TEM grids or the preparation of wet cells allow for preparing environmentally relevant specimens in a dry or in a fully hydrated state for 2D and 3D STXM measurements. In this chapter we give a short overview about the principles of STXM, its application to environmental sciences, different preparation techniques, and the analysis and 3D reconstruction of STXM tomography data. PMID:24357389

  7. Simulation and Realization of a Focus Shifting Unit using a Tunable Lens for 3D Laser Material Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, G.; Chiron, V.; Wegener, K.

    3D laser microprocessing using current market available technologies reveals itself to be a cost intensive and complex undertaking which is mostly due to the control architecture and use of moving components. Recent market appearance of electronically tunable lenses exhibiting NIR transmission, large aperture, high damage threshold and fast response times are available for laser based applications. Hence, enabling usage in the field of laser microprocessing. This paper thus introduces the functional principle of electrically tunable lenses, setup arrangement for 3D laser microprocessing, computational simulation of system parameters and comparison with experimental results.

  8. Surface analysis by laser beam scanning and stereophotogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The possibility to describe mathematically the body surfaces could improve diagnosis and objective evaluation of deformities, the follow up of progressive diseases and could represent a useful tool for other medical sectors as prosthetic and plastic surgery as well as for industrial applications where a real shape needs to be digitized and analyzed or modified mathematically. The approach here presented is based on the acquisition of a surface scanned by a laser beam. The 3D coordinates of the spot generated on the surface by the beam are obtained by an automatic image analyzer (ELITE system), originally developed for human motion analysis. The 3D coordinates are obtained by stereo-photogrammetry starting from at least two different view of the subject. A software package for graphic representation of the obtained surfaces has been developed and some preliminary results about some body shapes will be presented.

  9. Femtosecond laser 3D fabrication of whispering-gallery-mode microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, HuaiLiang; Sun, HongBo

    2015-11-01

    Whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microcavities with high-quality factors and small volumes have attracted intense interests in the past decades because of their potential applications in various research fields such as quantum information, sensing, and optoelectronics. This leads to rapid advance in a variety of processing technologies that can create high-quality WGM micro- cavities. Due to the unique characteristics of femtosecond laser pulses with high peak intensity and ultrashort pulse duration, femtosecond laser shows the ability to carry out ultrahigh precision micromachining of a variety of transparent materials through nonlinear multiphoton absorption and tunneling ionization. This review paper describes the basic principle of femtosecond laser direct writing, and presents an overview of recent progress concerning femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) fabrications of optical WGM microcavities, which include the advances in the fabrications of passive and active WGMs microcavities in a variety of materials such as polymer, glass and crystals, as well as in processing the integrated WGM-microcavity device. Lastly, a summary of this dynamic field with a future perspective is given.

  10. Simulation of excimer laser micromachined 3D surface using a CAD solid modeling package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, Richard G.; Iovenitti, Pio G.; Hayes, Jason P.; Harvey, Erol C.

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes the research on the development of a visualisation tool to generate 3D solid models of structures produced by micromachining using an excimer laser system. Currently, the development of part programs to achieve a desired microstructure is by a trial and error approach. This simulation tool assists designers and excimer machine programmers to produce microstructures using the excimer laser. Users can develop their microstructures and part programs with the assistance of digital prototypes rather than designing products using expensive laser micromachining equipment. The methods to simulate micromachining using the solid modelling package, SolidWorks, are described, and simulation and actual machined examples are reported. A basic knowledge of the solid modelling package is required to develop the simulations, and complex models take time to prepare, however, the development time can be minimised by working from previous simulations. The models developed can be parameterised so that families of designs can be investigated for little additional effort to optimise the design before committing to laser micromachining.

  11. On-machine measurement of the grinding wheels' 3D surface topography using a laser displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongcheng; Zhao, Qingliang; Guo, Bing

    2014-08-01

    A method of non-contact, on-machine measurement of three dimensional surface topography of grinding wheels' whole surface was developed in this paper, focusing on an electroplated coarse-grained diamond grinding wheel. The measuring system consists of a Keyence laser displacement sensor, a Keyence controller and a NI PCI-6132 data acquisition card. A resolution of 0.1μm in vertical direction and 8μm in horizontal direction could be achieved. After processing the data by LabVIEW and MATLAB, the 3D topography of the grinding wheel's whole surface could be reconstructed. When comparing the reconstructed 3D topography of the grinding wheel's marked area to its real topography captured by a high-depth-field optical digital microscope (HDF-ODM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), they were very similar to each other, proving that this method is accurate and effective. By a subsequent data processing, the topography of every grain could be extracted and then the active grain number, the active grain volume and the active grain's bearing ration could be calculated. These three parameters could serve as the criterion to evaluate the grinding performance of coarse-grained diamond grinding wheels. Then the performance of the grinding wheel could be evaluated on-machine accurately and quantitatively.

  12. Automatic thermographic scanning with the creation of 3D panoramic views of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarini, G.; Cadelano, G.; Bortolin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared thermography is widely applied to the inspection of building, enabling the identification of thermal anomalies due to the presence of hidden structures, air leakages, and moisture. One of the main advantages of this technique is the possibility to acquire rapidly a temperature map of a surface. However, due to the actual low-resolution of thermal camera and the necessity of scanning surfaces with different orientation, during a building survey it is necessary to take multiple images. In this work a device based on quantitative infrared thermography, called aIRview, has been applied during building surveys to automatically acquire thermograms with a camera mounted on a robotized pan tilt unit. The goal is to perform a first rapid survey of the building that could give useful information for the successive quantitative thermal investigations. For each data acquisition, the instrument covers a rotational field of view of 360° around the vertical axis and up to 180° around the horizontal one. The obtained images have been processed in order to create a full equirectangular projection of the ambient. For this reason the images have been integrated into a web visualization tool, working with web panorama viewers such as Google Street View, creating a webpage where it is possible to have a three dimensional virtual visit of the building. The thermographic data are embedded with the visual imaging and with other sensor data, facilitating the understanding of the physical phenomena underlying the temperature distribution.

  13. The Use Of Computerized Tomographic (CT) Scans For 3-D Display And Prosthesis Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovich, Nicholas J.; Woodruff, Tracey J.; Beumer, John

    1985-06-01

    The construction of preformed cranial prostheses for large cranial bony defects is both error prone and time consuming. We discuss a method used for the creation of cranial prostheses from automatically extracted bone contours taken from Computerized Tomographic (CT) scans. Previous methods of prosthesis construction have relied on the making of a mold directly from the region of cranial defect. The use of image processing, bone contour extraction, and three-dimensional display allowed us to create a better fitting prosthesis while reducing patient surgery time. This procedure involves direct bone margin extraction from the digital CT images followed by head model construction from serial plots of the bone margin. Three-dimensional data display is used to verify the integrity of the skull data set prior to model construction. Once created, the model is used to fabricate a custom fitting prosthesis which is then surgically implanted. This procedure is being used with patients in the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Clinic at UCLA and this paper details the technique.

  14. Final Report – Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment. Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2015-09-14

    ARM set out 20 years ago to “close” the radiation problem, that is, to improve radiation models to the point where they could routinely predict the observed spectral radiation fluxes knowing the optical properties of the surface and of gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. Only then could such radiation models form a proper springboard for global climate model (GCM) parameterizations of spectral radiation. Sustained efforts have more or less achieved that goal with regard to longwave radiation; ASR models now routinely predict ARM spectral longwave radiances to 1–2%. Similar efforts in the shortwave have achieved far less; the successes are mainly for carefully selected 1D stratiform cloud cases. Such cases amount, even with the most optimistic interpretation, to no more than 30% of all cases at SGP. The problem has not been lack of effort but lack of appropriate instruments.The new ARM stimulus-funded instruments, with their new capabilities, will dramatically improve this situation and once again make progress possible on the shortwave problem. The new shortwave spectrometers will provide a reliable, calibrated record including the near infrared – and for other climatic regimes than SGP. The new scanning radars will provide the 3D cloud view, making it possible to tackle fully 3D situations. Thus, our main theme for the project is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars and shortwave spectrometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools.

  15. Method for visualization and presentation of priceless old prints based on precise 3D scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunsch, Eryk; Sitnik, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Graphic prints and manuscripts constitute main part of the cultural heritage objects created by the most of the known civilizations. Their presentation was always a problem due to their high sensitivity to light and changes of external conditions (temperature, humidity). Today it is possible to use an advanced digitalization techniques for documentation and visualization of mentioned objects. In the situation when presentation of the original heritage object is impossible, there is a need to develop a method allowing documentation and then presentation to the audience of all the aesthetical features of the object. During the course of the project scans of several pages of one of the most valuable books in collection of Museum of Warsaw Archdiocese were performed. The book known as "Great Dürer Trilogy" consists of three series of woodcuts by the Albrecht Dürer. The measurement system used consists of a custom designed, structured light-based, high-resolution measurement head with automated digitization system mounted on the industrial robot. This device was custom built to meet conservators' requirements, especially the lack of ultraviolet or infrared radiation emission in the direction of measured object. Documentation of one page from the book requires about 380 directional measurements which constitute about 3 billion sample points. The distance between the points in the cloud is 20 μm. Provided that the measurement with MSD (measurement sampling density) of 2500 points makes it possible to show to the publicity the spatial structure of this graphics print. An important aspect is the complexity of the software environment created for data processing, in which massive data sets can be automatically processed and visualized. Very important advantage of the software which is using directly clouds of points is the possibility to manipulate freely virtual light source.

  16. LASER APPLICATIONS: Thermographic system with a laser scanning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsov, L. A.; Kirillov, V. M.

    2007-11-01

    It is shown that laser photothermal radiometry (LPTR) in combination with laser beam scanning within the instantaneous field of view of a single-element photodetector can be used to develop a scanning thermal emission microscope. An expression is derived for estimating its temperature resolution. The results of calculations are presented and the factors influencing the spatial lateral resolution of the technique and the time of image formation with the help of an acousto-optical deflector are analysed.

  17. The design of laser scanning galvanometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoling; Zhou, Bin; Xie, Weihao; Zhang, Yuangeng

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we designed the laser scanning galvanometer system according to our requirements. Based on scanning range of our laser scanning galvanometer system, the design parameters of this system were optimized. During this work, we focused on the design of the f-θ field lens. An optical system of patent lens in the optical manual book, which had three glasses structure, was used in our designs. Combining the aberration theory, the aberration corrections and image quality evaluations were finished using Code V optical design software. An optimum f-θ field lens was designed, which had focal length of 434 mm, pupil diameter of 30 mm, scanning range of 160 mm × 160 mm, and half field angle of 18°×18°. At the last, we studied the influences of temperature changes on our system.

  18. High speed micro scanner for 3D in-volume laser micro processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, D.; Gottmann, J.; Hermans, M.; Ortmann, J.; Kelbassa, I.

    2013-03-01

    Using an in-house developed micro scanner three-dimensional micro components and micro fluidic devices in fused silica are realized using the ISLE process (in-volume selective laser-induced etching). With the micro scanner system the potential of high average power femtosecond lasers (P > 100 W) is exploited by the fabrication of components with micrometer precision at scan speeds of several meters per second. A commercially available galvanometer scanner is combined with an acousto-optical and/or electro-optical beam deflector and translation stages. For focusing laser radiation high numerical aperture microscope objectives (NA > 0.3) are used generating a focal volume of a few cubic micrometers. After laser exposure the materials are chemically wet etched in aqueous solution. The laser-exposed material is etched whereas the unexposed material remains nearly unchanged. Using the described technique called ISLE the fabrication of three-dimensional micro components, micro holes, cuts and channels is possible with high average power femtosecond lasers resulting in a reduced processing time for exposure. By developing the high speed micro scanner up-scaling of the ISLE process is demonstrated. The fabricated components made out of glass can be applied in various markets like biological and medical diagnostics as well as in micro mechanics.

  19. Laser scanning stereomicroscopy for fast volumetric imaging with two-photon excitation and scanned Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yanlong; Zhou, Xing; Li, Runze; Van Horn, Mark; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Wu, Di; Chen, Xun; Yao, Baoli; Ye, Tong

    2015-03-01

    Bessel beams have been used in many applications due to their unique optical properties of maintaining their intensity profiles unchanged during propagation. In imaging applications, Bessel beams have been successfully used to provide extended focuses for volumetric imaging and uniformed illumination plane in light-sheet microscopy. Coupled with two-photon excitation, Bessel beams have been successfully used in realizing fluorescence projected volumetric imaging. We demonstrated previously a stereoscopic solution-two-photon fluorescence stereomicroscopy (TPFSM)-for recovering the depth information in volumetric imaging with Bessel beams. In TPFSM, tilted Bessel beams were used to generate stereoscopic images on a laser scanning two-photon fluorescence microscope; upon post image processing we could successfully provide 3D perception of acquired volume images by wearing anaglyph 3D glasses. However, tilted Bessel beams were generated by shifting either an axicon or an objective laterally; the slow imaging speed and severe aberrations made it hard to use in real-time volume imaging. In this article, we report recent improvements of TPFSM with newly designed scanner and imaging software, which allows 3D stereoscopic imaging without moving any of the optical components on the setup. This improvement has dramatically improved focusing qualities and imaging speed so that the TPFSM can be performed potentially in real-time to provide 3D visualization in scattering media without post image processing.

  20. Imaging Single ZnO Vertical Nanowire Laser Cavities using UV-Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gargas, D.J.; Toimil-Molares, M.E.; Yang, P.

    2008-11-17

    We report the fabrication and optical characterization of individual ZnO vertical nanowire laser cavities. Dilute nanowire arrays with interwire spacing>10 ?m were produced by a modified chemical vapor transport (CVT) method yielding an ideal platform for single nanowire imaging and spectroscopy. Lasing characteristics of a single vertical nanowire are presented, as well as high-resolution photoluminescence imaging by UV-laser scanning confocal microscopy. In addition, three-dimensional (3D) mapping of the photoluminescence emission performed in both planar and vertical dimensions demonstrates height-selective imaging useful for vertical nanowires and heteronanostructures emerging in the field of optoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  1. Footprint Map Partitioning Using Airborne Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, B.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays many cities and countries are creating their 3D building models for a better daily management and smarter decision making. The newly created 3D models are required to be consistent with existing 2D footprint maps. Thereby the 2D maps are usually combined with height data for the task of 3D reconstruction. Many buildings are often composed by parts that are discontinuous over height. Building parts can be reconstructed independently and combined into a complete building. Therefore, most of the state-of-the-art work on 3D building reconstruction first decomposes a footprint map into parts. However, those works usually change the footprint maps for easier partitioning and cannot detect building parts that are fully inside the footprint polygon. In order to solve those problems, we introduce two methodologies, one more dependent on height data, and the other one more dependent on footprints. We also experimentally evaluate the two methodologies and compare their advantages and disadvantages. The experiments use Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) data and two vector maps, one with 1:10,000 scale and another one with 1:500 scale.

  2. 3D geometrical inspection of complex geometry parts using a novel laser triangulation sensor and a robot.

    PubMed

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly "coupled" as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a "zero" or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  3. 3D Geometrical Inspection of Complex Geometry Parts Using a Novel Laser Triangulation Sensor and a Robot

    PubMed Central

    Brosed, Francisco Javier; Aguilar, Juan José; Guillomía, David; Santolaria, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses different non contact 3D measuring strategies and presents a model for measuring complex geometry parts, manipulated through a robot arm, using a novel vision system consisting of a laser triangulation sensor and a motorized linear stage. First, the geometric model incorporating an automatic simple module for long term stability improvement will be outlined in the article. The new method used in the automatic module allows the sensor set up, including the motorized linear stage, for the scanning avoiding external measurement devices. In the measurement model the robot is just a positioning of parts with high repeatability. Its position and orientation data are not used for the measurement and therefore it is not directly “coupled” as an active component in the model. The function of the robot is to present the various surfaces of the workpiece along the measurement range of the vision system, which is responsible for the measurement. Thus, the whole system is not affected by the robot own errors following a trajectory, except those due to the lack of static repeatability. For the indirect link between the vision system and the robot, the original model developed needs only one first piece measuring as a “zero” or master piece, known by its accurate measurement using, for example, a Coordinate Measurement Machine. The strategy proposed presents a different approach to traditional laser triangulation systems on board the robot in order to improve the measurement accuracy, and several important cues for self-recalibration are explored using only a master piece. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the technique and the final 3D measurement accuracy. PMID:22346569

  4. Continuous section extraction and over-underbreak detection of tunnel based on 3D laser technology and image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Wang, Zhiwei; Han, Ya; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Over Underbreak detection of road and solve the problemof the roadway data collection difficulties, this paper presents a new method of continuous section extraction and Over Underbreak detection of road based on 3D laser scanning technology and image processing, the method is divided into the following three steps: based on Canny edge detection, local axis fitting, continuous extraction section and Over Underbreak detection of section. First, after Canny edge detection, take the least-squares curve fitting method to achieve partial fitting in axis. Then adjust the attitude of local roadway that makes the axis of the roadway be consistent with the direction of the extraction reference, and extract section along the reference direction. Finally, we compare the actual cross-sectional view and the cross-sectional design to complete Overbreak detected. Experimental results show that the proposed method have a great advantage in computing costs and ensure cross-section orthogonal intercept terms compared with traditional detection methods.

  5. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, F.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Montaldo, G.; Marsac, L.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-05-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  6. 3D Imaging of Nanoparticle Distribution in Biological Tissue by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Y.; Busser, B.; Trichard, F.; Kulesza, A.; Laurent, J. M.; Zaun, V.; Lux, F.; Benoit, J. M.; Panczer, G.; Dugourd, P.; Tillement, O.; Pelascini, F.; Sancey, L.; Motto-Ros, V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials represent a rapidly expanding area of research with huge potential for future medical applications. Nanotechnology indeed promises to revolutionize diagnostics, drug delivery, gene therapy, and many other areas of research. For any biological investigation involving nanomaterials, it is crucial to study the behavior of such nano-objects within tissues to evaluate both their efficacy and their toxicity. Here, we provide the first account of 3D label-free nanoparticle imaging at the entire-organ scale. The technology used is known as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and possesses several advantages such as speed of operation, ease of use and full compatibility with optical microscopy. We then used two different but complementary approaches to achieve 3D elemental imaging with LIBS: a volume reconstruction of a sliced organ and in-depth analysis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the quantitative imaging of both endogenous and exogenous elements within entire organs and paves the way for innumerable applications. PMID:27435424

  7. Orientation of Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds with Multi-View, Multi-Scale Image Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Rönnholm, Petri; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Haggrén, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive 3D modeling of our environment requires integration of terrestrial and airborne data, which is collected, preferably, using laser scanning and photogrammetric methods. However, integration of these multi-source data requires accurate relative orientations. In this article, two methods for solving relative orientation problems are presented. The first method includes registration by minimizing the distances between of an airborne laser point cloud and a 3D model. The 3D model was derived from photogrammetric measurements and terrestrial laser scanning points. The first method was used as a reference and for validation. Having completed registration in the object space, the relative orientation between images and laser point cloud is known. The second method utilizes an interactive orientation method between a multi-scale image block and a laser point cloud. The multi-scale image block includes both aerial and terrestrial images. Experiments with the multi-scale image block revealed that the accuracy of a relative orientation increased when more images were included in the block. The orientations of the first and second methods were compared. The comparison showed that correct rotations were the most difficult to detect accurately by using the interactive method. Because the interactive method forces laser scanning data to fit with the images, inaccurate rotations cause corresponding shifts to image positions. However, in a test case, in which the orientation differences included only shifts, the interactive method could solve the relative orientation of an aerial image and airborne laser scanning data repeatedly within a couple of centimeters. PMID:22454569

  8. Solid state synthesis of chitosan and its unsaturated derivatives for laser microfabrication of 3D scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopova, T. A.; Demina, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Bardakova, K. N.; Novikov, M. M.; Selezneva, I. I.; Istomin, A. V.; Svidchenko, E. A.; Cherkaev, G. V.; Surin, N. M.; Timashev, P. S.

    2015-07-01

    Chitosans with various degrees of deacetylation and molecular weights and their allyl substituted derivatives were obtained through a solvent-free reaction under shear deformation in an extruder. Structure and physical-chemical analysis of the samples were carried out using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultraviolet (UV) and infrared radiation (IR) spectroscopy. Photosensitive materials based on the synthesized polymers were successfully used for microfabrication of 3D well-defined architectonic structures by laser stereolithography. Study on the metabolic activity of NCTC L929 cultured in the presence of the cured chitosan extracts indicates that the engineered biomaterials could support adhesion, spreading and growth of adherent-dependent cells, and thus could be considered as biocompatible scaffolds.

  9. Recent advances in two-photon 3D laser lithography with self-Q-switched Nd:YAG microchip lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeck, Patrice L.; Prabhakaran, Prem; Liu, Chao-Yuan; Bouriau, Michel; Gredy, Laetitia; Stephan, Olivier; Vergote, Thomas; Chaumeil, Hélène; Malval, Jean-Pierre; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chih-Lang; Lin, Chin-Te; Hsueh, Ya Hsun; Chung, Tien-Tung

    2013-09-01

    We review our recent results towards the development of a turnkey 3D laser printer, based on self-Q-switched microchip Nd:YAG lasers, with reproducible sub-100nm resolution, and with large-scale (cm) and fast-speed (cm/sec) capability at micron resolution. First of all, we report on line fabrication with 70nm lateral, and 150nm longitudinal resolutions without significant shrinking. This is due to the tight focusing with green visible wavelength, large numerical aperture, and excellent resin properties. Secondly, we report on two-photon sensitive photoacid generators that lead to efficient 3D microfabrication with epoxy SU-8 resin. Thirdly, we demonstrate high-speed microfabrication of large scale, millimeter size, scaffolds and cemtimeter height needle with high repetition rate (130Khz), and high average power (1W) amplified microchip laser. Finally we demonstrate the two-photon induced cross-linking of antibodies to determine the type of red blood cells in microfluidic channels.

  10. Low-level laser therapy in 3D cell culture model using gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Basso, Fernanda G; Soares, Diana G; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-07-01

    Besides extensive data about the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on different cell types, so far, these results were obtained from monolayer cell culture models, which have limitations in terms of cell morphology and phenotype expression. Therefore, for better in vitro evaluation of the effects of LLLT, this study was performed with a 3D cell culture model, where gingival fibroblasts were seeded in collagen matrix. Cells isolated from a healthy patient were seeded in wells of 24-well plates with culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum and collagen type I solution. After 5 days, a serum-free DMEM was added to the matrices with cells that were subjected or not to three consecutive irradiations of LLLT by means of the LaserTABLE diode device (780 nm, 25 mW) at 0.5, 1.5, and 3 J/cm(2). Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell viability and morphology as well as gene expression of growth factors were assessed. Histological evaluation of matrices demonstrated uniform distribution and morphology of gingival fibroblasts within the collagen matrix. LLLT at 3 J/cm(2) increased gingival fibroblast viability. Enhanced gene expression of hCOL-I and hEGF was observed for 0.5 J/cm(2), while no significant changes were detected for the other irradiation densities tested. In conclusion, LLLT promoted biostimulation of gingival fibroblasts seeded in a 3D cell culture model, demonstrating that this model can be applied for phototherapy studies and that LLLT could penetrate the collagen matrix to increase cell functions related to tissue repair. PMID:27126408

  11. Fast and memory-efficient LOGISMOS graph search for intraretinal layer segmentation of 3D macular OCT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Zhang, Li; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Image segmentation is important for quantitative analysis of medical image data. Recently, our research group has introduced a 3-D graph search method which can simultaneously segment optimal interacting surfaces with respect to the cost function in volumetric images. Although it provides excellent segmentation accuracy, it is computationally demanding (both CPU and memory) to simultaneously segment multiple surfaces from large volumetric images. Therefore, we propose a new, fast, and memory-efficient graph search method for intraretinal layer segmentation of 3-D macular optical coherence tomograpy (OCT) scans. The key idea is to reduce the size of a graph by combining the nodes with high costs based on the multiscale approach. The new approach requires significantly less memory and achieves significantly faster processing speeds (p < 0.01) with only small segmentation differences compared to the original graph search method. This paper discusses sub-optimality of this approach and assesses trade-off relationships between decreasing processing speed and increasing segmentation differences from that of the original method as a function of employed scale of the underlying graph construction.

  12. Ta Keo Temple Reconstruction Based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X.; Wang, C.; Wan, Y. P.; Khuon, K. N.

    2015-08-01

    Ta Keo temple is one of the very famous temple complex of Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia. It has been suffering massive collapse and other serious damages in recent years. Nowadays, Terrestrial Laser Scanning(TLS) technology is considered as a wellestablished resource for heritage documentation and protection (Lerma et al, 2008; Reshetyuk, 2009). This paper used TLS to reconstruct Ta Keo Temple. Firstly, we acquired 71 scanning stations of points cloud data with high density and high accuracy, and over one thousand images with high spatial resolution about the temple. Secondly, the raw points cloud data were denoised, reduced and managed efficiently, and registrated using an adjusted ICP algorithm. Thirdly, a triangulation method was used to model most objects. At last, we mapped the texture data into the digital model and a 3-D model of Ta Keo with high accuracy was achieved. The authors focus on large object reconstruction by TLS technology, and pay much attention to the scanning design, multi-station data and the whole project's data registration, and texture mapping and so on. The research result will be useful for Ta Keo restoration, reconstruction and protection. Also, it is a good reference source for large complex buildings reconstruction when using terrestrial laser scanning technology.

  13. Direct Determination of 3D Distribution of Elemental Composition in Single Semiconductor Nanoislands by Scanning Auger Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ponomaryov, Semyon S; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr O; Lytvyn, Peter M; Valakh, Mykhailo Ya

    2016-12-01

    An application of scanning Auger microscopy with ion etching technique and effective compensation of thermal drift of the surface analyzed area is proposed for direct local study of composition distribution in the bulk of single nanoislands. For GexSi1 - x-nanoislands obtained by MBE of Ge on Si-substrate gigantic interdiffusion mixing takes place both in the open and capped nanostructures. Lateral distributions of the elemental composition as well as concentration-depth profiles were recorded. 3D distribution of the elemental composition in the d-cluster bulk was obtained using the interpolation approach by lateral composition distributions in its several cross sections and concentration-depth profile. It was shown that there is a germanium core in the nanoislands of both nanostructure types, which even penetrates the substrate. In studied nanostructures maximal Ge content in the nanoislands may reach about 40 at.%. PMID:26909783

  14. 3D Scan of Ornamental Column (huabiao) Using Terrestrial LiDAR and Hand-held Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Wang, C.; Xi, X.

    2015-08-01

    In ancient China, Huabiao was a type of ornamental column used to decorate important buildings. We carried out 3D scan of a Huabiao located in Peking University, China. This Huabiao was built no later than 1742. It is carved by white marble, 8 meters in height. Clouds and various postures of dragons are carved on its body. Two instruments were used to acquire the point cloud of this Huabiao, a terrestrial LiDAR (Riegl VZ-1000) and a hand-held imager (Mantis Vision F5). In this paper, the details of the experiment were described, including the differences between these two instruments, such as working principle, spatial resolution, accuracy, instrument dimension and working flow. The point clouds obtained respectively by these two instruments were compared, and the registered point cloud of Huabiao was also presented. These should be of interest and helpful for the research communities of archaeology and heritage.

  15. Direct Determination of 3D Distribution of Elemental Composition in Single Semiconductor Nanoislands by Scanning Auger Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Semyon S.; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr O.; Lytvyn, Peter M.; Valakh, Mykhailo Ya

    2016-02-01

    An application of scanning Auger microscopy with ion etching technique and effective compensation of thermal drift of the surface analyzed area is proposed for direct local study of composition distribution in the bulk of single nanoislands. For GexSi1 - x-nanoislands obtained by MBE of Ge on Si-substrate gigantic interdiffusion mixing takes place both in the open and capped nanostructures. Lateral distributions of the elemental composition as well as concentration-depth profiles were recorded. 3D distribution of the elemental composition in the d-cluster bulk was obtained using the interpolation approach by lateral composition distributions in its several cross sections and concentration-depth profile. It was shown that there is a germanium core in the nanoislands of both nanostructure types, which even penetrates the substrate. In studied nanostructures maximal Ge content in the nanoislands may reach about 40 at.%.

  16. Comparison of clinical bracket point registration with 3D laser scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash; Baghban, Ali Reza Akbarzadeh; Massudi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of a laser scanner developed to determine the coordinates of clinical bracket points and to compare with the results of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). METHODS: This diagnostic experimental study was conducted on maxillary and mandibular orthodontic study casts of 18 adults with normal Class I occlusion. First, the coordinates of the bracket points were measured on all casts by a CMM. Then, the three-dimensional coordinates (X, Y, Z) of the bracket points were measured on the same casts by a 3D laser scanner designed at Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. The validity and reliability of each system were assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Dahlberg's formula. RESULTS: The difference between the mean dimension and the actual value for the CMM was 0.0066 mm. (95% CI: 69.98340, 69.99140). The mean difference for the laser scanner was 0.107 ± 0.133 mm (95% CI: -0.002, 0.24). In each method, differences were not significant. The ICC comparing the two methods was 0.998 for the X coordinate, and 0.996 for the Y coordinate; the mean difference for coordinates recorded in the entire arch and for each tooth was 0.616 mm. CONCLUSION: The accuracy of clinical bracket point coordinates measured by the laser scanner was equal to that of CMM. The mean difference in measurements was within the range of operator errors. PMID:25741826

  17. Uav-Based Acquisition of 3d Point Cloud - a Comparison of a Low-Cost Laser Scanner and Sfm-Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, D.; Blaskow, R.; Westfeld, P.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    The Project ADFEX (Adaptive Federative 3D Exploration of Multi Robot System) pursues the goal to develop a time- and cost-efficient system for exploration and monitoring task of unknown areas or buildings. A fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with appropriate sensors (laser scanner, RGB camera, near infrared camera, thermal camera) were designed and built. A typical operational scenario may include the exploration of the object or area of investigation by an UAV equipped with a laser scanning range finder to generate a rough point cloud in real time to provide an overview of the object on a ground station as well as an obstacle map. The data about the object enables the path planning for the robot fleet. Subsequently, the object will be captured by a RGB camera mounted on the second flying robot for the generation of a dense and accurate 3D point cloud by using of structure from motion techniques. In addition, the detailed image data serves as basis for a visual damage detection on the investigated building. This paper focuses on our experience with use of a low-cost light-weight Hokuyo laser scanner onboard an UAV. The hardware components for laser scanner based 3D point cloud acquisition are discussed, problems are demonstrated and analyzed, and a quantitative analysis of the accuracy potential is shown as well as in comparison with structure from motion-tools presented.

  18. A comparison of multi-view 3D reconstruction of a rock wall using several cameras and a laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoeni, K.; Giacomini, A.; Murtagh, R.; Kniest, E.

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a comparative study between multi-view 3D reconstruction using various digital cameras and a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Five different digital cameras were used in order to estimate the limits related to the camera type and to establish the minimum camera requirements to obtain comparable results to the ones of the TLS. The cameras used for this study range from commercial grade to professional grade and included a GoPro Hero 1080 (5 Mp), iPhone 4S (8 Mp), Panasonic Lumix LX5 (9.5 Mp), Panasonic Lumix ZS20 (14.1 Mp) and Canon EOS 7D (18 Mp). The TLS used for this work was a FARO Focus 3D laser scanner with a range accuracy of ±2 mm. The study area is a small rock wall of about 6 m height and 20 m length. The wall is partly smooth with some evident geological features, such as non-persistent joints and sharp edges. Eight control points were placed on the wall and their coordinates were measured by using a total station. These coordinates were then used to georeference all models. A similar number of images was acquired from a distance of between approximately 5 to 10 m, depending on field of view of each camera. The commercial software package PhotoScan was used to process the images, georeference and scale the models, and to generate the dense point clouds. Finally, the open-source package CloudCompare was used to assess the accuracy of the multi-view results. Each point cloud obtained from a specific camera was compared to the point cloud obtained with the TLS. The latter is taken as ground truth. The result is a coloured point cloud for each camera showing the deviation in relation to the TLS data. The main goal of this study is to quantify the quality of the multi-view 3D reconstruction results obtained with various cameras as objectively as possible and to evaluate its applicability to geotechnical problems.

  19. Physical properties and microstructures of nanocrystals reinforced ice laser 3D print layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-Ning; Liu, Ke-Gao; Gong, Shui-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Bin; Liu, Peng

    2015-02-01

    Rapid prototyping based on laser alloying by the pre-placed mixed powders has been used to produce the nanocrystals reinforced three-dimensional layer in this study. Such a layer was fabricated on a TC17 titanium alloy by laser rapid prototyping (LRP) of the Co-Sb-TiB2 mixed powders in ice. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) test results indicated that the ice addition was able to decrease the maximum temperature of molten pool during the LRP process, favoring the formation of nanocrystals; growth of such nanocrystals was retarded by the surrounded amorphous in a certain extent, favoring the formations of ultrafine nanoparticles (UN), and the twin crystals and the high-angle grain boundaries were also observed; differential thermal analysis (DTA) test was used to explain the physical properties and formation mechanism of amorphous-nanocrystals, and also the relationship between the amorphous and nanocrystalline phases in such a LRP layer.

  20. 3D Functional Elements Deep Inside Silicon with Nonlinear Laser Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokel, Onur; Turnali, Ahmet; Ergecen, Emre; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, Fatih Omer

    Functional optical and electrical elements fabricated on silicon (Si) constitute fundamental building blocks of electronics and Si-photonics. However, since the highly successful established lithography are geared towards surface processing, elements embedded inside Si simply do not exist. Here, we present a novel direct-laser writing method for positioning buried functional elements inside Si wafers. This new phenomenon is distinct from previous work, in that the surface of Si is not modified. By exploiting nonlinear interactions of a focused laser, permanent refractive index changes are induced inside Si. The imprinted index contrast is then used to demonstrate a plethora of functional elements and capabilities embedded inside Si. In particular, we demonstrate the first functional optical element inside Si, the first information-storage capability inside Si, creation of high-resolution subsurface holograms, buried multilevel structures, and complex 3D architectures in Si, none of which is currently possible with other methods. This new approach complements available techniques by taking advantage of the real estate under Si, and therefore can pave the way for creating entirely new multilevel devices through electronic-photonic integration.

  1. 3D simulations of pre-ionized and two-stage ionization injected laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Asher; Zheng, Ming; Lu, Wei; Xu, Xinlu; Joshi, Chang; Silva, Luis O.; Martins, Joana; Fonseca, Ricardo; Mori, Warren B.

    2012-12-01

    In plasma based accelerators (LWFA and PWFA), the methods of injecting high quality electron bunches into the accelerating wakefield is of utmost importance for various applications. To fully understand the numerical effect of simulating the trapping process, numerous numerical convergence tests were performed to ensure the correctness of preionized simulations which confirm the physical picture first proposed in [1]. We Further investigate the use of a two-stage ionization injected LWFA to achieve high quality monoenergetic beams through the use of 3D PIC simulations. The first stage constitutes the Injection Regime, which is 99.5% He and 0.5% N, while the second stage constitutes the Acceleration Regime, which is entirely composed of He. Two of the simulations model the parameters of the LWFA experiments for the LLNL Callisto laser, at laser powers of 90 and 100TW. energies as high as 680MeV were observed in the 90TW simulation, and those as high as 1.44GeV were observed in the 100TW simulation. The affect of the matching condition of the spot size in this LWFA is discussed.

  2. 3D reconstruction and characterization of laser induced craters by in situ optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, A.; Cerrato, R.; Mateo, M. P.; Nicolas, G.

    2016-06-01

    A low-cost optical microscope was developed and coupled to an irradiation system in order to study the induced effects on material during a multipulse regime by an in situ visual inspection of the surface, in particular of the spot generated at different pulses. In the case of laser ablation, a reconstruction of the crater in 3D was made from the images of the sample surface taken during the irradiation process, and the subsequent profiles of ablated material were extracted. The implementation of this homemade optical device gives an added value to the irradiation system, providing information about morphology evolution of irradiated area when successive pulses are applied. In particular, the determination of ablation rates in real time can be especially useful for a better understanding and controlling of the ablation process in applications where removal of material is involved, such as laser cleaning and in-depth characterization of multilayered samples and diffusion processes. The validation of the developed microscope was made by a comparison with a commercial confocal microscope configured for the characterization of materials where similar results of crater depth and diameter were obtained for both systems.

  3. NavOScan: hassle-free handheld 3D scanning with automatic multi-view registration based on combined optical and inertial pose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkelt, C.; Kleiner, B.; Thorhallsson, T.; Mendoza, C.; Bräuer-Burchardt, C.; Kühmstedt, P.; Notni, G.

    2013-05-01

    Portable 3D scanners with low measurement uncertainty are ideally suited for capturing the 3D shape of objects right in their natural environment. However, elaborate manual post processing was usually necessary to build a complete 3D model from several overlapping scans (multiple views), or expensive or complex additional hardware (like trackers etc.) was needed. On the contrary, the NavOScan project[1] aims at fully automatic multi-view 3D scan assembly through a Navigation Unit attached to the scanner. This light weight device combines an optical tracking system with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) for robust relative scanner position estimation. The IMU provides robustness against swift scanner movements during view changes, while the wide angle, high dynamic range (HDR) optical tracker focused on the measurement object and its background ensures accurate sensor position estimations. The underlying software framework, partly implemented in hardware (FPGA) for performance reasons, fusions both data streams in real time and estimates the navigation unit's current pose. Using this pose to calculate the starting solution of the Iterative Closest Point registration approach allows for automatic registration of multiple 3D scans. After finishing the individual scans required to fully acquire the object in question, the operator is readily presented with its finalized complete 3D model! The paper presents an overview over the NavOScan architecture, highlights key aspects of the registration and navigation pipeline and shows several measurement examples obtained with the Navigation Unit attached to a hand held structured-light 3D scanner.

  4. Laser scan microscope and infrared laser scan microcope: two important tools for device testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Eberhard

    1991-03-01

    The optical beam induced current (OBIC) produced in devices by a laser scan microscope (LSM) is used to localize hot spots, leakage currents, electrostatic discharge defects and weak points. The LSM also allows photoluminescence measurements with high spatial and energy resolution. Using the infrared laser scan microscope (IR LSM), defects in the metallization and latch-up sensitive region could be detected from the back of the device.

  5. Comparison of 2D and 3D flame topography measured by planar laser-induced fluorescence and tomographic chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Wu, Yue; Xu, Wenjiang; Hammack, Stephen D; Lee, Tonghun; Carter, Campbell D

    2016-07-10

    The goal of this work was to contrast and compare the 2D and 3D flame topography of a turbulent flame. The 2D measurements were obtained using CH-based (methylidyne radical-based) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), and the 3D measurements were obtained through a tomographic chemiluminescence (TC) technique. Both PLIF and TC were performed simultaneously on a turbulent premixed Bunsen flame. The PLIF measurements were then compared to a cross section of the 3D TC measurements, both to provide a validation to the 3D measurements and also to illustrate the differences in flame structures inferred from the 2D and 3D measurements. PMID:27409304

  6. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  7. Hybrid 3D laser sensor based on a high-performance long-range wide-field-of-view laser scanner and a calibrated high-resolution digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Andreas; Studnicka, Nikolaus; Riegl, Johannes

    2004-09-01

    We present a hybrid sensor consisting of a high-performance 3D imaging laser sensor and a high-resolution digital camera. The laser sensor uses the time-of-flight principle based on near-infrared pulses. We demonstrate the performance capabilities of the system by presenting example data and we describe the software package used for data acquisition, data merging and visualization. The advantages of using both, near range photogrammetry and laser scanning, for data registration and data extraction are discussed.

  8. Seeding requirements for scanning laser velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    To measure the velocity distributions within time dependent turbulent flow fields, a continuously scanning laser velocimeter system is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL). A prototype of this system has produced results which show that spatial and temporal variations in particle seed distribution seriously compromise the overall performance and operation of this device. To alleviate some of these problems, alternate flow seeding concepts are explored. The most promising appear to be those that actively induce laser sparks within the gas flow, the velocity of which may be measured by a Fourier transformed velocimetry system.

  9. 3D geometric modeling and simulation of laser propagation through turbulence with plenoptic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Plenoptic functions are functions that preserve all the necessary light field information of optical events. Theoretical work has demonstrated that geometric based plenoptic functions can serve equally well in the traditional wave propagation equation known as the "scalar stochastic Helmholtz equation". However, in addressing problems of 3D turbulence simulation, the dominant methods using phase screen models have limitations both in explaining the choice of parameters (on the transverse plane) in real-world measurements, and finding proper correlations between neighboring phase screens (the Markov assumption breaks down). Though possible corrections to phase screen models are still promising, the equivalent geometric approach based on plenoptic functions begins to show some advantages. In fact, in these geometric approaches, a continuous wave problem is reduced to discrete trajectories of rays. This allows for convenience in parallel computing and guarantees conservation of energy. Besides the pairwise independence of simulated rays, the assigned refractive index grids can be directly tested by temperature measurements with tiny thermoprobes combined with other parameters such as humidity level and wind speed. Furthermore, without loss of generality one can break the causal chain in phase screen models by defining regional refractive centers to allow rays that are less affected to propagate through directly. As a result, our work shows that the 3D geometric approach serves as an efficient and accurate method in assessing relevant turbulence problems with inputs of several environmental measurements and reasonable guesses (such as Cn 2 levels). This approach will facilitate analysis and possible corrections in lateral wave propagation problems, such as image de-blurring, prediction of laser propagation over long ranges, and improvement of free space optic communication systems. In this paper, the plenoptic function model and relevant parallel algorithm computing

  10. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  11. Monitoring stream bluff erosion using repeat terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzel, G.; Gran, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technology provides high-resolution topographic data that can be used to detect geomorphic change in fluvial environments. In this study, we utilize successive terrestrial laser scans to investigate the relationship between peak flow rates and stream bluff erosion in the Amity Creek watershed in Duluth, Minnesota. We also combine TLS scan results with bluff inventories from airborne lidar to estimate the volume of sediment erosion from bluffs in the watershed, which is an important source of fine sediment contributing to the creek's turbidity impairment. We selected nine study bluffs to conduct terrestrial laser scans on after all significant flood events over a two-year time period. The study employs a Faro Focus 3D phase-shift laser to collect data. Post-processing of the TLS-point cloud data sets involves: (1) removal of vegetation and objects other than the erosional surface of interest; (2) decimation of the point cloud in PC Tools and extraction of zmin values to produce a data set manageable in GIS; (3) creation of a bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) for each set of scans using ArcMap; and (4) utilization of Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) software to generate DEMs of Difference (DODs) from subsequent terrestrial laser scans. Preliminary results from three flooding events indicate significant erosional activity at all field sites. Slumps were observed at two bluffs following spring melt and freeze/thaw cycling. Two major precipitation events in late spring and early summer provided a unique opportunity to observe the impact of extreme high flow events on bluff erosion throughout the watershed using TLS technology. 4.75 inches of intermittent rain over a six-day period in late May 2012 (May 23-28) resulted in slumping at many bluffs and one major failure. The ≥100-year flood that occurred on June 19-20 (7.25 inches), 2012 was powerful enough to induce considerable channel change. Slumps occurred at six study sites

  12. Experimental validation of a newly designed 6 degrees of freedom scanning laser head: Application to three-dimensional beam structure

    SciTech Connect

    Di Maio, D.; Copertaro, E.

    2013-12-15

    A new scanning laser head is designed to use single Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) for performing measurements up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) at a target. The scanning head is supported by a rotating hollow shaft, which allows the laser beam to travel up to the scanning head from an opposite direction where an LDV is set up. The scanning head is made of a set of two mirrors, which deflects the laser beam with an angle so that the rotation of the scanning head produces a conical scan. When measurements are performed at the focal point of the conical scan then three translational vibration components can be measured, otherwise the very small circle scan, before and after the focal point, can measure up to 6 degrees of freedom, including three translations and three rotations. This paper presents the 6DOF scanning head and the measurements of 3D operational deflection shapes of a test structure.

  13. Multiplatform Approach to Mobile Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukko, A.; Kaartinen, H.; Hyyppä, J.; Chen, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Mobile laser scanning is an emerging technology for capturing three-dimensional information from the surrounding objects. With state of the art sensors the achieved point cloud could capture fine details of the surroundings with good accuracy and effectiveness. Many of the applications deal with the civil engineering purposes in urban areas for traffic and city planning and modelling. In this article we present multiplatform mobile laser scanning solutions for mapping applications that require mobility in various terrains and river environments but yet produce high density point clouds with good reliability and accuracy. The ROAMER mobile laser scanning system was deployed in multitude of tasks from urban areas to climate research. The paper also introduces a completely new backpack Akhka platform for mobile lidar mapping of areas where wheeled vehicles cannot operate. The sensor set is the same in all of the approaches, but the carrying vessel was selected according to the application. This was possible thanks to a relatively light and compact yet simple design of the system. ROAMER system is one of the few high-end MLS systems that are easily adaptable to various platforms. In addition to technical description of the system we discuss the practical performance of the solutions through various applications in the fields of urban mapping, fluvial geomorphology, snow cover characterization and climate change monitoring.

  14. Two-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmerjahn, A.; Theer, P.; Helmchen, F.

    Since its inception more than 15 years ago, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) has found widespread use in biological and medical research. Two-photon microscopy is based on simultaneous absorption of two photons by fluorophores and subsequent fluorescence emission, a process which under normal illumination conditions is highly improbable. Theoretically described around 1930 by Maria Göppert-Mayer [1], the first experimental demonstration of two-photon excitation had to await the invention of the laser, which produced sufficiently high light intensities to observe two-photon absorption events [2]. Only after the development of ultrafast lasers providing subpicosecond light pulses with high peak power intensities, however, two-photon-excited fluorescence became practical in a laser-scanning microscope [3]. Since then 2PLSM has developed into the method of choice for high-resolution imaging in living animals (reviewed in [4,5]). One of the main reasons is the low sensitivity of 2PLSM to light scattering, which enables imaging relatively deep inside biological tissue and direct observation of the dynamic behavior of cells in their native environment. In this chapter, we introduce the physical principles governing 2PLSM and briefly describe the key instrument components. We give an overview of fluorescence labeling techniques and how they are combined with 2PLSM for functional imaging and photomanipulation in living tissue. Finally, we discuss limitations and provide some future perspectives.

  15. Laser scanner data processing and 3D modeling using a free and open source software

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriele, Fatuzzo; Michele, Mangiameli Giuseppe, Mussumeci; Salvatore, Zito

    2015-03-10

    The laser scanning is a technology that allows in a short time to run the relief geometric objects with a high level of detail and completeness, based on the signal emitted by the laser and the corresponding return signal. When the incident laser radiation hits the object to detect, then the radiation is reflected. The purpose is to build a three-dimensional digital model that allows to reconstruct the reality of the object and to conduct studies regarding the design, restoration and/or conservation. When the laser scanner is equipped with a digital camera, the result of the measurement process is a set of points in XYZ coordinates showing a high density and accuracy with radiometric and RGB tones. In this case, the set of measured points is called “point cloud” and allows the reconstruction of the Digital Surface Model. Even the post-processing is usually performed by closed source software, which is characterized by Copyright restricting the free use, free and open source software can increase the performance by far. Indeed, this latter can be freely used providing the possibility to display and even custom the source code. The experience started at the Faculty of Engineering in Catania is aimed at finding a valuable free and open source tool, MeshLab (Italian Software for data processing), to be compared with a reference closed source software for data processing, i.e. RapidForm. In this work, we compare the results obtained with MeshLab and Rapidform through the planning of the survey and the acquisition of the point cloud of a morphologically complex statue.

  16. Laser scanned image sensors using photoconductors with deep traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1975-01-01

    Photoconductor records image when holes and electrons are trapped inside it due to incident photons. Image can be read out by exposing photoconductor to scanning laser beam. Photons from scanning laser empty traps, generating photocurrent. Image information is obtained by detecting this photocurrent synchronously with laser scan.

  17. Methodological Developments in 3d Scanning and Modelling of Archaeological French Heritage Site : the Bronze Age Painted Cave of "LES FRAUX", Dordogne (france)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burens, A.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Carozza, L.; Lévêque, F.; Mathé, V.

    2013-07-01

    For six years, an interdisciplinary team of archaeologists, surveyors, environmentalists and archaeometrists have jointly carried out the study of a Bronze Age painted cave, registrered in the French Historical Monuments. The archaeological cave of Les Fraux (Saint-Martin-de-Fressengeas, Dordogne) forms a wide network of galleries, characterized by the exceptional richness of its archaeological remains such as ceramic and metal deposits, parietal representation and about domestic fireplaces. This cave is the only protohistorical site in Europe wherein are gathered testimonies of domestic, spiritual and artistic activities. Fortunately, the cave was closed at the end of the Bronze Age, following to the collapse of its entrance. The site was re-discovered in 1989 and its study started in 2007. The study in progress takes place in a new kind of tool founded by the CNRS's Institute of Ecology and Environment. The purpose of this observatory is the promotion of new methodologies and experimental studies in Global Ecology. In that framework, 3D models of the cave constitute the common work support and the best way for scientific communication for the various studies conducted on the site by nearly forty researchers. In this specific context, a partnership among archaeologists and surveyors from INSA Strasbourg allows the team to develop, in an interdisciplinary way, new methods of data acquiring based on contact-free measurements techniques in order to acquire a full 3D-documentation. This work is conducted in compliance with the integrity of the site. Different techniques based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning, Digital Photogrammetry and Spatial Imaging System have been used in order to generate a geometric and photorealistic 3D model from the combination of point clouds and photogrammetric images, for both visualization and accurate documentation purposes. Various scales of acquiring and diverse resolutions have been applied according to the subject: global volume cave

  18. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guangni; Zhu, Wenxin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yao; Zhang, Anfeng; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments).

  19. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangni; Zhu, Wenxin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yao; Zhang, Anfeng; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments). PMID:27302087

  20. Real-time microstructure imaging by Laue microdiffraction: A sample application in laser 3D printed Ni-based superalloys.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangni; Zhu, Wenxin; Shen, Hao; Li, Yao; Zhang, Anfeng; Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Laue microdiffraction has been widely applied to characterize the local crystal structure, orientation, and defects of inhomogeneous polycrystalline solids by raster scanning them under a micro/nano focused polychromatic X-ray probe. In a typical experiment, a large number of Laue diffraction patterns are collected, requiring novel data reduction and analysis approaches, especially for researchers who do not have access to fast parallel computing capabilities. In this article, a novel approach is developed by plotting the distributions of the average recorded intensity and the average filtered intensity of the Laue patterns. Visualization of the characteristic microstructural features is realized in real time during data collection. As an example, this method is applied to image key features such as microcracks, carbides, heat affected zone, and dendrites in a laser assisted 3D printed Ni-based superalloy, at a speed much faster than data collection. Such analytical approach remains valid for a wide range of crystalline solids, and therefore extends the application range of the Laue microdiffraction technique to problems where real-time decision-making during experiment is crucial (for instance time-resolved non-reversible experiments). PMID:27302087

  1. 3D microscale laser dynamic forming: Multiscale modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Huang; Cheng, Gary J.

    2011-05-15

    Microscale laser dynamic forming ({mu}LDF) shows great potential in fabricating robust and high-aspect-ratio metallic microcomponents. Experiments revealed that strain rate and sample size play important roles in determining the dynamic plasticity and final results of {mu}LDF. To further understand these effects, a multiscale modeling methodology is adopted to characterize the microscale dynamic plasticity considering the evolutions of nano-to-submicron dislocations avalanches under shock loading. In this methodology, 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are implemented to derive the yield strength and the initial strain hardening dependence on size and strain rate. It is observed that there exist three dynamic stages during deformation process. The initial strain hardening rate in Stage II increases with strain rate. The mechanical threshold stress model, intrinsically equipped with strain-rate-dependent flow stress and initial hardening, is chosen and modified to incorporate size effect quantitatively. This scale-dependent model, implemented in abaqus/explicit, provides deformation depths and thickness variations in good agreement with experimental results in {mu}LDF.

  2. Monolithic transparent 3D dielectrophoretic micro-actuator fabricated by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Bellouard, Yves

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) monolithic micro-actuator fabricated by non-ablative femtosecond laser micromachining and subsequent chemical etching. The actuating principle is based on dielectrophoresis. An analytical modeling of this actuation scheme is conducted, which is capable of performance prediction, parameter optimization and instability analysis. Static and dynamic characterizations are experimentally verified. An actuation range of 30 μm is well attainable; resonances are captured with an evaluated quality factor of 40 (measured in air) and a bandwidth of 5 Hz for the primary vertical resonance of 200 Hz. A settling time of 200 ms in transient response indicates the damping properties of such actuation scheme. This actuation principle suppresses the need for electrodes on the mobile, non-conductive component and is particularly interesting for moving transparent elements. Thanks to the flexibility of the manufacturing process, it can be coupled to other functionalities within monolithic transparent micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for applications like tunable optical couplers.

  3. A quantitative study of 3D-scanning frequency and Δd of tracking points on the tooth surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Liang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Micro-movement of human jaws in the resting state might influence the accuracy of direct three-dimensional (3D) measurement. Providing a reference for sampling frequency settings of intraoral scanning systems to overcome this influence is important. In this study, we measured micro-movement, or change in distance (∆d), as the change in position of a single tracking point from one sampling time point to another in five human subjects. ∆d of tracking points on incisors at 7 sampling frequencies was judged against the clinical accuracy requirement to select proper sampling frequency settings. The curve equation was then fit quantitatively between ∆d median and the sampling frequency to predict the trend of ∆d with increasing f. The difference of ∆d among the subjects and the difference between upper and lower incisor feature points of the same subject were analyzed by a non-parametric test (α = 0.05). Significant differences of incisor feature points were noted among different subjects and between upper and lower jaws of the same subject (P < 0.01). Overall, ∆d decreased with increasing frequency. When the frequency was 60 Hz, ∆d nearly reached the clinical accuracy requirement. Frequencies higher than 60 Hz did not significantly decrease Δd further. PMID:26400112

  4. 3D analytical investigation of melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Dorfman, S. M.; Gaal, R.; Piet, H.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    The diamond anvil cell is a unique tool to study materials under static pressures up to several hundreds of GPa. It is possible to generate temperatures as high as several thousand degrees in the diamond anvil cell by laser heating. This allows us to achieve deep mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC). The small heated volume is surrounded by thermally conductive diamond anvils results in high temperature gradients which affect phase transformation and chemical distribution in the LH-DAC. Analytical characterization of samples in three dimensions is essential to fully understand phase assemblages and equilibrium in LHDAC. In this study we used San Carlos olivine as a starting material as a simple proxy to deep mantle composition. Three samples were melted at ~3000 K and at ~45 GPa for three different durations ranging from 1 to 6 minutes; two other samples were melted at 30 GPa and 70 GPa. All samples were then sliced by focused ion beam (FIB). From each slice, an electron image and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) map were acquired by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the dual beam FIB instrument. These slices were collected on one half of the heated area in each sample, from which we obtained 3D elemental and phase distribution. The other half of the heated area was used to extract a 100 nm thick section for subsequent analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain diffraction patterns and high resolution EDX maps. 3D reconstruction of SEM EDX results shows at least four differentiated regions in the heated area for all samples. The exact Fe and Mg compositions mentioned below are an example of the sample melted at 45 GPa for 6 minutes. The bulk of the heated are is surrounded by ferropericlase (Mg0.92, Fe0.08)O shell (Fp). Inside this shell we find a thick region of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (Brg) coexisting with Fp. In the center lies a Fe-rich core which is surrounded by magnesiow

  5. Complete-mouth rehabilitation using a 3D printing technique and the CAD/CAM double scanning method: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han-Sung; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-07-01

    According to evolving computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, ceramic materials such as zirconia can be used to create fixed dental prostheses for partial removable dental prostheses. Since 3D printing technology was introduced a few years ago, dental applications of this technique have gradually increased. This clinical report presents a complete-mouth rehabilitation using 3D printing and the CAD/CAM double-scanning method. PMID:26946918

  6. Nature of heterophase inclusions in high-purity optical fiber materials as studied with 3D laser ultramicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketkova, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    3D laser ultramicroscopy (3D LUM) is intended specially for determining the concentration and size distribution of submicron inclusions in the bulk samples of high-purity materials for visible and IR fiber optics. In this work the 3D LUM technique is shown to be able to identify the nature of individual inclusions detected. The measurement of the light scattered by an inclusion at a varied probe beam wavelength and polarization and at a varied scattered light collection angle makes it possible to determine the inclusion refractive index. The 3D LUM possibilities are illustrated by the example of studying the inclusion nature in the As2S3 glass samples prepared by the direct synthesis from elements in a quartz container at elevated temperatures.

  7. Jigsaw phase III: a miniaturized airborne 3-D imaging laser radar with photon-counting sensitivity for foliage penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, Mohan; Blask, Steven; Higgins, Thomas; Clifton, William; Davidsohn, Daniel; Carson, Ryan; Reynolds, Van; Pfannenstiel, Joanne; Cannata, Richard; Marino, Richard; Drover, John; Hatch, Robert; Schue, David; Freehart, Robert; Rowe, Greg; Mooney, James; Hart, Carl; Stanley, Byron; McLaughlin, Joseph; Lee, Eui-In; Berenholtz, Jack; Aull, Brian; Zayhowski, John; Vasile, Alex; Ramaswami, Prem; Ingersoll, Kevin; Amoruso, Thomas; Khan, Imran; Davis, William; Heinrichs, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Jigsaw three-dimensional (3D) imaging laser radar is a compact, light-weight system for imaging highly obscured targets through dense foliage semi-autonomously from an unmanned aircraft. The Jigsaw system uses a gimbaled sensor operating in a spot light mode to laser illuminate a cued target, and autonomously capture and produce the 3D image of hidden targets under trees at high 3D voxel resolution. With our MIT Lincoln Laboratory team members, the sensor system has been integrated into a geo-referenced 12-inch gimbal, and used in airborne data collections from a UH-1 manned helicopter, which served as a surrogate platform for the purpose of data collection and system validation. In this paper, we discuss the results from the ground integration and testing of the system, and the results from UH-1 flight data collections. We also discuss the performance results of the system obtained using ladar calibration targets.

  8. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  9. Combination of thermal extrusion printing and ultrafast laser fabrication for the manufacturing of 3D composite scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balčiūnas, Evaldas; Lukoševičius, Laurynas; Mackevičiūtė, Dovilė; Rekštytė, Sima; Rutkūnas, Vygandas; Paipulas, Domas; Stankevičiūtė, Karolina; Baltriukienė, Daiva; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Piskarskas, Algis P.; Malinauskas, Mangirdas

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to manufacturing 3D microstructured composite scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. A thermal extrusion 3D printer - a simple, low-cost tabletop device enabling rapid materialization of CAD models in plastics - was used to produce cm-scale microporous scaffolds out of polylactic acid (PLA). The fabricated objects were subsequently immersed in a photosensitive monomer solution and direct laser writing technique (DLW) was used to refine its inner structure by fabricating a fine mesh inside the previously produced scaffold. In addition, a composite material structure out of four different materials fabricated via DLW is presented. This technique, empowered by ultrafast lasers allows 3D structuring with high spatial resolution in a great variety of photosensitive materials. A composite scaffold made of distinct materials and periodicities is acquired after the development process used to wash out non-linked monomers. Another way to modify the 3D printed PLA surfaces was also demonstrated - ablation with femtosecond laser beam. Structure geometry on macro- to micro- scales could be finely tuned by combining these fabrication techniques. Such artificial 3D substrates could be used for cell growth or as biocompatible-biodegradable implants. To our best knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration showing the creation of composite 3D scaffolds using convenient 3D printing combined with DLW. This combination of distinct material processing techniques enables rapid fabrication of diverse functional micro-featured and integrated devices. Hopefully, the proposed approach will find numerous applications in the field of tissue engineering, as well as in microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, microoptics and others.

  10. Ship-in-a-bottle integration by hybrid femtosecond laser technology for fabrication of true 3D biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, Felix; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jian; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Sugioka, Koji

    2015-03-01

    We propose herein the "ship-in-a-bottle" integration of three-dimensional (3D) polymeric sinusoidal ridges inside photosensitive glass microfluidic channel by a hybrid subtractive - additive femtosecond laser processing method. It consists of Femtosecond Laser Assisted Wet Etching (FLAE) of a photosensitive Foturan glass followed by Two-Photon Polymerization (TPP) of a SU-8 negative epoxy-resin. Both subtractive and additive processes are carried out using the same set-up with the change of laser focusing objective only. A 522 nm wavelength of the second harmonic generation from an amplified femtosecond Yb-fiber laser (FCPA µJewel D-400, IMRA America, 1045 nm; pulse width 360 fs, repetition rate 200 kHz) was employed for irradiation. The new method allows lowering the size limit of 3D objects created inside channels to smaller details down to the dimensions of a cell, and improve the structure stability. Sinusoidal periodic patterns and ridges are of great use as base scaffolds for building up new structures on their top or for modulating cell migration, guidance and orientation while created interspaces can be exploited for microfluidic applications. The glass microchannel offers robustness and appropriate dynamic flow conditions for cellular studies while the integrated patterns are reducing the size of structure to the level of cells responsiveness. Taking advantage of the ability to directly fabricate 3D complex shapes, both glass channels and polymeric integrated patterns enable us to 3D spatially design biochips for specific applications.

  11. Gravel-bed surface roughness from airborne laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, G.; Wang, C.

    2011-12-01

    The roughness of gravel-bed surface is of great importance for fluvial geomorpholoy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the fractal theory and the log-log variogram are useful for describing the multi-scaling behavior(grain scale and form scale) of the gravel-bed surface. In this study, we obtained the 3D surface information of the gravel surface of a central bar in Nan-Shih River, Taiwan using an airborne laser scanning with a nominal point density of 100 points/m2. The data were divided into 6m × 6m grids. The roughness characteristics of the gravel bar were discussed using the anisotropy axes (also called the directions of maximum and minimum continuity, respectively) determined from the variogram map for each grid. And, the fractal dimension of the two directions were also calculated.

  12. Laser light scan analysis of the “anticonvulsant face”

    PubMed Central

    Orup, H. Ivan; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Holmes, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The “anticonvulsant face”, comprised of a short nose, low nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, and wide mouth, was suggested in the 1970s to indicate teratogenesis caused by the anticonvulsant drugs phenytoin and phenobarbital. However, these were based on subjective clinical observations. In the present study we have applied objective and reliable quantitative measures to the operational definitions of craniofacial features in anticonvulant-exposed cases. We have adopted anthropometric analysis based on image analysis of laser light scans. Using morphometric methods, we established the positions of physical features and objectively determined the changes in the size and shape of affected soft tissues of the faces of children exposed to those anticonvulsant drugs during pregnancy. METHODS Thirteen individuals, exposed throughout pregnancy to phenytoin as either monotherapy or polytherapy, were identified in a previous analysis as having significant changes in their craniofacial features based on measurements of cephalometric radiographs, changes associated with “the anticonvulsant face”.. The soft tissues of their faces were imaged by 3D laser (structured light) scanning. RESULTS The notable changes in soft tissues identified by laser light scans were a wide philtrum (between the left and right cristae philtri), narrow mouth (between the left and right cheilions), short nasal bridge (between nasale and pronasale), short nose height (between the nasale and subnasale), and flat orbits (based on the orbital protrusion index). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of phenytoin-exposed individuals is the first anthropometric analysis of the craniofacial surface, designed to render the identification of abnormal features both objective and realiable. These analyses demonstrated that there were several significant changes in the soft tissue of the face, corroborating earlier studies of alterations of the craniofacial skeleton in the anticonvulsant face. Two of the

  13. Extraction of power lines from mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Qing; Li, Jonathan; Wen, Chenglu; Huang, Pengdi

    2016-03-01

    Modern urban life is becoming increasingly more dependent on reliable electric power supply. Since power outages cause substantial financial losses to producers, distributors and consumers of electric power, it is in the common interest to minimize failures of power lines. In order to detect defects as early as possible and to plan efficiently the maintenance activities, distribution networks are regularly inspected. Carrying out foot patrols or climbing the structures to visually inspect transmission lines and aerial surveys (e.g., digital imaging or most recent airborne laser scanning (ALS) are the two most commonly used methods of power line inspection. Although much faster in comparison to the foot patrol inspection, aerial inspection is more expensive and usually less accurate, in complex urban areas particularly. This paper presents a scientific work that is done in the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) point clouds for automated extraction of power lines. In the proposed method, 2D power lines are extracted using Hough transform in the projected XOY plane and the 3D power line points are visualized after the point searching. Filtering based on an elevation threshold is applied, which is combined with the vehicle's trajectory in the horizontal section.

  14. 3D leaf water content mapping using terrestrial laser scanner backscatter intensity with radiometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Niemann, K. Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Leaf water content (LWC) plays an important role in agriculture and forestry management. It can be used to assess drought conditions and wildfire susceptibility. Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data have been widely used in forested environments for retrieving geometrically-based biophysical parameters. Recent studies have also shown the potential of using radiometric information (backscatter intensity) for estimating LWC. However, the usefulness of backscatter intensity data has been limited by leaf surface characteristics, and incidence angle effects. To explore the idea of using LiDAR intensity data to assess LWC we normalized (for both angular effects and leaf surface properties) shortwave infrared TLS data (1550 nm). A reflectance model describing both diffuse and specular reflectance was applied to remove strong specular backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle. Leaves with different surface properties were collected from eight broadleaf plant species for modeling the relationship between LWC and backscatter intensity. Reference reflectors (Spectralon from Labsphere, Inc.) were used to build a look-up table to compensate for incidence angle effects. Results showed that before removing the specular influences, there was no significant correlation (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05) between the backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle and LWC. After the removal of the specular influences, a significant correlation emerged (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.05). The agreement between measured and TLS-derived LWC demonstrated a significant reduction of RMSE (root mean square error, from 0.008 to 0.003 g/cm2) after correcting for the incidence angle effect. We show that it is possible to use TLS to estimate LWC for selected broadleaved plants with an R2 of 0.76 (significance level α = 0.05) at leaf level. Further investigations of leaf surface and internal structure will likely result in improvements of 3D LWC mapping for studying physiology and ecology in vegetation.

  15. Laser scanning system for object monitoring

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy James [Knoxville, TN; Maxey, Lonnie Curtis [Powell, TN; Chiaro, Jr; John, Peter [Clinton, TN

    2008-04-22

    A laser scanner is located in a fixed position to have line-of-sight access to key features of monitored objects. The scanner rapidly scans pre-programmed points corresponding to the positions of retroreflecting targets affixed to the key features of the objects. The scanner is capable of making highly detailed scans of any portion of the field of view, permitting the exact location and identity of targets to be confirmed. The security of an object is verified by determining that the cooperative target is still present and that its position has not changed. The retroreflecting targets also modulate the reflected light for purposes of returning additional information back to the location of the scanner.

  16. Time-resolved, 3D, laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fine-structure passive scalar mixing in a tubular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vliet, E.; Van Bergen, S. M.; Derksen, J. J.; Portela, L. M.; Van den Akker, H. E. A.

    A three-dimensional, time-resolved, laser-induced fluorescence (3D-LIF) technique was developed to measure the turbulent (liquid-liquid) mixing of a conserved passive scalar in the wake of an injector inserted perpendicularly into a tubular reactor with Re=4,000. In this technique, a horizontal laser sheet was traversed in its normal direction through the measurement section. Three-dimensional scalar fields were reconstructed from the 2D images captured at consecutive, closely spaced levels by means of a high-speed CCD camera. The ultimate goal of the measurements was to assess the downstream development of the 3D scalar fields (in terms of the full scalar gradient vector field and its associated scalar energy dissipation rate) in an industrial flow with significant advection velocity. As a result of this advection velocity, the measured 3D scalar field is artificially ``skewed'' during a scan period. A method to correct for this skewing was developed, tested and applied. Analysis of the results show consistent physical behaviour.

  17. A novel quality control procedure for the evaluation of laser scanning data segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Durgham, K.; Habib, A.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past few years, laser scanning systems have been acknowledged as the leading tools for the collection of high density 3D point cloud over physical surfaces for many different applications. However, no interpretation and scene classification is performed during the acquisition of these datasets. Consequently, the collected data must be processed to extract the required information. The segmentation procedure is usually considered as the fundamental step in information extraction from laser scanning data. So far, various approaches have been developed for the segmentation of 3D laser scanning data. However, none of them is exempted from possible anomalies due to disregarding the internal characteristics of laser scanning data, improper selection of the segmentation thresholds, or other problems during the segmentation procedure. Therefore, quality control procedures are required to evaluate the segmentation outcome and report the frequency of instances of expected problems. A few quality control techniques have been proposed for the evaluation of laser scanning segmentation. These approaches usually require reference data and user intervention for the assessment of segmentation results. In order to resolve these problems, a new quality control procedure is introduced in this paper. This procedure makes hypotheses regarding potential problems that might take place in the segmentation process, detects instances of such problems, quantifies the frequency of these problems, and suggests possible actions to remedy them. The feasibility of the proposed approach is verified through quantitative evaluation of planar and linear/cylindrical segmentation outcome from two recently-developed parameter-domain and spatial-domain segmentation techniques.

  18. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  19. D Documentation of a Historical Monument Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning Case Study: Byzantine Water Cistern, Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temizer, T.; Nemli, G.; Ekizce, E.; Ekizce, A.; Demir, S.; Bayram, B.; Askin, F. H.; Cobanoglu, A. V.; Yilmaz, H. F.

    2013-07-01

    3D modelling of architectural structures for monitoring, conservation and restoration alterations in heritage sites has special challenges for data acquisition and processing. The accuracy of created 3D model is very important. In general, because of the complexity of the structures, 3D modelling can be time consuming and may include some difficulties. 3D terrestrial laser scanning technique is a reliable and advantageous method for reconstruction and conservation of monuments. This technique is commonly acknowledged due to its accuracy, speed and flexibility. Terrestrial laser scanners can be used for documentation of the cultural heritage for the future. But it is also important to understand the capabilities and right conditions of use and limitations of this technology. Istanbul is a rich city with cultural monuments, buildings and cultural heritage. The presented study consists of documentation of a Byzantine water cistern situated underground the court of Sarnicli Han building. The cistern which represents a very good living example of its period has been modelled in 3D by using terrestrial laser scanning technology and the accuracy assessment of this modelling is examined.

  20. Multidimensional Laser Scanning System for Underwater Mapping of Small Structures and Bottom Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, E.

    2005-05-01

    A multidimensional laser scanning imaging system is under development to investigate new concepts in underwater imaging. The system is a modification of the 3D Laser Imaging & Tracking Electro-optical System (3D LITES; HBOI, patent # 5,418,608) that was developed for 3D mapping applications in biological oceanography. The new 3D-FLITES ("F" stands for added Fluorescence capability) captures both spatial and spectral data and offers extended operation capabilities. The system can capture the range to each pixel in the sensor's field of view, the relative reflectance of each pixel (similar to "conventional" images) and five channels of fluorescence emission in the scene, captured sequentially. Multidimensional data sets can be instrumental in bottom topography mapping and object identification. The 3D FLITES has the unique capability to operate in user-selectable line or raster scanning modes if mounted on a moving platform. In raster mode two perpendicular mirrors are driven, allowing the operator to capture single frames (capturing either reflectance or fluorescence data) or a stream of images in fast rate (16 frames per second). With this operational flexibility the operator can combine a "fly over" scanning mode with "look ahead", "look sideways" and "zoom" modes. The current system is limited in range and resolution; nevertheless it can serve as a test-bed to evaluate operational parameters, data acquisition and signal processing protocols that could lead to a smaller, more efficient system in the future.

  1. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  2. Reliable fusion of knee bone laser scans to establish ground truth for cartilage thickness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Ching; Trinh, Nhon H.; Fleming, Braden C.; Kimia, Benjamin B.

    2010-03-01

    We are interested in establishing ground truth data for validating morphology measurements of human knee cartilage from MR imaging. One promising approach is to compare the high-accuracy 3D laser scans of dissected cadaver knees before and after the dissolution of their cartilage. This requires an accurate and reliable method to fuse the individual laser scans from multiple views of the cadaver knees. Unfortunately existing methods using Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm from off-the-shell packages often yield unreliable fusion results. We identify two major sources of variation: (i) the noise in depth measurements of the laser scans is significantly high and (ii) the use of point-to-point correspondence in ICP is not suitable due to sampling variation in the laser scans. We resolve the first problem by performing adaptive Gaussian smoothing on each individual laser scans prior to the fusion. For the second problem, we construct a surface mesh from the point cloud of each scan and adopt a point-to-mesh ICP scheme for pairwise alignment. The complete surface mesh is constructed by fusing all the scans in the order maximizing mutual overlaps. In experiments on 6 repeated scanning trials of a cadaver knee, our approach reduced the alignment error of point-to-point ICP by 30% and reduced coefficient of variation (CV) of cartilage thickness measurements from 5% down to 1.4%, significantly improving the method's repeatability.

  3. Scanning laser polarimetry of the peripapillar retinal nerve fiber layer in glaucoma cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiec, Slawomir; Rzendkowski, Marek; Gierek-Ciaciura, Stanislawa; Szymkowiak, Monika; Momot-Kawalska, Barbara

    1998-10-01

    Scanning laser polarimetry is the method of evaluating the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Different pathologies damage retinal fibers, but in glaucoma the damage is present very often before other symptoms reveal. As the earliest possible diagnosis of glaucoma is essential for treatment results, scanning laser polarimetry offers a very useful diagnostic tool for ophthalmology. This paper describes the principles of the method and discusses the results obtained in 50 glaucomatous eyes in conjunction with 2- and 3-D topographical parameters of the optic disc.

  4. Mobile Laser Scanning for Indoor Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Apostolopoulos, G.; Backes, D.; Boehm, J.

    2013-10-01

    The process of capturing and modelling buildings has gained increased focus in recent years with the rise of Building Information Modelling (BIM). At the heart of BIM is a process change for the construction and facilities management industries whereby a BIM aids more collaborative working through better information exchange, and as a part of the process Geomatic/Land Surveyors are not immune from the changes. Terrestrial laser scanning has been proscribed as the preferred method for rapidly capturing buildings for BIM geometry. This is a process change from a traditional measured building survey just with a total station and is aided by the increasing acceptance of point cloud data being integrated with parametric building models in BIM tools such as Autodesk Revit or Bentley Architecture. Pilot projects carried out previously by the authors to investigate the geometry capture and modelling of BIM confirmed the view of others that the process of data capture with static laser scan setups is slow and very involved requiring at least two people for efficiency. Indoor Mobile Mapping Systems (IMMS) present a possible solution to these issues especially in time saved. Therefore this paper investigates their application as a capture device for BIM geometry creation over traditional static methods through a fit-for-purpose test.

  5. A scanning laser velocimeter for turbulence research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duen, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent and unsteady separated flows occur on most practical flight vehicles, but are not yet sufficiently understood for designs to provide safe margins of performance without recourse to extensive experiment and computation. In date, reliable experimental data for even basic flows is severely limited and does not yet provide a satisfactory data base with which to assess current design and calculation methods. Although the laser velocimeter (LV) has become a proven, nonintrusive instrument for the measurement of local mean velocities and turbulence properties, measurements have been of a mean, statistical nature derived from averages accumulated independently at different positions in the flow. Thus, the measurements do not give an instantaneous dynamic, picture of the flow-field structures. Accordingly, a new technique for rapid LV scans of turbulent flow fields was proposed. The potential of this new instrument for fundamental fluid mechanical measurements of turbulent flows has been demonstrated. The results clearly show that significant unsteady flow features are hidden by conventional measurements and that the scanning laser velocimeter should prove an invauable tool in future studies of the structure of turbulent flows.

  6. Laser scanning endoscope for diagnostic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouimette, Donald R.; Nudelman, Sol; Spackman, Thomas; Zaccheo, Scott

    1990-07-01

    A new type of endoscope is being developed which utilizes an optical raster scanning system for imaging through an endoscope. The optical raster scanner utilizes a high speed, multifaceted, rotating polygon mirror system for horizontal deflection, and a slower speed galvanometer driven mirror as the vertical deflection system. When used in combination, the optical raster scanner traces out a raster similar to an electron beam raster used in television systems. This flying spot of light can then be detected by various types of photosensitive detectors to generate a video image of the surface or scene being illuminated by the scanning beam. The optical raster scanner has been coupled to an endoscope. The raster is projected down the endoscope, thereby illuminating the object to be imaged at the distal end of the endoscope. Elemental photodetectors are placed at the distal or proximal end of the endoscope to detect the reflected illumination from the flying spot of light. This time sequenced signal is captured by an image processor for display and processing. This technique offers the possibility for very small diameter endoscopes since illumination channel requirements are eliminated. Using various lasers, very specific spectral selectivity can be achieved to optimum contrast of specific lesions of interest. Using several laser lines, or a white light source, with detectors of specific spectral response, multiple spectrally selected images can be acquired simultaneously. The potential for co-linear therapy delivery while imaging is also possible.

  7. Delineation of individual tree crowns for mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rosen; Chen, Yiping; Wen, Chenglu; Wang, Cheng; Li, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    The information of individual trees plays an important role in urban surveying and mapping. With the development of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology, 3-Dimenisonal (3D) structure of trees can be generated in point clouds with high spatial resolution and accuracy. Individual tree segmentations are used to derive tree structural attributes such as tree height, crown diameter, stem position etc. In this study, a framework is proposed to take advantage of the detailed structures of tree crowns which are represented in the mobile laser scanning (MLS) data. This framework consists of five steps: (1) Automatically detect and remove ground points using RANSAC; (2) Compress all the above ground points to image grid with 3