Science.gov

Sample records for 3d simulation software

  1. [Accuracy of morphological simulation for orthognatic surgery. Assessment of a 3D image fusion software.

    PubMed

    Terzic, A; Schouman, T; Scolozzi, P

    2013-08-06

    The CT/CBCT data allows for 3D reconstruction of skeletal and untextured soft tissue volume. 3D stereophotogrammetry technology has strongly improved the quality of facial soft tissue surface texture. The combination of these two technologies allows for an accurate and complete reconstruction. The 3D virtual head may be used for orthognatic surgical planning, virtual surgery, and morphological simulation obtained with a software dedicated to the fusion of 3D photogrammetric and radiological images. The imaging material include: a multi-slice CT scan or broad field CBCT scan, a 3D photogrammetric camera. The operative image processing protocol includes the following steps: 1) pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT scan and 3D photogrammetric image acquisition; 2) 3D image segmentation and fusion of untextured CT/CBCT skin with the preoperative textured facial soft tissue surface of the 3D photogrammetric scan; 3) image fusion of the pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT data set virtual osteotomies, and 3D photogrammetric soft tissue virtual simulation; 4) fusion of virtual simulated 3D photogrammetric and real postoperative images, and assessment of accuracy using a color-coded scale to measure the differences between the two surfaces. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Usefulness of three-dimensional(3D) simulation software in hepatectomy for pediatric hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhou, Xian-Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Zhan; Dong, Qian; Su, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Hepatoblastoma (HB) is the most common malignant liver tumor in childhood. Complete HB surgical resection which is technically demanding is the cornerstone of effective therapy with a good prognosis. The aim of our study is to evaluate the usefulness of 3D simulation software in assisting hepatectomy in pediatric patients with HB. 21 children with HB who underwent hepatectomy were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent computer tomography (CT) imaging preoperatively. CT images from 11 cases (from September 2013 to August 2015) were reconstructed with Hisense CAS, and performed hetpatectomy. While 10 cases (from September 2011 to August 2013) without 3D simulation were token as the control group. The clinical outcome were analyzed and compared between the 2 groups. All the HB were successfully removed for all patients and there was no positive margins in the surgical specimens, no complications, and no recurrences. For the reconstructing group, 3D simulation software successfully reconstructed the 3D images of liver and were used as a navigator in the operation room during hepatectomy. Anatomic hepatectomy were successfully completed for all patients after operation planning using the software. There was no obvious discrepancy between the virtual and the actual hepatectomy. The mean operation time was shorter (142.18 ± 21.87 min VS. the control group, 173.5 ± 54.88 min, p = 0.047) and intraoperative bleeding was less (28.73 ± 14.17 ml VS. 42.8 ± 41.12 ml, p = 0.011) in the reconstructing group. Moreover, postoperative hospital stay tended to be shorter in the reconstructing group (11.18 ± 2.78d VS. the control group 13 ± 3.46d, P = 0.257). 3D simulation software facilitates the investigation of the complex liver structure, contributes to the optimal operation planning, and enables an individualized anatomic hepatectomy for each pediatric patient with HB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Toward high-speed 3D nonlinear soft tissue deformation simulations using Abaqus software.

    PubMed

    Idkaidek, Ashraf; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2015-12-01

    We aim to achieve a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a porcine liver deformation under a surgical tool pressure using the commercial finite element software Abaqus. The liver geometry is obtained using magnetic resonance imaging, and a nonlinear constitutive law is employed to capture large deformations of the tissue. Effects of implicit versus explicit analysis schemes, element type, and mesh density on computation time are studied. We find that Abaqus explicit and implicit solvers are capable of simulating nonlinear soft tissue deformations accurately using first-order tetrahedral elements in a relatively short time by optimizing the element size. This study provides new insights and guidance on accurate and relatively fast nonlinear soft tissue simulations. Such simulations can provide force feedback during robotic surgery and allow visualization of tissue deformations for surgery planning and training of surgical residents.

  4. Panthere V2: Multipurpose Simulation Software for 3D Dose Rate Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penessot, Gaël; Bavoil, Éléonore; Wertz, Laurent; Malouch, Fadhel; Visonneau, Thierry; Dubost, Julien

    2017-09-01

    PANTHERE is a multipurpose radiation protection software developed by EDF to calculate gamma dose rates in complex 3D environments. PANTHERE takes a key role in the EDF ALARA process, enabling to predict dose rates and to organize and optimize operations in high radiation environments. PANTHERE is also used for nuclear waste characterization, transport of nuclear materials, etc. It is used in most of the EDF engineering units and their design service providers and industrial partners.

  5. Software Development: 3D Animations and Creating User Interfaces for Realistic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2015-01-01

    My fall 2015 semester was spent at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center working in the Integrated Graphics, Operations, and Analysis Laboratory (IGOAL). My first project was to create a video animation that could tell the story of OMICS. OMICS is a term being used in the field of biomedical science to describe the collective technologies that study biological systems, such as what makes up a cell and how it functions with other systems. In the IGOAL I used a large 23 inch Wacom monitor to draw storyboards, graphics, and line art animations. I used Blender as the 3D environment to sculpt, shape, cut or modify the several scenes and models for the video. A challenge creating this video was to take a term used in biomedical science and describe it in such a way that an 8th grade student can understand. I used a line art style because it would visually set the tone for what we thought was an educational style. In order to get a handle on the perspective and overall feel for the animation without overloading my workspace, I split up the 2 minute animation into several scenes. I used Blender's python scripting capabilities which allowed for the addition of plugins to add or modify tools. The scripts can also directly interact with the objects to create naturalistic patterns or movements. After collecting the rendered scenes, I used Blender's built-in video editing workspace to output the animation. My second project was to write software that emulates a physical system's interface. The interface was to simulate a boat, ROV, and winch system. Simulations are a time and cost effective way to test complicated data and provide training for operators without having to use expensive hardware. We created the virtual controls with 3-D Blender models and 2-D graphics, and then add functionality in C# using the Unity game engine. The Unity engine provides several essential behaviors of a simulator, such as the start and update functions. A framework for Unity, which was developed in

  6. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  7. Calcium3D: a visual software package for the simulation of calcium buffered diffusion in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Germán; Gil, Amparo; Segura, Javier

    2005-11-01

    We present Calcium3D, a user-friendly software package for simulating calcium triggered processes in neuroendocrine cells. We use Monte Carlo methods for the simulation of the basic processes involved: entry of calcium into the cytoplasm, the diffusion of ions and mobile intracellular calcium buffers inside the intracellular medium, and the kinetics of the reaction of calcium with these buffers. The outputs of the simulation are calcium and buffer concentrations as a function of time and for different depths from the cellular membrane.

  8. [Development of a software for 3D virtual phantom design].

    PubMed

    Zou, Lian; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Qi

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D virtual phantom design software, which was developed based on object-oriented programming methodology and dedicated to medical physics research. This software was named Magical Phan tom (MPhantom), which is composed of 3D visual builder module and virtual CT scanner. The users can conveniently construct any complex 3D phantom, and then export the phantom as DICOM 3.0 CT images. MPhantom is a user-friendly and powerful software for 3D phantom configuration, and has passed the real scene's application test. MPhantom will accelerate the Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculation in radiation therapy and X ray imaging reconstruction algorithm research.

  9. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  10. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  11. Faster Aerodynamic Simulation With Cart3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A NASA-developed aerodynamic simulation tool is ensuring the safety of future space operations while providing designers and engineers with an automated, highly accurate computer simulation suite. Cart3D, co-winner of NASA's 2002 Software of the Year award, is the result of over 10 years of research and software development conducted by Michael Aftosmis and Dr. John Melton of Ames Research Center and Professor Marsha Berger of the Courant Institute at New York University. Cart3D offers a revolutionary approach to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the computer simulation of how fluids and gases flow around an object of a particular design. By fusing technological advancements in diverse fields such as mineralogy, computer graphics, computational geometry, and fluid dynamics, the software provides a new industrial geometry processing and fluid analysis capability with unsurpassed automation and efficiency.

  12. Interactive 3D display simulator for autostereoscopic smart pad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Yeong-Seon; Lee, Ho-Dong; Park, Min-Chul; Son, Jung-Young; Park, Gwi-Tae

    2012-06-01

    There is growing interest of displaying 3D images on a smart pad for entertainments and information services. Designing and realizing various types of 3D displays on the smart pad is not easy for costs and given time. Software simulation can be an alternative method to save and shorten the development. In this paper, we propose a 3D display simulator for autostereoscopic smart pad. It simulates light intensity of each view and crosstalk for smart pad display panels. Designers of 3D display for smart pad can interactively simulate many kinds of autostereoscopic displays interactively by changing parameters required for panel design. Crosstalk to reduce leakage of one eye's image into the image of the other eye, and light intensity for computing visual comfort zone are important factors in designing autostereoscopic display for smart pad. Interaction enables intuitive designs. This paper describes an interactive 3D display simulator for autostereoscopic smart pad.

  13. New software for 3D fracture network analysis and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Noh, Y.; Choi, Y.; Um, J.; Hwang, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents new software to perform analysis and visualization of the fracture network system in 3D. The developed software modules for the analysis and visualization, such as BOUNDARY, DISK3D, FNTWK3D, CSECT and BDM, have been developed using Microsoft Visual Basic.NET and Visualization TookKit (VTK) open-source library. Two case studies revealed that each module plays a role in construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3D, calculation of equivalent pipes, production of cross-section map and management of borehole data, respectively. The developed software for analysis and visualization of the 3D fractured rock mass can be used to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  14. Performance Evaluation of 3d Modeling Software for Uav Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2016-06-01

    UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry, which combines UAV and freely available internet-based 3D modeling software, is widely used as a low-cost and user-friendly photogrammetry technique in the fields such as remote sensing and geosciences. In UAV photogrammetry, only the platform used in conventional aerial photogrammetry is changed. Consequently, 3D modeling software contributes significantly to its expansion. However, the algorithms of the 3D modelling software are black box algorithms. As a result, only a few studies have been able to evaluate their accuracy using 3D coordinate check points. With this motive, Smart3DCapture and Pix4Dmapper were downloaded from the Internet and commercial software PhotoScan was also employed; investigations were performed in this paper using check points and images obtained from UAV.

  15. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  16. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  17. INCORPORATING DYNAMIC 3D SIMULATION INTO PRA

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Prescott; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    Through continued advancement in computational resources, development that was previously done by trial and error production is now performed through computer simulation. These virtual physical representations have the potential to provide accurate and valid modeling results and are being used in many different technical fields. Risk assessment now has the opportunity to use 3D simulation to improve analysis results and insights, especially for external event analysis. By using simulations, the modeler only has to determine the likelihood of an event without having to also predict the results of that event. The 3D simulation automatically determines not only the outcome of the event, but when those failures occur. How can we effectively incorporate 3D simulation into traditional PRA? Most PRA plant modeling is made up of components with different failure modes, probabilities, and rates. Typically, these components are grouped into various systems and then are modeled together (in different combinations) as a “system” with logic structures to form fault trees. Applicable fault trees are combined through scenarios, typically represented by event tree models. Though this method gives us failure results for a given model, it has limitations when it comes to time-based dependencies or dependencies that are coupled to physical processes which may themselves be space- or time-dependent. Since, failures from a 3D simulation are naturally time related, they should be used in that manner. In our simulation approach, traditional static models are converted into an equivalent state diagram representation with start states, probabilistic driven movements between states and terminal states. As the state model is run repeatedly, it converges to the same results as the PRA model in cases where time-related factors are not important. In cases where timing considerations are important (e.g., when events are dependent upon each other), then the simulation approach will typically

  18. Simulation of 3D diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forcolin, G. T.; Oh, A.; Murphy, S. A.

    2017-02-01

    3D diamond detectors present an interesting prospect for future Particle Physics experiments. They have been studied in detail at beam tests with 120 GeV protons and 4 MeV protons. To understand the observations that have been made, simulations have been carried out using Synopsys TCAD in order to explain the movement of charge carriers within the sample, as well as the effects of charge sharing. Reasonable agreement has been observed between simulation and experiment.

  19. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  20. 3D Fiber Orientation Simulation for Plastic Injection Molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Baojiu; Jin, Xiaoshi; Zheng, Rong; Costa, Franco S.; Fan, Zhiliang

    2004-06-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer is widely used in the products made using injection molding processing. The distribution of fiber orientation inside plastic parts has direct effects on quality of molded parts. Using computer simulation to predict fiber orientation distribution is one of most efficient ways to assist engineers to do warpage analysis and to find a good design solution to produce high quality plastic parts. Fiber orientation simulation software based on 2-1/2D (midplane /Dual domain mesh) techniques has been used in industry for a decade. However, the 2-1/2D technique is based on the planar Hele-Shaw approximation and it is not suitable when the geometry has complex three-dimensional features which cannot be well approximated by 2D shells. Recently, a full 3D simulation software for fiber orientation has been developed and integrated into Moldflow Plastics Insight 3D simulation software. The theory for this new 3D fiber orientation calculation module is described in this paper. Several examples are also presented to show the benefit in using 3D fiber orientation simulation.

  1. Crashworthiness simulations with DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Hoover, C.G.; Kay, G.J.; Lee, A.S.; De Groot, A.J.

    1996-04-01

    Current progress in parallel algorithm research and applications in vehicle crash simulation is described for the explicit, finite element algorithms in DYNA3D. Problem partitioning methods and parallel algorithms for contact at material interfaces are the two challenging algorithm research problems that are addressed. Two prototype parallel contact algorithms have been developed for treating the cases of local and arbitrary contact. Demonstration problems for local contact are crashworthiness simulations with 222 locally defined contact surfaces and a vehicle/barrier collision modeled with arbitrary contact. A simulation of crash tests conducted for a vehicle impacting a U-channel small sign post embedded in soil has been run on both the serial and parallel versions of DYNA3D. A significant reduction in computational time has been observed when running these problems on the parallel version. However, to achieve maximum efficiency, complex problems must be appropriately partitioned, especially when contact dominates the computation.

  2. SOAX: a software for quantification of 3D biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Nie, Wei; Yusuf, Eddy; I-Ju Lee; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Huang, Xiaolei

    2015-03-13

    Filamentous biopolymer networks in cells and tissues are routinely imaged by confocal microscopy. Image analysis methods enable quantitative study of the properties of these curvilinear networks. However, software tools to quantify the geometry and topology of these often dense 3D networks and to localize network junctions are scarce. To fill this gap, we developed a new software tool called "SOAX", which can accurately extract the centerlines of 3D biopolymer networks and identify network junctions using Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs). It provides an open-source, user-friendly platform for network centerline extraction, 2D/3D visualization, manual editing and quantitative analysis. We propose a method to quantify the performance of SOAX, which helps determine the optimal extraction parameter values. We quantify several different types of biopolymer networks to demonstrate SOAX's potential to help answer key questions in cell biology and biophysics from a quantitative viewpoint.

  3. Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Various NASA Small Business Innovation Research grants from Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Ames Research Center were used to develop the 'kernel' of COMCO's modeling and simulation software, the PHLEX finite element code. NASA needed it to model designs of flight vehicles; one of many customized commercial applications is UNISIM, a PHLEX-based code for analyzing underground flows in oil reservoirs for Texaco, Inc. COMCO's products simulate a computational mechanics problem, estimate the solution's error and produce the optimal hp-adapted mesh for the accuracy the user chooses. The system is also used as a research or training tool in universities and in mechanical design in industrial corporations.

  4. A software tool for 3D dose verification and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa'd, M. Al; Graham, J.; Liney, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    The main recent developments in radiotherapy have focused on improved treatment techniques in order to generate further significant improvements in patient prognosis. There is now an internationally recognised need to improve 3D verification of highly conformal radiotherapy treatments. This is because of the very high dose gradients used in modern treatment techniques, which can result in a small error in the spatial dose distribution leading to a serious complication. In order to gain the full benefits of using 3D dosimetric technologies (such as gel dosimetry), it is vital to use 3D evaluation methods and algorithms. We present in this paper a software solution that provides a comprehensive 3D dose evaluation and analysis. The software is applied to gel dosimetry, which is based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a read-out method. The software can also be used to compare any two dose distributions, such as two distributions planned using different methods of treatment planning systems, or different dose calculation algorithms.

  5. Comparison of Actual Surgical Outcomes and 3D Surgical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Scott; Cevidanes, Lucia; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The advent of imaging software programs have proved to be useful for diagnosis, treatment planning, and outcome measurement, but precision of 3D surgical simulation still needs to be tested. This study was conducted to determine if the virtual surgery performed on 3D models constructed from Cone-beam CT (CBCT) can correctly simulate the actual surgical outcome and to validate the ability of this emerging technology to recreate the orthognathic surgery hard tissue movements in 3 translational and 3 rotational planes of space. Methods Construction of pre- and post-surgery 3D models from CBCTs of 14 patients who had combined maxillary advancement and mandibular setback surgery and 6 patients who had one-piece maxillary advancement surgery was performed. The post-surgery and virtually simulated surgery 3D models were registered at the cranial base to quantify differences between simulated and actual surgery models. Hotelling T-test were used to assess the differences between simulated and actual surgical outcomes. Results For all anatomic regions of interest, there was no statistically significant difference between the simulated and the actual surgical models. The right lateral ramus was the only region that showed a statistically significant, but small difference when comparing two- and one-jaw surgeries. Conclusions Virtual surgical methods were reliably reproduced, oral surgery residents could benefit from virtual surgical training, and computer simulation has the potential to increase predictability in the operating room. PMID:20591553

  6. Performance testing of 3D point cloud software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-González, M.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2013-10-01

    LiDAR systems are being used widely in recent years for many applications in the engineering field: civil engineering, cultural heritage, mining, industry and environmental engineering. One of the most important limitations of this technology is the large computational requirements involved in data processing, especially for large mobile LiDAR datasets. Several software solutions for data managing are available in the market, including open source suites, however, users often unknown methodologies to verify their performance properly. In this work a methodology for LiDAR software performance testing is presented and four different suites are studied: QT Modeler, VR Mesh, AutoCAD 3D Civil and the Point Cloud Library running in software developed at the University of Vigo (SITEGI). The software based on the Point Cloud Library shows better results in the loading time of the point clouds and CPU usage. However, it is not as strong as commercial suites in working set and commit size tests.

  7. Quasi-3D space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The longitudinal space charge effect is simulated by binning the longitudinal beam profile in order to calculate the force on the bins using the binned particle distribution via FFT, and applying momentum kick based upon this space charge force to macro-particles. Usually, the longitudinal space charge kick is calculated once per turn since the longitudinal profile doesn't change much in a single turn. Besides, the longitudinal profile is used as a weighting factor for the transverse space charge force. The transverse space charge effect is simulated by projecting the 3-D beam to a 2-D Gaussian distribution in order to use the complex error function to compute the transverse space charge force, and applying this space charge force to macro-particles. One transverse space charge calculation per scale length of the beam shape variation requires at least ten transverse space charge force calculations per betatron oscillation.

  8. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkina, Viktoriya

    2016-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  9. 3-D Simulations of Ion Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Yu. A.; Sudan, R. N.

    1996-11-01

    The FIREX (Field-Reversed Ion Ring Experiment) program is underway at Cornell University to demonstrate an ion ring magnetic field-reversed configuration (IRC) by injecting an intense annular proton beam across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. The previous axisymmetric PIC simulations performed with the 21\\over 2-D FIRE code have predicted [1] that strong ion rings (with a self-magnetic field large enough to reverse the applied field on axis) can be produced using this technique. We have constructed a new, parallel, object-oriented (C++), 3-D, hybrid, PIC code, FLAME to study the 3-D aspects of the ion ring formation in strongly magnetized plasmas and stability of ion ring configurations to the toroidal perturbations. These questions are extremely important for the practical realization of the FIREX ideas and are expected to be clarified in the course of investigation of the ion beam injection and ring formation in a toroidally aberrated applied magnetic field. The nonlinear evolution of ion ring tilt and precession modes as well as code testing and performance issues will also be addressed. 1. Yu.A. Omelchenko and R.N. Sudan, Phys. Plasmas, 2773 (1995)

  10. Software tool for 3D extraction of germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Escalona, Merly; Faro, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Germinal Centers (GC) are short-lived micro-anatomical structures, within lymphoid organs, where affinity maturation is initiated. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of the GC reaction including follicular CD4+ T helper and the recently described follicular regulatory CD4+ T cell populations, predicts that the intensity and life span of such reactions is driven by both types of T cells, yet controlled primarily by follicular regulatory CD4+ T cells. In order to calibrate GC models, it is necessary to properly analyze the kinetics of GC sizes. Presently, the estimation of spleen GC volumes relies upon confocal microscopy images from 20-30 slices spanning a depth of ~ 20 - 50 μm, whose GC areas are analyzed, slice-by-slice, for subsequent 3D reconstruction and quantification. The quantity of data to be analyzed from such images taken for kinetics experiments is usually prohibitively large to extract semi-manually with existing software. As a result, the entire procedure is highly time-consuming, and inaccurate, thereby motivating the need for a new software tool that can automatically identify and calculate the 3D spot volumes from GC multidimensional images. We have developed pyBioImage, an open source cross platform image analysis software application, written in python with C extensions that is specifically tailored to the needs of immunologic research involving 4D imaging of GCs. The software provides 1) support for importing many multi-image formats, 2) basic image processing and analysis, and 3) the ExtractGC module, that allows for automatic analysis and visualization of extracted GC volumes from multidimensional confocal microscopy images. We present concrete examples of different microscopy image data sets of GC that have been used in experimental and theoretical studies of mouse model GC dynamics. The pyBioImage software framework seeks to be a general purpose image application for immunological research based on 4D imaging. The ExtractGC module uses a

  11. (abstract) 3D Electromagnetic Plasma Particle Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Liewer, P. C.; Lyster, P.; Decyk, V. K.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D electromagnetic plasma particle-in-cell code has been developed using the General Concurrent PIC algorithm. The GCPIC algorithm uses a domain decomposition to divide the computation among the processors. Particles must be exchanged between processors as they move. The efficiencies for 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional partitions of the three dimensional domain are compared, and the algorithm is found to be very efficient even when a large fraction (e.g., 30%) of the particles must be exchanged at every time step. This PIC code has been used to perform simulations of a variety of space plasma physics problems. Results of three applications will be discussed: 1) plasma disturbances induced by moving conducting bodies in a magnetized plasma; 2) plasma plume interactions; and 3) solar wind termination shock.

  12. 3D electrohydrodynamic simulation of electrowetting displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Lin, Chi-Hao; Lo, Kuo-Lung; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Cheng, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Kuo-Ching

    2014-12-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior within a pixel of an electrowetting display (EWD) is thoroughly investigated through a 3D simulation. By coupling the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) force deduced from the Maxwell stress tensor with the laminar phase field of the oil-water dual phase, the complete switch processes of an EWD, including the break-up and the electrowetting stages in the switch-on process (with voltage) and the oil spreading in the switch-off process (without voltage), are successfully simulated. By considering the factor of the change in the apparent contact angle at the contact line, the electro-optic performance obtained from the simulation is found to agree well with its corresponding experiment. The proposed model is used to parametrically predict the effect of interfacial (e.g. contact angle of grid) and geometric (e.g. oil thickness and pixel size) properties on the defects of an EWD, such as oil dewetting patterns, oil overflow, and oil non-recovery. With the help of the defect analysis, a highly stable EWD is both experimentally realized and numerically analyzed.

  13. Non-isothermal 3D SDPD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Potami, Raffaele; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    The study of fluids at micro and nanoscale requires new modeling and computational approaches. Smooth Particle Dissipative Dynamics (SDPD) is a mesh-free method that provides a bridge between the continuum equations of hydrodynamics embedded in the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics approach and the molecular nature embedded in the DPD approach. SDPD is thermodynamically consistent, does not rely on arbitrary coefficients for its thermostat, involves realistic transport coefficients, and includes fluctuation terms. SDPD is implemented in our work for arbitrary 3D geometries with a methodology to model solid wall boundary conditions. We present simulations for isothermal flows for verification of our approach. The entropy equation is implemented with a velocity-entropy Verlet integration algorithm Flows with heat transfer are simulated for verification of the SDPD. We present also the self-diffusion coefficient derived from SDPD simulations for gases and liquids. Results show the scale dependence of self-diffusion coefficient on SDPD particle size. Computational Mathematics Program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant/contract number FA9550-06-1-0236.

  14. Internet-based hardware/software co-design framework for embedded 3D graphics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chi-Tsai; Wang, Chun-Hao; Huang, Ing-Jer; Wong, Weng-Fai

    2011-12-01

    Advances in technology are making it possible to run three-dimensional (3D) graphics applications on embedded and handheld devices. In this article, we propose a hardware/software co-design environment for 3D graphics application development that includes the 3D graphics software, OpenGL ES application programming interface (API), device driver, and 3D graphics hardware simulators. We developed a 3D graphics system-on-a-chip (SoC) accelerator using transaction-level modeling (TLM). This gives software designers early access to the hardware even before it is ready. On the other hand, hardware designers also stand to gain from the more complex test benches made available in the software for verification. A unique aspect of our framework is that it allows hardware and software designers from geographically dispersed areas to cooperate and work on the same framework. Designs can be entered and executed from anywhere in the world without full access to the entire framework, which may include proprietary components. This results in controlled and secure transparency and reproducibility, granting leveled access to users of various roles.

  15. Simulating nanoparticle transport in 3D geometries with MNM3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Carlo; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2017-04-01

    . The software was developed in the framework of the FP7 European research project NanoRem and can be used to predict the NP mobility at different stages of a nanoremediation application, both in the planning and design stages (i.e. support the design of the injection plan), and later to predict the long-term particle mobility after injection (i.e. support the monitoring, final fate of the injected particles). In this work MNM3D an integrated experimental-modelling procedure is used to assess and predict the nanoparticle transport in porous media at different spatial and time scales: laboratory tests are performed and interpreted using MNMs to characterize the nanoparticle mobility and derive the constitutive equations describing the suspension behavior in groundwater. MNM3D is then used to predict the NP transport at the field scale. The procedure is here applied to two practical cases: a 3D pilot scale injection of CARBO-IRON® in a large scale flume carried out at the VEGAS facilities in the framework of the NanoRem project; the long term fate of an hypothetical release of nanoparticles into the environment from a landfill is simulated.

  16. Colossal Tooling Design: 3D Simulation for Ergonomic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Thomas, Robert E.; Babai, Majid

    2003-01-01

    The application of high-level 3D simulation software to the design phase of colossal mandrel tooling for composite aerospace fuel tanks was accomplished to discover and resolve safety and human engineering problems. The analyses were conducted to determine safety, ergonomic and human engineering aspects of the disassembly process of the fuel tank composite shell mandrel. Three-dimensional graphics high-level software, incorporating various ergonomic analysis algorithms, was utilized to determine if the process was within safety and health boundaries for the workers carrying out these tasks. In addition, the graphical software was extremely helpful in the identification of material handling equipment and devices for the mandrel tooling assembly/disassembly process.

  17. Evaluation of 3-D graphics software: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Chasen, S. H.; Garner, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient 3-D geometry graphics software package which is suitable for advanced design studies was developed. The advanced design system is called GRADE--Graphics for Advanced Design. Efficiency and ease of use are gained by sacrificing flexibility in surface representation. The immediate options were either to continue development of GRADE or to acquire a commercially available system which would replace or complement GRADE. Test cases which would reveal the ability of each system to satisfy the requirements were developed. A scoring method which adequately captured the relative capabilities of the three systems was presented. While more complex multi-attribute decision methods could be used, the selected method provides all the needed information without being so complex that it is difficult to understand. If the value factors are modestly perturbed, system Z is a clear winner based on its overall capabilities. System Z is superior in two vital areas: surfacing and ease of interface with application programs.

  18. Virtual environment display for a 3D audio room simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, William L.; Foster, Scott H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a virtual environment simulation system integrating a 3D acoustic audio model with an immersive 3D visual scene is discussed. The system complements the acoustic model and is specified to: allow the listener to freely move about the space, a room of manipulable size, shape, and audio character, while interactively relocating the sound sources; reinforce the listener's feeling of telepresence in the acoustical environment with visual and proprioceptive sensations; enhance the audio with the graphic and interactive components, rather than overwhelm or reduce it; and serve as a research testbed and technology transfer demonstration. The hardware/software design of two demonstration systems, one installed and one portable, are discussed through the development of four iterative configurations.

  19. Virtual environment display for a 3D audio room simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, William L.; Foster, Scott H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a virtual environment simulation system integrating a 3D acoustic audio model with an immersive 3D visual scene is discussed. The system complements the acoustic model and is specified to: allow the listener to freely move about the space, a room of manipulable size, shape, and audio character, while interactively relocating the sound sources; reinforce the listener's feeling of telepresence in the acoustical environment with visual and proprioceptive sensations; enhance the audio with the graphic and interactive components, rather than overwhelm or reduce it; and serve as a research testbed and technology transfer demonstration. The hardware/software design of two demonstration systems, one installed and one portable, are discussed through the development of four iterative configurations.

  20. 3D Simulations of the Beehive Proplyd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feitosa, J. A.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Cerqueira, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Some star formation regions, like the Orion nebula, have stars of different masses, from massive stars, responsible for strong ionizing winds and HII regions, to low-mass stars, which spend a long time in the protostellar phase, and are frequently associated with protostellar disks and jets. Massive O or B stars emit a great deal of UV radiation, able to dissociate the hydrogen molecule (FUV radiation, energies between 6-13 eV), to ionize the atomic hydrogen (EUV radiation, energies greater than 13.6 eV) and heat the gas. Around these stars, a large and hot (10^{4}K) region is formed, known as HII region. T-Tauri stars inside HII regions produce a type of young stellar object, a proplyd, described with accuracy in O'Dell et al. (1993). Proplyds exhibit a cometary shape from which we can distinguish a central low-mass star with an accretion disk, an ionization front, a photodissociation region and, sometimes, an external bow shock and a protostellar jet. Its morphological characteristics depends on the distance between the low-mass star and the source of the ionizing radiation. The Beehive, a giant proplyd in Orion Nebula, has attracted attention due to its exotic system of rings coaxial to the HH540 jet's axis. Bally et al. (2005) suggested that the rings are perturbations due to the crossing of the ionization front by the jet. In this work, we test this hypothesis making 3D hydrodynamic numerical simulations over an adaptive grid, using the Yguazú-A code (Raga et al., 2000), properly adapted for the Beehive conditions. Our results show that the jet causes a perturbation in the ionization front of the proplyd, but is necessary to adjust carefully some parameters of the jet like its velocity and ejection frequency in order to have the results matching the observations.

  1. 3D-CANVENT: An interactive mine ventilation simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    3D-CANVENT is a software package that integrates advanced computer aided design (ACAD) true 3D graphics with a mine ventilation simulator. The package runs as a Windows{trademark} application to access its printer drivers environment and does not need third party CAD software. It is composed of two primary modules: DMVENT and MINEDESIGNER. DMVENT is a traditional Fortran coded Hardy-Cross iterative ventilation network solver written in 1980 with thermodynamic capabilities. This module is relatively unchanged with the traditional data input options for branch type, specified or calculated resistances, fixed flows, and fixed or variable pressure fans. MINEDESIGNER is the graphics engine that optimizes the ventilation design process. It performs the front-end transformation of input data entered in the graphical interface into the correct format for the solver. At the back-end it reconverts the historically standard tabular data output from the solver into an easily viewed graphical format. ACAD features of MINEDESIGNER are used to generate a 3D wire-frame node and branch network of the mine`s ventilation system. The network can be displayed in up to 4 views orientated to XYZ planes or a 3D view. AU the views have zoom, pan, slice and rotate options. The graphical interface efficiently permits data entry and editing via a mouse with pick-and-point item selection. Branches can be found or added with {open_quotes}search{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}join{close_quotes} options. Visual interpretation is enhanced by the 16 colour options for branches and numerous graphical attributes. Network locations are readily identified by alpha-numeric names for branches, junctions and fans, and also the logical numbering of junctions. The program is also readily expandable for pollutant simulation and control/monitoring applications.

  2. 3D Numerical simulations of oblique subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, C.; Gerya, T.; Scambelluri, M.; Crispini, L.; Federico, L.; Capponi, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the past 2D numerical studies (e.g. Gerya et al., 2002; Gorczyk et al., 2007; Malatesta et al., 2012) provided evidence that during intraoceanic subduction a serpentinite channel forms above the downgoing plate. This channel forms as a result of hydration of the mantle wedge by uprising slab-fluids. Rocks buried at high depths are finally exhumed within this buoyant low-viscosity medium. Convergence rate in these 2D models was described by a trench-normal component of velocity. Several present and past subduction zones worldwide are however driven by oblique convergence between the plates, where trench-normal motion of the subducting slab is coupled with trench-parallel displacement of the plates. Can the exhumation mechanism and the exhumation rates of high-pressure rocks be affected by the shear component of subduction? And how uprise of these rocks can vary along the plate margin? We tried to address these questions performing 3D numerical models that simulate an intraoceanic oblique subduction. The models are based on thermo-mechanical equations that are solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010). In most of the models a narrow oceanic basin (500 km-wide) surrounded by continental margins is depicted. The basin is floored by either layered or heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere with gabbro as discrete bodies in serpentinized peridotite and a basaltic layer on the top. A weak zone in the mantle is prescribed to control the location of subduction initiation and therefore the plate margins geometry. Finally, addition of a third dimension in the simulations allowed us to test the role of different plate margin geometries on oblique subduction dynamics. In particular in each model we modified the dip angle of the weak zone and its "lateral" geometry (e.g. continuous, segmented). We consider "continuous" weak zones either parallel or increasingly moving away from the continental margins

  3. USM3D Simulations for Second Sonic Boom Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa; Carter, Melissa B.; Nayani, Sudheer N.; Cliff, Susan; Pearl, Jason M.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System with the USM3D flow solver was used to compute test cases for the Second AIAA Sonic Boom Prediction Workshop. The intent of this report is to document the USM3D results for SBPW2 test cases. The test cases included an axisymmetric equivalent area body, a JAXA wing body, a NASA low boom supersonic configuration modeled with flow through nacelles and engine boundary conditions. All simulations were conducted for a free stream Mach number of 1.6, zero degrees angle of attack, and a Reynolds number of 5.7 million per meter. Simulations were conducted on tetrahedral grids provided by the workshop committee, as well as a family of grids generated by an in-house approach for sonic boom analyses known as BoomGrid using current best practices. The near-field pressure signatures were extracted and propagated to the ground with the atmospheric propagation code, sBOOM. The USM3D near-field pressure signatures, corresponding sBOOM ground signatures, and loudness levels on the ground are compared with mean values from other workshop participants.

  4. 3D FEM Simulation of Flank Wear in Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attanasio, Aldo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio

    2011-05-01

    This work deals with tool wear simulation. Studying the influence of tool wear on tool life, tool substitution policy and influence on final part quality, surface integrity, cutting forces and power consumption it is important to reduce the global process costs. Adhesion, abrasion, erosion, diffusion, corrosion and fracture are some of the phenomena responsible of the tool wear depending on the selected cutting parameters: cutting velocity, feed rate, depth of cut, …. In some cases these wear mechanisms are described by analytical models as a function of process variables (temperature, pressure and sliding velocity along the cutting surface). These analytical models are suitable to be implemented in FEM codes and they can be utilized to simulate the tool wear. In the present paper a commercial 3D FEM software has been customized to simulate the tool wear during turning operations when cutting AISI 1045 carbon steel with uncoated tungsten carbide tip. The FEM software was improved by means of a suitable subroutine able to modify the tool geometry on the basis of the estimated tool wear as the simulation goes on. Since for the considered couple of tool-workpiece material the main phenomena generating wear are the abrasive and the diffusive ones, the tool wear model implemented into the subroutine was obtained as combination between the Usui's and the Takeyama and Murata's models. A comparison between experimental and simulated flank tool wear curves is reported demonstrating that it is possible to simulate the tool wear development.

  5. Using Delft3D to Simulate Current Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. C.; Chartrand, C.; Roberts, J.

    2015-12-01

    As public concern with renewable energy increases, current energy conversion (CEC) technology is being developed to optimize energy output and minimize environmental impact. CEC turbines generate energy from tidal and current systems and create wakes that interact with turbines located downstream of a device. The placement of devices can greatly influence power generation and structural reliability. CECs can also alter the ecosystem process surrounding the turbines, such as flow regimes, sediment dynamics, and water quality. Software is needed to investigate specific CEC sites to simulate power generation and hydrodynamic responses of a flow through a CEC turbine array. This work validates Delft3D against several flume experiments by simulating the power generation and hydrodynamic response of flow through a turbine or actuator disc(s). Model parameters are then calibrated against these data sets to reproduce momentum removal and wake recovery data with 3-D flow simulations. Simulated wake profiles and turbulence intensities compare favorably to the experimental data and demonstrate the utility and accuracy of a fast-running tool for future siting and analysis of CEC arrays in complex domains.

  6. 3D Magnetron simulation with CST STUDIO SUITE

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Monika C.

    2011-07-01

    The modeling of magnetrons compared to other tubes is more difficult since it requires 3D modeling rather than a 2D investigation. This is not only due to the geometry which can include complicated details to be modeled in 3D but also due to the interaction process itself. The electric field, magnetic field and particle movement span a 3D space. In this paper 3D simulations of a strapped magnetron with CSTSTUDIO SUITE{sup TM} are presented. (author)

  7. Evaluation of an improved algorithm for producing realistic 3D breast software phantoms: application for mammography.

    PubMed

    Bliznakova, K; Suryanarayanan, S; Karellas, A; Pallikarakis, N

    2010-11-01

    This work presents an improved algorithm for the generation of 3D breast software phantoms and its evaluation for mammography. The improved methodology has evolved from a previously presented 3D noncompressed breast modeling method used for the creation of breast models of different size, shape, and composition. The breast phantom is composed of breast surface, duct system and terminal ductal lobular units, Cooper's ligaments, lymphatic and blood vessel systems, pectoral muscle, skin, 3D mammographic background texture, and breast abnormalities. The key improvement is the development of a new algorithm for 3D mammographic texture generation. Simulated images of the enhanced 3D breast model without lesions were produced by simulating mammographic image acquisition and were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively. For evaluation purposes, a database with regions of interest taken from simulated and real mammograms was created. Four experienced radiologists participated in a visual subjective evaluation trial, as they judged the quality of the simulated mammograms, using the new algorithm compared to mammograms, obtained with the old modeling approach. In addition, extensive quantitative evaluation included power spectral analysis and calculation of fractal dimension, skewness, and kurtosis of simulated and real mammograms from the database. The results from the subjective evaluation strongly suggest that the new methodology for mammographic breast texture creates improved breast models compared to the old approach. Calculated parameters on simulated images such as beta exponent deducted from the power law spectral analysis and fractal dimension are similar to those calculated on real mammograms. The results for the kurtosis and skewness are also in good coincidence with those calculated from clinical images. Comparison with similar calculations published in the literature showed good agreement in the majority of cases. The improved methodology generated breast

  8. 3D visualization of port simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Horsthemke, W. H.; Macal, C. M.; Nevins, M. R.

    1999-06-14

    Affordable and realistic three dimensional visualization technology can be applied to large scale constructive simulations such as the port simulation model, PORTSIM. These visualization tools enhance the experienced planner's ability to form mental models of how seaport operations will unfold when the simulation model is implemented and executed. They also offer unique opportunities to train new planners not only in the use of the simulation model but on the layout and design of seaports. Simulation visualization capabilities are enhanced by borrowing from work on interface design, camera control, and data presentation. Using selective fidelity, the designers of these visualization systems can reduce their time and efforts by concentrating on those features which yield the most value for their simulation. Offering the user various observational tools allows the freedom to simply watch or engage in the simulation without getting lost. Identifying the underlying infrastructure or cargo items with labels can provide useful information at the risk of some visual clutter. The PortVis visualization expands the PORTSIM user base which can benefit from the results provided by this capability, especially in strategic planning, mission rehearsal, and training. Strategic planners will immediately reap the benefits of seeing the impact of increased throughput visually without keeping track of statistical data. Mission rehearsal and training users will have an effective training tool to supplement their operational training exercises which are limited in number because of their high costs. Having another effective training modality in this visualization system allows more training to take place and more personnel to gain an understanding of seaport operations. This simulation and visualization training can be accomplished at lower cost than would be possible for the operational training exercises alone. The application of PORTSIM and PortVis will lead to more efficient

  9. 3D simulation for falling papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takayuki

    2001-12-01

    The combination of IDO (Interpolated Differential Operator) scheme, Cut Cell technique, and overlapping grid method make it possible to simulate the falling process of papers. We have the result of the falling with fluttering trajectory for a certain initial angle of the paper, and the fluttering mechanism becomes clear. It is shown that the simulation is applicable to the phenomena of falling leaves with complex shape.

  10. 3D scientific visualization of reservoir simulation post-processing

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, M.C.; Miranda-Filho, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a 3D visualization software designed at PETROBRAS and TecGraf/PUC-RJ in Brazil for the analysis of reservoir engineering post-processing data. It offers an advanced functional environment on graphical workstations with intuitive and ergonomic interface. Applications to real reservoir models show the enriching features of the software.

  11. OS3D/GIMRT software for modeling multicomponent-multidimensional reactive transport

    SciTech Connect

    CI Steefel; SB Yabusaki

    2000-05-17

    OS3D/GIMRT is a numerical software package for simulating multicomponent reactive transport in porous media. The package consists of two principal components: (1) the code OS3D (Operator Splitting 3-Dimensional Reactive Transport) which simulates reactive transport by either splitting the reaction and transport steps in time, i.e., the classic time or operator splitting approach, or by iterating sequentially between reactions and transport, and (2) the code GIMRT (Global Implicit Multicomponent Reactive Transport) which treats up to two dimensional reactive transport with a one step or global implicit approach. Although the two codes do not yet have totally identical capabilities, they can be run from the same input file, allowing comparisons to be made between the two approaches in many cases. The advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches are discussed more fully below, but in general OS3D is designed for simulation of transient concentration fronts, particularly under high Peclet number transport conditions, because of its use of a total variation diminishing or TVD transport algorithm. GIMRT is suited for simulating water-rock alteration over long periods of time where the aqueous concentration field is at or close to a quasi-stationary state and the numerical transport errors are less important. Where water-rock interaction occurs over geological periods of time, GIMRT may be preferable to OS3D because of its ability to take larger time steps.

  12. Surviving sepsis--a 3D integrative educational simulator.

    PubMed

    Ježek, Filip; Tribula, Martin; Kulhánek, Tomáš; Mateják, Marek; Privitzer, Pavol; Šilar, Jan; Kofránek, Jiří; Lhotská, Lenka

    2015-08-01

    Computer technology offers greater educational possibilities, notably simulation and virtual reality. This paper presents a technology which serves to integrate multiple modalities, namely 3D virtual reality, node-based simulator, Physiomodel explorer and explanatory physiological simulators employing Modelica language and Unity3D platform. This emerging tool chain should allow the authors to concentrate more on educational content instead of application development. The technology is demonstrated through Surviving sepsis educational scenario, targeted on Microsoft Windows Store platform.

  13. Study, simulation and design of a 3D clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavone, Valentina; Guarnieri, Vincenzo; Lobascio, Cesare; Soma, Aurelio; Bosso, Nicola; Lamantea, Matteo Maria

    High cost and limited number of physically executable experiments in space have introduced the need for ground simulation systems that enable preparing experiments to be carried out on board, identifying phenomena associated with the altered gravity conditions, and taking advantage of these conditions, as in Biotechnology. Among systems developed to simulate microgravity, especially for life sciences experiments, different types of clinostats were realized. This work deals with mechanical design of a three-dimensional clinostat and simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system by varying the operating parameters. The design and simulation phase was preceded by a careful analysis of the state of art and by the review of the most recent results, in particular from the major investigators of Life Sciences in Space. The mechanical design is quite innovative by adoption of a structure entirely in aluminum, which allows robustness while reducing the overall weight. The transmission system of motion has been optimized by means of brushless DC micro motors, light and compact, which helped to reduce weight, dimensions, power consumption and increase the reliability and durability of the system. The study of the dynamic behavior using SIMPACK, a multibody simulation software, led to results in line with those found in the most important and recent scientific publications. This model was also appropriately configured to represent any desired operating condition, and for eventual system scalability. It would be interesting to generate simulated hypogravity - e.g.: 0.38-g (Mars) or 0.17-g (Moon). This would allow to investigate how terrestrial life forms can grow in other planetary habitats, or to determine the gravity threshold response of different organisms. At the moment, such a system can only be achieved by centrifuges in real microgravity. We are confident that simulation and associated tests with our 3D clinostat can help adjusting the parameters allowing variable g

  14. 3D simulation for solitons used in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasile, F.; Tebeica, C. M.; Schiopu, P.; Vladescu, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper is described 3D simulation for solitions used in optical fibers. In the scientific works is started from nonlinear propagation equation and the solitons represents its solutions. This paper presents the simulation of the fundamental soliton in 3D together with simulation of the second order soliton in 3D. These simulations help in the study of the optical fibers for long distances and in the interactions between the solitons. This study helps the understanding of the nonlinear propagation equation and for nonlinear waves. These 3D simulations are obtained using MATLAB programming language, and we can observe fundamental difference between the soliton and the second order/higher order soliton and in their evolution.

  15. Analysis of 3D Modeling Software Usage Patterns for K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yi-Chieh; Liao, Wen-Hung; Chi, Ming-Te; Li, Tsai-Yen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the recent trend in maker movement, teachers are learning 3D techniques actively and bringing 3D printing into the classroom to enhance variety and creativity in designing lectures. This study investigates the usage pattern of a 3D modeling software, Qmodel Creator, which is targeted at K-12 students. User logs containing…

  16. 3D Simulations of Irradiated One-Sided Dual-Column 3D Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Gronland, T.

    2010-01-07

    We undertook, at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), full 3D simulations of one-sided dual-type column 3D Si detectors (p-type substrate) after irradiation levels up to 1 x 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Etching does not extend all the way through the substrate, so that all electrodes are on the front side; the backside was neither supported nor processed, covered only with a layer of silicon dioxide. Hence, BNL's one-sided dual-type column 3D detectors are true one-sided detectors. Our simulations of the electric fields at various fluences will add to our knowledge about the practicable applicability of these detectors in the high-radiation environment of future colliders. Simulations show that the full depletion voltage, V{sub fd}, for a dual-column 3D detector is about 1.4 times higher than that of a 2D (planar) pad detector with a thickness d, the same as the column spacing, L{sub p}, in the 3D detector. Moreover, the highest E-field is near the n{sup +} column, while the high E-field mainly is distributed between the n{sup +} and p{sup +} columns. The low E-field is between the two p{sup +} columns, with its lowest point in the center of the unit cell with two p{sup +} columns and two n{sup +} columns. To fully deplete a dual-column 3D detector at 1 x 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} with a reasonable bias ({le} 200 V) necessitates reducing the column spacing, L{sub p}, to 30 {mu}m. The volume under the columns (10% of the total volume) can be depleted with a modest bias ({le}200 V); this underlying volume is not a dead volume. In addition, this depletion volume can support detection sensitivity directly under the columns, thereby lowering the effective dead volume in a 3D Si detector.

  17. 3D reconstruction software comparison for short sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, Adam; Czupryński, BłaŻej

    2014-11-01

    Large scale multiview reconstruction is recently a very popular area of research. There are many open source tools that can be downloaded and run on a personal computer. However, there are few, if any, comparisons between all the available software in terms of accuracy on small datasets that a single user can create. The typical datasets for testing of the software are archeological sites or cities, comprising thousands of images. This paper presents a comparison of currently available open source multiview reconstruction software for small datasets. It also compares the open source solutions with a simple structure from motion pipeline developed by the authors from scratch with the use of OpenCV and Eigen libraries.

  18. Metos3D: a marine ecosystem toolkit for optimization and simulation in 3-D - Simulation Package v0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwonski, J.; Slawig, T.

    2015-06-01

    A general programming interface for parameter identification for marine ecosystem models is introduced. A comprehensive solver software for periodic steady-states is implemented that includes a fixed point iteration (spin-up) and a Newton solver. The software is based on the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) library and uses transport matrices for efficient off-line simulation in 3-D. In addition to the usage of PETSc's parallel data structures and PETSc's Newton solver, an own load balancing algorithm is implemented. A simple verification is carried out using a well investigated biogeochemical model for phosphate (PO4) and dissolved organic phosphorous (DOP) with 7 parameters. The model is coupled via the interface to transport matrices that correspond to a longitudinal and latitudinal resolution of 2.8125° and 15 vertical layers. Initial tests show that both solvers and the load balancing algorithm work correctly. Further experiments demonstrate the robustness of the Newton solver with respect to parameter variations. Moreover, the numerical tests reveal that, with optimal control settings, the Newton solver converges at least 6 times faster towards a solution than the spin-up. However, additional twin experiments reveal differences between both solvers regarding a derivative-based black-box optimization. Whereas an optimization run with spin-up-based model evaluations is capable to identify model parameters of a reference solution, Newton-based model evaluations result in an inaccurate gradient approximation.

  19. Design of 3D simulation engine for oilfield safety training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua-Ming; Kang, Bao-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aiming at the demand for rapid custom development of 3D simulation system for oilfield safety training, this paper designs and implements a 3D simulation engine based on script-driven method, multi-layer structure, pre-defined entity objects and high-level tools such as scene editor, script editor, program loader. A scripting language been defined to control the system's progress, events and operating results. Training teacher can use this engine to edit 3D virtual scenes, set the properties of entity objects, define the logic script of task, and produce a 3D simulation training system without any skills of programming. Through expanding entity class, this engine can be quickly applied to other virtual training areas.

  20. An Evaluative Review of Simulated Dynamic Smart 3d Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeijn, H.; Sheth, F.; Pettit, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of plants can be an asset for creating agricultural based visualisation products. The continuum of 3D plants models ranges from static to dynamic objects, also known as smart 3D objects. There is an increasing requirement for smarter simulated 3D objects that are attributed mathematically and/or from biological inputs. A systematic approach to plant simulation offers significant advantages to applications in agricultural research, particularly in simulating plant behaviour and the influences of external environmental factors. This approach of 3D plant object visualisation is primarily evident from the visualisation of plants using photographed billboarded images, to more advanced procedural models that come closer to simulating realistic virtual plants. However, few programs model physical reactions of plants to external factors and even fewer are able to grow plants based on mathematical and/or biological parameters. In this paper, we undertake an evaluation of plant-based object simulation programs currently available, with a focus upon the components and techniques involved in producing these objects. Through an analytical review process we consider the strengths and weaknesses of several program packages, the features and use of these programs and the possible opportunities in deploying these for creating smart 3D plant-based objects to support agricultural research and natural resource management. In creating smart 3D objects the model needs to be informed by both plant physiology and phenology. Expert knowledge will frame the parameters and procedures that will attribute the object and allow the simulation of dynamic virtual plants. Ultimately, biologically smart 3D virtual plants that react to changes within an environment could be an effective medium to visually represent landscapes and communicate land management scenarios and practices to planners and decision-makers.

  1. Evaluation of an improved algorithm for producing realistic 3D breast software phantoms: Application for mammography

    PubMed Central

    Bliznakova, K.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Karellas, A.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents an improved algorithm for the generation of 3D breast software phantoms and its evaluation for mammography. Methods: The improved methodology has evolved from a previously presented 3D noncompressed breast modeling method used for the creation of breast models of different size, shape, and composition. The breast phantom is composed of breast surface, duct system and terminal ductal lobular units, Cooper’s ligaments, lymphatic and blood vessel systems, pectoral muscle, skin, 3D mammographic background texture, and breast abnormalities. The key improvement is the development of a new algorithm for 3D mammographic texture generation. Simulated images of the enhanced 3D breast model without lesions were produced by simulating mammographic image acquisition and were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively. For evaluation purposes, a database with regions of interest taken from simulated and real mammograms was created. Four experienced radiologists participated in a visual subjective evaluation trial, as they judged the quality of the simulated mammograms, using the new algorithm compared to mammograms, obtained with the old modeling approach. In addition, extensive quantitative evaluation included power spectral analysis and calculation of fractal dimension, skewness, and kurtosis of simulated and real mammograms from the database. Results: The results from the subjective evaluation strongly suggest that the new methodology for mammographic breast texture creates improved breast models compared to the old approach. Calculated parameters on simulated images such as β exponent deducted from the power law spectral analysis and fractal dimension are similar to those calculated on real mammograms. The results for the kurtosis and skewness are also in good coincidence with those calculated from clinical images. Comparison with similar calculations published in the literature showed good agreement in the majority of cases. Conclusions: The

  2. Evaluation of an improved algorithm for producing realistic 3D breast software phantoms: Application for mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Bliznakova, K.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Karellas, A.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents an improved algorithm for the generation of 3D breast software phantoms and its evaluation for mammography. Methods: The improved methodology has evolved from a previously presented 3D noncompressed breast modeling method used for the creation of breast models of different size, shape, and composition. The breast phantom is composed of breast surface, duct system and terminal ductal lobular units, Cooper's ligaments, lymphatic and blood vessel systems, pectoral muscle, skin, 3D mammographic background texture, and breast abnormalities. The key improvement is the development of a new algorithm for 3D mammographic texture generation. Simulated images of the enhanced 3D breast model without lesions were produced by simulating mammographic image acquisition and were evaluated subjectively and quantitatively. For evaluation purposes, a database with regions of interest taken from simulated and real mammograms was created. Four experienced radiologists participated in a visual subjective evaluation trial, as they judged the quality of the simulated mammograms, using the new algorithm compared to mammograms, obtained with the old modeling approach. In addition, extensive quantitative evaluation included power spectral analysis and calculation of fractal dimension, skewness, and kurtosis of simulated and real mammograms from the database. Results: The results from the subjective evaluation strongly suggest that the new methodology for mammographic breast texture creates improved breast models compared to the old approach. Calculated parameters on simulated images such as {beta} exponent deducted from the power law spectral analysis and fractal dimension are similar to those calculated on real mammograms. The results for the kurtosis and skewness are also in good coincidence with those calculated from clinical images. Comparison with similar calculations published in the literature showed good agreement in the majority of cases. Conclusions: The

  3. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  4. Preliminary investigations on 3D PIC simulation of DPHC structure using NEPTUNE3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hailong; Dong, Ye; Zhou, Haijing; Zou, Wenkang; Wang, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Cubic region (34cm × 34cm × 18cm) including the double post-hole convolute (DPHC) structure was chosen to perform a series of fully 3D PIC simulations using NEPTUNE3D codes, massive data ( 200GB) could be acquired and solved in less than 5 hours. Cold-chamber tests were performed during which only cathode electron emission was considered without temperature rise or ion emission, current loss efficiency was estimated by comparisons between output magnetic field profiles with or without electron emission. PIC simulation results showed three stages of current transforming process with election emission in DPHC structure, the maximum ( 20%) current loss was 437kA at 15ns, while only 0.46% 0.48% was lost when driving current reached its peak. DPHC structure proved valuable functions during energy transform process in PTS facility, and NEPTUNE3D provided tools to explore this sophisticated physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant No. 11571293, 11505172.

  5. 3D Ultrasonic Wave Simulations for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Leckey Cara A/; Miler, Corey A.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for the detection of damage in aerospace materials is an important area of research at NASA. Ultrasonic guided Lamb waves are a promising SHM damage detection technique since the waves can propagate long distances. For complicated flaw geometries experimental signals can be difficult to interpret. High performance computing can now handle full 3-dimensional (3D) simulations of elastic wave propagation in materials. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate ultrasound scattering from flaws in materials. EFIT results have been compared to experimental data and the simulations provide unique insight into details of the wave behavior. This type of insight is useful for developing optimized experimental SHM techniques. 3D EFIT can also be expanded to model wave propagation and scattering in anisotropic composite materials.

  6. M3D project for simulation studies of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) project carries out simulation studies of plasmas of various regimes using multi-levels of physics, geometry, and mesh schemes in one code package. This paper and papers by Strauss, Sugiyama, and Belova in this workshop describe the project, and present examples of current applications. The currently available physics models of the M3D project are MHD, two-fluids, gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid, and gyrokinetic particle ion/two-fluid hybrid models. The code can be run with both structured and unstructured meshes.

  7. New software for visualizing 3D geological data in coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungjae; Choi, Yosoon

    2015-04-01

    This study developed new software to visualize 3D geological data in coal mines. The Visualization Tool Kit (VTK) library and Visual Basic.NET 2010 were used to implement the software. The software consists of several modules providing functionalities: (1) importing and editing borehole data; (2) modelling of coal seams in 3D; (3) modelling of coal properties using 3D ordinary Kriging method; (4) calculating economical values of 3D blocks; (5) pit boundary optimization for identifying economical coal reserves based on the Lerchs-Grosmann algorithm; and (6) visualizing 3D geological, geometrical and economical data. The software has been applied to a small-scale open-pit coal mine in Indonesia revealed that it can provide useful information supporting the planning and design of open-pit coal mines.

  8. 3D finite element simulation of TIG weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Asserin, O.; Gounand, S.; Gilles, P.; Bergheau, J. M.; Medale, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a three-dimensional weld pool model for the moving gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, in order to understand the main factors that limit the weld quality and improve the productivity, especially with respect to the welding speed. Simulation is a very powerful tool to help in understanding the physical phenomena in the weld process. A 3D finite element model of heat and fluid flow in weld pool considering free surface of the pool and traveling speed has been developed for the GTAW process. Cast3M software is used to compute all the governing equations. The free surface of the weld pool is calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. The combined effects of surface tension gradient, buoyancy force, arc pressure, arc drag force to drive the fluid flow is included in our model. The deformation of the weld pool surface and the welding speed affect fluid flow, heat flow and thus temperature gradients and molten pool dimensions. Welding trials study is presented to compare our numerical results with macrograph of the molten pool.

  9. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  10. Development of a Simulation Tool for 3D Braiding Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosana, N.; Lomov, S.; Stüve, J.; Miravete, A.

    2007-04-01

    The usage of textile technologies for composites is widely extended in aeronautic applications. They provide an improvement on mechanical properties in the thickness direction, and offer some other advantages in comparison with prepreg technology regarding production. Nowadays 3D-braiding machines do not only enable the production of solid profiles but enable also the production of complex near-net-shape reinforcement structures with changing cross section geometry. In order to attain a full understanding on structure of 3d braids to be able to predict mechanical properties, simulation tools including machine operation are needed. A simulation tool is being developed as a part of the EU project "Integrated Tool for Simulation of Textile Composites", starting from 3d braiding machinery description and operation. This information is required to reproduce yarn paths in the produced unit cell, based on the interlacing pattern of the braid.

  11. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-08-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given.

  12. Simulation of 3D food printing extrusion and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Masato; Fukuzawa, Daisuke; Murashima, Takahiro; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    In our 3D food printer, gel food such as gelatin is extruded from syringe and deposited to make a shape. Low viscosity is reasonable when the food is injected. On the other hand, high viscosity or solid state is desirable to keep the food shape after the food is deposited. The selection of the food viscoelastic property is difficult to succeed in the food printing. In general, we need trial and error to appropriate food viscosity. To avoid the trial and error, we are developing a simulation system of 3D food printing using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which is a kind of particle based simulation method.

  13. Summary of Documentation for DYNA3D-ParaDyn's Software Quality Assurance Regression Test Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zywicz, Edward

    2016-08-18

    The Software Quality Assurance (SQA) regression test suite for DYNA3D (Zywicz and Lin, 2015) and ParaDyn (DeGroot, et al., 2015) currently contains approximately 600 problems divided into 21 suites, and is a required component of ParaDyn’s SQA plan (Ferencz and Oliver, 2013). The regression suite allows developers to ensure that software modifications do not unintentionally alter the code response. The entire regression suite is run prior to permanently incorporating any software modification or addition. When code modifications alter test problem results, the specific cause must be determined and fully understood before the software changes and revised test answers can be incorporated. The regression suite is executed on LLNL platforms using a Python script and an associated data file. The user specifies the DYNA3D or ParaDyn executable, number of processors to use, test problems to run, and other options to the script. The data file details how each problem and its answer extraction scripts are executed. For each problem in the regression suite there exists an input deck, an eight-processor partition file, an answer file, and various extraction scripts. These scripts assemble a temporary answer file in a specific format from the simulation results. The temporary and stored answer files are compared to a specific level of numerical precision, and when differences are detected the test problem is flagged as failed. Presently, numerical results are stored and compared to 16 digits. At this accuracy level different processor types, compilers, number of partitions, etc. impact the results to various degrees. Thus, for consistency purposes the regression suite is run with ParaDyn using 8 processors on machines with a specific processor type (currently the Intel Xeon E5530 processor). For non-parallel regression problems, i.e., the two XFEM problems, DYNA3D is used instead. When environments or platforms change, executables using the current source code and the new

  14. Ankle-Foot Orthosis Made by 3D Printing Technique and Automated Design Software.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yong Ho; Lee, Keun Ho; Ryu, Hong Jong; Joo, Il Won; Seo, Anna; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Sang Jun

    2017-01-01

    We described 3D printing technique and automated design software and clinical results after the application of this AFO to a patient with a foot drop. After acquiring a 3D modelling file of a patient's lower leg with peroneal neuropathy by a 3D scanner, we loaded this file on the automated orthosis software and created the "STL" file. The designed AFO was printed using a fused filament fabrication type 3D printer, and a mechanical stress test was performed. The patient alternated between the 3D-printed and conventional AFOs for 2 months. There was no crack or damage, and the shape and stiffness of the AFO did not change after the durability test. The gait speed increased after wearing the conventional AFO (56.5 cm/sec) and 3D-printed AFO (56.5 cm/sec) compared to that without an AFO (42.2 cm/sec). The patient was more satisfied with the 3D-printed AFO than the conventional AFO in terms of the weight and ease of use. The 3D-printed AFO exhibited similar functionality as the conventional AFO and considerably satisfied the patient in terms of the weight and ease of use. We suggest the possibility of the individualized AFO with 3D printing techniques and automated design software.

  15. Ankle-Foot Orthosis Made by 3D Printing Technique and Automated Design Software

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yong Ho; Lee, Keun Ho; Ryu, Hong Jong; Joo, Il Won; Seo, Anna; Kim, Dong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    We described 3D printing technique and automated design software and clinical results after the application of this AFO to a patient with a foot drop. After acquiring a 3D modelling file of a patient's lower leg with peroneal neuropathy by a 3D scanner, we loaded this file on the automated orthosis software and created the “STL” file. The designed AFO was printed using a fused filament fabrication type 3D printer, and a mechanical stress test was performed. The patient alternated between the 3D-printed and conventional AFOs for 2 months. There was no crack or damage, and the shape and stiffness of the AFO did not change after the durability test. The gait speed increased after wearing the conventional AFO (56.5 cm/sec) and 3D-printed AFO (56.5 cm/sec) compared to that without an AFO (42.2 cm/sec). The patient was more satisfied with the 3D-printed AFO than the conventional AFO in terms of the weight and ease of use. The 3D-printed AFO exhibited similar functionality as the conventional AFO and considerably satisfied the patient in terms of the weight and ease of use. We suggest the possibility of the individualized AFO with 3D printing techniques and automated design software. PMID:28827977

  16. Automatic 3D virtual scenes modeling for multisensors simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latger, Jean; Le Goff, Alain; Cathala, Thierry; Larive, Mathieu

    2006-05-01

    SEDRIS that stands for Synthetic Environment Data Representation and Interchange Specification is a DoD/DMSO initiative in order to federate and make interoperable 3D mocks up in the frame of virtual reality and simulation. This paper shows an original application of SEDRIS concept for research physical multi sensors simulation, when SEDRIS is more classically known for training simulation. CHORALE (simulated Optronic Acoustic Radar battlefield) is used by the French DGA/DCE (Directorate for Test and Evaluation of the French Ministry of Defense) to perform multi-sensors simulations. CHORALE enables the user to create virtual and realistic multi spectral 3D scenes, and generate the physical signal received by a sensor, typically an IR sensor. In the scope of this CHORALE workshop, French DGA has decided to introduce a SEDRIS based new 3D terrain modeling tool that enables to create automatically 3D databases, directly usable by the physical sensor simulation CHORALE renderers. This AGETIM tool turns geographical source data (including GIS facilities) into meshed geometry enhanced with the sensor physical extensions, fitted to the ray tracing rendering of CHORALE, both for the infrared, electromagnetic and acoustic spectrum. The basic idea is to enhance directly the 2D source level with the physical data, rather than enhancing the 3D meshed level, which is more efficient (rapid database generation) and more reliable (can be generated many times, changing some parameters only). The paper concludes with the last current evolution of AGETIM in the scope mission rehearsal for urban war using sensors. This evolution includes indoor modeling for automatic generation of inner parts of buildings.

  17. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  18. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  19. UCVM: Open Source Software for Understanding and Delivering 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based ground motion simulations can calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through 3D velocity models of the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework to help researchers build structured or unstructured velocity meshes from 3D velocity models for use in wave propagation simulations. The UCVM software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Currently, the platform supports multiple California models, including SCEC CVM-S4 and CVM-H 11.9.1, and has been designed to support models from any region on earth. UCVM is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. In this presentation, we describe improvements to the UCVM software. The current version, UCVM 14.3.0, released in March of 2014, supports the newest Southern California velocity model, CVM-S4.26, which was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations using CVM-S4 as the starting model (Lee et al., this meeting), and the Broadband 1D velocity model used in the CyberShake 14.2 study. We have ported UCVM to multiple Linux distributions and OS X. Also included in this release is the ability to add small-scale stochastic heterogeneities to extract Cartesian meshes for use in high-frequency ground motion simulations. This tool was built using the C language open-source FFT library, FFTW. The stochastic parameters (Hurst exponent, correlation length, and the horizontal/vertical aspect ratio) can be customized by the user. UCVM v14.3.0 also provides visualization scripts for constructing cross-sections, horizontal slices, basin depths, and Vs30 maps. The interface allows researchers to visually review velocity models . Also, UCVM v14.3.0 can extract

  20. RANS Simulations using OpenFOAM Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED RANS Simulations using OpenFOAM Software D.A. Jones1, M. Chapuis3, M. Liefvendahl3, D. Norrison1, and R. Widjaja2...Agency - FOI, SE 147 25 Tumba, Stockholm, Sweden DST-Group-TR-3204 ABSTRACT The use of the OpenFOAM software suite for the performance of Reynolds...016-502 January 2016 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED RANS Simulations using OpenFOAM Software Executive Summary

  1. Parallelization of Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dana P.; Korte, John J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the parallelization of the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST3D). POST3D uses a gradient-based optimization algorithm that reaches an optimum design point by moving from one design point to the next. The gradient calculations required to complete the optimization process, dominate the computational time and have been parallelized using a Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) on a distributed memory NUMA (non-uniform memory access) architecture. The Origin2000 was used for the tests presented.

  2. The benefits of enhanced integration capabilities in 3-D reservoir modelling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, S.T.; Ikwumonu, A.

    1996-12-31

    The use of proprietary, closely linked 3-D geological and reservoir simulation software has greatly enhanced the reservoir modelling process by enabling complete integration of geological and engineering data in a 3-D manner. The software were used to model and simulate a deltaic sandstone reservoir in the Nigerian Forcados Yokri field in order to describe the reservoir sweep pattern. A simple simulation of the reservoir was first carried out to identify the main controls on the reservoir performance, which in this case were the intra-reservoir shales. As they are the only baffles or barriers to flow, proper modelling of them was critical to achieving a history match. Well logs, 3-D seismic, limited core data and sequence stratigraphic concepts were used to define a three dimensional depositional model which was then used to guide the 3-D reservoir architecture modelling. The reservoir model was evaluated in the 3-D simulator and, when the initial model did not yield a proper match with the historical production data, alternative models were easily generated and simulated until an acceptable match was achieved. The result was a 10% increase in predicted ultimate recovery, a better understanding of the reservoir and an optimized reservoir depletion plan.

  3. Using 3-D Numerical Weather Data in Piloted Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the process of acquiring and using 3-D numerical model weather data sets in NASA Langley's Research Flight Deck (RFD). A set of software tools implement the process and can be used for other purposes as well. Given time and location information of a weather phenomenon of interest, the user can download associated numerical weather model data. These data are created by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model, and are then processed using a set of Mathworks' Matlab(TradeMark) scripts to create the usable 3-D weather data sets. Each data set includes radar re ectivity, water vapor, component winds, temperature, supercooled liquid water, turbulence, pressure, altitude, land elevation, relative humidity, and water phases. An open-source data processing program, wgrib2, is available from NOAA online, and is used along with Matlab scripts. These scripts are described with sucient detail to make future modi cations. These software tools have been used to generate 3-D weather data for various RFD experiments.

  4. On Fundamental Evaluation Using Uav Imagery and 3d Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Suzuki, H.; Tamino, T.; Chikatsu, H.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which have been widely used in recent years, can acquire high-resolution images with resolutions in millimeters; such images cannot be acquired with manned aircrafts. Moreover, it has become possible to obtain a surface reconstruction of a realistic 3D model using high-overlap images and 3D modeling software such as Context capture, Pix4Dmapper, Photoscan based on computer vision technology such as structure from motion and multi-view stereo. 3D modeling software has many applications. However, most of them seem to not have obtained appropriate accuracy control in accordance with the knowledge of photogrammetry and/or computer vision. Therefore, we performed flight tests in a test field using an UAV equipped with a gimbal stabilizer and consumer grade digital camera. Our UAV is a hexacopter and can fly according to the waypoints for autonomous flight and can record flight logs. We acquired images from different altitudes such as 10 m, 20 m, and 30 m. We obtained 3D reconstruction results of orthoimages, point clouds, and textured TIN models for accuracy evaluation in some cases with different image scale conditions using 3D modeling software. Moreover, the accuracy aspect was evaluated for different units of input image—course unit and flight unit. This paper describes the fundamental accuracy evaluation for 3D modeling using UAV imagery and 3D modeling software from the viewpoint of close-range photogrammetry.

  5. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Frank, J.; Sol, H.

    1999-05-01

    Koide et al have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state or in hydrostatic equilibrium) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code on a full 3-dimensional system. We will investigate how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics. 3-D RMHD simulations wil be also performed to investigate the dynamics of a jet with a helical mangetic field in it.

  6. 3D finite element simulations of high velocity projectile impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ožbolt, Joško; İrhan, Barış; Ruta, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    An explicit three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) code is developed for the simulation of high velocity impact and fragmentation events. The rate sensitive microplane material model, which accounts for large deformations and rate effects, is used as a constitutive law. In the code large deformation frictional contact is treated by forward incremental Lagrange multiplier method. To handle highly distorted and damaged elements the approach based on the element deletion is employed. The code is then used in 3D FE simulations of high velocity projectile impact. The results of the numerical simulations are evaluated and compared with experimental results. It is shown that it realistically predicts failure mode and exit velocities for different geometries of plain concrete slab. Moreover, the importance of some relevant parameters, such as contact friction, rate sensitivity, bulk viscosity and deletion criteria are addressed.

  7. Some Methods of Applied Numerical Analysis to 3d Facial Reconstruction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Şerban; Ianeş, Emilia; Roşu, Doina

    2010-09-01

    This paper deals with the collective work performed by medical doctors from the University Of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara and engineers from the Politechnical Institute Timisoara in the effort to create the first Romanian 3d reconstruction software based on CT or MRI scans and to test the created software in clinical practice.

  8. 3D simulation of coaxial carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Dinh Sy; Thi Luong, Nguyen; Tuan, Thi Tran Anh; Viet Nga, Dinh

    2009-09-01

    We provide a model of coaxial CNTFET geometry. Coaxial devices are of special interest because their geometry allows for better electrostatics. We explore the possibilities of using non-equilibrium Green's function method to get I-V characteristics for CNTFETs. This simulator also includes a graphic user interface (GUI) of Matlab. We review the capabilities of the simulator, and give examples of typical CNTFET's 3D simulations (current-voltage characteristics are a function of parameters such as the length of CNTFET, gate thickness and temperature). The obtained I-V characteristics of the CNTFET are also presented by analytical equations.

  9. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  10. Software for browsing sectioned images of a dog body and generating a 3D model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seo; Jung, Yong Wook

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to provide accessible and instructive browsing software for sectioned images and a portable document format (PDF) file that includes three-dimensional (3D) models of an entire dog body and (2) to develop techniques for segmentation and 3D modeling that would enable an investigator to perform these tasks without the aid of a computer engineer. To achieve these goals, relatively important or large structures in the sectioned images were outlined to generate segmented images. The sectioned and segmented images were then packaged into browsing software. In this software, structures in the sectioned images are shown in detail and in real color. After 3D models were made from the segmented images, the 3D models were exported into a PDF file. In this format, the 3D models could be manipulated freely. The browsing software and PDF file are available for study by students, for lecture for teachers, and for training for clinicians. These files will be helpful for anatomical study by and clinical training of veterinary students and clinicians. Furthermore, these techniques will be useful for researchers who study two-dimensional images and 3D models.

  11. 3DVEM Software Modules for Efficient Management of Point Clouds and Photorealistic 3d Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabado, S.; Seguí, A. E.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.; García-De-San-Miguel, D.; Lerma, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    Cultural heritage managers in general and information users in particular are not usually used to deal with high-technological hardware and software. On the contrary, information providers of metric surveys are most of the times applying latest developments for real-life conservation and restoration projects. This paper addresses the software issue of handling and managing either 3D point clouds or (photorealistic) 3D models to bridge the gap between information users and information providers as regards the management of information which users and providers share as a tool for decision-making, analysis, visualization and management. There are not many viewers specifically designed to handle, manage and create easily animations of architectural and/or archaeological 3D objects, monuments and sites, among others. 3DVEM - 3D Viewer, Editor & Meter software will be introduced to the scientific community, as well as 3DVEM - Live and 3DVEM - Register. The advantages of managing projects with both sets of data, 3D point cloud and photorealistic 3D models, will be introduced. Different visualizations of true documentation projects in the fields of architecture, archaeology and industry will be presented. Emphasis will be driven to highlight the features of new userfriendly software to manage virtual projects. Furthermore, the easiness of creating controlled interactive animations (both walkthrough and fly-through) by the user either on-the-fly or as a traditional movie file will be demonstrated through 3DVEM - Live.

  12. A 3D TCAD simulation of a thermoelectric module configured for thermoelectric power generation, cooling and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, C. A.; Shammas, N. Y. A.; Grainger, S.; Taylor, I.; Simpson, K.

    2012-06-01

    This paper documents the 3D modeling and simulation of a three couple thermoelectric module using the Synopsys Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) semiconductor simulation software. Simulation results are presented for thermoelectric power generation, cooling and heating, and successfully demonstrate the basic thermoelectric principles. The 3D TCAD simulation model of a three couple thermoelectric module can be used in the future to evaluate different thermoelectric materials, device structures, and improve the efficiency and performance of thermoelectric modules.

  13. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  14. Implementation of virtual models from sheet metal forming simulation into physical 3D colour models using 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, S.

    2016-08-01

    Today the methods of numerical simulation of sheet metal forming offer a great diversity of possibilities for optimization in product development and in process design. However, the results from simulation are only available as virtual models. Because there are any forming tools available during the early stages of product development, physical models that could serve to represent the virtual results are therefore lacking. Physical 3D-models can be created using 3D-printing and serve as an illustration and present a better understanding of the simulation results. In this way, the results from the simulation can be made more “comprehensible” within a development team. This paper presents the possibilities of 3D-colour printing with particular consideration of the requirements regarding the implementation of sheet metal forming simulation. Using concrete examples of sheet metal forming, the manufacturing of 3D colour models will be expounded upon on the basis of simulation results.

  15. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  16. Coniferous canopy BRF simulation based on 3-D realistic scene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Yun; Guo, Zhi-Feng; Qin, Wen-Han; Sun, Guo-Qing

    2011-09-01

    It is difficulties for the computer simulation method to study radiation regime at large-scale. Simplified coniferous model was investigated in the present study. It makes the computer simulation methods such as L-systems and radiosity-graphics combined method (RGM) more powerful in remote sensing of heterogeneous coniferous forests over a large-scale region. L-systems is applied to render 3-D coniferous forest scenarios, and RGM model was used to calculate BRF (bidirectional reflectance factor) in visible and near-infrared regions. Results in this study show that in most cases both agreed well. Meanwhile at a tree and forest level, the results are also good.

  17. 3D simulation of the Cluster-Cluster Aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xiong, Hailing

    2014-12-01

    We write a program to implement the Cluster-Cluster Aggregation (CCA) model with java programming language. By using the simulation program, the fractal aggregation growth process can be displayed dynamically in the form of a three-dimensional (3D) figure. Meanwhile, the related kinetics data of aggregation simulation can be also recorded dynamically. Compared to the traditional programs, the program has better real-time performance and is more helpful to observe the fractal growth process, which contributes to the scientific study in fractal aggregation. Besides, because of adopting java programming language, the program has very good cross-platform performance.

  18. 3D reconstruction of SEM images by use of optical photogrammetry software.

    PubMed

    Eulitz, Mona; Reiss, Gebhard

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) surface of an object to be examined is widely used for structure analysis in science and many biological questions require information about their true 3D structure. For Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) there has been no efficient non-destructive solution for reconstruction of the surface morphology to date. The well-known method of recording stereo pair images generates a 3D stereoscope reconstruction of a section, but not of the complete sample surface. We present a simple and non-destructive method of 3D surface reconstruction from SEM samples based on the principles of optical close range photogrammetry. In optical close range photogrammetry a series of overlapping photos is used to generate a 3D model of the surface of an object. We adapted this method to the special SEM requirements. Instead of moving a detector around the object, the object itself was rotated. A series of overlapping photos was stitched and converted into a 3D model using the software commonly used for optical photogrammetry. A rabbit kidney glomerulus was used to demonstrate the workflow of this adaption. The reconstruction produced a realistic and high-resolution 3D mesh model of the glomerular surface. The study showed that SEM micrographs are suitable for 3D reconstruction by optical photogrammetry. This new approach is a simple and useful method of 3D surface reconstruction and suitable for various applications in research and teaching. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D Numerical Simulations of the Breakout Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Lee, J.; Lynch, B. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2005-05-01

    We present the continuing progress of the numerical simulations of the breakout model for coronal mass ejection initiation. To validate the 3D spherical ARMS code we have run the 2.5D breakout problem and compare the eruption to the published 2D results. The ARMS 2.5D CME also forms a large magnetic island ahead of the erupting plasmoid due to the code's excellent maintenance of equatorial symmetry. Progress on the fully 3D breakout problem is also discussed. To build up enough magnetic free energy for an eruption the active region field must be strong with a steep gradient near the polarity inversion line and the shear must be highly concentrated there. This requires adaptive griding techniques. In the current simulation, the active region to background field ratio is 20-to-1 and the neutral line is long compared to the active region width. We present the evolution of this topology under Br-conserving shearing flow and discuss implications for a 3D eruption. This work is supported by NASA and ONR. BJL is supported by NASA GSRP grant NGT5-50453.

  20. 3D EFT imaging with planar electrode array: Numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuykin, T.; Korjenevsky, A.

    2010-04-01

    Electric field tomography (EFT) is the new modality of the quasistatic electromagnetic sounding of conductive media recently investigated theoretically and realized experimentally. The demonstrated results pertain to 2D imaging with circular or linear arrays of electrodes (and the linear array provides quite poor quality of imaging). In many applications 3D imaging is essential or can increase value of the investigation significantly. In this report we present the first results of numerical simulation of the EFT imaging system with planar array of electrodes which allows 3D visualization of the subsurface conductivity distribution. The geometry of the system is similar to the geometry of our EIT breast imaging system providing 3D conductivity imaging in form of cross-sections set with different depth from the surface. The EFT principle of operation and reconstruction approach differs from the EIT system significantly. So the results of numerical simulation are important to estimate if comparable quality of imaging is possible with the new contactless method. The EFT forward problem is solved using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for the 8×8 square electrodes array. The calculated results of measurements are used then to reconstruct conductivity distributions by the filtered backprojections along electric field lines. The reconstructed images of the simple test objects are presented.

  1. Motion-Capture-Enabled Software for Gestural Control of 3D Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Luo, Victor; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Valderrama, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art systems use general-purpose input devices such as a keyboard, mouse, or joystick that map to tasks in unintuitive ways. This software enables a person to control intuitively the position, size, and orientation of synthetic objects in a 3D virtual environment. It makes possible the simultaneous control of the 3D position, scale, and orientation of 3D objects using natural gestures. Enabling the control of 3D objects using a commercial motion-capture system allows for natural mapping of the many degrees of freedom of the human body to the manipulation of the 3D objects. It reduces training time for this kind of task, and eliminates the need to create an expensive, special-purpose controller.

  2. IVUSAngio tool: a publicly available software for fast and accurate 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Doulaverakis, Charalampos; Tsampoulatidis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios P; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Giannoglou, George D

    2013-11-01

    There is an ongoing research and clinical interest in the development of reliable and easily accessible software for the 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries. In this work, we present the architecture and validation of IVUSAngio Tool, an application which performs fast and accurate 3D reconstruction of the coronary arteries by using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and biplane angiography data. The 3D reconstruction is based on the fusion of the detected arterial boundaries in IVUS images with the 3D IVUS catheter path derived from the biplane angiography. The IVUSAngio Tool suite integrates all the intermediate processing and computational steps and provides a user-friendly interface. It also offers additional functionality, such as automatic selection of the end-diastolic IVUS images, semi-automatic and automatic IVUS segmentation, vascular morphometric measurements, graphical visualization of the 3D model and export in a format compatible with other computer-aided design applications. Our software was applied and validated in 31 human coronary arteries yielding quite promising results. Collectively, the use of IVUSAngio Tool significantly reduces the total processing time for 3D coronary reconstruction. IVUSAngio Tool is distributed as free software, publicly available to download and use. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MRDIS Simulation Software

    SciTech Connect

    Pete Humphrey, Charles Babb

    2012-01-05

    The MRDIS Simulator is a software application to duplicate the tcp/ip output normally produced by a Mobile Radiation Detection and Identification System (MRDIS) radiation detector. Output simulates the data stream from TSA radiation detectors plus OCR data from AsiaVision OCR systems (used by the actual MRDIS).

  4. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Hughes, J. P.

    2001-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system without the axisymmetry. We have investigated how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation. We will perform simulations with various incoming flows from an accompanying star.

  5. Jet Formation with 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Preece, R.; Hardee, P.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Hughes, J. P.; Fishman, J.

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. The magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the accretion disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by the J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and the magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system without the axisymmetry. We have investigated how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation. We will perform simulations with various incoming flows from an accompanying star.

  6. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Shibata, Kazunari; Kudoh, Takashiro; Sol, Helene; Hughes, John

    2002-04-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J × B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system without the axisymmetry. We have investigated how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation. We will perform simulations with various incoming flows from an accompanying star.

  7. Computational issues connected with 3D N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenniger, D.; Friedli, D.

    1993-03-01

    Computational problems related to modeling gravitational systems, and running and analyzing 3D N-body models are discussed. N-body simulations using Particle-Mesh techniques with polar grids are especially well-suited, and physically justified, when studying quiet evolutionary processes in disk galaxies. This technique allows large N, high central resolution, and is still the fastest one. Regardless of the method chosen to compute gravitation, softening is a compromise between HF amplification and resolution. Softened spherical and ellipsoidal kernels with variable resolution are set up. Detailed characteristics of the 3D polar grid, tests, code performances, and vectorization rates are also given. For integrating motion in rotating coordinates, a stable symplectic extension of the leap-frog algorithm is described. The technique used to search for periodic orbits in arbitrary N-body potentials and to determine their stability is explained.

  8. Morphological and Volumetric Assessment of Cerebral Ventricular System with 3D Slicer Software.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo Domínguez, Miguel; Hernández, Cristina; Ruisoto, Pablo; Juanes, Juan A; Prats, Alberto; Hernández, Tomás

    2016-06-01

    We present a technological process based on the 3D Slicer software for the three-dimensional study of the brain's ventricular system with teaching purposes. It values the morphology of this complex brain structure, as a whole and in any spatial position, being able to compare it with pathological studies, where its anatomy visibly changes. 3D Slicer was also used to obtain volumetric measurements in order to provide a more comprehensive and detail representation of the ventricular system. We assess the potential this software has for processing high resolution images, taken from Magnetic Resonance and generate the three-dimensional reconstruction of ventricular system.

  9. 3-D Imaging and Simulation for Nephron Sparing Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Liu, Jen-Jane

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) is now considered the procedure of choice for small renal masses largely based on functional advantages over traditional open surgery. Lack of haptic feedback, the need for spatial understanding of tumor borders, and advanced operative techniques to minimize ischemia time or achieve zero-ischemia PN are among factors that make MIPN a technically demanding operation with a steep learning curve for inexperienced surgeons. Surgical simulation has emerged as a useful training adjunct in residency programs to facilitate the acquisition of these complex operative skills in the setting of restricted work hours and limited operating room time and autonomy. However, the majority of available surgical simulators focus on basic surgical skills, and procedure-specific simulation is needed for optimal surgical training. Advances in 3-dimensional (3-D) imaging have also enhanced the surgeon's ability to localize tumors intraoperatively. This article focuses on recent procedure-specific simulation models for laparoscopic and robotic-assisted PN and advanced 3-D imaging techniques as part of pre- and some cases, intraoperative surgical planning.

  10. 3D numerical simulation analysis of passive drag near free surface in swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jie-min; Li, Tian-zeng; Chen, Xue-bin; Li, Yok-sheung; Wai, Wing-hong Onyx

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to build a 3D numerical model to study the characteristics of passive drag on competitive swimmers taking into account the impact of the free surface. This model solves the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using RNG k- ɛ turbulence closure. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to locate the free surface. The 3D virtual model is created by Computer Aided Industrial Design (CAID) software, Rhinoceros. Firstly, a specific posture of swimming is studied. The simulation results are in good agreement with the data from mannequin towing experiments. The effects of a swimmer's arms and legs positions on swimming performance are then studied. Finally, it is demonstrated that the present method is capable of simulating gliding near the free surface.

  11. Statistical 3D 'Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Slavcheva, G.; Brown, A. R.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    A 3D statistical 'atomistic' simulation technique has been developed to study the effect of the random dopant induced parameter fluctuations in aggressively scaled MOSFETs. Efficient implementation of the 'atomistic' simulation approach has been used to investigate the threshold voltage standard deviation and lowering in the case of uniformly doped MOSFETs, and in fluctuation-resistant architectures utilising epitaxial-layers and delta-doping. The effect of the random doping in the polysilicon gate on the threshold voltage fluctuations has also been thoroughly investigated. The influence of a single-charge trapping on the channel conductivity in decanano MOSFETs is studied in the 'atomistic' framework as well. Quantum effects are taken into consideration in our 'atomistic' simulations using the density gradient formalism.

  12. Flexible simulation framework to couple processes in complex 3D models for subsurface utilization assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; Nakaten, Benjamin; De Lucia, Marco; Nakaten, Natalie; Otto, Christopher; Pohl, Maik; Tillner, Elena; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Utilization of the geological subsurface for production and storage of hydrocarbons, chemical energy and heat as well as for waste disposal requires the quantification and mitigation of environmental impacts as well as the improvement of georesources utilization in terms of efficiency and sustainability. The development of tools for coupled process simulations is essential to tackle these challenges, since reliable assessments are only feasible by integrative numerical computations. Coupled processes at reservoir to regional scale determine the behaviour of reservoirs, faults and caprocks, generally demanding for complex 3D geological models to be considered besides available monitoring and experimenting data in coupled numerical simulations. We have been developing a flexible numerical simulation framework that provides efficient workflows for integrating the required data and software packages to carry out coupled process simulations considering, e.g., multiphase fluid flow, geomechanics, geochemistry and heat. Simulation results are stored in structured data formats to allow for an integrated 3D visualization and result interpretation as well as data archiving and its provision to collaborators. The main benefits in using the flexible simulation framework are the integration of data geological and grid data from any third party software package as well as data export to generic 3D visualization tools and archiving formats. The coupling of the required process simulators in time and space is feasible, while different spatial dimensions in the coupled simulations can be integrated, e.g., 0D batch with 3D dynamic simulations. User interaction is established via high-level programming languages, while computational efficiency is achieved by using low-level programming languages. We present three case studies on the assessment of geological subsurface utilization based on different process coupling approaches and numerical simulations.

  13. Development of a 3D particle treecode for plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Benjamin; Christlieb, Andrew; Krasny, Robert

    2008-11-01

    In this work we present a fully 3-D Boundary Integral Treecode (BIT). We apply the method to several classic problems such as sheath formation and 3D simulations of a Penning trap. In addition, we investigate the ability of the solver to naturally capture Coloumb scattering. A key point in the investigation is to understand the effect of different types of regularizations, and how to appropriately incorporate the regularization in the BIT framework. This work builds on substantial efforts in 1- and 2-D. [1] R. Krasny and K. Lindsay, A particle method and adaptive treecode for vortex sheet motion in 3-D flow, JCP, Vol. 172, No. 2, 879-907 [2] K. Matyash, R. Schneider, R. Sydora, and F. Taccogna, Application of a Grid-Free Kinetic Model to the Collisionless Sheath, Contrib. Plasma Phys, Vol. 48, No. 1-3, 116-120 (2008) [3] K. Cartwright and A. Christlieb, Boundary Integral Corrected Particle in Cell, SIAM Journal on Sci. Comput., submitted [4] A. Christlieb, R. Krasny, B. Ong and J. Qiu, A Step Towards Addressing Temporal Multi-scale Problems in Plasma Physics, in prep.

  14. 3D hydrodynamic simulations of carbon burning in massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristini, A.; Meakin, C.; Hirschi, R.; Arnett, D.; Georgy, C.; Viallet, M.; Walkington, I.

    2017-10-01

    We present the first detailed 3D hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of turbulent convection of carbon burning in massive stars. Simulations begin with radial profiles mapped from a carbon-burning shell within a 15 M⊙ 1D stellar evolution model. We consider models with 1283, 2563, 5123, and 10243 zones. The turbulent flow properties of these carbon-burning simulations are very similar to the oxygen-burning case. We performed a mean field analysis of the kinetic energy budgets within the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes framework. For the upper convective boundary region, we find that the numerical dissipation is insensitive to resolution for linear mesh resolutions above 512 grid points. For the stiffer, more stratified lower boundary, our highest resolution model still shows signs of decreasing sub-grid dissipation suggesting it is not yet numerically converged. We find that the widths of the upper and lower boundaries are roughly 30 per cent and 10 per cent of the local pressure scaleheights, respectively. The shape of the boundaries is significantly different from those used in stellar evolution models. As in past oxygen-shell-burning simulations, we observe entrainment at both boundaries in our carbon-shell-burning simulations. In the large Péclet number regime found in the advanced phases, the entrainment rate is roughly inversely proportional to the bulk Richardson number, RiB (∝RiB-α, 0.5 ≲ α ≲ 1.0). We thus suggest the use of RiB as a means to take into account the results of 3D hydrodynamics simulations in new 1D prescriptions of convective boundary mixing.

  15. Unstructured 3D grid toolbox for modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.

    1997-11-01

    Computable 3D grids that accurately represent complex multimaterial geometries are essential for both static and time-dependent modeling and simulation. LaGriT, the grid toolbox developed at Los Alamos provides a sophisticated set of initial grid generation, grid maintenance and grid optimization tools. We present example grids that demonstrate the flexibility of the grid generator. Additionally, we present the results of an electrostatic calculation and a grain growth problem that illustrate the grid optimization features and the utility of the grid server architecture.

  16. 3D Game-Based Learning System for Improving Learning Achievement in Software Engineering Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su,Chung-Ho; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of game-based learning has encouraged many related studies, such that students could better learn curriculum by 3-dimension virtual reality. To enhance software engineering learning, this paper develops a 3D game-based learning system to assist teaching and assess the students' motivation, satisfaction and learning achievement. A…

  17. Composite manufacturing: Simulation of 3-D resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Cheng Ping

    1998-10-01

    A technique was developed for simulating the resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The major feature of the technique is a computational steering system that enables the user to make changes during the simulation. Specifically, at any instance, the user can inspect the progress of the resin front. On the basis of the observed resin front position, the user can, as needed, change the port and vent locations, open and close ports and vents, adjust the inlet and exit pressures or flow rates, and reorient the mold with respect to the gravitational field. Additionally, the user can "rewind" the simulator to any previous time in the mold filling process, make any of the above changes and then continue the simulation. The technique is augmented by a computer code which has three main components, the Simulator, the Graphics User Interface (GUI), and the Global Data Storage. The Simulator is a finite element code that calculates the resin flow inside the fiber preform. The GUI serves as the interface between the user and the Simulator; it provides the commands to the Simulator and displays the results. The Global Data Storage is the module that manages the exchange of data between the GUI and the Simulator. The computer code (designated as SUPERTMsb-3D) is suitable for simulating the resin flow inside two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional fiber preforms of arbitrary shapes. The use of this computer code is illustrated through sample problems. These problems demonstrate how (with this code) the designer can establish the port and vent locations, opening and closing sequences of ports and vents such that the fiber preform is filled completely in the shortest time with the fewest number of vents.

  18. Advanced system for 3D dental anatomy reconstruction and 3D tooth movement simulation during orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Carlos; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Albalat, Salvador E.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a new method for 3D orthodontics treatment simulation developed for an orthodontics planning system (MAGALLANES). We develop an original system for 3D capturing and reconstruction of dental anatomy that avoid use of dental casts in orthodontic treatments. Two original techniques are presented, one direct in which data are acquired directly form patient's mouth by mean of low cost 3D digitizers, and one mixed in which data are obtained by 3D digitizing of hydrocollids molds. FOr this purpose we have designed and manufactured an optimized optical measuring system based on laser structured light. We apply these 3D dental models to simulate 3D movement of teeth, including rotations, during orthodontic treatment. The proposed algorithms enable to quantify the effect of orthodontic appliance on tooth movement. The developed techniques has been integrated in a system named MAGALLANES. This original system present several tools for 3D simulation and planning of orthodontic treatments. The prototype system has been tested in several orthodontic clinic with very good results.

  19. Dust emission in simulated dwarf galaxies using GRASIL-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Santos, I. M.; Domínguez-Tenreiro, R.; Granato, G. L.; Brook, C. B.; Obreja, A.

    2017-03-01

    Recent Herschel observations of dwarf galaxies have shown a wide diversity in the shapes of their IR-submm spectral energy distributions as compared to more massive galaxies, presenting features that cannot be explained with the current models. In order to understand the physics driving these differences, we have computed the emission of a sample of simulated dwarf galaxies using the radiative transfer code GRASIL-3D. This code separately treats the radiative transfer in dust grains from molecular clouds and cirri. The simulated galaxies have masses ranging from 10^6-10^9 M_⊙ and have evolved within a Local Group environment by using CLUES initial conditions. We show that their IR band luminosities are in agreement with observations, with their SEDs reproducing naturally the particular spectral features observed. We conclude that the GRASIL-3D two-component model gives a physical interpretation to the emission of dwarf galaxies, with molecular clouds (cirri) as the warm (cold) dust components needed to recover observational data.

  20. Simulation of 3D Global Wave Propagation Through Geodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuberth, B.; Piazzoni, A.; Bunge, H.; Igel, H.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2005-12-01

    This project aims at a better understanding of the forward problem of global 3D wave propagation. We use the spectral element program "SPECFEM3D" (Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002a,b) with varying input models of seismic velocities derived from mantle convection simulations (Bunge et al., 2002). The purpose of this approach is to obtain seismic velocity models independently from seismological studies. In this way one can test the effects of varying parameters of the mantle convection models on the seismic wave field. In order to obtain the seismic velocities from the temperature field of the geodynamical simulations we follow a mineral physics approach. Assuming a certain mantle composition (e.g. pyrolite with CMASF composition) we compute the stable phases for each depth (i.e. pressure) and temperature by system Gibbs free energy minimization. Elastic moduli and density are calculated from the equations of state of the stable mineral phases. For this we use a mineral physics database derived from calorimetric experiments (enthalphy and entropy of formation, heat capacity) and EOS parameters.

  1. 3D-printed pediatric endoscopic ear surgery simulator for surgical training.

    PubMed

    Barber, Samuel R; Kozin, Elliott D; Dedmon, Matthew; Lin, Brian M; Lee, Kyuwon; Sinha, Sumi; Black, Nicole; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Surgical simulators are designed to improve operative skills and patient safety. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery (TEES) is a relatively new surgical approach with a slow learning curve due to one-handed dissection. A reusable and customizable 3-dimensional (3D)-printed endoscopic ear surgery simulator may facilitate the development of surgical skills with high fidelity and low cost. Herein, we aim to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator. The TEES simulator was designed in computer-aided design (CAD) software using anatomic measurements taken from anthropometric studies. Cross sections from external auditory canal samples were traced as vectors and serially combined into a mesh construct. A modified tympanic cavity with a modular testing platform for simulator tasks was incorporated. Components were fabricated using calcium sulfate hemihydrate powder and multiple colored infiltrants via a commercial inkjet 3D-printing service. All components of a left-sided ear were printed to scale. Six right-handed trainees completed three trials each. Mean trial time (n = 3) ranged from 23.03 to 62.77 s using the dominant hand for all dissection. Statistically significant differences between first and last completion time with the dominant hand (p < 0.05) and average completion time for junior and senior residents (p < 0.05) suggest construct validity. A 3D-printed simulator is feasible for TEES simulation. Otolaryngology training programs with access to a 3D printer may readily fabricate a TEES simulator, resulting in inexpensive yet high-fidelity surgical simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coniferous Canopy BRF Simulation Based on 3-D Realistic Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xin-yun; Guo, Zhi-feng; Qin, Wen-han; Sun, Guo-qing

    2011-01-01

    It is difficulties for the computer simulation method to study radiation regime at large-scale. Simplified coniferous model was investigate d in the present study. It makes the computer simulation methods such as L-systems and radiosity-graphics combined method (RGM) more powerf ul in remote sensing of heterogeneous coniferous forests over a large -scale region. L-systems is applied to render 3-D coniferous forest scenarios: and RGM model was used to calculate BRF (bidirectional refle ctance factor) in visible and near-infrared regions. Results in this study show that in most cases both agreed well. Meanwhiie at a tree and forest level. the results are also good.

  3. 3-D MHD Simulation of Oscillating Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Prager, S. C.; Wright, J. C.

    2000-10-01

    Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD) is a proposed low frequency steady-state current drive technique for the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). In OFCD toroidal and poloidal oscillating electric fields are applied with 90^circ phase difference to inject magnetic helicity. In the present work, the 3-D nonlinear, resistive MHD code DEBS is used to simulate OFCD in relaxed RFP plasmas. The present simulations are at high Lundquist number S=10^5 and low spect ratio R/a=1.5. The physics issues investigated are the response of background magnetic fluctuations to the oscillating fields, the relative contributions of the tearing mode dynamo and the oscillating fields to the current profile, and the sustainment and control of the steady-state current profile. Initial results with low amplitude oscillating fields show the expected increase in magnetic helicity and current. Results with higher amplitude will also be presented.

  4. MHD instabilities in accretion mounds - II. 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Mignone, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the onset of pressure-driven toroidal-mode instabilities in accretion mounds on neutron stars by 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the PLUTO MHD code. Our results confirm that for mounds beyond a threshold mass, instabilities form finger-like channels at the periphery, resulting in mass-loss from the magnetically confined mound. Ring-like mounds with hollow interior show the instabilities at the inner edge as well. We perform the simulations for mounds of different sizes to investigate the effect of the mound mass on the growth rate of the instabilities. We also investigate the effect of such instabilities on observables such as cyclotron resonant scattering features and timing properties of such systems.

  5. GBS: Global 3D simulation of tokamak edge region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ben; Fisher, Dustin; Rogers, Barrett; Ricci, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    A 3D two-fluid global code, namely Global Braginskii Solver (GBS), is being developed to explore the physics of turbulent transport, confinement, self-consistent profile formation, pedestal scaling and related phenomena in the edge region of tokamaks. Aimed at solving drift-reduced Braginskii equations [1] in complex magnetic geometry, the GBS is used for turbulence simulation in SOL region. In the recent upgrade, the simulation domain is expanded into close flux region with twist-shift boundary conditions. Hence, the new GBS code is able to explore global transport physics in an annular full-torus domain from the top of the pedestal into the far SOL. We are in the process of identifying and analyzing the linear and nonlinear instabilities in the system using the new GBS code. Preliminary results will be presented and compared with other codes if possible.[4pt] [1] A. Zeiler, J. F. Drake and B. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 4, 2134 (1997)

  6. Reproducibility of a novel echocardiographic 3D automated software for the assessment of mitral valve anatomy.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Iolanda; González, Ariana; Fernández-Golfín, Covadonga; Rincón, Luis Miguel; Casas, Eduardo; García, Ana; Hinojar, Rocio; Jiménez-Nacher, José Julio; Zamorano, José Luis

    2016-05-17

    3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is superior to 2D TEE in quantitative anatomic evaluation of the mitral valve (MV) but it shows limitations regarding automatic quantification. Here, we tested the inter-/intra-observer reproducibility of a novel full-automated software in the evaluation of MV anatomy compared to manual 3D assessment. Thirty-six out of 61 screened patients referred to our Cardiac Imaging Unit for TEE were retrospectively included. 3D TEE analysis was performed both manually and with the automated software by two independent operators. Mitral annular area, intercommissural distance, anterior leaflet length and posterior leaflet length were assessed. A significant correlation between both methods was found for all variables: intercommissural diameter (r = 0.84, p < 0.01), mitral annular area (r = 0.94, p > 0, 01), anterior leaflet length (r = 0.83, p < 0.01) and posterior leaflet length (r = 0.67, p < 0.01). Interobserver variability assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient was superior for the automatic software: intercommisural distance 0.997 vs. 0.76; mitral annular area 0.957 vs. 0.858; anterior leaflet length 0.963 vs. 0.734 and posterior leaflet length 0.936 vs. 0.838. Intraobserver variability was good for both methods with a better level of agreement with the automatic software. The novel 3D automated software is reproducible in MV anatomy assessment. The incorporation of this new tool in clinical MV assessment may improve patient selection and outcomes for MV interventions as well as patient diagnosis and prognosis stratification. Yet, high-quality 3D images are indispensable.

  7. A Novel Temporal Bone Simulation Model Using 3D Printing Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Sarah E; Jammal, Hachem; Myer, Charles; Solares, Clementino Arturo; Weinberger, Paul

    2015-09-01

    An inexpensive temporal bone model for use in a temporal bone dissection laboratory setting can be made using a commercially available, consumer-grade 3D printer. Several models for a simulated temporal bone have been described but use commercial-grade printers and materials to produce these models. The goal of this project was to produce a plastic simulated temporal bone on an inexpensive 3D printer that recreates the visual and haptic experience associated with drilling a human temporal bone. Images from a high-resolution CT of a normal temporal bone were converted into stereolithography files via commercially available software, with image conversion and print settings adjusted to achieve optimal print quality. The temporal bone model was printed using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic filament on a MakerBot 2x 3D printer. Simulated temporal bones were drilled by seven expert temporal bone surgeons, assessing the fidelity of the model as compared with a human cadaveric temporal bone. Using a four-point scale, the simulated bones were assessed for haptic experience and recreation of the temporal bone anatomy. The created model was felt to be an accurate representation of a human temporal bone. All raters felt strongly this would be a good training model for junior residents or to simulate difficult surgical anatomy. Material cost for each model was $1.92. A realistic, inexpensive, and easily reproducible temporal bone model can be created on a consumer-grade desktop 3D printer.

  8. Optimizing prostate needle biopsy through 3D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianchao; Kaplan, Charles; Xuan, Jian Hua; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Lynch, John H.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-06-01

    Prostate needle biopsy is used for the detection of prostate cancer. The protocol of needle biopsy that is currently routinely used in the clinical environment is the systematic sextant technique, which defines six symmetric locations on the prostate surface for needle insertion. However, this protocol has been developed based on the long-term observation and experience of urologists. Little quantitative or scientific evidence supports the use of this biopsy technique. In this research, we aim at developing a statistically optimized new prostate needle biopsy protocol to improve the quality of diagnosis of prostate cancer. This new protocol will be developed by using a three-dimensional (3-D) computer- based probability map of prostate cancer. For this purpose, we have developed a computer-based 3-D visualization and simulation system with prostate models constructed from the digitized prostate specimens, in which the process of prostate needle biopsy can be simulated automatically by the computer. In this paper, we first develop an interactive biopsy simulation mode in the system, and evaluate the performance of the automatic biopsy simulation with the sextant biopsy protocol by comparing the results by the urologist using the interactive simulation mode with respect to 53 prostate models. This is required to confirm that the automatic simulation is accurate and reliable enough for the simulation with respect to a large number of prostate models. Then we compare the performance of the existing protocols using the automatic biopsy simulation system with respect to 107 prostate models, which will statistically identify if one protocol is better than another. Since the estimation of tumor volume is extremely important in determining the significance of a tumor and in deciding appropriate treatment methods, we further investigate correlation between the tumor volume and the positive core volume with 89 prostate models. This is done in order to develop a method to

  9. Physics and 3D in Flash Simulations: Open Source Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J. B.; Dusenbery, P.

    2009-12-01

    Over the last decade our ability to deliver simulations over the web has steadily advanced. The improvements in speed of the Adobe Flash engine, and the development of open source tools to expand it, allow us to deliver increasingly sophisticated simulation based games through the browser, with no additional downloads required. In this paper we will present activities we are developing as part of two asteroids education projects: Finding NEO (funded through NSF and NASA SMD), and Asteroids! (funded through NSF). The first activity is Rubble!, an asteroids deflection game built on the open source Box2D physics engine. This game challenges players to push asteroids in to safe orbits before they crash in to the Earth. The Box2D engine allows us to go well beyond simple 2-body orbital calculations and incorporate “rubble piles”. These objects, which are representative of many asteroids, are composed of 50 or more individual rocks which gravitationally bind and separate in realistic ways. Even bombs can be modeled with sufficient physical accuracy to convince players of the hazards of trying to “blow up” incoming asteroids. The ability to easily build games based on underlying physical models allows us to address physical misconceptions in a natural way: by having the player operate in a world that directly collides with those misconceptions. Rubble! provides a particularly compelling example of this due to the variety of well documented misconceptions regarding gravity. The second activity is a Light Curve challenge, which uses the open source PaperVision3D tools to analyze 3D asteroid models. The goal of this activity is to introduce the player to the concept of “light curves”, measurements of asteroid brightness over time which are used to calculate the asteroid’s period. These measurements can even be inverted to generate three dimensional models of asteroids that are otherwise too small and distant to directly image. Through the use of the Paper

  10. Simulating 3D Spacecraft Constellations for Low Frequency Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, A. M.; Amiri, N.; Lazio, J.; Belov, K.; Kasper, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Constellations of small spacecraft could be used to realize a low-frequency phased array for either heliophysics or astrophysics observations. However, there are issues that arise with an orbiting array that do not occur on the ground, thus rendering much of the existing radio astronomy software inadequate for data analysis and simulation. In this work we address these issues and consider the performance of two constellation concepts. The first is a 32-spacecraft constellation for astrophysical observations, and the second is a 5-element concept for pointing to the location of radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs). For the first, we fill the software gap by extending the APSYNSIM software to simulate the aperture synthesis for a radio interferometer in orbit. This involves using the dynamic baselines from the relative motion of the individual spacecraft as well as the capability to add galactic noise. The ability to simulate phase errors corresponding to positional uncertainty of the antennas was also added. The upgraded software was then used to model the imaging of a 32 spacecraft constellation that would orbit the moon to image radio galaxies like Cygnus A at .3-30 MHz. Animated images showing the improvement of the dirty image as the orbits progressed were made. RMSE plots that show how well the dirty image matches the input image as a function of integration time were made. For the second concept we performed radio interferometric simulations of the Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE) using the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. SunRISE is a five spacecraft phased array that would orbit Earth to localize the low frequency radio emission from CMEs. This involved simulating the array in CASA, creating truth images for the CMEs over the entire frequency band of SunRISE, and observing them with the simulated array to see how well it could localize the true position of the CME. The results of our analysis show that we

  11. The 3-D General Geometry PIC Software for Distributed Memory MIMD Computers; EM Software Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    GENERAL GEOMETRY PIC SOFTWARE FOR DISTRIBUTED MEMORY MIMD COMPUTERS : TASK 1 FINAL REPORT J W Eastwood, W... GENERAL GEOMETRY PIC SOFTWARE FOR DISTRIBUTED MEMORY MIMD COMPUTERS : TASK 1 FINAL REPORT J W Eastwood, W Arter, N J Brealey, R W Hockney September 1994... General geometry PIC for MIMD computers : Final report . Report RFFX(93)56,

  12. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  13. Multi-Cell Simulations of Development and Disease Using the CompuCell3D Simulation Environment

    PubMed Central

    Swat, Maciej H.; Hester, Susan D.; Heiland, Randy W.; Zaitlen, Benjamin L.; Glazier, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computer simulation have become crucial to biological fields from genomics to ecology. However, multi-cell, tissue-level simulations of development and disease have lagged behind other areas because they are mathematically more complex and lack easy-to-use software tools that allow building and running in-silico experiments without requiring in-depth knowledge of programming. This tutorial introduces Glazier-Graner-Hogeweg (GGH) multi-cell simulations and CompuCell3D, a simulation framework that allows users to build, test and run GGH simulations. PMID:19399437

  14. Ground Motion and Variability from 3-D Deterministic Broadband Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Kyle Brett

    The accuracy of earthquake source descriptions is a major limitation in high-frequency (> 1 Hz) deterministic ground motion prediction, which is critical for performance-based design by building engineers. With the recent addition of realistic fault topography in 3D simulations of earthquake source models, ground motion can be deterministically calculated more realistically up to higher frequencies. We first introduce a technique to model frequency-dependent attenuation and compare its impact on strong ground motions recorded for the 2008 Chino Hills earthquake. Then, we model dynamic rupture propagation for both a generic strike-slip event and blind thrust scenario earthquakes matching the fault geometry of the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake along rough faults up to 8 Hz. We incorporate frequency-dependent attenuation via a power law above a reference frequency in the form Q0fn, with high accuracy down to Q values of 15, and include nonlinear effects via Drucker-Prager plasticity. We model the region surrounding the fault with and without small-scale medium complexity in both a 1D layered model characteristic of southern California rock and a 3D medium extracted from the SCEC CVMSi.426 including a near-surface geotechnical layer. We find that the spectral acceleration from our models are within 1-2 interevent standard deviations from recent ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and compare well with that of recordings from strong ground motion stations at both short and long periods. At periods shorter than 1 second, Q(f) is needed to match the decay of spectral acceleration seen in the GMPEs as a function of distance from the fault. We find that the similarity between the intraevent variability of our simulations and observations increases when small-scale heterogeneity and plasticity are included, extremely important as uncertainty in ground motion estimates dominates the overall uncertainty in seismic risk. In addition to GMPEs, we compare with simple

  15. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  16. Unsteady 3D flow simulations in cranial arterial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph; Karniadakis, George

    2008-11-01

    High resolution unsteady 3D flow simulations in major cranial arteries have been performed. Two cases were considered: 1) a healthy volunteer with a complete Circle of Willis (CoW); and 2) a patient with hydrocephalus and an incomplete CoW. Computation was performed on 3344 processors of the new half petaflop supercomputer in TACC. Two new numerical approaches were developed and implemented: 1) a new two-level domain decomposition method, which couples continuous and discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the computational domain; and 2) a new type of outflow boundary conditions, which imposes, in an accurate and computationally efficient manner, clinically measured flow rates. In the first simulation, a geometric model of 65 cranial arteries was reconstructed. Our simulation reveals a high degree of asymmetry in the flow at the left and right parts of the CoW and the presence of swirling flow in most of the CoW arteries. In the second simulation, one of the main findings was a high pressure drop at the right anterior communicating artery (PCA). Due to the incompleteness of the CoW and the pressure drop at the PCA, the right internal carotid artery supplies blood to most regions of the brain.

  17. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  18. MPSalsa 3D Simulations of Chemically Reacting Flows

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many important scientific and engineering applications require a detailed analysis of complex systems with coupled fluid flow, thermal energy transfer, mass transfer and nonequilibrium chemical reactions. Currently, computer simulations of these complex reacting flow problems are limited to idealized systems in one or two spatial dimensions when coupled with a detailed, fundamental chemistry model. The goal of our research is to develop, analyze and implement advanced MP numerical algorithms that will allow high resolution 3D simulations with an equal emphasis on fluid flow and chemical kinetics modeling. In our research, we focus on the development of new, fully coupled, implicit solution strategies that are based on robust MP iterative solution methods (copied from http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/). These simulations are needed for scientific and technical areas such as: combustion research for transportation, atmospheric chemistry modeling for pollution studies, chemically reacting flow models for analysis and control of manufacturing processes, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling for production of advanced semiconductor materials (http://www.cs.sandia.gov/CRF/MPSalsa/).

    This project website provides six QuickTime videos of these simulations, along with a small image gallery and slideshow animations. A list of related publications and conference presentations is also made available.

  19. Massive parallel 3D PIC simulation of negative ion extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Adrien; Mochalskyy, Serhiy; Montellano, Ivar Mauricio; Wünderlich, Dirk; Fantz, Ursel; Minea, Tiberiu

    2017-09-01

    The 3D PIC-MCC code ONIX is dedicated to modeling Negative hydrogen/deuterium Ion (NI) extraction and co-extraction of electrons from radio-frequency driven, low pressure plasma sources. It provides valuable insight on the complex phenomena involved in the extraction process. In previous calculations, a mesh size larger than the Debye length was used, implying numerical electron heating. Important steps have been achieved in terms of computation performance and parallelization efficiency allowing successful massive parallel calculations (4096 cores), imperative to resolve the Debye length. In addition, the numerical algorithms have been improved in terms of grid treatment, i.e., the electric field near the complex geometry boundaries (plasma grid) is calculated more accurately. The revised model preserves the full 3D treatment, but can take advantage of a highly refined mesh. ONIX was used to investigate the role of the mesh size, the re-injection scheme for lost particles (extracted or wall absorbed), and the electron thermalization process on the calculated extracted current and plasma characteristics. It is demonstrated that all numerical schemes give the same NI current distribution for extracted ions. Concerning the electrons, the pair-injection technique is found well-adapted to simulate the sheath in front of the plasma grid.

  20. Occupational therapists' perceptions about the clinical utility of the 3D interior design software.

    PubMed

    Atwa, Anita; Money, Arthur G; Spiliotopoulou, Georgia; Mcintyre, Anne

    2013-07-01

    The 3D interior design software (3DIDS) is a technology, which primarily allows users to simulate their homes and visualize any changes prior to implementing them. This feasibility study aimed to examine occupational therapists' perceptions about the clinical utility of the 3DIDS. A secondary aim was to explore the attitudes of occupational therapists towards technology in general. Three focus groups were conducted with 25 occupational therapists working with older people in the UK. The qualitative data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The three main themes that were identified were usage and attitudes of technology, opportunities for realistic application of the 3DIDS and related threats and benefits for the occupational therapy profession. Occupational therapists had a positive attitude towards technology. They suggested that the 3DIDS could be used in discharge planning and in rehabilitation. They viewed it as a tool that could enhance their status within the health care profession and improve communication, but not as a tool that should replace the role of the occupational therapist. This research offers new and important findings about the utilization of the 3DIDS by occupational therapists and provides information as to where this technology should be trialled.

  1. The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Holger; Mathers, Steve; Sobisch, Hans-Georg

    2009-06-01

    The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists have learned to use the software that is now routinely deployed in building systematic and commercial 3D geological models. The success of the GSI3D methodology and software is based on its intuitive design and the fact that it utilises exactly the same data and methods, albeit in digital forms, that geologists have been using for two centuries in order to make geological maps and cross-sections. The geologist constructs models based on a career of observation of geological phenomena, thereby incorporating tacit knowledge into the model. This knowledge capture is a key element to the GSI3D approach. In BGS GSI3D is part of a much wider set of systems and work processes that together make up the cyberinfrastructure of a modern geological survey. The GSI3D software is not yet designed to cope with bedrock structures in which individual stratigraphic surfaces are repeated or inverted, but the software is currently being extended by BGS to encompass these more complex geological scenarios. A further challenge for BGS is to enable its 3D geological models to become part of the semantic Web using GML application schema like GeoSciML. The biggest benefits of widely available systematic geological models will be an enhanced public understanding of the sub-surface in 3D, and the teaching of geoscience students.

  2. Interactive virtual simulation using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Yajima, Naoki; Sato, Yosuke; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the authors' advanced presurgical interactive virtual simulation technique using a 3D computer graphics model for microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. The authors performed interactive virtual simulation prior to surgery in 26 patients with trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm. The 3D computer graphics models for interactive virtual simulation were composed of the brainstem, cerebellum, cranial nerves, vessels, and skull individually created by the image analysis, including segmentation, surface rendering, and data fusion for data collected by 3-T MRI and 64-row multidetector CT systems. Interactive virtual simulation was performed by employing novel computer-aided design software with manipulation of a haptic device to imitate the surgical procedures of bone drilling and retraction of the cerebellum. The findings were compared with intraoperative findings. In all patients, interactive virtual simulation provided detailed and realistic surgical perspectives, of sufficient quality, representing the lateral suboccipital route. The causes of trigeminal neuralgia or hemifacial spasm determined by observing 3D computer graphics models were concordant with those identified intraoperatively in 25 (96%) of 26 patients, which was a significantly higher rate than the 73% concordance rate (concordance in 19 of 26 patients) obtained by review of 2D images only (p < 0.05). Surgeons evaluated interactive virtual simulation as having "prominent" utility for carrying out the entire surgical procedure in 50% of cases. It was evaluated as moderately useful or "supportive" in the other 50% of cases. There were no cases in which it was evaluated as having no utility. The utilities of interactive virtual simulation were associated with atypical or complex forms of neurovascular compression and structural restrictions in the surgical window. Finally, MVD procedures were performed as simulated in 23 (88%) of the 26 patients . Our

  3. 3D MHD disruptions simulations of tokamaks plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Strauss, Hank; Breslau, Joshua

    2008-11-01

    Tokamaks Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) and disruptions simulations in toroidal geometry by means of a single fluid visco-resistive magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model are presented in this paper. The plasma model, implemented in the M3D code [1], is completed with the presence of a 2D homogeneous wall with finite resistivity. This allows the study of the relatively slowly growing magneto-hydro-dynamical perturbation, the resistive wall mode (RWM), which is, in this work, the main drive of the disruptions. Amplitudes and asymmetries of the halo currents pattern at the wall are also calculated and comparisons with tokamak experimental databases and predictions for ITER are given. [1] W. Park, E.V. Belova, G.Y. Fu, X.Z. Tang, H.R. Strauss, L.E. Sugiyama, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 1796.

  4. Photon Scattering in 3D Radiative MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    Recent results from 3D time-dependent radiative hydrodynamic simulations of stellar atmospheres are presented, which include the effects of coherent scattering in the radiative transfer treatment. Rayleigh scattering and electron scattering are accounted for in the source function, requiring an iterative solution of the transfer equation. Opacities and scattering coefficients are treated in the multigroup opacity approximation. The impact of scattering on the horizontal mean temperature structure is investigated, which is an important diagnostic for model atmospheres, with implications for line formation and stellar abundance measurements. We find that continuum scattering is not important for the atmosphere of a metal-poor Sun with metailicity [Fe/H] = -3.0, similar to the previously investigated photosphere at solar metallicity.

  5. 3D simulations of an electrostatic quadrupole injector

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P. |; Friedman, A.; Yu, S.

    1993-02-01

    Analysis of the dynamics of a space charge dominated beam in a lattice of electrostatic focusing structures requires a full three-dimensional conic that includes self-consistent space charge fields and the fields from the complex conductor shapes. The existing WARP3d code, a particle simulation code which has been developed for heavy-ion fusion (HIF) applications contains machinery for handling particles in three-dimensional fields. A successive overrelaxation field solver with subgrid-scale placement of boundaries for rounded surface and four-fold symmetry has been added to the code. The electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) injector for the ILSE accelerator facility being planned at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is shown as an application. The issue of concern is possible emittance degradation because the focusing voltages are a significant fraction of the particles` energy and because there are significant nonlinear fields arising from the shapes of the quadrupole structures.

  6. Simulation of 3D Chaotic Electroconvection in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Scott; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Electroconvection, a microscale electrohydrodynamic phenomenon with chaotic features reminiscent of turbulence, provides the dominant transport mechanism in many electrochemical processes where ions are driven through ion-selective surfaces under large applied voltages. Electrodialysis, for example, desalinates water by flowing it between layers of ion-selective membranes with alternating selectivity while an electric field is applied normal to the membranes. This process leads to alternating channels becoming enriched and depleted of ions. Despite its key importance, much about how electroconvection enhances ion transport, particularly in the presence of crossflow, remains a mystery. We present results of 3D direct numerical simulations of electroconvection in a canonical geometry of an electrolyte between an ion-selective membrane and a reservoir with periodic sides subject to applied shear flow. We analyze the effects of crossflow on both flow statistics and qualitative structures in the fully chaotic regime. Stanford Graduate Fellowship, NSF GRFP.

  7. PAB3D Simulations for the CAWAPI F-16XL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa; Abdol-Hamid, K. S.; Massey, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the flow around F-16XL are performed as a contribution to the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI) using the PAB3D CFD code. Two turbulence models are used in the calculations: a standard k-! model, and the Shih-Zhu-Lumley (SZL) algebraic stress model. Seven flight conditions are simulated for the flow around the F-16XL where the free stream Mach number varies from 0.242 to 0.97. The range of angles of attack varies from 0deg to 20deg. Computational results, surface static pressure, boundary layer velocity profiles, and skin friction are presented and compared with flight data. Numerical results are generally in good agreement with flight data, considering that only one grid resolution is utilized for the different flight conditions simulated in this study. The ASM results are closer to the flight data than the k-! model results. The ASM predicted a stronger primary vortex, however, the origin of the vortex and footprint is approximately the same as in the k-! predictions.

  8. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  9. Enhancing Simulation of Sand Behavior through 3D Subdivision Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2011-12-01

    is a planetary rover interacting with our sand simulation. Sand that is actively interacting with a rover wheel will be represented as an individual particle whereas sand that is further under the surface will be represented by a 3D region that represents several particles. As a particle region moves closer to the surface, it subdivides into smaller regions until individual sand particles are left. Our technique uses a variation of a 3D Voronoi decomposition in order to generate regions of sand. However, in our iteration, sand on the surface will be subdivided as particles whereas sand deeper into the earth will be subdivided into subsequently larger regions. By doing this, we can represent many more particles of sand than through traditional means. In addition, we have the added benefit of being able to parallelize the interaction between active particles through the use of the GPU. As such, not only are we able to represent vast amounts of sand, but we can also utilize more individual particles at the interaction source. An enhanced sand model through the use of subdivision techniques and GPUs has great potential for earth science research. Our collaborations with JPL have helped to further refine our simulation framework. As a result, we feel this work could also benefit other earth science fields, such as understanding sinkholes and debris flows.

  10. 3D Dynamic Earthquake Fracture Simulation (Test Case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    A 3D dynamic earthquake fracture simulation is being developed for the fault structures which are non-planar to understand heterogeneous stress states in the Marmara Sea. Locating in a seismic gap, a large earthquake is expected in the center of the Sea of Marmara. Concerning the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants of İstanbul, located very closely to the Marmara Sea, the importance of the analysis of the Central Marmara Sea is extremely high. A few 3D dynamic earthquake fracture studies have been already done in the Sea of Marmara for pure right lateral strike-slip stress regimes (Oglesby and Mai, 2012; Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). In this study, a 3D dynamic earthquake fracture model with heterogeneous stress patches from the TPV5, a SCEC code validation case, is adapted. In this test model, the fault and the ground surfaces are gridded by a scalene triangulation technique using GMSH program. For a grid size changing between 0.616 km and 1.050 km the number of elements for the fault surface is 1984 and for the ground surface is 1216. When these results are compared with Kaneko's results for TPV5 from SPECFEM3D, reliable findings could be observed for the first 6.5 seconds (stations on the fault) although a stability problem is encountered after this time threshold. To solve this problem grid sizes are made smaller, so the number of elements increase 7986 for the fault surface and 4867 for the ground surface. On the other hand, computational problems arise in that case, since the computation time is directly proportional to the number of total elements and the required memory also increases with the square of that. Therefore, it is expected that this method can be adapted for less coarse grid cases, regarding the main difficulty coming from the necessity of an effective supercomputer and run time limitations. The main objective of this research is to obtain 3D dynamic earthquake rupture scenarios, concerning not only planar and non-planar faults but also

  11. Implementation of Headtracking and 3D Stereo with Unity and VRPN for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores low-cost hardware and software methods to provide depth cues traditionally absent in monocular displays. The use of a VRPN server in conjunction with a Microsoft Kinect and/or Nintendo Wiimote to provide head tracking information to a Unity application, and NVIDIA 3D Vision for retinal disparity support, is discussed. Methods are suggested to implement this technology with NASA's EDGE simulation graphics package, along with potential caveats. Finally, future applications of this technology to astronaut crew training, particularly when combined with an omnidirectional treadmill for virtual locomotion and NASA's ARGOS system for reduced gravity simulation, are discussed.

  12. Numerical simulation of the 3D unsteady turbulent flow in a combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuparu, Adrian; Holotescu, Sorin

    2011-06-01

    The influence of turbulence models on the 3D unsteady flow in a combustion chamber with a central bluff body is analyzed. Three different turbulence models are used (realizable k-ɛ, Reynolds Stress Model and Large Eddy Simulation) and a comparison is made on the evolution of the velocity field over time. The numerical simulation of the gas flow in the combustion chamber was performed using FLUENT 6.3 software and the computational geometry, consisting of a structured mesh with 810,000 cells, was built using the pre-processor GAMBIT 2.4. The extent of the recirculation region behind the bluff body was determined for each turbulence model.

  13. Numerical simulation of the 3D unsteady turbulent flow in a combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuparu, Adrian; Holotescu, Sorin

    2011-06-01

    The influence of turbulence models on the 3D unsteady flow in a combustion chamber with a central bluff body is analyzed. Three different turbulence models are used ( realizable k-ɛ, Reynolds Stress Model and Large Eddy Simulation) and a comparison is made on the evolution of the velocity field over time. The numerical simulation of the gas flow in the combustion chamber was performed using FLUENT 6.3 software and the computational geometry, consisting of a structured mesh with 810,000 cells, was built using the pre-processor GAMBIT 2.4. The extent of the recirculation region behind the bluff body was determined for each turbulence model.

  14. The Performance Evaluation of Multi-Image 3d Reconstruction Software with Different Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, V.; Khosravi, M.; Ahmadi, M.; Noori, N.; Naveh, A. Hosseini; Varshosaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Today, multi-image 3D reconstruction is an active research field and generating three dimensional model of the objects is one the most discussed issues in Photogrammetry and Computer Vision that can be accomplished using range-based or image-based methods. Very accurate and dense point clouds generated by range-based methods such as structured light systems and laser scanners has introduced them as reliable tools in the industry. Image-based 3D digitization methodologies offer the option of reconstructing an object by a set of unordered images that depict it from different viewpoints. As their hardware requirements are narrowed down to a digital camera and a computer system, they compose an attractive 3D digitization approach, consequently, although range-based methods are generally very accurate, image-based methods are low-cost and can be easily used by non-professional users. One of the factors affecting the accuracy of the obtained model in image-based methods is the software and algorithm used to generate three dimensional model. These algorithms are provided in the form of commercial software, open source and web-based services. Another important factor in the accuracy of the obtained model is the type of sensor used. Due to availability of mobile sensors to the public, popularity of professional sensors and the advent of stereo sensors, a comparison of these three sensors plays an effective role in evaluating and finding the optimized method to generate three-dimensional models. Lots of research has been accomplished to identify a suitable software and algorithm to achieve an accurate and complete model, however little attention is paid to the type of sensors used and its effects on the quality of the final model. The purpose of this paper is deliberation and the introduction of an appropriate combination of a sensor and software to provide a complete model with the highest accuracy. To do this, different software, used in previous studies, were compared and

  15. 3D mapping and simulation of Geneva Lake environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Roch; Maignan, Michel; Kanevski, Mikhail; Rapin, Francois; Klein, Audrey

    2010-05-01

    The Geneva Lake is the biggest alpine and subalpine lake in central Europe. The depth of this lake is 309 meters and its total volume of water is 89 billions m3. It takes, on average, around twelve years so that waters of the lake are completely brewed. Furthermore the Geneva lake waters are rich in dissolved substances as carbonate, sulfate. The quantity of particles in suspension in the lake, which mainly arrived from the Rhône, is nowadays around height million of tones. The International Commission for the Leman Lake (CIPEL) works about the improvement of the quality of this lake since 1962. In the present study three dimensional environmental data (temperature, oxygen and nitrate) which cover the period from 1954 to 2008, for a total of 27'500 cases are investigated. We are interested to study the evolution of the temperature of the lake because there is an impact on the reproduction of fishes and also because the winter brewing of the water makes the re-oxygenation of deep-water. In order that biological balance is maintained in a lake, there must be enough oxygen in the water. Moreover, we work on nitrate distribution and evolution because contributions in fertilizers cause eutrophication of lake. The data are very numerous when we consider the time series, some of them with more than 300 occurrences, but there are between 2 and 15 data available for spatial cartography. The basic methodology used for the analysis, mapping and simulations of 3D patterns of environmental data is based on geostatistical predictions (family of kriging models) and conditional stochastic simulations. Spatial and temporal variability, 3D monitoring networks changing over time, make this study challenging. An important problem is also to make interpolation/simulations over a long period of time, like ten years. One way used to overcome this problem, consists in using a weighted average of ten variograms during this period. 3D mapping was carried out using environment data for

  16. Simulation of underwater explosion benchmark experiments with ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R.; Faux, D.

    1997-05-19

    Some code improvements have been made during the course of this study. One immediately obvious need was for more flexibility in the constitutive representation for materials in shell elements. To remedy this situation, a model with a tabular representation of stress versus strain and rate dependent effects was implemented. This was required in order to obtain reasonable results in the IED cylinder simulation. Another deficiency was in the ability to extract and plot variables associated with shell elements. The pipe whip analysis required the development of a scheme to tally and plot time dependent shell quantities such as stresses and strains. This capability had previously existed only for solid elements. Work was initiated to provide the same range of plotting capability for structural elements that exist with the DYNA3D/TAURUS tools. One of the characteristics of these problems is the disparity in zoning required in the vicinity of the charge and bubble compared to that needed in the far field. This disparity can cause the equipotential relaxation logic to provide a less than optimal solution. Various approaches were utilized to bias the relaxation to obtain more optimal meshing during relaxation. Extensions of these techniques have been developed to provide more powerful options, but more work still needs to be done. The results presented here are representative of what can be produced with an ALE code structured like ALE3D. They are not necessarily the best results that could have been obtained. More experience in assessing sensitivities to meshing and boundary conditions would be very useful. A number of code deficiencies discovered in the course of this work have been corrected and are available for any future investigations.

  17. First 3-D simulations of meteor plasma dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2015-02-01

    Millions of small but detectable meteors hit the Earth's atmosphere every second, creating trails of hot plasma that turbulently diffuse into the background atmosphere. For over 60 years, radars have detected meteor plasmas and used these signals to infer characteristics of the meteoroid population and upper atmosphere, but, despite the importance of meteor radar measurements, the complex processes by which these plasmas evolve have never been thoroughly explained or modeled. In this paper, we present the first fully 3-D simulations of meteor evolution, showing meteor plasmas developing instabilities, becoming turbulent, and inhomogeneously diffusing into the background ionosphere. These instabilities explain the characteristics and strength of many radar observations, in particular the high-resolution nonspecular echoes made by large radars. The simulations reveal how meteors create strong electric fields that dig out deep plasma channels along the Earth's magnetic fields. They also allow researchers to explore the impacts of the intense winds and wind shears, commonly found at these altitudes, on meteor plasma evolution. This study will allow the development of more sophisticated models of meteor radar signals, enabling the extraction of detailed information about the properties of meteoroid particles and the atmosphere.

  18. The 3D scanner prototype utilize object profile imaging using line laser and octave software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdini, Mugi; Manunggal, Trikarsa Tirtadwipa; Samsi, Agus

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional scanner or 3D Scanner is a device to reconstruct the real object into digital form on a computer. 3D Scanner is a technology that is being developed, especially in developed countries, where the current 3D Scanner devices is the advanced version with a very expensive prices. This study is basically a simple prototype of 3D Scanner with a very low investment costs. 3D Scanner prototype device consists of a webcam, a rotating desk system controlled by a stepper motor and Arduino UNO, and a line laser. Objects that limit the research is the object with same radius from its center point (object pivot). Scanning is performed by using object profile imaging by line laser which is then captured by the camera and processed by a computer (image processing) using Octave software. On each image acquisition, the scanned object on a rotating desk rotated by a certain degree, so for one full turn multiple images of a number of existing side are finally obtained. Then, the profile of the entire images is extracted in order to obtain digital object dimension. Digital dimension is calibrated by length standard, called gage block. Overall dimensions are then digitally reconstructed into a three-dimensional object. Validation of the scanned object reconstruction of the original object dimensions expressed as a percentage error. Based on the results of data validation, horizontal dimension error is about 5% to 23% and vertical dimension error is about +/- 3%.

  19. Enhancement of temporal bone anatomy learning with computer 3D rendered imaging software.

    PubMed

    Venail, Frederic; Deveze, Arnaud; Lallemant, Benjamin; Guevara, Nicolas; Mondain, Michel

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether the use of 3D anatomical models is helpful to students and enhances their anatomical knowledge. First year undergraduate students on the speech therapy or hearing aid practitioner courses attended either a lecture alone or a lecture followed by a 3D anatomy based tutorial, the latter which was also attended by ENT residents. Participants who received the tutorial were free to use the 3D model on the university computers or on their home computer and were then asked to answer a satisfaction questionnaire. At the end of the first year examinations, the grades of the undergraduate students were compared between the lecture alone group and lecture plus tutorial group. Generally, all participants found this new tool interesting and user-friendly for the learning of temporal bone anatomy. However, most also considered the help of a teacher indispensable to guide them through the virtual dissection. First year undergraduate students who received the 3D anatomy tutorial performed significantly better during their end of year examination compared to those receiving a lecture alone, particularly concerning the more difficult questions. The 3D anatomical software, used in parallel with traditional teaching methods, such as lectures and cadaver dissection, appears to be a promising tool to improve student learning of temporal bone anatomy.

  20. 3D Numerical Simulation on the Rockslide Generated Tsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, M.; Wu, T.; Wang, C.; Chu, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rockslide generated tsunami is one of the most devastating nature hazards. However, the involvement of the moving obstacle and dynamic free-surface movement makes the numerical simulation a difficult task. To describe both the fluid motion and solid movement at the same time, we newly developed a two-way fully-coupled moving solid algorithm with 3D LES turbulent model. The free-surface movement is tracked by volume of fluid (VOF) method. The two-step projection method is adopted to solve the Navier-Stokes type government equations. In the new moving solid algorithm, a fictitious body force is implicitly prescribed in MAC correction step to make the cell-center velocity satisfied with the obstacle velocity. We called this method the implicit velocity method (IVM). Because no extra terms are added to the pressure Poission correction, the pressure field of the fluid part is stable, which is the key of the two-way fluid-solid coupling. Because no real solid material is presented in the IVM, the time marching step is not restricted to the smallest effective grid size. Also, because the fictitious force is implicitly added to the correction step, the resulting velocity is accurate and fully coupled with the resulting pressure field. We validated the IVM by simulating a floating box moving up and down on the free-surface. We presented the time-history obstacle trajectory and compared it with the experimental data. Very accurate result can be seen in terms of the oscillating amplitude and the period (Fig. 1). We also presented the free-surface comparison with the high-speed snapshots. At the end, the IVM was used to study the rock-slide generated tsunamis (Liu et al., 2005). Good validations on the slide trajectory and the free-surface movement will be presented in the full paper. From the simulation results (Fig. 2), we observed that the rockslide generated waves are manly caused by the rebounding waves from two sides of the sliding rock after the water is dragging

  1. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  2. Strategy and software for the statistical spatial analysis of 3D intracellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Biot, Eric; Crowell, Elizabeth; Burguet, Jasmine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha; Andrey, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The localization of proteins in specific domains or compartments in the 3D cellular space is essential for many fundamental processes in eukaryotic cells. Deciphering spatial organization principles within cells is a challenging task, in particular because of the large morphological variations between individual cells. We present here an approach for normalizing variations in cell morphology and for statistically analyzing spatial distributions of intracellular compartments from collections of 3D images. The method relies on the processing and analysis of 3D geometrical models that are generated from image stacks and that are used to build representations at progressively increasing levels of integration, ultimately revealing statistical significant traits of spatial distributions. To make this methodology widely available to end-users, we implemented our algorithmic pipeline into a user-friendly, multi-platform, and freely available software. To validate our approach, we generated 3D statistical maps of endomembrane compartments at subcellular resolution within an average epidermal root cell from collections of image stacks. This revealed unsuspected polar distribution patterns of organelles that were not detectable in individual images. By reversing the classical 'measure-then-average' paradigm, one major benefit of the proposed strategy is the production and display of statistical 3D representations of spatial organizations, thus fully preserving the spatial dimension of image data and at the same time allowing their integration over individual observations. The approach and software are generic and should be of general interest for experimental and modeling studies of spatial organizations at multiple scales (subcellular, cellular, tissular) in biological systems. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Parallel Cartesian grid refinement for 3D complex flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelidis, Dionysios; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    A second order accurate method for discretizing the Navier-Stokes equations on 3D unstructured Cartesian grids is presented. Although the grid generator is based on the oct-tree hierarchical method, fully unstructured data-structure is adopted enabling robust calculations for incompressible flows, avoiding both the need of synchronization of the solution between different levels of refinement and usage of prolongation/restriction operators. The current solver implements a hybrid staggered/non-staggered grid layout, employing the implicit fractional step method to satisfy the continuity equation. The pressure-Poisson equation is discretized by using a novel second order fully implicit scheme for unstructured Cartesian grids and solved using an efficient Krylov subspace solver. The momentum equation is also discretized with second order accuracy and the high performance Newton-Krylov method is used for integrating them in time. Neumann and Dirichlet conditions are used to validate the Poisson solver against analytical functions and grid refinement results to a significant reduction of the solution error. The effectiveness of the fractional step method results in the stability of the overall algorithm and enables the performance of accurate multi-resolution real life simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0005482.

  4. Permafrost simulations in the Dolomites using Alpine3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkogler, W.; Bavay, M.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Permafrost is a strong indicator for climate change and an important structural fact for Alpine infrastructures. Therefore, its spatial distribution and temporal evolution are of great interest for scientists and practitioners. The effects of permafrost degradation due to climate change on slope stability, and thus debris flows or rock falls generated in high alpine regions, seriously affects mountain communities. Simulations as will be presented in this work can aid to identify, simulate and forecast impacts of climate change scenarios on permafrost areas. The potential permafrost distribution in the Veneto region (Italy) was calculated for a spatial resolution of 150 m by applying the hydro-meteorological model Alpine3D and the one-dimensional model of vegetation, snow, and soil SNOWPACK. Information on land use and soil characteristics served as input data and for the initialization of the model, which was then run for 12 years with the meteorological data provided from up to 44 automatic weather stations inside or close to the investigation area as driving variables. Sub-surface temperatures calculated by the model served as indicators for the likelihood of permafrost. According to the sub-surface conditions the areas situated within the potential permafrost realm are further subdivided into different zones. Areas were defined as class 'permafrost likely' as long as they are < -1°C for the whole calculation period. Areas which are < -1°C for at least 50 % of the calculation period are classified as 'permafrost possible' based on the assumption that a short term warming would not be able to totally remove existing permafrost. Our calculations for the Veneto region show that only a comparatively small fraction of the total investigation area is likely to have permafrost under the given climatic conditions. For the whole Veneto region (21283 km2), a total area of 2.2 km2 is of class 'permafrost likely' and additionally 5.3 km2 are of class 'permafrost possible'.

  5. Web-based interactive 2D/3D medical image processing and visualization software.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Seyyed Ehsan; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Rahmani, Roohollah; Faghih-Roohi, Shahrooz; Taimouri, Vahid; Sabouri, Ahmad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    There are many medical image processing software tools available for research and diagnosis purposes. However, most of these tools are available only as local applications. This limits the accessibility of the software to a specific machine, and thus the data and processing power of that application are not available to other workstations. Further, there are operating system and processing power limitations which prevent such applications from running on every type of workstation. By developing web-based tools, it is possible for users to access the medical image processing functionalities wherever the internet is available. In this paper, we introduce a pure web-based, interactive, extendable, 2D and 3D medical image processing and visualization application that requires no client installation. Our software uses a four-layered design consisting of an algorithm layer, web-user-interface layer, server communication layer, and wrapper layer. To compete with extendibility of the current local medical image processing software, each layer is highly independent of other layers. A wide range of medical image preprocessing, registration, and segmentation methods are implemented using open source libraries. Desktop-like user interaction is provided by using AJAX technology in the web-user-interface. For the visualization functionality of the software, the VRML standard is used to provide 3D features over the web. Integration of these technologies has allowed implementation of our purely web-based software with high functionality without requiring powerful computational resources in the client side. The user-interface is designed such that the users can select appropriate parameters for practical research and clinical studies.

  6. Identification of coronal heating events in 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanella, Charalambos; Gudiksen, Boris V.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The solar coronal heating problem has been an open question in the science community since 1939. One of the proposed models for the transport and release of mechanical energy generated in the sub-photospheric layers and photosphere is the magnetic reconnection model that incorporates Ohmic heating, which releases a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. In this model many unresolved flaring events occur in the solar corona, releasing enough energy to heat the corona. Aims: The problem with the verification and quantification of this model is that we cannot resolve small scale events due to limitations of the current observational instrumentation. Flaring events have scaling behavior extending from large X-class flares down to the so far unobserved nanoflares. Histograms of observable characteristics of flares show powerlaw behavior for energy release rate, size, and total energy. Depending on the powerlaw index of the energy release, nanoflares might be an important candidate for coronal heating; we seek to find that index. Methods: In this paper we employ a numerical three-dimensional (3D)-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation produced by the numerical code Bifrost, which enables us to look into smaller structures, and a new technique to identify the 3D heating events at a specific instant. The quantity we explore is the Joule heating, a term calculated directly by the code, which is explicitly correlated with the magnetic reconnection because it depends on the curl of the magnetic field. Results: We are able to identify 4136 events in a volume 24 × 24 × 9.5 Mm3 (i.e., 768 × 786 × 331 grid cells) of a specific snapshot. We find a powerlaw slope of the released energy per second equal to αP = 1.5 ± 0.02, and two powerlaw slopes of the identified volume equal to αV = 1.53 ± 0.03 and αV = 2.53 ± 0.22. The identified energy events do not represent all the released energy, but of the identified events, the total energy of the largest events

  7. Scalable, high-performance 3D imaging software platform: system architecture and application to virtual colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli; Brett, Bevin

    2012-01-01

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. In this work, we have developed a software platform that is designed to support high-performance 3D medical image processing for a wide range of applications using increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems: multi-core, clusters, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable, high-performance computing, our platform (1) employs size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D image processing algorithms; (2) supports task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing; and (3) consists of a layered parallel software libraries that allow a wide range of medical applications to share the same functionalities. We evaluated the performance of our platform by applying it to an electronic cleansing system in virtual colonoscopy, with initial experimental results showing a 10 times performance improvement on an 8-core workstation over the original sequential implementation of the system.

  8. A PC-based 3D imaging system: algorithms, software, and hardware considerations.

    PubMed

    Raya, S P; Udupa, J K; Barrett, W A

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging in medicine is known to produce easily and quickly derivable medically relevant information, especially in complex situations. We intend to demonstrate in this paper, that with an appropriate choice of approaches and a proper design of algorithms and software, it is possible to develop a low-cost 3D imaging system that can provide a level of performance sufficient to meet the daily case load in an individual or even group-practice situation. We describe hardware considerations of a generic system and give an example of a specific system we used for our implementation. Given a 3D image as a stack of slices, we generate a packed binary cubic voxel array, by combining segmentation (density thresholding), interpolation, and packing in an efficient way. Since threshold-based segmentation is very often not perfect, object-like structures and noise clutter the binary scene. We utilize an effective mechanism to isolate the object from this clutter by tracking a specified, connected surface of the object. The surface description thus obtained is rendered to create a depiction of the surface on a 2D display screen. Efficient implementation of hidden-part removal and image-space shading and a simple and fast antialiasing technique provide a level of performance which otherwise would not have been possible in a PC environment. We outline our software emphasizing some design aspects and present some clinical examples.

  9. Assessment of the reliability and repeatability of landmarks using 3-D cephalometric software.

    PubMed

    Frongia, Gianluigi; Piancino, Maria Grazia; Bracco, Andrea Adriano; Crincoli, Vito; Debernardi, Cesare Lorenzo; Bracco, Pietro

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the reliability and repeatability of identification landmarks using 3-D cephalometric software. Ten orthognathic patients were selected for this study and underwent the following protocol: 1. radiographic evaluation (CBCT technique); 2. stone casts; 3. photos; and 4. 3-D cephalometric evaluation. Twenty-one hard tissue landmarks and 14 cephalometric measurements were taken three times (T1, T2, and T3) on each patient, with an interval of one week by two experts in orthodontics (A, B). Standard deviation and Pearson's correlation coefficient were calculated to evaluate intra- and inter-observer repeatability. The results showed a strong correlation for both intra- and inter-observer Pearson's correlation coefficient (>0.7). The current preliminary study showed that the reliability and repeatability of the identification landmarks were very high if the 3-D cephalometric landmarks are defined correctly in the three planes of the space. Further evaluation is necessary to better define the 3-D cephalometric system.

  10. Development of Mould of Rheology Test Sample via CadMould 3D-F Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, M. H.; Yusof, M. A. M.; Hasan, S.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.; Amin, S. Y. M.; Marwah, O. M. F.; Shaari, M. F.; Johar, M. A.; Shahbudin, S. N. A.

    2017-08-01

    This research was about the development of mould for rheology test sample via simulation. The development work concerned with stages of design, simulation, analysis, and fabrication of the mould to produce good quality samples. In the design stage, three mould concepts have been prepared via Solid Works software. The simulation of injection moulding was conducted by using CadMould 3D-F software. Then, in the analysis stage, the main factor that has been studied were the cavity system, runner system and the gating system. For each design, different type of systems were applied to compare different simulation result. Through the simulation software, it was rectified that the parameter such as the number of cavities, filling time, shear stress were the main factors to contribute good rheological properties of the sample. The final result shows that Design 2 was chosen as the suitable mould due to number of cavities and good results in the analysis, as compare to other mould design. Finally, Design 2 have been fabricated and undergo fitting test to see whether the dimension had been done correctly. Based on this research findings, it was proven that to develop a mould suitable for rheology sample, the mould design selection should be made based on the type of system in simulations.

  11. 3-D numerical simulations of volcanic ash transport and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y. J.; Koyaguchi, T.

    2012-12-01

    During an explosive volcanic eruption, volcanic gas and pyroclasts are ejected from the volcanic vent. The pyroclasts are carried up within a convective plume, advected by the surrounding wind field, and sediment on the ground depending on their terminal velocity. The fine ash are expected to have atmospheric residence, whereas the coarser particles form fall deposits. Accurate modeling of particle transport and deposition is of critical importance from the viewpoint of disaster prevention. Previously, some particle-tracking models (e.g., PUFF) and advection-diffusion models (e.g., TEPHRA2 and FALL3D) tried to forecast particle concentration in the atmosphere and particle loading at ground level. However, these models assumed source conditions (the grain-size distribution, plume height, and mass release location) based on the simple 1-D model of convective plume. In this study, we aim to develop a new 3-D model which reproduces both of the dynamics of convective plume and the ash transport. The model is designed to describe the injection of eruption cloud and marker particles from a circular vent above a flat surface into the stratified atmosphere. Because the advection is the predominant mechanism of particle transport near the volcano, the diffusive process is not taken into account in this model. The distribution of wind velocity is given as an initial condition. The model of the eruption cloud dynamics is based on the 3-D time-dependent model of Suzuki et al. (2005). We apply a pseudo-gas model to calculate the eruption cloud dynamics: the effect of particle separation on the cloud dynamics is not considered. In order to reproduce the drastic change of eruption cloud density, we change the effective gas constant and heat capacity of the mixture in the equation of state for ideal gases with the mixing ratio between the ejected material and entrained air. In order to calculate the location and movement of ash particles, the present model employs Lagrangian marker

  12. Remote measurement methods for 3-D modeling purposes using BAE Systems' Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Stewart; Pietrzak, Arleta

    2015-06-01

    Efficient, accurate data collection from imagery is the key to an economical generation of useful geospatial products. Incremental developments of traditional geospatial data collection and the arrival of new image data sources cause new software packages to be created and existing ones to be adjusted to enable such data to be processed. In the past, BAE Systems' digital photogrammetric workstation, SOCET SET®, met fin de siècle expectations in data processing and feature extraction. Its successor, SOCET GXP®, addresses today's photogrammetric requirements and new data sources. SOCET GXP is an advanced workstation for mapping and photogrammetric tasks, with automated functionality for triangulation, Digital Elevation Model (DEM) extraction, orthorectification and mosaicking, feature extraction and creation of 3-D models with texturing. BAE Systems continues to add sensor models to accommodate new image sources, in response to customer demand. New capabilities added in the latest version of SOCET GXP facilitate modeling, visualization and analysis of 3-D features.

  13. Bergamo 3D Rhinoplasty Software: Select, Store, and Share Surgical Maneuvers in a Three-Dimensional Nasal Model.

    PubMed

    Codazzi, Denis; Bruschi, Stefano; Mazzola, Riccardo F; Bocchiotti, Maria Alessandra; Bogetti, Paolo; Ortelli, Luca; Robotti, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Rhinoplasty is considered the most challenging chapter of plastic surgery due to its variability and the continuing evolution of surgical maneuvers. Worksheets became essential to unequivocally record surgical steps and to demonstrate their reciprocal effects/interactions during the follow-up period. After 1989, no other software was created to upgrade the Gunter Rhinoplasty Diagrams, the forefather and benchmark of the rhinoplasty "virtual" worksheet maker. The authors built a new standard three-dimensional nasal framework model in STL format. All the basic components were modified to simulate the interaction among sutures, grafts, and the most common maneuvers performed during rhinoplasty. The authors created a total of 669 (99 built-in units and 285 unilateral units) three-dimensional figures which can be selected by the surgeon from among 230 options. The interface for the surgeon is Bergamo 3D Rhinoplasty Software. Bergamo 3D Rhinoplasty Software is made up of the database section, which gathers all the patient's personal information and documents, and the surgery section, which groups multiple selection lists in 10 surgical areas. Eighty percent of the options modify the original shape of the three-dimensional model. Several options help the surgeon to tailor the final result and to export it both in desktop software and in a real three-dimensional printed model. Bergamo Rhinoplasty Software revolutionizes the concept of patient and surgical data storage. Furthermore, the immediacy of three dimensions facilitates communication with patients, allows case sharing with colleagues, simplifies teaching, and encourages the surgeon's self-analysis and professional growth. Customization of the original model and of the maneuvers is the main limitation of the software, because of the currently existing technology in 2014.

  14. Deriving 3d Point Clouds from Terrestrial Photographs - Comparison of Different Sensors and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederheiser, Robert; Mokroš, Martin; Lange, Julia; Petschko, Helene; Prasicek, Günther; Oude Elberink, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry nowadays offers a reasonably cheap, intuitive and effective approach to 3D-modelling. However, the important choice, which sensor and which software to use is not straight forward and needs consideration as the choice will have effects on the resulting 3D point cloud and its derivatives. We compare five different sensors as well as four different state-of-the-art software packages for a single application, the modelling of a vegetated rock face. The five sensors represent different resolutions, sensor sizes and price segments of the cameras. The software packages used are: (1) Agisoft PhotoScan Pro (1.16), (2) Pix4D (2.0.89), (3) a combination of Visual SFM (V0.5.22) and SURE (1.2.0.286), and (4) MicMac (1.0). We took photos of a vegetated rock face from identical positions with all sensors. Then we compared the results of the different software packages regarding the ease of the workflow, visual appeal, similarity and quality of the point cloud. While PhotoScan and Pix4D offer the user-friendliest workflows, they are also "black-box" programmes giving only little insight into their processing. Unsatisfying results may only be changed by modifying settings within a module. The combined workflow of Visual SFM, SURE and CloudCompare is just as simple but requires more user interaction. MicMac turned out to be the most challenging software as it is less user-friendly. However, MicMac offers the most possibilities to influence the processing workflow. The resulting point-clouds of PhotoScan and MicMac are the most appealing.

  15. 20 and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta= 1 level (Le., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a lOW-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  16. 2D and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta=1 level (i.e., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a low-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  17. 2D and 3D Numerical Simulations of Flux Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C.; Antiochos, S. K.; Linton, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancellation of magnetic flux in the solar photosphere and chromosphere has been linked observationally and theoretically to a broad range of solar activity, from filament channel formation to CME initiation. Because this phenomenon is typically measured at only a single layer in the atmosphere, in the radial (line of sight) component of the magnetic field, the actual processes behind this observational signature are ambiguous. It is clear that reconnection is involved in some way, but the location of the reconnection sites and associated connectivity changes remain uncertain in most cases. We are using numerical modeling to demystify flux cancellation, beginning with the simplest possible configuration: a subphotospheric Lundquist flux tube surrounded by a potential field, immersed in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere, spanning many orders of magnitude in plasma beta. In this system, cancellation is driven slowly by a 2-cell circulation pattern imposed in the convection zone, such that the tops of the cells are located around the beta=1 level (i.e., the photosphere) and the flows converge and form a downdraft at the polarity inversion line; note however that no flow is imposed along the neutral line. We will present the results of 2D and 3D MHD-AMR simulations of flux cancellation, in which the flux at the photosphere begins in either an unsheared or sheared state. In all cases, a low-lying flux rope is formed by reconnection at the polarity inversion line within a few thousand seconds. The flux rope remains stable and does not rise, however, in contrast to models which do not include the presence of significant mass loading.

  18. Towards implementing plate tectonics in 3D mantle convection simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollada, Peter; Davies, Huw

    2010-05-01

    One of the great challenges in numerical mantle convection simulations is to achieve models that naturally develop plate tectonic like behaviour at the surface. In this work we are looking to achieve such models by investigating the set of models where a single consistent rheology is used for the whole model. We have started by investigating a viscoelastic rheology, related to the Oldroyd-B model from the field of polymers. The goal will be to have the parameter that controls the relaxation between elastic and viscous behaviour to depend upon temperature, pressure and strain-rate. With an appropriate choice of this dependence we have, on the near surface, high viscous/elastic regions interfaced with lower, pure viscous, regions of high strain-rate; while it also becomes more viscous at depth in the interior. In this way we hope to obtain plate like behaviour at the surface which naturally progresses to viscous convective behaviour in the interior. We have started to implement this model in the established mantle 3D finite element spherical mantle convection code TERRA (Baumgardner, 1984). Some parts of the model have been implemented as a force (to be combined with the gravitational body force) on the right hand side. The work has required us to develop and code in TERRA: (i) methods to overcome the continuity problem of the stress field stemming from the fact that the velocity field is represented by linear finite elements; (ii) new operators to handle stress and its gradients; (iii) methods to analyse plate-like behaviour at the surface (iv) the necessary functional dependence of viscosity and elastic relaxation time on temperature, strain-rate and pressure We will present the background to the work, its implementation and results.

  19. Understanding the mixing process in 3D microfluidic nozzle/diffuser systems: simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayah, Abdeljalil; Gijs, Martin A. M.

    2016-11-01

    We characterise computationally and experimentally a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic passive mixer for various Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 to 100, corresponding to primary flow rates of 10-870 µl min-1. The 3D mixing channel is composed of multiple curved segments: circular arcs situated in the substrate plane and curved nozzle/diffuser elements normal to the substrate plane. Numerical simulation provides a detailed understanding of the mixing mechanism resulting from the geometrical topology of the mixer. These Comsol software-based simulations reveal the development of two secondary flows perpendicular to the primary flow: a swirling flow resulting from tangential injection of the flow into the nozzle holes and Dean vortices present in the circular arcs. These phenomena are particularly important at a Reynolds number larger than 30, where mixing occurs by chaotic advection. Experimentally, the 3D mixer is fabricated in a monolithic glass substrate by powder blasting machining, exploiting eroding powder beams at various angles of impact with respect to the substrate plane. Experimental mixing was characterised using two coloured dyes, showing nearly perfect mixing for a microfluidic footprint of the order of a few mm2, in good agreement with the simulations.

  20. Meso-Scale Damage Simulation of 3D Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Axial Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Chunjian; Zhou, Yexin

    2017-01-01

    The microstructure of 3D braided composites is composed of three phases: braiding yarn, matrix and interface. In this paper, a representative unit-cell (RUC) model including these three phases is established. Coupling with the periodical boundary condition, the damage behavior of 3D braided composites under quasi-static axial tension is simulated by using finite element method based on this RUC model. An anisotropic damage model based on Murakami damage theory is proposed to predict the damage evolution of yarns and matrix; a damage-friction combination interface constitutive model is adopted to predict the interface debonding behavior. A user material subroutine (VUMAT) involving these damage models is developed and implemented in the finite element software ABAQUS/Explicit. The whole process of damage evolution of 3D braided composites under quasi-static axial tension with typical braiding angles is simulated, and the damage mechanisms are revealed in detail in the simulation process. The tensile strength properties of the braided composites are predicted from the calculated stress-strain curves. Numerical results agree with the available experiment data and thus validates the proposed damage analysis model. The effects of certain material parameters on the predicted stress-strain responses are also discussed by numerical parameter study.

  1. Reliable and Fault-Tolerant Software-Defined Network Operations Scheme for Remote 3D Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyun; Gil, Joon-Min

    2015-03-01

    The recent wide expansion of applicable three-dimensional (3D) printing and software-defined networking (SDN) technologies has led to a great deal of attention being focused on efficient remote control of manufacturing processes. SDN is a renowned paradigm for network softwarization, which has helped facilitate remote manufacturing in association with high network performance, since SDN is designed to control network paths and traffic flows, guaranteeing improved quality of services by obtaining network requests from end-applications on demand through the separated SDN controller or control plane. However, current SDN approaches are generally focused on the controls and automation of the networks, which indicates that there is a lack of management plane development designed for a reliable and fault-tolerant SDN environment. Therefore, in addition to the inherent advantage of SDN, this paper proposes a new software-defined network operations center (SD-NOC) architecture to strengthen the reliability and fault-tolerance of SDN in terms of network operations and management in particular. The cooperation and orchestration between SDN and SD-NOC are also introduced for the SDN failover processes based on four principal SDN breakdown scenarios derived from the failures of the controller, SDN nodes, and connected links. The abovementioned SDN troubles significantly reduce the network reachability to remote devices (e.g., 3D printers, super high-definition cameras, etc.) and the reliability of relevant control processes. Our performance consideration and analysis results show that the proposed scheme can shrink operations and management overheads of SDN, which leads to the enhancement of responsiveness and reliability of SDN for remote 3D printing and control processes.

  2. Metos3D: the Marine Ecosystem Toolkit for Optimization and Simulation in 3-D - Part 1: Simulation Package v0.3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwonski, Jaroslaw; Slawig, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We designed and implemented a modular software framework for the offline simulation of steady cycles of 3-D marine ecosystem models based on the transport matrix approach. It is intended for parameter optimization and model assessment experiments. We defined a software interface for the coupling of a general class of water column-based biogeochemical models, with six models being part of the package. The framework offers both spin-up/fixed-point iteration and a Jacobian-free Newton method for the computation of steady states. The simulation package has been tested with all six models. The Newton method converged for four models when using standard settings, and for two more complex models after alteration of a solver parameter or the initial guess. Both methods delivered the same steady states (within a reasonable precision) on convergence for all models employed, with the Newton iteration generally operating 6 times faster. The effects on performance of both the biogeochemical and the Newton solver parameters were investigated for one model. A profiling analysis was performed for all models used in this work, demonstrating that the number of tracers had a dominant impact on overall performance. We also implemented a geometry-adapted load balancing procedure which showed close to optimal scalability up to a high number of parallel processors.

  3. New Instruments for Survey: on Line Softwares for 3d Recontruction from Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratus de Balestrini, E.; Guerra, F.

    2011-09-01

    3d scanning technologies had a significant development and have been widely used in documentation of cultural, architectural and archeological heritages. Modern methods of three-dimensional acquiring and modeling allow to represent an object through a digital model that combines visual potentialities of images (normally used for documentation) to the accuracy of the survey, becoming at the same time support for the visualization that for metric evaluation of any artefact that have an historical or artistic interest, opening up new possibilities for cultural heritage's fruition, cataloging and study. Despite this development, because of the small catchment area and the 3D laser scanner's sophisticated technologies, the cost of these instruments is very high and beyond the reach of most operators in the field of cultural heritages. This is the reason why they have appeared low-cost technologies or even free, allowing anyone to approach the issues of acquisition and 3D modeling, providing tools that allow to create three-dimensional models in a simple and economical way. The research, conducted by the Laboratory of Photogrammetry of the University IUAV of Venice, of which we present here some results, is intended to figure out whether, with Arc3D, it is possible to obtain results that can be somehow comparable, in therms of overall quality, to those of the laser scanner, and/or whether it is possible to integrate them. They were carried out a series of tests on certain types of objects, models made with Arc3D, from raster images, were compared with those obtained using the point clouds from laser scanner. We have also analyzed the conditions for an optimal use of Arc3D: environmental conditions (lighting), acquisition tools (digital cameras) and type and size of objects. After performing the tests described above, we analyzed the patterns generated by Arc3D to check what other graphic representations can be obtained from them: orthophotos and drawings. The research

  4. A graphic user interface for efficient 3D photo-reconstruction based on free software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael; Gómez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, different studies have stressed the applicability of 3D photo-reconstruction based on Structure from Motion algorithms in a wide range of geoscience applications. For the purpose of image photo-reconstruction, a number of commercial and freely available software packages have been developed (e.g. Agisoft Photoscan, VisualSFM). The workflow involves typically different stages such as image matching, sparse and dense photo-reconstruction, point cloud filtering and georeferencing. For approaches using open and free software, each of these stages usually require different applications. In this communication, we present an easy-to-use graphic user interface (GUI) developed in Matlab® code as a tool for efficient 3D photo-reconstruction making use of powerful existing software: VisualSFM (Wu, 2015) for photo-reconstruction and CloudCompare (Girardeau-Montaut, 2015) for point cloud processing. The GUI performs as a manager of configurations and algorithms, taking advantage of the command line modes of existing software, which allows an intuitive and automated processing workflow for the geoscience user. The GUI includes several additional features: a) a routine for significantly reducing the duration of the image matching operation, normally the most time consuming stage; b) graphical outputs for understanding the overall performance of the algorithm (e.g. camera connectivity, point cloud density); c) a number of useful options typically performed before and after the photo-reconstruction stage (e.g. removal of blurry images, image renaming, vegetation filtering); d) a manager of batch processing for the automated reconstruction of different image datasets. In this study we explore the advantages of this new tool by testing its performance using imagery collected in several soil erosion applications. References Girardeau-Montaut, D. 2015. CloudCompare documentation accessed at http://cloudcompare.org/ Wu, C. 2015. VisualSFM documentation access at http://ccwu.me/vsfm/doc.html#.

  5. Balloon Ascent: 3-D Simulation Tool for the Ascent and Float of High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.

    2005-01-01

    The BalloonAscent balloon flight simulation code represents a from-scratch development using Visual Basic 5 as the software platform. The simulation code is a transient analysis of balloon flight, predicting the skin and gas temperatures along with the 3-D position and velocity in a time and spatially varying environment. There are manual and automated controls for gas valving and the dropping of ballast. Also, there are many handy calculators, such as appropriate free lift, and steady-state thermal solutions with temperature gradients. The strength of this simulation model over others in the past is that the infrared environment is deterministic rather than guessed at. The ground temperature is specified along with the emissivity, which creates a ground level IR environment that is then partially absorbed as it travels upward through the atmosphere to the altitude of the balloon.

  6. Fully 3D Multiple Beam Dynamics Processes Simulation for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has been, until 2010, the premier high-energy physics collider in the world. The data collected over the last decade by high-energy physics experiments running at the Tevatron have been analyzed to make important measurements in fundamental areas such as B meson masses and flavor oscillation, searches for the Higgs boson, and supersymmetry. Collecting these data at the limits of detectability has required the Tevatron to operate reliably at high beam intensities to maximize the number of collisions to analyze. This impressive achievement has been assisted by the use of HPC resources and software provided through the SciDAC program. This paper describes the enhancements to the BeamBeam3d code to realistically simulate the Tevatron, the validation of these simulations, and the improvement in equipment reliability and personal safety achieved with the aid of simulations.

  7. 3D GRMHD and GRPIC Simulations of Disk-Jet Coupling and Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Y.; Watson, M.; Hardee, P.; Fuerst, S.; Wu, K.; Fishman, G.J.; /NASA, Marshall

    2006-12-19

    We investigate jet formation in black-hole systems using 3-D General Relativistic Particle-In-Cell (GRPIC) and 3-D GRMHD simulations. GRPIC simulations, which allow charge separations in a collisionless plasma, do not need to invoke the frozen condition as in GRMHD simulations. 3-D GRPIC simulations show that jets are launched from Kerr black holes as in 3-D GRMHD simulations, but jet formation in the two cases may not be identical. Comparative study of black hole systems with GRPIC and GRMHD simulations with the inclusion of radiate transfer will further clarify the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disk-jet systems.

  8. 3D Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation for laser acupuncture and optimization of illumination parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Fulin; Li, Ting; Pan, Boan; Wang, Pengbo

    2017-02-01

    Laser acupuncture is an effective photochemical and nonthermal stimulation of traditional acupuncture points with lowintensity laser irradiation, which is advantageous in painless, sterile, and safe compared to traditional acupuncture. Laser diode (LD) provides single wavelength and relatively-higher power light for phototherapy. The quantitative effect of illumination parameters of LD in use of laser acupuncture is crucial for practical operation of laser acupuncture. However, this issue is not fully demonstrated, especially since experimental methodologies with animals or human are pretty hard to address to this issue. For example, in order to protect viability of cells and tissue, and get better therapeutic effect, it's necessary to control the output power varied at 5mW 10mW range, while the optimized power is still not clear. This study aimed to quantitatively optimize the laser output power, wavelength, and irradiation direction with highly realistic modeling of light transport in acupunctured tissue. A Monte Carlo Simulation software for 3D vowelized media and the highest-precision human anatomical model Visible Chinese Human (VCH) were employed. Our 3D simulation results showed that longer wavelength/higher illumination power, larger absorption in laser acupuncture; the vertical direction emission of the acupuncture laser results in higher amount of light absorption in both the acupunctured voxel of tissue and muscle layer. Our 3D light distribution of laser acupuncture within VCH tissue model is potential to be used in optimization and real time guidance in clinical manipulation of laser acupuncture.

  9. Cognitive/emotional models for human behavior representation in 3D avatar simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, James K.

    2004-08-01

    Simplified models of human cognition and emotional response are presented which are based on models of auditory/ visual polymodal fusion. At the core of these models is a computational model of Area 37 of the temporal cortex which is based on new isocortex models presented recently by Grossberg. These models are trained using carefully chosen auditory (musical sequences), visual (paintings) and higher level abstract (meta level) data obtained from studies of how optimization strategies are chosen in response to outside managerial inputs. The software modules developed are then used as inputs to character generation codes in standard 3D virtual world simulations. The auditory and visual training data also enable the development of simple music and painting composition generators which significantly enhance one's ability to validate the cognitive model. The cognitive models are handled as interacting software agents implemented as CORBA objects to allow the use of multiple language coding choices (C++, Java, Python etc) and efficient use of legacy code.

  10. Comparison of 3D reconstruction of mandible for pre-operative planning using commercial and open-source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Johari Yap; Omar, Marzuki; Pritam, Helmi Mohd Hadi; Husein, Adam; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    3D printing of mandible is important for pre-operative planning, diagnostic purposes, as well as for education and training. Currently, the processing of CT data is routinely performed with commercial software which increases the cost of operation and patient management for a small clinical setting. Usage of open-source software as an alternative to commercial software for 3D reconstruction of the mandible from CT data is scarce. The aim of this study is to compare two methods of 3D reconstruction of the mandible using commercial Materialise Mimics software and open-source Medical Imaging Interaction Toolkit (MITK) software. Head CT images with a slice thickness of 1 mm and a matrix of 512x512 pixels each were retrieved from the server located at the Radiology Department of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. The CT data were analysed and the 3D models of mandible were reconstructed using both commercial Materialise Mimics and open-source MITK software. Both virtual 3D models were saved in STL format and exported to 3matic and MeshLab software for morphometric and image analyses. Both models were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Hausdorff Distance. No significant differences were obtained between the 3D models of the mandible produced using Mimics and MITK software. The 3D model of the mandible produced using MITK open-source software is comparable to the commercial MIMICS software. Therefore, open-source software could be used in clinical setting for pre-operative planning to minimise the operational cost.

  11. Design and test of a PC-based portable three-dimensional ultrasound software system Ultra3D.

    PubMed

    Xu, X George; Hum Na, Yong; Zhang, Tiantian

    2008-02-01

    Currently, portable ultrasound units lack three-dimensional (3D) image display, limiting their potential usefulness especially under remote and hostile operating environments where information must be intuitive and objective. A freehand 3D image processing and visualization software package, Ultra3D, has been developed and tested, especially to work with a miniaturized linear-array transducer probe that is connected to a laptop PC. This paper presents the software design and method to integrate Ultra3D into Terason's miniaturized SmartProbe for freehand 3D ultrasound imaging. Since images generated by Ultra3D are in a digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format, data sharing with others is easy.

  12. Novel 3D/VR interactive environment for MD simulations, visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Doblack, Benjamin N; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P

    2014-12-18

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced.

  13. Novel 3D/VR Interactive Environment for MD Simulations, Visualization and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Doblack, Benjamin N.; Allis, Tim; Dávila, Lilian P.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing development of computing (hardware and software) in the last decades has impacted scientific research in many fields including materials science, biology, chemistry and physics among many others. A new computational system for the accurate and fast simulation and 3D/VR visualization of nanostructures is presented here, using the open-source molecular dynamics (MD) computer program LAMMPS. This alternative computational method uses modern graphics processors, NVIDIA CUDA technology and specialized scientific codes to overcome processing speed barriers common to traditional computing methods. In conjunction with a virtual reality system used to model materials, this enhancement allows the addition of accelerated MD simulation capability. The motivation is to provide a novel research environment which simultaneously allows visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis. The research goal is to investigate the structure and properties of inorganic nanostructures (e.g., silica glass nanosprings) under different conditions using this innovative computational system. The work presented outlines a description of the 3D/VR Visualization System and basic components, an overview of important considerations such as the physical environment, details on the setup and use of the novel system, a general procedure for the accelerated MD enhancement, technical information, and relevant remarks. The impact of this work is the creation of a unique computational system combining nanoscale materials simulation, visualization and interactivity in a virtual environment, which is both a research and teaching instrument at UC Merced. PMID:25549300

  14. Aeroacoustic Simulations of a Nose Landing Gear with FUN3D: A Grid Refinement Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockard, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A systematic grid refinement study is presented for numerical simulations of a partially-dressed, cavity-closed (PDCC) nose landing gear configuration that was tested in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Mixed-element grids generated using the Pointwise (Registered Trademark) grid generation software are used for numerical simulations. Particular care is taken to ensure quality cells and proper resolution in critical areas of interest in an effort to minimize errors introduced by numerical artifacts. A set of grids was generated in this manner to create a family of uniformly refined grids. The finest grid was then modified to coarsen the wall-normal spacing to create a grid suitable for the wall-function implementation in FUN3D code. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence modeling approach is used for these simulations. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these grids are compared with the measured data. These CFD solutions are used as input to a FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels. The agreement of the computed results with the experimental data improves as the grid is refined.

  15. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Frank, J.; Sol, H.

    1999-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state or in hydrostatic equilibrium) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system. We will investigate how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation.

  16. 3-D General Relativistic MHD Simulations of Generating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Koide, S.; Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.; Sol, H.; Hughes, J. P.

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of an accretion disk around Schwarzschild black holes initially threaded by a uniform poloidal magnetic field in a non-rotating corona (either in a steady-state infalling state) around a non-rotating black hole using a 3-D GRMHD with the ``axisymmetry'' along the z-direction. Magnetic field is tightly twisted by the rotation of the disk, and plasmas in the shocked region of the disk are accelerated by J x B force to form bipolar relativistic jets. In order to investigate variabilities of generated relativistic jets and magnetic field structure inside jets, we have performed calculations using the 3-D GRMHD code with a full 3-dimensional system. We will investigate how the third dimension affects the global disk dynamics and jet generation.

  17. DREAM3D simulations of inner-belt dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Gregory Scott

    2015-05-26

    A 1973 paper by Lyons and Thorne explains the two-belt structure for electrons in the inner magnetosphere as a balance between inward radial diffusion and loss to the atmosphere, where the loss to the atmosphere is enabled by pitch-angle scattering from Coulomb and wave-particle interactions. In the 1973 paper, equilibrium solutions to a decoupled set of 1D radial diffusion equations, one for each value of the first invariant of motion, μ, were computed to produce the equilibrium two-belt structure. Each 1D radial diffusion equation incorporated an L-and μ-dependent `lifetime' due to the Coulomb and wave-particle interactions. This decoupling of the problem is appropriate under the assumption that radial diffusion is slow in comparison to pitch-angle scattering. However, for some values of μ and L the lifetime associated with pitch-angle scattering is comparable to the timescale associated with radial diffusion, suggesting that the true equilibrium solutions might reflect `coupled modes' involving pitch-angle scattering and radial diffusion and thus requiring a 3D diffusion model. In the work we show here, we have computed the equilibrium solutions using our 3D diffusion model, DREAM3D, that allows for such coupling. We find that the 3D equilibrium solutions are quite similar to the solutions shown in the 1973 paper when we use the same physical models for radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering from hiss. However, we show that the equilibrium solutions are quite sensitive to various aspects of the physics model employed in the 1973 paper that can be improved, suggesting that additional work needs to be done to understand the two-belt structure.

  18. Method and simulation to study 3D crosstalk perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaustova, Dar'ya; Blondé, Laurent; Huynh-Thu, Quan; Vienne, Cyril; Doyen, Didier

    2012-03-01

    To various degrees, all modern 3DTV displays suffer from crosstalk, which can lead to a decrease of both visual quality and visual comfort, and also affect perception of depth. In the absence of a perfect 3D display technology, crosstalk has to be taken into account when studying perception of 3D stereoscopic content. In order to improve 3D presentation systems and understand how to efficiently eliminate crosstalk, it is necessary to understand its impact on human perception. In this paper, we present a practical method to study the perception of crosstalk. The approach consists of four steps: (1) physical measurements of a 3DTV, (2) building of a crosstalk surface based on those measurements and representing specifically the behavior of that 3TV, (3) manipulation of the crosstalk function and application on reference images to produce test images degraded by crosstalk in various ways, and (4) psychophysical tests. Our approach allows both a realistic representation of the behavior of a 3DTV and the easy manipulation of its resulting crosstalk in order to conduct psycho-visual experiments. Our approach can be used in all studies requiring the understanding of how crosstalk affects perception of stereoscopic content and how it can be corrected efficiently.

  19. A software tool for automatic classification and segmentation of 2D/3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Michal; Szczypinski, Piotr; Materka, Andrzej; Klepaczko, Artur

    2013-02-01

    Modern medical diagnosis utilizes techniques of visualization of human internal organs (CT, MRI) or of its metabolism (PET). However, evaluation of acquired images made by human experts is usually subjective and qualitative only. Quantitative analysis of MR data, including tissue classification and segmentation, is necessary to perform e.g. attenuation compensation, motion detection, and correction of partial volume effect in PET images, acquired with PET/MR scanners. This article presents briefly a MaZda software package, which supports 2D and 3D medical image analysis aiming at quantification of image texture. MaZda implements procedures for evaluation, selection and extraction of highly discriminative texture attributes combined with various classification, visualization and segmentation tools. Examples of MaZda application in medical studies are also provided.

  20. Recent Developments in the VISRAD 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, Joseph; Woodruff, P.; Golovkin, I.

    2011-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e . g . , that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. VISRAD includes a variety of user-friendly graphics for setting up targets and displaying results, can readily display views from any point in space, and can be used to generate image sequences for animations. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  1. Simulating A Factory Via Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Zhang, Shou X.; Tseng, Fan T.

    1990-01-01

    Software system generates simulation program from user's responses to questions. AMPS/PC system is simulation software tool designed to aid user in defining specifications of manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for target simulation language, GPSS/PC. Domain of problems AMPS/PC simulates is that of manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. Written in Turbo Pascal Version 4.

  2. Bragg Grating Simulation Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Organisation DSTO-TN-0800 ABSTRACT (U) This document is a user manual for a software application that predicts the complex reflection spectrum of...fibre Bragg gratings, given user defined input parameters. The software is designed primarily to complement the joint DSTO/Swinburne grating writing

  3. Simulating the Cortical 3D Visuomotor Transformation of Reach Depth

    PubMed Central

    Blohm, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    We effortlessly perform reach movements to objects in different directions and depths. However, how networks of cortical neurons compute reach depth from binocular visual inputs remains largely unknown. To bridge the gap between behavior and neurophysiology, we trained a feed-forward artificial neural network to uncover potential mechanisms that might underlie the 3D transformation of reach depth. Our physiologically-inspired 4-layer network receives distributed 3D visual inputs (1st layer) along with eye, head and vergence signals. The desired motor plan was coded in a population (3rd layer) that we read out (4th layer) using an optimal linear estimator. After training, our network was able to reproduce all known single-unit recording evidence on depth coding in the parietal cortex. Network analyses predict the presence of eye/head and vergence changes of depth tuning, pointing towards a gain-modulation mechanism of depth transformation. In addition, reach depth was computed directly from eye-centered (relative) visual distances, without explicit absolute depth coding. We suggest that these effects should be observable in parietal and pre-motor areas. PMID:22815979

  4. TEMPUS: Simulating personnel and tasks in a 3-D environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Korein, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The latest TEMPUS installation occurred in March, 1985. Another update is slated for early June, 1985. An updated User's Manual is in preparation and will be delivered approximately mid-June, 1985. NASA JSC has full source code listings and internal documentation for installed software. NASA JSC staff has received instruction in the use of TEMPUS. Telephone consultations have augmented on-site instruction.

  5. IGMAS+ a new 3D Gravity, FTG and Magnetic Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Schmidt, Sabine; Fichler, Christine; Planka, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Modern geophysical interpretation requires an interdisciplinary approach, particularly when considering the available amount of 'state of the art' information contained in comprehensive data bases. A combination of different geophysical surveys employing seismics, gravity and geoelectrics, together with geological and petrological studies, can provide new insights into the structures and tectonic evolution of the lithosphere and natural deposits. Interdisciplinary interpretation is essential for any numerical modelling of these structures and the processes acting on them Three-dimensional (3D) interactive modeling with the IGMAS+ software provides means for integrated processing and interpretation of geoid, gravity and magnetic fields and their gradients (full tensor), yielding improved geological interpretation. IGMAS+ is an acronym standing for "Interactive Geophysical Modelling Application System". It bases on the existing software IGMAS (http://www.gravity.uni-kiel.de/igmas), a tool developed during the past twenty years for potential field modelling. The new IGMAS+, however, will comprise the advantages of the "old" IGMAS (e.g. flexible geometry concept and a fast and stable algorithm) with automated interpretation tools and a modern graphical GUI based on leading edge insights from psychological computer graphics research and thus provide optimal man machine communication. IGMAS+ fully three-dimensional models are constructed using triangulated polyhedra and/or triangulated grids, to which constant density and/or induced and remanent susceptibility are assigned. Interactive modifications of model parameters (geometry, density, susceptibility, magnetization), access to the numerical modeling process, and direct visualization of both calculated and measured fields of gravity and magnetics, enable the interpreter to design the model as realistically as possible. IGMAS+ allows easy integration of constraining data into interactive modeling processes

  6. IGMAS+ A New 3D Gravity, FTG and Magnetic Modeling Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, H.; Schmidt, S.; Fichler, C.; Alvers, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    Modern geophysical interpretation requires an interdisciplinary approach, particularly when considering the available amount of 'state of the art' information contained in comprehensive data bases. A combination of different geophysical surveys employing seismics, gravity and geoelectrics, together with geological and petrological studies, can provide new insights into the structures and tectonic evolution of the lithosphere and natural deposits. Interdisciplinary interpretation is essential for any numerical modelling of these structures and the processes acting on them. Three-dimensional (3D) interactive modeling with the IGMAS+ software provides means for integrated processing and interpretation of geoid, gravity and magnetic fields and their gradients (full tensor), yielding improved geological interpretation. IGMAS+ is an acronym standing for "Interactive Geophysical Modelling Application System". It bases on the existing software IGMAS (http://www.gravity.uni-kiel.de/igmas), a tool developed during the past twenty years for potential field modelling. The new IGMAS+, however, will comprise the advantages of the "old" IGMAS (e.g. flexible geometry concept and a fast and stable algorithm) with automated interpretation tools and a modern graphical GUI based on leading edge insights from psychological computer graphics research and thus provide optimal man machine communication. IGMAS+ fully three-dimensional models are constructed using triangulated polyhedra and/or triangulated grids, to which constant density and/or induced and remanent susceptibility are assigned. Interactive modifications of model parameters (geometry, density, susceptibility, magnetization), access to the numerical modeling process, and direct visualization of both calculated and measured fields of gravity and magnetics, enable the interpreter to design the model as realistically as possible. IGMAS+ allows easy integration of constraining data into interactive modeling processes

  7. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  8. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  9. 3D stress field simulation for Greater Munich, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna Maria; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Geotechnical applications such as tunneling, storage of waste, wellbore planning, or reservoir engineering requires detailed 3D information on the rock properties and behavior of the continuum. One of the key parameters is the contemporary crustal in-situ stress state. However, generally the availability of stress data on reservoir scale is scarce or no data exists at all. Furthermore, stress data is often limited to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress. Hence, geomechanical-numerical modelling provides an approximation of a continuous description of the 3D in-situ stress state. We present a model workflow that shows (1) how to calibrate a regional scale model of Greater Munich with stress orientations and magnitudes mainly from borehole data and (2) how to derive from the regional model boundary conditions for a local high-resolution model of a geothermal reservoir site. This approach using two models is an alternative to the required trade-off between resolution, computational cost and a sufficient number of calibration data which is otherwise inevitable for a single model. The incorporated 3D geological models contain the topography from a digital elevation model and 6 stratigraphic units with different elasto-plastic rock properties. The local model mimics the area of a planned reservoir and its resolution is significantly higher than in the regional model and down to 10 m near the planned borehole trajectories using 21×106 tetrahedron finite elements with linear approximation functions. The uncertainties of the calibrated regional model are large since no information on the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress is available. Even in the entire Greater Munich area only two reliable leak-off tests that deliver the magnitude of the minimum horizontal stress could be used. These uncertainties are transferred also to the local model. Hence we also show how to quantify for the workflow in general the systematic uncertainties and discuss

  10. Building a 3D Virtual Liver: Methods for Simulating Blood Flow and Hepatic Clearance on 3D Structures

    PubMed Central

    Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatio-temporal modeling approach to describe blood and drug flow, as well as drug uptake and elimination, on an approximation of the liver. Extending on previously developed computational approaches, we generate an approximation of a liver, which consists of a portal and hepatic vein vasculature structure, embedded in the surrounding liver tissue. The vasculature is generated via constrained constructive optimization, and then converted to a spatial grid of a selected grid size. Estimates for surrounding upscaled lobule tissue properties are then presented appropriate to the same grid size. Simulation of fluid flow and drug metabolism (hepatic clearance) are completed using discretized forms of the relevant convective-diffusive-reactive partial differential equations for these processes. This results in a single stage, uniformly consistent method to simulate equations for blood and drug flow, as well as drug metabolism, on a 3D structure representative of a liver. PMID:27649537

  11. Building a 3D Virtual Liver: Methods for Simulating Blood Flow and Hepatic Clearance on 3D Structures.

    PubMed

    White, Diana; Coombe, Dennis; Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatio-temporal modeling approach to describe blood and drug flow, as well as drug uptake and elimination, on an approximation of the liver. Extending on previously developed computational approaches, we generate an approximation of a liver, which consists of a portal and hepatic vein vasculature structure, embedded in the surrounding liver tissue. The vasculature is generated via constrained constructive optimization, and then converted to a spatial grid of a selected grid size. Estimates for surrounding upscaled lobule tissue properties are then presented appropriate to the same grid size. Simulation of fluid flow and drug metabolism (hepatic clearance) are completed using discretized forms of the relevant convective-diffusive-reactive partial differential equations for these processes. This results in a single stage, uniformly consistent method to simulate equations for blood and drug flow, as well as drug metabolism, on a 3D structure representative of a liver.

  12. WEB downloadable software for training in cardiovascular hemodynamics in the (3-D) stress echo lab.

    PubMed

    Bombardini, Tonino; Cini, Davide; Arpesella, Giorgio; Picano, Eugenio

    2010-11-13

    When a physiological (exercise) stress echo is scheduled, interest focuses on wall motion segmental contraction abnormalities to diagnose ischemic response to stress, and on left ventricular ejection fraction to assess contractile reserve. Echocardiographic evaluation of volumes (plus standard assessment of heart rate and blood pressure) is ideally suited for the quantitative and accurate calculation of a set of parameters allowing a complete characterization of cardiovascular hemodynamics (including cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance), left ventricular elastance (mirroring left ventricular contractility, theoretically independent of preload and afterload changes heavily affecting the ejection fraction), arterial elastance, ventricular arterial coupling (a central determinant of net cardiovascular performance in normal and pathological conditions), and diastolic function (through the diastolic mean filling rate). All these parameters were previously inaccessible, inaccurate or labor-intensive and now become, at least in principle, available in the stress echocardiography laboratory since all of them need an accurate estimation of left ventricular volumes and stroke volume, easily derived from 3 D echo. Aims of this paper are: 1) to propose a simple method to assess a set of parameters allowing a complete characterization of cardiovascular hemodynamics in the stress echo lab, from basic measurements to calculations 2) to propose a simple, web-based software program, to learn and training calculations as a phantom of the everyday activity in the busy stress echo lab 3) to show examples of software testing in a way that proves its value.The informatics infrastructure is available on the web, linking to http://cctrainer.ifc.cnr.it.

  13. 3D visualization software to analyze topological outcomes of topoisomerase reactions

    PubMed Central

    Darcy, I. K.; Scharein, R. G.; Stasiak, A.

    2008-01-01

    The action of various DNA topoisomerases frequently results in characteristic changes in DNA topology. Important information for understanding mechanistic details of action of these topoisomerases can be provided by investigating the knot types resulting from topoisomerase action on circular DNA forming a particular knot type. Depending on the topological bias of a given topoisomerase reaction, one observes different subsets of knotted products. To establish the character of topological bias, one needs to be aware of all possible topological outcomes of intersegmental passages occurring within a given knot type. However, it is not trivial to systematically enumerate topological outcomes of strand passage from a given knot type. We present here a 3D visualization software (TopoICE-X in KnotPlot) that incorporates topological analysis methods in order to visualize, for example, knots that can be obtained from a given knot by one intersegmental passage. The software has several other options for the topological analysis of mechanisms of action of various topoisomerases. PMID:18440983

  14. Evaluating Dense 3d Reconstruction Software Packages for Oblique Monitoring of Crop Canopy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, S.; Bareth, G.

    2016-06-01

    Crop Surface Models (CSMs) are 2.5D raster surfaces representing absolute plant canopy height. Using multiple CMSs generated from data acquired at multiple time steps, a crop surface monitoring is enabled. This makes it possible to monitor crop growth over time and can be used for monitoring in-field crop growth variability which is useful in the context of high-throughput phenotyping. This study aims to evaluate several software packages for dense 3D reconstruction from multiple overlapping RGB images on field and plot-scale. A summer barley field experiment located at the Campus Klein-Altendorf of University of Bonn was observed by acquiring stereo images from an oblique angle using consumer-grade smart cameras. Two such cameras were mounted at an elevation of 10 m and acquired images for a period of two months during the growing period of 2014. The field experiment consisted of nine barley cultivars that were cultivated in multiple repetitions and nitrogen treatments. Manual plant height measurements were carried out at four dates during the observation period. The software packages Agisoft PhotoScan, VisualSfM with CMVS/PMVS2 and SURE are investigated. The point clouds are georeferenced through a set of ground control points. Where adequate results are reached, a statistical analysis is performed.

  15. Low-cost real-time 3D PC distributed-interactive-simulation (DIS) application for C4I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonthier, David L.; Veron, Harry

    1998-04-01

    A 3D Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) application was developed and demonstrated in a PC environment. The application is capable of running in the stealth mode or as a player which includes battlefield simulations, such as ModSAF. PCs can be clustered together, but not necessarily collocated, to run a simulation or training exercise on their own. A 3D perspective view of the battlefield is displayed that includes terrain, trees, buildings and other objects supported by the DIS application. Screen update rates of 15 to 20 frames per second have been achieved with fully lit and textured scenes thus providing high quality and fast graphics. A complete PC system can be configured for under $2,500. The software runs under Windows95 and WindowsNT. It is written in C++ and uses a commercial API called RenderWare for 3D rendering. The software uses Microsoft Foundation classes and Microsoft DirectPlay for joystick input. The RenderWare libraries enhance the performance through optimization for MMX and the Pentium Pro processor. The RenderWare and the Righteous 3D graphics board from Orchid Technologies with an advertised rendering rate of up to 2 million texture mapped triangles per second. A low-cost PC DIS simulator that can partake in a real-time collaborative simulation with other platforms is thus achieved.

  16. DREAM3D simulations of inner-belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, G.

    2015-12-01

    A 1973 paper by Lyons and Thorne explains the two-belt structure for electrons in the inner magnetosphere as a balance between inward radial diffusion and loss to the atmosphere due to pitch-angle scattering from Coulomb and VLF wave-particle interactions. In this paper, equilibrium solutions to a set of 1D radial diffusion equations, one for each value of the first invariant of motion, μ, were computed to produce the equilibrium structure. Each diffusion equation incorporated an L- and μ-dependent `lifetime' due to the Coulomb and wave-particle interactions. This model is appropriate under the assumption that radial diffusion is slow in comparison to pitch-angle scattering, and that there is no acceleration caused by the VLF wave-particle interactions. We have revisited this model using our DREAM3D 3D diffusion code, which allows the user to explicitly model the diffusion in pitch-angle and momentum rather than using a lifetime. We find that a) replacing the lifetimes with an explicit model of pitch-angle diffusion, thus allowing for coupling between radial and pitch-angle diffusion, affects the equilibrium structure, and b) over the long time scales needed to reach equilibrium, significant acceleration due to VLF wave particle interactions takes place due to the 'cross-terms' in pitch-angle and momentum and the sharp gradient in the equilibrium pitch-angle distributions. We also find that the equilibrium solutions are quite sensitive to various aspects of the physics model employed in the 1973 paper that can be improved, suggesting that additional work needs to be done to fully understand the equilibirum nature of the trapped electron radiation belts.

  17. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  18. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  19. 3-D Simulations of NSTAR Ion Thruster Plasma Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Brophy, J.; Polk, J.; Brinza, D.

    1996-01-01

    Described is a Particle-in-Cell with Monte Carlo Collision code developed to perform detailed three-dimensional ion thruster simulations. To capture the full kinetic behavior of ion thruster plumes, both the electrons and ions are treated as test particles. Simulation results are given of the NSTAR ion thruster under ground test and in space conditions. Numerical results are compared.

  20. Efficient 3D rendering for web-based medical imaging software: a proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Medical Imaging Software (MIS) found in research and in clinical practice, such as in Picture and Archiving Communication Systems (PACS) and Radiology Information Systems (RIS), has not been able to take full advantage of the Internet as a deployment platform. MIS is usually tightly coupled to algorithms that have substantial hardware and software requirements. Consequently, MIS is deployed on thick clients which usually leads project managers to allocate more resources during the deployment phase of the application than the resources that would be allocated if the application were deployed through a web interface.To minimize the costs associated with this scenario, many software providers use or develop plug-ins to provide the delivery platform (internet browser) with the features to load, interact and analyze medical images. Nevertheless there has not been a successful standard means to achieve this goal so far. This paper presents a study of WebGL as an alternative to plug-in development for efficient rendering of 3D medical models and DICOM images. WebGL is a technology that enables the internet browser to have access to the local graphics hardware in a native fashion. Because it is based in OpenGL, a widely accepted graphic industry standard, WebGL is being implemented in most of the major commercial browsers. After a discussion on the details of the technology, a series of experiments are presented to determine the operational boundaries in which WebGL is adequate for MIS. A comparison with current alternatives is also addressed. Finally conclusions and future work are discussed.

  1. Simple 3-D stimulus for motion parallax and its simulation.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroshi; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; D'Amour, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Simulation of a given stimulus situation should produce the same perception as the original. Rogers et al (2009 Perception 38 907-911) simulated Wheeler's (1982, PhD thesis, Rutgers University, NJ) motion parallax stimulus and obtained quite different perceptions. Wheeler's observers were unable to reliably report the correct direction of depth, whereas Rogers's were. With three experiments we explored the possible reasons for the discrepancy. Our results suggest that Rogers was able to see depth from the simulation partly due to his experience seeing depth with random dot surfaces.

  2. 3-D massively parallel impact simulations using PCTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Robinson, A.C.

    1992-12-31

    Simulations of hypervelocity impact problems are performed frequently by government laboratories and contractors for armor/anti-armor applications. These simulations need to deal with shock wave physics phenomena, large material deformation, motion of debris particles and complex geometries. As a result, memory and processing time requirements are large for detailed, three-dimensional calculations. The large massively parallel supercomputing systems of the future will provide the power necessary to greatly reduce simulation times currently required by shared-memory, vector supercomputers. This paper gives an introduction to PCTH, a next-generation shock wave physics code which is being built at Sandia National Laboratories for massively parallel supercomputers, and demonstrates that massively parallel hydrocodes, such as PCTH, can provide highly-detailed, three-dimensional simulations of armor/anti-armor systems.

  3. 3-D massively parallel impact simulations using PCTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Robinson, A.C.

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of hypervelocity impact problems are performed frequently by government laboratories and contractors for armor/anti-armor applications. These simulations need to deal with shock wave physics phenomena, large material deformation, motion of debris particles and complex geometries. As a result, memory and processing time requirements are large for detailed, three-dimensional calculations. The large massively parallel supercomputing systems of the future will provide the power necessary to greatly reduce simulation times currently required by shared-memory, vector supercomputers. This paper gives an introduction to PCTH, a next-generation shock wave physics code which is being built at Sandia National Laboratories for massively parallel supercomputers, and demonstrates that massively parallel hydrocodes, such as PCTH, can provide highly-detailed, three-dimensional simulations of armor/anti-armor systems.

  4. 3D Hydrodynamic Simulation of Classical Novae Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Coleman J.

    2015-01-01

    This project investigates the formation and lifecycle of classical novae and determines how parameters such as: white dwarf mass, star mass and separation affect the evolution of the rotating binary system. These parameters affect the accretion rate, frequency of the nova explosions and light curves. Each particle in the simulation represents a volume of hydrogen gas and are initialized randomly in the outer shell of the companion star. The forces on each particle include: gravity, centrifugal, coriolis, friction, and Langevin. The friction and Langevin forces are used to model the viscosity and internal pressure of the gas. A velocity Verlet method with a one second time step is used to compute velocities and positions of the particles. A new particle recycling method was developed which was critical for computing an accurate and stable accretion rate and keeping the particle count reasonable. I used C++ and OpenCL to create my simulations and ran them on two Nvidia GTX580s. My simulations used up to 1 million particles and required up to 10 hours to complete. My simulation results for novae U Scorpii and DD Circinus are consistent with professional hydrodynamic simulations and observed experimental data (light curves and outburst frequencies). When the white dwarf mass is increased, the time between explosions decreases dramatically. My model was used to make the first prediction for the next outburst of nova DD Circinus. My simulations also show that the companion star blocks the expanding gas shell leading to an asymmetrical expanding shell.

  5. Modeling Airport Ground Operations using Discrete Event Simulation (DES) and X3D Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    studies, because it offers a number of features as for example: 12 1. Open source 2. Character animation support (CAL3D) 3. Game engine with...Simulation, DES, Simkit, Diskit, Viskit, Savage, XML, Distributed Interactive Simulation, DIS, Blender , X3D Edit 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...10 5. Blender Authoring Tool

  6. Enhancing Pre-Service Teachers' Awareness to Pupils' Test-Anxiety with 3D Immersive Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passig, David; Moshe, Ronit

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether participating in a 3D immersive virtual reality world simulating the experience of test-anxiety would affect preservice teachers' awareness to the phenomenon. Ninety subjects participated in this study, and were divided into three groups. The experimental group experienced a 3D immersive simulation which made…

  7. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  8. Simulated and Real Sheet-of-Light 3D Object Scanning Using a-Si:H Thin Film PSD Arrays.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Tornero, Josep; Ferreira, Isabel; Martins, Rodrigo; Gomes, Luis; Fortunato, Elvira

    2015-11-30

    A MATLAB/SIMULINK software simulation model (structure and component blocks) has been constructed in order to view and analyze the potential of the PSD (Position Sensitive Detector) array concept technology before it is further expanded or developed. This simulation allows changing most of its parameters, such as the number of elements in the PSD array, the direction of vision, the viewing/scanning angle, the object rotation, translation, sample/scan/simulation time, etc. In addition, results show for the first time the possibility of scanning an object in 3D when using an a-Si:H thin film 128 PSD array sensor and hardware/software system. Moreover, this sensor technology is able to perform these scans and render 3D objects at high speeds and high resolutions when using a sheet-of-light laser within a triangulation platform. As shown by the simulation, a substantial enhancement in 3D object profile image quality and realism can be achieved by increasing the number of elements of the PSD array sensor as well as by achieving an optimal position response from the sensor since clearly the definition of the 3D object profile depends on the correct and accurate position response of each detector as well as on the size of the PSD array.

  9. Simulated and Real Sheet-of-Light 3D Object Scanning Using a-Si:H Thin Film PSD Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Javier; Tornero, Josep; Ferreira, Isabel; Martins, Rodrigo; Gomes, Luis; Fortunato, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    A MATLAB/SIMULINK software simulation model (structure and component blocks) has been constructed in order to view and analyze the potential of the PSD (Position Sensitive Detector) array concept technology before it is further expanded or developed. This simulation allows changing most of its parameters, such as the number of elements in the PSD array, the direction of vision, the viewing/scanning angle, the object rotation, translation, sample/scan/simulation time, etc. In addition, results show for the first time the possibility of scanning an object in 3D when using an a-Si:H thin film 128 PSD array sensor and hardware/software system. Moreover, this sensor technology is able to perform these scans and render 3D objects at high speeds and high resolutions when using a sheet-of-light laser within a triangulation platform. As shown by the simulation, a substantial enhancement in 3D object profile image quality and realism can be achieved by increasing the number of elements of the PSD array sensor as well as by achieving an optimal position response from the sensor since clearly the definition of the 3D object profile depends on the correct and accurate position response of each detector as well as on the size of the PSD array. PMID:26633403

  10. A Comprehensive Software System for Interactive, Real-time, Visual 3D Deterministic and Stochastic Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2002-05-01

    Taking advantage of the recent developments in groundwater modeling research and computer, image and graphics processing, and objected oriented programming technologies, Dr. Li and his research group have recently developed a comprehensive software system for unified deterministic and stochastic groundwater modeling. Characterized by a new real-time modeling paradigm and improved computational algorithms, the software simulates 3D unsteady flow and reactive transport in general groundwater formations subject to both systematic and "randomly" varying stresses and geological and chemical heterogeneity. The software system has following distinct features and capabilities: Interactive simulation and real time visualization and animation of flow in response to deterministic as well as stochastic stresses. Interactive, visual, and real time particle tracking, random walk, and reactive plume modeling in both systematically and randomly fluctuating flow. Interactive statistical inference, scattered data interpolation, regression, and ordinary and universal Kriging, conditional and unconditional simulation. Real-time, visual and parallel conditional flow and transport simulations. Interactive water and contaminant mass balance analysis and visual and real-time flux update. Interactive, visual, and real time monitoring of head and flux hydrographs and concentration breakthroughs. Real-time modeling and visualization of aquifer transition from confined to unconfined to partially de-saturated or completely dry and rewetting Simultaneous and embedded subscale models, automatic and real-time regional to local data extraction; Multiple subscale flow and transport models Real-time modeling of steady and transient vertical flow patterns on multiple arbitrarily-shaped cross-sections and simultaneous visualization of aquifer stratigraphy, properties, hydrological features (rivers, lakes, wetlands, wells, drains, surface seeps), and dynamically adjusted surface flooding area

  11. 3D MHD Simulations of Stratified Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James M.; Hawley, John F.; Gammie, Charles

    1993-12-01

    We investigate the growth and nonlinear saturation of a powerful local shear instability in weakly magnetised accretion disks using three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. To achieve a sufficiently high numerical resolution, we use a local approximation for the disk and carry out the simulations on massively parallel supercomputers. Here we investigate the linear growth and nonlinear saturation of the instability in a vertically stratified, intially isothermal disk. A variety of initial field configurations and strengths are considered. The simulations allow a quantitative analysis of the role of bouyancy as a saturation mechanism, and possible dynamo action in the disk. This work is partially supported by NSF grant PHY-9018251 and NASA grants NAGW-1510 and NAGW-2376. Code development is supported by the NASA HPCC Initiative through grant NAG5-2202. Computations were carried out on the CM200 system of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

  12. SIERRA - A 3-D device simulator for reliability modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jue-Hsien; Arledge, Lawrence A., Jr.; Yang, Ping; Maeda, John T.

    1989-05-01

    SIERRA is a three-dimensional general-purpose semiconductor-device simulation program which serves as a foundation for investigating integrated-circuit (IC) device and reliability issues. This program solves the Poisson and continuity equations in silicon under dc, transient, and small-signal conditions. Executing on a vector/parallel minisupercomputer, SIERRA utilizes a matrix solver which uses an incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioned conjugate gradient square (CGS, BCG) method. The ILU-CGS method provides a good compromise between memory size and convergence rate. The authors have observed a 5x to 7x speedup over standard direct methods in simulations of transient problems containing highly coupled Poisson and continuity equations such as those found in reliability-oriented simulations. The application of SIERRA to parasitic CMOS latchup and dynamic random-access memory single-event-upset studies is described.

  13. 3D Simulations of methane convective storms on Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Titan has opened an unprecedented opportunity to study the atmosphere of this satellite. Under the pressure-temperature conditions on Titan, methane, a large atmospheric component amounting perhaps to a 3-5% of the atmosphere, is close to its triple point, potentially playing a similar role as water on Earth. The Huygens probe has shown a terrain shaped by erosion of probably liquid origin, suggestive of past rain. On the other hand, Voyager IRIS spectroscopic observations of Titan imply a saturated atmosphere of methane (amounting perhaps to 150 covered by methane clouds, if we think on Earth meteorology. However, observations from Earth and Cassini have shown that clouds are localized, transient and fast evolving, in particular in the South Pole (currently in its summer season). This might imply a lack of widespread presence on Titan of nuclei where methane could initiate condensation and particle growth with subsequent precipitation. We investigate different scenarios of moist convective storms on Titan using a complete 3D atmospheric model that incorporates a full microphysics treatment required to study cloud formation processes under a saturated atmosphere with low concentration of condensation nuclei. We study local convective development under a variety of atmospheric conditions: sub-saturation, super-saturation, abundances of condensation nuclei fall, condensation nuclei lifted from the ground or gently falling from the stratosphere. We show that under the appropriate circumstances, precipitation rates comparable to typical tropical storms on Earth can be found. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  14. Status of the phenomena representation, 3D modeling, and cloud-based software architecture development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis L.; Prescott, Steven; Kvarfordt, Kellie; Sampath, Ram; Larson, Katie

    2015-09-01

    Early in 2013, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory outlined a technical framework to support the implementation of state-of-the-art probabilistic risk assessment to predict the safety performance of advanced small modular reactors. From that vision of the advanced framework for risk analysis, specific tasks have been underway in order to implement the framework. This report discusses the current development of a several tasks related to the framework implementation, including a discussion of a 3D physics engine that represents the motion of objects (including collision and debris modeling), cloud-based analysis tools such as a Bayesian-inference engine, and scenario simulations. These tasks were performed during 2015 as part of the technical work associated with the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  15. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  16. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  17. 3-D MHD disk wind simulations of protostellar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid; Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disk winds for different initial magnetic field configurations. The jets are followed from the source to distances, which are resolvable by HST and ALMA observations. Our simulations show that jets are heated along their length by many shocks. The mass of the protostar is a free parameter that can be inserted in the post processing of the data, and we apply the simulations to both low mass and high mass protostars. For the latter we also compute the expected diagnostics when the outflow is photoionized by the protostar. We compute the emission lines that are produced, and find excellent agreement with observations. For a one solar mass protostar, we find the jet width to be between 20 and 30 au while the maximum velocities perpendicular to the jet are found to be 100 km s-1. The initially less open magnetic field configuration simulations result in a wider, two-component jet; a cylindrically shaped outer jet surrounding a narrow and much faster, inner jet. For the initially most open magnetic field configuration the kink mode creates a narrow corkscrew-like jet without a clear Keplerian rotation profile and even regions where we observe rotation opposite to the disk (counter-rotating). This is not seen in the less open field configurations.

  18. WEB downloadable software for training in cardiovascular hemodynamics in the (3-D) stress echo lab

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    When a physiological (exercise) stress echo is scheduled, interest focuses on wall motion segmental contraction abnormalities to diagnose ischemic response to stress, and on left ventricular ejection fraction to assess contractile reserve. Echocardiographic evaluation of volumes (plus standard assessment of heart rate and blood pressure) is ideally suited for the quantitative and accurate calculation of a set of parameters allowing a complete characterization of cardiovascular hemodynamics (including cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance), left ventricular elastance (mirroring left ventricular contractility, theoretically independent of preload and afterload changes heavily affecting the ejection fraction), arterial elastance, ventricular arterial coupling (a central determinant of net cardiovascular performance in normal and pathological conditions), and diastolic function (through the diastolic mean filling rate). All these parameters were previously inaccessible, inaccurate or labor-intensive and now become, at least in principle, available in the stress echocardiography laboratory since all of them need an accurate estimation of left ventricular volumes and stroke volume, easily derived from 3 D echo. Aims of this paper are: 1) to propose a simple method to assess a set of parameters allowing a complete characterization of cardiovascular hemodynamics in the stress echo lab, from basic measurements to calculations 2) to propose a simple, web-based software program, to learn and training calculations as a phantom of the everyday activity in the busy stress echo lab 3) to show examples of software testing in a way that proves its value. The informatics infrastructure is available on the web, linking to http://cctrainer.ifc.cnr.it PMID:21073738

  19. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D.

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Mellor-Crummy, J.; DeVries, M.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Ma, K. L.; Podhorski, N.; Liao, W. K.; Klasky, S.; de Supinski, B.; Choudhary, A.; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air co-flow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  20. Terascale direct numerical simulations of turbulent combustion using S3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Choudhary, A.; de Supinski, B.; DeVries, M.; Hawkes, E. R.; Klasky, S.; Liao, W. K.; Ma, K. L.; Mellor-Crummey, J.; Podhorszki, N.; Sankaran, R.; Shende, S.; Yoo, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational science is paramount to the understanding of underlying processes in internal combustion engines of the future that will utilize non-petroleum-based alternative fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and burn in new combustion regimes that will attain high efficiency while minimizing emissions of particulates and nitrogen oxides. Next-generation engines will likely operate at higher pressures, with greater amounts of dilution and utilize alternative fuels that exhibit a wide range of chemical and physical properties. Therefore, there is a significant role for high-fidelity simulations, direct numerical simulations (DNS), specifically designed to capture key turbulence-chemistry interactions in these relatively uncharted combustion regimes, and in particular, that can discriminate the effects of differences in fuel properties. In DNS, all of the relevant turbulence and flame scales are resolved numerically using high-order accurate numerical algorithms. As a consequence terascale DNS are computationally intensive, require massive amounts of computing power and generate tens of terabytes of data. Recent results from terascale DNS of turbulent flames are presented here, illustrating its role in elucidating flame stabilization mechanisms in a lifted turbulent hydrogen/air jet flame in a hot air coflow, and the flame structure of a fuel-lean turbulent premixed jet flame. Computing at this scale requires close collaborations between computer and combustion scientists to provide optimized scaleable algorithms and software for terascale simulations, efficient collective parallel I/O, tools for volume visualization of multiscale, multivariate data and automating the combustion workflow. The enabling computer science, applied to combustion science, is also required in many other terascale physics and engineering simulations. In particular, performance monitoring is used to identify the performance of key kernels in the DNS code, S3D and especially memory

  1. 3D simulation of drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Desjardins, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    In this talk, an efficient numerical approach to simulate liquid-gas flows with moving contact lines is presented, then employed to investigate drop impact on a horizontal fiber. This approach combines a conservative level set method to capture the interface, an immersed boundary method to represent the curved boundary, and a curvature boundary method to treat the contact line. Simulations of drop-fiber impact are compared with experimental results with perticular focus on two key aspects: the critical velocity for a drop to be captured by a fiber, and the topology of the impacting drop. Numerical results show good agreement with experiments in predicting the critical velocity. A regime map of drop topology based on the Weber number and drop-to-fiber diameter ratio is compared to the experimental results.

  2. ROAR: A 3-D tethered rocket simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, A. R., II; Ludwigsen, J. S.

    1992-04-01

    A high-velocity impact testing technique, utilizing a tethered rocket, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The technique involves tethering a rocket assembly to a pivot location and flying it in a semicircular trajectory to deliver the rocket and payload to an impact target location. Integral to developing this testing technique is the parallel development of accurate simulation models. An operational computer code, called ROAR (Rocket-on-a-Rope), has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional transient dynamic behavior of the tether and motor/payload assembly. This report presents a discussion of the parameters modeled, the governing set of equations, the through-time integration scheme, and the input required to set up a model. Also included is a sample problem and a comparison with experimental results.

  3. ROAR: A 3-D tethered rocket simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Ludwigsen, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    A high-velocity impact testing technique, utilizing a tethered rocket, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The technique involves tethering a rocket assembly to a pivot location and flying it in a semicircular trajectory to deliver the rocket and payload to an impact target location. Integral to developing this testing technique is the parallel development of accurate simulation models. An operational computer code, called ROAR (Rocket-on-a-Rope), has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional transient dynamic behavior of the tether and motor/payload assembly. This report presents a discussion of the parameters modeled, the governing set of equations, the through-time integration scheme, and the input required to set up a model. Also included is a sample problem and a comparison with experimental results.

  4. 3D Continuum-Particle Simulations for Multiscale Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Sanith; Hornung, Richard; Garcia, Alejandro; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2001-06-01

    An adaptive mesh and algorithmic refinement (AMAR) scheme to model multi-scale, continuum-particle hydrodynamic flows is presented. AMAR ensures the particle description is applied exclusively in regions with high flow gradients and discontinous material interfaces, i.e. regions where the continuum flow assumptions are typically invalid. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is used to model the particle regions on the finest grid of the adaptive hierarchy. The continuum flow is modelled using the compressible flow Euler equations and is solved using a second order Godunov scheme. Coupling is achieved by conservation of fluxes across the continuum-particle grid boundaries. The AMAR data structures are supported by a C++ object oriented framework (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure - SAMRAI) which allows for efficient parallel implementation. The scheme also extends to simulations of gas mixtures. Results for test cases are compared with theory and experiment.

  5. Advanced 3D Photocathode Modeling and Simulations Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitre A Dimitrov; David L Bruhwiler

    2005-06-06

    High brightness electron beams required by the proposed Next Linear Collider demand strong advances in photocathode electron gun performance. Significant improvement in the production of such beams with rf photocathode electron guns is hampered by the lack high-fidelity simulations. The critical missing piece in existing gun codes is a physics-based, detailed treatment of the very complex and highly nonlinear photoemission process.

  6. Numerical simulations of 3D compressible vortex ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dora, C. L.; De, A.; Das, D.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the evolution and instability of compressible vortex rings at the open end of shock tube are investigated. Three-dimensional Navier-stokes simulations are performed to reveal the instability of circular-compressible vortex rings at different shock Mach numbers. Three shock Mach numbers Ms=1.26, 1.5 and 1.61 each corresponding to subsonic, moderately under-expanded, and highly under-expanded jet regimes, respectively are considered for simulations. It is observed that, in all the cases, the initial stable vortex ring becomes unstable to azimuthal disturbances. The azimuthal waves are seen to develop around the circumference of the vortex core and amplify with time, similar to incompressible vortex rings. At Ms=1.61, the results indicate that a counter-rotating vortex ring forms ahead of the primary vortex ring due to the roll-up of the slipstream vortices. With the presence of counter-rotating vortex ring, the primary vortex ring is severely stretched and the azimuthal waves are seen to be amplified. Furthermore, a preliminary analysis on the number of waves (n) formed around the circumference of the vortex ring is presented. The results show that incompressible instability analysis under-predicts the value of n. However, by incorporating the compressibility correction, the value of n closely matches with the present simulation.

  7. RoboCup 3D Soccer Simulation Server: A Progressing Testbed for AI Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darab, Mohammad Ali Darvish; Ebrahimi, Mosalam

    RoboCup 3D Soccer Simulation is a growing domain that makes a wide variety of AI and Multi-Agent researches possible. The RoboCup 3D Soccer Simulation Server is a Multi-Agent environment that supports 22 independent agents to play a soccer match within a real-time and complex environment. Many researchers from all over the world have been using this simulator to pursue their researches in a wide variety of areas such as multiagent learning, cooperative actions and multiagent planning. This paper illustrates the current organization of RoboCup 3D Soccer Simulation Server.

  8. [3D Virtual Reality Laparoscopic Simulation in Surgical Education - Results of a Pilot Study].

    PubMed

    Kneist, W; Huber, T; Paschold, M; Lang, H

    2016-06-01

    The use of three-dimensional imaging in laparoscopy is a growing issue and has led to 3D systems in laparoscopic simulation. Studies on box trainers have shown differing results concerning the benefit of 3D imaging. There are currently no studies analysing 3D imaging in virtual reality laparoscopy (VRL). Five surgical fellows, 10 surgical residents and 29 undergraduate medical students performed abstract and procedural tasks on a VRL simulator using conventional 2D and 3D imaging in a randomised order. No significant differences between the two imaging systems were shown for students or medical professionals. Participants who preferred three-dimensional imaging showed significantly better results in 2D as wells as in 3D imaging. First results on three-dimensional imaging on box trainers showed different results. Some studies resulted in an advantage of 3D imaging for laparoscopic novices. This study did not confirm the superiority of 3D imaging over conventional 2D imaging in a VRL simulator. In the present study on 3D imaging on a VRL simulator there was no significant advantage for 3D imaging compared to conventional 2D imaging. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. 3D vesicle dynamics simulations with a linearly triangulated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedec, G.; Leonetti, M.; Jaeger, M.

    2011-02-01

    Simulations of biomembranes have gained an increasing interest in the past years. Specificities of these membranes propose new challenges for the numerics. In particular, vesicle dynamics are governed by bending forces as well as a surface incompressibility constraint. A method to compute the bending force density resultant onto piecewise linearly triangulated surface meshes is described. This method is coupled with a boundary element method solver for inner and outer fluids, to compute vesicle dynamics under external flows. The surface incompressibility constraint is satisfied by the construction of a projection operator.

  10. Photorealistic 3D omni-directional stereo simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, Dirk; Cruz-Neira, Carolina; Neumann, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    While a lot of areas in VR have made significant advances, visual rendering in VR is often not quite keeping up with the state of the art. There are many reasons for this, but one way to alleviate some of the issues is by using ray tracing instead of rasterization for image generation. Contrary to popular belief, ray tracing is a realistic, competitive technology nowadays. This paper looks at the pros and cons of using ray tracing and demonstrates the feasibility of employing it using the example of a helicopter flight simulator image generator.

  11. Application Of Moldex3D For Thin-wall Injection Moulding Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šercer, Mladen; Godec, Damir; Bujanić, Božo

    2007-05-01

    The benefits associated with decreasing wall thicknesses below their current values are still measurable and desired even if the final wall thickness is nowhere near those of the aggressive portable electronics industry. It is important to note that gains in wall section reduction do not always occur without investment, in this case, in tooling and machinery upgrades. Equally important is the fact that productivity and performance benefits of reduced material usage, fast cycle times, and lighter weight can often outweigh most of the added costs. In order to eliminate unnecessary mould trials, minimize product development cycle, reduce overall costs and improve product quality, polymeric engineers use new CAE technology (Computer Aided Engineering). This technology is a simulation tool, which combines proven theories, material properties and process conditions to generate realistic simulations and produce valuable recommendations. Based on these recommendations, an optional combination of product design, material and process conditions can be identified. In this work, Moldex3D software was used for simulation of injection moulding in order to avoid potential moulding problems. The results gained from the simulation were used for the optimization of an existing product design, for mould development and for optimization of processing parameters, e.g. injection pressure, mould cavity temperature, etc.

  12. Aeroacoustic Simulations of a Nose Landing Gear Using FUN3D on Pointwise Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Rhoads, John; Lockard, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a partially-dressed, cavity-closed (PDCC) nose landing gear configuration that was tested in the University of Florida's open-jet acoustic facility known as the UFAFF. The unstructured-grid flow solver FUN3D is used to compute the unsteady flow field for this configuration. Mixed-element grids generated using the Pointwise(TradeMark) grid generation software are used for these simulations. Particular care is taken to ensure quality cells and proper resolution in critical areas of interest in an effort to minimize errors introduced by numerical artifacts. A hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large eddy simulation (RANS/LES) turbulence model is used for these simulations. Solutions are also presented for a wall function model coupled to the standard turbulence model. Time-averaged and instantaneous solutions obtained on these Pointwise grids are compared with the measured data and previous numerical solutions. The resulting CFD solutions are used as input to a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings noise propagation code to compute the farfield noise levels in the flyover and sideline directions. The computed noise levels compare well with previous CFD solutions and experimental data.

  13. Numerical grid generation in 3D Euler-flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-04-01

    The technical problems with grid generation are analyzed and an overview of proposed solutions is given. The usefulness of grid-generation techniques, for the numerical simulation of Euler (and Navier-Stokes) flows around complex three-dimensional aerodynamic configurations, is illustrated. It is shown that the core of the grid-generation problem is a topology problem. The following remarks are sketched: grid generation is a subtask in a numerical simulation of a flow in industrial and research environments; the design requirements of a grid generation concern the geometrical imput, the desired grid as output, the technical means to control grid resolution and quality and turnaround time performance; the construction of a blocked grid can be subdivided in a block-decomposition task and a grid-point distribution task. A technique for using connectivity relations to define conventions about local coordinate systems in edges, faces and blocks is presented. Experiences are reported and an example concerning a 96-blocked grid around a complex aerodynamic configuration is given. Concepts for improvements in the presented technique are discussed.

  14. Linking continuum mechanics and 3D discrete dislocation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    El-Azab, A. A.; Fivel, M.

    1998-10-18

    A technique is developed for linking the methods of discrete dislocation dynamics simulation and finite element to treat elasto-plasticity problems. The overall formulation views the plastically deforming crystal as an elastic crystal with continuously changing dislocation microstructure which is tracked by the numerical dynamics simulation. The FEM code needed in this regard is based on linear elasticity only. This formulation presented here is focused on a continuous updating of the outer shape of the crystal, for possible regeneration of the FEM mesh, and adjustment of the surface geometry, in particular the surface normal. The method is expected to be potentially applicable to the nano- indentation experiments, where the zone around the indenter-crystal contact undergoes significant permanent deformation, the rigorous determination of which is very important to the calculation of the indentation print area and in turn, the surface hardness. Furthermore, the technique is expected to account for the plastic history of the surface displacement under the indenter. Other potential applications are mentioned in the text.

  15. Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser Device Simulation Using the 3D, Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    overall rate of dimensional ( 3D ) GASP model for the COIL flowfield dissociation of I2. was executed in time accurate mode utilizing lst-order The gas... 3D , Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...ADP023803 UNCLASSIFIED Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser Device Simulation Using the 3D , Unsteady Navier- Stokes Equations Timothy J. Madden US Air Force

  16. Dynamic 3D simulations of earthquakes on en echelon faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the mysteries of earthquake mechanics is why earthquakes stop. This process determines the difference between small and devastating ruptures. One possibility is that fault geometry controls earthquake size. We test this hypothesis using a numerical algorithm that simulates spontaneous rupture propagation in a three-dimensional medium and apply our knowledge to two California fault zones. We find that the size difference between the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield, California, earthquakes may be the product of a stepover at the southern end of the 1934 earthquake and show how the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake followed physically reasonable expectations when it jumped across en echelon faults to become a large event. If there are no linking structures, such as transfer faults, then strike-slip earthquakes are unlikely to propagate through stepovers >5 km wide. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. 3D Simulation and Validation of Tube Piercing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio; Attanasio, Aldo

    2007-05-01

    In many cases the development of analytical or simulative models of actual production processes can help in improving the product quality furnishing defect-free parts. In particular, when tube piercing processes are referring to, the main problem that can arise is the low quality of the internal tube surface. This type of defect cannot be eliminated during the successive production phases so compromising the final part quality. It is possible to overcome this problem by placing in the correct position the internal plug which defines the internal tube diameter. This position greatly depends on where the tube material begins to break due the acting internal stresses. This phenomenon is called Mannesmann effect. The farther the plug from the Mannesmann cone formation, the higher the oxidation of the internal tube surface. On the contrary the closer the plug, the higher the wear of the plug. In actual practice an on-line control of the position of the Mannesmann cone is impossible to be implemented. In the past, the Authors have developed a model to help the production line technicians in determining where to place the plug. This model was a two dimensional representation of the actual phenomenon, and it has already been proved to correctly represent the actual tube behavior since it was validated by comparing its results with experiments. Using the results of a wide simulation campaign, a neural network was trained and now it is used as an on-line plug position definition support. In the present paper the results obtained using a fully three dimensional model of the process are reported. This model will allow to confirm some simplifying assumption made in the 2D model definition and to study the tube behavior when it reaches and moves on the plug, too. Some comparisons with practical evidences are reported.

  18. Software engineering and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shou X.; Schroer, Bernard J.; Messimer, Sherri L.; Tseng, Fan T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of several automatic programming systems for discrete event simulation. Emphasis is given on the model development, or problem definition, and the model writing phases of the modeling life cycle.

  19. Development of 3D beam-beam simulation for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-06-01

    We present status of development of a 3D Beam-Beam simulation code for simulating the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The essential features of the code are 3D particle-in-cell Poisson solver for calculating the Beam-Beam electromagnetic interactions with additional modules for linear optics, machine impedance and chromaticity, and multiple bunch tracking. The simulations match synchrobetatron oscillations measured at the VEPP-2M collider. The impedance calculations show beam instability development consistent with analytic expressions.

  20. Detailed 3D Simulation of the GEM-based detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Biswas, S.; Mohanty, B.; Majumdar, N.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2016-10-01

    The operation of Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) has often suffered from effects such as distortion of the electric field due to space charge, despite their widespread use in particle-physics and nuclear-physics experiments, astro-particle research, medical imaging, material science etc. To keep distortions due to space-charge at a manageable level, a lower ion feedback is required while maintaining substantial detector gain and good resolution. Thus, a proper optimization of the detector geometry, field configuration and gas mixtures are required to have a higher electron transparency and lower ion backflow. In our work, Garfield simulation framework has been adopted as a tool to evaluate the fundamental features of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). Our study begins with the computation of electrostatic field and its variation with different geometrical and electrical parameters using the neBEM toolkit. Different efficient algorithms have been implemented to increase the computational efficiency of the field solver. Finally, ion backflow and electron transparency of single and quadruple GEMs with different geometry and field configurations suitable for the ALICE-TPC, have been studied.

  1. Interactive reconstructions of cranial 3D implants under MeVisLab as an alternative to commercial planning software.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan; Gall, Markus; Tax, Alois; Ücal, Muammer; Zefferer, Ulrike; Li, Xing; von Campe, Gord; Schäfer, Ute; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Chen, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    In this publication, the interactive planning and reconstruction of cranial 3D Implants under the medical prototyping platform MeVisLab as alternative to commercial planning software is introduced. In doing so, a MeVisLab prototype consisting of a customized data-flow network and an own C++ module was set up. As a result, the Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software prototype guides a user through the whole workflow to generate an implant. Therefore, the workflow begins with loading and mirroring the patients head for an initial curvature of the implant. Then, the user can perform an additional Laplacian smoothing, followed by a Delaunay triangulation. The result is an aesthetic looking and well-fitting 3D implant, which can be stored in a CAD file format, e.g. STereoLithography (STL), for 3D printing. The 3D printed implant can finally be used for an in-depth pre-surgical evaluation or even as a real implant for the patient. In a nutshell, our research and development shows that a customized MeVisLab software prototype can be used as an alternative to complex commercial planning software, which may also not be available in every clinic. Finally, not to conform ourselves directly to available commercial software and look for other options that might improve the workflow.

  2. Interactive reconstructions of cranial 3D implants under MeVisLab as an alternative to commercial planning software

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Gall, Markus; Tax, Alois; Ücal, Muammer; Zefferer, Ulrike; Li, Xing; von Campe, Gord; Schäfer, Ute; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Chen, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    In this publication, the interactive planning and reconstruction of cranial 3D Implants under the medical prototyping platform MeVisLab as alternative to commercial planning software is introduced. In doing so, a MeVisLab prototype consisting of a customized data-flow network and an own C++ module was set up. As a result, the Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software prototype guides a user through the whole workflow to generate an implant. Therefore, the workflow begins with loading and mirroring the patients head for an initial curvature of the implant. Then, the user can perform an additional Laplacian smoothing, followed by a Delaunay triangulation. The result is an aesthetic looking and well-fitting 3D implant, which can be stored in a CAD file format, e.g. STereoLithography (STL), for 3D printing. The 3D printed implant can finally be used for an in-depth pre-surgical evaluation or even as a real implant for the patient. In a nutshell, our research and development shows that a customized MeVisLab software prototype can be used as an alternative to complex commercial planning software, which may also not be available in every clinic. Finally, not to conform ourselves directly to available commercial software and look for other options that might improve the workflow. PMID:28264062

  3. Particle image velocimetry on simulated 3D ultrafast ultrasound from pediatric matrix TEE transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorneveld, J. D.; Bera, D.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; de Jong, N.; Bosch, J. G.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrafast 3D transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) imaging, combined with 3D echo particle image velocimetry (ePIV), would be ideal for tracking the complex blood flow patterns in the heart. We are developing a miniature pediatric matrix TEE transducer that employs micro-beamforming (μBF) and allows high framerate in 3D. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of 3D ePIV with a high frame rate, small aperture transducer and the influence of the micro-beamforming technique. We compare the results of 3D ePIV on simulated images using the μBF transducer and an idealized, fully sampled (FS) matrix transducer. For the two transducers, we have simulated high-framerate imaging of an 8.4mm diameter artery having a known 4D velocity field. The simulations were performed in FieldII. 1000 3D volumes, at a rate of 1000 volumes/sec, were created using a single diverging transmission per volume. The error in the 3D velocity estimation was measured by comparing the ePIV results of both transducers to the ground truth. The results on the simulated volumes show that ePIV can estimate the 4D velocity field of the arterial phantom using these small-aperture transducers suitable for pediatric 3D TEE. The μBF transducer (RMSE 44.0%) achieved comparable ePIV accuracy to that of the FS transducer (RMSE 42.6%).

  4. The Virtual Radiopharmacy Laboratory: A 3-D Simulation for Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexiou, Antonios; Bouras, Christos; Giannaka, Eri; Kapoulas, Vaggelis; Nani, Maria; Tsiatsos, Thrasivoulos

    2004-01-01

    This article presents Virtual Radiopharmacy Laboratory (VR LAB), a virtual laboratory accessible through the Internet. VR LAB is designed and implemented in the framework of the VirRAD European project. This laboratory represents a 3D simulation of a radio-pharmacy laboratory, where learners, represented by 3D avatars, can experiment on…

  5. The Virtual Radiopharmacy Laboratory: A 3-D Simulation for Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexiou, Antonios; Bouras, Christos; Giannaka, Eri; Kapoulas, Vaggelis; Nani, Maria; Tsiatsos, Thrasivoulos

    2004-01-01

    This article presents Virtual Radiopharmacy Laboratory (VR LAB), a virtual laboratory accessible through the Internet. VR LAB is designed and implemented in the framework of the VirRAD European project. This laboratory represents a 3D simulation of a radio-pharmacy laboratory, where learners, represented by 3D avatars, can experiment on…

  6. i3Drefine software for protein 3D structure refinement and its assessment in CASP10.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8(th) CASP experiment. During the 9(th) and recently concluded 10(th) CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as 'MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT') was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/.

  7. i3Drefine Software for Protein 3D Structure Refinement and Its Assessment in CASP10

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8th CASP experiment. During the 9th and recently concluded 10th CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as ‘MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT’) was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/. PMID:23894517

  8. AnimatLab: a 3D graphics environment for neuromechanical simulations.

    PubMed

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Reid, James; Zhu, Ying; Heitler, William J; Edwards, Donald H

    2010-03-30

    The nervous systems of animals evolved to exert dynamic control of behavior in response to the needs of the animal and changing signals from the environment. To understand the mechanisms of dynamic control requires a means of predicting how individual neural and body elements will interact to produce the performance of the entire system. AnimatLab is a software tool that provides an approach to this problem through computer simulation. AnimatLab enables a computational model of an animal's body to be constructed from simple building blocks, situated in a virtual 3D world subject to the laws of physics, and controlled by the activity of a multicellular, multicompartment neural circuit. Sensor receptors on the body surface and inside the body respond to external and internal signals and then excite central neurons, while motor neurons activate Hill muscle models that span the joints and generate movement. AnimatLab provides a common neuromechanical simulation environment in which to construct and test models of any skeletal animal, vertebrate or invertebrate. The use of AnimatLab is demonstrated in a neuromechanical simulation of human arm flexion and the myotactic and contact-withdrawal reflexes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-million Atom Electronic Structure Simulations using NEMO 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Boykin, Timothy B.; Bowen, R. Chris

    2002-03-01

    The detailed physical understanding of heterostructure interfaces enabled the creation of now well developed devices such as quantum well lasers, quantum well detectors, heterostructure field transistors and resonant tunneling diodes. The design and optimization of these devices and their implementation required the development and utilization of quantitative simulation tools. One such example is the nanoelectronic modeling tool (NEMO 1-D) originally developed by Texas Instruments. The need for such simulation tools is expected to only increase as device feature sizes and experimental characterization capabilities decrease and as manufacturing uncertainties increase. Quantum dot are a proptotypical 3-D nanoelectronic device and they have been studied experimentally and theoretically extensively in the past few years. The presentation will outline our recent developments to model such quantum dots on an atomistic level using the tight-binding method. The parallelization of the software on Intel-based Beowulfs and an SGI Origin, will be discussed. Simulation domains consisting of several million atoms will be analyzed for effects of random particle disorder, interfaces and confinement. More information about the work can be found at this website http://hpc.jpl.nasa.gov/PEP/ gekco.

  10. Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning and simulation: 3D virtual osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Ip, H H; Samman, N; Wang, D; Kot, C S; Yeung, R W; Tideman, H

    2000-02-01

    A computer-assisted three-dimensional virtual osteotomy system for orthognathic surgery (CAVOS) is presented. The virtual reality workbench is used for surgical planning. The surgeon immerses in a virtual reality environment with stereo eyewear, holds a virtual "scalpel" (3D Mouse) and operates on a "real" patient (3D visualization) to obtain pre-surgical prediction (3D bony segment movements). Virtual surgery on a computer-generated 3D head model is simulated and can be visualized from any arbitrary viewing point in a personal computer system.

  11. Interactive 3D-PDF Presentations for the Simulation and Quantification of Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Surgical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Mavar-Haramija, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto; Méndez, Juan A Juanes; Puigdelívoll-Sánchez, Anna; de Notaris, Matteo

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of the skull base was reconstructed from the pre- and post-dissection head CT images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The CT images were segmented using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data, and the resulting 3D geometrical models of anatomical structures were used for dual purpose: to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approaches and to perform the quantitative analysis of the procedures. The analysis consisted of bone removal quantification and the calculation of quantitative parameters (surgical freedom and exposure area) of each procedure. The results are presented in three PDF documents containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D-PDF files include reconstructions of the nasal structures (nasal septum, vomer, middle turbinates), the bony structures of the anterior skull base and maxillofacial region and partial reconstructions of the optic nerve, the hypoglossal and vidian canals and the internal carotid arteries. Alongside the anatomical model, axial, sagittal and coronal CT images are shown. Interactive 3D presentations were created to explain the surgery and the associated quantification methods step-by-step. The resulting 3D-PDF files allow the user to interact with the model through easily available software, free of charge and in an intuitive manner. The files are available for offline use on a personal computer and no previous specialized knowledge in informatics is required. The documents can be downloaded at http://hdl.handle.net/2445/55224 .

  12. 3D visualization of ultra-fine ICON climate simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Spickermann, Dela; Böttinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Advances in high performance computing and model development allow the simulation of finer and more detailed climate experiments. The new ICON model is based on an unstructured triangular grid and can be used for a wide range of applications, ranging from global coupled climate simulations down to very detailed and high resolution regional experiments. It consists of an atmospheric and an oceanic component and scales very well for high numbers of cores. This allows us to conduct very detailed climate experiments with ultra-fine resolutions. ICON is jointly developed in partnership with DKRZ by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology and the German Weather Service. This presentation discusses our current workflow for analyzing and visualizing this high resolution data. The ICON model has been used for eddy resolving (<10km) ocean simulations, as well as for ultra-fine cloud resolving (120m) atmospheric simulations. This results in very large 3D time dependent multi-variate data that need to be displayed and analyzed. We have developed specific plugins for the free available visualization software ParaView and Vapor, which allows us to read and handle that much data. Within ParaView, we can additionally compare prognostic variables with performance data side by side to investigate the performance and scalability of the model. With the simulation running in parallel on several hundred nodes, an equal load balance is imperative. In our presentation we show visualizations of high-resolution ICON oceanographic and HDCP2 atmospheric simulations that were created using ParaView and Vapor. Furthermore we discuss our current efforts to improve our visualization capabilities, thereby exploring the potential of regular in-situ visualization, as well as of in-situ compression / post visualization.

  13. 3-d finite element model development for biomechanics: a software demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Ashby, E.

    1997-03-01

    Finite element analysis is becoming an increasingly important part of biomechanics and orthopedic research, as computational resources become more powerful, and data handling algorithms become more sophisticated. Until recently, tools with sufficient power did not exist or were not accessible to adequately model complicated, three-dimensional, nonlinear biomechanical systems. In the past, finite element analyses in biomechanics have often been limited to two-dimensional approaches, linear analyses, or simulations of single tissue types. Today, we have the resources to model fully three-dimensional, nonlinear, multi-tissue, and even multi-joint systems. The authors will present the process of developing these kinds of finite element models, using human hand and knee examples, and will demonstrate their software tools.

  14. A graphical user interface for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, J. C. L.; Leung, M. K. K.

    2008-02-01

    A software graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is developed using MATLAB. This GUI (DOSCTP) provides a user-friendly platform for DICOM CT-based dose calculation using EGSnrcMP-based DOSXYZnrc code. It offers numerous features not found in DOSXYZnrc, such as the ability to use multiple beams from different phase-space files, and has built-in dose analysis and visualization tools. DOSCTP is written completely in MATLAB, with integrated access to DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE. The program function may be divided into four subgroups, namely, beam placement, MC simulation with DOSXYZnrc, dose visualization, and export. Each is controlled by separate routines. The verification of DOSCTP was carried out by comparing plans with different beam arrangements (multi-beam/photon arc) on an inhomogeneous phantom as well as patient CT between the GUI and Pinnacle3. DOSCTP was developed and verified with the following features: (1) a built-in voxel editor to modify CT-based DOSXYZnrc phantoms for research purposes; (2) multi-beam placement is possible, which cannot be achieved using the current DOSXYZnrc code; (3) the treatment plan, including the dose distributions, contours and image set can be exported to a commercial treatment planning system such as Pinnacle3 or to CERR using RTOG format for plan evaluation and comparison; (4) a built-in RTOG-compatible dose reviewer for dose visualization and analysis such as finding the volume of hot/cold spots in the 3D dose distributions based on a user threshold. DOSCTP greatly simplifies the use of DOSXYZnrc and CTCREATE, and offers numerous features that not found in the original user-code. Moreover, since phase-space beams can be defined and generated by the user, it is a particularly useful tool to carry out plans using specifically designed irradiators/accelerators that cannot be found in the Linac library of commercial treatment planning systems.

  15. Simulation of bacteria transport processes in a river with Flow3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Bui, Minh Duc; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Water quality aspects are getting more and more important due to the European water Framework directive (WFD). One problem related to this topic is the inflow of untreated wastewater due to combined sewer overflows into a river. The wastewater mixture contains even bacteria like E. coli and Enterococci which are markers for water quality. In our work we investigated the transport of these bacteria in river Isar by using a large-scale flume in the outside area of our lab (Oskar von Miller Institute). Therefor we could collect basic data and knowledge about the processes which occur during bacteria sedimentation and remobilisation. In our flume we could use the real grain with the exact size distribution curve as in the river Isar which we want to simulate and we had the chance to nurture a biofilm which is realistic for the analysed situation. This biofilm plays an important role in the remobilisation processes, because the bacteria are hindered to be washed out back into the bulk phase as fast and in such an amount as this would happen without biofilm. The results of our experiments are now used for a module in the 3D software Flow3D to simulate the effects of a point source inlet of raw wastewater on the water quality. Therefor we have to implement the bacteria not as a problem of concentration with advection and diffusion but as single particles which can be inactivated during the process of settling and need to be hindered from remobilisation by the biofilm. This biofilm has special characteristic, it is slippery and has a special thickness which influences the chance of bacteria being removed. To achieve realistic results we have to include the biofilm with more than a probabilistic-tool to make sure that our module is transferable. The module should be as flexible as possible to be improved step by step with increasing quality of dataset.

  16. Nanoelectronic Modeling (NEMO): Moving from commercial grade 1-D simulation to prototype 3-D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of commercially pursued heterostructure devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared photodetectors, and quantum well lasers are enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The creation of these heterostructure devices is realized in a vast design space of material compositions, layer thicknesses and doping profiles. The full experimental exploration of this design space is unfeasible and a reliable design tool is needed. The Nanoelectronic Modeling tool (NEMO) is one of the first commercial grade attempts for such a modeling tool. NEMO was developed as a general-purpose quantum mechanics-based 1-D device design and analysis tool from 1993-97 by the Central Research Laboratory of Texas Instruments (later Raytheon Systems). NEMO enables(R. Lake, G. Klimeck, R. C. Bowen, and D. Jovanovic, J. Appl. Phys. 81), 7845 (1997). the fundamentally sound inclusion of the required(G. Klimeck et al.), in the 1997 55th Annual Device Research Conference Digest, (IEEE, NJ, 1997), p. 92^,(R. C. Bowen et al.), J. Appl. Phys 81, 3207 (1997). physics: bandstructure, scattering, and charge self-consistency based on the non-equilibrium Green function approach. A new class of devices which require full 3-D quantum mechanics based models is starting to emerge: quantum dots, or in general semiconductor based deca-nano devices. We are currently building a 3-D modeling tool based on NEMO to include the important physics to understand electronic stated in such superscaled structures. This presentation will overview various facets of the NEMO 1-D tool such electron transport physics in RTDs, numerical technology, software engineering and graphical user interface. The lessons learned from that work are now entering the 3D>NEMO 3-D development and first results using the NEMO 3-D prototype will be shown. More information about

  17. Computer-assisted three-dimensional surgical planning and simulation: 3D color facial model generation.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Wang, D; Samman, N; Yeung, R W; Tideman, H

    2000-02-01

    A scheme for texture mapping a 3D individualized color photo-realistic facial model from real color portraits and CT data is described. First, 3D CT images including both soft and hard tissues should be reconstructed from sequential CT slices, using a surface rendering technique. Facial features are extracted from 3D soft tissue. A generic mesh is individualized by correspondence matching and interpolation from those feature vertices. Three digitized color portraits with the "third" dimension from reconstructed soft tissue are blended and texture-mapped onto the 3D head model (mesh). A color simulated human head generated from frontal, right and left real color portraits can be viewed from an arbitrary angle in an inexpensive and user-friendly conventional personal computer. This scheme is the basic procedure in 3D computer-assisted simulation surgery.

  18. 3D simulations of multipacting in the 56 MHz SRF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ge, L.; Ko, K.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Xiao, L.

    2012-05-20

    The 56 MHz SRF Quarter-Wave Resonator (QWR) is designed for RHIC as a storage cavity to improve the collider performance. 2D multipacting simulation has been done for the cavity alone. Ripples were added to the outer body of the cavity for multipacting suppression based on the simulation findings. During operation, there will be four higher order mode (HOM) couplers. All of these components will be exposed to high RF fields. In this paper we compare 2D and 3D codes simulation results for multipacting in the cavity. We also report 3D simulation results for multipacting simulation at the couplers.

  19. RVA. 3-D Visualization and Analysis Software to Support Management of Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, Donald A.; Shaffer, Eric G.; Storsved, Brynne; Vanmoer, Mark; Angrave, Lawrence; Damico, James R.; Grigsby, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    A free software application, RVA, has been developed as a plugin to the US DOE-funded ParaView visualization package, to provide support in the visualization and analysis of complex reservoirs being managed using multi-fluid EOR techniques. RVA, for Reservoir Visualization and Analysis, was developed as an open-source plugin to the 64 bit Windows version of ParaView 3.14. RVA was developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with contributions from the Illinois State Geological Survey, Department of Computer Science and National Center for Supercomputing Applications. RVA was designed to utilize and enhance the state-of-the-art visualization capabilities within ParaView, readily allowing joint visualization of geologic framework and reservoir fluid simulation model results. Particular emphasis was placed on enabling visualization and analysis of simulation results highlighting multiple fluid phases, multiple properties for each fluid phase (including flow lines), multiple geologic models and multiple time steps. Additional advanced functionality was provided through the development of custom code to implement data mining capabilities. The built-in functionality of ParaView provides the capacity to process and visualize data sets ranging from small models on local desktop systems to extremely large models created and stored on remote supercomputers. The RVA plugin that we developed and the associated User Manual provide improved functionality through new software tools, and instruction in the use of ParaView-RVA, targeted to petroleum engineers and geologists in industry and research. The RVA web site (http://rva.cs.illinois.edu) provides an overview of functions, and the development web site (https://github.com/shaffer1/RVA) provides ready access to the source code, compiled binaries, user manual, and a suite of demonstration data sets. Key functionality has been included to support a range of reservoirs visualization and analysis needs, including

  20. Representativeness of 2D models to simulate 3D unstable variable density flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Bastian; Xie, Yueqing; Stumpp, Christine; Maloszewski, Piotr; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-11-01

    Variable density flow in porous media has been studied primarily using numerical models because it is a semi-chaotic and transient process. Most of these studies have been 2D, owing to the computational restrictions on 3D simulations, and the ability to observe variable density flow in 2D experimentation. However, it is recognised that variable density flow is a three-dimensional process. A 3D system may cause weaker variable density flow than a 2D system due to stronger dispersion, but may also result in bigger fingers and hence stronger variable density flow because of more space for fingers to coalesce. This study aimed to determine the representativeness of 2D modelling to simulate 3D variable density flow. 3D homogeneous sand column experiments were conducted at three different water flow velocities with three different bromide tracer solutions mixed with methanol resulting in different density ratios. Both 2D axisymmetric and 3D numerical simulations were performed to reproduce experimental data. Experimental results showed that the magnitude of variable density flow increases with decreasing flow rates and decreasing density ratios. The shapes of the observed breakthrough curves differed significantly from those produced by 2D axisymmetric and 3D simulations. Compared to 2D simulations, the onset of instabilities was delayed but the growth was more pronounced in 3D simulations. Despite this difference, both 2D axisymmetric and 3D models successfully simulated mass recovery with high efficiency (between 77% and 99%). This study indicates that 2D simulations are sufficient to understand integrated features of variable density flow in homogeneous sand column experiments.

  1. Software interoperability for energy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Robert J.

    2002-07-31

    This paper provides an overview of software interoperability as it relates to the energy simulation of buildings. The paper begins with a discussion of the difficulties in using sophisticated analysis tools like energy simulation at various stages in the building life cycle, and the potential for interoperability to help overcome these difficulties. An overview of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), a common data model for supporting interoperability under continuing development by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) is then given. The process of creating interoperable software is described next, followed by specific details for energy simulation tools. The paper closes with the current status of, and future plans for, the ongoing efforts to achieve software interoperability.

  2. 3D Printed Surgical Instruments Evaluated by a Simulated Crew of a Mars Mission.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julielynn Y; Pfahnl, Andreas C

    2016-09-01

    The first space-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer became operational in 2014. This study evaluated whether Mars simulation crewmembers of the Hawai'i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) II mission with no prior surgical experience could utilize acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic surgical instruments FDM 3D printed on Earth to complete simulated surgical tasks. This study sought to examine the feasibility of using 3D printed surgical tools when the primary crew medical officer is incapacitated and the back-up crew medical officer must conduct a surgical procedure during a simulated extended space mission. During a 4 mo duration ground-based analog mission, five simulation crewmembers with no prior surgical experience completed 16 timed sets of simulated prepping, draping, incising, and suturing tasks to evaluate the relative speed of using four ABS thermoplastic instruments printed on Earth compared to conventional instruments. All four simulated surgical tasks were successfully performed using 3D printed instruments by Mars simulation crewmembers with no prior surgical experience. There was no substantial difference in time to completion of simulated tasks with control vs. 3D printed sponge stick, towel clamp, scalpel handle, and toothed forceps. These limited findings support further investigation into the creation of an onboard digital catalog of validated 3D printable surgical instrument design files to support autonomous, crew-administered healthcare on Mars missions. Future work could include addressing sterility, biocompatibility, and having astronaut crew medical officers test a wider range of surgical instruments printed in microgravity during actual surgical procedures. Wong JY, Pfahnl AC. 3D printed surgical instruments evaluated by a simulated crew of a Mars mission. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(9):806-810.

  3. Lessons in modern digital field geology: Open source software, 3D techniques, and the new world of digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Terry; Hurtado, Jose; Langford, Richard; Serpa, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Although many geologists refuse to admit it, it is time to put paper-based geologic mapping into the historical archives and move to the full potential of digital mapping techniques. For our group, flat map digital geologic mapping is now a routine operation in both research and instruction. Several software options are available, and basic proficiency with the software can be learned in a few hours of instruction and practice. The first practical field GIS software, ArcPad, remains a viable, stable option on Windows-based systems. However, the vendor seems to be moving away from ArcPad in favor of mobile software solutions that are difficult to implement without GIS specialists. Thus, we have pursued a second software option based on the open source program QGIS. Our QGIS system uses the same shapefile-centric data structure as our ArcPad system, including similar pop-up data entry forms and generic graphics for easy data management in the field. The advantage of QGIS is that the same software runs on virtually all common platforms except iOS, although the Android version remains unstable as of this writing. A third software option we are experimenting with for flat map-based field work is Fieldmove, a derivative of the 3D-capable program Move developed by Midland Valley. Our initial experiments with Fieldmove are positive, particularly with the new, inexpensive (<300Euros) Windows tablets. However, the lack of flexibility in data structure makes for cumbersome workflows when trying to interface our existing shapefile-centric data structures to Move. Nonetheless, in spring 2014 we will experiment with full-3D immersion in the field using the full Move software package in combination with ground based LiDAR and photogrammetry. One new workflow suggested by our initial experiments is that field geologists should consider using photogrammetry software to capture 3D visualizations of key outcrops. This process is now straightforward in several software packages, and

  4. Shuttle mission simulator software conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Software conceptual designs (SCD) are presented for meeting the simulator requirements for the shuttle missions. The major areas of the SCD discussed include: malfunction insertion, flight software, applications software, systems software, and computer complex.

  5. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  6. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  7. A 3D numerical simulation of different phases of friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerdoux, S.; Fourment, L.

    2009-10-01

    An adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is developed to compute the material flow and the temperature evolution during the three phases of the friction stir welding (FSW) process. It follows a splitting approach: after the calculations of the velocity/pressure and temperature fields, the mesh velocity is derived from the domain boundary evolution and from an adaptive refinement criterion provided by error estimation, and finally state variables are remapped. In this way, the unilateral contact conditions between the plate and the tool are accurately taken into account, so allowing one to model various instabilities that may occur during the process, such as the role played by the plunge depth of the tool on the formations of flashes, the possible appearance of non-steady voids or tunnel holes and the influence of the threads on the material flow, the temperature field and the welding efforts. This formulation is implemented in the 3D Forge3 FE software with automatic remeshing. The non-steady phases of FSW can so be simulated, as well as the steady welding phase. The study of different process conditions shows that the main phenomena taking place during FSW can be simulated with the right sensitivities.

  8. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a Gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the

  9. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2013-04-07

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy. Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical

  10. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-04-01

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a Gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy. Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical

  11. A Software Framework for Blast Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    The vehicles in the simulations will be modeled using the MPMICE MPM techniques (for approximate vehicle models), DYNA3D FE code and off-the-shelf...and decoupled preprocessor-based models, to a comprehensive, tightly coupled simulation tool based on the C-SAFE and DYNA3D codes. The model...involves integrating the MPMICE code, DYNA3D (for tightly coupled simulations), LS-DYNA (for uncoupled simulations) and a reduced order model

  12. 3D Imaging for hand gesture recognition: Exploring the software-hardware interaction of current technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periverzov, Frol; Ilieş, Horea T.

    2012-09-01

    Interaction with 3D information is one of the fundamental and most familiar tasks in virtually all areas of engineering and science. Several recent technological advances pave the way for developing hand gesture recognition capabilities available to all, which will lead to more intuitive and efficient 3D user interfaces (3DUI). These developments can unlock new levels of expression and productivity in all activities concerned with the creation and manipulation of virtual 3D shapes and, specifically, in engineering design. Building fully automated systems for tracking and interpreting hand gestures requires robust and efficient 3D imaging techniques as well as potent shape classifiers. We survey and explore current and emerging 3D imaging technologies, and focus, in particular, on those that can be used to build interfaces between the users' hands and the machine. The purpose of this paper is to categorize and highlight the relevant differences between these existing 3D imaging approaches in terms of the nature of the information provided, output data format, as well as the specific conditions under which these approaches yield reliable data. Furthermore we explore the impact of each of these approaches on the computational cost and reliability of the required image processing algorithms. Finally we highlight the main challenges and opportunities in developing natural user interfaces based on hand gestures, and conclude with some promising directions for future research. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Real-Time Climate Simulations in the Interactive 3D Game Universe Sandbox ²

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenson, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Exploration in an open-ended computer game is an engaging way to explore climate and climate change. Everyone can explore physical models with real-time visualization in the educational simulator Universe Sandbox ² (universesandbox.com/2), which includes basic climate simulations on planets. I have implemented a time-dependent, one-dimensional meridional heat transport energy balance model to run and be adjustable in real time in the midst of a larger simulated system. Universe Sandbox ² is based on the original game - at its core a gravity simulator - with other new physically-based content for stellar evolution, and handling collisions between bodies. Existing users are mostly science enthusiasts in informal settings. We believe that this is the first climate simulation to be implemented in a professionally developed computer game with modern 3D graphical output in real time. The type of simple climate model we've adopted helps us depict the seasonal cycle and the more drastic changes that come from changing the orbit or other external forcings. Users can alter the climate as the simulation is running by altering the star(s) in the simulation, dragging to change orbits and obliquity, adjusting the climate simulation parameters directly or changing other properties like CO2 concentration that affect the model parameters in representative ways. Ongoing visuals of the expansion and contraction of sea ice and snow-cover respond to the temperature calculations, and make it accessible to explore a variety of scenarios and intuitive to understand the output. Variables like temperature can also be graphed in real time. We balance computational constraints with the ability to capture the physical phenomena we wish to visualize, giving everyone access to a simple open-ended meridional energy balance climate simulation to explore and experiment with. The software lends itself to labs at a variety of levels about climate concepts including seasons, the Greenhouse effect

  14. LB3D: A parallel implementation of the Lattice-Boltzmann method for simulation of interacting amphiphilic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieschek, S.; Shamardin, L.; Frijters, S.; Krüger, T.; Schiller, U. D.; Harting, J.; Coveney, P. V.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce the lattice-Boltzmann code LB3D, version 7.1. Building on a parallel program and supporting tools which have enabled research utilising high performance computing resources for nearly two decades, LB3D version 7 provides a subset of the research code functionality as an open source project. Here, we describe the theoretical basis of the algorithm as well as computational aspects of the implementation. The software package is validated against simulations of meso-phases resulting from self-assembly in ternary fluid mixtures comprising immiscible and amphiphilic components such as water-oil-surfactant systems. The impact of the surfactant species on the dynamics of spinodal decomposition are tested and quantitative measurement of the permeability of a body centred cubic (BCC) model porous medium for a simple binary mixture is described. Single-core performance and scaling behaviour of the code are reported for simulations on current supercomputer architectures.

  15. 3D Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Simulation of Acoustic Waves in Turbulent Moving Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, N. P.; Aldridge, D. F.; Marlin, D.; Wilson, D. K.; Sullivan, P.; Ostashev, V.

    2003-12-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in a three-dimensional heterogeneous moving atmosphere is accurately simulated with a numerical algorithm recently developed under the DOD Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). Sound waves within such a dynamic environment are mathematically described by a set of four, coupled, first-order partial differential equations governing small-amplitude fluctuations in pressure and particle velocity. The system is rigorously derived from fundamental principles of continuum mechanics, ideal-fluid constitutive relations, and reasonable assumptions that the ambient atmospheric motion is adiabatic and divergence-free. An explicit, time-domain, finite-difference (FD) numerical scheme is used to solve the system for both pressure and particle velocity wavefields. The atmosphere is characterized by 3D gridded models of sound speed, mass density, and the three components of the wind velocity vector. Dependent variables are stored on staggered spatial and temporal grids, and centered FD operators possess 2nd-order and 4th-order space/time accuracy. Accurate sound wave simulation is achieved provided grid intervals are chosen appropriately. The gridding must be fine enough to reduce numerical dispersion artifacts to an acceptable level and maintain stability. The algorithm is designed to execute on parallel computational platforms by utilizing a spatial domain-decomposition strategy. Currently, the algorithm has been validated on four different computational platforms, and parallel scalability of approximately 85% has been demonstrated. Comparisons with analytic solutions for uniform and vertically stratified wind models indicate that the FD algorithm generates accurate results with either a vanishing pressure or vanishing vertical-particle velocity boundary condition. Simulations are performed using a kinematic turbulence wind profile developed with the quasi-wavelet method. In addition, preliminary results are presented

  16. Creating and Testing Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinich, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to learn about the software development process, specifically the process to test and fix components of the software. The paper will cover the techniques of testing code, and the benefits of using one style of testing over another. It will also discuss the overall software design and development lifecycle, and how code testing plays an integral role in it. Coding is notorious for always needing to be debugged due to coding errors or faulty program design. Writing tests either before or during program creation that cover all aspects of the code provide a relatively easy way to locate and fix errors, which will in turn decrease the necessity to fix a program after it is released for common use. The backdrop for this paper is the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI), a project whose goal is to simulate a launch using simulated models of the ground systems and the connections between them and the control room. The simulations will be used for training and to ensure that all possible outcomes and complications are prepared for before the actual launch day. The code being tested is the Programmable Logic Controller Interface (PLCIF) code, the component responsible for transferring the information from the models to the model Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), basic computers that are used for very simple tasks.

  17. Diagnostic potential of 3D-data-based reconstruction software: an analysis of the rare disease pattern of cherubism.

    PubMed

    Holst, Alexandra Ioana; Hirschfelder, Ursula; Holst, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Cherubism is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by bilateral maxillomandibular bony degeneration, fibrous connective tissue hyperplasia, and displacement of permanent tooth germs. Reossification of the cystic lumen occurs spontaneously, but dislocated teeth must be realigned orthodontically. Advancements in virtual 3D reconstruction of anatomic structures based on computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT data have provided for more predictable individual treatment planning. We evaluated two software programs for making densitometry and volume measurements of cystic areas in the mandibles, and for 3D visualization of permanent tooth germs within the cystic lumen, in two siblings with cherubism.

  18. Meshing Preprocessor for the Mesoscopic 3D Finite Element Simulation of 2D and Interlock Fabric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendling, A.; Daniel, J. L.; Hivet, G.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Boisse, P.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation is a powerful tool to predict the mechanical behavior and the feasibility of composite parts. Among the available numerical approaches, as far as woven reinforced composites are concerned, 3D finite element simulation at the mesoscopic scale leads to a good compromise between realism and complexity. At this scale, the fibrous reinforcement is modeled by an interlacement of yarns assumed to be homogeneous that have to be accurately represented. Among the numerous issues induced by these simulations, the first one consists in providing a representative meshed geometrical model of the unit cell at the mesoscopic scale. The second one consists in enabling a fast data input in the finite element software (contacts definition, boundary conditions, elements reorientation, etc.) so as to obtain results within reasonable time. Based on parameterized 3D CAD modeling tool of unit-cells of dry fabrics already developed, this paper presents an efficient strategy which permits an automated meshing of the models with 3D hexahedral elements and to accelerate of several orders of magnitude the simulation data input. Finally, the overall modeling strategy is illustrated by examples of finite element simulation of the mechanical behavior of fabrics.

  19. Quasi-3D Modeling and Efficient Simulation of Laminar Flows in Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Zahurul; Tsui, Ying Yin

    2016-10-03

    A quasi-3D model has been developed to simulate the flow in planar microfluidic systems with low Reynolds numbers. The model was developed by decomposing the flow profile along the height of a microfluidic system into a Fourier series. It was validated against the analytical solution for flow in a straight rectangular channel and the full 3D numerical COMSOL Navier-Stokes solver for flow in a T-channel. Comparable accuracy to the full 3D numerical solution was achieved by using only three Fourier terms with a significant decrease in computation time. The quasi-3D model was used to model flows in a micro-flow cytometer chip on a desktop computer and good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results was found.

  20. New insights on pulsating white dwarfs from 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fontaine, Gilles; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Gianninas, Alexandros; Kilic, Mukremin

    We have recently computed a grid of 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations for the atmosphere of pure-hydrogen DA white dwarfs in the range 5.0 < log g < 9.0. Our grid covers the full ZZ Ceti instability strip where pulsating DA white dwarfs are located. We have significantly improved the theoretical framework to study these objects by removing the free parameters of 1D convection, which were previously a major modeling hurdle. We present improved atmospheric parameter determinations based on spectroscopic fits with 3D model spectra, allowing for an updated definition of the empirical edges of the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Our 3D simulations also precisely predict the depth of the convection zones, narrowing down the internal layers where pulsation are being driven. We hope that these 3D effects will be included in asteroseismic models in the future to predict the region of the HR diagram where white dwarfs are expected to pulsate.

  1. Quasi-3D Modeling and Efficient Simulation of Laminar Flows in Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Zahurul; Tsui, Ying Yin

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-3D model has been developed to simulate the flow in planar microfluidic systems with low Reynolds numbers. The model was developed by decomposing the flow profile along the height of a microfluidic system into a Fourier series. It was validated against the analytical solution for flow in a straight rectangular channel and the full 3D numerical COMSOL Navier-Stokes solver for flow in a T-channel. Comparable accuracy to the full 3D numerical solution was achieved by using only three Fourier terms with a significant decrease in computation time. The quasi-3D model was used to model flows in a micro-flow cytometer chip on a desktop computer and good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results was found. PMID:27706104

  2. Three-dimensional (3D) printed endovascular simulation models: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Craig; McCaslin, James; Bagnall, Alan; Davey, Philip; Bose, Pentop; Williams, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a manufacturing process in which an object is created by specialist printers designed to print in additive layers to create a 3D object. Whilst there are initial promising medical applications of 3D printing, a lack of evidence to support its use remains a barrier for larger scale adoption into clinical practice. Endovascular virtual reality (VR) simulation plays an important role in the safe training of future endovascular practitioners, but existing VR models have disadvantages including cost and accessibility which could be addressed with 3D printing. Methods This study sought to evaluate the feasibility of 3D printing an anatomically accurate human aorta for the purposes of endovascular training. Results A 3D printed model was successfully designed and printed and used for endovascular simulation. The stages of development and practical applications are described. Feedback from 96 physicians who answered a series of questions using a 5 point Likert scale is presented. Conclusions Initial data supports the value of 3D printed endovascular models although further educational validation is required. PMID:28251121

  3. 3D Simulation of External Flooding Events for the RISMC Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Steven; Mandelli, Diego; Sampath, Ramprasad; Smith, Curtis; Lin, Linyu

    2015-09-01

    Incorporating 3D simulations as part of the Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMIC) Toolkit allows analysts to obtain a more complete picture of complex system behavior for events including external plant hazards. External events such as flooding have become more important recently – however these can be analyzed with existing and validated simulated physics toolkits. In this report, we describe these approaches specific to flooding-based analysis using an approach called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. The theory, validation, and example applications of the 3D flooding simulation are described. Integrating these 3D simulation methods into computational risk analysis provides a spatial/visual aspect to the design, improves the realism of results, and can prove visual understanding to validate the analysis of flooding.

  4. Simulations of Coulomb systems with slab geometry using an efficient 3D Ewald summation method.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Alexandre P; Girotto, Matheus; Levin, Yan

    2016-04-14

    We present a new approach to efficiently simulate electrolytes confined between infinite charged walls using a 3d Ewald summation method. The optimal performance is achieved by separating the electrostatic potential produced by the charged walls from the electrostatic potential of electrolyte. The electric field produced by the 3d periodic images of the walls is constant inside the simulation cell, with the field produced by the transverse images of the charged plates canceling out. The non-neutral confined electrolyte in an external potential can be simulated using 3d Ewald summation with a suitable renormalization of the electrostatic energy, to remove a divergence, and a correction that accounts for the conditional convergence of the resulting lattice sum. The new algorithm is at least an order of magnitude more rapid than the usual simulation methods for the slab geometry and can be further sped up by adopting a particle-particle particle-mesh approach.

  5. 3-D GRMHD Simulations of Disk-Jet Coupling and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Fuerst, S.; zei. zl/; Watson, M.; Hardee, P.; Koide, S.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed a fully 3-D GRMHD simulation of jet formation from a thin accretion disk around a Schwarzschild black hole with a free-falling corona. The simulation results show that a bipolar jet is initially created. At later times, the accretion disk becomes thick and the jet fades resulting in a wind that is ejected from the surface of the thickened (torus-like) disk. This evolution of disk-jet coupling suggests that the jet fades with a thickened accretion disk. Recently we have developed two new codes: 3 -D GRMHD: RelAtivIStic magnetoHydrodynamica1 sImulatioN (RAISHIN) code constructed by modern high-resolution shock-capturing (HRSC) techniques and 3-D GRPIC code. We have calculated free-free and synchrotron emission from the disks and jet/outflows obtained from our GRMHD simulations using a fully covariant radiative transfer formulation.

  6. Prototype Development Capabilities of 3D Spatial Interactions and Failures During Scenario Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Tony Koonce

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a prototype for using 3D modeling and simulation engine to improve risk analysis and evaluate reactor structures and components for a given scenario. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  7. Scalable Iterative Solvers Applied to 3D Parallel Simulation of Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Loureiro, A. J.; Aldegunde, M.; Seoane, N.

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the performance of a preconditioned iterative solver to speed up a 3D semiconductor device simulator. Since 3D simulations necessitate large computing resources, the choice of algorithms and their parameters become of utmost importance. This code uses a density gradient drift-diffusion semiconductor transport model based on the finite element method which is one of the most general and complex discretisation techniques. It has been implemented for a distributed memory multiprocessor environment using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. We have applied this simulator to a 67 nm effective gate length Si MOSFET.

  8. 3D COMSOL Simulations for Thermal Deflection of HFIR Fuel Plate in the "Cheverton-Kelley" Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K; Freels, James D; Cook, David Howard

    2012-08-01

    Three dimensional simulation capabilities are currently being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element modeling software, to investigate thermal expansion of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) s low enriched uranium fuel plates. To validate simulations, 3D models have also been developed for the experimental setup used by Cheverton and Kelley in 1968 to investigate the buckling and thermal deflections of HFIR s highly enriched uranium fuel plates. Results for several simulations are presented in this report, and comparisons with the experimental data are provided when data are available. A close agreement between the simulation results and experimental findings demonstrates that the COMSOL simulations are able to capture the thermal expansion physics accurately and that COMSOL could be deployed as a predictive tool for more advanced computations at realistic HFIR conditions to study temperature-induced fuel plate deflection behavior.

  9. Multicellular dosimetric chain for molecular radiotherapy exemplified with dose simulations on 3D cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, Vappu; Kanninen, Liisa K; Hippeläinen, Eero; Lou, Yan-Ru; Salli, Eero; Sofiev, Alexey; Malinen, Melina; Paasonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Kuronen, Antti; Savolainen, Sauli

    2017-08-01

    Absorbed radiation dose-response relationships are not clear in molecular radiotherapy (MRT). Here, we propose a voxel-based dose calculation system for multicellular dosimetry in MRT. We applied confocal microscope images of a spherical cell aggregate i.e. a spheroid, to examine the computation of dose distribution within a tissue from the distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A confocal microscope Z-stack of a human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 spheroid was segmented using a support-vector machine algorithm and a watershed function. Heterogeneity in activity uptake was simulated by selecting a varying amount of the cell nuclei to contain (111)In, (125)I, or (177)Lu. Absorbed dose simulations were carried out using vxlPen, a software application based on the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. We developed a schema for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. The schema utilizes a partially supervised segmentation method for cell-level image data together with a novel main program for voxel-based radiation dose simulations. We observed that for (177)Lu, radiation cross-fire enabled full dose coverage even if the radiopharmaceutical had accumulated to only 60% of the spheroid cells. This effect was not found with (111)In and (125)I. Using these Auger/internal conversion electron emitters seemed to guarantee that only the cells with a high enough activity uptake will accumulate a lethal amount of dose, while neighboring cells are spared. We computed absorbed radiation dose distributions in a 3D-cultured cell spheroid with a novel multicellular dosimetric chain. Combined with pharmacological studies in different tissue models, our cell-level dosimetric calculation method can clarify dose-response relationships for radiopharmaceuticals used in MRT. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Introducing 3D U-statistic method for separating anomaly from background in exploration geochemical data with associated software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannadpour, Seyyed Saeed; Hezarkhani, Ardeshir

    2016-03-01

    The U-statistic method is one of the most important structural methods to separate the anomaly from the background. It considers the location of samples and carries out the statistical analysis of the data without judging from a geochemical point of view and tries to separate subpopulations and determine anomalous areas. In the present study, to use U-statistic method in three-dimensional (3D) condition, U-statistic is applied on the grade of two ideal test examples, by considering sample Z values (elevation). So far, this is the first time that this method has been applied on a 3D condition. To evaluate the performance of 3D U-statistic method and in order to compare U-statistic with one non-structural method, the method of threshold assessment based on median and standard deviation (MSD method) is applied on the two example tests. Results show that the samples indicated by U-statistic method as anomalous are more regular and involve less dispersion than those indicated by the MSD method. So that, according to the location of anomalous samples, denser areas of them can be determined as promising zones. Moreover, results show that at a threshold of U = 0, the total error of misclassification for U-statistic method is much smaller than the total error of criteria of bar {x}+n× s. Finally, 3D model of two test examples for separating anomaly from background using 3D U-statistic method is provided. The source code for a software program, which was developed in the MATLAB programming language in order to perform the calculations of the 3D U-spatial statistic method, is additionally provided. This software is compatible with all the geochemical varieties and can be used in similar exploration projects.

  11. Spatial 3D infrastructure: display-independent software framework, high-speed rendering electronics, and several new displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Won-Suk; Napoli, Joshua; Cossairt, Oliver S.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Purtell, Thomas J., II; Schooler, James F.; Banker, Yigal; Favalora, Gregg E.

    2005-03-01

    We present a software and hardware foundation to enable the rapid adoption of 3-D displays. Different 3-D displays - such as multiplanar, multiview, and electroholographic displays - naturally require different rendering methods. The adoption of these displays in the marketplace will be accelerated by a common software framework. The authors designed the SpatialGL API, a new rendering framework that unifies these display methods under one interface. SpatialGL enables complementary visualization assets to coexist through a uniform infrastructure. Also, SpatialGL supports legacy interfaces such as the OpenGL API. The authors" first implementation of SpatialGL uses multiview and multislice rendering algorithms to exploit the performance of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable real-time visualization of 3-D graphics from medical imaging, oil & gas exploration, and homeland security. At the time of writing, SpatialGL runs on COTS workstations (both Windows and Linux) and on Actuality"s high-performance embedded computational engine that couples an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 Ultra GPU, an AMD Athlon 64 processor, and a proprietary, high-speed, programmable volumetric frame buffer that interfaces to a 1024 x 768 x 3 digital projector. Progress is illustrated using an off-the-shelf multiview display, Actuality"s multiplanar Perspecta Spatial 3D System, and an experimental multiview display. The experimental display is a quasi-holographic view-sequential system that generates aerial imagery measuring 30 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, providing 198 horizontal views.

  12. Measuring fish and their physical habitats: Versatile 2D and 3D video techniques with user-friendly software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuswanger, Jason R.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Hughes, Nicholas F.

    2017-01-01

    Applications of video in fisheries research range from simple biodiversity surveys to three-dimensional (3D) measurement of complex swimming, schooling, feeding, and territorial behaviors. However, researchers lack a transparently developed, easy-to-use, general purpose tool for 3D video measurement and event logging. Thus, we developed a new measurement system, with freely available, user-friendly software, easily obtained hardware, and flexible underlying mathematical methods capable of high precision and accuracy. The software, VidSync, allows users to efficiently record, organize, and navigate complex 2D or 3D measurements of fish and their physical habitats. Laboratory tests showed submillimetre accuracy in length measurements of 50.8 mm targets at close range, with increasing errors (mostly <1%) at longer range and for longer targets. A field test on juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) feeding behavior in Alaska streams found that individuals within aggregations avoided the immediate proximity of their competitors, out to a distance of 1.0 to 2.9 body lengths. This system makes 3D video measurement a practical tool for laboratory and field studies of aquatic or terrestrial animal behavior and ecology.

  13. Cerebral Aneurysm Clipping Surgery Simulation Using Patient-Specific 3D Printing and Silicone Casting.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Justin R; Almefty, Kaith K; Nakaji, Peter; Frakes, David H

    2016-04-01

    Neurosurgery simulator development is growing as practitioners recognize the need for improved instructional and rehearsal platforms to improve procedural skills and patient care. In addition, changes in practice patterns have decreased the volume of specific cases, such as aneurysm clippings, which reduces the opportunity for operating room experience. The authors developed a hands-on, dimensionally accurate model for aneurysm clipping using patient-derived anatomic data and three-dimensional (3D) printing. Design of the model focused on reproducibility as well as adaptability to new patient geometry. A modular, reproducible, and patient-derived medical simulacrum was developed for medical learners to practice aneurysmal clipping procedures. Various forms of 3D printing were used to develop a geometrically accurate cranium and vascular tree featuring 9 patient-derived aneurysms. 3D printing in conjunction with elastomeric casting was leveraged to achieve a patient-derived brain model with tactile properties not yet available from commercial 3D printing technology. An educational pilot study was performed to gauge simulation efficacy. Through the novel manufacturing process, a patient-derived simulacrum was developed for neurovascular surgical simulation. A follow-up qualitative study suggests potential to enhance current educational programs; assessments support the efficacy of the simulacrum. The proposed aneurysm clipping simulator has the potential to improve learning experiences in surgical environment. 3D printing and elastomeric casting can produce patient-derived models for a dynamic learning environment that add value to surgical training and preparation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring upper airway volume: accuracy and reliability of Dolphin 3D software compared to manual segmentation in craniosynostosis patients.

    PubMed

    de Water, Valerie R; Saridin, Joan K; Bouw, Frederik; Murawska, Magdalena M; Koudstaal, Maarten J

    2014-01-01

    To test the accuracy and reliability of Dolphin 3-dimensional (3D) software airway analysis compared with manual segmentation in patients who underwent a Le Fort III osteotomy. Computed tomographic scans of 20 patients with syndromic craniosynostosis at Sophia's Children's Hospital (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) were used for airway volume measurements using Dolphin 3D. The same scans had been used for measurement using a manual segmentation method. The results of this previous study were reported in 2010. The manual segmentation measuring result was used as a gold standard. The airway was subdivided into the oropharynx and the nasal passage. A linear mixed effects statistical model was applied. Dolphin 3D measurements differed from manual segmentation by 9 to 43%, depending on the observer, the time at which the measured scan was acquired (pre- or postoperative), and the airway compartment being measured. The highest accuracy for Dolphin 3D was found for measurements from postoperative scans of the nasal passage. The airway analysis tool of Dolphin 3D is not accurate or reliable enough to use in a Le Fort III osteotomy evaluation. When scanning properties are conditioned and measurements are standardized, accuracy and reliability may increase. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 3D simulation of tungsten low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in contact holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bär, E.; Lorenz, J.

    1995-10-01

    We present a new method for three-dimensional (3D) simulation of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition in arbitrary geometries using a segment-based topography discretization with triangles combined with the calculation of particle fluxes to the wafer surface. The simulation program is applied to tungsten LPCVD using the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF 6) by silane (SiH 4). We found that an approach in which the redistribution of the SiH 4 molecules is simulated and a constant reaction probability after collision of a SiH 4 molecule with the surface is assumed allows the simulation of this process with a reaction probability which is consistent with thermodynamic calculations. A comparison between a simulated 3D profile and experimental data from tungsten LPCVD in a contact hole shows very good agreement between experiment and simulation.

  16. DYNA3D, INGRID, and TAURUS: an integrated, interactive software system for crashworthiness engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Stillman, D.W.

    1985-04-01

    Crashworthiness engineering has always been a high priority at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory because of its role in the safe transport of radioactive material for the nuclear power industry and military. As a result, the authors have developed an integrated, interactive set of finite element programs for crashworthiness analysis. The heart of the system is DYNA3D, an explicit, fully vectorized, large deformation structural dynamics code. DYNA3D has the following four capabilities that are critical for the efficient and accurate analysis of crashes: (1) fully nonlinear solid, shell, and beam elements for representing a structure, (2) a broad range of constitutive models for representing the materials, (3) sophisticated contact algorithms for the impact interactions, and (4) a rigid body capability to represent the bodies away from the impact zones at a greatly reduced cost without sacrificing any accuracy in the momentum calculations. To generate the large and complex data files for DYNA3D, INGRID, a general purpose mesh generator, is used. It runs on everything from IBM PCs to CRAYS, and can generate 1000 nodes/minute on a PC. With its efficient hidden line algorithms and many options for specifying geometry, INGRID also doubles as a geometric modeller. TAURUS, an interactive post processor, is used to display DYNA3D output. In addition to the standard monochrome hidden line display, time history plotting, and contouring, TAURUS generates interactive color displays on 8 color video screens by plotting color bands superimposed on the mesh which indicate the value of the state variables. For higher quality color output, graphic output files may be sent to the DICOMED film recorders. We have found that color is every bit as important as hidden line removal in aiding the analyst in understanding his results. In this paper the basic methodologies of the programs are presented along with several crashworthiness calculations.

  17. Argonaute 3D: a real-time cooperative medical planning software on DSL network.

    PubMed

    Le Mer, Pascal; Soler, Luc; Pavy, Dominique; Bernard, Alain; Moreau, Johan; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Today, diagnosis of cancer and also therapeutic choice imply many specialized practitioners. They are generally located at different places and have to take the best decision as promptly as possible with the difficulty of CT-scan or MRI interpretation. Argonaute 3D is a tool that easily overcomes these issues, thanks to a cooperative solution based on virtual reality. An experimentation, where four practitioners met virtually throughout France, allowed to assess the interest of this solution.

  18. Stem dependence on stiffness in 3D RNA simulation using SimRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Wayne; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz

    2015-03-01

    SimRNA is a recently developed de novo 3D structure prediction program in our laboratory that uses the Monte Carlo method to search the conformation space of RNA using knowledge based energy functions. In developing the 3D model, we have also be exploring the larger physical questions about what generates differences in Kuhn length (a measure of stiffness) in biopolymers. In previoius work, this was shown to depend on the stem length and to be a function of the length and Young's modulus. A complete theoretical model was of the entropy changes due to the freezing out of degrees of freedom was developed base on this model. In this study, we find that this is further supported in the development of the 3D statitstical potentials for actual 3D simulations of RNA.

  19. Mixed reality orthognathic surgical simulation by entity model manipulation and 3D-image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonagayoshi, Tatsunari; Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Fushima, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    In orthognathic surgery, the framing of 3D-surgical planning that considers the balance between the front and back positions and the symmetry of the jawbone, as well as the dental occlusion of teeth, is essential. In this study, a support system for orthodontic surgery to visualize the changes in the mandible and the occlusal condition and to determine the optimum position in mandibular osteotomy has been developed. By integrating the operating portion of a tooth model that is to determine the optimum occlusal position by manipulating the entity tooth model and the 3D-CT skeletal images (3D image display portion) that are simultaneously displayed in real-time, the determination of the mandibular position and posture in which the improvement of skeletal morphology and occlusal condition is considered, is possible. The realistic operation of the entity model and the virtual 3D image display enabled the construction of a surgical simulation system that involves augmented reality.

  20. 3D current source density imaging based on acoustoelectric effect: a simulation study using unipolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Liu, Jun; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    It is of importance to image electrical activity and properties of biological tissues. Recently hybrid imaging modality combing ultrasound scanning and source imaging through the acousto-electric (AE) effect has generated considerable interest. Such modality has the potential to provide high spatial resolution current density imaging by utilizing the pressure induced AE resistivity change confined at the ultrasound focus. In this study, we investigate a novel 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI) approach using unipolar ultrasound pulses. Utilizing specially designed unipolar ultrasound pulses and by combining AE signals associated to the local resistivity changes at the focusing point, we are able to reconstruct the 3D current density distribution with the boundary voltage measurements obtained while performing a 3D ultrasound scan. We have shown in computer simulation that using the present method, it is feasible to image with high spatial resolution an arbitrary 3D current density distribution in an inhomogeneous conductive media. PMID:21628774

  1. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  2. Benchmark and comparisons of FEL simulation programs TDA3D and GENESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.-C.; Milton, S.V.

    1999-09-11

    A low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This line will initially be used to demonstrate a free-electron laser (FEL) based on the self-amplified spontaneous-emission (SASE) process. The FEL simulation programs, TDA3D and GENESIS, together with several other codes have been used for the LEUTL project. In order to increase the confidence on the simulation results, we attempted to benchmark two programs TDA3D and GENESIS. The results are reported here.

  3. Simulation approach of atomic layer deposition in large 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwille, Matthias C.; Barth, Jonas; Schössler, Timo; Schön, Florian; Bartha, Johann W.; Oettel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We present a new simulation method predicting thicknesses of thin films obtained by atomic layer deposition in high aspect ratio 3D geometries as they appear in MEMS manufacturing. The method features a Monte-Carlo computation of film deposition in free molecular flow, as well as in the Knudsen and diffusive gas regime, applicable for large structures. We compare our approach to analytic and simulation results from the literature. The capability of the method is demonstrated by a comparison to experimental film thicknesses in a large 3D structure. Finally, the feasability to extract process parameters, i.e. sticking coefficients is shown.

  4. Ground motion simulations in Marmara (Turkey) region from 3D finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ulrich, Thomas; Douglas, John

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European project MARSite (2012-2016), one of the main contributions from our research team was to provide ground-motion simulations for the Marmara region from various earthquake source scenarios. We adopted a 3D finite difference code, taking into account the 3D structure around the Sea of Marmara (including the bathymetry) and the sea layer. We simulated two moderate earthquakes (about Mw4.5) and found that the 3D structure improves significantly the waveforms compared to the 1D layer model. Simulations were carried out for different earthquakes (moderate point sources and large finite sources) in order to provide shake maps (Aochi and Ulrich, BSSA, 2015), to study the variability of ground-motion parameters (Douglas & Aochi, BSSA, 2016) as well as to provide synthetic seismograms for the blind inversion tests (Diao et al., GJI, 2016). The results are also planned to be integrated in broadband ground-motion simulations, tsunamis generation and simulations of triggered landslides (in progress by different partners). The simulations are freely shared among the partners via the internet and the visualization of the results is diffused on the project's homepage. All these simulations should be seen as a reference for this region, as they are based on the latest knowledge that obtained during the MARSite project, although their refinement and validation of the model parameters and the simulations are a continuing research task relying on continuing observations. The numerical code used, the models and the simulations are available on demand.

  5. Precipitation Processes Developed During ARM (1997), TOGA COARE (1992) GATE (1974), SCSMEX (1998), and KWAJEX (1999): Consistent 3D, Semi-3D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Hou, A.; Atlas, R.; Starr, D.; Sud, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Real clouds and cloud systems are inherently three-dimensional (3D). Because of the limitations in computer resources, however, most cloud-resolving models (CRMs) today are still two-dimensional (2D) have been used to study the response of clouds to large-scale forcing. IN these 3D simulators, the model domain was small, and the integration time was 6 hours. Only recently have 3D experiments been performed for multi-day periods for tropical clouds systems with large horizontal domains at the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and at NASA Goddard Space Center. At Goddard, a 3D cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was used to simulate periods during TOGA COARE, GATE, SCSMEX, ARM, and KWAJEX using a 512 by 512 km domain (with 2-km resolution). The result indicate that surface precipitation and latent heating profiles are very similar between the 2D and 3D GCE model simulation. The major objective of this paper are: (1) to assess the performance of the super-parametrization technique, (2) calculate and examine the surface energy (especially radiation) and water budget, and (3) identify the differences and similarities in the organization and entrainment rates of convection between simulated 2D and 3D cloud systems.

  6. Accurate load prediction by BEM with airfoil data from 3D RANS simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Marc S.; Nitzsche, Jens; Hennings, Holger

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two methods for the extraction of airfoil coefficients from 3D CFD simulations of a wind turbine rotor are investigated, and these coefficients are used to improve the load prediction of a BEM code. The coefficients are extracted from a number of steady RANS simulations, using either averaging of velocities in annular sections, or an inverse BEM approach for determination of the induction factors in the rotor plane. It is shown that these 3D rotor polars are able to capture the rotational augmentation at the inner part of the blade as well as the load reduction by 3D effects close to the blade tip. They are used as input to a simple BEM code and the results of this BEM with 3D rotor polars are compared to the predictions of BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients plus common empirical corrections for stall delay and tip loss. While BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients produces a very different radial distribution of loads than the RANS simulation, the BEM with 3D rotor polars manages to reproduce the loads from RANS very accurately for a variety of load cases, as long as the blade pitch angle is not too different from the cases from which the polars were extracted.

  7. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; ...

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties.more » Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.« less

  8. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties. Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.

  9. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  10. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties. Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.

  11. BurnCase 3D software validation study: Burn size measurement accuracy and inter-rater reliability.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Daryousch; Giretzlehner, Michael; Wurzer, Paul; Klein, Limor Dinur; Shoham, Yaron; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Haller, Herbert L; Tuca, Alexandru; Branski, Ludwik K; Lumenta, David B; Herndon, David N; Kamolz, Lars-P

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of burn size estimation using the computer-assisted software BurnCase 3D (RISC Software GmbH, Hagenberg, Austria) with that using a 2D scan, considered to be the actual burn size. Thirty artificial burn areas were pre planned and prepared on three mannequins (one child, one female, and one male). Five trained physicians (raters) were asked to assess the size of all wound areas using BurnCase 3D software. The results were then compared with the real wound areas, as determined by 2D planimetry imaging. To examine inter-rater reliability, we performed an intraclass correlation analysis with a 95% confidence interval. The mean wound area estimations of the five raters using BurnCase 3D were in total 20.7±0.9% for the child, 27.2±1.5% for the female and 16.5±0.1% for the male mannequin. Our analysis showed relative overestimations of 0.4%, 2.8% and 1.5% for the child, female and male mannequins respectively, compared to the 2D scan. The intraclass correlation between the single raters for mean percentage of the artificial burn areas was 98.6%. There was also a high intraclass correlation between the single raters and the 2D Scan visible. BurnCase 3D is a valid and reliable tool for the determination of total body surface area burned in standard models. Further clinical studies including different pediatric and overweight adult mannequins are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D simulations of fluctuation spectra in the hall-MHD plasma.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Shukla, P K

    2009-01-30

    Turbulent spectral cascades are investigated by means of fully three-dimensional (3D) simulations of a compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD) plasma in order to understand the observed spectral break in the solar wind turbulence spectra in the regime where the characteristic length scales associated with electromagnetic fluctuations are smaller than the ion gyroradius. In this regime, the results of our 3D simulations exhibit that turbulent spectral cascades in the presence of a mean magnetic field follow an omnidirectional anisotropic inertial-range spectrum close to k(-7/3). The latter is associated with the Hall current arising from nonequal electron and ion fluid velocities in our 3D H-MHD plasma model.

  13. 3-D FDTD simulation of shear waves for evaluation of complex modulus imaging.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Marko; Wang, Yue; Insana, Michael

    2011-02-01

    The Navier equation describing shear wave propagation in 3-D viscoelastic media is solved numerically with a finite differences time domain (FDTD) method. Solutions are formed in terms of transverse scatterer velocity waves and then verified via comparison to measured wave fields in heterogeneous hydrogel phantoms. The numerical algorithm is used as a tool to study the effects on complex shear modulus estimation from wave propagation in heterogeneous viscoelastic media. We used an algebraic Helmholtz inversion (AHI) technique to solve for the complex shear modulus from simulated and experimental velocity data acquired in 2-D and 3-D. Although 3-D velocity estimates are required in general, there are object geometries for which 2-D inversions provide accurate estimations of the material properties. Through simulations and experiments, we explored artifacts generated in elastic and dynamic-viscous shear modulus images related to the shear wavelength and average viscosity.

  14. 3D particle simulations of space-charge-dominated beams in HIF accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S.M.; Haber, I.

    1997-05-01

    The development of a high current, heavy-ion beam for inertial confinement fusion requires a detailed understanding of the behavior of the beam, including effects of the large self-fields. This necessity makes particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation the appropriate tool, and for this reason, the three-dimensional PIC/accelerator code WARP3d is being developed. WARP3d has been used extensively to study the creation and propagation of ion beams both to support experiments and for the understanding of basic beam physics. An overview of the structure of the code is presented along with a discussion of features that make the code an effective tool in the understanding of space-charge dominated beam behavior. A number of applications where WARP3d has played an important role is discussed, emphasizing the need of three-dimensional, first principles simulations. Results and comparisons with experiment are presented.

  15. Stochastic microstructure modeling and electrochemical simulation of lithium-ion cell anodes in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Simon; Feinauer, Julian; Westhoff, Daniel; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Latz, Arnulf

    2016-12-01

    Thermodynamically consistent transport theory is used to compare 3D images of real anode microstructures from lithium-ion batteries to virtual ones created by a parametric stochastic 3D microstructure model. Half-cell simulations in 3D with spatially resolved microstructures at different applied currents show that for low currents the deviations between various electrochemical quantities like current density or overpotential are negligibly small. For larger currents small differences become more pronounced. Qualitative and quantitative differences of these features are discussed with respect to the microstructure and it is shown that the real and virtual structures behave similar during electrochemical simulations. Extensions of the stochastic microstructure model, which overcome small differences in electrochemical behavior, are proposed.

  16. Proving the possibility of using Delft3D in irrigation systems simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theol, Shaimaa; Suryadi, Francisco; de-Fraiture, Charlotte; Jagers, Bert

    2017-04-01

    Irrigation system's performance and sustainability are highly affected by sediment deposition. A significant amount of research has been carried out regarding non-cohesive sedimentation in rivers, coastal, estuaries and irrigation canals. For cohesive sediments, research has been undertaken only in rivers and estuaries, but not in irrigation canals. Also most of mathematical models are used for rivers, few models are used for irrigation canals. There is hardly any mathematical model that simulates cohesive sediments in irrigation systems. From literature review it was found that Delft3d model, which is originally designed for rivers, is suitable because it can simulate cohesive sediments and it deals with networks, also because of the big similarities between rivers and irrigation systems. This study verifies the possibility of using Delft3d in simulation of irrigation canals from a hydrodynamic and morphodynamic points of view. For this purpose the Delft3D model was applied to a hypothetical case study where a main canal feeds one branch canal to simulate flow in several canals with different sizes. In scenario 1 and 2 it is assumed that no sediment is in the system and its results are compared with other results obtained from mathematical model which is originally used in irrigation canals named DUFLOW model. The results of scenario 1 and 2 were too close to each other and the flow was steady in the canal, therefore based on the results of the comparison it can be stated that Delft3d model is suitable to be used in irrigation systems from hydrodynamic point of view. After getting these satisfactory results and proved ability of delft3d, scenario 3 were taken assuming cohesive sediments enter an irrigation systems with concentration equal to 0.05 kg/m3. Delft3d gave good image about cohesive sediments behaviour, so it can be stated that Delft3d model is suitable to be used in irrigation systems from morphodynamic point of view despite some constrains As a forward

  17. "Just-In-Time" Simulation Training Using 3-D Printed Cardiac Models After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Laura J; Su, Lillian; Hynes, Conor F; Krieger, Axel; Alfares, Fahad A; Ramakrishnan, Karthik; Zurakowski, David; Marshall, M Blair; Kim, Peter C W; Jonas, Richard A; Nath, Dilip S

    2016-03-01

    High-fidelity simulation using patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models may be effective in facilitating pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) provider training for clinical management of congenital cardiac surgery patients. The 3D-printed heart models were rendered from preoperative cross-sectional cardiac imaging for 10 patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery. Immediately following surgical repair, a congenital cardiac surgeon and an intensive care physician conducted a simulation training session regarding postoperative care utilizing the patient-specific 3D model for the PCICU team. After the simulation, Likert-type 0 to 10 scale questionnaire assessed participant perception of impact of the training session. Seventy clinicians participated in training sessions, including 22 physicians, 38 nurses, and 10 ancillary care providers. Average response to whether 3D models were more helpful than standard hand off was 8.4 of 10. Questions regarding enhancement of understanding and clinical ability received average responses of 9.0 or greater, and 90% of participants scored 8 of 10 or higher. Nurses scored significantly higher than other clinicians on self-reported familiarity with the surgery (7.1 vs. 5.8; P = .04), clinical management ability (8.6 vs. 7.7; P = .02), and ability enhancement (9.5 vs. 8.7; P = .02). Compared to physicians, nurses and ancillary providers were more likely to consider 3D models more helpful than standard hand off (8.7 vs. 7.7; P = .05). Higher case complexity predicted greater enhancement of understanding of surgery (P = .04). The 3D heart models can be used to enhance congenital cardiac critical care via simulation training of multidisciplinary intensive care teams. Benefit may be dependent on provider type and case complexity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Numerical simulations and vorticity dynamics of self-propelled swimming of 3D bionic fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, ZhiQiang; Wu, ChuiJie

    2012-02-01

    Numerical simulations and the control of self-propelled swimming of three-dimensional bionic fish in a viscous flow and the mechanism of fish swimming are carried out in this study, with a 3D computational fluid dynamics package, which includes the immersed boundary method and the volume of fluid method, the adaptive multi-grid finite volume method, and the control strategy of fish swimming. Firstly, the mechanism of 3D fish swimming was studied and the vorticity dynamics root was traced to the moving body surface by using the boundary vorticity-flux theory. With the change of swimming speed, the contributions of the fish body and caudal fin to thrust are analyzed quantitatively. The relationship between vortex structures of fish swimming and the forces exerted on the fish body are also given in this paper. Finally, the 3D wake structure of self-propelled swimming of 3D bionic fish is presented. The in-depth analysis of the 3D vortex structure in the role of 3D biomimetic fish swimming is also performed.

  19. Software Development for Producing Standard Navy Surf Output from Delft3D

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-29

    and surf prediction. We thank Mr. Ted Mettlach, formerly at Neptune Sciences Inc., for evaluating the software. REFERENCES Allard, R., J. Dykes...ending index % Com file is opened and relevant info is extracted. filename = sprintf (’%s%s’, ’com-’, runid, ’.dat’) Nfs = vs_use (filename,’quiet

  20. Multi-scale simulations of space problems with iPIC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bettarini, Lapo; Markidis, Stefano

    The implicit Particle-in-Cell method for the computer simulation of space plasma, and its im-plementation in a three-dimensional parallel code, called iPIC3D, are presented. The implicit integration in time of the Vlasov-Maxwell system removes the numerical stability constraints and enables kinetic plasma simulations at magnetohydrodynamics scales. Simulations of mag-netic reconnection in plasma are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithm. In particular we will show a number of simulations done for large scale 3D systems using the physical mass ratio for Hydrogen. Most notably one simulation treats kinetically a box of tens of Earth radii in each direction and was conducted using about 16000 processors of the Pleiades NASA computer. The work is conducted in collaboration with the MMS-IDS theory team from University of Colorado (M. Goldman, D. Newman and L. Andersson). Reference: Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Available online 17 October 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  1. Peach Bottom 2 Turbine Trip Simulation Using TRAC-BF1/COS3D, a Best-Estimate Coupled 3-D Core and Thermal-Hydraulic Code System

    SciTech Connect

    Ui, Atsushi; Miyaji, Takamasa

    2004-10-15

    The best-estimate coupled three-dimensional (3-D) core and thermal-hydraulic code system TRAC-BF1/COS3D has been developed. COS3D, based on a modified one-group neutronic model, is a 3-D core simulator used for licensing analyses and core management of commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) plants in Japan. TRAC-BF1 is a plant simulator based on a two-fluid model. TRAC-BF1/COS3D is a coupled system of both codes, which are connected using a parallel computing tool. This code system was applied to the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark. Since the two-group cross-section tables are provided by the benchmark team, COS3D was modified to apply to this specification. Three best-estimate scenarios and four hypothetical scenarios were calculated using this code system. In the best-estimate scenario, the predicted core power with TRAC-BF1/COS3D is slightly underestimated compared with the measured data. The reason seems to be a slight difference in the core boundary conditions, that is, pressure changes and the core inlet flow distribution, because the peak in this analysis is sensitive to them. However, the results of this benchmark analysis show that TRAC-BF1/COS3D gives good precision for the prediction of the actual BWR transient behavior on the whole. Furthermore, the results with the modified one-group model and the two-group model were compared to verify the application of the modified one-group model to this benchmark. This comparison shows that the results of the modified one-group model are appropriate and sufficiently precise.

  2. 3D simulation of silicon micro-ring resonator with Comsol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, S. A.; Podlipnov, V. V.; Verma, Payal; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we provide 3d full-vector static electromagnetic simulation of silicon micro-ring resonator operating. We show that geometrical and scalar approaches are not sufficiently accurate for calculating resonator parameters. Quite strong dependence of ring resonator radius on waveguide width is revealed.

  3. An Object-Oriented Simulator for 3D Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Kubra

    2013-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV) are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM) values. PMID:24371468

  4. Online Stereo 3D Simulation in Studying the Spherical Pendulum in Conservative Force Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav S.

    2013-01-01

    The current paper aims at presenting a modern e-learning method and tool that is utilized in teaching physics in the universities. An online stereo 3D simulation is used for e-learning mechanics and specifically the teaching of spherical pendulum as part of the General Physics course for students in the universities. This approach was realized on…

  5. PEGASUS. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  6. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code Which Solves for Geometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, Timothy J.

    1998-01-13

    Pegasus is a 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Code which solves for geometries which can be represented by bodies of revolution. Included are all the surface chemistry enhancements in the 2D code Icarus as well as a real vacuum pump model. The code includes multiple species transport.

  7. Results of a 3-D full particle simulation of quasi-perpendicular shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress of computational power enables us to perform really macro-scale three-dimensional situations with full particle codes. In this presentation, we will report results of a three-dimensional simulation of a quasi-perpendicular shock. The simulation parameters were selected to simulate a Cluster-II observational result reported by Seki et al. (2009), M_A=7.4 and beta=0.16. The realistic mass ratio mi/me=1840 was taken, and almost one ion inertia length square could be allocated to the plane perpendicular to the upstream flow axis. The result shows that both the self-reformation process and whistler emission are observed. However, the 3-D result is not a simple superposition of 2-D results. The most impressive feature is that quite complicated wave activity is found in the shock foot region. With the help of this wave activity, electron heating observed in the 3-D run is more efficient than those in the 1-D and 2-D runs with the same shock parameters. Moreover, non-thermal electrons are also produced only in the 3D run. In this paper, comparing the 3-D result with previous 1-D and 2-D simulation results, three dimensional nature of the shock transition region of quasi-perpendicular shock is discussed.

  8. Learning Patterns as Criterion for Forming Work Groups in 3D Simulation Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maria Cela-Ranilla, Jose; Molías, Luis Marqués; Cervera, Mercè Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between the use of learning patterns as a grouping criterion to develop learning activities in the 3D simulation environment at University. Participants included 72 Spanish students from the Education and Marketing disciplines. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were conducted. The process was…

  9. Learning Patterns as Criterion for Forming Work Groups in 3D Simulation Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maria Cela-Ranilla, Jose; Molías, Luis Marqués; Cervera, Mercè Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between the use of learning patterns as a grouping criterion to develop learning activities in the 3D simulation environment at University. Participants included 72 Spanish students from the Education and Marketing disciplines. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were conducted. The process was…

  10. Structured light imaging system for structural and optical characterization of 3D tissue-simulating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songde; Smith, Zach; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-10-01

    There is a pressing need for a phantom standard to calibrate medical optical devices. However, 3D printing of tissue-simulating phantom standard is challenged by lacking of appropriate methods to characterize and reproduce surface topography and optical properties accurately. We have developed a structured light imaging system to characterize surface topography and optical properties (absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient) of 3D tissue-simulating phantoms. The system consisted of a hyperspectral light source, a digital light projector (DLP), a CMOS camera, two polarizers, a rotational stage, a translation stage, a motion controller, and a personal computer. Tissue-simulating phantoms with different structural and optical properties were characterized by the proposed imaging system and validated by a standard integrating sphere system. The experimental results showed that the proposed system was able to achieve pixel-level optical properties with a percentage error of less than 11% for absorption coefficient and less than 7% for reduced scattering coefficient for phantoms without surface curvature. In the meanwhile, 3D topographic profile of the phantom can be effectively reconstructed with an accuracy of less than 1% deviation error. Our study demonstrated that the proposed structured light imaging system has the potential to characterize structural profile and optical properties of 3D tissue-simulating phantoms.

  11. An object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Saeed; Cengiz, Kubra; Kamasak, Mustafa; Yildirim, Isa

    2013-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV) are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM) values.

  12. The Filament Editor: an interactive software environment for visualization, proof-editing and analysis of 3D neuron morphology.

    PubMed

    Dercksen, Vincent J; Hege, Hans-Christian; Oberlaender, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    Neuroanatomical analysis, such as classification of cell types, depends on reliable reconstruction of large numbers of complete 3D dendrite and axon morphologies. At present, the majority of neuron reconstructions are obtained from preparations in a single tissue slice in vitro, thus suffering from cut off dendrites and, more dramatically, cut off axons. In general, axons can innervate volumes of several cubic millimeters and may reach path lengths of tens of centimeters. Thus, their complete reconstruction requires in vivo labeling, histological sectioning and imaging of large fields of view. Unfortunately, anisotropic background conditions across such large tissue volumes, as well as faintly labeled thin neurites, result in incomplete or erroneous automated tracings and even lead experts to make annotation errors during manual reconstructions. Consequently, tracing reliability renders the major bottleneck for reconstructing complete 3D neuron morphologies. Here, we present a novel set of tools, integrated into a software environment named 'Filament Editor', for creating reliable neuron tracings from sparsely labeled in vivo datasets. The Filament Editor allows for simultaneous visualization of complex neuronal tracings and image data in a 3D viewer, proof-editing of neuronal tracings, alignment and interconnection across sections, and morphometric analysis in relation to 3D anatomical reference structures. We illustrate the functionality of the Filament Editor on the example of in vivo labeled axons and demonstrate that for the exemplary dataset the final tracing results after proof-editing are independent of the expertise of the human operator.

  13. [Pre-surgical simulation of microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm using 3D-models].

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Toshihiro; Yang, Qiang; Kaneko, Naoki; Konno, Takehiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Eiju

    2015-01-01

    We have been performing pre-surgical simulations using custom-built patient-specific 3D-models. Here we report the advantageous use of 3D-models for simulating microvascular decompression(MVD)for hemifacial spasms. Seven cases of MVD surgery were performed. Two types of 3D-printers were used to fabricate the 3D-models:one using plaster as the modeling material(Z Printer®450, 3D systems, Rock Hill, SC, USA)and the other using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene(ABS)(UP! Plus 3D printer®, Beijing Tiertime Technology, Beijing). We tested three types of models. Type 1 was a plaster model of the brainstem, cerebellum, facial nerve, and the artery compressing the root exit zone of the facial nerve. Part of the cerebellum was digitally trimmed off to observe "the compressing point" from the same angle as that used during actual surgery. Type 2 was a modified Type 1 in which part of the skull was opened digitally to mimic a craniectomy. Type 3 was a combined model in which the cerebellum and the artery of the Type 2 model were replaced by a soft retractable cerebellum and an elastic artery. The cerebellum was made from polyurethane and cast from a plaster prototype. To fabricate elastic arteries, liquid silicone was painted onto the surface of an ABS artery and the inner ABS model was dissolved away using solvent. In all cases, the 3D-models were very useful. Although each type has advantages, the Type-3 model was judged extremely useful for training junior surgeons in microsurgical approaches.

  14. The Vajont disaster: a 3D numerical simulation for the slide and the waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Angelo; Androsov, Alexey; Vacondio, Renato; Zanchettin, Davide; Voltzinger, Naum

    2016-04-01

    A very high resolution O(5 m), 3D hydrostatic nonlinear numerical model was used to simulate the dynamics of both the slide and the surface waves produced during the Vajont disaster (north Italy, 1963), one of the major landslide-induced tsunamis ever documented. Different simulated wave phenomena like, e.g., maximum run-up on the opposite shore, maximum height, and water velocity were analyzed and compared with data available in literature, including the results of a fully 3D simulation obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code. The difference between measured and simulated after-slide bathymetries was calculated and used in an attempt to quantify the relative magnitude and extension of rigid and fluid motion components during the event.

  15. The computer simulation of 3d gas dynamics in a gas centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Bogovalov, S. V.; Borisevich, V. D.; Tronin, I. V.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We argue on the basis of the results of 2D analysis of the gas flow in gas centrifuges that a reliable calculation of the circulation of the gas and gas content in the gas centrifuge is possible only in frameworks of 3D numerical simulation of gas dynamics in the gas centrifuge (hereafter GC). The group from National research nuclear university, MEPhI, has created a computer code for 3D simulation of the gas flow in GC. The results of the computer simulations of the gas flows in GC are presented. A model Iguassu centrifuge is explored for the simulations. A nonaxisymmetric gas flow is produced due to interaction of the hypersonic rotating flow with the scoops for extraction of the product and waste flows from the GC. The scoops produce shock waves penetrating into a working camera of the GC and form spiral waves there.

  16. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C.J.H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in eta Car.We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form.We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for eta Car.

  17. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in Eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in Eta Car. We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form. We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for Eta Car.

  18. Rise time of proton cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, J.; Gizzi, L. A.; Londrillo, P.; Mirzanejad, S.; Rovelli, T.; Sinigardi, S.; Turchetti, G.

    2017-04-01

    The Target Normal Sheath Acceleration regime for proton acceleration by laser pulses is experimentally consolidated and fairly well understood. However, uncertainties remain in the analysis of particle-in-cell simulation results. The energy spectrum is exponential with a cut-off, but the maximum energy depends on the simulation time, following different laws in two and three dimensional (2D, 3D) PIC simulations so that the determination of an asymptotic value has some arbitrariness. We propose two empirical laws for the rise time of the cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations, suggested by a model in which the proton acceleration is due to a surface charge distribution on the target rear side. The kinetic energy of the protons that we obtain follows two distinct laws, which appear to be nicely satisfied by PIC simulations, for a model target given by a uniform foil plus a contaminant layer that is hydrogen-rich. The laws depend on two parameters: the scaling time, at which the energy starts to rise, and the asymptotic cut-off energy. The values of the cut-off energy, obtained by fitting 2D and 3D simulations for the same target and laser pulse configuration, are comparable. This suggests that parametric scans can be performed with 2D simulations since 3D ones are computationally very expensive, delegating their role only to a correspondence check. In this paper, the simulations are carried out with the PIC code ALaDyn by changing the target thickness L and the incidence angle α, with a fixed a0 = 3. A monotonic dependence, on L for normal incidence and on α for fixed L, is found, as in the experimental results for high temporal contrast pulses.

  19. 3D range-modulator for scanned particle therapy: development, Monte Carlo simulations and experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Yuri; Weber, Uli; Penchev, Petar; Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Schuy, Christoph; Brons, Stephan; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Bliedtner, Jens; Zink, Klemens

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to design and manufacture a 3D range-modulator for scanned particle therapy. The modulator is intended to create a highly conformal dose distribution with only one fixed energy, simultaneously reducing considerably the treatment time. As a proof of concept, a 3D range-modulator was developed for a spherical target volume with a diameter of 5 cm, placed at a depth of 25 cm in a water phantom. It consists of a large number of thin pins with a well-defined shape and different lengths to modulate the necessary shift of the Bragg peak. The 3D range-modulator was manufactured with a rapid prototyping technique. The FLUKA Monte Carlo package was used to simulate the modulating effect of the 3D range-modulator and the resulting dose distribution. For that purpose, a special user routine was implemented to handle its complex geometrical contour. Additionally, FLUKA was extended with the capability of intensity modulated scanning. To validate the simulation results, dose measurements were carried out at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center with a 400.41 MeV/u 12C beam. The high resolution dosimetric measurements show a good agreement between simulated and measured dose distributions. Irradiation of the monoenergetic raster plan took 3 s, which is approximately 20 times shorter than a comparable plan with 16 different energies. The combination of only one energy and a 3D range-modulator leads to a tremendous decrease in irradiation time. ‘Interplay effects’, typical for moving targets and pencil beam scanning, can be immensely reduced or disappear completely, making the delivery of a homogeneous dose to moving targets more reliable. Combining high dose conformity, very good homogeneity and extremely short irradiation times, the 3D range-modulator is considered to become a clinically applicable method for very fast treatment of lung tumours.

  20. 3D Printing of Preoperative Simulation Models of a Splenic Artery Aneurysm: Precision and Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Takao, Hidemasa; Amemiya, Shiori; Shibata, Eisuke; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is attracting increasing attention in the medical field. This study aimed to apply 3D printing to the production of hollow splenic artery aneurysm models for use in the simulation of endovascular treatment, and to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the simulation model. From 3D computed tomography (CT) angiography data of a splenic artery aneurysm, 10 hollow models reproducing the vascular lumen were created using a fused deposition modeling-type desktop 3D printer. After filling with water, each model was scanned using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of the lumen. All images were coregistered, binarized, and then combined to create an overlap map. The cross-sectional area of the splenic artery aneurysm and its standard deviation (SD) were calculated perpendicular to the x- and y-axes. Most voxels overlapped among the models. The cross-sectional areas were similar among the models, with SDs <0.05 cm(2). The mean cross-sectional areas of the splenic artery aneurysm were slightly smaller than those calculated from the original mask images. The maximum mean cross-sectional areas calculated perpendicular to the x- and y-axes were 3.90 cm(2) (SD, 0.02) and 4.33 cm(2) (SD, 0.02), whereas those calculated from the original mask images were 4.14 cm(2) and 4.66 cm(2), respectively. The mean cross-sectional areas of the afferent artery were, however, almost the same as those calculated from the original mask images. The results suggest that 3D simulation modeling of a visceral artery aneurysm using a fused deposition modeling-type desktop 3D printer and computed tomography angiography data is highly precise and accurate. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Laser scanner data processing and 3D modeling using a free and open source software

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriele, Fatuzzo; Michele, Mangiameli Giuseppe, Mussumeci; Salvatore, Zito

    2015-03-10

    The laser scanning is a technology that allows in a short time to run the relief geometric objects with a high level of detail and completeness, based on the signal emitted by the laser and the corresponding return signal. When the incident laser radiation hits the object to detect, then the radiation is reflected. The purpose is to build a three-dimensional digital model that allows to reconstruct the reality of the object and to conduct studies regarding the design, restoration and/or conservation. When the laser scanner is equipped with a digital camera, the result of the measurement process is a set of points in XYZ coordinates showing a high density and accuracy with radiometric and RGB tones. In this case, the set of measured points is called “point cloud” and allows the reconstruction of the Digital Surface Model. Even the post-processing is usually performed by closed source software, which is characterized by Copyright restricting the free use, free and open source software can increase the performance by far. Indeed, this latter can be freely used providing the possibility to display and even custom the source code. The experience started at the Faculty of Engineering in Catania is aimed at finding a valuable free and open source tool, MeshLab (Italian Software for data processing), to be compared with a reference closed source software for data processing, i.e. RapidForm. In this work, we compare the results obtained with MeshLab and Rapidform through the planning of the survey and the acquisition of the point cloud of a morphologically complex statue.

  2. XML-based 3D model visualization and simulation framework for dynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2002-07-01

    Relatively recent advances in computer technology enable us to create three-dimensional (3D) dynamic models and simulate them within a 3D web environment. The use of such models is especially valuable when teaching simulation, and the concepts behind dynamic models, since the models are made more accessible to the students. Students tend to enjoy a construction process in which they are able to employ their own cultural and aesthetic forms. The challenge is to create a language that allows for a grammar for modeling, while simultaneously permitting arbitrary presentation styles. For further flexibility, we need an effective way to represent and simulate dynamic models that can be shared by modelers over the Internet. We present an Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based framework that will guide a modeler in creating personalized 3D models, visualizing its dynamic behaviors, and simulating the created models. A model author will use XML files to represent geometries and topology of a dynamic model. Model Fusion Engine, written in Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT), expedites the modeling process by automating the creation of dynamic models with the user-defined XML files. Modelers can also link simulation programs with a created model to analyze the characteristics of the model. The advantages of this system lie in the education of modeling and simulating dynamic models, and in the exploitation of visualizing the dynamic model behaviors.

  3. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chunye; Liu, Jie; Chi, Lihua; Huang, Haowei; Fang, Jingyue; Gong, Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates ( Sn) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  4. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  5. Flow simulation in a 3D model of pig airways and connection to lung sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Kara L.; Williams, Paul T.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Ward, Richard C.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Paulus, Michael J.; Munro, Nancy B.; Mahinthakumar, Gnanamanika; Narasimhan, Chandrasegaran; Hammersley, Jeffrey R.; Olson, Dan E.

    2001-08-01

    Fundamental to the understanding of the various transport processes within the respiratory system, airway fluid dynamics plays an important role in biomedical research. When air flows through the respiratory tract, it is constantly changing direction through a complex system of curved and bifurcating tubes. As a result, numerical simulations of the airflow through this tracheobronchial system must be capable of resolving such fluid dynamic phenomena as flow separation, recirculation, secondary flows due to centrifugal instabilities, and shear stress variation along the airway surface. Anatomic complexities within the tracheobronchial tree, such as sharp carinal regions at asymmetric bifurcations, have motivated the application of the incompressible Computational Fluid Dynamics code PHI3D to the modeling of airflow. Developed at ORNL, PHI3D implements the new Continuity Constraint Method. Using a finite-element methodology, complex geometries can be easily simulated with PHI3D using unstructured grids. A time- accurate integration scheme allows the simulation of both transient and steady-state flows. A realistic geometry model of the central airways for the fluid flow studies was obtained from pig lungs using a new high resolution x-ray computed tomography system developed at ORNL for generating 3D images of the internal structure of laboratory animals.

  6. MODES: open-access software for the normal-mode representation of the global 3D circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2015-04-01

    The goal of the talk is to present MODES, software for the normal-mode function representation of the 3D global datasets. The software, developed within the ERC project MODES, is now available to atmospheric research community as an open-access tool. MODES allows one to diagnose properties of balanced and inertio-gravity (IG) circulation across many scales by considering both mass and wind field and the whole model depth. In particular, the IG spectrum, which has only recently become observable in global datasets, can be studied simultaneously in the mass field and wind field and considering the whole model depth. The software can be used for the comparison of climate model outputs with the reanalysis datasets. The presentation will include theoretical background and basic technical details of the software that can be installed and used with a relatively modest effort. Example of the software outputs are available in real-time at http://meteo.fmf.uni-lj.si/MODES. Results from the modal analysis of the ERA Interim dataset as well as the ensemble prediction system of ECMWF are presented.

  7. Parallel implementation of 3D FFT with volumetric decomposition schemes for efficient molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaewoon; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Imamura, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (3D FFT) plays an important role in a wide variety of computer simulations and data analyses, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this study, we develop hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) parallelization schemes of 3D FFT based on two new volumetric decompositions, mainly for the particle mesh Ewald (PME) calculation in MD simulations. In one scheme, (1d_Alltoall), five all-to-all communications in one dimension are carried out, and in the other, (2d_Alltoall), one two-dimensional all-to-all communication is combined with two all-to-all communications in one dimension. 2d_Alltoall is similar to the conventional volumetric decomposition scheme. We performed benchmark tests of 3D FFT for the systems with different grid sizes using a large number of processors on the K computer in RIKEN AICS. The two schemes show comparable performances, and are better than existing 3D FFTs. The performances of 1d_Alltoall and 2d_Alltoall depend on the supercomputer network system and number of processors in each dimension. There is enough leeway for users to optimize performance for their conditions. In the PME method, short-range real-space interactions as well as long-range reciprocal-space interactions are calculated. Our volumetric decomposition schemes are particularly useful when used in conjunction with the recently developed midpoint cell method for short-range interactions, due to the same decompositions of real and reciprocal spaces. The 1d_Alltoall scheme of 3D FFT takes 4.7 ms to simulate one MD cycle for a virus system containing more than 1 million atoms using 32,768 cores on the K computer.

  8. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijerathne, M. L. L.; Hori, Muneo; Sakaguchi, Hide; Oguni, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  9. The program FANS-3D (finite analytic numerical simulation 3-dimensional) and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bravo, Ramiro H.; Chen, Ching-Jen

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the program named FANS-3D (Finite Analytic Numerical Simulation-3 Dimensional) is presented. FANS-3D was designed to solve problems of incompressible fluid flow and combined modes of heat transfer. It solves problems with conduction and convection modes of heat transfer in laminar flow, with provisions for radiation and turbulent flows. It can solve singular or conjugate modes of heat transfer. It also solves problems in natural convection, using the Boussinesq approximation. FANS-3D was designed to solve heat transfer problems inside one, two and three dimensional geometries that can be represented by orthogonal planes in a Cartesian coordinate system. It can solve internal and external flows using appropriate boundary conditions such as symmetric, periodic and user specified.

  10. Simulations of 3D-Si sensors for the innermost layer of the ATLAS pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselga, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.

    2017-03-01

    The LHC is expected to reach luminosities up to 3000 fb-1 and the innermost layer of the ATLAS upgrade plans to cope with higher occupancy and to decrease the pixel size. 3D-Si sensors are a good candidate for the innermost layer of the ATLAS pixel upgrade since they exhibit good performance under high fluences and the new designs will have smaller pixel size to fulfill the electronics expectations. This paper reports TCAD simulations of the 3D-Si sensors designed at IMB-CNM with non-passing-through columns that are being fabricated for the next innermost layer of the ATLAS pixel upgrade. It shows the charge collection response before and after irradiation, and the response of 3D-Si sensors located at large η angles.

  11. SF3M 2.0: improvement of 3D photo-reconstruction interface based on freely available software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael R.; Pérez, Rafael; Gómez, Jose A.

    2016-04-01

    During recent years, a number of tools based on Structure-from-Motion algorithms have been released for full image-based 3D reconstruction either freely (e.g. Bundler, PMVS2, VisualSFM, MicMac) or commercially (e.g. Agisoft PhotoScan). The SF3M interface was developed in Matlab® to use link software developments (VisualSFM, CloudCompare) and new applications to create a semi-automated workflow including reconstruction, georeferencing and point-cloud filtering, and has been tested for gully erosion assessment with terrestrial images (Castillo et al., 2015). The main aim of this work to provide an improved freely-available and easy-to-use alternative for 3D reconstruction intended for public agencies, non-profit organisations, researchers and other stakeholders interested in 3D modelling. In this communication we present SF3M 2.0, a new version of the graphical user interface. In this case, the SfM module is based on MicMac, an open-software tool (Pierrot-Deseilligny and Cléry, 2011) which provides advanced features such as camera calibration and constrained bundle adjustment using ground control points. SF3M 2.0 will be tested in two scenarios: a) using the same ground-based image set tested in Castillo et al. (2015) to compare the performance of both versions and b) using aerial images taken from a helium balloon to assess a gully network in a 40-hectares catchment. In this study we explore the advantages of SF3M 2.0, explain its operation and evaluate its accuracy and performance. This tool will be also available for free download. References Castillo, C., James, M.R., Redel-Macías, M. D., Pérez, R., and Gómez, J.A.: SF3M software: 3-D photo-reconstruction for non-expert users and its application to a gully network, SOIL, 1, 583-594. Pierrot-Deseilligny, M and Cléry, I. APERO, an Open Source Bundle Adjusment Software for Automatic Calibration and Orientation of a Set of Images. Proceedings of the ISPRS Commission V Symposium, Image Engineering and Vision

  12. Magnetic Dissipation in Asymmetric Strong Guide 3D Simulations: Examples of Magnetic Diffusion and Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Interpretations of 2D simulations of magnetic reconnection are greatly simplified by using the flux function, usually the out of plane component of the vector potential. This theoretical device is no longer available when simulations are analyzed in 3-D. We illustrate the results of determining the locale rates of flux slippage in simulations by a technique based on Maxwell's equations. The technique recovers the usual results obtained for the flux function in 2D simulations, but remains viable in 3D simulations where there is no flux function. The method has also been successfully tested for full PIC simulations where reconnection is geometrically forbiddden. While such layers possess measurable flux slippages (diffusion) their level is not as strong as recorded in known 2D PIC reconnection sites using the same methodology. This approach will be used to explore the spatial incidence and strength of flux slippages across a 3D, asymmetric, strong guide field run discussed previously in the literature. Regions of diffusive behavior are illustrated where LHDI has been previously identified out on the separatrices, while much stronger flux slippages, typical of the X-regions of 2D simulations, are shown to occur elsewhere throughout the simulation. These results suggest that reconnection requires sufficiently vigorous flux slippage to be self sustaining, while non-zero flux slippage can and does occur without being at the reconnection site. A cross check of this approach is provided by the mixing ratio of tagged simulation particles of known spatial origin discussed by Daughton et al., 2013 (this meeting); they provide an integral measure of flux slippage up to the present point in the simulation. We will discuss the correlations between our Maxwell based flux slippage rates and the inferred rates of change of this mixing ratio (as recorded in the local fluid frame).

  13. 3-D land subsidence simulation using the NDIS package for MODFLOW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D. H.; Li, J.

    2015-11-01

    The standard subsidence package for MODFLOW, MODFLOW-SUB simulates aquifer-system compaction and subsidence assuming that only 1-D-vertical displacement of the aquifer system occurs in response to applied stresses such as drawdowns accompanying groundwater extraction. In the present paper, 3-D movement of an aquifer system in responses to one or more pumping wells is considered using the new aquifer-system deformation package for MODFLOW, NDIS. The simulation of aquifer- system 3-D movement using NDIS was conducted with a stress or hydraulic head dependent specific storage coefficient to simulate nonlinear deformation behavior of aquifer-system sedimentary materials. NDIS's numerical simulation for aquifer horizontal movement is consistent with an analytic solution for horizontal motion in response to pumping from a leaky confined aquifer (Li, 2007). For purposes of comparison, vertical subsidence of the aquifer system in response to groundwater pumping is simulated by the both the NDIS and MODFLOW-SUB models. The results of the simulations show that land subsidence simulated by MODFLOW-SUB is significantly larger and less sensitive to pumping rate and time than that simulated by NDIS. The NDIS simulations also suggest that if the total pumpage is the same, pumping from a single well may induce more land subsidence than pumping from multiple wells.

  14. Software for Building Models of 3D Objects via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramer, Tim; Jensen, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    The Virtual EDF Builder (where EDF signifies Electronic Development Fixture) is a computer program that facilitates the use of the Internet for building and displaying digital models of three-dimensional (3D) objects that ordinarily comprise assemblies of solid models created previously by use of computer-aided-design (CAD) programs. The Virtual EDF Builder resides on a Unix-based server computer. It is used in conjunction with a commercially available Web-based plug-in viewer program that runs on a client computer. The Virtual EDF Builder acts as a translator between the viewer program and a database stored on the server. The translation function includes the provision of uniform resource locator (URL) links to other Web-based computer systems and databases. The Virtual EDF builder can be used in two ways: (1) If the client computer is Unix-based, then it can assemble a model locally; the computational load is transferred from the server to the client computer. (2) Alternatively, the server can be made to build the model, in which case the server bears the computational load and the results are downloaded to the client computer or workstation upon completion.

  15. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  16. [The use of open source software in graphic anatomic reconstructions and in biomechanic simulations].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, O

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain three-dimensional (3D) images and to perform biomechanical simulations starting from DICOM images obtained by computed tomography (CT). Open source software were used to prepare digitized 2D images of tissue sections and to create 3D reconstruction from the segmented structures. Finally, 3D images were used in open source software in order to perform biomechanic simulations. This study demonstrates the applicability and feasibility of open source software developed in our days for the 3D reconstruction and biomechanic simulation. The use of open source software may improve the efficiency of investments in imaging technologies and in CAD/CAM technologies for implants and prosthesis fabrication which need expensive specialized software.

  17. Using virtual reality technology and hand tracking technology to create software for training surgical skills in 3D game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirova, A. A.; Ganiev, B. A.; Mullin, R. I.

    2015-11-01

    The lack of visible and approachable ways of training surgical skills is one of the main problems in medical education. Existing simulation training devices are not designed to teach students, and are not available due to the high cost of the equipment. Using modern technologies such as virtual reality and hands movements fixation technology we want to create innovative method of learning the technics of conducting operations in 3D game format, which can make education process interesting and effective. Creating of 3D format virtual simulator will allow to solve several conceptual problems at once: opportunity of practical skills improvement unlimited by the time without the risk for patient, high realism of environment in operational and anatomic body structures, using of game mechanics for information perception relief and memorization of methods acceleration, accessibility of this program.

  18. Accuracy and efficiency of computer-aided anatomical analysis using 3D visualization software based on semi-automated and automated segmentations.

    PubMed

    An, Gao; Hong, Li; Zhou, Xiao-Bing; Yang, Qiong; Li, Mei-Qing; Tang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-03-01

    We investigated and compared the functionality of two 3D visualization software provided by a CT vendor and a third-party vendor, respectively. Using surgical anatomical measurement as baseline, we evaluated the accuracy of 3D visualization and verified their utility in computer-aided anatomical analysis. The study cohort consisted of 50 adult cadavers fixed with the classical formaldehyde method. The computer-aided anatomical analysis was based on CT images (in DICOM format) acquired by helical scan with contrast enhancement, using a CT vendor provided 3D visualization workstation (Syngo) and a third-party 3D visualization software (Mimics) that was installed on a PC. Automated and semi-automated segmentations were utilized in the 3D visualization workstation and software, respectively. The functionality and efficiency of automated and semi-automated segmentation methods were compared. Using surgical anatomical measurement as a baseline, the accuracy of 3D visualization based on automated and semi-automated segmentations was quantitatively compared. In semi-automated segmentation, the Mimics 3D visualization software outperformed the Syngo 3D visualization workstation. No significant difference was observed in anatomical data measurement by the Syngo 3D visualization workstation and the Mimics 3D visualization software (P>0.05). Both the Syngo 3D visualization workstation provided by a CT vendor and the Mimics 3D visualization software by a third-party vendor possessed the needed functionality, efficiency and accuracy for computer-aided anatomical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores (''agreement'') on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. ''Poor'' agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. Results: The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated

  20. The simulation of 3D microcalcification clusters in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Eman; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Zanca, Federica; Cockmartin, Lesley; Marshall, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jurgen; Young, Kenneth C; R Dance, David; Bosmans, Hilde

    2011-12-01

    This work proposes a new method of building 3D models of microcalcification clusters and describes the validation of their realistic appearance when simulated into 2D digital mammograms and into breast tomosynthesis images. A micro-CT unit was used to scan 23 breast biopsy specimens of microcalcification clusters with malignant and benign characteristics and their 3D reconstructed datasets were segmented to obtain 3D models of microcalcification clusters. These models were then adjusted for the x-ray spectrum used and for the system resolution and simulated into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. Six radiologists were asked to distinguish between 40 real and 40 simulated clusters of microcalcifications in two separate studies on 2D mammography and tomosynthesis datasets. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to test the ability of each observer to distinguish between simulated and real microcalcification clusters. The kappa statistic was applied to assess how often the individual simulated and real microcalcification clusters had received similar scores ("agreement") on their realistic appearance in both modalities. This analysis was performed for all readers and for the real and the simulated group of microcalcification clusters separately. "Poor" agreement would reflect radiologists' confusion between simulated and real clusters, i.e., lesions not systematically evaluated in both modalities as either simulated or real, and would therefore be interpreted as a success of the present models. The area under the ROC curve, averaged over the observers, was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [0.44, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.46 (95% confidence interval [0.29, 0.64]) for the tomosynthesis study, indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated lesions (p > 0.05). Agreement

  1. A fast convolution-based methodology to simulate 2-D/3-D cardiac ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hang; Choi, Hon Fai; Claus, Piet; Boonen, Steven; Jaecques, Siegfried; Van Lenthe, G Harry; Van der Perre, Georges; Lauriks, Walter; D'hooge, Jan

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a fast convolution-based methodology for simulating ultrasound images in a 2-D/3-D sector format as typically used in cardiac ultrasound. The conventional convolution model is based on the assumption of a space-invariant point spread function (PSF) and typically results in linear images. These characteristics are not representative for cardiac data sets. The spatial impulse response method (IRM) has excellent accuracy in the linear domain; however, calculation time can become an issue when scatterer numbers become significant and when 3-D volumetric data sets need to be computed. As a solution to these problems, the current manuscript proposes a new convolution-based methodology in which the data sets are produced by reducing the conventional 2-D/3-D convolution model to multiple 1-D convolutions (one for each image line). As an example, simulated 2-D/3-D phantom images are presented along with their gray scale histogram statistics. In addition, the computation time is recorded and contrasted to a commonly used implementation of IRM (Field II). It is shown that COLE can produce anatomically plausible images with local Rayleigh statistics but at improved calculation time (1200 times faster than the reference method).

  2. Development of discrete gas kinetic scheme for simulation of 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Sun, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The sphere function-based gas kinetic scheme (GKS), which was presented by Shu and his coworkers [23] for simulation of inviscid compressible flows, is extended to simulate 3D viscous incompressible and compressible flows in this work. Firstly, we use certain discrete points to represent the spherical surface in the phase velocity space. Then, integrals along the spherical surface for conservation forms of moments, which are needed to recover 3D Navier-Stokes equations, are approximated by integral quadrature. The basic requirement is that these conservation forms of moments can be exactly satisfied by weighted summation of distribution functions at discrete points. It was found that the integral quadrature by eight discrete points on the spherical surface, which forms the D3Q8 discrete velocity model, can exactly match the integral. In this way, the conservative variables and numerical fluxes can be computed by weighted summation of distribution functions at eight discrete points. That is, the application of complicated formulations resultant from integrals can be replaced by a simple solution process. Several numerical examples including laminar flat plate boundary layer, 3D lid-driven cavity flow, steady flow through a 90° bending square duct, transonic flow around DPW-W1 wing and supersonic flow around NACA0012 airfoil are chosen to validate the proposed scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the present scheme can provide reasonable numerical results for 3D viscous flows.

  3. Lorentz boosted frame simulation of Laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Meyers, Michael; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Tsung, Frank; Decyk, Viktor; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis; Mori, Warren

    2015-11-01

    We present results on a systematic study of Particle-In-Cell simulation of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) by combining the Lorentz boosted frame technique with the quasi-3D algorithm, in which fields are expanded into azimuthal harmonics and solved on an r - z PIC grid keeping only a few harmonics. The studies emphasize on LWFA in the nonlinear blowout regime, which is more challenging from a computational standpoint. We first discuss strategies for eliminating the numerical Cerenkov instability (NCI) that inevitably arises due to the presence of plasma drifting across the grid with relativistic speeds in quasi-3D geometry. These strategies work for FFT based Maxwell solvers. We have incorporated these mitigation strategies into our PIC code OSIRIS by adding a new hybrid Yee-FFT Maxwell solver. With these strategies, OSIRIS can now be used to combine the quasi-3D algorithm and Lorentz boosted frame technique, and carry out high fidelity LWFA boosted frame simulation with no evidence of the NCI in the quasi-3D geometry, leading to unprecedented speedups. Work supported by NSF and DOE.

  4. Numerical simulation of 3D boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lei, Junjun; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-02-07

    This article discusses three-dimensional (3D) boundary-driven streaming in acoustofluidic devices. Firstly, the 3D Rayleigh streaming pattern in a microchannel is simulated and its effect on the movement of microparticles of various sizes is demonstrated. The results obtained from this model show good comparisons with 3D experimental visualisations and demonstrate the fully 3D nature of the acoustic streaming field and the associated acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in acoustofluidic devices. This method is then applied to another acoustofluidic device in order to gain insights into an unusual in-plane streaming pattern. The origin of this streaming has not been fully described and its characteristics cannot be explained from the classical theory of Rayleigh streaming. The simulated in-plane streaming pattern was in good agreement with the experimental visualisation. The mechanism behind it is shown to be related to the active sound intensity field, which supports our previous findings on the mechanism of the in-plane acoustic streaming pattern visualised and modelled in a thin-layered capillary device.

  5. 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel coupled with neutronic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Uddin, Rizwan

    2010-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) is widely considered as one of the top candidates identified in the Next Generation Nuclear Power-plant (NGNP) Technology Roadmap under the U.S . Depanment of Energy's Generation IV program. TRlSO particle is a common element among different VHTR designs and its performance is critical to the safety and reliability of the whole reactor. A TRISO particle experiences complex thermo-mechanical changes during reactor operation in high temperature and high burnup conditions. TRISO fuel performance analysis requires evaluation of these changes on micro scale. Since most of these changes are temperature dependent, 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel is a crucial step of the whole analysis package. In this paper, a 3D numerical thermal model was developed to calculate temperature distribution inside TRISO and pebble under different scenarios. 3D simulation is required because pebbles or TRISOs are always subjected to asymmetric thermal conditions since they are randomly packed together. The numerical model was developed using finite difference method and it was benchmarked against ID analytical results and also results reported from literature. Monte-Carlo models were set up to calculate radial power density profile. Complex convective boundary condition was applied on the pebble outer surface. Three reactors were simulated using this model to calculate temperature distribution under different power levels. Two asymmetric boundary conditions were applied to the pebble to test the 3D capabilities. A gas bubble was hypothesized inside the TRISO kernel and 3D simulation was also carried out under this scenario. Intuition-coherent results were obtained and reported in this paper.

  6. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-09

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  7. Determination of key parameters of SEU occurrence using 3-D full cell SRAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, P.; Palau, J.M.; Bruguier, G.; Tavernier, C.; Ecoffet, R.; Gasiot, J.

    1999-12-01

    A 3-D entire SRAM cell, based on a 0.35-{micro}m current CMOS technology, is simulated in this work with a DEVICE simulator. The transient current, resulting from a heavy ion strike in the most sensitive region of the cell, is studied as a function of the LET value, the cell layout and the ion penetration depth. A definition of the critical charge is proposed and two new methods are presented to compute this basic amount of charge only using SPICE simulations. Numerical applications are performed with two different generations of submicron CMOS technologies, including the determination of the sensitive thicknesses.

  8. A cut cell method for the 3D simulation of Crookes radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechriste, Guillaume; Mieussens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    Devices involved in engineering applications, such as vacuum pumps or MEMS, may be made of several moving parts. This raise the issue of the simulation of rarefied gas flow around moving boundaries. We propose a simple process, known as cut cell method, to treat the motion of a solid body in the framework of the deterministic solving of a kinetic equation. Up to our knowledge, this is the first time that this approach has been used for this kind of simulations. The method is illustrated by the 2D and 3D simulations of a Crookes radiometer.

  9. Reactive Flow Modeling of Liquid Explosives via ALE3D/Cheetah Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, I W; Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2010-03-10

    We carried out reactive flow simulations of liquid explosives such as nitromethane using the hydrodynamic code ALE3D coupled with equations of state and reaction kinetics modeled by the thermochemical code Cheetah. The simulation set-up was chosen to mimic cylinder experiments. For pure unconfined nitromethane we find that the failure diameter and detonation velocity dependence on charge diameter are in agreement with available experimental results. Such simulations are likely to be useful for determining detonability and failure behavior for a wide range of experimental conditions and explosive compounds.

  10. A 3D virtual reality simulator for training of minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Mi, Shao-Hua; Hou, Zeng-Gunag; Yang, Fan; Xie, Xiao-Liang; Bian, Gui-Bin

    2014-01-01

    For the last decade, remarkable progress has been made in the field of cardiovascular disease treatment. However, these complex medical procedures require a combination of rich experience and technical skills. In this paper, a 3D virtual reality simulator for core skills training in minimally invasive surgery is presented. The system can generate realistic 3D vascular models segmented from patient datasets, including a beating heart, and provide a real-time computation of force and force feedback module for surgical simulation. Instruments, such as a catheter or guide wire, are represented by a multi-body mass-spring model. In addition, a realistic user interface with multiple windows and real-time 3D views are developed. Moreover, the simulator is also provided with a human-machine interaction module that gives doctors the sense of touch during the surgery training, enables them to control the motion of a virtual catheter/guide wire inside a complex vascular model. Experimental results show that the simulator is suitable for minimally invasive surgery training.

  11. Comparison of flow and transport experiments on 3D printed 'rocks' with direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, F. E.; Geiger, S.; Mackay, E.; Singleton, M.; McGravie, T.; Anouilh, T.; Jobe, D.; Zhang, S.; Agar, S. M.; Ishutov, S.; Hasiuk, F.; Chalaturnyk, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    3D printing technology has the potential to revolutionise modelling of fluid flow and mass transport in porous media. Using 3D printing to replicate pore geometries from real rocks quickly and cheaply, and being able to assign specific properties to the samples, would enable us to repeat experiments where things such as permeability, porosity, reactivity, or wettability are known a priori. Destructive tests, such as reactive transport experiments, could then be performed using the same, realistic, initial geometry, in a repeatable fashion; in addition, specific properties of the porous media (e.g. the reactivity of individual grains) could be altered in a controlled way. Similarly, two-phase flow experiments could be carried out where relevant properties (e.g. individual grain wettability) are modified between experiments. Results from such experiments would shed new light on key physio-chemical processes occurring at the pore-scale during multi-phase reactive flow and would allow us to validate the suite of emerging direct numerical simulation techniques (e.g. Lattice Boltzman, Volume of Fluid) currently used to model pore-scale flow and transport. We have developed a novel experimental setup to investigate single-phase flow and transport through translucent 3D printed and Perspex samples and to visualise the experiments for comparison with numerical simulations. Dyed fluid is injected at one end of the sample and the behaviour of the system is recorded using a digital camera situated directly above it. Image processing techniques are employed to quantify dye concentration and location through time. We use the finite volume method to simulate the flow experiments in OpenFOAM, using the same input geometry that was used to print the sample. Comparison of experimental results with simulations enables us to identify similarities and differences between flow and transport observed in the 3D printed samples and behaviour expected from the numerical simulations.

  12. 3D modeling and simulation of 2G HTS stacks and coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zermeño, Víctor M. R.; Grilli, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Use of 2G HTS coated conductors in several power applications has become popular in recent years. Their large current density under high magnetic fields makes them suitable candidates for high power capacity applications such as stacks of tapes, coils, magnets, cables and current leads. For this reason, modeling and simulation of their electromagnetic properties is very desirable in the design and optimization processes. For many applications, when symmetries allow it, simple models consisting of 1D or 2D representations are well suited for providing a satisfying description of the problem at hand. However, certain designs such as racetrack coils and finite-length or non-straight stacks, do pose a 3D problem that cannot be easily reduced to a 2D configuration. Full 3D models have been developed, but their use for simulating superconducting devices is a very challenging task involving a large-scale computational problem. In this work, we present a new method to simulate the electromagnetic transient behavior of 2G HTS stacks and coils. The method, originally used to model stacks of straight superconducting tapes or circular coils in 2D, is now extended to 3D. The main idea is to construct an anisotropic bulk-like equivalent for the stack or coil, such that the geometrical layout of the internal alternating structures of insulating, metallic, superconducting and substrate layers is reduced while keeping the overall electromagnetic behavior of the original device. Besides the aforementioned interest in modeling and simulating 2G HTS coated conductors, this work provides a further step towards efficient 3D modeling and simulation of superconducting devices for large-scale applications.

  13. Characteristics of tumor and host cells in 3-D simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, V.; Dinh, T.; Wood, T.; Pellis, N.; Hannigan, E.

    Co-cultures of three-dimensional (3-D) constructs of one cell type with dispersed cells of a second cell type in low-shear rotating suspension cultures in simulated microgravity environment have been used to investigate invasive properties of normal and malignant cell types. We have shown that the epithelial and endothelial cells undergo a switch in characteristics when grown in an in vitro 3-D environment, that mimics the in vivo host environment as compared with conventional two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures. Histological preparations and immunohistochemical staining procedures of cocultured harvests demonstrated various markers of interest: like collagen vimentin, mucin, elastin, fibrin, fibrinogen, cytokeratin, adhesion molecules and various angiogenic factors by tumor cells from gynecological cancer patients along with fibroblasts, endothelial cells and patient-derived mononuclear cells (n=8). The growth rate was enhanced 10-15 folds by 3-D cocultures of patient-derived cells as compared with 2-D monolayer cultures and 3-D monocultures. The production of interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin -8, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and angiogenin was studied by using ELISA and RT- PCR. Human umbilical vein-derived endothelial cell (HUVEC) were used to study the mitogenic response of the conditioned medium collected from 3-D monocultures and cocultures during proliferation and migration assays. The conditioned medium collected from 3-D cocultures of cancer cells also 1) increased the expression of message levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor flt-1 and KDR was observed by HUVEC, and 2) increased the expression of intracellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules on the surface of HUVEC, when measured by using Live cell ELISA assays and immunofluorescent staining as compared with 3-D monocultures of normal epithelial cells. There was an increase in production of 1) enzymatic activity that

  14. Momentum Transport: 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to investigate the momentum budgets associated with several convective systems that developed during the TOGA COARE IOP (west Pacific warm pool region) and GATE (east Atlantic region). The tool for this study is the improved Goddard Cumulas Ensemble (GCE) model which includes a 3-class ice-phase microphysical scheme, explicit cloud radiative interactive processes and air-sea interactive surface processes. The model domain contains 256 x 256 grid points (with 2 km resolution) in the horizontal and 38 grid points (to a depth of 22 km) in the vertical. The 2D domain has 1024 grid points. The simulations were performed over a 7-day time period (December 19-26, 1992, for TOGA COARE and September 1-7, 1994 for GATE). Cyclic literal boundary conditions are required for this type of long-term integration. Two well organized squall systems (TOGA, COARE February 22, 1993, and GATE September 12, 1994) were also simulated using the 3D GCE model. Only 9 h simulations were required to cover the life time of the squall systems. the lateral boundary conditions were open for these two squall systems simulations. the following will be examined: (1) the momentum budgets in the convective and stratiform regions, (2) the relationship between momentum transport and cloud organization (i.e., well organized squall lines versus less organized convective), (3) the differences and similarities in momentum transport between 2D and 3D simulated convective systems, and (4) the differences and similarities in momentum budgets between cloud systems simulated with open and cyclic lateral boundary conditions. Preliminary results indicate that there are only small differences between 2D and 3D simulated momentum budgets. Major differences occur, however, between momentum budgets associated with squall systems simulated using different lateral boundary conditions.

  15. Fabrication and evaluation of novel rabbit model cardiovascular simulator with 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Min; Lee, Min-Woo; Seo, See-Yoon; Shin, Sang-Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Simulators allow researchers to study the hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system in a reproducible way without using complicated equations. Previous simulators focused on heart functions. However, a detailed model of the vessels is required to replicate the pulse wave of the arterial system. A computer simulation was used to simplify the arterial branch because producing every small artery is neither possible nor necessary. A 3D-printed zig was used to make a hand-made arterial tree. The simulator that was developed was evaluated by comparing its results to in-vivo data, in terms of the hemodynamic parameters (waveform, augmentation index, impedance, etc.) that were measured at three points: the ascending aorta, the thoracic aorta, and the brachiocephalic artery. The results from the simulator showed good agreement with the in-vivo data. Therefore, this simulator can be used as a research tool for the cardiovascular study of animal models, specifically rabbits.

  16. 3D-Assisted Quantitative Assessment of Orbital Volume Using an Open-Source Software Platform in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Hsu, Chung-En; Chen, Chih-hao; Chen, Chien-Tzung

    2015-01-01

    Orbital volume evaluation is an important part of pre-operative assessments in orbital trauma and congenital deformity patients. The availability of the affordable, open-source software, OsiriX, as a tool for preoperative planning increased the popularity of radiological assessments by the surgeon. A volume calculation method based on 3D volume rendering-assisted region-of-interest computation was used to determine the normal orbital volume in Taiwanese patients after reorientation to the Frankfurt plane. Method one utilized 3D points for intuitive orbital rim outlining. The mean normal orbital volume for left and right orbits was 24.3±1.51 ml and 24.7±1.17 ml in male and 21.0±1.21 ml and 21.1±1.30 ml in female subjects. Another method (method two) based on the bilateral orbital lateral rim was also used to calculate orbital volume and compared with method one. The mean normal orbital volume for left and right orbits was 19.0±1.68 ml and 19.1±1.45 ml in male and 16.0±1.01 ml and 16.1±0.92 ml in female subjects. The inter-rater reliability and intra-rater measurement accuracy between users for both methods was found to be acceptable for orbital volume calculations. 3D-assisted quantification of orbital volume is a feasible technique for orbital volume assessment. The normal orbital volume can be used as controls in cases of unilateral orbital reconstruction with a mean size discrepancy of less than 3.1±2.03% in females and 2.7±1.32% in males. The OsiriX software can be used reliably by the individual surgeon as a comprehensive preoperative planning and imaging tool for orbital volume measurement and computed tomography reorientation. PMID:25774683

  17. 3D-assisted quantitative assessment of orbital volume using an open-source software platform in a Taiwanese population.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Hsu, Chung-En; Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chien-Tzung

    2015-01-01

    Orbital volume evaluation is an important part of pre-operative assessments in orbital trauma and congenital deformity patients. The availability of the affordable, open-source software, OsiriX, as a tool for preoperative planning increased the popularity of radiological assessments by the surgeon. A volume calculation method based on 3D volume rendering-assisted region-of-interest computation was used to determine the normal orbital volume in Taiwanese patients after reorientation to the Frankfurt plane. Method one utilized 3D points for intuitive orbital rim outlining. The mean normal orbital volume for left and right orbits was 24.3±1.51 ml and 24.7±1.17 ml in male and 21.0±1.21 ml and 21.1±1.30 ml in female subjects. Another method (method two) based on the bilateral orbital lateral rim was also used to calculate orbital volume and compared with method one. The mean normal orbital volume for left and right orbits was 19.0±1.68 ml and 19.1±1.45 ml in male and 16.0±1.01 ml and 16.1±0.92 ml in female subjects. The inter-rater reliability and intra-rater measurement accuracy between users for both methods was found to be acceptable for orbital volume calculations. 3D-assisted quantification of orbital volume is a feasible technique for orbital volume assessment. The normal orbital volume can be used as controls in cases of unilateral orbital reconstruction with a mean size discrepancy of less than 3.1±2.03% in females and 2.7±1.32% in males. The OsiriX software can be used reliably by the individual surgeon as a comprehensive preoperative planning and imaging tool for orbital volume measurement and computed tomography reorientation.

  18. Blob Dynamics in 3D BOUT Simulations of Tokamak Edge Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D; D'Ippolito, D; Myra, J; Nevins, W; Xu, X

    2004-08-23

    Propagating filaments of enhanced plasma density, or blobs, observed in 3D numerical simulations of a diverted, neutral-fueled tokamak are studied. Fluctuations of vorticity, electrical potential {phi}, temperature T{sub e} and current density J{sub {parallel}} associated with the blobs have a dipole structure perpendicular to the magnetic field and propagate radially with large E {center_dot} B drift velocities (> 1 km/s). The simulation results are consistent with a 3D blob dynamics model that incorporates increased parallel plasma resistivity (from neutral cooling of the X-point region), blob disconnection from the divertor sheath, X-point closure of the current loops, and collisional physics to sustain the {phi}, T{sub e}, J{sub {parallel}} dipoles.

  19. 3D SPH numerical simulation of the wave generated by the Vajont rockslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacondio, R.; Mignosa, P.; Pagani, S.

    2013-09-01

    A 3D numerical modeling of the wave generated by the Vajont slide, one of the most destructive ever occurred, is presented in this paper. A meshless Lagrangian Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique was adopted to simulate the highly fragmented violent flow generated by the falling slide in the artificial reservoir. The speed-up achievable via General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GP-GPU) allowed to adopt the adequate resolution to describe the phenomenon. The comparison with the data available in literature showed that the results of the numerical simulation reproduce satisfactorily the maximum run-up, also the water surface elevation in the residual lake after the event. Moreover, the 3D velocity field of the flow during the event and the discharge hydrograph which overtopped the dam, were obtained.

  20. 3D Kinetic Simulation of Plasma Jet Penetration in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-11-01

    A high velocity plasmoid penetration through a magnetic barrier is a problem of a great experimental and theoretical interest. Our LSP PIC code 3D fully kinetic numerical simulations of high density (10^16 cm-3) high velocity (30-140 km/sec) plasma jet/bullet, penetrating through the transversal magnetic field, demonstrate three different regimes: reflection by field, penetration by magnetic field expulsion and penetration by magnetic self-polarization. The behavior depends on plasma jet parameters and its composition: hydrogen, carbon (A=12) and C60-fullerene (A=720) plasmas were investigated. The 3D simulation of two plasmoid head-on injections along uniform magnetic field lines is analyzed. Mini rail plasma gun (accelerator) modeling is also presented and discussed.

  1. Co-located haptic and 3D graphic interface for medical simulations.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Peter; Miyasaka, Muneaki; Bozlee, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    We describe a system which provides high-fidelity haptic feedback in the same physical location as a 3D graphical display, in order to enable realistic physical interaction with virtual anatomical tissue during modelled procedures such as needle driving, palpation, and other interventions performed using handheld instruments. The haptic feedback is produced by the interaction between an array of coils located behind a thin flat LCD screen, and permanent magnets embedded in the instrument held by the user. The coil and magnet configuration permits arbitrary forces and torques to be generated on the instrument in real time according to the dynamics of the simulated tissue by activating the coils in combination. A rigid-body motion tracker provides position and orientation feedback of the handheld instrument to the computer simulation, and the 3D display is produced using LCD shutter glasses and a head-tracking system for the user.

  2. Stability of 3D Textile Composite Reinforcement Simulations: Solutions to Spurious Transverse Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Hamila, N.; Dupé, F.; Descamps, C.; Boisse, P.

    2016-08-01

    The simulation of thick 3D composite reinforcement forming brings to light new modeling challenges. The specific anisotropic material behavior due to the possible slippage between fibers induces, among other phenomena, the development of spurious transverse modes in bending-dominated 3D simulations. To obtain coherent finite element responses, two solutions are proposed. The first one uses a simple assumed strain formulation usually prescribed to prevent volumetric locking. This solution avoids spurious transverse modes by stiffening of the hourglass modes. Nevertheless the deformation obtained by this approach still suffers from the inability of the standard continuum mechanics of Cauchy to describe fibrous material deformation. The second proposed approach is based on the introduction of a bending stiffness which both avoids the spurious transverse modes and also improves the global behavior of the element formulation by enriching the underlying continuum. To emphasize the differences between different formulations, element stiffnesses are explicitly calculated and compared.

  3. Software architecture as a freedom for 3D content providers and users along with independency on purposes and used devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Razia; Christ, Andreas; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The improvements in the hardware and software of communication devices have allowed running Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) applications on those. Nowadays, it is possible to overlay synthetic information on real images, or even to play 3D on-line games on smart phones or some other mobile devices. Hence the use of 3D data for business and specially for education purposes is ubiquitous. Due to always available at hand and always ready to use properties of mobile phones, those are considered as most potential communication devices. The total numbers of mobile phone users are increasing all over the world every day and that makes mobile phones the most suitable device to reach a huge number of end clients either for education or for business purposes. There are different standards, protocols and specifications to establish the communication among different communication devices but there is no initiative taken so far to make it sure that the send data through this communication process will be understood and used by the destination device. Since all the devices are not able to deal with all kind of 3D data formats and it is also not realistic to have different version of the same data to make it compatible with the destination device, it is necessary to have a prevalent solution. The proposed architecture in this paper describes a device and purpose independent 3D data visibility any time anywhere to the right person in suitable format. There is no solution without limitation. The architecture is implemented in a prototype to make an experimental validation of the architecture which also shows the difference between theory and practice.

  4. WARP3D-Release 10.8: Dynamic Nonlinear Analysis of Solids using a Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppenhoefer, Kyle C.; Gullerud, Arne S.; Ruggieri, Claudio; Dodds, Robert H., Jr.; Healy, Brian E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes theoretical background material and commands necessary to use the WARP3D finite element code. WARP3D is under continuing development as a research code for the solution of very large-scale, 3-D solid models subjected to static and dynamic loads. Specific features in the code oriented toward the investigation of ductile fracture in metals include a robust finite strain formulation, a general J-integral computation facility (with inertia, face loading), an element extinction facility to model crack growth, nonlinear material models including viscoplastic effects, and the Gurson-Tver-gaard dilatant plasticity model for void growth. The nonlinear, dynamic equilibrium equations are solved using an incremental-iterative, implicit formulation with full Newton iterations to eliminate residual nodal forces. The history integration of the nonlinear equations of motion is accomplished with Newmarks Beta method. A central feature of WARP3D involves the use of a linear-preconditioned conjugate gradient (LPCG) solver implemented in an element-by-element format to replace a conventional direct linear equation solver. This software architecture dramatically reduces both the memory requirements and CPU time for very large, nonlinear solid models since formation of the assembled (dynamic) stiffness matrix is avoided. Analyses thus exhibit the numerical stability for large time (load) steps provided by the implicit formulation coupled with the low memory requirements characteristic of an explicit code. In addition to the much lower memory requirements of the LPCG solver, the CPU time required for solution of the linear equations during each Newton iteration is generally one-half or less of the CPU time required for a traditional direct solver. All other computational aspects of the code (element stiffnesses, element strains, stress updating, element internal forces) are implemented in the element-by- element, blocked architecture. This greatly improves

  5. Modeling and 3-D Simulation of Biofilm Dynamics in Aqueous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi

    2011-11-01

    We present a complex fluid model for biofilms growing in an aqueous environment. The modeling approach represents a new paradigm to develop models for biofilm-environment interaction that can be used to systematically incorporate refined chemical and physiological mechanisms. Special solutions of the model are presented and analyzed. 3-D numerical simulations in aqueous environment with emphasis on biofilm- ambient fluid interaction will be discussed in detail.

  6. Effectiveness Evaluation of Force Protection Training Using Computer-Based Instruction and X3d Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    to growing operational constraints accelerated by the Global War on Terror, the United States Navy is looking for alternative methods of training to...accomplished efficiently and effectively, saving the U.S. Navy time and resources while maintaining a high state of readiness. The goal of this thesis is...COMPUTER-BASED INSTRUCTION AND X3D SIMULATION Wilfredo Cruzbaez Lieutenant, United States Navy B.A., Norfolk State University, 2001 Submitted in

  7. Simulation of a true-triaxial deformation test on anisotropic gneiss using FLAC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shenghua; Sehizadeh, Mehdi; Nasseri, Mohammad; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A series of true-triaxial experiments have been carried out at the University of Toronto's Rock Fracture Dynamics Laboratory. Isotropic pegmatite and gneiss have been used to systematically study the effect of anisotropy on the strength, behaviour and seismic response. Samples were loaded under true-triaxial stress conditions and subjected to complex loading and unloading histories associated with rock deformation around underground openings. The results show expected patterns of weakness from preferentially oriented samples and highlight the importance of unloading history under true-triaxial conditions on the deformation and seismic response of the samples. These tests have been used to validate a synthetic simulation using the Itasca FLAC3D numerical code. The paper describes the FLAC3D simulations of the complex true-triaxial loading and unloading history of the different anisotropic samples. Various parameters were created to describe the physico-mechanical properties of the synthetic rock samples. Foliation planes of preferential orientations with respect to the primary loading direction were added to the synthetic rock samples to reflect the anisotropy of the gneiss. These synthetic rock samples were subjected to the same loading and unloading paths as the real rock samples, and failed in the same mechanism as what was observed from the experiments, and thus it proved the validity of this numerical simulation with FLAC3D.

  8. 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of optical phantoms simulating heterogeneous biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minjie; Shen, Shuwei; Yang, Jie; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    The performance of biomedical optical imaging devices heavily relies on appropriate calibration. However, many of existing calibration phantoms for biomedical optical devices are based on homogenous materials without considering the multi-layer heterogeneous structures observed in biological tissue. Using such a phantom for optical calibration may result in measurement bias. To overcome this problem, we propose a 3D printing method for freeform fabrication of tissue simulating phantoms with multilayer heterogeneous structure. The phantom simulates not only the morphologic characteristics of biological tissue but also absorption and scattering properties. The printing system is based on a 3D motion platform with coordinated control of the DC motors. A special jet nozzle is designed to mix base, scattering, and absorption materials at different ratios. 3D tissue structures are fabricated through layer-by-layer printing with selective deposition of phantom materials of different ingredients. Different mixed ratios of base, scattering and absorption materials have been tested in order to optimize the printing outcome. A spectrometer and a tissue spectrophotometer are used for characterizing phantom absorption and scattering properties. The goal of this project is to fabricate skin tissue simulating phantoms as a traceable standard for the calibration of biomedical optical spectral devices.

  9. Progress on 3-D ICF simulations and Ray-Traced Power Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Andrew J.; Fyfe, David E.

    2016-10-01

    We have performed 3D simulations of Omega-scale and NIF-scale spherical direct-drive targets with the massively parallel fastrad3d code. Of particular interest is the robustness of the targets to the low mode perturbations impressed on the target by the laser system and how it compares to the influence of the perturbations produced by laser imprinting. As part of this simulation capability, we have upgraded our smoothed 3D raytrace package to run in spherical geometry. This package, which connects rays to form bundles and performs power deposition calculations on the bundles, can decrease laser absorption noise while using fewer rays and less message passing. This model produces both the imprint and the low-mode asymmetry drive that we are interested in here. We show recent simulation results of directly-driven targets using conventional ignition drive, and report on the influences of the two sources - low mode asymmetry and laser imprint - as the pellet conditions (e.g. adiabat) are varied. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  10. Simulation and testing of a multichannel system for 3D sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Edward Albert

    Three-dimensional (3D) audio involves the ability to localize sound anywhere in a three-dimensional space. 3D audio can be used to provide the listener with the perception of moving sounds and can provide a realistic listening experience for applications such as gaming, video conferencing, movies, and concerts. The purpose of this research is to simulate and test 3D audio by incorporating auditory localization techniques in a multi-channel speaker system. The objective is to develop an algorithm that can place an audio event in a desired location by calculating and controlling the gain factors of each speaker. A MATLAB simulation displays the location of the speakers and perceived sound, which is verified through experimentation. The scenario in which the listener is not equidistant from each of the speakers is also investigated and simulated. This research is envisioned to lead to a better understanding of human localization of sound, and will contribute to a more realistic listening experience.

  11. 3D Numerical Simulation on the Sloshing Waves Excited by the Seismic Shacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Wu, Tso-Ren

    2016-04-01

    In the event of 2015 Nepal earthquake, a video clip broadcasted worldwide showed a violent water spilling in a hotel swimming pool. This sloshing phenomenon indicates a potential water loss in the sensitive facilities, e.g. the spent fuel pools in nuclear power plant, has to be taken into account carefully under the consideration of seismic-induced ground acceleration. In the previous studies, the simulation of sloshing mainly focused on the pressure force on the structure by using a simplified Spring-Mass Method developed in the field of solid mechanics. However, restricted by the assumptions of plane water surface and limited wave height, significant error will be made in evaluating the amount of water loss in the tank. In this paper, the computational fluid dynamical model, Splash3D, was adopted for studying the sloshing problem accurately. Splash3D solved 3D Navier-Stokes Equation directly with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulent closure. The Volume-of-fluid (VOF) method with piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC) was used to track the complex breaking water surface. The time series acceleration of a design seismic was loaded to excite the water. With few restrictions from the assumptions, the accuracy of the simulation results were improved dramatically. A series model validations were conducted by compared to a 2D theoretical solution, and a 3D experimental data. Good comparisons can be seen. After the validation, we performed the simulation for considering a sloshing case in a rectangular water tank with a dimension of 12 m long, 8 m wide, 8 m deep, which contained water with 7 m in depth. The seismic movement was imported by considering time-series acceleration in three dimensions, which were about 0.5 g to 1.2 g in the horizontal directions, and 0.3 g to 1 g in the vertical direction. We focused the discussions on the kinematics of the water surface, wave breaking, velocity field, pressure field, water force on the side walls, and, most

  12. Full 3D opto-electronic simulation tool for nanotextured solar cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michallon, Jérôme; Collin, Stéphane

    2017-04-01

    Increasing efforts on the photovoltaics research have recently been devoted to material savings, leading to the emergence of new designs based on nanotextured and nanowire-based solar cells. The use of small absorber volumes, light-trapping nanostructures and unconventional carrier collection schemes (radial nanowire junctions, point contacts in planar structures,…) increases the impact of surfaces recombination and induces homogeneity in the photogenerated carrier concentrations. The investigation of their impacts on the device performances need to be addressed using full 3D coupled opto-electrical modeling. In this context, we have developed a new tool for full 3D opto-electrical simulation using the most advanced optical and electrical simulation techniques. We will present an overview of its simulation capabilities and the key issues that have been solved to make it fully operational and reliable. We will provide various examples of opto-electronic simulation of (i) nanostructured solar cells with localized contacts and (ii) nanowire solar cells. We will also show how opto-electronic simulation can be used to simulate light- and electron-beam induced current (LBIC/EBIC) experiments, targeting quantitative analysis of the passivation properties of surfaces.

  13. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy. PMID:26081313

  14. Development of fast patient position verification software using 2D-3D image registration and its clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Riki; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    To improve treatment workflow, we developed a graphic processing unit (GPU)-based patient positional verification software application and integrated it into carbon-ion scanning beam treatment. Here, we evaluated the basic performance of the software. The algorithm provides 2D/3D registration matching using CT and orthogonal X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) images. The participants were 53 patients with tumors of the head and neck, prostate or lung receiving carbon-ion beam treatment. 2D/3D-ITchi-Gime (ITG) calculation accuracy was evaluated in terms of computation time and registration accuracy. Registration calculation was determined using the similarity measurement metrics gradient difference (GD), normalized mutual information (NMI), zero-mean normalized cross-correlation (ZNCC), and their combination. Registration accuracy was dependent on the particular metric used. Representative examples were determined to have target registration error (TRE) = 0.45 ± 0.23 mm and angular error (AE) = 0.35 ± 0.18° with ZNCC + GD for a head and neck tumor; TRE = 0.12 ± 0.07 mm and AE = 0.16 ± 0.07° with ZNCC for a pelvic tumor; and TRE = 1.19 ± 0.78 mm and AE = 0.83 ± 0.61° with ZNCC for lung tumor. Calculation time was less than 7.26 s.The new registration software has been successfully installed and implemented in our treatment process. We expect that it will improve both treatment workflow and treatment accuracy.

  15. Understanding fiber mixture by simulation in 3D Polarized Light Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Melanie; Menzel, Miriam; Wiese, Hendrik; Reckfort, Julia; Hanke, Frederike; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Axer, Markus

    2015-05-01

    3D Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI) is a neuroimaging technique that has opened up new avenues to study the complex architecture of nerve fibers in postmortem brains. The spatial orientations of the fibers are derived from birefringence measurements of unstained histological brain sections that are interpreted by a voxel-based analysis. This, however, implies that a single fiber orientation vector is obtained for each voxel and reflects the net effect of all comprised fibers. The mixture of various fiber orientations within an individual voxel is a priori not accessible by a standard 3D-PLI measurement. In order to better understand the effects of fiber mixture on the measured 3D-PLI signal and to improve the interpretation of real data, we have developed a simulation method referred to as SimPLI. By means of SimPLI, it is possible to reproduce the entire 3D-PLI analysis starting from synthetic fiber models in user-defined arrangements and ending with measurement-like tissue images. For the simulation, each synthetic fiber is considered as an optical retarder, i.e., multiple fibers within one voxel are described by multiple retarder elements. The investigation of different synthetic crossing fiber arrangements generated with SimPLI demonstrated that the derived fiber orientations are strongly influenced by the relative mixture of crossing fibers. In case of perpendicularly crossing fibers, for example, the derived fiber direction corresponds to the predominant fiber direction. The derived fiber inclination turned out to be not only influenced by myelin density but also systematically overestimated due to signal attenuation. Similar observations were made for synthetic models of optic chiasms of a human and a hooded seal which were opposed to experimental 3D-PLI data sets obtained from the chiasms of both species. Our study showed that SimPLI is a powerful method able to test hypotheses on the underlying fiber structure of brain tissue and, therefore, to improve the

  16. High Resolution 3D Simulations of the Impacts of Asteroids into the Venusian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Zahnle, K. J.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2000-10-01

    We compare high-resolution 2D and 3D numerical hydrocode simulations of asteroids striking the atmosphere of Venus. Our focus is on aerobraking and its effect on the size of impact craters. We consider impacts both by spheres and by the real asteroid 4769 Castalia, a severely nonspherical body in a Venus-crossing orbit. We compute mass and momentum fluxes as functions of altitude as global measures of the asteroid's progress. We find that, on average, the 2D and 3D simulations are in broad agreement over how quickly an asteroid slows down, but that the scatter about the average is much larger for the 2D models than for the 3D models. The 2D models appear to be strongly susceptible to the ``butterfly effect'', in which tiny changes in initial conditions (e.g., 0.05% change in the impact velocity) produce quite different chaotic evolutions. By contrast the global properties of the 3D models appear more reproducible despite seemingly large differences in initial conditions. We argue that this difference between 2D and 3D models has its root in the greater geometrical constraints present in any 2D model, and in particular in the conservation of enstrophy in 2D that forces energy to pool in large-scale structures. It is the interaction of these artificial large-scale structures that causes slightly different 2D models to diverge so greatly. These constraints do not apply in 3D and large scale structures are not observed to form. A one-parameter modified pancake model reproduces the crater-forming potential of the 3D Castalias quite well. This work was supported by NASA's Exobiology and Planetary Atmospheres Programs. Image rendering was done using the resources of UCSC Vizualizaton Lab. M-MML is partially supported by a CAREER fellowship from the US NSF. This work was partially supported by the National Computational Science Alliance, utilizing the NCSA SGI/CRAY Power Challenge array at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

  17. The Impact of 3D Data Quality on Improving GNSS Performance Using City Models Initial Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellul, C.; Adjrad, M.; Groves, P.

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for highly accurate positioning information in urban areas, to support applications such as people and vehicle tracking, real-time air quality detection and navigation. However systems such as GPS typically perform poorly in dense urban areas. A number of authors have made use of 3D city models to enhance accuracy, obtaining good results, but to date the influence of the quality of the 3D city model on these results has not been tested. This paper addresses the following question: how does the quality, and in particular the variation in height, level of generalization and completeness and currency of a 3D dataset, impact the results obtained for the preliminary calculations in a process known as Shadow Matching, which takes into account not only where satellite signals are visible on the street but also where they are predicted to be absent. We describe initial simulations to address this issue, examining the variation in elevation angle - i.e. the angle above which the satellite is visible, for three 3D city models in a test area in London, and note that even within one dataset using different available height values could cause a difference in elevation angle of up to 29°. Missing or extra buildings result in an elevation variation of around 85°. Variations such as these can significantly influence the predicted satellite visibility which will then not correspond to that experienced on the ground, reducing the accuracy of the resulting Shadow Matching process.

  18. OptogenSIM: a 3D Monte Carlo simulation platform for light delivery design in optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuming; Jacques, Steven L.; Azimipour, Mehdi; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Pashaie, Ramin; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing light delivery for optogenetics is critical in order to accurately stimulate the neurons of interest while reducing nonspecific effects such as tissue heating or photodamage. Light distribution is typically predicted using the assumption of tissue homogeneity, which oversimplifies light transport in heterogeneous brain. Here, we present an open-source 3D simulation platform, OptogenSIM, which eliminates this assumption. This platform integrates a voxel-based 3D Monte Carlo model, generic optical property models of brain tissues, and a well-defined 3D mouse brain tissue atlas. The application of this platform in brain data models demonstrates that brain heterogeneity has moderate to significant impact depending on application conditions. Estimated light density contours can show the region of any specified power density in the 3D brain space and thus can help optimize the light delivery settings, such as the optical fiber position, fiber diameter, fiber numerical aperture, light wavelength and power. OptogenSIM is freely available and can be easily adapted to incorporate additional brain atlases. PMID:26713200

  19. Sedimentary basin effects in Seattle, Washington: Ground-motion observations and 3D simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur; Stephenson, William; Carver, David

    2009-01-01

    Seismograms of local earthquakes recorded in Seattle exhibit surface waves in the Seattle basin and basin-edge focusing of S waves. Spectral ratios of Swaves and later arrivals at 1 Hz for stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin show a dependence on the direction to the earthquake, with earthquakes to the south and southwest producing higher average amplification. Earthquakes to the southwest typically produce larger basin surface waves relative to S waves than earthquakes to the north and northwest, probably because of the velocity contrast across the Seattle fault along the southern margin of the Seattle basin. S to P conversions are observed for some events and are likely converted at the bottom of the Seattle basin. We model five earthquakes, including the M 6.8 Nisqually earthquake, using 3D finite-difference simulations accurate up to 1 Hz. The simulations reproduce the observed dependence of amplification on the direction to the earthquake. The simulations generally match the timing and character of basin surface waves observed for many events. The 3D simulation for the Nisqually earth-quake produces focusing of S waves along the southern margin of the Seattle basin near the area in west Seattle that experienced increased chimney damage from the earthquake, similar to the results of the higher-frequency 2D simulation reported by Stephenson et al. (2006). Waveforms from the 3D simulations show reasonable agreement with the data at low frequencies (0.2-0.4 Hz) for the Nisqually earthquake and an M 4.8 deep earthquake west of Seattle.

  20. Simulation of 3-D shear flows around a nozzle-afterbody at high speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Hoffman, Wendy B.

    1991-01-01

    3D, compressible, unsteady, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are presently solved by a finite-volume and alternating-direction-implicit method in order to simulate supersonic and hypersonic turbulent shear flows. The effect of turbulence is incorporated via a modified Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model which reflects the influence of high-speed compressibility, multiple walls, near-wall vortices, and turbulent memory effects, as well as local equilibrium effects. Attention is given to the simulation of the flow around the nozzle-afterbody of a generic, scramjet-propelled hypersonic vehicle; computed pressure distributions are consonant with experimental surface and off-surface flow surveys.

  1. 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations of a SLAC Klystrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Luginsland, John; Hackett, Kirk; Haworth, Michael; Song, Liqun; Scheitrum, Glenn

    2000-10-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory is collaborating with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in performing 3-D PIC simulations using ARGUS and ICEPIC on a klystrino with the following parameters: voltage of 110 kV, current of 2.4 A, frequency of 94 GHz, peak magnetic field of 4 kG. Results wll be presented and will be compared to 2-D MAGIC simulations, as well as to experimental test data. This work is supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. 3D MHD simulations of planet migration in turbulent stratified disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Ana; Klahr, Hubert; Flock, Mario; Henning, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    We performed 3D MHD numerical simulations of planet migration in stratified disks using the Godunov code PLUTO (Mignone et al. 2007). The disk is invaded by turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the migration for planets with different mass to primary mass ratio. The migration of the low-mass planet (q=Mp/Ms=10-5) is dominated by random fluctuations in the torque and there is no defined direction of migration on timescales of 100 orbits. The intermediate-mass planet (q=Mp/Ms=10-4) can experience systematic outwards migration that was sustained for the times we were able to simulate.

  3. Improving light propagation Monte Carlo simulations with accurate 3D modeling of skin tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Price, Jeffery R; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D light propagation model to simulate multispectral reflectance images of large skin surface areas. In particular, we aim to simulate more accurately the effects of various physiological properties of the skin in the case of subcutaneous vein imaging compared to existing models. Our method combines a Monte Carlo light propagation model, a realistic three-dimensional model of the skin using parametric surfaces and a vision system for data acquisition. We describe our model in detail, present results from the Monte Carlo modeling and compare our results with those obtained with a well established Monte Carlo model and with real skin reflectance images.

  4. GeoGebra 3D from the Perspectives of Elementary Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers Who Are Familiar with a Number of Software Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaci, Serdal; Yildiz, Avni

    2015-01-01

    Each new version of the GeoGebra dynamic mathematics software goes through updates and innovations. One of these innovations is the GeoGebra 5.0 version. This version aims to facilitate 3D instruction by offering opportunities for students to analyze 3D objects. While scanning the previous studies of GeoGebra 3D, it is seen that they mainly focus…

  5. The Mutual Effect of Reciprocally Moving Geokhod and Geological Environment Studied by the Discrete Element Method in Software PFC3D 5.00

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. Yu.; Kust, T. S.; Dronov, A. A.; Beloglazov, I. I.; Ikonnikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    A numerical experiment procedure of geokhod traverse in the geological environment, based on software PFC3D 5.00 is presented in the paper; the interpretation of numerical experiment results is provided.

  6. Simulation of the impact of 3-D porosity distribution in metallic U-10Zr fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Di; Yacout, Abdellatif M.; Stan, Marius; Bauer, Theodore H.; Wright, Arthur E.

    2014-05-01

    Evolution of porosity generated in metallic U-Zr fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactors leads to changes in fuel properties and impacts important phenomena such as heat transport and constituent redistribution. The porosity is generated as a result of the accumulation of fission gases and is affected by the possible bond sodium infiltration into the fuel. Typically, the impact of porosity development on properties, such as thermal conductivity, is accounted for through empirical correlations that are dependent on porosity and infiltrated sodium fractions. Currently available simulation tools make it possible to take into account fuel 3-D porosity distributions, potentially eliminating the need for such correlations. This development allows for a more realistic representation of the porosity evolution in metallic fuel and creates a framework for truly mechanistic fuel development models. In this work, COMSOL multi-physics simulation platform is used to model 3-D porosity distributions and simulate heat transport in metallic U-10Zr fuel. Available experimental data regarding microstructural evolution of fuel that was irradiated in EBR-II and associated phase stability information are used to guide the simulation. The impact of changes in porosity characteristics on material properties is estimated and the results are compared with calculated temperature distributions. The simulations demonstrate the developed capability and importance of accounting for detailed porosity distribution features for accurate fuel performance evaluation.

  7. Performance of dental students versus prosthodontics residents on a 3D immersive haptic simulator.

    PubMed

    Eve, Elizabeth J; Koo, Samuel; Alshihri, Abdulmonem A; Cormier, Jeremy; Kozhenikov, Maria; Donoff, R Bruce; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the performance of dental students versus prosthodontics residents on a simulated caries removal exercise using a newly designed, 3D immersive haptic simulator. The intent of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the simulator's construct validity, which in the context of this experiment was defined as its ability to detect a statistically significant performance difference between novice dental students (n=12) and experienced prosthodontics residents (n=14). Both groups received equivalent calibration training on the simulator and repeated the same caries removal exercise three times. Novice and experienced subjects' average performance differed significantly on the caries removal exercise with respect to the percentage of carious lesion removed and volume of surrounding sound tooth structure removed (p<0.05). Experienced subjects removed a greater portion of the carious lesion, but also a greater volume of the surrounding tooth structure. Efficiency, defined as percentage of carious lesion removed over drilling time, improved significantly over the course of the experiment for both novice and experienced subjects (p<0.001). Within the limitations of this study, experienced subjects removed a greater portion of carious lesion on a 3D immersive haptic simulator. These results are a first step in establishing the validity of this device.

  8. Software-Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Abdel-Hamid, T.; Sherif, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Software Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model is described which was developed at JPL. SEPS is a dynamic simulation model of the software project development process. It uses the feedback principles of system dynamics to simulate the dynamic interactions among various software life cycle development activities and management decision making processes. The model is designed to be a planning tool to examine tradeoffs of cost, schedule, and functionality, and to test the implications of different managerial policies on a project's outcome. Furthermore, SEPS will enable software managers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of software project development and perform postmodern assessments.

  9. 3D printing of microtube in solid phantom to simulate tissue oxygenation and perfusion (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiang; Xue, Yue; Wang, Haili; Shen, Shu Wei; Zhou, Ximing; Liu, Guangli; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald X.

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms with interior vascular network may facilitate traceable calibration and quantitative validation of many medical optical devices. However, a solid phantom that reliably simulates tissue oxygenation and blood perfusion is still not available. This paper presents a new method to fabricate hollow microtubes for blood vessel simulation in solid phantoms. The fabrication process combines ultraviolet (UV) rapid prototyping technique with fluid mechanics of a coaxial jet flow. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a UV-curable polymer are mixed at the designated ratio and extruded through a coaxial needle device to produce a coaxial jet flow. The extruded jet flow is quickly photo-polymerized by ultraviolet (UV) light to form vessel-simulating solid structures at different sizes ranging from 700 μm to 1000 μm. Microtube structures with adequate mechanical properties can be fabricated by adjusting material compositions and illumination intensity. Curved, straight and stretched microtubes can be formed by adjusting the extrusion speed of the materials and the speed of the 3D printing platform. To simulate vascular structures in biologic tissue, we embed vessel-simulating microtubes in a gel wax phantom of 10 cm x10 cm x 5 cm at the depth from 1 to 2 mm. Bloods at different oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration levels are circulated through the microtubes at different flow rates in order to simulate different oxygenation and perfusion conditions. The simulated physiologic parameters are detected by a tissue oximeter and a laser speckle blood flow meter respectively and compared with the actual values. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed 3D printing process is able to produce solid phantoms with simulated vascular networks for potential applications in medical device calibration and drug delivery studies.

  10. Simulations of Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar for the EISCAT_3D Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Hoz, C.; Belyey, V.

    2012-12-01

    EISCAT_3D is a project to build the next generation of incoherent scatter radars endowed with multiple 3-dimensional capabilities that will replace the current EISCAT radars in Northern Scandinavia. Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. To demonstrate the feasibility of the antenna configurations and the imaging inversion algorithms a simulation of synthetic incoherent scattering data has been performed. The simulation algorithm incorporates the ability to control the background plasma parameters with non-homogeneous, non-stationary components over an extended 3-dimensional space. Control over the positions of a number of separated receiving antennas, their signal-to-noise-ratios and arriving phases allows realistic simulation of a multi-baseline interferometric imaging radar system. The resulting simulated data is fed into various inversion algorithms. This simulation package is a powerful tool to evaluate various antenna configurations and inversion algorithms. Results applied to realistic design alternatives of EISCAT_3D will be described.

  11. Full Core 3-D Simulation of a Partial MOX LWR Core

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bays; W. Skerjanc; M. Pope

    2009-05-01

    A comparative analysis and comparison of results obtained between 2-D lattice calculations and 3-D full core nodal calculations, in the frame of MOX fuel design, was conducted. This study revealed a set of advantages and disadvantages, with respect to each method, which can be used to guide the level of accuracy desired for future fuel and fuel cycle calculations. For the purpose of isotopic generation for fuel cycle analyses, the approach of using a 2-D lattice code (i.e., fuel assembly in infinite lattice) gave reasonable predictions of uranium and plutonium isotope concentrations at the predicted 3-D core simulation batch average discharge burnup. However, it was found that the 2-D lattice calculation can under-predict the power of pins located along a shared edge between MOX and UO2 by as much as 20%. In this analysis, this error did not occur in the peak pin. However, this was a coincidence and does not rule out the possibility that the peak pin could occur in a lattice position with high calculation uncertainty in future un-optimized studies. Another important consideration in realistic fuel design is the prediction of the peak axial burnup and neutron fluence. The use of 3-D core simulation gave peak burnup conditions, at the pellet level, to be approximately 1.4 times greater than what can be predicted using back-of-the-envelope assumptions of average specific power and irradiation time.

  12. [Design of a 3D afterloading brachytherapy simulation system based on CT images].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Xu, Hai-Rong; Zhang, Shu-Xu; Shi, Yu-Sheng; Qian, Jian-Yang

    2008-03-01

    To design a new afterloading brachytherapy simulation system based on CT images. This paper mainly focuses on the anthropomorphic pelvic phantom spiled by three pipelines and the nasopharyngeal carcinoma spiled by two pipelines. Microsoft Visual C++ was used to parse CT images for some information, then to reconstruct pipelines in the body of phantom or the patient and to give the three-dimensional coordinate of dwelling points. The dose distribution displayed on CT images was processed by the dose distribution calculation methods near single afterloading source and the dose optimization methods. VTK technology was used in the 3D display in the system. According to the reference points applied by doctors, the system can calculate reversely the dwelling time of dwelling points in pipelines and get satisfying dose distribution on CT images. Besides, it can reflect the 3D relationship between the dose volume and the normal tissues. This system overcomes some deficiencies of 2D afterloading brachytherapy simulation system based on X-ray films which are used widely in China. It supplies 3D display of dose distribution for clinical doctors. At present, the system is being tested in clinics.

  13. Phenomenological modelling and simulation of cell clusters in 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    González-Valverde, I; Semino, C; García-Aznar, J M

    2016-10-01

    Cell clustering and aggregation are fundamental processes in the development of several tissues and the progression of many diseases. The formation of these aggregates also has a direct impact on the oxygen concentration in their surroundings due to cellular respiration and poor oxygen diffusion through clusters. In this work, we propose a mathematical model that is capable of simulating cell cluster formation in 3D cultures through combining a particle-based and a finite element approach to recreate complex experimental conditions. Cells are modelled considering cell proliferation, cell death and cell-cell mechanical interactions. Additionally, the oxygen concentration profile is calculated through finite element analysis using a reaction-diffusion model that considers cell oxygen consumption and diffusion through the extracellular matrix and the cell clusters. In our model, the local oxygen concentration in the medium determines both cell proliferation and cell death. Numerical predictions are also compared with experimental data from the literature. The simulation results indicate that our model can predict cell clustering, cluster growth and oxygen distribution in 3D cultures. We conclude that the initial cell distribution, cell death and cell proliferation dynamics determine the size and density of clusters. Moreover, these phenomena are directly affected by the oxygen transport in the 3D culture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Software for Simulating Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Bilimoria, Karl; Grabbe, Shon; Chatterji, Gano; Sheth, Kapil; Mulfinger, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Future Air Traffic Management Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET) is a system of software for performing computational simulations for evaluating advanced concepts of advanced air-traffic management. FACET includes a program that generates a graphical user interface plus programs and databases that implement computational models of weather, airspace, airports, navigation aids, aircraft performance, and aircraft trajectories. Examples of concepts studied by use of FACET include aircraft self-separation for free flight; prediction of air-traffic-controller workload; decision support for direct routing; integration of spacecraft-launch operations into the U.S. national airspace system; and traffic- flow-management using rerouting, metering, and ground delays. Aircraft can be modeled as flying along either flight-plan routes or great-circle routes as they climb, cruise, and descend according to their individual performance models. The FACET software is modular and is written in the Java and C programming languages. The architecture of FACET strikes a balance between flexibility and fidelity; as a consequence, FACET can be used to model systemwide airspace operations over the contiguous U.S., involving as many as 10,000 aircraft, all on a single desktop or laptop computer running any of a variety of operating systems. Two notable applications of FACET include: (1) reroute conformance monitoring algorithms that have been implemented in one of the Federal Aviation Administration s nationally deployed, real-time, operational systems; and (2) the licensing and integration of FACET with the commercially available Flight Explorer, which is an Internet- based, real-time flight-tracking system.

  15. Lightning strike simulation using coaxial line technique and 3D linear injection current analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flourens, F.; Gauthier, D.; Serafin, D.

    1989-09-01

    The GORFFD code for determining aircraft responses to either a lightning event or to simulated current injection is based on the finite-difference solution of Maxwell's equation, and allows the simulation of complex, 3D metallic and dielectric composite structures. A transfer method is used to analyze the EM environment associated with in-flight measurements. Attention is given to a linear-analysis numerical model in which the lightning channel is simulated as a thin wire that is driven by a current source. Surface E-fields and current mappings are produced for the Transall transport and Mirage fighter aircraft. An experimental method has been devised for verification of these lightning-strike simulations.

  16. Numerical simulation of pulsation processes in hydraulic turbine based on 3D model of cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, L. V.; Chirkov, D. V.; Cherny, S. G.; Pylev, I. M.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was proposed for simulation of unsteady cavitating flow in the flow passage of a hydraulic power plant. 1D hydro-acoustics equations are solved in the penstock domain. 3D equations of turbulent flow of isothermal compressible liquid-vapor mixture are solved in the turbine domain. Cavitation is described by a transfer equation for liquid phase with a source term which is responsible for evaporation and condensation. The developed method was applied for simulation of pulsations in pressure, discharge, and total energy propagating along the flow conduit of the hydraulic power plant. Simulation results are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment. The influence of key physical and numerical parameters like discharge, cavitation number, penstock length, time step, and vapor density on simulation results was studied.

  17. Anomalous Surface Deformation of Sapphire Clarified by 3D-FEM Simulation of the Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Roman; Manninen, Timo; Li, Chunliang; Heiskanen, Kari; Hannula, Simo-Pekka; Lindroos, Veikko; Soga, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Fusahito

    This work clarifies the origin of anomalous surface deformation reflected by peculiar surface patterns around indentation impressions on various crystallographic planes of sapphire. The three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D-FEM) of nanoindentation in Al2O3 crystal allowed the authors to localize the regions in which various kinds of twinning and slip are most prone to be activated. The work provides a novel approach to the “hardness anisotropy”, which was modeled so far using a modified uniaxial-stress approximation of this essentially 3D, non-isotropic contact problem. The calculated results enabled the authors to unravel the asymmetric surface deformation detected on prismatic planes by the high-resolution microscopy, which cannot be explained using simple crystallographic considerations.

  18. Application of FUN3D Solver for Aeroacoustics Simulation of a Nose Landing Gear Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a nose landing gear configuration corresponding to the experimental tests conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for solving the unsteady flow field associated with this configuration. A series of successively finer unstructured grids has been generated to assess the effect of grid refinement. Solutions have been obtained on purely tetrahedral grids as well as mixed element grids using hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models. The agreement of FUN3D solutions with experimental data on the same size mesh is better on mixed element grids compared to pure tetrahedral grids, and in general improves with grid refinement.

  19. Comparison between 2D and 3D Numerical Modelling of a hot forging simulative test

    SciTech Connect

    Croin, M.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2007-04-07

    The paper presents the comparative analysis between 2D and 3D modelling of a simulative experiment, performed in laboratory environment, in which operating conditions approximate hot forging of a turbine aerofoil section. The plane strain deformation was chosen as an ideal case to analyze the process because of the thickness variations in the final section and the consequent distributions of contact pressure and sliding velocity at the interface that are closed to the conditions of the real industrial process. In order to compare the performances of 2D and 3D approaches, two different analyses were performed and compared with the experiments in terms of loads and temperatures peaks at the interface between the dies and the workpiece.

  20. Reconstruction of quadratic curves in 3D using two or more perspective views: simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Sukavanam, N.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2006-01-01

    The shapes of many natural and man-made objects have planar and curvilinear surfaces. The images of such curves usually do not have sufficient distinctive features to apply conventional feature-based reconstruction algorithms. In this paper, we describe a method of reconstruction of a quadratic curve in 3-D space as an intersection of two cones containing the respective projected curve images. The correspondence between this pair of projections of the curve is assumed to be established in this work. Using least-square curve fitting, the parameters of a curve in 2-D space are found. From this we are reconstructing the 3-D quadratic curve. Relevant mathematical formulations and analytical solutions for obtaining the equation of reconstructed curve are given. The result of the described reconstruction methodology are studied by simulation studies. This reconstruction methodology is applicable to LBW decision in cricket, path of the missile, Robotic Vision, path lanning etc.

  1. Analysis of nuclear organization with TANGO, software for high-throughput quantitative analysis of 3D fluorescence microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Ollion, Jean; Cochennec, Julien; Loll, François; Escudé, Christophe; Boudier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly organized cellular organelle that contains the genome. An important step to understand the relationships between genome positioning and genome functions is to extract quantitative data from three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence imaging. However, such approaches are limited by the requirement for processing and analyzing large sets of images. Here we present a practical approach using TANGO (Tools for Analysis of Nuclear Genome Organization), an image analysis tool dedicated to the study of nuclear architecture. TANGO is a generic tool able to process large sets of images, allowing quantitative study of nuclear organization. In this chapter a practical description of the software is drawn in order to give an overview of its different concepts and functionalities. This description is illustrated with a precise example that can be performed step-by-step on experimental data provided on the website http://biophysique.mnhn.fr/tango/HomePage.

  2. Clinical experience with Mobius FX software for 3D dose verification for prostate VMAT plans and comparison with physical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Quino, L. A.; Huerta-Hernandez, C. I.; Rangaraj, D.

    2017-05-01

    MobiusFX, an add-on software module from Mobius Medical Systems for IMRT and VMAT QA, uses measurements in linac treatment logs to calculate and verify the 3D dose delivered to patients. In this study, 10 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) prostate plans were planned and delivered in a Varian TrueBeam linac. The plans consisted of beams with 6 and 10 MV energy and 2 to 3 arcs per plan. The average gamma value with criterion of 3% and 3mm MobiusFX and TPS: 99.96%, 2% and 2mm MobiusFX and TPS: 98.70 %. Further comparison with ArcCheck measurements was conducted.

  3. 3D source localization derived from subdural strip and grid electrodes: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dümpelmann, Matthias; Fell, Jürgen; Wellmer, Jörg; Urbach, Horst; Elger, Christian E

    2009-06-01

    Little experience exists in the application of source reconstruction methods to recordings from subdural strip and grid electrodes. This study addressed the question, whether reliable and accurate 3D source localization is possible from the Electrocorticogram (ECoG). The accuracy of source reconstruction was investigated by simulations and a case study. Simulated sources were used to compute potentials at the electrode positions derived from the MRI of a patient with subdural electrodes. Used procedures were the linear estimation (minimum norm) algorithm and the MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) scan. Maxima of linear estimation were attracted to adjacent electrodes. Reliable localization with a localization error 15 mm was only achieved for about 35% of the original source positions. Maxima of the MUSIC metric were identical to original positions for simulations without noise. Noise reduced the percentage of reliable solutions down to a 79.0%. Electrode contacts distant to the source had small influence on localization accuracy. The case study supported simulation results. Reliable source reconstruction derived from ECoG can be achieved by the application of the MUSIC algorithm. Linear estimation needs additional compensation mechanisms. MUSIC based 3D localization based on ECoG has the potential improving epilepsy diagnosis and cognitive research.

  4. Magnetospheric Magnetic Reconnection with Southward IMF by a 3D EMPM Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Yan, X. Y.; Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.

    2004-01-01

    We report our new simulation results on magnetospheric magnetic reconnection with southward IMF using a 3D EMPM model, with greater resolution and more particles using the parallelized 3D HPF TRISTAN code on VPP5000 supercomputer. Main parameters used in the new simulation are: domain size is 215 x 145 x 145, grid size = 0.5 Earth radius, initial particle number is 16 per cell, the IMF is southward. Arrival of southward IMF will cause reconnection in the magnetopause, thus allowing particles to enter into the inner magnetosphere. Sunward and tailward high particle flow are observed by satellites, and these phenomena are also observed in the simulation near the neutral line (X line) of the near-Earth magnetotail. This high particle flow goes along with the reconnected island. The magnetic reconnection process contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process eats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. We investigate magnetic, electric fields, density, and current during this magnetic reconnection with southward IMF. Further investigation with this simulation will provide insight into unsolved problems, such as the triggering of storms and substorms, and the storm-substorm relationship. New results will be presented at the meeting.

  5. Simulation of RBS spectra with known 3D sample surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinský, Petr; Siegel, Jakub; Hnatowicz, Vladimir; Macková, Anna; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-09-01

    The Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is a technique for elemental depth profiling with a nanometer depth resolution. Possible surface roughness of analysed samples can deteriorate the RBS spectra and makes their interpretation more difficult and ambiguous. This work describes the simulation of RBS spectra which takes into account real 3D morphology of the sample surface obtained by AFM method. The RBS spectrum is calculated as a sum of the many particular spectra obtained for randomly chosen particle trajectories over sample 3D landscape. The spectra, simulated for different ion beam incidence angles, are compared to the experimental ones measured with 2.0 MeV 4He+ ions. The main aim of this work is to obtain more definite information on how a particular surface morphology and measuring geometry affects the RBS spectra and derived elemental depth profiles. A reasonable agreement between the measured and simulated spectra was found and the results indicate that the AFM data on the sample surface can be used for the simulation of RBS spectra.

  6. Simulating 3-D lung dynamics using a programmable graphics processing unit.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Anand P; Hamza-Lup, Felix G; Rolland, Jannick P

    2007-09-01

    Medical simulations of lung dynamics promise to be effective tools for teaching and training clinical and surgical procedures related to lungs. Their effectiveness may be greatly enhanced when visualized in an augmented reality (AR) environment. However, the computational requirements of AR environments limit the availability of the central processing unit (CPU) for the lung dynamics simulation for different breathing conditions. In this paper, we present a method for computing lung deformations in real time by taking advantage of the programmable graphics processing unit (GPU). This will save the CPU time for other AR-associated tasks such as tracking, communication, and interaction management. An approach for the simulations of the three-dimensional (3-D) lung dynamics using Green's formulation in the case of upright position is taken into consideration. We extend this approach to other orientations as well as the subsequent changes in breathing. Specifically, the proposed extension presents a computational optimization and its implementation in a GPU. Results show that the computational requirements for simulating the deformation of a 3-D lung model are significantly reduced for point-based rendering.

  7. 3D simulations of young core-collapse supernova remnants undergoing efficient particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2016-06-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the 'knee'. However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components, and the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We address such question by the means of numerical simulations that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra of the thermal and non-thermal emission, that can be compared with multi-wavelength observations (in radio, X-rays, and γ-rays). Supernovae come in different types, and although their energy budget is of the same order, their remnants have different properties, and so may contribute in different ways to the pool of Galactic cosmic-rays. Our first simulations were focused on thermonuclear supernovae, like Tycho's SNR, that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium. Here we present our 3D simulations of core-collapse supernovae, like the Cas A SNR, that occur in a more complex medium bearing the imprint of the wind of the progenitor star.

  8. Multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering simulations using 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2012-02-01

    We have implemented three-dimensional (3D) elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations to model Lamb wave scattering for two flaw-types in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate, a rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole and a disbond of the same shape. The plate thickness and flaws explored in this work include frequency-thickness regions where several Lamb wave modes exist and sometimes overlap in phase and/or group velocity. For the case of the flat-bottom hole the depth was incrementally increased to explore progressive changes in multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering due to the damage. The flat-bottom hole simulation results have been compared to experimental data and are shown to provide key insight for this well-defined experimental case by explaining unexpected results in experimental waveforms. For the rounded rectangle disbond flaw, which would be difficult to implement experimentally, we found that Lamb wave behavior differed significantly from the flat-bottom hole flaw. Most of the literature in this field is restricted to low frequency-thickness regions due to difficulties in interpreting data when multiple modes exist. We found that benchmarked 3D EFIT simulations can yield an understanding of scattering behavior for these higher frequency-thickness regions and in cases that would be difficult to set up experimentally. Additionally, our results show that 2D simulations would not have been sufficient for modeling the complicated scattering that occurred. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Fast thermal simulations and temperature optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning, including realistic 3D vessel networks.

    PubMed

    Kok, H P; van den Berg, C A T; Bel, A; Crezee, J

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal simulations in hyperthermia treatment planning require discrete modeling of large blood vessels. The very long computation time of the finite difference based DIscrete VAsculature model (DIVA) developed for this purpose is impractical for clinical applications. In this work, a fast steady-state thermal solver was developed for simulations with realistic 3D vessel networks. Additionally, an efficient temperature-based optimization method including the thermal effect of discrete vasculature was developed. The steady-state energy balance for vasculature and tissue was described by a linear system, which was solved with an iterative method on the graphical processing unit. Temperature calculations during optimization were performed by superposition of several precomputed temperature distributions, calculated with the developed thermal solver. The thermal solver and optimization were applied to a human anatomy, with the prostate being the target region, heated with the eight waveguide 70 MHz AMC-8 system. Realistic 3D pelvic vasculature was obtained from angiography. Both the arterial and venous vessel networks consisted of 174 segments and 93 endpoints with a diameter of 1.2 mm. Calculation of the steady-state temperature distribution lasted about 3.3 h with the original DIVA model, while the newly developed method took only ≈ 1-1.5 min. Temperature-based optimization with and without taking the vasculature into account showed differences in optimized waveguide power of more than a factor 2 and optimized tumor T90 differed up to ≈ 0.5°C. This shows the necessity to take discrete vasculature into account during optimization. A very fast method was developed for thermal simulations with realistic 3D vessel networks. The short simulation time allows online calculations and makes temperature optimization with realistic vasculature feasible, which is an important step forward in hyperthermia treatment planning.

  10. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  11. MONTE GENEROSO ROCKFALL FIELD TEST (SWITZERLAND): Real size experiment to constraint 2D and 3D rockfall simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, F.; Matasci, B.; Carrea, D.; Pedrazzini, A.; Loye, A.; Pedrozzi, G.; Nicolet, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    account the results of the experimental testing are performed and compared with the a-priori simulations. 3D simulations were performed using a software that takes into account the effect of the forest cover in the blocky trajectory (RockyFor 3D) and an other that neglects this aspect (Rotomap; geo&soft international). 2D simulation (RocFall; Rocscience) profiles were located in the blocks paths deduced from 3D simulations. The preliminary results show that: (1) high speed movies are promising and allow us to track the blocks using video software, (2) the a-priori simulations tend to overestimate the runout distance which is certainly due to an underestimation of the obstacles as well as the breaking of the failing rocks which is not taken into account in the models, (3) the trajectories deduced from both a-priori simulation and real size experiment highlights the major influence of the channelized slope morphology on rock paths as it tends to follow the flow direction. This indicates that the 2D simulation have to be performed along the line of flow direction.

  12. Use of the 3D surgical modelling technique with open-source software for mandibular fibula free flap reconstruction and its surgical guides.

    PubMed

    Ganry, L; Hersant, B; Quilichini, J; Leyder, P; Meningaud, J P

    2017-06-01

    Tridimensional (3D) surgical modelling is a necessary step to create 3D-printed surgical tools, and expensive professional software is generally needed. Open-source software are functional, reliable, updated, may be downloaded for free and used to produce 3D models. Few surgical teams have used free solutions for mastering 3D surgical modelling for reconstructive surgery with osseous free flaps. We described an Open-source software 3D surgical modelling protocol to perform a fast and nearly free mandibular reconstruction with microvascular fibula free flap and its surgical guides, with no need for engineering support. Four successive specialised Open-source software were used to perform our 3D modelling: OsiriX(®), Meshlab(®), Netfabb(®) and Blender(®). Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data on patient skull and fibula, obtained with a computerised tomography (CT) scan, were needed. The 3D modelling of the reconstructed mandible and its surgical guides were created. This new strategy may improve surgical management in Oral and Craniomaxillofacial surgery. Further clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the feasibility, reproducibility, transfer of know how and benefits of this technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Fabrication of cerebral aneurysm simulator with a desktop 3D printer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Gao, Qing; Du, Song; Chen, ZiChen; Fu, JianZhong; Chen, Bing; Liu, ZhenJie; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Now, more and more patients are suffering cerebral aneurysm. However, long training time limits the rapid growth of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons. Here we developed a novel cerebral aneurysm simulator which can be better represented the dynamic bulging process of cerebral aneurysm The proposed simulator features the integration of a hollow elastic vascular model, a skull model and a brain model, which can be affordably fabricated at the clinic (Fab@Clinic), under $25.00 each with the help of a low-cost desktop 3D printer. Moreover, the clinical blood flow and pulsation pressure similar to the human can be well simulated, which can be used to train the neurosurgical residents how to clip aneurysms more effectively. PMID:28513626

  14. Fabrication of cerebral aneurysm simulator with a desktop 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Gao, Qing; Du, Song; Chen, Zichen; Fu, Jianzhong; Chen, Bing; Liu, Zhenjie; He, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Now, more and more patients are suffering cerebral aneurysm. However, long training time limits the rapid growth of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons. Here we developed a novel cerebral aneurysm simulator which can be better represented the dynamic bulging process of cerebral aneurysm The proposed simulator features the integration of a hollow elastic vascular model, a skull model and a brain model, which can be affordably fabricated at the clinic (Fab@Clinic), under $25.00 each with the help of a low-cost desktop 3D printer. Moreover, the clinical blood flow and pulsation pressure similar to the human can be well simulated, which can be used to train the neurosurgical residents how to clip aneurysms more effectively.

  15. A 3D technique for simulation of irregular electron treatment fields using a digital camera

    SciTech Connect

    Bassalow, Roustem; Sidhu, Narinder P

    2003-09-30

    Cerrobend inserts, which define electron field apertures, are manufactured at our institution using perspex templates. Contours are reproduced manually on these templates at the simulator from the field outlines drawn on the skin or mask of a patient. A previously reported technique for simulation of electron treatment fields uses a digital camera to eliminate the need for such templates. However, avoidance of the image distortions introduced by non-flat surfaces on which the electron field outlines were drawn could only be achieved by limiting the application of this technique to surfaces which were flat or near flat. We present a technique that employs a digital camera and allows simulation of electron treatment fields contoured on an anatomical surface of an arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) shape, such as that of the neck, extremities, face, or breast. The procedure is fast, accurate, and easy to perform.

  16. pF3D Simulations of SBS and SRS in NIF Hohlraum Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Steven; Strozzi, David; Amendt, Peter; Chapman, Thomas; Hopkins, Laura; Kritcher, Andrea; Sepke, Scott

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) for NIF experiments using high foot pulses in cylindrical hohlraums and for low foot pulses in rugby-shaped hohlraums. We use pF3D, a massively-parallel, paraxial-envelope laser plasma interaction code, with plasma profiles obtained from the radiation-hydrodynamics codes Lasnex and HYDRA. We compare the simulations to experimental data for SBS and SRS power and spectrum. We also show simulated SRS and SBS intensities at the target chamber wall and report the fraction of the backscattered light that passes through and misses the lenses. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-697482.

  17. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  18. 3D Integration of MEMS and IC: Design, Technology and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taklo, Maaike M. V.; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Lietaer, Nicolas; Prainsack, Josef; Elfving, Anders; Weber, Josef; Klein, Matthias; Schneider, Peter; Reitz, Sven

    A 3D integrated silicon stack consisting of two MEMS devices and two IC devices is presented. The MEMS devices are a pressure sensor and a bulk acoustic resonator (BAR). The stack was constructed for a tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) which was one out of three demonstrators for an EU funded project called e-CUBES. Thermal simulations were performed to check the level of thermo-mechanical stresses induced on the pressure sensor membrane during extreme environmental conditions. Additional simulations were made to calculate the exact temperature on the BAR device during operation as this was important for the operational frequency. This paper presents and discusses the technology choices made for the stacking of the pressure sensor and the BAR. Results are given from simulations, initial short-loop experiments and for the final stacking.

  19. Jupiter Magnetotail Interaction with a Variable Solar Wind: A 3D MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranquist, D. A.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is the largest object within the heliosphere. Voyager 2 detected its influence at Saturn's orbit, 4.3 AU away. It takes considerable time, therefore, for the solar wind to propagate such lengths down the tail. This propagation time is much greater than typical periods between changes in direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We expect these variable magnetic fields to create a jumbled structure in Jupiter's magnetotail, resulting in magnetic reconnection and other magnetic processes. We simulate the global interaction of the solar wind with Jupiter's magnetosphere using a 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code. Delamere & Bagenal (2010) argue that the interaction is largely viscous, so we simulate the jovian magnetosphere as a region where the momentum equation has an added loss term. We also use in situ data gathered by the Ulysses spacecraft near Jupiter's orbit for solar wind input. Here, we report on the simulated dynamics in Jupiter's tail region.

  20. Fabrication of cerebral aneurysm simulator with a desktop 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Gao, Qing; Du, Song; Chen, ZiChen; Fu, JianZhong; Chen, Bing; Liu, ZhenJie; He, Yong

    2017-05-17

    Now, more and more patients are suffering cerebral aneurysm. However, long training time limits the rapid growth of cerebrovascular neurosurgeons. Here we developed a novel cerebral aneurysm simulator which can be better represented the dynamic bulging process of cerebral aneurysm The proposed simulator features the integration of a hollow elastic vascular model, a skull model and a brain model, which can be affordably fabricated at the clinic (Fab@Clinic), under $25.00 each with the help of a low-cost desktop 3D printer. Moreover, the clinical blood flow and pulsation pressure similar to the human can be well simulated, which can be used to train the neurosurgical residents how to clip aneurysms more effectively.

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of high-current beams in induction accelerators with WARP3d

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Haber, I.

    1995-09-01

    For many issues relevant to acceleration and propagation of heavy-ion beams for inertial confinement fusion, understanding the behavior of the beam requires the self-consistent inclusion of the self-fields of the beams in multiple dimensions. For these reasons, the three-dimensional simulation code WARP3d A.Friedman was developed. The code combines the particle-in-cell plasma simulation technique with a realistic description of the elements which make up an accelerator. In this paper, the general structure of the code is reviewed and details of two ongoing applications are presented along with a discussion of simulation techniques used. The most important results of this work are presented.

  2. 3D MHD Simulations of accreting neutron stars: evidence of QPO emission from the surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bachetti, Matteo; Burderi, Luciano; Romanova, Marina M.; Kulkarni, Akshay; Salvo, Tiziana di

    2010-07-15

    3D Magnetohydrodynamic simulations show that when matter accretes onto neutron stars, in particular if the misalignment angle is small, it does not constantly fall at a fixed spot. Instead, the location at which matter reaches the star moves. These moving hot spots can be produced both during stable accretion, where matter falls near the magnetic poles of the star, and unstable accretion, characterized by the presence of several tongues of matter which fall on the star near the equator, due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Precise modeling with Monte Carlo simulations shows that those movements could be observed as high frequency Quasi Periodic Oscillations. We performed a number of new simulation runs with a much wider set of parameters, focusing on neutron stars with a small misalignment angle. In most cases we observe oscillations whose frequency is correlated with the mass accretion rate M. Moreover, in some cases double QPOs appear, each of them showing the same correlation with M.

  3. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  4. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang, S.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  5. Study of the internal magnetic field of Mercury through 3D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Ludivine; Marcel Chanteur, Gerard; Modolo, Ronan; Leblanc, Francois; Schmidt, Carl; Langlais, Benoît; Thebault, Erwan

    2016-10-01

    In 1974, Mariner 10 discovered the intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury which interacts with the solar wind, leading to the formation of a magnetosphere. In spite of the recent MESSENGER observations, this magnetosphere remains quite unknown, especially in the Southern hemisphere. In order to improve our understanding of the Hermean magnetosphere, and to prepare the Bepi-Colombo mission (ESA/JAXA), we simulated the magnetized environment of Mercury using the model named LatHyS (LATMOS Hybrid Simulation). LatHyS is a 3D parallel multi-species hybrid code which has been applied to Mars, Titan and Ganymede, which has recently be improved by the implementation of a multi-grid method allowing to refine the spatial resolution near the planetary object (40 km in the case of Mercury). In order to investigate the Hermean environment, several hybrid simulations have been performed considering different internal field models, and results are compared with MESSENGER observations.

  6. 3D CFD simulations of trailing suction hopper dredger plume mixing: comparison with field measurements.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Lynyrd; Talmon, A M; van Rhee, C

    2014-11-15

    A 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used to simulate mixing of an overflow plume within 400 m from a trailing suction hopper dredger (TSHD). The simulations are compared with new field measurements. It is the first time simulations of overflow dredging plumes are compared in such detail to field measurements this close to a TSHD. Seven cases with a large variety in overflow flux and plume characteristics are used. Measured maximum suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) vary between 30 and 500 mg/l and fluxes vary between 0.7% and 20% of the total overflow flux; the CFD model has, subject to the limitations of the field data, been shown to reproduce this in a satisfactory way. The model gives better understanding of important near field processes, which helps to assess the frequency, duration and intensity of stresses like turbidity and sedimentation needed to find the environmental impact of dredging projects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. SVD-GFD scheme to simulate complex moving body problems in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Yu, P.; Yeo, K. S.; Khoo, B. C.

    2010-03-01

    The present paper presents a hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid method for simulating moving body incompressible viscous flow problems in 3D space. The method combines the merits of cost-efficient and accurate conventional finite difference approximations on Cartesian grids with the geometric freedom of generalized finite difference (GFD) approximations on meshfree grids. Error minimization in GFD is carried out by singular value decomposition (SVD). The Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) form of the Navier-Stokes equations on convecting nodes is integrated by a fractional-step projection method. The present hybrid grid method employs a relatively simple mode of nodal administration. Nevertheless, it has the geometrical flexibility of unstructured mesh-based finite-volume and finite element methods. Boundary conditions are precisely implemented on boundary nodes without interpolation. The present scheme is validated by a moving patch consistency test as well as against published results for 3D moving body problems. Finally, the method is applied on low-Reynolds number flapping wing applications, where large boundary motions are involved. The present study demonstrates the potential of the present hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid scheme for solving complex moving body problems in 3D.

  8. 2-D/3-D ECE imaging data for validation of turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minjun; Lee, Jaehyun; Yun, Gunsu; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Park, Young-Seok; Sabbagh, Steve A.; Wang, Weixing; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    2015-11-01

    The 2-D/3-D KSTAR ECEI diagnostic can provide a local 2-D/3-D measurement of ECE intensity. Application of spectral analysis techniques to the ECEI data allows local estimation of frequency spectra S (f) , wavenumber spectra S (k) , wavernumber and frequency spectra S (k , f) , and bispectra b (f1 ,f2) of ECE intensity over the 2-D/3-D space, which can be used to validate turbulence simulations. However, the minimum detectable fluctuation amplitude and the maximum detectable wavenumber are limited by the temporal and spatial resolutions of the diagnostic system, respectively. Also, the finite measurement area of the diagnostic channel could introduce uncertainty in the spectra estimation. The limitations and accuracy of the ECEI estimated spectra have been tested by a synthetic ECEI diagnostic with the model and/or fluctuations calculated by GTS. Supported by the NRF of Korea under Contract No. NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029881 and NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029865 and by U.S. DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  9. 3-D imaging and quantitative comparison of human dentitions and simulated bite marks.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, S A; Taylor, R V; Gordon, I; Ogleby, C L; Tanijiri, T; Yoshino, M; Donald, M R; Clement, J G

    2007-01-01

    This study presents a technique developed for 3-D imaging and quantitative comparison of human dentitions and simulated bite marks. A sample of 42 study models and the corresponding bites, made by the same subjects in acrylic dental wax, were digitised by laser scanning. This technique allows image comparison of a 3-D dentition with a 3-D bite mark, eliminating distortion due to perspective as experienced in conve