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Sample records for 3d smoothed particle

  1. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  2. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  3. Diffusive smoothing of 3D segmented medical data

    PubMed Central

    Patané, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an accurate, computationally efficient, and spectrum-free formulation of the heat diffusion smoothing on 3D shapes, represented as triangle meshes. The idea behind our approach is to apply a (r,r)-degree Padé–Chebyshev rational approximation to the solution of the heat diffusion equation. The proposed formulation is equivalent to solve r sparse, symmetric linear systems, is free of user-defined parameters, and is robust to surface discretization. We also discuss a simple criterion to select the time parameter that provides the best compromise between approximation accuracy and smoothness of the solution. Finally, our experiments on anatomical data show that the spectrum-free approach greatly reduces the computational cost and guarantees a higher approximation accuracy than previous work. PMID:26257940

  4. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  5. 3D View of Mars Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a 3D representation of the pits seen in the first Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM, images sent back from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Red represents the highest point and purple represents the lowest point.

    The particle in the upper left corner shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a rounded particle about one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across. It is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Assessing a 3D smoothed seismicity model of induced earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechar, Jeremy; Király, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    As more energy exploration and extraction efforts cause earthquakes, it becomes increasingly important to control induced seismicity. Risk management schemes must be improved and should ultimately be based on near-real-time forecasting systems. With this goal in mind, we propose a test bench to evaluate models of induced seismicity based on metrics developed by the CSEP community. To illustrate the test bench, we consider a model based on the so-called seismogenic index and a rate decay; to produce three-dimensional forecasts, we smooth past earthquakes in space and time. We explore four variants of this model using the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 datasets to make short-term forecasts, test their consistency, and rank the model variants. Our results suggest that such a smoothed seismicity model is useful for forecasting induced seismicity within three days, and giving more weight to recent events improves forecast performance. Moreover, the location of the largest induced earthquake is forecast well by this model. Despite the good spatial performance, the model does not estimate the seismicity rate well: it frequently overestimates during stimulation and during the early post-stimulation period, and it systematically underestimates around shut-in. In this presentation, we also describe a robust estimate of information gain, a modification that can also benefit forecast experiments involving tectonic earthquakes.

  7. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  8. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-04-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated.

  9. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; Di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated. PMID:25904062

  10. Ultrafine particle emissions from desktop 3D printers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Brent; Azimi, Parham; El Orch, Zeineb; Ramos, Tiffanie

    2013-11-01

    The development of low-cost desktop versions of three-dimensional (3D) printers has made these devices widely accessible for rapid prototyping and small-scale manufacturing in home and office settings. Many desktop 3D printers rely on heated thermoplastic extrusion and deposition, which is a process that has been shown to have significant aerosol emissions in industrial environments. However, we are not aware of any data on particle emissions from commercially available desktop 3D printers. Therefore, we report on measurements of size-resolved and total ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations resulting from the operation of two types of commercially available desktop 3D printers inside a commercial office space. We also estimate size-resolved (11.5 nm-116 nm) and total UFP (<100 nm) emission rates and compare them to emission rates from other desktop devices and indoor activities known to emit fine and ultrafine particles. Estimates of emission rates of total UFPs were large, ranging from ˜2.0 × 1010 # min-1 for a 3D printer utilizing a polylactic acid (PLA) feedstock to ˜1.9 × 1011 # min-1 for the same type of 3D printer utilizing a higher temperature acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic feedstock. Because most of these devices are currently sold as standalone devices without any exhaust ventilation or filtration accessories, results herein suggest caution should be used when operating in inadequately ventilated or unfiltered indoor environments. Additionally, these results suggest that more controlled experiments should be conducted to more fundamentally evaluate particle emissions from a wider arrange of desktop 3D printers.

  11. Light shaping along 3D curves and particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, José A.; Alieva, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    We present a non-iterative holographic technique for efficient and versatile laser beam shaping along arbitrary 3D curves. Light beams with intensity shaped for several 3D curves: Tilted ring, Viviani's curve, Archimedean spiral, and trefoil-knotted curve have been experimentally generated and applied for optical trapping of micrometer-sized dielectric particles. The high intensity gradients and independent phase control prescribed along the curve make this kind of laser trap attractive for multiple particle manipulation and allow for forward and backward motion to the light source. Indeed, different configurations of tractor beam traps are experimentally demonstrated. This technique can also be applied for laser micro-machining.

  12. Progress in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Dilts, G.A.; Mandell, D.A.; Crotzer, L.A.; Knapp, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless, Lagrangian numerical method for hydrodynamics calculations where calculational elements are fuzzy particles which move according to the hydrodynamic equations of motion. Each particle carries local values of density, temperature, pressure and other hydrodynamic parameters. A major advantage of SPH is that it is meshless, thus large deformation calculations can be easily done with no connectivity complications. Interface positions are known and there are no problems with advecting quantities through a mesh that typical Eulerian codes have. These underlying SPH features make fracture physics easy and natural and in fact, much of the applications work revolves around simulating fracture. Debris particles from impacts can be easily transported across large voids with SPH. While SPH has considerable promise, there are some problems inherent in the technique that have so far limited its usefulness. The most serious problem is the well known instability in tension leading to particle clumping and numerical fracture. Another problem is that the SPH interpolation is only correct when particles are uniformly spaced a half particle apart leading to incorrect strain rates, accelerations and other quantities for general particle distributions. SPH calculations are also sensitive to particle locations. The standard artificial viscosity treatment in SPH leads to spurious viscosity in shear flows. This paper will demonstrate solutions for these problems that they and others have been developing. The most promising is to replace the SPH interpolant with the moving least squares (MLS) interpolant invented by Lancaster and Salkauskas in 1981. SPH and MLS are closely related with MLS being essentially SPH with corrected particle volumes. When formulated correctly, JLS is conservative, stable in both compression and tension, does not have the SPH boundary problems and is not sensitive to particle placement. The other approach to

  13. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bergonzo, P.; Caylar, B.; Forcolin, G.; Haughton, I.; Hits, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Li, L.; Oh, A.; Phan, S.; Pomorski, M.; Smith, D. S.; Tyzhnevyi, V.; Wallny, R.; Whitehead, D.

    2015-06-01

    A novel device using single-crystal chemical vapour deposited diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond detector is presented. The electrodes of the device were fabricated with laser assisted phase change of diamond into a combination of diamond-like carbon, amorphous carbon and graphite. The connections to the electrodes of the device were made using a photo-lithographic process. The electrical and particle detection properties of the device were investigated. A prototype detector system consisting of the 3D device connected to a multi-channel readout was successfully tested with 120 GeV protons proving the feasibility of the 3D diamond detector concept for particle tracking applications for the first time.

  14. Particle Acceleration at Reconnecting 3D Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Browning, P.; Gordovskyy, M.; Dalla, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hard X-ray observations from the RHESSI spacecraft indicate that a significant fraction of solar flare energy release is in non-thermal energetic particles. A plausible acceleration mechanism for these are the strong electric fields associated with reconnection, a process that can be particularly efficient when particles become unmagnetised near to null points. This mechanism has been well studied in 2D, at X-points within reconnecting current sheets; however, 3D reconnection models show significant qualitative differences and it is not known whether these new models are efficient for particle acceleration. We place test particles in analytic model fields (eg. Craig and Fabling 1996) and numerical solutions to the the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations near reconnecting 3D nulls. We compare the behaviour of these test particles with previous results for test particle acceleration in ideal MHD models (Dalla and Browning 2005). We find that the fan model is very efficient due to an increasing "guide field" that stabilises particles against ejection from the current sheet. However, the spine model, which was the most promising in the ideal case, gives weak acceleration as the reconnection electric field is localised to a narrow cylinder about the spine axis.

  15. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  16. Two-photon single particle tracking in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Peter T. C.; Ragan, Timothy; Gratton, Enrico; Carerro, Jenny; Voss, Edward

    1997-05-01

    Transport processes are important in biology and medicine. Examples include virus docking and infection, endocytosis of extracellular protein and phagocytosis of antigenic material. Trafficking driven by molecular motors inside a complex 3D environment is a shared common theme. The complex sequence of these events are difficult to resolve with conventional techniques where the action of many cells are asynchronously averaged. Single particle tracking (SPT) was developed by Ghosh and Webb to address this problem and has proven to be a powerful technique in understanding membrane- protein interaction. Since the traditional SPT method uses wide field illumination and area detectors, it is limited to the study of 2D systems. In this presentation, we report the development of a 3D single particle tracking technique using two-photon excitation. Using a real-time feedback system, we can dynamically position the sub-femtoliter two-photon excitation volume to follow the fluorescent particle under transport by maximizing the detected fluorescent intensity. Further, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed in real time along the particle trajectory to monitor the underlying biochemical signals driving this transport process. The first application of this instrument will focus on the study of antigen endocytosis process of macrophages.

  17. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  18. Image reconstruction for 3D light microscopy with a regularized linear method incorporating a smoothness prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preza, Chrysanthe; Miller, Michael I.; Conchello, Jose-Angel

    1993-07-01

    We have shown that the linear least-squares (LLS) estimate of the intensities of a 3-D object obtained from a set of optical sections is unstable due to the inversion of small and zero-valued eigenvalues of the point-spread function (PSF) operator. The LLS solution was regularized by constraining it to lie in a subspace spanned by the eigenvectors corresponding to a selected number of the largest eigenvalues. In this paper we extend the regularized LLS solution to a maximum a posteriori (MAP) solution induced by a prior formed from a 'Good's like' smoothness penalty. This approach also yields a regularized linear estimator which reduces noise as well as edge artifacts in the reconstruction. The advantage of the linear MAP (LMAP) estimate over the current regularized LLS (RLLS) is its ability to regularize the inverse problem by smoothly penalizing components in the image associated with small eigenvalues. Computer simulations were performed using a theoretical PSF and a simple phantom to compare the two regularization techniques. It is shown that the reconstructions using the smoothness prior, give superior variance and bias results compared to the RLLS reconstructions. Encouraging reconstructions obtained with the LMAP method from real microscopical images of a 10 micrometers fluorescent bead, and a four-cell Volvox embryo are shown.

  19. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on three-dimensional super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision. PMID:25866640

  20. Optimizing Stellarators for Energetic Particle Confinement using BEAMS3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolgert, Peter; Drevlak, Michael; Lazerson, Sam; Gates, David; White, Roscoe

    2015-11-01

    Energetic particle (EP) loss has been called the ``Achilles heel of stellarators,'' (Helander, Rep. Prog. Phys. 77 087001 (2014)) and there is a great need for magnetic configurations with improved EP confinement. In this study we utilize a newly developed capability of the stellarator optimization code STELLOPT: the ability to optimize EP confinement via an interface with guiding center code BEAMS3D (McMillan et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56, 095019 (2014)). Using this new tool, optimizations of the W7-X experiment and ARIES-CS reactor are performed where the EP loss fraction is one of many target functions to be minimized. In W7-X, we simulate the experimental NBI system using realistic beam geometry and beam deposition physics. The goal is to find configurations with improved neutral beam deposition and energetic particle confinement. These calculations are compared to previous studies of W7-X NBI deposition. In ARIES-CS, we launch 3.5 MeV alpha particles from a near-axis flux surface using a uniform grid in toroidal and poloidal angle. As these particles are born from D-T reactions, we consider an isotropic distribution in velocity space. This research is supported by DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. 3-D Particle Simulation of Current Sheet Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2015-11-01

    The electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) instabilities of a Harris current sheet are investigated using a 3-D linearized (δf) gyrokinetic (GK) electron and fully kinetic (FK) ion (GeFi) particle simulation code. The equilibrium magnetic field consists of an asymptotic anti-parallel Bx 0 and a guide field BG. The ES simulations show the excitation of lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) at the current sheet edge. The growth rate of the 3-D LHDI is scanned through the (kx ,ky) space. The most unstable modes are found to be at k∥ = 0 for smaller ky. As ky increases, the growth rate shows two peaks at k∥ ≠ 0 , consistent with analytical GK theory. The eigenmode structure and growth rate of LHDI obtained from the GeFi simulation agree well with those obtained from the FK PIC simulation. Decreasing BG, the asymptotic βe 0, or background density can destabilize the LHDI. In the EM simulation, tearing mode instability is dominant in the cases with ky kx , there exist two unstable modes: a kink-like (LHDI) mode at the current sheet edge and a sausage-like mode at the sheet center. The results are compared with the GK eigenmode theory and the FK simulation.

  2. Numerical Convergence In Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qirong; Hernquist, Lars; Li, Yuexing

    2015-02-01

    We study the convergence properties of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using numerical tests and simple analytic considerations. Our analysis shows that formal numerical convergence is possible in SPH only in the joint limit N → ∞, h → 0, and Nnb → ∞, where N is the total number of particles, h is the smoothing length, and Nnb is the number of neighbor particles within the smoothing volume used to compute smoothed estimates. Previous work has generally assumed that the conditions N → ∞ and h → 0 are sufficient to achieve convergence, while holding Nnb fixed. We demonstrate that if Nnb is held fixed as the resolution is increased, there will be a residual source of error that does not vanish as N → ∞ and h → 0. Formal numerical convergence in SPH is possible only if Nnb is increased systematically as the resolution is improved. Using analytic arguments, we derive an optimal compromise scaling for Nnb by requiring that this source of error balance that present in the smoothing procedure. For typical choices of the smoothing kernel, we find Nnb vpropN 0.5. This means that if SPH is to be used as a numerically convergent method, the required computational cost does not scale with particle number as O(N), but rather as O(N 1 + δ), where δ ≈ 0.5, with a weak dependence on the form of the smoothing kernel.

  3. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics with smoothed pseudo-density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoko; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), which, unlike the standard SPH (SSPH), is well behaved at the contact discontinuity. The SSPH scheme cannot handle discontinuities in density (e.g., the contact discontinuity and the free surface), because it requires that the density of fluid is positive and continuous everywhere. Thus there is inconsistency in the formulation of the SSPH scheme at discontinuities of the fluid density. To solve this problem, we introduce a new quantity associated with particles and the "density" of that quantity. This "density" evolves through the usual continuity equation with an additional artificial diffusion term, in order to guarantee the continuity of the "density." We use this "density," or pseudo-density, instead of the mass density, to formulate our SPH scheme. We call our new method SPH with smoothed pseudo-density, and we show that it is physically consistent and can handle discontinuities quite well.

  4. Nonequilibrium flows with smooth particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kum, O.

    1995-07-01

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows through they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expression for (u{rho}) and (T{rho}), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier`s heat-flow law and Newton`s viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking to them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh-Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails.

  5. Animation Strategies for Smooth Transformations Between Discrete Lods of 3d Building Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, Martin; Wichmann, Andreas; Filippovska, Yevgeniya; Hermes, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The cartographic 3D visualization of urban areas has experienced tremendous progress over the last years. An increasing number of applications operate interactively in real-time and thus require advanced techniques to improve the quality and time response of dynamic scenes. The main focus of this article concentrates on the discussion of strategies for smooth transformation between two discrete levels of detail (LOD) of 3D building models that are represented as restricted triangle meshes. Because the operation order determines the geometrical and topological properties of the transformation process as well as its visual perception by a human viewer, three different strategies are proposed and subsequently analyzed. The simplest one orders transformation operations by the length of the edges to be collapsed, while the other two strategies introduce a general transformation direction in the form of a moving plane. This plane either pushes the nodes that need to be removed, e.g. during the transformation of a detailed LOD model to a coarser one, towards the main building body, or triggers the edge collapse operations used as transformation paths for the cartographic generalization.

  6. Development and characterization of a 3D multicell microtissue culture model of airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Nishat; Cole, Darren J.; Walker, Matthew J.; Legant, Wesley R.; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher S.; Favreau, John T.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Cowley, Elizabeth A.; Maksym, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cellular and molecular biology is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on flat 2D substrates. However, cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures, and it is well established in other cell types that altering substrate geometry exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall, and highlights a need for more physiologically relevant models of ASM function. We utilized a tissue engineering platform known as microfabricated tissue gauges to develop a 3D culture model of ASM featuring arrays of ∼0.4 mm long, ∼350 cell “microtissues” capable of simultaneous contractile force measurement and cell-level microscopy. ASM-only microtissues generated baseline tension, exhibited strong cellular organization, and developed actin stress fibers, but lost structural integrity and dissociated from the cantilevers within 3 days. Addition of 3T3-fibroblasts dramatically improved survival times without affecting tension development or morphology. ASM-3T3 microtissues contracted similarly to ex vivo ASM, exhibiting reproducible responses to a range of contractile and relaxant agents. Compared with 2D cultures, microtissues demonstrated identical responses to acetylcholine and KCl, but not histamine, forskolin, or cytochalasin D, suggesting that contractility is regulated by substrate geometry. Microtissues represent a novel model for studying ASM, incorporating a physiological 3D structure, realistic mechanical environment, coculture of multiple cells types, and comparable contractile properties to existing models. This new model allows for rapid screening of biochemical and mechanical factors to provide insight into ASM dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23125251

  7. Simulation of the 3D viscoelastic free surface flow by a parallel corrected particle scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin-Lian, Ren; Tao, Jiang

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the behavior of the three-dimensional (3D) jet coiling based on the viscoelastic Oldroyd-B model is investigated by a corrected particle scheme, which is named the smoothed particle hydrodynamics with corrected symmetric kernel gradient and shifting particle technique (SPH_CS_SP) method. The accuracy and stability of SPH_CS_SP method is first tested by solving Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Green flow. Then the capacity for the SPH_CS_SP method to solve the viscoelastic fluid is verified by the polymer flow through a periodic array of cylinders. Moreover, the convergence of the SPH_CS_SP method is also investigated. Finally, the proposed method is further applied to the 3D viscoelastic jet coiling problem, and the influences of macroscopic parameters on the jet coiling are discussed. The numerical results show that the SPH_CS_SP method has higher accuracy and better stability than the traditional SPH method and other corrected SPH method, and can improve the tensile instability. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20130436 and BK20150436) and the Natural Science Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. 15KJB110025).

  8. Some cautionary remarks about smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Potential difficulties with smoothed particle hydrodynamics are discussed. In particular, empirical tests are used to demonstrate that the errors resulting from the use of variable smoothing can be much larger than commonly believed. Fortunately, however, these errors, which are normally small, do not appear to promote instability on small scales, such as fragmentation in self-gravitating fluids. Still, while SPH remains a useful tool for many problems of astrophysical interest, a rigorous formulation of it, which is adaptive but still satisfies conservation properties, is clearly wanting.

  9. 3D measurement of the position of gold particles via evanescent digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Unno, Noriyuki; Nakata, Shuichiro; Taniguchi, Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new technique based on digital holography and evanescent waves was developed for 3D measurements of the position of gold nanoparticles in water. In this technique, an intensity profile is taken from a holographic image of a gold particle. To detect the position of the gold particle with high accuracy, its holographic image is recorded on a nanosized step made of MEXFLON, which has a refractive index close to that of water, and the position of the particle is reconstructed by means of digital holography. The height of the nanosized step was measured by using a profilometer and the digitally reconstructed height of the glass substrate had good agreement with the measured value. Furthermore, this method can be used to accurately track the 3D position of a gold particle in water.

  10. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  11. SPHGR: Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    SPHGR (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Galaxy Reduction) is a python based open-source framework for analyzing smoothed-particle hydrodynamic simulations. Its basic form can run a baryonic group finder to identify galaxies and a halo finder to identify dark matter halos; it can also assign said galaxies to their respective halos, calculate halo & galaxy global properties, and iterate through previous time steps to identify the most-massive progenitors of each halo and galaxy. Data about each individual halo and galaxy is collated and easy to access. SPHGR supports a wide range of simulations types including N-body, full cosmological volumes, and zoom-in runs. Support for multiple SPH code outputs is provided by pyGadgetReader (ascl:1411.001), mainly Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and TIPSY (ascl:1111.015).

  12. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chau, C.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Costa, S.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D`Alessandro, R.; de Boer, W.; Dehning, B.; Dobos, D.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gonella, L.; Gorišek, A.; Graber, L.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; McFadden, N.; McGoldrick, G.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Oh, A.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sapinski, M.; Scaringella, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Schreiner, T.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shimchuk, G.; Smith, D. S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weilhammer, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, results towards the development of a 3D diamond sensor are presented. Conductive channels are produced inside the sensor bulk using a femtosecond laser. This electrode geometry allows full charge collection even for low quality diamond sensors. Results from testbeam show that charge is collected by these electrodes. In order to understand the channel growth parameters, with the goal of producing low resistivity channels, the conductive channels produced with a different laser setup are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Particle Acceleration in the Low Corona Over Broad Longitudes: Coupling MHD and 3D Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, M.; Schwadron, N.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Desai, M. I.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work on the coupling between the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM, a 3D energetic particle model) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around a Sphere (MAS, an MHD code developed at Predictive Science, Inc.) has demonstrated the efficacy of compression regions around fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for particle acceleration low in the corona (˜ 3 - 6 solar radii). These couplings show rapid particle acceleration over a broad longitudinal extent (˜ 80 degrees) resulting from the pile-up of magnetic flux in the compression regions and their subsequent expansion. The challenge for forming large SEP events in such compression-acceleration scenarios is to have enhanced scattering within the acceleration region while also allowing for efficient escape of accelerated particles downstream (away from the Sun) from the compression region. We present here the most recent simulation results including energetic particle and CME plasma profiles, the subsequent flux and dosages at 1AU, and an analysis of the compressional regions as efficient accelerators.

  14. Particle splitting in smoothed particle hydrodynamics based on Voronoi diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaki, Gen; Yoshida, Naoki

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel method for particle splitting in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Our method utilizes the Voronoi diagram for a given particle set to determine the position of fine daughter particles. We perform several test simulations to compare our method with a conventional splitting method in which the daughter particles are placed isotropically over the local smoothing length. We show that, with our method, the density deviation after splitting is reduced by a factor of about 2 compared with the conventional method. Splitting would smooth out the anisotropic density structure if the daughters are distributed isotropically, but our scheme allows the daughter particles to trace the original density distribution with length-scales of the mean separation of their parent. We apply the particle splitting to simulations of the primordial gas cloud collapse. The thermal evolution is accurately followed to the hydrogen number density of 1012 cm-3. With the effective mass resolution of ˜10-4 M⊙ after the multistep particle splitting, the protostellar disc structure is well resolved. We conclude that the method offers an efficient way to simulate the evolution of an interstellar gas and the formation of stars.

  15. Dual wavelength digital holography for 3D particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grare, S.; Coëtmellec, S.,; Allano, D.; Grehan, G.; Brunel, M.; Lebrun, D.

    2015-02-01

    A multi-exposure digital in-line hologram of a moving particle field is recorded by two different wavelengths and at different times. As a result, during the reconstruction step, each hologram can be independently and accurately reconstructed for each wavelength. This procedure enables avoiding the superimposition of particles images that may be close to each other in multi-exposure holography. The feasibility is demonstrated by using a standard particle sizing reticle and shows the potential of this method for particle velocity measurement.

  16. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics with GRAPE-1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umemura, Masayuki; Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Makino, Junichiro; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Daiichiro; Turner, Edwin L.; Loeb, Abraham

    1993-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) scheme using GRAPE-1A, a special-purpose processor used for gravitational N-body simulations. The GRAPE-1A calculates the gravitational force exerted on a particle from all other particles in a system, while simultaneously making a list of the nearest neighbors of the particle. It is found that GRAPE-1A accelerates SPH calculations by direct summation by about two orders of magnitudes for a ten thousand-particle simulation. The effective speed is 80 Mflops, which is about 30 percent of the peak speed of GRAPE-1A. Also, in order to investigate the accuracy of GRAPE-SPH, some test simulations were executed. We found that the force and position errors are smaller than those due to representing a fluid by a finite number of particles. The total energy and momentum were conserved within 0.2-0.4 percent and 2-5 x 10 exp -5, respectively, in simulations with several thousand particles. We conclude that GRAPE-SPH is quite effective and sufficiently accurate for self-gravitating hydrodynamics.

  17. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  18. Workshop on advances in smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.; Miller, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    This proceedings contains viewgraphs presented at the 1993 workshop held at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Discussed topics include: negative stress, reactive flow calculations, interface problems, boundaries and interfaces, energy conservation in viscous flows, linked penetration calculations, stability and consistency of the SPH method, instabilities, wall heating and conservative smoothing, tensors, tidal disruption of stars, breaking the 10,000,000 particle limit, modelling relativistic collapse, SPH without H, relativistic KSPH avoidance of velocity based kernels, tidal compression and disruption of stars near a supermassive rotation black hole, and finally relativistic SPH viscosity and energy.

  19. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s‑1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  20. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  1. 3-D spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  2. 3-D Spreadsheet Simulation of a Modern Particle Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.

    2004-01-01

    A spreadsheet simulation of a modern particle detector has been developed and can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics classroom. The spreadsheet creates a three-dimensional model that can be rotated and helical trajectories can be highlighted. An associated student worksheet is also presented.

  3. Conduction Modelling Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    Heat transfer is very important in many industrial and geophysical problems. Because these problems often have complicated fluid dynamics, there are advantages in solving them using Lagrangian methods like smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Since SPH particles become disordered, the second derivative terms may be estimated poorly, especially when materials with different properties are adjacent. In this paper we show how a simple alteration to the standard SPH formulation ensures continuity of heat flux across discontinuities in material properties. A set of rules is formulated for the construction of isothermal boundaries leading to accurate conduction solutions. A method for accurate prediction of heat fluxes through isothermal boundaries is also given. The accuracy of the SPH conduction solutions is demonstrated through a sequence of test problems of increasing complexity.

  4. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics approach for poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorno, Maria; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the SHynergie project we look to investigate hydraulic fracturing and crack evolving in poroelastic media. We model biphasic media assuming incompressible solid grain and incompressible pore liquid. Modeling evolving fractures and fracture networks in elastic and poroelastic media by mesh-based numerical approaches, like X-FEM, is especially in 3-dim a challenging task. Therefore, we propose a meshless particle method for fractured media based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) approach. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method highly suitable for the simulation of large deformations including free surfaces and/or interfaces. Within the SPH method, the computational domain is discretized with particles, avoiding the computational expenses of meshing. Our SPH solution is implemented in a parallel computational framework, which allows to simulate large domains more representative of the scale of our study cases. Our implementation is carefully validated against classical mesh-based approaches and compared with classical solutions for consolidation problems. Furthermore, we discuss fracture initiation and propagation in poroelastic rocks at the reservoir scale.

  5. An analysis of smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Mello, F.J.; Hicks, D.L.

    1994-03-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine its applicability in the field of solid dynamics. An important result of the work is a rigorous von Neumann stability analysis which provides a simple criterion for the stability or instability of the method in terms of the stress state and the second derivative of the kernel function. Instability, which typically occurs only for solids in tension, results not from the numerical time integration algorithm, but because the SPH algorithm creates an effective stress with a negative modulus. The analysis provides insight into possible methods for removing the instability. Also, SPH has been coupled into the transient dynamics finite element code PRONTO, and a weighted residual derivation of the SPH equations has been obtained.

  6. Computational brittle fracture using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPBM. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPBM. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we have simulated a number of experiments. We discuss three of these simulations in this paper. The first experiment consists of a brittle steel sphere impacting a plate. The experimental sphere fragment patterns are compared to the calculations. The second experiment is a steel flyer plate in which the recovered steel target crack patterns are compared to the calculated crack patterns. We also briefly describe a simulation of a tungsten rod impacting a heavily confined alumina target, which has been recently reported on in detail.

  7. New approach for the modeling and smoothing of scattered 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbacher, Stefan; Haeusler, Gerd

    1998-03-01

    In order to digitize the whole surface of a three-dimensional object by means of an optical range sensor, usually multiple range images are acquired from different viewpoints and merged into a single surface description. The simplest and most accurate way is to generate a polyhedral surface. The data are usually distorted by measuring errors like noise, aliasing, outliers, calibration and registration errors, etc., so that they have to be filtered. Calibration and registration errors first appear after merging of different views. As the merged data are no longer represented on a grid, conventional filters for digital signal processing are not applicable. We introduce a new approach for modeling and smoothing scattered data based on an approximation of a mesh of circular arcs. This new method enables interpolation of curved surfaces using solely the vertex position and the associated vertex normals of a polyhedral mesh. The new smoothing filter is specifically adapted to the requirements of geometric data, as it minimizes curvature variations. In contrast to linear filters, undesired surface undulations are avoided, which is an important pre- condition for NC milling and rendering.

  8. An implicit Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Knapp

    2000-04-01

    An implicit version of the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code SPHINX has been written and is working. In conjunction with the SPHINX code the new implicit code models fluids and solids under a wide range of conditions. SPH codes are Lagrangian, meshless and use particles to model the fluids and solids. The implicit code makes use of the Krylov iterative techniques for solving large linear-systems and a Newton-Raphson method for non-linear corrections. It uses numerical derivatives to construct the Jacobian matrix. It uses sparse techniques to save on memory storage and to reduce the amount of computation. It is believed that this is the first implicit SPH code to use Newton-Krylov techniques, and is also the first implicit SPH code to model solids. A description of SPH and the techniques used in the implicit code are presented. Then, the results of a number of tests cases are discussed, which include a shock tube problem, a Rayleigh-Taylor problem, a breaking dam problem, and a single jet of gas problem. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with analytic solutions, experimental results, and the explicit SPHINX code. In the case of the single jet of gas case it has been demonstrated that the implicit code can do a problem in much shorter time than the explicit code. The problem was, however, very unphysical, but it does demonstrate the potential of the implicit code. It is a first step toward a useful implicit SPH code.

  9. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modelling for failure in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Russell K.

    It is generally regarded to be a difficult task to model multiple fractures leading to fragmentation in metals subjected to high strain rates using numerical methods. Meshless methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) are well suited to the application of fracture mechanics, since they are not prone to the problems associated with mesh tangling. This research demonstrates and validates a numerical inter-particle fracture model for the initiation, growth and subsequent failure in metals at high strain rate, applicable within a Total Lagrangian SPH scheme. Total Lagrangian SPH performs calculations in the reference state of a material and therefore the neighbourhoods remain fixed throughout the computation; this allows the inter-particle bonds to be stored and tracked as material history parameters. Swegle (2000) showed that the SPH momentum equation can be rearranged in terms of a particle-particle interaction area. By reducing this area to zero via an inter-particle damage parameter, the principles of continuum damage mechanics can be observed without the need for an effective stress term, held at the individual particles.. This research makes use of the Cochran-Banner damage growth model which has been updated for 3D damage and makes the appropriate modifications for inter-particle damage growth. The fracture model was tested on simulations of a 1D flyer plate impact test and the results were compared to experimental data. Some limited modelling was also conducted in 2 and 3 dimensions and promising results were observed. Research was also performed into the mesh sensitivity of the explosively driven Mock- Holt experiment. 3D simulations using the Eulerian SPH formulation were conducted and the best results were observed with a radial packing arrangement. An in-depth assessment of the Monaghan repulsive force correction was also conducted in attempt to eliminate the presence of the SPH tensile instability and stabilise the available Eulerian SPH code

  10. Simulating Ice Particle Melting using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Pelissier, Craig

    2015-04-01

    To measure precipitation from space requires an accurate estimation of the collective scattering properties of particles suspended in a precipitating column. It is well known that the complicated and typically unknowable shapes of the solid precipitation particles cause much uncertainty in the retrievals involving such particles. This remote-sensing problem becomes even more difficult with the "melting layer" containing partially melted ice particles, where both the geometric shape and liquid-solid fraction of the hydrometeors are variables.. For the scattering properties of these particles depend not only on their shapes, but also their melt-water fraction,and the spatial distribution of liquid and ice within. To obtain an accurate estimation thus requires a set of "realistic" particle geometries and a method to determine the melt-water distribution at various stages in the melting process. Once this is achieved, a suitable method can be used to compute the scattering properties. In previous work, the growth of a set of astoundingly realistic ice particles has been simulated using the "Snowfake" algorithm of Gravner and Griffeath. To simulate the melting process of these particles, the method of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used. SPH is a mesh-less particle-based approach where kinematic and thermal dynamics is controlled entirely through two-body interactions between neighboring SPH particles. An important property of SPH is that the interaction at boundaries between air/ice/water is implicitly taken care of. This is crucial for this work since those boundaries are complex and vary throughout the melting process. We present the SPH implementation and a simulation, using highly parallel Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), with ~1 million SPH particles to represent one of the generated ice particle geometries. We plan to use this method, especially its parallelized version, to simulate the melting of all the "Snowfake" particles (~10,000 of them) in our

  11. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  12. Discrete-element modelling and smoothed particle hydrodynamics: potential in the environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Paul W; Prakash, Mahesh

    2004-09-15

    Particle-based simulation methods, such as the discrete-element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics, have specific advantages in modelling complex three-dimensional (3D) environmental fluid and particulate flows. The theory of both these methods and their relative advantages compared with traditional methods will be discussed. Examples of 3D flows on realistic topography illustrate the environmental application of these methods. These include the flooding of a river valley as a result of a dam collapse, coastal inundation by a tsunami, volcanic lava flow and landslides. Issues related to validation and quality data availability are also discussed. PMID:15306427

  13. Characterizing heterogeneity among virus particles by stochastic 3D signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Gong, Yunye; Wang, Qiu; Zheng, Yili; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-09-01

    In single-particle cryo electron microscopy, many electron microscope images each of a single instance of a biological particle such as a virus or a ribosome are measured and the 3-D electron scattering intensity of the particle is reconstructed by computation. Because each instance of the particle is imaged separately, it should be possible to characterize the heterogeneity of the different instances of the particle as well as a nominal reconstruction of the particle. In this paper, such an algorithm is described and demonstrated on the bacteriophage Hong Kong 97. The algorithm is a statistical maximum likelihood estimator computed by an expectation maximization algorithm implemented in Matlab software.

  14. Methods for Measuring the Orientation and Rotation Rate of 3D-printed Particles in Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brendan C; Marcus, Guy G; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental methods are presented for measuring the rotational and translational motion of anisotropic particles in turbulent fluid flows. 3D printing technology is used to fabricate particles with slender arms connected at a common center. Shapes explored are crosses (two perpendicular rods), jacks (three perpendicular rods), triads (three rods in triangular planar symmetry), and tetrads (four arms in tetrahedral symmetry). Methods for producing on the order of 10,000 fluorescently dyed particles are described. Time-resolved measurements of their orientation and solid-body rotation rate are obtained from four synchronized videos of their motion in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids with Rλ = 91. In this relatively low-Reynolds number flow, the advected particles are small enough that they approximate ellipsoidal tracer particles. We present results of time-resolved 3D trajectories of position and orientation of the particles as well as measurements of their rotation rates. PMID:27404898

  15. An investigation of particles suspension using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazouki, Arman; Negrut, Dan

    2013-11-01

    This contribution outlines a method for the direct numerical simulation of rigid body suspensions in a Lagrangian-Lagrangian framework using extended Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (XSPH) method. The dynamics of the arbitrarily shaped rigid bodies is fully resolved via Boundary Condition Enforcing (BCE) markers and updated according to the general Newton-Euler equations of motion. The simulation tool, refered to herien as Chrono::Fluid, relies on a parallel implementation that runs on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards. The simulation results obtained for transient Poiseuille flow, migration of cylinder and sphere in Poiseuille flow, and distribution of particles at different cross sections of the laminar flow of dilute suspension were respectively within 0.1%, 1%, and 5% confidence interval of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It was shown that at low Reynolds number, Re = O(1), the radial migration (a) behaves non-monotonically as the particles relative distance (distance over diameter) increases from zero to two; and (b) decreases as the particle skewness and size increases. The scaling of Chrono::Fluid was demonstrated in conjunction with a suspension dynamics analysis in which the number of ellipsoids went up to 3e4. Financial support was provided in part by National Science Foundation grant NSF CMMI-084044.

  16. M3D-K simulations of sawteeth and energetic particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Wang, Feng

    2014-09-15

    Nonlinear simulations of sawteeth and related energetic particle transport are carried out using the kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K. MHD simulations show repeated sawtooth cycles for a model tokamak equilibrium. Furthermore, test particle simulations are carried out to study the energetic particle transport due to a sawtooth crash. The results show that energetic particles are redistributed radially in the plasma core, depending on pitch angle and energy. For trapped particles, the redistribution occurs for particle energy below a critical value in agreement with existing theories. For co-passing particles, the redistribution is strong with little dependence on particle energy. In contrast, the redistribution level of counter-passing particles decreases with increasing particle energy.

  17. Particle-based optical pressure sensors for 3D pressure mapping.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Niladri; Xie, Yan; Chalaseni, Sandeep; Mastrangelo, Carlos H

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents particle-based optical pressure sensors for in-flow pressure sensing, especially for microfluidic environments. Three generations of pressure sensitive particles have been developed- flat planar particles, particles with integrated retroreflectors and spherical microballoon particles. The first two versions suffer from pressure measurement dependence on particles orientation in 3D space and angle of interrogation. The third generation of microspherical particles with spherical symmetry solves these problems making particle-based manometry in microfluidic environment a viable and efficient methodology. Static and dynamic pressure measurements have been performed in liquid medium for long periods of time in a pressure range of atmospheric to 40 psi. Spherical particles with radius of 12 μm and balloon-wall thickness of 0.5 μm are effective for more than 5 h in this pressure range with an error of less than 5%.

  18. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics ``smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,`` in 1977. It is a likely contributor to ``hybrid`` simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  19. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  20. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  1. Bidirectional inward migration of particles lagging behind a Poiseuille flow in a rectangular microchannel for 3D particle focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Won; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2015-02-01

    Electrophoretic mobility of particles dispersed in an electrolyte solution induces the particles to lag behind a Poiseuille flow in a rectangular microchannel, which causes bidirectional inward migration of particles to the central axis of the channel. As a result, in the present theoretical and experimental study, three-dimensional (3D) particle focusing is clearly realized in such a manner that the particles are aligned in a single file along the axis of the channel as they are transported downstream. Theoretical prediction on the particle migration time provides an excellent assessment of the experimental results. The method proposed in the present study has potential for development of low-cost rapid manufacturing process of sheathless monolayer microchips for 3D particle focusing.

  2. PEPT: An invaluable tool for 3-D particle tracking and CFD simulation verification in hydrocyclone studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Fen; Adamsen, Tom C. H.; Pisarev, Gleb I.; Hoffmann, Alex C.

    2013-05-01

    Particle tracks in a hydrocyclone generated both experimentally by positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) and numerically with Eulerian-Lagranian CFD have been studied and compared. A hydrocyclone with a cylinder-on-cone design was used in this study, the geometries used in the CFD simulations and in the experiments being identical. It is shown that it is possible to track a fast-moving particle in a hydrocyclone using PEPT with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The numerical 3-D particle trajectories were generated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) turbulence model for the fluid and Lagrangian particle tracking for the particles. The behaviors of the particles were analyzed in detail and were found to be consistent between experiments and CFD simulations. The tracks of the particles are discussed and related to the fluid flow field visualized in the CFD simulations using the cross-sectional static pressure distribution.

  3. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  4. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals. PMID:21503074

  5. Application of smoothed particle hydrodynamics method in aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless Lagrangian method in which the domain is represented by particles. Each particle is assigned properties such as mass, pressure, density, temperature, and velocity. These properties are then evaluated at the particle positions using a smoothing kernel that integrates over the values of the surrounding particles. In the present study the SPH method is first used to obtain numerical solutions for fluid flows over a cylinder and then we are going to apply the same principle over an airfoil obstacle.

  6. Nondestructive optical testing of 3D disperse systems with micro- and nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2005-04-01

    Nondestructive testing and analysis of three-dimensional (3D) disperse systems (DS) with micro- and nano-particles of different nature by complex of optical compatible methods can provide further progress in on-line control of water and air. The simultaneous analysis of 3D-DS by refractometry, absorbency, fluorescence and by different types of light scattering can help to elaborate the sensing elements for specific impurity control. In our research we have investigated by complex of optical methods different 3D-DS such as: proteins, nucleoproteids, lipoproteids, liposomes, viruses, virosomes, lipid emulsions, blood substitutes, latexes, liquid crystals, biological cells with various form and size (including bacterial cells), metallic powders, clays, kimberlites, zeolites, oils, crude oils, etc., and mixtures -- proteins with nucleic acids, liposomes and viruses, liquid crystals with surfactants, mixtures of clay with bacterial cells, samples of natural and water-supply waters, etc. This experience suggests that the set of optical parameters of so called second class is unique for each 3D-DS. In another words each DS can be characterized by n-dimensional vector in n-dimensional space of optical parameters. Mixtures can be considered as polycomponent and polymodal 3D-DS (such as natural water and air). Due to the fusion of various optical data it is possible to indicate by information statistical theory the inverse physical problem on the presence of impurities in mixtures (viruses, bacteria, oil, metallic particles, etc.), and in this case polymodality of particle size distribution is not an obstacle. Bank of optical data for 3D-DS is the base for analysis by information-statistical method.

  7. 3D imaging of particle tracks in Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) and associated ionizing decay products is known to cause lung cancer in human. In the U.K., it has been suggested that 3 to 5 % of total lung cancer deaths can be linked to elevated radon concentrations in the home and/or workplace. Radon monitoring in buildings is therefore routinely undertaken in areas of known risk. Indeed, some organisations such as the Radon Council in the UK and the Environmental Protection Agency in the USA, advocate a ‘to test is best' policy. Radon gas occurs naturally, emanating from the decay of 238U in rock and soils. Its concentration can be measured using CR?39 plastic detectors which conventionally are assessed by 2D image analysis of the surface; however there can be some variation in outcomes / readings even in closely spaced detectors. A number of radon measurement methods are currently in use (for examples, activated carbon and electrets) but the most widely used are CR?39 solid state nuclear track?etch detectors (SSNTDs). In this technique, heavily ionizing alpha particles leave tracks in the form of radiation damage (via interaction between alpha particles and the atoms making up the CR?39 polymer). 3D imaging of the tracks has the potential to provide information relating to angle and energy of alpha particles but this could be time consuming. Here we describe a new method for rapid high resolution 3D imaging of SSNTDs. A ‘LEXT' OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope was used in confocal mode to successfully obtain 3D image data on four CR?39 plastic detectors. 3D visualisation and image analysis enabled characterisation of track features. This method may provide a means of rapid and detailed 3D analysis of SSNTDs. Keywords: Radon; SSNTDs; confocal laser scanning microscope; 3D imaging; LEXT

  8. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  9. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  10. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images. PMID:27292544

  11. Hollow Cone Electron Imaging for Single Particle 3D Reconstruction of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Lobato, Ivan; van Dyck, Dirk; Chen, Fu-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The main bottlenecks for high-resolution biological imaging in electron microscopy are radiation sensitivity and low contrast. The phase contrast at low spatial frequencies can be enhanced by using a large defocus but this strongly reduces the resolution. Recently, phase plates have been developed to enhance the contrast at small defocus but electrical charging remains a problem. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy is mostly used to minimize the radiation damage and to enhance the resolution of the 3D reconstructions but it requires averaging images of a massive number of individual particles. Here we present a new route to achieve the same goals by hollow cone dark field imaging using thermal diffuse scattered electrons giving about a 4 times contrast increase as compared to bright field imaging. We demonstrate the 3D reconstruction of a stained GroEL particle can yield about 13.5 Å resolution but using a strongly reduced number of images.

  12. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  13. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, T.; Annaratone, B. M.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-09-01

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm3) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  14. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Marcus, Guy G.; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Cole, Brendan

    2014-11-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 μm. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow. This research is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1208990.

  15. Measuring the orientation and rotation rate of 3D printed particles in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg; Kramel, Stefan; Cole, Brendan

    2015-03-01

    The orientation distribution and rotations of anisotropic particles plays a key role in many applications ranging from icy clouds to papermaking and drag reduction in pipe flow. Experimental access to time resolved orientations of anisotropic particles has not been easy to achieve. We have found that 3D printing technology can be used to fabricate a wide range of particle shapes with smallest dimension down to 300 ?m. So far we have studied rods, crosses, jacks, tetrads, and helical shapes. We extract the particle orientations from stereoscopic video images using a method of least squares optimization in Euler angle space. We find that in turbulence the orientation and rotation rate of many particles can be understood using a simple picture of alignment of both the vorticity and a long axis of the particle with the Lagrangian stretching direction of the flow.

  16. Generating Optimal Initial Conditions for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, S.; Rockefeller, G.; Fryer, C. L.; Riethmiller, D.; Statler, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    We review existing smoothed particle hydrodynamics setup methods and outline their advantages, limitations, and drawbacks. We present a new method for constructing initial conditions for smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations, and demonstrate this method on a number of applications. This new method is inspired by adaptive binning techniques using weighted Voronoi tessellations. Particles are placed and iteratively moved based on their proximity to neighbouring particles and the desired spatial resolution. This new method can satisfy arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements.

  17. Numerical heat conductivity in smooth particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |; Posch, H.A.

    1996-11-01

    Smooth particle applied mechanics provides a method for solving the basic equations of continuum mechanics, interpolating these equations onto a grid made up of moving particles. The moving particle grid gives rise to a thoroughly artificial numerical heat conductivity, analogous to the numerical viscosities associated with finite-difference schemes. We exploit an isomorphism linking the smooth-particle method to conventional molecular dynamics, and evaluate this numerical heat conductivity. We find that the corresponding thermal diffusivity is comparable in value to the numerical kinematic viscosity, and that neither is described very well by the Enskog theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. 3-D imaging of particle tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wertheim, D.; Gillmore, G.; Brown, L.; Petford, N.

    2010-05-01

    It has been suggested that 3 to 5% of total lung cancer deaths in the UK may be associated with elevated radon concentration. Radon gas levels can be assessed using CR-39 plastic detectors which are often assessed by 2-D image analysis of surface images. 3-D analysis has the potential to provide information relating to the angle at which alpha particles impinge on the detector. In this study we used a "LEXT" OLS3100 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to image tracks on five CR-39 detectors. We were able to identify several patterns of single and coalescing tracks from 3-D visualisation. Thus this method may provide a means of detailed 3-D analysis of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors.

  19. Use of magnetic micro-cantilevers to study the dynamics of 3D engineered smooth muscle constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Zhao, Ruogang; Copeland, Craig; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The normal and pathological response of arterial tissue to mechanical stimulus sheds important light on such conditions as atherosclerosis and hypertension. While most previous methods of determining the biomechanical properties of arteries have relied on excised tissue, we have devised a system that enables the growth and in situ application of forces to arrays of stable suspended microtissues consisting of arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Briefly, this magnetic microtissue tester system consists of arrays of pairs of elastomeric magnetically actuated micro-cantilevers between which SMC-infused 3D collagen gels self-assemble and remodel into aligned microtissue constructs. These devices allow us to simultaneously apply force and track stress-strain relationships of multiple microtissues per substrate. We have studied the dilatory capacity and subsequent response of the tissues and find that the resulting stress-strain curves show viscoelastic behavior as well as a linear dynamic recovery. These results provide a foundation for elucidating the mechanical behavior of this novel model system as well as further experiments that simulate pathological conditions. Supported in part by NIH grant HL090747.

  20. Dusty gas with one fluid in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laibe, Guillaume; Price, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    In a companion paper we have shown how the equations describing gas and dust as two fluids coupled by a drag term can be re-formulated to describe the system as a single-fluid mixture. Here, we present a numerical implementation of the one-fluid dusty gas algorithm using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The algorithm preserves the conservation properties of the SPH formalism. In particular, the total gas and dust mass, momentum, angular momentum and energy are all exactly conserved. Shock viscosity and conductivity terms are generalized to handle the two-phase mixture accordingly. The algorithm is benchmarked against a comprehensive suit of problems: DUSTYBOX, DUSTYWAVE, DUSTYSHOCK and DUSTYOSCILL, each of them addressing different properties of the method. We compare the performance of the one-fluid algorithm to the standard two-fluid approach. The one-fluid algorithm is found to solve both of the fundamental limitations of the two-fluid algorithm: it is no longer possible to concentrate dust below the resolution of the gas (they have the same resolution by definition), and the spatial resolution criterion h < csts, required in two-fluid codes to avoid over-damping of kinetic energy, is unnecessary. Implicit time-stepping is straightforward. As a result, the algorithm is up to ten billion times more efficient for 3D simulations of small grains. Additional benefits include the use of half as many particles, a single kernel and fewer SPH interpolations. The only limitation is that it does not capture multi-streaming of dust in the limit of zero coupling, suggesting that in this case a hybrid approach may be required.

  1. Ultra-high-speed 3D astigmatic particle tracking velocimetry: application to particle-laden supersonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, N. A.; Cierpka, C.; Kähler, C. J.; Soria, J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates ultra-high-speed three-component, three-dimensional (3C3D) velocity measurements of micron-sized particles suspended in a supersonic impinging jet flow. Understanding the dynamics of individual particles in such flows is important for the design of particle impactors for drug delivery or cold gas dynamic spray processing. The underexpanded jet flow is produced via a converging nozzle, and micron-sized particles ( d p = 110 μm) are introduced into the gas flow. The supersonic jet impinges onto a flat surface, and the particle impact velocity and particle impact angle are studied for a range of flow conditions and impingement distances. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high-speed digital camera (Shimadzu HPV-1) capable of recording rates of up to 1 Mfps. Astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry (APTV) is used to measure the 3D particle position (Cierpka et al., Meas Sci Technol 21(045401):13, 2010) by coding the particle depth location in the 2D images by adding a cylindrical lens to the high-speed imaging system. Based on the reconstructed 3D particle positions, the particle trajectories are obtained via a higher-order tracking scheme that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution to increase robustness and accuracy of the measurement. It is shown that the particle velocity and impingement angle are affected by the gas flow in a manner depending on the nozzle pressure ratio and stand-off distance where higher pressure ratios and stand-off distances lead to higher impact velocities and larger impact angles.

  2. 3D monolithically stacked CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for particle position and direction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Passeri, D.; Morozzi, A.; Magalotti, D.; Piperku, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we propose a 3D monolithically stacked, multi-layer detectors based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) layers which allows at the same time accurate estimation of the impact point and of the incidence angle an ionizing particle. The whole system features two fully-functional CMOS APS matrix detectors, including both sensing area and control/signal elaboration circuitry, stacked in a monolithic device by means of Through Silicon Via (TSV) connections thanks to the capabilities of the CMOS vertical scale integration (3D-IC) 130 nm Chartered/Tezzaron technology. In order to evaluate the suitability of the two layer monolithic active pixel sensor system to reconstruct particle tracks, tests with proton beams have been carried out at the INFN LABEC laboratories in Florence (Italy) with 3 MeV proton beam.

  3. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  4. Measurements of 3D relative locations of particles by Fourier Interferometry Imaging (FII).

    PubMed

    Briard, Paul; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Meunier-Guttin-Cluzel, Siegfried; Chen, Linghong; Cen, Kefa; Grehan, Gérard

    2011-06-20

    In a large number of physical systems formed of discrete particles, a key parameter is the relative distance between the objects, as for example in studies of spray evaporation or droplets micro-explosion. This paper is devoted to the presentation of an approach where the relative 3D location of particles in the control volume is accurately extracted from the interference patterns recorded at two different angles. No reference beam is used and only ten (2 + 8) 2D-FFT have to be computed. PMID:21716513

  5. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution.

  6. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution. PMID:26193484

  7. LEWICE3D/GlennHT Particle Analysis of the Honeywell Al502 Low Pressure Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Rigby, David L.

    2015-01-01

    A flow and ice particle trajectory analysis was performed for the booster of the Honeywell AL502 engine. The analysis focused on two closely related conditions one of which produced a rollback and another which did not rollback during testing in the Propulsion Systems Lab at NASA Glenn Research Center. The flow analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn GlennHT flow solver and the particle analysis was generated using the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D v3.56 ice accretion software. The flow and particle analysis used a 3D steady flow, mixing plane approach to model the transport of flow and particles through the engine. The inflow conditions for the rollback case were: airspeed, 145 ms; static pressure, 33,373 Pa; static temperature, 253.3 K. The inflow conditions for the non-roll-back case were: airspeed, 153 ms; static pressure, 34,252 Pa; static temperature, 260.1 K. Both cases were subjected to an ice particle cloud with a median volume diameter of 24 microns, an ice water content of 2.0 gm3 and a relative humidity of 100 percent. The most significant difference between the rollback and non-rollback conditions was the inflow static temperature which was 6.8 K higher for the non-rollback case.

  8. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  9. Activation of Transcription Factor GAX and Concomitant Downregulation of IL-1β and ERK1/2 Modulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype in 3D Fibrous Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shigang; Mequanint, Kibret

    2015-09-01

    Since vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) display phenotypic plasticity in response to changing environmental cues, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypic modulation mediated by a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold is important to engineer functional vasculature. Following cell seeding into 3D scaffolds, the synthetic phenotype is desired to enable cells to expand rapidly and produce and assemble extracellular matrix components, but must revert to a quiescent contractile phenotype after tissue fabrication to impart the contractile properties found in native blood vessels. This study shows that 3D electrospun fibrous scaffolds regulate human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) toward a more synthetic phenotype characterized by reduced contractile markers, such as smooth muscle alpha-actin and calponin. The reduction in contractile markers expression was mediated by endogenously expressed proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). 3D topography transiently induces concomitant upregulation of IL-1β and MAPK ERK1/2 through nuclear factor-κB-dependent signaling pathway. An early burst of expression of IL-1β is essential for suppression of the homeobox transcription factor Gax and related cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip1), which are key regulators for cells exiting from cell cycle. Our findings provide new insights for understanding signaling mechanisms of HCASMCs in electrospun 3D fibrous scaffolds, which have considerable value for application in vascular tissue engineering. PMID:26041434

  10. Analysis of thoracic aorta hemodynamics using 3D particle tracking velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Diego; Gülan, Utku; Di Stefano, Antonietta; Ponzini, Raffaele; Lüthi, Beat; Holzner, Markus; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2014-09-22

    Parallel to the massive use of image-based computational hemodynamics to study the complex flow establishing in the human aorta, the need for suitable experimental techniques and ad hoc cases for the validation and benchmarking of numerical codes has grown more and more. Here we present a study where the 3D pulsatile flow in an anatomically realistic phantom of human ascending aorta is investigated both experimentally and computationally. The experimental study uses 3D particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to characterize the flow field in vitro, while finite volume method is applied to numerically solve the governing equations of motion in the same domain, under the same conditions. Our findings show that there is an excellent agreement between computational and measured flow fields during the forward flow phase, while the agreement is poorer during the reverse flow phase. In conclusion, here we demonstrate that 3D PTV is very suitable for a detailed study of complex unsteady flows as in aorta and for validating computational models of aortic hemodynamics. In a future step, it will be possible to take advantage from the ability of 3D PTV to evaluate velocity fluctuations and, for this reason, to gain further knowledge on the process of transition to turbulence occurring in the thoracic aorta.

  11. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools. PMID:27215416

  12. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  13. 3D printing enables separation of orthogonal functions within a hydrogel particle.

    PubMed

    Raman, Ritu; Clay, Nicholas E; Sen, Sanjeet; Melhem, Molly; Qin, Ellen; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional particles with distinct physiochemical phases are required by a variety of applications in biomedical engineering, such as diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. This motivates the development of a repeatable, efficient, and customizable approach to manufacturing particles with spatially segregated bioactive moieties. This study demonstrates a stereolithographic 3D printing approach for designing and fabricating large arrays of biphasic poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) gel particles. The fabrication parameters governing the physical and biochemical properties of multi-layered particles are thoroughly investigated, yielding a readily tunable approach to manufacturing customizable arrays of multifunctional particles. The advantage in spatially organizing functional epitopes is examined by loading superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in separate layers of biphasic PEGDA gel particles and examining SPION-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast and BSA-release kinetics. Particles with spatial segregation of functional moieties have demonstrably higher MR contrast and BSA release. Overall, this study will contribute significant knowledge to the preparation of multifunctional particles for use as biomedical tools.

  14. GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Chunye; Liu Jie; Chi Lihua; Huang Haowei; Fang Jingyue; Gong Zhenghu

    2011-07-01

    Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, inhomogeneous Boltzmann transport equation. The numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation involves the discrete ordinates (S{sub n}) method and the procedure of source iteration. In this paper, we present a GPU accelerated simulation of one energy group time-independent deterministic discrete ordinates particle transport in 3D Cartesian geometry (Sweep3D). The performance of the GPU simulations are reported with the simulations of vacuum boundary condition. The discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the GPU implementation, the simulation on multi GPUs, the programming effort and code portability are also reported. The results show that the overall performance speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU ranges from 2.56 compared with one Intel Xeon X5670 chip to 8.14 compared with one Intel Core Q6600 chip for no flux fixup. The simulation with flux fixup on one M2050 is 1.23 times faster than on one X5670.

  15. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  16. Single particle 3D reconstruction for 2D crystal images of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Sebastian; Arheit, Marcel; Kowal, Julia; Zeng, Xiangyan; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-01

    In cases where ultra-flat cryo-preparations of well-ordered two-dimensional (2D) crystals are available, electron crystallography is a powerful method for the determination of the high-resolution structures of membrane and soluble proteins. However, crystal unbending and Fourier-filtering methods in electron crystallography three-dimensional (3D) image processing are generally limited in their performance for 2D crystals that are badly ordered or non-flat. Here we present a single particle image processing approach, which is implemented as an extension of the 2D crystallographic pipeline realized in the 2dx software package, for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of membrane proteins. The algorithm presented, addresses the low single-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 2D crystal images by exploiting neighborhood correlation between adjacent proteins in the 2D crystal. Compared with conventional single particle processing for randomly oriented particles, the computational costs are greatly reduced due to the crystal-induced limited search space, which allows a much finer search space compared to classical single particle processing. To reduce the considerable computational costs, our software features a hybrid parallelization scheme for multi-CPU clusters and computer with high-end graphic processing units (GPUs). We successfully apply the new refinement method to the structure of the potassium channel MloK1. The calculated 3D reconstruction shows more structural details and contains less noise than the map obtained by conventional Fourier-filtering based processing of the same 2D crystal images.

  17. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  18. Is the 3-D magnetic null point with a convective electric field an efficient particle accelerator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.-N.; Büchner, J.; Otto, A.; Santos, J.; Marsch, E.; Gan, W.-Q.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We study the particle acceleration at a magnetic null point in the solar corona, considering self-consistent magnetic fields, plasma flows and the corresponding convective electric fields. Methods: We calculate the electromagnetic fields by 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and expose charged particles to these fields within a full-orbit relativistic test-particle approach. In the 3-D MHD simulation part, the initial magnetic field configuration is set to be a potential field obtained by extrapolation from an analytic quadrupolar photospheric magnetic field with a typically observed magnitude. The configuration is chosen so that the resulting coronal magnetic field contains a null. Driven by photospheric plasma motion, the MHD simulation reveals the coronal plasma motion and the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. In a subsequent test particle experiment the particle energies and orbits (determined by the forces exerted by the convective electric field and the magnetic field around the null) are calculated in time. Results: Test particle calculations show that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV near the null if the local plasma flow velocity is of the order of 1000 km s-1 (in solar active regions). The final parallel velocity is much higher than the perpendicular velocity so that accelerated particles escape from the null along the magnetic field lines. Stronger convection electric field during big flare explosions can accelerate protons up to 2 MeV and electrons to 3 keV. Higher initial velocities can help most protons to be strongly accelerated, but a few protons also run the risk to be decelerated. Conclusions: Through its convective electric field and due to magnetic nonuniform drifts and de-magnetization process, the 3-D null can act as an effective accelerator for protons but not for electrons. Protons are more easily de-magnetized and accelerated than electrons because of their larger Larmor radii. Notice that macroscopic MHD

  19. 3D hybrid simulations with gyrokinetic particle ions and fluid electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The previous hybrid MHD/particle model (MH3D-K code) represented energetic ions as gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) particles coupled to MHD equations using the pressure or current coupling scheme. A small energetic to bulk ion density ratio was assumed, n{sub h}/n{sub b} {much_lt} 1, allowing the neglect of the energetic ion perpendicular inertia in the momentum equation and the use of MHD Ohm`s law E = {minus}v{sub b} {times} B. A generalization of this model in which all ions are treated as gyrokinetic/drift-kinetic particles and fluid description is used for the electron dynamics is considered in this paper.

  20. Magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites consisting of an opal matrix with embedded spinel ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Korolev, A. V.; Samoylovich, M. I.; Kleshcheva, S. M.; Perov, D. V.

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of 3D nanocomposites representing Mn-Zn, Ni-Zn, Co-Zn, La-Co-Zn, and Nd-Co-Zn spinel ferrite particles embedded in the interspherical spaces of opal matrices are studied. Experimental data are obtained in the temperature interval 2-300 K by measuring the magnetization at a static magnetic field strength of up to 50 kOe and the ac magnetic susceptibility at an alternating magnetic field amplitude of 4 kOe and a frequency of 80 Hz.

  1. Simulation of 3-D Magnetic Reconnection by Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    3-D collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out for cases with various finite guide field BG in a current sheet as occurring in space and laboratory plasmas. Turbulence power spectrum of magenetic field is found in the reconnection current sheet, with a clear k-5/3 dependence. The wave properties are analyzed. The anomalous resistivity in the electron diffusion region is estimated. The Dependence of the reconnection physics on the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are also investigated.

  2. M3D Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven MHD Mode with Unstructured Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G. Y.; Park, W.; Strauss, H. R.

    2001-10-01

    The energetic particle-driven MHD modes are studied using a multi-level extended MHD code M3D(W. Park et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999)). In a Extended-MHD model, the plasma is divided into the bulk part and the energetic particle component. The bulk plasma is treated as either a single fluid or two fluids. The energetic particles are described by gyrokinetic particles following the self-consistent electromagnetic field. The model is self-consistent, including nonlinear effects of hot particles on the MHD dynamics and the nonlinear MHD mode coupling. Previously we had shown the results of nonlinear saturation of TAEfootnote G.Y. Fu and W. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1594 (1995), energetic particle stabilization of an internal kink and excitation of fishbone^2, and nonlinear saturation of fishbone in circular tokamaks (G.Y. Fu et al, 2000 Sherwood Meeting, Paper 2C2.). In this work, we extend the simulations to general geometry using unstructured mesh(H.R. Strauss and W. Park, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2676 (1998). We also use a gyrofluid model for fishbone in order to study the role of MHD nonlinearity in saturation near the marginal stability. Results of applications to tokamaks and spherical tokamaks will be presented.

  3. 3D imaging of particle-scale rotational motion in cyclically driven granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matt; Powers, Dylan; Cooper, Eric; Losert, Wolfgang

    Recent experimental advances have enabled three-dimensional (3D) imaging of motion, structure, and failure within granular systems. 3D imaging allows researchers to directly characterize bulk behaviors that arise from particle- and meso-scale features. For instance, segregation of a bidisperse system of spheres under cyclic shear can originate from microscopic irreversibilities and the development of convective secondary flows. Rotational motion and frictional rotational coupling, meanwhile, have been less explored in such experimental 3D systems, especially under cyclic forcing. In particular, relative amounts of sliding and/or rolling between pairs of contacting grains could influence the reversibility of both trajectories, in terms of both position and orientation. In this work, we apply the Refractive Index Matched Scanning technique to a granular system that is cyclically driven and measure both translational and rotational motion of individual grains. We relate measured rotational motion to resulting shear bands and convective flows, further indicating the degree to which pairs and neighborhoods of grains collectively rotate.

  4. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Reactive Transport and Mineral Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Redden, George; Meakin, Paul; Fang, Yilin

    2006-06-30

    A new Lagrangian particle model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics was used to simulate pore scale precipitation reactions. The side-by-side injection of reacting solutions into two halves of a two-dimensional granular porous medium was simulated. Precipitation on grain surfaces occurred along a narrow zone in the middle of the domain, where the reacting solutes mixed to generate a supersaturated reaction product. The numerical simulations qualitatively reproduced the behavior observed in related laboratory experiments.

  5. Water Flow Simulation using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce; Berg, Jared; Harris, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of water flow from the rainbird nozzles has been accomplished using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The advantage of using SPH is that no meshing is required, thus the grid quality is no longer an issue and accuracy can be improved.

  6. Launch Environment Water Flow Simulations Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Berg, Jared J.; Harris, Michael F.; Crespo, Alejandro C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the water flow from the rainbird nozzle system used in the sound suppression system during pad abort and nominal launch. The simulations help determine if water from rainbird nozzles will impinge on the rocket nozzles and other sensitive ground support elements.

  7. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively placemore » injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.« less

  8. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, Lori; Disz, Terry; Papka, Mike; Heath, Daniel; Diachin, Darin; Herzog, Jim; Ryan, and Bob

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively place injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.

  9. Enhanced copper micro/nano-particle mixed paste sintered at low temperature for 3D interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y. Y.; Ng, M. Z.; Anantha, P.; Lin, Y. D.; Li, Z. G.; Gan, C. L.; Tan, C. S.

    2016-06-01

    An enhanced copper paste, formulated by copper micro- and nano-particles mixture, is reported to prevent paste cracking and obtain an improved packing density. The particle mixture of two different sizes enables reduction in porosity of the micro-paste and resolves the cracking issue in the nano-paste. In-situ temperature and resistance measurements indicate that the mixed paste has a lower densification temperature. Electrical study also shows a ˜12× lower sheet resistance of 0.27 Ω/sq. In addition, scanning electron microscope image analysis confirms a ˜50% lower porosity, which is consistent with the thermal and electrical results. The 3:1 (micro:nano, wt. %) mixed paste is found to have the strongest synergistic effect. This phenomenon is discussed further. Consequently, the mixed paste is a promising material for potential low temperature 3D interconnects fabrication.

  10. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  11. Calibrating an updated smoothed particle hydrodynamics scheme within gcd+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, D.; Okamoto, T.; Gibson, B. K.; Barnes, D. J.; Cen, R.

    2013-01-01

    We adapt a modern scheme of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to our tree N-body/SPH galactic chemodynamics code gcd+. The applied scheme includes implementations of the artificial viscosity switch and artificial thermal conductivity proposed by Morris & Monaghan, Rosswog & Price and Price to model discontinuities and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities more accurately. We first present hydrodynamics test simulations and contrast the results to runs undertaken without artificial viscosity switch or thermal conduction. In addition, we also explore the different levels of smoothing by adopting larger or smaller smoothing lengths, i.e. a larger or smaller number of neighbour particles, Nnb. We demonstrate that the new version of gcd+ is capable of modelling Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities to a similar level as the mesh code, athena. From the Gresho vortex, point-like explosion and self-similar collapse tests, we conclude that setting the smoothing length to keep Nnb as high as ˜58 is preferable to adopting smaller smoothing lengths. We present our optimized parameter sets from the hydrodynamics tests.

  12. Some Progress in Large-Eddy Simulation using the 3-D Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    This two-month visit at CTR was devoted to investigating possibilities in LES modeling in the context of the 3-D vortex particle method (=vortex element method, VEM) for unbounded flows. A dedicated code was developed for that purpose. Although O(N(sup 2)) and thus slow, it offers the advantage that it can easily be modified to try out many ideas on problems involving up to N approx. 10(exp 4) particles. Energy spectrums (which require O(N(sup 2)) operations per wavenumber) are also computed. Progress was realized in the following areas: particle redistribution schemes, relaxation schemes to maintain the solenoidal condition on the particle vorticity field, simple LES models and their VEM extension, possible new avenues in LES. Model problems that involve strong interaction between vortex tubes were computed, together with diagnostics: total vorticity, linear and angular impulse, energy and energy spectrum, enstrophy. More work is needed, however, especially regarding relaxation schemes and further validation and development of LES models for VEM. Finally, what works well will eventually have to be incorporated into the fast parallel tree code.

  13. The Effects of Matrix Stiffness and RhoA on the Phenotypic Plasticity of Smooth Muscle Cells in a 3-D Biosynthetic Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kim, Peter D.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seliktar, Dror; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies using 2-D cultures have shown that the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell migration, spreading, proliferation, and differentiation; however, cellular mechanosensing in 3-D remains under-explored. To investigate this topic, a unique biomaterial system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated fibrinogen was adapted to study phenotypic plasticity in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as a function of ECM mechanics in 3-D. Tuning compressive modulus between 448–5804 Pa modestly regulated SMC cytoskeletal assembly in 3-D, with spread cells in stiff matrices having a slightly higher degree of F-actin bundling after prolonged culture. However, vinculin expression in all 3-D conditions was qualitatively low and was not assembled into the classic focal adhesions typically seen in 2-D cultures. Given the evidence that RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal contractility represents a critical node in mechanosensing, we molecularly upregulated contractility by inducing SMCs to express constitutively active RhoA. In these cells, F-actin bundling and total vinculin expression increased, and focal adhesion-like structures began to emerge, consistent with RhoA’s mechanism of action cells cultured on 2-D substrates. Furthermore, SMC proliferation in 3-D did not depend significantly on matrix stiffness, and was reduced by constitutive activation of RhoA irrespective of ECM mechanical properties. Conversely, the expression of contractile markers globally increased with constitutive RhoA activation and depended on 3-D matrix stiffness only in cells with heightened RhoA activity. Combined, these data suggest the synergistic effects of ECM mechanics and RhoA activity on SMC phenotype in 3-D are distinct from those in 2-D, and highlight the importance of studying the mechanical role of cell-matrix interactions in tunable 3-D environments. PMID:18342366

  14. 3D structure determination of protein using TEM single particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chikara; Mio, Kazuhiro; Kawata, Masaaki; Ogura, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Proteins play important roles in cell functions such as enzymes, cell trafficking, neurotransmission, muscle contraction and hormone secretion. However, some proteins are very difficult to be crystallized and their structures are undetermined. Several techniques have been developed to elucidate the structure of macromolecules; X-ray or electron crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and high-resolution electron microscopy. Among them, electron microscopy based single particle reconstruction (SPA) technique is a computer-aided structure determination method. This method reconstructs the 3D structure from projection images of dispersed protein. A large number of two-dimensional particle images are picked up from EM films, aligned and classified to generate 2D averages, and used to reconstruct the 3D structure by assigning the Euler angle of each 2D average. Due to the necessity of elaborate collaboration between the classical biology and the innovative information technology including parallel computing, scientists needed to break unseen barriers to get a start of this analysis. However, recent progresses in electron microscopes, mathematical algorithms, and computational abilities greatly reduced the height of barriers and expanded targets that are considered to be primarily addressable using single particle analysis. Membrane proteins are one of these targets to which the single particle analysis is successfully applied for the understanding of their 3D structures. For this purpose, we have developed various SPA methods [1-5] and applied them to different proteins [6-8].Here, we introduce reconstructed proteins, and discuss the availability of this technique. The intramembrane-cleaving proteases (I-CLiPs) that sever the transmembrane domains of their substrates have been identified in a range of organisms and play a variety of roles in biological conditions. I-CLiPs have been classified into three groups: serine-, aspartyl- and metalloprotease

  15. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  16. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  17. Particle entry through "Sash" groove simulated by Global 3D Electromagnetic Particle code with duskward IMF By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Cai, D.; Nishikawa, K.; Lembege, B.

    2004-12-01

    We made our efforts to parallelize the global 3D HPF Electromagnetic particle model (EMPM) for several years and have also reported our meaningful simulation results that revealed the essential physics involved in interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere using this EMPM (Nishikawa et al., 1995; Nishikawa, 1997, 1998a, b, 2001, 2002) in our PC cluster and supercomputer(D.S. Cai et al., 2001, 2003). Sash patterns and related phenomena have been observed and reported in some satellite observations (Fujumoto et al. 1997; Maynard, 2001), and have motivated 3D MHD simulations (White and al., 1998). We also investigated it with our global 3D parallelized HPF EMPM with dawnward IMF By (K.-I. Nishikawa, 1998) and recently new simulation with dusk-ward IMF By was accomplished in the new VPP5000 supercomputer. In the new simulations performed on the new VPP5000 supercomputer of Tsukuba University, we used larger domain size, 305×205×205, smaller grid size (Δ ), 0.5R E(the radium of the Earth), more total particle number, 220,000,000 (about 8 pairs per cell). At first, we run this code until we get the so-called quasi-stationary status; After the quasi-stationary status was established, we applied a northward IMF (B z=0.2), and then wait until the IMF arrives around the magnetopuase. After the arrival of IMF, we begin to change the IMF from northward to duskward (IMF B y=-0.2). The results revealed that the groove structure at the day-side magnetopause, that causes particle entry into inner magnetosphere and the cross structure or S-structure at near magneto-tail are formed. Moreover, in contrast with MHD simulations, kinetic characteristic of this event is also analyzed self-consistently with this simulation. The new simulation provides new and more detailed insights for the observed sash event.

  18. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  19. 3D quantification of brain microvessels exposed to heavy particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, C.; Coats, J. S.; Obenaus, A.; Nelson, G.; Krucker, T.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-09-01

    Space radiation with high energy particles and cosmic rays presents a significant hazard to spaceflight crews. Recent reviews of the health risk to astronauts from ionizing radiation concluded to establish a level of risk which may indicate the possible performance decrements and decreased latency of late dysfunction syndromes (LDS) of the brain. A hierarchical imaging approach developed at ETH Zürich and PSI, which relies on synchrotron based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM), was used to visualize and analyze 3D vascular structures down to the capillary level in their precise anatomical context. Various morphological parameters, such as overall vessel volume, vessel thickness and spacing, are extracted to characterize the vascular structure within a region of interest. For a first quantification of the effect of high energy particles on the vasculature we scanned a set of 6 animals, all of same age. The animals were irradiated with 1 Gy, 2 Gy and 4 Gy of 600MeV 56Fe heavy particles simulating the space radiation environment. We found that with increasing dose the diameter of vessels and the overall vessel volume are decreased whereas the vessel spacing is increased. As these parameters reflect blood flow in three-dimensional space they can be used as indicators for the degree of vascular efficiency which can have an impact on the function and development of lung tissue or tumors.

  20. Polyribosomes are molecular 3D nanoprinters that orchestrate the assembly of vault particles.

    PubMed

    Mrazek, Jan; Toso, Daniel; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Zhang, Xing; Zhou, Z Hong; Fernandez, Beatriz Campo; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Rome, Leonard H

    2014-11-25

    Ribosomes are molecular machines that function in polyribosome complexes to translate genetic information, guide the synthesis of polypeptides, and modulate the folding of nascent proteins. Here, we report a surprising function for polyribosomes as a result of a systematic examination of the assembly of a large ribonucleoprotein complex, the vault particle. Structural and functional evidence points to a model of vault assembly whereby the polyribosome acts like a 3D nanoprinter to direct the ordered translation and assembly of the multi-subunit vault homopolymer, a process which we refer to as polyribosome templating. Structure-based mutagenesis and cell-free in vitro expression studies further demonstrated the critical importance of the polyribosome in vault assembly. Polyribosome templating prevents chaos by ensuring efficiency and order in the production of large homopolymeric protein structures in the crowded cellular environment and might explain the origin of many polyribosome-associated molecular assemblies inside the cell.

  1. Improving convergence in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations without pairing instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehnen, Walter; Aly, Hossam

    2012-09-01

    The numerical convergence of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) can be severely restricted by random force errors induced by particle disorder, especially in shear flows, which are ubiquitous in astrophysics. The increase in the number NH of neighbours when switching to more extended smoothing kernels at fixed resolution (using an appropriate definition for the SPH resolution scale) is insufficient to combat these errors. Consequently, trading resolution for better convergence is necessary, but for traditional smoothing kernels this option is limited by the pairing (or clumping) instability. Therefore, we investigate the suitability of the Wendland functions as smoothing kernels and compare them with the traditional B-splines. Linear stability analysis in three dimensions and test simulations demonstrate that the Wendland kernels avoid the pairing instability for all NH, despite having vanishing derivative at the origin (disproving traditional ideas about the origin of this instability; instead, we uncover a relation with the kernel Fourier transform and give an explanation in terms of the SPH density estimator). The Wendland kernels are computationally more convenient than the higher order B-splines, allowing large NH and hence better numerical convergence (note that computational costs rise sublinear with NH). Our analysis also shows that at low NH the quartic spline kernel with NH ≈ 60 obtains much better convergence than the standard cubic spline.

  2. 3D Plasma Equilibrium and Stability with Hot Particle Anisotropic Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Hirshman, S. P.; Merkel, P.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H. F. G.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Narushima, Y.

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic pressure free-boundary three-dimsnsional (3D) equilibrium code ANI-MEC with nested magnetic flux surfaces has been developed as an extension of the VMEC2000 code. The preconditioning algorithm included is exploited to allow the computation of equilibrium states with radial force balance error improvements exceeding 4 orders of magnitude compared with the non-conditioned results. Large off-axis energetic particle deposition has been applied in a 2-field period quasiaxisymmetric stellarator reactor at <{beta}>{approx_equal}4.5% to test the limitations of the code. The hot particle pressures are roughly uniform around the flux surfaces when p{sub parallel}>p{sub perpendicular}. The fast particle perpendicular pressures localise in the region of deposition for p{sub perpendicular}>p{sub parallel}, while the energetic particle parallel pressures concentrate on the low-field side. Two anisotropic pressure models for global fluid stability implemented in the TERPSICHORE code have been applied to the LHD Heliotron for a sequence of equilibria with fixed <{beta}{sub dia}>{approx_equal}5%(<{beta}{sub th}>{approx_equal}3.5%) varying the fast particle temperature ratio T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular}. Global magnetohydrodynamic modes are quasi-stable according to the model with rigid hot particle layers, while they become stabilised according to the fully interacting energetic particle model with increasing T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular}. As T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular} approaches 3, however, the n = 1 mode family becomes unstable. A transition from a nearly stable quasi-external ballooning-interchange structure to a weakly unstable internal kink mode takes place. The investigation of beam-driven fusion in a Heliotron system is broached. A background plasma with cold ions and warm electrons at <{beta}{sub ith}>{approx_equal}1% is examined with fixed T{sub parallel}/T{sub perpendicular} = 10 in which the hot particle contribution to <{beta

  3. 3D Plasma Equilibrium and Stability with Hot Particle Anisotropic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Hirshman, S. P.; Merkel, P.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H. F. G.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Narushima, Y.

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic pressure free-boundary three-dimsnsional (3D) equilibrium code ANI-MEC with nested magnetic flux surfaces has been developed as an extension of the VMEC2000 code. The preconditioning algorithm included is exploited to allow the computation of equilibrium states with radial force balance error improvements exceeding 4 orders of magnitude compared with the non-conditioned results. Large off-axis energetic particle deposition has been applied in a 2-field period quasiaxisymmetric stellarator reactor at <β>≃4.5% to test the limitations of the code. The hot particle pressures are roughly uniform around the flux surfaces when p∥>p⊥. The fast particle perpendicular pressures localise in the region of deposition for p⊥>p∥, while the energetic particle parallel pressures concentrate on the low-field side. Two anisotropic pressure models for global fluid stability implemented in the TERPSICHORE code have been applied to the LHD Heliotron for a sequence of equilibria with fixed <βdia>≃5%(<βth>≃3.5%) varying the fast particle temperature ratio T∥/T⊥. Global magnetohydrodynamic modes are quasi-stable according to the model with rigid hot particle layers, while they become stabilised according to the fully interacting energetic particle model with increasing T∥/T⊥. As T∥/T⊥ approaches 3, however, the n = 1 mode family becomes unstable. A transition from a nearly stable quasi-external ballooning-interchange structure to a weakly unstable internal kink mode takes place. The investigation of beam-driven fusion in a Heliotron system is broached. A background plasma with cold ions and warm electrons at <βith>≃1% is examined with fixed T∥/T⊥ = 10 in which the hot particle contribution to <β> is increased. An equilibrium limit is reached when the hot parallel component <β∥h> exceeds 6.1%. The rigid model predicts stability, while the fully interacting model shows stabilisation for <β∥h greater than 3%.

  4. Direct measurement of particle size and 3D velocity of a gas-solid pipe flow with digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchun; Wu, Xuecheng; Yao, Longchao; Gréhan, Gérard; Cen, Kefa

    2015-03-20

    The 3D measurement of the particles in a gas-solid pipe flow is of great interest, but remains challenging due to curved pipe walls in various engineering applications. Because of the astigmatism induced by the pipe, concentric ellipse fringes in the hologram of spherical particles are observed in the experiments. With a theoretical analysis of the particle holography by an ABCD matrix, the in-focus particle image can be reconstructed by the modified convolution method and fractional Fourier transform. Thereafter, the particle size, 3D position, and velocity are simultaneously measured by digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). The successful application of DHPTV to the particle size and 3D velocity measurement in a glass pipe's flow can facilitate its 3D diagnostics.

  5. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Numerical simulations of glass impacts using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, we have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. We have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, we did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  7. No more active galactic nuclei in clumpy disks than in smooth galaxies at z ∼ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; and others

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ∼ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ∼ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ∼ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies.

  8. CAST: Effective and Efficient User Interaction for Context-Aware Selection in 3D Particle Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present a family of three interactive Context-Aware Selection Techniques (CAST) for the analysis of large 3D particle datasets. For these datasets, spatial selection is an essential prerequisite to many other analysis tasks. Traditionally, such interactive target selection has been particularly challenging when the data subsets of interest were implicitly defined in the form of complicated structures of thousands of particles. Our new techniques SpaceCast, TraceCast, and PointCast improve usability and speed of spatial selection in point clouds through novel context-aware algorithms. They are able to infer a user's subtle selection intention from gestural input, can deal with complex situations such as partially occluded point clusters or multiple cluster layers, and can all be fine-tuned after the selection interaction has been completed. Together, they provide an effective and efficient tool set for the fast exploratory analysis of large datasets. In addition to presenting Cast, we report on a formal user study that compares our new techniques not only to each other but also to existing state-of-the-art selection methods. Our results show that Cast family members are virtually always faster than existing methods without tradeoffs in accuracy. In addition, qualitative feedback shows that PointCast and TraceCast were strongly favored by our participants for intuitiveness and efficiency.

  9. Single particle cryo-electron microscopy and 3-D reconstruction of viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3-4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced.

  10. Single Particle Cryo-electron Microscopy and 3-D Reconstruction of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    With fast progresses in instrumentation, image processing algorithms, and computational resources, single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) 3-D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses has now reached near-atomic resolutions (3–4 Å). With comparable resolutions and more predictable outcomes, cryo-EM is now considered a preferred method over X-ray crystallography for determination of atomic structure of icosahedral viruses. At near-atomic resolutions, all-atom models or backbone models can be reliably built that allow residue level understanding of viral assembly and conformational changes among different stages of viral life cycle. With the developments of asymmetric reconstruction, it is now possible to visualize the complete structure of a complex virus with not only its icosahedral shell but also its multiple non-icosahedral structural features. In this chapter, we will describe single particle cryo-EM experimental and computational procedures for both near-atomic resolution reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and asymmetric reconstruction of viruses with both icosahedral and non-icosahedral structure components. Procedures for rigorous validation of the reconstructions and resolution evaluations using truly independent de novo initial models and refinements are also introduced. PMID:24357374

  11. Modeling the Backscatter and Transmitted Light of High Power Smoothed Beams with pF3D, a Massively Parallel Laser Plasma Interaction Code

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R.L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Langdon, A.B.; Moody, J.D.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E.

    2000-06-01

    Using the three-dimensional wave propagation code, F3D[Berger et al., Phys. Fluids B 5,2243 (1993), Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5,4337(1998)], and the massively parallel version pF3D, [Still et al. Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000)], we have computed the transmitted and reflected light for laser and plasma conditions in experiments that simulated ignition hohlraum conditions. The frequency spectrum and the wavenumber spectrum of the transmitted light are calculated and used to identify the relative contributions of stimulated forward Brillouin and self-focusing in hydrocarbon-filled balloons, commonly called gasbags. The effect of beam smoothing, smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS), on the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from Scale-1 NOVA hohlraums was simulated with the use nonlinear saturation models that limit the amplitude of the driven acoustic waves. Other experiments on CO{sub 2} gasbags simultaneously measure at a range of intensities the SBS reflectivity and the Thomson scatter from the SBS-driven acoustic waves that provide a more detailed test of the modeling. These calculations also predict that the backscattered light will be very nonuniform in the nearfield (the focusing system optics) which is important for specifying the backscatter intensities be tolerated by the National Ignition Facility laser system.

  12. Rotational statistics in dense granular flows of smooth cylindrical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Jeffrey; Jantzi, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    We report the results of an experiment to investigate the dissipation in the rotational degree of freedom for smooth cylindrical particles in a dense, driven granular flow. The flow is studied in a rotating drum of radius R = 30 cm for particles of radius r = 0.635 cm while the cell is rotated at speeds between 0.25 and 0.75 Hz. The 2D geometry of the experimental design allows for the measurement of two translational degrees of freedom as well as the rotation of the disks within the driven flow. The rotational velocity statistics demonstrate non-Gaussian behavior as well as a significant amount of energy being dissipated within the flow via the tangential friction between the particles. The results of this experiment are significant in that many driven granular experiments use smooth cylindrical or spherical particles to investigate granular dynamics, but the contribution from the rotational degrees of freedom are often unmeasured. A novel imaging technique is used to extract both the translational and rotational velocity statistics to a high degree of precision in the entire cell during the experiment.

  13. Advanced 3D Poisson solvers and particle-in-cell methods for accelerator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafini, David B.; McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    We seek to improve on the conventional FFT-based algorithms for solving the Poisson equation with infinite-domain (open) boundary conditions for large problems in accelerator modeling and related areas. In particular, improvements in both accuracy and performance are possible by combining several technologies: the method of local corrections (MLC); the James algorithm; and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The MLC enables the parallelization (by domain decomposition) of problems with large domains and many grid points. This improves on the FFT-based Poisson solvers typically used as it doesn't require the all-to-all communication pattern that parallel 3d FFT algorithms require, which tends to be a performance bottleneck on current (and foreseeable) parallel computers. In initial tests, good scalability up to 1000 processors has been demonstrated for our new MLC solver. An essential component of our approach is a new version of the James algorithm for infinite-domain boundary conditions for the case of three dimensions. By using a simplified version of the fast multipole method in the boundary-to-boundary potential calculation, we improve on the performance of the Hockney algorithm typically used by reducing the number of grid points by a factor of 8, and the CPU costs by a factor of 3. This is particularly important for large problems where computer memory limits are a consideration. The MLC allows for the use of adaptive mesh refinement, which reduces the number of grid points and increases the accuracy in the Poisson solution. This improves on the uniform grid methods typically used in PIC codes, particularly in beam problems where the halo is large. Also, the number of particles per cell can be controlled more closely with adaptivity than with a uniform grid. To use AMR with particles is more complicated than using uniform grids. It affects depositing particles on the non-uniform grid, reassigning particles when the adaptive grid changes and maintaining the load

  14. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  15. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we use a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture the void probability and solvation free energy of nonpolar hard particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for an understanding of emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  16. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2016-02-28

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales. PMID:26931689

  17. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  18. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  19. Monitoring an eruption fissure in 3D: video recording, particle image velocimetry and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Tanja; Walter, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    The processes during an eruption are very complex. To get a better understanding several parameters are measured. One of the measured parameters is the velocity of particles and patterns, as ash and emitted magma, and of the volcano itself. The resulting velocity field provides insights into the dynamics of a vent. Here we test our algorithm for 3 dimensional velocity fields on videos of the second fissure eruption of Bárdarbunga 2014. There we acquired videos from lava fountains of the main fissure with 2 high speed cameras with small angles between the cameras. Additionally we test the algorithm on videos from the geyser Strokkur, where we had 3 cameras and larger angles between the cameras. The velocity is calculated by a correlation in the Fourier space of contiguous images. Considering that we only have the velocity field of the surface smaller angles result in a better resolution of the existing velocity field in the near field. For general movements also larger angles can be useful, e.g. to get the direction, height and velocity of eruption clouds. In summary, it can be stated that 3D velocimetry can be used for several application and with different setup due to the application.

  20. Transient dynamics simulations: Parallel algorithms for contact detection and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Plimpton, S.; Attaway, S.; Swegle, J.

    1996-09-01

    Transient dynamics simulations are commonly used to model phenomena such as car crashes, underwater explosions, and the response of shipping containers to high-speed impacts. Physical objects in such a simulation are typically represented by Lagrangian meshes because the meshes can move and deform with the objects as they undergo stress. Fluids (gasoline, water) or fluid-like materials (earth) in the simulation can be modeled using the techniques of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Implementing a hybrid mesh/particle model on a massively parallel computer poses several difficult challenges. One challenge is to simultaneously parallelize and load-balance both the mesh and particle portions of the computation. A second challenge is to efficiently detect the contacts that occur within the deforming mesh and between mesh elements and particles as the simulation proceeds. These contacts impart forces to the mesh elements and particles which must be computed at each timestep to accurately capture the physics of interest. In this paper we describe new parallel algorithms for smoothed particle hydrodynamics and contact detection which turn out to have several key features in common. Additionally, we describe how to join the new algorithms with traditional parallel finite element techniques to create an integrated particle/mesh transient dynamics simulation. Our approach to this problem differs from previous work in that we use three different parallel decompositions, a static one for the finite element analysis and dynamic ones for particles and for contact detection. We have implemented our ideas in a parallel version of the transient dynamics code PRONTO-3D and present results for the code running on a large Intel Paragon.

  1. Generating optimal initial conditions for smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Steven; Rockefeller, Gabriel M; Fryer, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    We present a new optimal method to set up initial conditions for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations, which may also be of interest for N-body simulations. This new method is based on weighted Voronoi tesselations (WVTs) and can meet arbitrarily complex spatial resolution requirements. We conduct a comprehensive review of existing SPH setup methods, and outline their advantages, limitations and drawbacks. A serial version of our WVT setup method is publicly available and we give detailed instruction on how to easily implement the new method on top of an existing parallel SPH code.

  2. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Kathrin Fedosov, Dmitry A. Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  3. Surface processes on the asteroid deduced from the external 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-10-01

    Particles on the surface of S-type Asteroid 25143 Itokawa were successfully recovered by the Hayabusa mission of JAXA (e.g., [1,2]). They are not only the first samples recovered from an asteroid, but also the second extraterrestrial regolith to have been sampled, the first being the Moon by Apollo and Luna missions. The analysis of tiny sample particles (20-200 μm) shows that the Itokawa surface material is consistent with LL chondrites suffered by space weathering as expected and brought an end to the origin of meteorites (e.g., [2-4]). In addition, the examination of Itokawa particles allow studies of surface processes on the asteroid because regolith particles can be regarded as an interface with the space environment, where the impacts of small objects and irradiation by the solar wind and galactic cosmic rays should have been recorded. External 3D shapes and surface features of Itokawa regolith particles were examined. Two kinds of surface modification, formation of space-weathering rims mainly by solar wind implantation and surface abrasion by grain migration, were recognized. Spectral change of the asteroid proceeded by formation of space-weathering rims and refreshment of the regolith surfaces. External 3D shapes and surface morphologies of the regolith particles can provide information about formation and evolution history of regolith particles in relation to asteroidal surface processes. 3D shapes of Itokawa regolith particles were obtained using microtomography [3]. The surface nanomiromorpholgy of Itokawa particles were also observed using FE-SEM [5]. However, the number of particles was limited and genial feature on the surface morphology has not been understood. In this study, the surface morphology of Itokawa regolith particles was systematically investigated together with their 3D structures.

  4. Tensor classification of structure in smoothed particle hydrodynamics density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan; Bonnell, Ian; Lucas, William; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    As hydrodynamic simulations increase in scale and resolution, identifying structures with non-trivial geometries or regions of general interest becomes increasingly challenging. There is a growing need for algorithms that identify a variety of different features in a simulation without requiring a `by eye' search. We present tensor classification as such a technique for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). These methods have already been used to great effect in N-Body cosmological simulations, which require smoothing defined as an input free parameter. We show that tensor classification successfully identifies a wide range of structures in SPH density fields using its native smoothing, removing a free parameter from the analysis and preventing the need for tessellation of the density field, as required by some classification algorithms. As examples, we show that tensor classification using the tidal tensor and the velocity shear tensor successfully identifies filaments, shells and sheet structures in giant molecular cloud simulations, as well as spiral arms in discs. The relationship between structures identified using different tensors illustrates how different forces compete and co-operate to produce the observed density field. We therefore advocate the use of multiple tensors to classify structure in SPH simulations, to shed light on the interplay of multiple physical processes.

  5. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  6. No More Active Galactic Nuclei in Clumpy Disks Than in Smooth Galaxies at z ~ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Juneau, Stéphanie; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Luo, Bin; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Bell, Eric F.; Brandt, W. N.; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Hopkins, Philip F.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lotz, Jennifer; Maseda, Michael; Mozena, Mark; Nandra, Kirpal; Rosario, David J.; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ~ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ~ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ~ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  7. Flow above and within granular media composed of spherical and non-spherical particles - using a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Kuhlmann, Jannis; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The entrainment of single grains and, hence, their erosion characteristics are dependent on fluid forcing, grain size and density, but also shape variations. To quantitatively describe and capture the hydrodynamic conditions around individual grains, researchers commonly use empirical approaches such as laboratory flume tanks. Nonetheless, it is difficult with such physical experiments to measure the flow velocities in the direct vicinity or within the pore spaces of sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-invasive way. As a result, the hydrodynamic conditions in the water column, at the fluid-porous interface and within pore spaces of a granular medium of various grain shapes is not yet fully understood. For that reason, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid speeds within a granular medium. A 3D-SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical wave tank model was set up to provide quantitative evidence on the flow velocities in the direct vicinity and in the interior of granular beds composed of two shapes as a complementary method to the difficult task of in situ measurement. On the basis of previous successful numerical wave tank models with SPH, the model geometry was chosen in dimensions of X=2.68 [m], Y=0.48 [m], and Z=0.8 [m]. Three suites of experiments were designed with a range of particle shape models: (1) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the across-stream direction, (2) ellipsoids with the long axis oriented in the along-stream direction, and (3) spheres. Particle diameters ranged from 0.04 [m] to 0.08 [m]. A wave was introduced by a vertical paddle that accelerated to 0.8 [m/s] perpendicular to the granular bed. Flow measurements showed that the flow velocity values into the beds were highest when the grains were oriented across the stream direction and lowest in case when the grains were oriented parallel to the stream, indicating that the model was capable to simulate simultaneously

  8. A local adaptive discretization algorithm for Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreng, Fabian; Schnabel, Dirk; Mueller, Alexandra; Eberhard, Peter

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, an extension to the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is proposed that allows for an adaptation of the discretization level of a simulated continuum at runtime. By combining a local adaptive refinement technique with a newly developed coarsening algorithm, one is able to improve the accuracy of the simulation results while reducing the required computational cost at the same time. For this purpose, the number of particles is, on the one hand, adaptively increased in critical areas of a simulation model. Typically, these are areas that show a relatively low particle density and high gradients in stress or temperature. On the other hand, the number of SPH particles is decreased for domains with a high particle density and low gradients. Besides a brief introduction to the basic principle of the SPH discretization method, the extensions to the original formulation providing such a local adaptive refinement and coarsening of the modeled structure are presented in this paper. After having introduced its theoretical background, the applicability of the enhanced formulation, as well as the benefit gained from the adaptive model discretization, is demonstrated in the context of four different simulation scenarios focusing on solid continua. While presenting the results found for these examples, several properties of the proposed adaptive technique are discussed, e.g. the conservation of momentum as well as the existing correlation between the chosen refinement and coarsening patterns and the observed quality of the results.

  9. rpSPH: a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Tom

    2011-05-01

    We suggest a novel discretization of the momentum equation for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and show that it significantly improves the accuracy of the obtained solutions. Our new formulation which we refer to as relative pressure SPH, rpSPH, evaluates the pressure force with respect to the local pressure. It respects Newton's first law of motion and applies forces to particles only when there is a net force acting upon them. This is in contrast to standard SPH which explicitly uses Newton's third law of motion continuously applying equal but opposite forces between particles. rpSPH does not show the unphysical particle noise, the clumping or banding instability, unphysical surface tension and unphysical scattering of different mass particles found for standard SPH. At the same time, it uses fewer computational operations and only changes a single line in existing SPH codes. We demonstrate its performance on isobaric uniform density distributions, uniform density shearing flows, the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, the Sod shock tube, the Sedov-Taylor blast wave and a cosmological integration of the Santa Barbara galaxy cluster formation test. rpSPH is an improvement in these cases. The improvements come at the cost of giving up exact momentum conservation of the scheme. Consequently, one can also obtain unphysical solutions particularly at low resolutions.

  10. Simulating Brittle Fracture of Rocks using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajarshi; Cleary, Paul W.

    2009-05-01

    Numerical modelling can assist in understanding and predicting complex fracture processes. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a particle-based Lagrangian method that is particularly suited to the analysis of fracture due to its capacity to model large deformation and to track free surfaces generated. A damage model is used to predict the fracture of elastic solids. The damage parameter represents the volume-averaged micro-fracture of the volume of material represented by an SPH particle. Evolution of damage is predicted using the strain history of each particle. Damage inhibits the transmission of tensile stress between particles, and once it reaches unity, the interface becomes unable to transmit tensile stress, resulting in a macro-crack. Connected macro-cracks lead to complete fragmentation. In this paper, we explore the ability of an SPH-based damage model to predict brittle fracture of rocks during impact. Rock shape is found to have considerable influence on the fracture process, the fragment sizes, the energy dissipation during impact, and the post-fracture motion of the fragments.

  11. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Secondly, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  12. Polyhedral 3D structure of human plasma very low density lipoproteins by individual particle cryo-electron tomography1[S

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yadong; Kuang, Yu-Lin; Lei, Dongsheng; Zhai, Xiaobo; Zhang, Meng; Krauss, Ronald M.; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Human VLDLs assembled in the liver and secreted into the circulation supply energy to peripheral tissues. VLDL lipolysis yields atherogenic LDLs and VLDL remnants that strongly correlate with CVD. Although the composition of VLDL particles has been well-characterized, their 3D structure is elusive because of their variations in size, heterogeneity in composition, structural flexibility, and mobility in solution. Here, we employed cryo-electron microscopy and individual-particle electron tomography to study the 3D structure of individual VLDL particles (without averaging) at both below and above their lipid phase transition temperatures. The 3D reconstructions of VLDL and VLDL bound to antibodies revealed an unexpected polyhedral shape, in contrast to the generally accepted model of a spherical emulsion-like particle. The smaller curvature of surface lipids compared with HDL may also reduce surface hydrophobicity, resulting in lower binding affinity to the hydrophobic distal end of the N-terminal β-barrel domain of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) compared with HDL. The directional binding of CETP to HDL and VLDL may explain the function of CETP in transferring TGs and cholesteryl esters between these particles. This first visualization of the 3D structure of VLDL could improve our understanding of the role of VLDL in atherogenesis. PMID:27538822

  13. 2D and 3D collagen and fibrin biopolymers promote specific ECM and integrin gene expression by vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    HONG, HELEN; STEGEMANN, JAN P.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen Type I and fibrin are polymeric proteins commonly used in the field of regenerative medicine as the foundational matrix of engineered tissues. We examined the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to both two-dimensional (2D) substrates as well as three-dimensional (3D) matrices of these biopolymers. Pure collagen Type I, pure fibrin and composite matrices consisting of 1:1 mixtures of collagen and fibrin were studied. Relative gene expression of three ECM molecules (collagen Type I and III, and tropoelastin) and three integrin subunits (integrins α1, β1 and β3) was determined over 7 days in culture using quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of all of these marker genes was up-regulated in 3D matrices, relative to 2D substrates. Tropoelastin, integrin α1 and integrin β1 were highest in collagen matrices, while collagen III and integrin β3 expression were highest in pure fibrin, and collagen I expression was highest in the collagen-fibrin composite materials. Both the compositional and temporal expression patterns of these specific ECM-related genes were suggestive of a wound healing response. These results illuminate the short-term responses of VSMC to 2D and 3D biopolymer matrices, and have relevance to tissue engineering and cardiovascular biology. PMID:18854122

  14. Water pipe flow simulation using improved virtual particles on smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, E. S.; Yeak, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless method used widely to solve problems such as fluid flows. Due to its meshless property, it is ideal to solve problems on complex geometry. In this paper, boundary treatment were implied for the rectangular pipe flow simulations using SPH. The repulsive force is applied to the boundary particles along with the improved virtual particles on different geometry alignment. The water flow is solved using incompressible SPH and will be examined throughout the simulation. Results from this simulation will be compared with single layered virtual particles. Based on the result of the study, it is found that the improved virtual particles is more accurate and stable.

  15. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  16. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 2, 15 July--15 October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4. Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.

  17. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 1, 5 April--5 July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The lack of a mathematical description of the interactions of fluid turbulence with other physics-chemical processes is a major obstacle in modeling many industrial program. Turbulent two-phase flow is a phenomenon that is of significant practical importance to coal combustion as well as other disciplines. The interactions of fluid turbulence with the particulate phase has yet to be accurately and efficiently modeled for these industrial applications. On 15 May 1991 work was initiated to cover four major tasks toward the development of a computational submodel for turbulent particle dispersion that would be applicable to coal combustion simulations. Those four tasks are: 1. A critical evaluation of the 2-D Lagrangian particle dispersion submodel, 2. Development of a 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 3. Evaluation of the 3-D submodel for turbulent particle dispersion, 4.Exploration of extensions of the Lagrangian dispersion theory to other applications including chemistry-turbulence interactions.

  18. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  19. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas and dust mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, R. A.; Sijacki, D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a `two-fluid' implementation of dust in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) in the test particle limit. The scheme is able to handle both short and long stopping times and reproduces the short friction time limit, which is not properly handled in other implementations. We apply novel tests to verify its accuracy and limitations, including multidimensional tests that have not been previously applied to the drag-coupled dust problem and which are particularly relevant to self-gravitating protoplanetary discs. Our tests demonstrate several key requirements for accurate simulations of gas-dust mixtures. First, in standard SPH particle jitter can degrade the dust solution, even when the gas density is well reproduced. The use of integral gradients, a Wendland kernel and a large number of neighbours can control this, albeit at a greater computational cost. Secondly, when it is necessary to limit the artificial viscosity we recommend using the Cullen & Dehnen switch, since the alternative, using α ˜ 0.1, can generate a large velocity noise up to σv ≲ 0.3cs in the dust particles. Thirdly, we find that an accurate dust density estimate requires >400 neighbours, since, unlike the gas, the dust particles do not feel regularization forces. This density noise applies to all particle-based two-fluid implementations of dust, irrespective of the hydro solver and could lead to numerically induced fragmentation. Although our tests show accurate dusty gas simulations are possible, care must be taken to minimize the contribution from numerical noise.

  20. Particle entry through sash in the magnetopause with a dawndard IMF as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Yan, X.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2003-12-01

    We report a new progress in the long-term effort to represent the global interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere using a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code with the improved resolutions using the HPF Tristan code. After a quasi-steady state is established with an unmagnetized solar wind we gradually switch on a northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which causes a magnetic reconnection at the nightside cusps and the magnetosphere to be depolarized. In the case that the northward IMF is switched gradually to dawnward, there is no signature of reconnection in the near-Earth magnetotail as in the case with the southward turning. On the contrary analysis of magnetic fields in the magnetopause confirms a signature of magnetic reconnection at both the dawnside and duskside. And the plasma sheet in the near-Earth magnetotail clearly thins as in the case of southward turning. Arrival of dawnward IMF to the magnetopause creates a reconnection groove which cause particle entry into the deep region of the magnetosphere via field lines that go near the magnetopause. This deep connection is more fully recognized tailward of Earth. The flank weak-field fan joins onto the plasma sheet and the current sheet to form a geometrical feature called the cross-tail S that structurally integrates the magnetopause and the tail interior. This structure contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process heats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. These phenomena have been found by Cluster observations. Further investigation with Cluster observations will provide new insights for unsolved problems such as hot flow anomalies (HFAs), substorms, and storm-substorm relationship. 3-D movies with sash structure will be presented at the meeting.

  1. A DAFT DL_POLY distributed memory adaptation of the Smoothed Particle Mesh Ewald method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, I. J.; Todorov, I. T.; Smith, W.

    2006-09-01

    The Smoothed Particle Mesh Ewald method [U. Essmann, L. Perera, M.L. Berkowtz, T. Darden, H. Lee, L.G. Pedersen, J. Chem. Phys. 103 (1995) 8577] for calculating long ranged forces in molecular simulation has been adapted for the parallel molecular dynamics code DL_POLY_3 [I.T. Todorov, W. Smith, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. London 362 (2004) 1835], making use of a novel 3D Fast Fourier Transform (DAFT) [I.J. Bush, The Daresbury Advanced Fourier transform, Daresbury Laboratory, 1999] that perfectly matches the Domain Decomposition (DD) parallelisation strategy [W. Smith, Comput. Phys. Comm. 62 (1991) 229; M.R.S. Pinches, D. Tildesley, W. Smith, Mol. Sim. 6 (1991) 51; D. Rapaport, Comput. Phys. Comm. 62 (1991) 217] of the DL_POLY_3 code. In this article we describe software adaptations undertaken to import this functionality and provide a review of its performance.

  2. Simulation of a ceramic impact experiment using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Schwalbe, L.A.

    1996-08-01

    We are developing statistically based, brittle-fracture models and are implementing them into hydrocodes that can be used for designing systems with components of ceramics, glass, and/or other brittle materials. Because of the advantages it has simulating fracture, we are working primarily with the smooth particle hydrodynamics code SPHINX. We describe a new brittle fracture model that we have implemented into SPHINX, and we discuss how the model differs from others. To illustrate the code`s current capability, we simulate an experiment in which a tungsten rod strikes a target of heavily confined ceramic. Simulations in 3D at relatively coarse resolution yield poor results. However, 2D plane-strain approximations to the test produce crack patterns that are strikingly similar to the data, although the fracture model needs further refinement to match some of the finer details. We conclude with an outline of plans for continuing research and development.

  3. A DENSITY-INDEPENDENT FORMULATION OF SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro

    2013-05-01

    The standard formulation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) assumes that the local density distribution is differentiable. This assumption is used to derive the spatial derivatives of other quantities. However, this assumption breaks down at the contact discontinuity. At the contact discontinuity, the density of the low-density side is overestimated while that of the high-density side is underestimated. As a result, the pressure of the low-density (high-density) side is overestimated (underestimated). Thus, unphysical repulsive force appears at the contact discontinuity, resulting in the effective surface tension. This tension suppresses fluid instabilities. In this paper, we present a new formulation of SPH, which does not require the differentiability of density. Instead of the mass density, we adopt the internal energy density (pressure) and its arbitrary function, which are smoothed quantities at the contact discontinuity, as the volume element used for the kernel integration. We call this new formulation density-independent SPH (DISPH). It handles the contact discontinuity without numerical problems. The results of standard tests such as the shock tube, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, point-like explosion, and blob tests are all very favorable to DISPH. We conclude that DISPH solved most of the known difficulties of the standard SPH, without introducing additional numerical diffusion or breaking the exact force symmetry or energy conservation. Our new SPH includes the formulation proposed by Ritchie and Thomas as a special case. Our formulation can be extended to handle a non-ideal gas easily.

  4. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qiang; Lehoucq, R. B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2014-12-31

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary. The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. As a result, an immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.

  5. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Qiang; Lehoucq, R. B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2014-12-31

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary.more » The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. As a result, an immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.« less

  6. Integral approximations to classical diffusion and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of the paper is the approximation of a classical diffusion operator by an integral equation with a volume constraint. A particular focus is on classical diffusion problems associated with Neumann boundary conditions. By exploiting this approximation, we can also approximate other quantities such as the flux out of a domain. Our analysis of the model equation on the continuum level is closely related to the recent work on nonlocal diffusion and peridynamic mechanics. In particular, we elucidate the role of a volumetric constraint as an approximation to a classical Neumann boundary condition in the presence of physical boundary. The volume-constrained integral equation then provides the basis for accurate and robust discretization methods. An immediate application is to the understanding and improvement of the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method.

  7. Protostellar jets and magnetised turbulence with smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields are an integral component of the formation of stars. During my thesis work, I built new methods to model magnetic fields in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics which enforce the divergence-free constraint on the magnetic field and reduce numerical dissipation of the magnetic field. Using these methods, we have performed simulations of isolated protostar formation, studying the production of jets and outflows of material and their effect on transporting angular momentum away from the protostar and reducing the efficiency of star formation. A major code comparison project on the small-scale turbulent dynamo amplification of magnetic fields was performed, using conditions representative of molecular clouds, the formation site of stars. The results were compared against results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and qualitative behaviour. I will outline the numerical methods developed, and present the results from our protostar and molecular cloud simulations.

  8. An hourglass control algorithm for Lagrangian Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilization scheme which addresses the rank-deficiency problem in meshless collocation methods for solid mechanics. Specifically, Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in the Total Lagrangian formalism is considered. This method is rank-deficient in the sense that the SPH approximation of the deformation gradient is not unique with respect to the positions of the integration points. The non-uniqueness can result in the formation of zero-energy modes. If undetected, these modes can grow and completely dominate the solution. Here, an algorithm is introduced, which effectively suppresses these modes in a fashion similar to hour-glass control mechanisms in Finite-Element methods. Simulations utilizing this control algorithm result exhibit much improved stability, accuracy, and error convergence properties. In contrast to an alternative method which eliminates zero-energy modes, namely the use of additional integration points, the here presented algorithm is easy to implement and computationally very efficient.

  9. Simulations of dolphin kick swimming using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raymond C Z; Cleary, Paul W; Mason, Bruce R

    2012-06-01

    In competitive human swimming the submerged dolphin kick stroke (underwater undulatory swimming) is utilized after dives and turns. The optimal dolphin kick has a balance between minimizing drag and maximizing thrust while also minimizing the physical exertion required of the swimmer. In this study laser scans of athletes are used to provide realistic swimmer geometries in a single anatomical pose. These are rigged and animated to closely match side-on video footage. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) fluid simulations are performed to evaluate variants of this swimming stroke technique. This computational approach provides full temporal and spatial information about the flow moving around the deforming swimmer model. The effects of changes in ankle flexibility and stroke frequency are investigated through a parametric study. The results suggest that the net streamwise force on the swimmer is relatively insensitive to ankle flexibility but is strongly dependent on kick frequency. PMID:21840077

  10. Simulations of dolphin kick swimming using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raymond C Z; Cleary, Paul W; Mason, Bruce R

    2012-06-01

    In competitive human swimming the submerged dolphin kick stroke (underwater undulatory swimming) is utilized after dives and turns. The optimal dolphin kick has a balance between minimizing drag and maximizing thrust while also minimizing the physical exertion required of the swimmer. In this study laser scans of athletes are used to provide realistic swimmer geometries in a single anatomical pose. These are rigged and animated to closely match side-on video footage. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) fluid simulations are performed to evaluate variants of this swimming stroke technique. This computational approach provides full temporal and spatial information about the flow moving around the deforming swimmer model. The effects of changes in ankle flexibility and stroke frequency are investigated through a parametric study. The results suggest that the net streamwise force on the swimmer is relatively insensitive to ankle flexibility but is strongly dependent on kick frequency.

  11. Modeling of cast systems using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul; Prakash, Mahesh; Ha, Joseph; Sinnott, Matthew; Nguyen, Thang; Grandfield, John

    2004-03-01

    To understand and control the filling process for metals in high-pressure die casting and ingot casting, researchers have used new flow-simulation software for the modeling of mold filling. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is a non-conventional computational fluid dynamics method that has been successfully applied to these problems. Due to its mesh-free nature, it can handle complex splashing free surface flows and the differential motion of multiple solid-casting equipment components relatively easily. The ability of SPH to predict the detailed filling patterns of real large-scale automotive die castings is demonstrated in this study, and the use of SPH simulation for wheel shape optimization in ingot casting based on minimizing oxide generation while increasing the throughput is also presented.

  12. Hydrodynamic simulations with the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murante, G.; Borgani, S.; Brunino, R.; Cha, S.-H.

    2011-10-01

    We present results based on an implementation of the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics (GSPH), originally developed by Inutsuka, in the GADGET-3 hydrodynamic code. We first review the derivation of the GSPH discretization of the equations of moment and energy conservation, starting from the convolution of these equations with the interpolating kernel. The two most important aspects of the numerical implementation of these equations are (a) the appearance of fluid velocity and pressure obtained from the solution of the Riemann problem between each pair of particles, and (b) the absence of an artificial viscosity term. We carry out three different controlled hydrodynamical three-dimensional tests, namely the Sod shock tube, the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a shear-flow test and the 'blob' test describing the evolution of a cold cloud moving against a hot wind. The results of our tests confirm and extend in a number of aspects those recently obtained by Cha, Inutsuka & Nayakshin: (i) GSPH provides a much improved description of contact discontinuities, with respect to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), thus avoiding the appearance of spurious pressure forces; (ii) GSPH is able to follow the development of gas-dynamical instabilities, such as the Kevin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor ones; (iii) as a result, GSPH describes the development of curl structures in the shear-flow test and the dissolution of the cold cloud in the 'blob' test. Besides comparing the results of GSPH with those from standard SPH implementations, we also discuss in detail the effect on the performances of GSPH of changing different aspects of its implementation: choice of the number of neighbours, accuracy of the interpolation procedure to locate the interface between two fluid elements (particles) for the solution of the Riemann problem, order of the reconstruction for the assignment of variables at the interface, choice of the limiter to prevent oscillations of

  13. Flow and Transport in Smooth and Rough Unsaturated Wide Aperture Fractures with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Geyer, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present pore- and fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions. Several empirical and semi-analytical solutions are used to verify the model. We show that our results satisfy the empirical scaling laws for droplet velocity and critical contact angle. Due to the efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces as well as the velocity enhancement of droplets on saturated surfaces can readily be obtained. Furthermore, we study the effect of surface roughness on droplet velocities. Lastly, we present flow and transport simulations in the presence of an adjacent porous matrix in order to investigate its influence on the fracture surface flow dynamics and transport across the matrix-fracture interface.

  14. 3D image reconstruction algorithms for cryo-electron-microscopy images of virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2000-11-01

    A statistical model for the object and the complete image formation process in cryo electron microscopy of viruses is presented. Using this model, maximum likelihood reconstructions of the 3D structure of viruses are computed using the expectation maximization algorithm and an example based on Cowpea mosaic virus is provided.

  15. TiO2 particles on a 3D network of single-walled nanotubes for NH3 gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yong Deok; Lee, Sooken; Seo, Jeongeun; Lee, Soobum; Ann, Doyeon; Lee, Haiwon

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) gas is one of the gases which causes damage to environment such as acidification and climate change. In this study, a gas sensor based on the three-dimensional (3D) network of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) was fabricated for the detection of NH3 gas in dry air. The sensor showed enhanced performance due to the fast gas diffusion rate and weak interactions between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate. Metal oxide particles were introduced to enhance the performance of the gas sensor. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit the metal oxide in the complex structure, and good control over thickness was achieved. The hybrid gas sensor consisting of the 3D network of SWNTs with anatase TiO2 particles showed stable, repeatable, and enhanced gas sensor performance. The phase of TiO2 particles was characterized by Raman and the morphology of the TiO2 particles on the 3D network of SWNTs was analyzed by transmission electron microscope.

  16. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  17. Multi-phase shock simulations with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omang, M. G.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present an approach to the implementation of a multi-phase description in the numerical Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The work is based on previous work, but has been modified to suit the applications of interest, in this case shock propagation through dusty gases. Theoretical models for multi-phase systems rely on the introduction of a number of terms describing the interaction between the different phases; drag and heat exchange are two examples. These terms contain parameters, the value of many of which must be determined empirically. We present results on the effect of changing values of some of the important parameters and compare our results to experimental and numerical results published in the literature. Our numerical results generally agree well with published results, taking uncertainties concerning accuracy in existing experimental data and details in the choice of parameters for numerical results into consideration. In particular, we find that a reduction in dust particle size is an efficient way of increasing shock retardation for a given dust loading.

  18. Simulations of reactive transport and precipitation with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Meakin, Paul; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Eichler West, Rogene M.

    2007-03-01

    A numerical model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) was developed for reactive transport and mineral precipitation in fractured and porous materials. Because of its Lagrangian particle nature, SPH has several advantages for modeling Navier-Stokes flow and reactive transport including: (1) in a Lagrangian framework there is no non-linear term in the momentum conservation equation, so that accurate solutions can be obtained for momentum dominated flows and; (2) complicated physical and chemical processes such as surface growth due to precipitation/dissolution and chemical reactions are easy to implement. In addition, SPH simulations explicitly conserve mass and linear momentum. The SPH solution of the diffusion equation with fixed and moving reactive solid-fluid boundaries was compared with analytical solutions, Lattice Boltzmann [Q. Kang, D. Zhang, P. Lichtner, I. Tsimpanogiannis, Lattice Boltzmann model for crystal growth from supersaturated solution, Geophysical Research Letters, 31 (2004) L21604] simulations and diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) [P. Meakin, Fractals, scaling and far from equilibrium. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1998] model simulations. To illustrate the capabilities of the model, coupled three-dimensional flow, reactive transport and precipitation in a fracture aperture with a complex geometry were simulated.

  19. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-01

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  20. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  1. Nondestructive testing of 3D disperse systems with micro- and nano-particles: N-dimensional space of optical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2006-04-01

    The simultaneous analysis of 3D disperse systems (DS) with micro- and nano- particles by refractometry, absorbency, fluorescence and by different types of light scattering, can help to elaborate the sensing elements for specffic impurity control. Our research has investigated by complex of optical methods different 3D DS such as: proteins, nucleoproteids, lipoproteids, liposomes, viruses, virosomes, lipid emulsions, blood substitutes, latexes, liquid crystals, biological cells with various form and size (including bacterial cells), metallic powders, clays, kimberlites, zeolites, oils, crude oils, samples of natural and water-supply waters, etc. This experience suggests that each 3D DS can be charactensed by N-dimensional vector in N-dimensional space of optical parameters. Due to the fusion of various optical data it is possible to solve the inverse physical problem on the presence of impurity in mixtures of 3D DS by information statistical theory methods. It is important that in this case polymodality of particle size distribution is not an obstacle.

  2. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  3. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for droplet and film flow on smooth and rough fracture surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Geyer, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    Flow on fracture surfaces has been identified by many authors as an important flow process in unsaturated fractured rock formations. Given the complexity of flow dynamics on such small scales, robust numerical methods have to be employed in order to capture the highly dynamic interfaces and flow intermittency. In this work we present microscale free-surface flow simulations using a three-dimensional multiphase Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code. Pairwise solid-fluid and fluid-fluid interaction forces are used to control the wetting behavior and cover a wide range of static and transient contact angles as well as Reynolds numbers encountered in droplet flow on rock surfaces. We validate our model via comparison with existing empirical and semi-analyical solutions for droplet flow. We use the model to investigate the occurence of adsorbed trailing films of droplets under various flow conditions and its importance for the flow dynamics when films and droplets coexist. We show that flow velocities are higher on prewetted surfaces covered by a thin film which is qualitatively attributed to the enhanced dynamic wetting and dewetting at the trailing and advancing contact line.

  4. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, C.; Borri, M.; Dalla Betta, G.; Haughton, I.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Povoli, M.; Mendicino, R.

    2015-04-01

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale.

  5. Development of stress boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) for the modeling of solids deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet-Grellier, Thomas; Pramanik, Ranjan; Pan, Kai; Albaiz, Abdulaziz; Jones, Bruce D.; Williams, John R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper develops a method for imposing stress boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) with and without the need for dummy particles. SPH has been used for simulating phenomena in a number of fields, such as astrophysics and fluid mechanics. More recently, the method has gained traction as a technique for simulation of deformation and fracture in solids, where the meshless property of SPH can be leveraged to represent arbitrary crack paths. Despite this interest, application of boundary conditions within the SPH framework is typically limited to imposed velocity or displacement using fictitious dummy particles to compensate for the lack of particles beyond the boundary interface. While this is enough for a large variety of problems, especially in the case of fluid flow, for problems in solid mechanics there is a clear need to impose stresses upon boundaries. In addition to this, the use of dummy particles to impose a boundary condition is not always suitable or even feasibly, especially for those problems which include internal boundaries. In order to overcome these difficulties, this paper first presents an improved method for applying stress boundary conditions in SPH with dummy particles. This is then followed by a proposal of a formulation which does not require dummy particles. These techniques are then validated against analytical solutions to two common problems in rock mechanics, the Brazilian test and the penny-shaped crack problem both in 2D and 3D. This study highlights the fact that SPH offers a good level of accuracy to solve these problems and that results are reliable. This validation work serves as a foundation for addressing more complex problems involving plasticity and fracture propagation.

  6. Development of a 3D to 1D Particle Transport Model to Predict Deposition in the Lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Jessica M.; Grandmont, Celine; Shadden, Shawn C.; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosolized particles are commonly used for therapeutic drug delivery as they can be delivered to the body systemically or be used to treat lung diseases. Recent advances in computational resources have allowed for sophisticated pulmonary simulations, however it is currently impossible to solve for airflow and particle transport for all length and time scales of the lung. Instead, multi-scale methods must be used. In our recent work, where computational methods were employed to solve for airflow and particle transport in the rat airways (Oakes et al. (2014), Annals of Biomedical Engineering 42, 899), the number of particles to exit downstream of the 3D domain was determined. In this current work, the time-dependent Lagrangian description of particles was used to numerically solve a 1D convection-diffusion model (trumpet model, Taulbee and Yu (1975), Journal of Applied Physiology, 38, 77) parameterized specifically for the lung. The expansion of the airway dimensions was determined based on data collected from our aerosol exposure experiments (Oakes et al. (2014), Journal of Applied Physiology, 116, 1561). This 3D-1D framework enables us to predict the fate of particles in the whole lung. This work was supported by the Whitaker Foundation at the IIE, a INRIA Associated Team Postdoc Grant, and a UC Presidential Fellowship.

  7. Synthesis of micro-sized shell-isolated 3D plasmonic superstructures for in situ single-particle SERS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Jingjing; Ji, Ji; Liu, Baohong

    2016-04-01

    A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis.A single-particle SERS system enabling real-time and in situ observation of Au-catalyzed reactions has been developed. Both the catalytic activity and the SERS effect are coupled into a single bi-functional 3D superstructure comprising Au nanosatellites self-assembled onto a shell-insulated Ag microflower core, which eliminates the interference from photocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis and characterization of the Ag@SiO2@Au superstructures (SEM and TEM images, UV/vis and SERS spectra). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00278a

  8. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  9. Numerical simulation of inhaled aerosol particle deposition within 3D realistic human upper respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Fan, J. R.; Zheng, Y. Q.; Hu, G. L.; Pan, D.

    2010-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of airflow and particle deposition in the upper respiratory tract (URT) were conducted in this paper. Based on the CT (Computerized Tomography) scanned images of a 19-years-old healthy boy, a realistic geometric model of URT from oral cavity to the upper six-generation bronchial is rebuilt. To investigate airflow and particle deposition in the obtained realistic human upper respiratory tract, RNG k-ɛ turbulence model was used to describe the primary flow and particle deposition under three breathing intensity such as 15 L/min, 30 L/min and 60 L/min. The particle is tracked and analyzed in the Lagrangian frame. The velocity fields of airflow under different airflow rates were computed and discussed. In order to study the characteristics of particles movement and the effect of particles diameter on the deposition pattern, eleven kinds of sphere particles with different diameters are selected as research object. The diameters of selected particles as follows: 0.1 μm, 0.5 μm, 1 μm, 2.5 μm, 3 μm, 3.5 μm, 4 μm, 4.5 μm, 5 μm, 6.5 μm and 8 μm. The variation of inhalable particles deposition in realistic human upper respiratory tract with respiratory intensity and particle size was researched and compared. Furthermore, the more real inhalable particles with Rosin-Rammler mass distribution are used to study the effect of particles size. The deposition rate of particles with the different diameter scope in the different part of upper respiratory tract was summarized. The geometrical model based images technology promises to provide more real results of airflow field and particle deposition in the URT.

  10. Smoothing of geoelectrical resistivity profiles in order to build a 3D model: A case study from an outcropping limestone block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Krisztina; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    Geoelectrical imaging is one of the most common survey methods in the field of shallow geophysics. In order to get information from the subsurface electric current is induced into the ground. In our summer camp organized by the Department of Geophysics and Space Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University we have carried out resistivity surveys to get more accurate information about the lithology of the Dorog basin located in the Transdanubian range, Middle Hungary. This study focused on the outcropping limestone block located next to the village Leányvár in the Dorog basin. The main aim of the research is the impoundment of the subsurface continuation of the limestone outcrop. Cable problems occurred during field survey therefore the dataset obtained by the measurement have become very noisy thus we had to gain smoothed data with the appropriate editing steps. The goal was to produce an optimized model to demonstrate the reality beneath the subsurface. In order to achieve better results from the noisy dataset we changed some parameters based on the description of the program. Whereas cable problems occurred we exterminated the bad datum points visually and statistically as well. Because of the noisiness we increased the value of the so called damping factor which is a variable parameter in the equation used by the inversion routine responsible for smoothing the data. The limitation of the range of model resistivity values based on our knowledge about geological environment was also necessary in order to avoid physically unrealistic results. The purpose of the modification was to obtain smoothed and more interpretable geoelectric profiles. The geological background combined with the explanation of the profiles gave us the approximate location of the block. In the final step of the research we created a 3D model with proper location and smoothed resistivity data included. This study was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized

  11. 3D Unsteady Multiphase Simulation of Uranium Tetrafluoride Particle Fluorination in Fluidized Bed Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konan, N. A.; Neau, H.; Simonin, O.; Dupoizat, M.; Le Geaziou, T.

    This paper investigates Eulerian simulation approach of uranium hexafluoride production in fluidized bed pilot. Mass transfer is modeled by using the shrinking particle model. The model successfully predicts expected amount of uranium hexafluoride. As heat transfers with wall are neglected, temperature increases within the reactor and there is no gradient in wall-normal direction of reactor. External diffusion model of reactive gas around particle is developed. Effect of fluorine diffusion within nitrogen is found to be negligible under the simulation conditions. Moreover, inter-particle radiative heat transfer between particles of dense phase in the bed is investigated in the frame of Rosseland approximation.

  12. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  13. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for water wave propagation in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidvar, Pourya; Norouzi, Hossein; Zarghami, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to simulate the propagation of waves in an intermediate depth water channel. The major advantage of using SPH is that no special treatment of the free surface is required, which is advantageous for simulating highly nonlinear flows with possible wave breaking. The SPH method has an option of different formulations with their own advantages and drawbacks to be implemented. Here, we apply the classical and Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) formulation for wave propagation in a water channel. The classical SPH should come with an artificial viscosity which stabilizes the numerical algorithm and increases the accuracy. Here, we will show that the use of classical SPH with an artificial viscosity may cause the waves in the channel to decay. On the other hand, we will show that using the ALE-SPH algorithm with a Riemann solver is more stable, and in addition to producing the pressure fields with much less numerical noise, the waves propagate in the channel without dissipation.

  14. Metal Diffusion in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Martel, Hugo; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to compare different metal mixing models. In particular, we examine the role of diffusion in the production of enriched outflows and in determining the metallicity distributions of gas and stars. We investigate different diffusion strengths by changing the pre-factor of the diffusion coefficient, by varying how the diffusion coefficient is calculated from the local velocity distribution, and by varying whether the speed of sound is included as a velocity term. Stronger diffusion produces a tighter [O/Fe]-[Fe/H] distribution in the gas and cuts off the gas metallicity distribution function at lower metallicities. Diffusion suppresses the formation of low-metallicity stars, even with weak diffusion, and also strips metals from enriched outflows. This produces a remarkably tight correlation between “metal mass-loading” (mean metal outflow rate divided by mean metal production rate) and the strength of diffusion, even when the diffusion coefficient is calculated in different ways. The effectiveness of outflows at removing metals from dwarf galaxies and the metal distribution of the gas is thus dependent on the strength of diffusion. By contrast, we show that the metallicities of stars are not strongly dependent on the strength of diffusion, provided that some diffusion is present.

  15. SPHGal: smoothed particle hydrodynamics with improved accuracy for galaxy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Moster, Benjamin P.; Oser, Ludwig

    2014-09-01

    We present the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) implementation SPHGal, which combines some recently proposed improvements in GADGET. This includes a pressure-entropy formulation with a Wendland kernel, a higher order estimate of velocity gradients, a modified artificial viscosity switch with a modified strong limiter, and artificial conduction of thermal energy. With a series of idealized hydrodynamic tests, we show that the pressure-entropy formulation is ideal for resolving fluid mixing at contact discontinuities but performs conspicuously worse at strong shocks due to the large entropy discontinuities. Including artificial conduction at shocks greatly improves the results. In simulations of Milky Way like disc galaxies a feedback-induced instability develops if too much artificial viscosity is introduced. Our modified artificial viscosity scheme prevents this instability and shows efficient shock capturing capability. We also investigate the star formation rate and the galactic outflow. The star formation rates vary slightly for different SPH schemes while the mass loading is sensitive to the SPH scheme and significantly reduced in our favoured implementation. We compare the accretion behaviour of the hot halo gas. The formation of cold blobs, an artefact of simple SPH implementations, can be eliminated efficiently with proper fluid mixing, either by conduction and/or by using a pressure-entropy formulation.

  16. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, T. S.; Price, D. J.; Federrath, C.

    2016-05-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small- scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of starforming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning method may be used to achieve ∇ • B = 0 to machine precision, albeit at significant computational expense.

  17. Metal Diffusion in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, David; Martel, Hugo; Kawata, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    We perform a series of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to compare different metal mixing models. In particular, we examine the role of diffusion in the production of enriched outflows and in determining the metallicity distributions of gas and stars. We investigate different diffusion strengths by changing the pre-factor of the diffusion coefficient, by varying how the diffusion coefficient is calculated from the local velocity distribution, and by varying whether the speed of sound is included as a velocity term. Stronger diffusion produces a tighter [O/Fe]–[Fe/H] distribution in the gas and cuts off the gas metallicity distribution function at lower metallicities. Diffusion suppresses the formation of low-metallicity stars, even with weak diffusion, and also strips metals from enriched outflows. This produces a remarkably tight correlation between “metal mass-loading” (mean metal outflow rate divided by mean metal production rate) and the strength of diffusion, even when the diffusion coefficient is calculated in different ways. The effectiveness of outflows at removing metals from dwarf galaxies and the metal distribution of the gas is thus dependent on the strength of diffusion. By contrast, we show that the metallicities of stars are not strongly dependent on the strength of diffusion, provided that some diffusion is present.

  18. Dual-wavelength digital holography for 3D particle image velocimetry: experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Grare, S; Allano, D; Coëtmellec, S; Perret, G; Corbin, F; Brunel, M; Gréhan, G; Lebrun, D

    2016-01-20

    A multi-exposure digital in-line hologram of a particle field is recorded by two successive pulses of different wavelengths. During the reconstruction step, each recording can be independently analyzed by selecting a given wavelength. This procedure enables avoiding the superimposition of particle images that may be close to each other.

  19. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  20. Form From Projected Shadow (FFPS): An algorithm for 3D shape analysis of sedimentary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro Ríos, Anibal; Sarocchi, Damiano; Nahmad-Molinari, Yuri; Borselli, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present a simple and effective method based on measuring the projected shadow of sedimentary particles by means of a digital image processing algorithm that enables the three principal axes of the particle to be determined from a single 2D color image. The method consists in projecting the shadow of the particle when it is resting on the maximum projection area (“c” axis pointing almost vertical, since in this configuration minimal distance from the center of mass to the floor is achieved minimizing the gravitational potential energy), by means of an oblique incident illumination system. Using HSL (hue-saturation-lightness) color space segmentation, two axes of the particle are measured directly from the maximum projected area. The length of the shadow provides the third axis of the particle. Multiple textured and colored sedimentary particles can be easily segmented from a green background and their corresponding shadows by means of a single space color transformation. This simple method enables the lengths of the three main axes of several particles to be determined at the same time without expensive equipment (the software is provided free by the authors). The axis lengths can span a broad range of sizes, and are measured with low experimental error (less than 5%).

  1. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  2. Developments in digital in-line holography enable validated measurement of 3D particle field dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert

    2013-12-01

    Digital in-line holography is an optical technique which can be applied to measure the size, three-dimensional position, and three-component velocity of disperse particle fields. This work summarizes recent developments at Sandia National Laboratories focused on improvement in measurement accuracy, experimental validation, and applications to multiphase flows. New routines are presented which reduce the uncertainty in measured position along the optical axis to a fraction of the particle diameter. Furthermore, application to liquid atomization highlights the ability to measure complex, three-dimensional structures. Finally, investigation of particles traveling at near sonic conditions prove accuracy despite significant experimental noise due to shock-waves.

  3. An efficient quasi-3D particle tracking-based approach for transport through fractures with application to dynamic dispersion calculation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichun; Cardenas, M Bayani

    2015-08-01

    The quantitative study of transport through fractured media has continued for many decades, but has often been constrained by observational and computational challenges. Here, we developed an efficient quasi-3D random walk particle tracking (RWPT) algorithm to simulate solute transport through natural fractures based on a 2D flow field generated from the modified local cubic law (MLCL). As a reference, we also modeled the actual breakthrough curves (BTCs) through direct simulations with the 3D advection-diffusion equation (ADE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The RWPT algorithm along with the MLCL accurately reproduced the actual BTCs calculated with the 3D ADE. The BTCs exhibited non-Fickian behavior, including early arrival and long tails. Using the spatial information of particle trajectories, we further analyzed the dynamic dispersion process through moment analysis. From this, asymptotic time scales were determined for solute dispersion to distinguish non-Fickian from Fickian regimes. This analysis illustrates the advantage and benefit of using an efficient combination of flow modeling and RWPT. PMID:26042625

  4. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3D, EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, O.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Neubert, T.

    1993-01-01

    The results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a three dimensional, electromagnetic (EM) particle code are presented. Hitherto such global simulations were done with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes while lower dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. The kinetic model combines macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equations and the Lorentz equation for particles. The preliminary results are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn to dusk asymmetries.

  5. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present here our first results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a new three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code. Hitherto such global simulations were done with MHD codes while lower-dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. Our kinetic model attempts to combine the macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equation and the Lorentz equation for particles, which are ideally suited for computers. The preliminary results shown here are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn-dusk asymmetries.

  6. Fabrication of a three dimensional particle focusing microfluidic device using a 3D printer, PDMS, and glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, Robyn; Rosen, Daniel; Shirk, Kathryn

    Microfluidic devices have high importance in fields such as bioanalysis because they can manipulate volumes of fluid in the range of microliters to picoliters. Small samples can be quickly and easily tested using complex microfluidic devices. Typically, these devices are created through lithography techniques, which can be costly and time consuming. It has been shown that inexpensive microfluidic devices can be produced quickly using a 3D printer and PDMS. However, a size limitation prohibits the fabrication of precisely controlled microchannels. By using shrinking materials in combination with 3D printing of flow-focusing geometries, this limitation can be overcome. This research seeks to employ these techniques to quickly fabricate an inexpensive, working device with three dimensional particle focusing capabilities. By modifying the channel geometry, colloidal particles in a solution will be focused into a single beam when passed through this device. The ability to focus particles is necessary for a variety of biological applications which requires precise detection and characterization of particles in a sample. We would like to thank the Shippensburg University Undergraduate Research Grant Program for their generous funding.

  7. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  8. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  9. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array.

    PubMed

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-08-16

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams.

  10. Gravity driven deterministic lateral displacement for suspended particles in a 3D obstacle array

    PubMed Central

    Du, Siqi; Drazer, German

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple modification to enhance the separation ability of deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) systems by expanding the two-dimensional nature of these devices and driving the particles into size-dependent, fully three-dimensional trajectories. Specifically, we drive the particles through an array of long cylindrical posts, such that they not only move parallel to the basal plane of the posts as in traditional two-dimensional DLD systems (in-plane motion), but also along the axial direction of the solid posts (out-of-plane motion). We show that the (projected) in-plane motion of the particles is completely analogous to that observed in 2D-DLD systems. In fact, a theoretical model originally developed for force-driven, two-dimensional DLD systems accurately describes the experimental results. More importantly, we analyze the particles out-of-plane motion and observe, for certain orientations of the driving force, significant differences in the out-of-plane displacement depending on particle size. Therefore, taking advantage of both the in-plane and out-of-plane motion of the particles, it is possible to achieve the simultaneous fractionation of a polydisperse suspension into multiple streams. PMID:27526935

  11. Efficient generation of smooth muscle cells from adipose-derived stromal cells by 3D mechanical stimulation can substitute the use of growth factors in vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A M; Poot, André A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Occluding artery disease causes a high demand for bioartificial replacement vessels. We investigated the combined use of biodegradable and creep-free poly (1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with smooth muscle cells (SMC) derived by biochemical or mechanical stimulation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC) to engineer bioartificial arteries. Biochemical induction of cultured ASC to SMC was done with TGF-β1 for 7d. Phenotype and function were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunodetection and collagen contraction assays. The influence of mechanical stimulation on non-differentiated and pre-differentiated ASC, loaded in porous tubular PTMC scaffolds, was assessed after culturing under pulsatile flow for 14d. Assays included qRT-PCR, production of extracellular matrix and scanning electron microscopy. ASC adhesion and TGF-β1-driven differentiation to contractile SMC on PTMC did not differ from tissue culture polystyrene controls. Mesenchymal and SMC markers were increased compared to controls. Interestingly, pre-differentiated ASC had only marginal higher contractility than controls. Moreover, in 3D PTMC scaffolds, mechanical stimulation yielded well-aligned ASC-derived SMC which deposited ECM. Under the same conditions, pre-differentiated ASC-derived SMC maintained their SMC phenotype. Our results show that mechanical stimulation can replace TGF-β1 pre-stimulation to generate SMC from ASC and that pre-differentiated ASC keep their SMC phenotype with increased expression of SMC markers.

  12. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ~90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection.Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic

  13. Soot particle size modelling in 3D simulations of diesel engine combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraioli, V.; Beatrice, C.; Lazzaro, M.

    2011-12-01

    The present work is focused on multi-dimensional simulations of combustion in diesel engines. The primary objective was to test, in a diesel engine framework, a soot particle size model to represent the carbon particle formation and calculate the corresponding size distribution function. Simulations are performed by means of a parallel version of the KIVA3V numerical code, modified to adopt detailed kinetics reaction mechanisms. A skeletal reaction scheme for n-heptane autoignition has been extended, to include PAH kinetics and carbonaceous particle formation and consumption rates: the full reaction set is made up of 82 gas species and 50 species accounting for the particles, thus the complete reaction scheme comprises 132 species and 2206 reaction steps. Four different engine operative conditions, varying engine speed and load, are taken into account and experimentally tested on a single cylinder diesel engine fuelling pure n-heptane. Computed particle size distribution functions are compared with corresponding measurements at the exhaust, performed by a differential mobility spectrometer. A satisfying agreement between computed and measured combustion profiles is obtained in all the conditions. A reasonable aerosol evolution can be obtained, yet in all the cases the model exhibits the tendency to overestimate the number of particles within the range 5-160 nm. Moreover calculations predict a nucleation mode not detected by the available instrument. According to the simulations, the total number and size of the nascent particles would not depend on the operative conditions, while the features of the larger aggregates distinctly vary with the engine functioning.

  14. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D anlaysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bielewski, M; Eriksson, M; Himbert, J; Simon, R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T F

    2007-11-27

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal {micro}-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 {micro}m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  15. Parallel 3-D Electromagnetic Particle Code Using High Performance FORTRAN: Parallel TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D.; Li, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; et al.

    A three-dimensional full electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC ) code, TRISTAN (Tridimensional Stanford) code, has been parallelized using High Performance Fortran (HPF) as a RPM (Real Parallel Machine). In the parallelized HPF code, the simulation domain is decomposed in one-dimension, and both the particle and field data located in each domain that we call the sub-domain are distributed on each processor. Both the particle and field data on a sub-domain are needed by the neighbor sub-domains and thus communications between the sub-domains are inevitable. Our simulation results using HPF exhibit the promising applicability of the HPF communications to a large scale scientific computing such as solar wind-magnetosphere interactions.

  16. The giant impact simulations with density independent smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Natsuki; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro; Genda, Hidenori; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-06-01

    At present, the giant impact (GI) is the most widely accepted model for the origin of the Moon. Most of the numerical simulations of GI have been carried out with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Recently, however, it has been pointed out that standard formulation of SPH (SSPH) has difficulties in the treatment of a contact discontinuity such as a core-mantle boundary and a free surface such as a planetary surface. This difficulty comes from the assumption of differentiability of density in SSPH. We have developed an alternative formulation of SPH, density independent SPH (DISPH), which is based on differentiability of pressure instead of density to solve the problem of a contact discontinuity. In this paper, we report the results of the GI simulations with DISPH and compare them with those obtained with SSPH. We found that the disk properties, such as mass and angular momentum produced by DISPH is different from that of SSPH. In general, the disks formed by DISPH are more compact: while formation of a smaller mass moon for low-oblique impacts is expected with DISPH, inhibition of ejection would promote formation of a larger mass moon for high-oblique impacts. Since only the improvement of core-mantle boundary significantly affects the properties of circumplanetary disks generated by GI and DISPH has not been significantly improved from SSPH for a free surface, we should be very careful when some conclusions are drawn from the numerical simulations for GI. And it is necessary to develop the numerical hydrodynamical scheme for GI that can properly treat the free surface as well as the contact discontinuity.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Interacting Stellar Winds Model Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Li, P. S.; Kwok, S.

    1997-12-01

    In the past decade, the Interacting Stellar Winds (ISW) model has been shown to be successful in explaining the formation of planetary nebulae, Wolf-Rayet nebulae, slow novae, and supernovae. Since analytical methods applied to the ISW model have been limited to the spherical symmetric (1D) geometry, numerical methods are necessary for axisymmetric (2D) or arbitrary (3D) geometries, such as the study of formation and evolution of planetary nebulae, and for symbiotic nova outbursts. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) algorithm has been developed to study hydrodynamics using the particle method. This algorithm has been applied in many different fields successfully. In this paper, we apply the SPH algorithm using the TREE code to the problem of interacting winds dynamics. We present three simulations: (1) the interaction of two winds in spherical symmetry to demonstrate the validity of the algorithm in dealing with ISW modeling, (2) the formation and evolution of an axisymmetric nebula in the first 500 years, and (3) the interacting-colliding winds caused by a slow nova outburst in a symbiotic system. It is the first time that the SPH algorithm has been applied to an ISW simulation. The SPH algorithm is proved to be an accurate and powerful tool in studying ISW model. This work is supported by NASA's US ISO program and the University of Calgary.

  18. Energy loss of a heavy particle near 3D charged rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider a charged rotating black hole in three dimensions with a scalar charge and discuss the energy loss of a heavy particle moving near the black-hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find the dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge increases the energy loss.

  19. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  20. Particle size distribution of cataclastic fault materials from Southern California: A 3-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin-Ji; Sammis, Charles G.

    1994-03-01

    The particle size distributions of fault gouge from the San Andreas, the San Gabriel, and the Lopez Canyon faults in Southern California were measured using sieving and Coulter-Counter techniques over a range of particle sizes from 2 μm to 16 mm. The distributions were found to be power law (fractal) for the smaller fragments and log-normal by mass for sizes near and above the peak size. The apparent fractal dimension D of the smaller particles in gouge samples from the San Andreas fault, the San Gabriel fault and the Lopez Canyon gouge were 2.4 3.6, 2.6 2.9 and 2.4 3.0, respectively. The average D for the Lopez Canyon gouge was 2.7±0.2, which is in agreement with earlier studies of this gouge using planar 2-D sections. The fractal dimension of the finer fragments from all three faults is observed to be correlated with the peak fragment size, with finer gouges tending to have a larger D. A computer automaton is used to show that this observation may be explained as resulting from a fragmentation process which has a “grinding limit” at which particle reduction stops.

  1. Cosmic Ray and Solar Energetic Particle Observations In The 3-d Heliosphere Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    Observations from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope during Ulysses recent fast lat- itude scan have provided the first latitudinal survey of intensities of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles near solar maximum. During the previous fast latitude scan near solar minimum, no significant solar energetic particle events were observed, but the galactic and anomalous component cosmic ray intensities showed small positive latitudinal gradients organized around a southwardly displaced heliospheric current sheet. The small size of the gradients, together with observation near the poles of 26-day intensity variations impressed by near-equatorial CIR-structures, led to the conclusion that latitudinal transport across the mean Parker spiral magnetic fields was much easier than had been expected prior to Ulysses observations. During the recently completed fast latitude scan near solar maximum, galactic cosmic rays could be ob- served only occasionally in the quiet times between frequent solar energetic particle events. When cosmic ray intensities could be observed, no measurable latitude gradi- ents were found, implying that modulation became much more spherically symmetric near solar maximum. From observations of the solar energetic particle intensities, we found that almost all large gradual events produced intensity increases both at Ulysses and at IMP-8 near Earth, regardless of the latitude or longitude of the spacecrafts relative to the initiating event in the corona. Most often the intensities at Ulysses and IMP-8 became comparable a few days after the onset of the event and remained nearly equal for the rest of the decay, which in some cases lasted as much as a full solar rota- tion. Both the cosmic ray and the solar energetic particle observations imply efficient latitudinal and cross-field transport of energetic particles even in the complex inter- planetary magnetic fields of solar maximum. Recent observations suggest that the solar polar coronal holes have

  2. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  3. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  4. Particle sedimentation in curved tubes: A 3D simulation and optimization for treatment of vestibular vertigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Squires, Todd M.; Hain, Timothy C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical disorder of the vestibular system where micron-size crystals abnormally drift into the semicircular canals of the inner ear that sense angular motion of the head. Sedimentation of these crystals causes sensation of motion after true head motion has stopped: vertigo results. The usual clinical treatment is through a series of head maneuvers designed to move the particles into a less sensitive region of the canal system. We present a three-dimensional model to simulate treatment of BPPV by determining the complete hydrodynamic motion of the particles through the course of a therapeutic maneuver while using a realistic representation of the actual geometry. Analyses of clinical maneuvers show the parameter range for which they are effective, and indicate inefficiencies in current practice. In addition, an optimization process determines the most effective head maneuver, which significantly differs from those currently in practice.

  5. 3D map of the plant photosystem II supercomplex obtained by cryoelectron microscopy and single particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Nield, J; Orlova, E V; Morris, E P; Gowen, B; van Heel, M; Barber, J

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the first 3D structure of the photosystem II (PSII) supercomplex of higher plants, constructed by single particle analysis of images obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This large multisubunit membrane protein complex functions to absorb light energy and catalyze the oxidation of water and reduction of plastoquinone. The resolution of the 3D structure is 24 A and emphasizes the dimeric nature of the supercomplex. The extrinsic proteins of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) are readily observed as a tetrameric cluster bound to the lumenal surface. By considering higher resolution data, obtained from electron crystallography, it has been possible to relate the binding sites of the OEC proteins with the underlying intrinsic membrane subunits of the photochemical reaction center core. The model suggests that the 33 kDa OEC protein is located towards the CP47/D2 side of the reaction center but is also positioned over the C-terminal helices of the D1 protein including its CD lumenal loop. In contrast, the model predicts that the 23/17 kDa OEC proteins are positioned at the N-terminus of the D1 protein incorporating the AB lumenal loop of this protein and two other unidentified transmembrane helices. Overall the 3D model represents a significant step forward in revealing the structure of the photosynthetic OEC whose activity is required to sustain the aerobic atmosphere on our planet.

  6. Steady flow of smooth, inelastic particles on a bumpy inclined plane: hard and soft particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anurag; Khakhar, D V

    2010-04-01

    We study smooth, slightly inelastic particles flowing under gravity on a bumpy inclined plane using event-driven and discrete-element simulations. Shallow layers (ten particle diameters) are used to enable simulation using the event-driven method within reasonable computational times. Steady flows are obtained in a narrow range of angles (13 degrees-14.5 degrees); lower angles result in stopping of the flow and higher angles in continuous acceleration. The flow is relatively dense with the solid volume fraction, nu approximately 0.5 , and significant layering of particles is observed. We derive expressions for the stress, heat flux, and dissipation for the hard and soft particle models from first principles. The computed mean velocity, temperature, stress, dissipation, and heat flux profiles of hard particles are compared to soft particle results for different values of stiffness constant (k). The value of stiffness constant for which results for hard and soft particles are identical is found to be k>or=2x10(6) mg/d, where m is the mass of a particle, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and d is the particle diameter. We compare the simulation results to constitutive relations obtained from the kinetic theory of Jenkins and Richman [J. T. Jenkins and M. W. Richman, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 87, 355 (1985)] for pressure, dissipation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. We find that all the quantities are very well predicted by kinetic theory for volume fractions nu<0.5. At higher densities, obtained for thicker layers (H=15d and H=20d), the kinetic theory does not give accurate prediction. Deviations of the kinetic theory predictions from simulation results are relatively small for dissipation and heat flux and most significant deviations are observed for shear viscosity and pressure. The results indicate the range of applicability of soft particle simulations and kinetic theory for dense flows.

  7. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  8. Physical viscosity in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker

    2006-09-01

    Most hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation carried out to date have tried to model the cosmic gas as an ideal, inviscid fluid, where only a small amount of (unwanted) numerical viscosity is present, arising from practical limitations of the numerical method employed, and with a strength that depends on numerical resolution. However, the physical viscosity of the gas in hot galaxy clusters may in fact not be negligible, suggesting that a self-consistent treatment that accounts for the internal gas friction would be more appropriate. To allow such simulations using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, we derive a novel SPH formulation of the Navier-Stokes and general heat transfer equations and implement them in the GADGET-2 code. We include both shear and bulk viscosity stress tensors, as well as saturation criteria that limit viscous stress transport where appropriate. Our scheme integrates consistently into the entropy and energy conserving formulation of SPH employed by the code. Using a number of simple hydrodynamical test problems, e.g. the flow of a viscous fluid through a pipe, we demonstrate the validity of our implementation. Adopting Braginskii parametrization for the shear viscosity of hot gaseous plasmas, we then study the influence of viscosity on the interplay between AGN-inflated bubbles and the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM). We find that certain bubble properties like morphology, maximum clustercentric radius reached or survival time depend quite sensitively on the assumed level of viscosity. Interestingly, the sound waves launched into the ICM by the bubble injection are damped by physical viscosity, establishing a non-local heating process. However, we find that the associated heating is rather weak due to the overall small energy content of the sound waves. Finally, we carry out cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation with a viscous ICM. We find that the presence of physical viscosity induces new

  9. Investigating the global collapse of filaments using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of cold, uniform density, self-gravitating filaments, to investigate their longitudinal collapse time-scales; these time-scales are important because they determine the time available for a filament to fragment into cores. A filament is initially characterized by its line-mass, μO, its radius, RO (or equivalently its density ρ O= μ O/π RO^2), and its aspect ratio, AO (≡ZO/RO, where ZO is its half-length). The gas is only allowed to contract longitudinally, i.e. parallel to the symmetry axis of the filament (the z-axis). Pon et al. (2012) have considered the global dynamics of such filaments analytically. They conclude that short filaments (AO ≲ 5) collapse along the z-axis more-or-less homologously, on a time-scale tHOM ˜ 0.44 AO (GρO)-1/2; in contrast, longer filaments (AO ≳ 5) undergo end-dominated collapse, i.e. two dense clumps form at the ends of the filament and converge on the centre sweeping up mass as they go, on a time-scale t_{END} ˜ 0.98 AO^{1/2} (Gρ O)^{-1/2}. Our simulations do not corroborate these predictions. First, for all AO ≳ 2, the collapse time satisfies a single equation t_{COL}˜ (0.49+0.26AO)(Gρ O)^{-1/2}, which for large AO is much longer than the Pon et al. prediction. Secondly, for all AO ≳ 2, the collapse is end-dominated. Thirdly, before being swept up, the gas immediately ahead of an end-clump is actually accelerated outwards by the gravitational attraction of the approaching clump, resulting in a significant ram pressure. For high aspect ratio filaments, the end-clumps approach an asymptotic inward speed, due to the fact that they are doing work both accelerating and compressing the gas they sweep up. Pon et al. appear to have neglected the outward acceleration and its consequences.

  10. Measurement of 3D-forces on a Micro Particle in Acoustofluidic Devices Using an Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Dual, Jurg

    Here, we use a calibrated high gradient laser trap to directly measure the total time-averaged 3D force on a dielectric silica parti- cle in the regime of an ultrasonic standing wave. Acoustic radiation and acoustic streaming apply forces on an optically trapped particle within an acoustofluidic device. From measuring the induced displacements from the laser trap center in three dimen- sions the acoustic forces (0.2-50pN) can be calculated in dependence of the particle position and excitation frequency. Thus, the real pressure distributions within acoustofluidic devices can be mapped out. The three dimensional direct measurement, as pre- sented here, opens up the possibility to quantify so far inaccessible small scale phenomena such as the effects of: a.) local and global acoustic streaming, and b.) boundaries or close-by objects.

  11. Robust and highly performant ring detection algorithm for 3d particle tracking using 2d microscope imaging

    PubMed Central

    Afik, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle tracking is an essential tool in studying dynamics under the microscope, namely, fluid dynamics in microfluidic devices, bacteria taxis, cellular trafficking. The 3d position can be determined using 2d imaging alone by measuring the diffraction rings generated by an out-of-focus fluorescent particle, imaged on a single camera. Here I present a ring detection algorithm exhibiting a high detection rate, which is robust to the challenges arising from ring occlusion, inclusions and overlaps, and allows resolving particles even when near to each other. It is capable of real time analysis thanks to its high performance and low memory footprint. The proposed algorithm, an offspring of the circle Hough transform, addresses the need to efficiently trace the trajectories of many particles concurrently, when their number in not necessarily fixed, by solving a classification problem, and overcomes the challenges of finding local maxima in the complex parameter space which results from ring clusters and noise. Several algorithmic concepts introduced here can be advantageous in other cases, particularly when dealing with noisy and sparse data. The implementation is based on open-source and cross-platform software packages only, making it easy to distribute and modify. It is implemented in a microfluidic experiment allowing real-time multi-particle tracking at 70 Hz, achieving a detection rate which exceeds 94% and only 1% false-detection. PMID:26329642

  12. Laboratory-based characterization of plutonium in soil particles using micro-XRF and 3D confocal XRF

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Patterson, Brian M.; Havrilla, George Joseph

    2015-03-29

    The investigation of plutonium (Pu) in a soil matrix is of interest in safeguards, nuclear forensics, and environmental remediation activities. The elemental composition of two plutonium contaminated soil particles was characterized nondestructively using a pair of micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) techniques including high resolution X-ray (hiRX) and 3D confocal XRF. The three dimensional elemental imaging capability of confocal XRF permitted the identification two distinct Pu particles within the samples: one external to the Ferich soil matrix and another co-located with Cu within the soil matrix. The size and morphology of the particles was assessed with X-ray transmission microscopy and micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) providing complementary morphological information. Limits of detection for a 30 μm Pu particle are <10 ng for each of the XRF techniques. Ultimately, this study highlights the capability for lab-based, nondestructive, spatially resolved characterization of heterogeneous matrices on the micrometer scale with nanogram sensitivity.

  13. Laboratory-based characterization of plutonium in soil particles using micro-XRF and 3D confocal XRF

    DOE PAGES

    McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Cordes, Nikolaus Lynn; Patterson, Brian M.; Havrilla, George Joseph

    2015-03-29

    The investigation of plutonium (Pu) in a soil matrix is of interest in safeguards, nuclear forensics, and environmental remediation activities. The elemental composition of two plutonium contaminated soil particles was characterized nondestructively using a pair of micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (micro-XRF) techniques including high resolution X-ray (hiRX) and 3D confocal XRF. The three dimensional elemental imaging capability of confocal XRF permitted the identification two distinct Pu particles within the samples: one external to the Ferich soil matrix and another co-located with Cu within the soil matrix. The size and morphology of the particles was assessed with X-ray transmission microscopy andmore » micro X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) providing complementary morphological information. Limits of detection for a 30 μm Pu particle are <10 ng for each of the XRF techniques. Ultimately, this study highlights the capability for lab-based, nondestructive, spatially resolved characterization of heterogeneous matrices on the micrometer scale with nanogram sensitivity.« less

  14. Numerical modeling of debris flow runout for a case in southwestern China with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Anika; Cuomo, Sabatino; Wang, Xueliang; Zhang, Luqing

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows and landslide dams are a major natural hazard causing high socioeconomic risk in inhabited mountainous areas. This is also true for vast parts of southwestern China, which are highly prone to slope failures due to several factors, such as a humid climate with high precipitation in the summer months, geological predisposing factors with highly weathered sedimentary rocks and a high seismicity. Not only do the landslides and flooding related to landslide dams threaten residents, buildings and transportation structures, but also do flooding conditions endanger power supply, which relies in this region partly on hydropower. In order to assess the potential of landslides to block rivers, it is crucial to understand which factors influence possible run-out distances and how they can be quantified. In the study we are presenting a numerical modeling analysis for a particular case of a complex landslide in Ningnan county, southwestern China, which transformed into a debris flow and blocked the river and the major road leading through the valley after heavy rainfall. For this purpose a quasi-3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model was implemented that can account for geotechnical slope parameters, run-out distance, velocities and deposition heights. A digital terrain model and the geometry information of the landslide were used as input data in order to estimate the relevant geotechnical parameters by back-analysis. The results of the analysis can be used for the prediction of run-out distances for future events at this site and other similar sites.

  15. How smooth are particle trajectories in a ΛCDM Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampf, Cornelius; Villone, Barbara; Frisch, Uriel

    2015-09-01

    It is shown here that in a flat, cold dark matter (CDM)-dominated Universe with positive cosmological constant (Λ), modelled in terms of a Newtonian and collisionless fluid, particle trajectories are analytical in time (representable by a convergent Taylor series) until at least a finite time after decoupling. The time variable used for this statement is the cosmic scale factor, i.e. the `a-time', and not the cosmic time. For this, a Lagrangian-coordinate formulation of the Euler-Poisson equations is employed, originally used by Cauchy for 3D incompressible flow. Temporal analyticity for ΛCDM is found to be a consequence of novel explicit all-order recursion relations for the a-time Taylor coefficients of the Lagrangian displacement field, from which we derive the convergence of the a-time Taylor series. A lower bound for the a-time where analyticity is guaranteed and shell-crossing is ruled out is obtained, whose value depends only on Λ and on the initial spatial smoothness of the density field. The largest time interval is achieved when Λ vanishes, i.e. for an Einstein-de Sitter universe. Analyticity holds also if, instead of the a-time, one uses the linear structure growth D-time, but no simple recursion relations are then obtained. The analyticity result also holds when a curvature term is included in the Friedmann equation for the background, but inclusion of a radiation term arising from the primordial era spoils analyticity.

  16. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  17. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  18. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TK<μ . For 1D, there is, in addition, a sizable intermediate-J regime where the Kondo temperature is quadratic in J due to the diverging density of states at the band edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square

  19. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  20. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE PAGES

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  1. Nonlinear Evolution of a 3D Inertial Alfvén Wave and Its Implication in Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation based on a pseudo-spectral method has been performed in order to study particle acceleration. A model for the acceleration of charged particles by field localization is developed for the low-β plasma. For this purpose, a fractional diffusion approach has been employed. The nonlinear interaction between a 3D inertial Alfvén wave and a slow magnetosonic wave has been examined, and the dynamical equations of these two waves in the presence of ponderomotive nonlinearity have been solved numerically. The nonlinear evolution of the inertial Alfvén wave in the presence of slow magnetosonic wave undergoes a filamentation instability and results in field intensity localization. The results obtained show the localization and power spectrum of inertial Alfvén wave due to nonlinear coupling. The scaling obtained after the first break point of the magnetic power spectrum has been used to calculate the formation of the thermal tail of energetic particles in the solar corona.

  2. Tightly coupled low cost 3D RISS/GPS integration using a mixture particle filter for vehicular navigation.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2011-01-01

    Satellite navigation systems such as the global positioning system (GPS) are currently the most common technique used for land vehicle positioning. However, in GPS-denied environments, there is an interruption in the positioning information. Low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based inertial sensors can be integrated with GPS and enhance the performance in denied GPS environments. The traditional technique for this integration problem is Kalman filtering (KF). Due to the inherent errors of low-cost MEMS inertial sensors and their large stochastic drifts, KF, with its linearized models, has limited capabilities in providing accurate positioning. Particle filtering (PF) was recently suggested as a nonlinear filtering technique to accommodate for arbitrary inertial sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF called the Mixture PF is utilized in this study to perform tightly coupled integration of a three dimensional (3D) reduced inertial sensors system (RISS) with GPS. In this work, the RISS consists of one single-axis gyroscope and a two-axis accelerometer used together with the vehicle's odometer to obtain 3D navigation states. These sensors are then integrated with GPS in a tightly coupled scheme. In loosely-coupled integration, at least four satellites are needed to provide acceptable GPS position and velocity updates for the integration filter. The advantage of the tightly-coupled integration is that it can provide GPS measurement update(s) even when the number of visible satellites is three or lower, thereby improving the operation of the navigation system in environments with partial blockages by providing continuous aiding to the inertial sensors even during limited GPS satellite availability. To effectively exploit the capabilities of PF, advanced modeling for the stochastic drift of the vertically aligned gyroscope is used. In order to benefit from measurement updates for such drift, which are

  3. Digital-Particle-Image-Velocimetry (DPIV) in a scanning light-sheet: 3D starting flow around a short cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.

    1995-08-01

    Scanning-Particle-Image-Velocimetry Technique (SPIV), introduced by Brücker (1992) and Brücker and Althaus (1992), offers the quantitative investigation of three-dimensional vortical structures in unsteady flows. On principle, this technique combines classical Particle-Image-Velocimetry (PIV) with volume scanning using a scanning light-sheet. In our previous studies, single scans obtained from photographic frame series were evaluated to show the instantaneous vortical structure of the respective flow phenomena. Here, continuous video recordings are processed to capture also the temporal information for the study of the set-up of 3D effects in the cylinder wake. The flow is continuously sampled in depth by the scanning light-sheet and in each of the parallel planes frame-to-frame cross-correlation of the video images (DPIV) is applied to obtain the 2D velocity field. Because the scanning frequency and repetition rate is high in comparison with the characteristic time-scale of the flow, the evaluation provides a complete time-record of the 3D flow during the starting process. With use of the continuity concept as described by Robinson and Rockwell (1993), we obtained in addition the out-of-plane component of the velocity in spanwise direction. This in view, the described technique enabled the reconstruction of the three-dimensional time-dependent velocity and vorticity field. The visualization of the dynamical behaviour of these quantities as, e.g. by video, gave a good impression of the spanwise flow showing the “tornado-like” suction effect of the starting vortices.

  4. SU-E-T-380: Particle Microdosimetry Study Based On 3D-Cylindrical Silicon Radiaton Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiola, C; Carabe-Fernandez, A; Gomez, F; Pellegrini, G; Fleta, C; Quirion, D; Lozano, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A new design of a solid-state-microdetector based on silicon 3D microfabrication and its performance to characterise Lineal energy, Specific Energy, dose, LET and other microdosimetric variables required for modelling particle relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is presented. Methods: A microdosimeter formed by a matrix of independent sensors with well-defined micrometric cylindrical shape and with a volume similar to those of cellular dimensions is used to measure microdosimetric variables. Each sensor measures the radiation deposited energy which, divided by the mean cord length of the sensors, provides us with the Linear Energy (y) of the radiation as well as its energy distribution, and frequencymean. Starting from the these distributions in different points of a proton beam, we generate biophysical data (e.g. Linear Energy Transfer (LET), Specific Energy (z), etc…) needed for relative biological effectiveness (RBE) calculations radiation effect models used in particle radiotherapy treatment planning. In addition, a Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) will be used as baseline to calibrate the “y” magnitude of the microdosimeter unit-cells. Results: The experimental measurements will soon be carried out at the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine (University of Pennsylvania), which provides proton beam for clinical research proposals. The results of distributions measured of the microdosimetric variables from the first tests developed in the proton facility will be presented and compared with Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 code. Conclusion: The use of 3D microdosimeters such as the one presented here will enhance the accuracy of RBE calculations normally affected by the inherent uncertainty of monte carlo simulations due to the approximation of material composition and energy dependent physical laws involved in such calculations. The effect of such approximations will be quatified by comparison with absolute measurement of

  5. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Monaghan, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is verif;ed by simulating Poiseuille flow, plane shear flow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian fluid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, such that the effect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  6. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  7. Particle Trajectory and Icing Analysis of the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Particle trajectory and ice shape calculations were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The particle trajectory and icing computations were performed using the new "block-to-block" collection efficiency method which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for three drop sizes and two drop distributions typically used in aircraft design and certification. Particle trajectory computations were made for water drop sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns. Particle trajectory and ice shape predictions were made for a 20 micron Langmuir-D distribution and for a 92 mm Super-cooled Large Droplet (SLD) distribution with and without splashing effects for a Liquid Water Content (LWC) of 0.3 g/cu m and an icing time of 30 min. The E3 fan and spinner combination proved to be an effective ice removal mechanism as they removed greater than 36 percent of the mass entering the inlet for the icing cases. The maximum free stream catch fraction for the fan and spinner combination was 0.60 while that on the elements downstream of the fan was 0.03. The non-splashing trajectory and collection efficiency results showed that as drop size increased impingement rates increased on the spinner and fan leaving less mass to impinge on downstream components. The SLD splashing case yielded more mass downstream of the fan than the SLD non-splashing case due to mass being splashed from the upstream inlet lip, spinner and fan components. The ice shapes generated downstream of the fan were either small or nonexistent due to the small available mass

  8. Lagrangian 3D particle tracking in high-speed flows: Shake-The-Box for multi-pulse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Matteo; Schanz, Daniel; Reuther, Nico; Kähler, Christian J.; Schröder, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The Shake-The-Box (STB) particle tracking technique, recently introduced for time-resolved 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV) images, is applied here to data from a multi-pulse investigation of a turbulent boundary layer flow with adverse pressure gradient in air at 36 m/s ( Re τ = 10,650). The multi-pulse acquisition strategy allows for the recording of four-pulse long time-resolved sequences with a time separation of a few microseconds. The experimental setup consists of a dual-imaging system and a dual-double-cavity laser emitting orthogonal polarization directions to separate the four pulses. The STB particle triangulation and tracking strategy is adapted here to cope with the limited amount of realizations available along the time sequence and to take advantage of the ghost track reduction offered by the use of two independent imaging systems. Furthermore, a correction scheme to compensate for camera vibrations is discussed, together with a method to accurately identify the position of the wall within the measurement domain. Results show that approximately 80,000 tracks can be instantaneously reconstructed within the measurement volume, enabling the evaluation of both dense velocity fields, suitable for spatial gradients evaluation, and highly spatially resolved boundary layer profiles. Turbulent boundary layer profiles obtained from ensemble averaging of the STB tracks are compared to results from 2D-PIV and long-range micro particle tracking velocimetry; the comparison shows the capability of the STB approach in delivering accurate results across a wide range of scales.

  9. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  10. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide. PMID:23140103

  11. Synthesis of crystalline and amorphous, particle-agglomerated 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides by femtosecond laser and the prediction of these particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivayoganathan, Mugunthan; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2012-11-01

    We report a single step technique of synthesizing particle-agglomerated, amorphous 3-D nanostructures of Al and Si oxides on powder-fused aluminosilicate ceramic plates and a simple novel method of wafer-foil ablation to fabricate crystalline nanostructures of Al and Si oxides at ambient conditions. We also propose a particle size prediction mechanism to regulate the size of vapor-condensed agglomerated nanoparticles in these structures. Size characterization studies performed on the agglomerated nanoparticles of fabricated 3-D structures showed that the size distributions vary with the fluence-to-threshold ratio. The variation in laser parameters leads to varying plume temperature, pressure, amount of supersaturation, nucleation rate, and the growth rate of particles in the plume. The novel wafer-foil ablation technique could promote the possibilities of fabricating oxide nanostructures with varying Al/Si ratio, and the crystallinity of these structures enhances possible applications. The fabricated nanostructures of Al and Si oxides could have great potentials to be used in the fabrication of low power-consuming complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits and in Mn catalysts to enhance the efficiency of oxidation on ethylbenzene to acetophenone in the super-critical carbon dioxide.

  12. Unsteady Analysis of Particle Transport and Deposition in the Human Lung: A Hybrid 3D/0D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Daniel C.; Kunz, Robert F.; Leemhuis, Laura S.; Banks, Syreeta S.; Kriete, Andres

    2003-11-01

    Three-dimensional CFD meshes including up the sixteenth generation of branching in a human tracheo-bronchial tree have been generated from surface data extracted using novel high-resolution bio-medical imaging and rendering methods. A zero-dimensional model for the deeper generations has been coupled with the three-dimensional model at each of the truncated branches. The 0D model imposes a time-varying volume to simulate realistic breathing cycles; it also includes a simple model for particle deposition. The resulting hybrid 3D/0D model has been exercised to compute the transport and deposition rates of particles of different sizes through full breathing cycles. Results are compared to earlier steady-flow CFD results, to results obtained using one-dimensional functional models of the human lung, and to experimental and modeling results for idealized branching-duct configurations. The aim of the research is to develop a virtual human respiratory system that can be used to address issues in pulmonary health in

  13. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude. PMID:26646289

  14. Breakup of Finite-Size Colloidal Aggregates in Turbulent Flow Investigated by Three-Dimensional (3D) Particle Tracking Velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debashish; Babler, Matthaus U; Holzner, Markus; Soos, Miroslav; Lüthi, Beat; Liberzon, Alex; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-01-12

    Aggregates grown in mild shear flow are released, one at a time, into homogeneous isotropic turbulence, where their motion and intermittent breakup is recorded by three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The aggregates have an open structure with a fractal dimension of ∼2.2, and their size is 1.4 ± 0.4 mm, which is large, compared to the Kolmogorov length scale (η = 0.15 mm). 3D-PTV of flow tracers allows for the simultaneous measurement of aggregate trajectories and the full velocity gradient tensor along their pathlines, which enables us to access the Lagrangian stress history of individual breakup events. From this data, we found no consistent pattern that relates breakup to the local flow properties at the point of breakup. Also, the correlation between the aggregate size and both shear stress and normal stress at the location of breakage is found to be weaker, when compared with the correlation between size and drag stress. The analysis suggests that the aggregates are mostly broken due to the accumulation of the drag stress over a time lag on the order of the Kolmogorov time scale. This finding is explained by the fact that the aggregates are large, which gives their motion inertia and increases the time for stress propagation inside the aggregate. Furthermore, it is found that the scaling of the largest fragment and the accumulated stress at breakup follows an earlier established power law, i.e., dfrag ∼ σ(-0.6) obtained from laminar nozzle experiments. This indicates that, despite the large size and the different type of hydrodynamic stress, the microscopic mechanism causing breakup is consistent over a wide range of aggregate size and stress magnitude.

  15. High energy scattering of Dirac particles on smooth potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Nguyen Suan; Dung, Le Anh; Xuan, Nguyen Nhu; Thang, Vu Toan

    2016-08-01

    The derivation of the Glauber type representation for the high energy scattering amplitude of particles of spin 1/2 is given within the framework of the Dirac equation in the Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) representation and two-component formalism. The differential cross-sections on the Yukawa and Gaussian potentials are also considered and discussed.

  16. ADVANCING THE ION BEAM THIN FILM PLANARIZATION PROCESS FOR THE SMOOTHING OF SUBSTRATE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkarimi, P B; Spiller, E; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Stearns, D G; Liddle, J A; Salmassi, F; Liang, T; Stivers, A R

    2004-10-19

    For a number of technologies small substrate contaminants are undesirable, and for one technology in particular, extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), they can be a very serious issue. We have demonstrated that the Ion Beam Thin Film Planarization Process, a coating process designed to planarize substrate asperities, can be extended to smooth {approx}70 nm and {approx}80 nm diameter particles on EUVL reticle substrates to a height of {approx}0.5 nm, which will render them noncritical in an EUVL printing process. We demonstrate this smoothing process using controlled nanoscale substrate particles and lines fabricated with an e-beam lithography process. The above smoothing process was also modified to yield an excellent reflectance/wavelength uniformity and a good EUV reflectivity for the multilayer, which is required for EUVL reticles. Cross-sectional TEM on a smoothed substrate line defect shows excellent agreement with results obtained from our multilayer growth model.

  17. Decoration of Micro-/Nanoscale Noble Metal Particles on 3D Porous Nickel Using Electrodeposition Technique as Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Hang, Tao; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Li, Ming

    2015-07-29

    Micro-/nanoscale noble metal (Ag, Au, and Pt) particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte are fabricated via galvanostatic electrodeposition technique. The developed electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements including Tafel polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is clearly shown that the enlarged real surface area caused by 3D highly porous dendritic structure has greatly reinforced the electrocatalytic activity toward HER. Comparative analysis of electrodeposited Ag, Au, and Pt particle-decorated porous nickel electrodes for HER indicates that both intrinsic property and size of the noble metal particles can lead to distinct catalytic activities. Both nanoscale Au and Pt particles have further reinforcement effect toward HER, whereas microscale Ag particles exhibit the reverse effect. As an effective 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the nanoscale Pt-particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrode demonstrates the highest catalytic activity with an extremely low overpotential of -0.045 V for hydrogen production, a considerable exchange current density of 9.47 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C, and high durability in long-term electrolysis, all of which are attributed to the intrinsic catalytic property and the extremely small size of Pt particles.

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. Volume conservation issues in incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Prapanch; Tomar, Gaurav

    2015-09-01

    A divergence-free velocity field is usually sought in numerical simulations of incompressible fluids. We show that the particle methods that compute a divergence-free velocity field to achieve incompressibility suffer from a volume conservation issue when a finite time-step position update scheme is used. Further, we propose a deformation gradient based approach to arrive at a velocity field that reduces the volume conservation issues in free surface flows and maintains density uniformity in internal flows while retaining the simplicity of first order time updates.

  20. Neumann and Robin boundary conditions for heat conduction modeling using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili Sikarudi, M. A.; Nikseresht, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is a robust Lagrangian particle method which is widely used in various applications, from astrophysics to hydrodynamics and heat conduction. It has intrinsic capabilities for simulating large deformation, composites, multiphysics events, and multiphase fluid flows. It is vital to use reliable boundary conditions when boundary value problems like heat conduction or Poisson equation for incompressible flows are solved. Since smoothed particle hydrodynamics is not a boundary fitted grids method, implementation of boundary conditions can be problematic. Many methods have been proposed for enhancing the accuracy of implementation of boundary conditions. In the present study a new approach for facilitating the implementation of Robin and Neumann boundary conditions is proposed and proven to give accurate results. Also there is no need to use complicated preprocessing as in virtual particle method. The new method is compared to an equivalent one dimensional moving least square scheme and it is shown that the present method is less sensitive to particle disorder.

  1. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  2. Development of a coupled discrete element (DEM)-smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method for polyhedral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassauer, Benjamin; Liedke, Thomas; Kuna, Meinhard

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, the direct coupling of a discrete element method (DEM) with polyhedral particles and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is presented. The two simulation techniques are fully coupled in both ways through interaction forces between the solid DEM particles and the fluid SPH particles. Thus this simulation method provides the possibility to simulate the individual movement of polyhedral, sharp-edged particles as well as the flow field around these particles in fluid-saturated granular matter which occurs in many technical processes e.g. wire sawing, grinding or lapping. The coupled method is exemplified and validated by the simulation of a particle in a shear flow, which shows good agreement with analytical solutions.

  3. Tsunami Simulator Integrating the Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics Method and the Nonlinear Shallow Water Wave Model with High Performance Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, T.; Imamura, F.; Sugawara, D.; Ogasawara, K.; Watanabe, M.; Hirahara, T.

    2014-12-01

    A tsunami simulator integrating a 3-D fluid simulation technology that runs on large-scale parallel computers using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed together with a 2-D tsunami propagation simulation technique using a nonlinear shallow water wave model. We use the 2-D simulation to calculate tsunami propagation of scale of about 1000km from epicenter to near shore. The 3-D SPH method can be used to calculate the water surface and hydraulic force that a tsunami can exert on a building, and to simulate flooding patterns at urban area of at most km scale. With our simulator we can also see three dimensional fluid feature such as complex changes a tsunami undergoes as it interacts with coastal topography or structures. As a result it is hoped that, e.g. , effect of the structures to dissipate waves energy passing over it can be elucidated. The authors utilize the simulator in the third of five fields of the Strategic Programs for Innovative Research, "Advanced Prediction Researches for Natural Disaster Prevention and Reduction," or the theme "Improvement of the tsunami forecasting system on the HPCI computer." The results of tsunami simulation using the K computer will be reported. We are going to apply it to a real problem of the disaster prevention in future.

  4. Ice Particle Transport Analysis With Phase Change for the E(sup 3) Turbofan Engine Using LEWICE3D Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ice Particle trajectory calculations with phase change were made for the Energy Efficient Engine (E(sup 3)) using the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The particle trajectory computations were performed using the new Glenn Ice Particle Phase Change Model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3.2 software. The E(sup 3) was developed by NASA and GE in the early 1980 s as a technology demonstrator and is representative of a modern high bypass turbofan engine. The E(sup 3) flow field was calculated using the NASA Glenn ADPAC turbomachinery flow solver. Computations were performed for the low pressure compressor of the E(sup 3) for a Mach 0.8 cruise condition at 11,887 m assuming a standard warm day for ice particle sizes of 5, 20, and 100 microns and a free stream particle concentration of 0.3 g/cu m. The impingement efficiency results showed that as particle size increased average impingement efficiencies and scoop factors increased for the various components. The particle analysis also showed that the amount of mass entering the inner core decreased with increased particle size because the larger particles were less able to negotiate the turn into the inner core due to particle inertia. The particle phase change analysis results showed that the larger particles warmed less as they were transported through the low pressure compressor. Only the smallest 5 micron particles were warmed enough to produce melting and the amount of melting was relatively small with a maximum average melting fraction of 0.836. The results also showed an appreciable amount of particle sublimation and evaporation for the 5 micron particles entering the engine core (22 percent).

  5. Modeling of liquid-vapor phase change using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Das, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    A model has been proposed based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics to describe gas liquid phase change. Pseudo particles of zero mass are initially placed to locate the interface. Mass generated due to phase change is assigned to the pseudo particles and their positions are updated at intervals to track the mobility of the interface. The developed algorithm has been used to simulate vapor formation around solid spheres both in the absence of gravity and in the normal gravitational field. Finally, bubble growth over a hot horizontal surface due to boiling has been simulated. Simulated results showed good matching with the reported literature.

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of shear-induced powder migration in injection moulding.

    PubMed

    Kauzlarić, David; Pastewka, Lars; Meyer, Hagen; Heldele, Richard; Schulz, Michael; Weber, Oxana; Piotter, Volker; Hausselt, Jürgen; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G

    2011-06-13

    We present the application of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization scheme to Phillips' model for shear-induced particle migration in concentrated suspensions. This model provides an evolution equation for the scalar mean volume fraction of idealized spherical solid particles of equal diameter which is discretized by the SPH formalism. In order to obtain a discrete evolution equation with exact conservation properties we treat in fact the occupied volume of the solid particles as the degree of freedom for the fluid particles. We present simulation results in two- and three-dimensional channel flow. The two-dimensional results serve as a verification by a comparison to analytic solutions. The three-dimensional results are used for a comparison with experimental measurements obtained from computer tomography of injection moulded ceramic microparts. We observe the best agreement of measurements with snapshots of the transient simulation for a ratio D(c)/D(η)=0.1 of the two model parameters. PMID:21536579

  7. Parallel algorithm for transient solid dynamics simulations using finite elements and smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Plimpton, S.J.; Swegle, J.W.; Gardner, D.R.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1997-05-01

    An efficient, scalable, parallel algorithm for treating contacts in solid mechanics has been applied to interactions between particles in smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The algorithm uses three different decompositions within a single timestep: (1) a static FE-decomposition of mesh elements; (2) a dynamic SPH-decomposition of SPH particles; (3) and a dynamic contact-decomposition of contact nodes and SPH particles. The overhead cost of such a scheme is the cost of moving mesh and particle data between the decompositions. This cost turns out to be small in practice, leading to a highly load-balanced decomposition in which to perform each of the three major computational states within a timestep.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Crater Creating Process in Dynamic Replacement Method by Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilewicz, Andrzej; Sikora, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical base of SPH method, including the governing equations, discussion of importance of the smoothing function length, contact formulation, boundary treatment and finally utilization in hydrocode simulations are presented. An application of SPH to a real case of large penetrations (crater creating) into the soil caused by falling mass in Dynamic Replacement Method is discussed. An influence of particles spacing on method accuracy is presented. An example calculated by LS-DYNA software is discussed. Chronological development of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics is presented. Theoretical basics of SPH method stability and consistency in SPH formulation, artificial viscosity and boundary treatment are discussed. Time integration techniques with stability conditions, SPH+FEM coupling, constitutive equation and equation of state (EOS) are presented as well.

  9. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  10. Numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocz, Philip; Succi, Sauro

    2015-05-01

    We formulate a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics numerical method, traditionally used for the Euler equations for fluid dynamics in the context of astrophysical simulations, to solve the nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the Madelung formulation. The probability density of the wave function is discretized into moving particles, whose properties are smoothed by a kernel function. The traditional fluid pressure is replaced by a quantum pressure tensor, for which a robust discretization is found. We demonstrate our numerical method on a variety of numerical test problems involving the simple harmonic oscillator, soliton-soliton collision, Bose-Einstein condensates, collapsing singularities, and dark matter halos governed by the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson equation. Our method is conservative, applicable to unbounded domains, and is automatically adaptive in its resolution, making it well suited to study problems with collapsing solutions.

  11. Neptune: An astrophysical smooth particle hydrodynamics code for massively parallel computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandalski, Stou

    Smooth particle hydrodynamics is an efficient method for modeling the dynamics of fluids. It is commonly used to simulate astrophysical processes such as binary mergers. We present a newly developed GPU accelerated smooth particle hydrodynamics code for astrophysical simulations. The code is named neptune after the Roman god of water. It is written in OpenMP parallelized C++ and OpenCL and includes octree based hydrodynamic and gravitational acceleration. The design relies on object-oriented methodologies in order to provide a flexible and modular framework that can be easily extended and modified by the user. Several pre-built scenarios for simulating collisions of polytropes and black-hole accretion are provided. The code is released under the MIT Open Source license and publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/neptune-sph/.

  12. Fast particles identification in programmable form at level-0 trigger by means of the 3D-Flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Crosetto, Dario B.

    1998-10-30

    The 3D-Flow Processor system is a new, technology-independent concept in very fast, real-time system architectures. Based on either an FPGA or an ASIC implementation, it can address, in a fully programmable manner, applications where commercially available processors would fail because of throughput requirements. Possible applications include filtering-algorithms (pattern recognition) from the input of multiple sensors, as well as moving any input validated by these filtering-algorithms to a single output channel. Both operations can easily be implemented on a 3D-Flow system to achieve a real-time processing system with a very short lag time. This system can be built either with off-the-shelf FPGAs or, for higher data rates, with CMOS chips containing 4 to 16 processors each. The basic building block of the system, a 3D-Flow processor, has been successfully designed in VHDL code written in ''Generic HDL'' (mostly made of reusable blocks that are synthesizable in different technologies, or FPGAs), to produce a netlist for a four-processor ASIC featuring 0.35 micron CBA (Ceil Base Array) technology at 3.3 Volts, 884 mW power dissipation at 60 MHz and 63.75 mm sq. die size. The same VHDL code has been targeted to three FPGA manufacturers (Altera EPF10K250A, ORCA-Lucent Technologies 0R3T165 and Xilinx XCV1000). A complete set of software tools, the 3D-Flow System Manager, equally applicable to ASIC or FPGA implementations, has been produced to provide full system simulation, application development, real-time monitoring, and run-time fault recovery. Today's technology can accommodate 16 processors per chip in a medium size die, at a cost per processor of less than $5 based on the current silicon die/size technology cost.

  13. Crack Propagation in Bi-Material System via Pseudo-Spring Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sukanta; Shaw, Amit

    2014-05-01

    A Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics (SPH) based framework with material constitutive model is developed to simulate crack initiation and propagation in a bi-material system. An efficient immediate neighbor interaction is formulated by connecting neighbors through pseudo-springs. A damage evolution law defines degradation of the inter-neighbor spring forces and corresponding reduced interaction is introduced in mass, momentum, and energy-conserving particle collocation. The proposed technique is validated through a simple test on a pre-notched bi-material system producing a conformal crack path.

  14. Multi-resolution flow simulations by smoothed particle hydrodynamics via domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    We present a methodology to concurrently couple particle-based methods via a domain decomposition (DD) technique for simulating viscous flows. In particular, we select two resolutions of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method as demonstration. Within the DD framework, a simulation domain is decomposed into two (or more) overlapping sub-domains, each of which has an individual particle scale determined by the local flow physics. Consistency of the two sub-domains is achieved in the overlap region by matching the two independent simulations based on Lagrangian interpolation of state variables and fluxes. The domain decomposition based SPH method (DD-SPH) employs different spatial and temporal resolutions, and hence, each sub-domain has its own smoothing length and time step. As a consequence, particle refinement and de-refinement are performed asynchronously according to individual time advancement of each sub-domain. The proposed strategy avoids SPH force interactions between different resolutions on purpose, so that coupling, in principle, can go beyond SPH - SPH, and may allow SPH to be coupled with other mesoscopic or microscopic particle methods. The DD-SPH method is validated first for a transient Couette flow, where simulation results base. US DOE Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4).

  15. Stochastic Multi-Scale Reconstruction of 3D Microstructure Consisting of Polycrystalline Grains and Second-Phase Particles from 2D Micrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaohua; Kirubanandham, Antony; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Jiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D polycrystalline microstructure of a material is crucial to its property prediction, performance optimization, and design. Here, we present a multi-scale computational scheme that allows one to stochastically reconstruct the 3D microstructure of a highly heterogeneous polycrystalline material with large variation in grain size, morphology, and spatial distribution, as well as the distribution of second-phase particles, from single-2D electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) micrograph. Specifically, the two-point correlation functions S 2 are employed to statistically characterize grain morphology, orientation, and spatial distribution and are incorporated into the simulated annealing procedure for microstructure reconstruction. During the reconstruction, the original polycrystalline microstructure is coarsened such that the large grains are reconstructed first and the smaller ones are generated later. The second-phase particles are then inserted into the reconstructed polycrystalline material based on the pair-correlation function g 2 sampled from the 2D back-scattered electron micrograph. The utility of our multi-scale scheme is demonstrated by successfully reconstructing a highly heterogeneous polycrystalline Sn-rich solder joint with Cu6Sn5 intermetallic particles. The accuracy of our reconstruction is ascertained by comparing the virtual microstructure with the actual 3D structure of the joint obtained via serial sectioning techniques.

  16. Towards a fully kinetic 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell model of streamer formation and dynamics in high-pressure electronegative gases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Thoma, C.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Bruner, N.; Rambo, P. K.; Atherton, B. W.

    2011-09-15

    Streamer and leader formation in high pressure devices is dynamic process involving a broad range of physical phenomena. These include elastic and inelastic particle collisions in the gas, radiation generation, transport and absorption, and electrode interactions. Accurate modeling of these physical processes is essential for a number of applications, including high-current, laser-triggered gas switches. Towards this end, we present a new 3D implicit particle-in-cell simulation model of gas breakdown leading to streamer formation in electronegative gases. The model uses a Monte Carlo treatment for all particle interactions and includes discrete photon generation, transport, and absorption for ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation. Central to the realization of this fully kinetic particle treatment is an algorithm that manages the total particle count by species while preserving the local momentum distribution functions and conserving charge [D. R. Welch, T. C. Genoni, R. E. Clark, and D. V. Rose, J. Comput. Phys. 227, 143 (2007)]. The simulation model is fully electromagnetic, making it capable of following, for example, the evolution of a gas switch from the point of laser-induced localized breakdown of the gas between electrodes through the successive stages of streamer propagation, initial electrode current connection, and high-current conduction channel evolution, where self-magnetic field effects are likely to be important. We describe the model details and underlying assumptions used and present sample results from 3D simulations of streamer formation and propagation in SF{sub 6}.

  17. 3D Models of Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Booth, R.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Maercker, M.

    2015-12-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, mass-losing giant and an accreting, compact companion. We present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of two such interacting binaries, RS Oph and Mira AB. RS Oph is also a recurrent nova system, thus we model multiple quiescent mass transfer-nova outburst cycles. The resulting circumstellar structures of both systems are highly complex with the formation of spirals, arcs, shells, equatorial and bipolar outflows. We compare the models to recent observations and discuss the implications of our results for related systems, e.g., bipolar nebulae and jets, chemically peculiar stars, and the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Giving peeps to my props: Using 3D printing to shed new light on particle transport in fractured rock.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, S. D.; Du Frane, W. L.; Vericella, J. J.; Aines, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Smart tracers and smart proppants promise new methods for sensing and manipulating rock fractures. However, the correct use and interpretation of these technologies relies on accurate models of their transport. Even for less exotic particles, the factors controlling particle transport through fractures are poorly understood. In this presentation, we will describe ongoing research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory into the transport properties of particles in natural rock fractures. Using three dimensional printing techniques, we create clear-plastic reproductions of real-world fracture surfaces, thereby enabling direct observation of the particle movement. We will also discuss how particle tracking of dense particle packs can be further enhanced by using such specially tailored flow cells in combination with micro-encapsulated tracer particles. Experimental results investigating the transport behavior of smart tracers and proppants close to the neutrally buoyant limit will be presented and we will describe how data from these experiments can be used to improve large-scale models of particle transport in fractures. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Predictor-corrector schemes for visualization of smoothed particle hydrodynamics data.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Benjamin; Fuchs, Raphael; Biddiscombe, John; Peikert, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for vortex core line extraction which operates directly on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) representation and, by this, generates smoother and more (spatially and temporally) coherent results in an efficient way. The underlying predictor-corrector scheme is general enough to be applied to other line-type features and it is extendable to the extraction of surfaces such as isosurfaces or Lagrangian coherent structures. The proposed method exploits temporal coherence to speed up computation for subsequent time steps. We show how the predictor-corrector formulation can be specialized for several variants of vortex core line definitions including two recent unsteady extensions, and we contribute a theoretical and practical comparison of these. In particular, we reveal a close relation between unsteady extensions of Fuchs et al. and Weinkauf et al. and we give a proof of the Galilean invariance of the latter. When visualizing SPH data, there is the possibility to use the same interpolation method for visualization as has been used for the simulation. This is different from the case of finite volume simulation results, where it is not possible to recover from the results the spatial interpolation that was used during the simulation. Such data are typically interpolated using the basic trilinear interpolant, and if smoothness is required, some artificial processing is added. In SPH data, however, the smoothing kernels are specified from the simulation, and they provide an exact and smooth interpolation of data or gradients at arbitrary points in the domain.

  20. The surface roughness of lactose particles can be modulated by wet-smoothing using a high-shear mixer.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Franca; Cocconi, Daniela; Bettini, Ruggero; Giordano, Ferdinando; Santi, Patrizia; Tobyn, Michael; Price, Robert; Young, Paul; Caramella, Carla; Colombo, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The surface morphology of a-lactose monohydrate particles was modified by a new wet-smoothing process performed in a high-shear mixer using solvents. Successive steps of wetting and drying of lactose powders during rolling in the mixer's cylindrical bowl were performed. Smoothed particles were tested for size distribution, flow, and packing. The wet-smoothing process flattened the surface and rounded the edges of lactose particles. In comparison with original lactose, an improvement of powder packing and flow properties was evidenced. When the process was performed in the presence of a ternary agent such as magnesium stearate, the smoothing was improved. The evolution of rugosity during the smoothing process was assessed through a fractal descriptor of SEM picture. Atomic force microscopy and surface area measurements quantified the surface rugosity. A very significant reduction of the rugosity, more remarkable in the presence of magnesium stearate, was measured. This new process of powder wet-smoothing allows the preparation of lactose particles with different degrees of smoothed surface for the control of flow and packing properties and particle-particle interactions. PMID:15760057

  1. A Nonlinear Framework of Delayed Particle Smoothing Method for Vehicle Localization under Non-Gaussian Environment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhu; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel nonlinear framework of smoothing method, non-Gaussian delayed particle smoother (nGDPS), is proposed, which enables vehicle state estimation (VSE) with high accuracy taking into account the non-Gaussianity of the measurement and process noises. Within the proposed method, the multivariate Student's t-distribution is adopted in order to compute the probability distribution function (PDF) related to the process and measurement noises, which are assumed to be non-Gaussian distributed. A computation approach based on Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is designed to cope with the mean and the covariance matrix of the proposal non-Gaussian distribution. A delayed Gibbs sampling algorithm, which incorporates smoothing of the sampled trajectories over a fixed-delay, is proposed to deal with the sample degeneracy of particles. The performance is investigated based on the real-world data, which is collected by low-cost on-board vehicle sensors. The comparison study based on the real-world experiments and the statistical analysis demonstrates that the proposed nGDPS has significant improvement on the vehicle state accuracy and outperforms the existing filtering and smoothing methods. PMID:27187405

  2. A Nonlinear Framework of Delayed Particle Smoothing Method for Vehicle Localization under Non-Gaussian Environment

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhu; Havyarimana, Vincent; Li, Tong; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel nonlinear framework of smoothing method, non-Gaussian delayed particle smoother (nGDPS), is proposed, which enables vehicle state estimation (VSE) with high accuracy taking into account the non-Gaussianity of the measurement and process noises. Within the proposed method, the multivariate Student’s t-distribution is adopted in order to compute the probability distribution function (PDF) related to the process and measurement noises, which are assumed to be non-Gaussian distributed. A computation approach based on Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is designed to cope with the mean and the covariance matrix of the proposal non-Gaussian distribution. A delayed Gibbs sampling algorithm, which incorporates smoothing of the sampled trajectories over a fixed-delay, is proposed to deal with the sample degeneracy of particles. The performance is investigated based on the real-world data, which is collected by low-cost on-board vehicle sensors. The comparison study based on the real-world experiments and the statistical analysis demonstrates that the proposed nGDPS has significant improvement on the vehicle state accuracy and outperforms the existing filtering and smoothing methods. PMID:27187405

  3. Self consistent particles dynamics in/out of the cusp region by using back tracking technics; a global 3D PIC simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, A.; Cai, D.; Lembege, B.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale three dimensionbal PIC (particle in cell) simulations are presently used in order to analyze the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere intreraction within a full self-consistent approach, and where both electrons and ions are treated as an assembly of individual particles. This 3D kinetic approach allows us to analyze in particular the dynamics and the fine structures of the cusp region when including self consistently not only its whole neighborhood (in the terrestrial magnetosphere) but also the impact of the solar wind and the interplanetary field (IMF) features. Herein, we focuss our attention on the cusp region and in particular on the acceleration and precipitation of particles (both ions and electrons) within the cusp. In present simulations, the IMF is chosen northward, (i.e. where the X -reconnection region is just above the cusp, in the meridian plane). Back-trackings of self-consistent particles are analyzed in details in order to determine (i) which particles (just above the cusp) are precipitated deeply into the cusp, (ii) which populations are injected from the cusp into the nearby tail, (iii) where the particles suffer the largest energisation along their self-consistent trajectories, (iv) where these populations accumulate, and (v) where the most energetic particles are originally coming from. This approach allows to make a traking of particles within the scenario "solar wind-magnetosheath- cusp -nearbytail"; moreover it strongly differs from the standard test particles technics and allows to provide informations not accessible when using full MHD approach. Keywords: Tracing Particles, Particle In Cell (PIC) simulation, double cusp, test particles method, IMF, Solar wind, Magnetosphere

  4. Modeling the propagation of volcanic debris avalanches by a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosio, Rosanna; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Hazard from collapses of volcanic edifices threatens million of people which currently live on top of volcanic deposits or around volcanoes prone to fail. Nevertheless, no much effort has been dedicated for the evaluation of the hazard posed by volcanic debris avalanches (e.g. emergency plans, hazard zoning maps). This work focuses at evaluating the exceptional mobility of volcanic debris avalanches for hazard analyses purposes by providing a set of calibrated cases. We model the propagation of eight debris avalanche selected among the best known historical events originated from sector collapses of volcanic edifices. The events have large volumes (ranging from 0.01-0.02 km3 to 25 km3) and are well preserved so that their main features are recognizable from satellite images. The events developed in a variety of settings and condition and they vary with respect to their morphological constrains, materials, styles of failure. The modeling has been performed using a Lagragian numerical method adapted from Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics to solve the depth averaged quasi-3D equation for motion (McDougall and Hungr 2004). This code has been designed and satisfactorily used to simulate rock and debris avalanches in non-volcanic settings (McDougall and Hungr, 2004). Its use is here extended to model volcanic debris avalanches which may differ from non-volcanic ones by dimensions, water content and by possible thermodynamic effects or degassing caused by active volcanic processes. The resolution of the topographic data is generally low for remote areas like the ones considered in this study, while the pre event topographies are more often not available. The effect of the poor topographic resolution on the final results has been evaluated by replicating the modeling on satellite-derived topographical grids with varying cell size (from 22 m to 90 m). The event reconstructions and the back analyses are based on the observations available from the literature. We test the

  5. Adaptive particle refinement and derefinement applied to the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcarolo, D. A.; Le Touzé, D.; Oger, G.; de Vuyst, F.

    2014-09-01

    SPH simulations are usually performed with a uniform particle distribution. New techniques have been recently proposed to enable the use of spatially varying particle distributions, which encouraged the development of automatic adaptivity and particle refinement/derefinement algorithms. All these efforts resulted in very interesting and promising procedures leading to more efficient and faster SPH simulations. In this article, a family of particle refinement techniques is reviewed and a new derefinement technique is proposed and validated through several test cases involving both free-surface and viscous flows. Besides, this new procedure allows higher resolutions in the regions requiring increased accuracy. Moreover, several levels of refinement can be used with this new technique, as often encountered in adaptive mesh refinement techniques in mesh-based methods.

  6. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  7. Fabrication of scalable tissue engineering scaffolds with dual-pore microarchitecture by combining 3D printing and particle leaching.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Sanger, Kuldeep; Heiskanen, Arto; Trifol, Jon; Szabo, Peter; Dufva, Marin; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Limitations in controlling scaffold architecture using traditional fabrication techniques are a problem when constructing engineered tissues/organs. Recently, integration of two pore architectures to generate dual-pore scaffolds with tailored physical properties has attracted wide attention in tissue engineering community. Such scaffolds features primary structured pores which can efficiently enhance nutrient/oxygen supply to the surrounding, in combination with secondary random pores, which give high surface area for cell adhesion and proliferation. Here, we present a new technique to fabricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications where 3D printing of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) mould is combined with salt leaching process. In this technique the sacrificial PVA mould, determining the structured pore architecture, was filled with salt crystals to define the random pore regions of the scaffold. After crosslinking the casted polymer the combined PVA-salt mould was dissolved in water. The technique has advantages over previously reported ones, such as automated assembly of the sacrificial mould, and precise control over pore architecture/dimensions by 3D printing parameters. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane and biodegradable poly(ϵ-caprolactone) were used for fabrication. However, we show that this technique is also suitable for other biocompatible/biodegradable polymers. Various physical and mechanical properties of the dual-pore scaffolds were compared with control scaffolds with either only structured or only random pores, fabricated using previously reported methods. The fabricated dual-pore scaffolds supported high cell density, due to the random pores, in combination with uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold, and higher cell proliferation and viability due to efficient nutrient/oxygen transport through the structured pores. In conclusion, the described fabrication technique is rapid, inexpensive, scalable, and compatible

  8. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, P.; Park, C. Y.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Tsuda, A.; Sager, T. M.; Molina, R. M.; Donaghey, T. C.; Alencar, A. M.; Kasahara, D. I.; Ericsson, T.; Millet, E. J.; Swenson, J.; Tschumperlin, D. J.; Butler, J. P.; Brain, J. D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Gehr, P.; Zhou, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40–100 nm and less than 44 μm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 μm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 μM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  9. 'If you assume, you can make an ass out of u and me': a decade of the disector for stereological counting of particles in 3D space.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M; Gundersen, H J

    1996-01-01

    The year 1984 was a watershed in stereology. It saw the introduction of highly efficient and unbiased design-based methods for counting the number of arbitrary objects in 3-dimensional (3D) space using 2D sectional images. The only requirement is that the objects be unambiguously identifiable on parallel sections or successive focal planes. The move away from the ¿assumption-based' and ¿model-based' methods applied previously has been a major scientific advance. It has led to the resolution of several problems in different biomedical areas. The basic principle which makes possible 3D counting from sections is the disector. Here, we review the disector principle and consider its impact on the counting and sizing of biological particles. From now on, there can be no excuse for applying the biased counting methods of yesteryear. Their continued use, despite the availability of unbiased alternatives, should be seen as paying homage to History rather than advancing Science. PMID:8655396

  10. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 3, October 15, 1991--January 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely or even primarily from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets are not well established, even when the characteristics of the turbulence are known. Several new theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles an droplets have proposed over the past five years. It is the purpose of this project to explore the potential of two of these theories for coupling with the other aspects of three-dimensional, reacting, turbulent, particle-laden systems to proved computational simulations that could be useful for addressing industrial problems.

  11. Improved kernel gradient free-smoothed particle hydrodynamics and its applications to heat transfer problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Mian, Lei; Xue-Ying, Peng

    2016-02-01

    Kernel gradient free-smoothed particle hydrodynamics (KGF-SPH) is a modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method which has higher precision than the conventional SPH. However, the Laplacian in KGF-SPH is approximated by the two-pass model which increases computational cost. A new kind of discretization scheme for the Laplacian is proposed in this paper, then a method with higher precision and better stability, called Improved KGF-SPH, is developed by modifying KGF-SPH with this new Laplacian model. One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) heat conduction problems are used to test the precision and stability of the Improved KGF-SPH. The numerical results demonstrate that the Improved KGF-SPH is more accurate than SPH, and stabler than KGF-SPH. Natural convection in a closed square cavity at different Rayleigh numbers are modeled by the Improved KGF-SPH with shifting particle position, and the Improved KGF-SPH results are presented in comparison with those of SPH and finite volume method (FVM). The numerical results demonstrate that the Improved KGF-SPH is a more accurate method to study and model the heat transfer problems.

  12. Smoothed Particle Inference: A Kilo-Parametric Method for X-ray Galaxy Cluster Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, John R.; Marshall, P.J.; Andersson, K.; /Stockholm U. /SLAC

    2005-08-05

    We propose an ambitious new method that models the intracluster medium in clusters of galaxies as a set of X-ray emitting smoothed particles of plasma. Each smoothed particle is described by a handful of parameters including temperature, location, size, and elemental abundances. Hundreds to thousands of these particles are used to construct a model cluster of galaxies, with the appropriate complexity estimated from the data quality. This model is then compared iteratively with X-ray data in the form of adaptively binned photon lists via a two-sample likelihood statistic and iterated via Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The complex cluster model is propagated through the X-ray instrument response using direct sampling Monte Carlo methods. Using this approach the method can reproduce many of the features observed in the X-ray emission in a less assumption-dependent way that traditional analyses, and it allows for a more detailed characterization of the density, temperature, and metal abundance structure of clusters. Multi-instrument X-ray analyses and simultaneous X-ray, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and lensing analyses are a straight-forward extension of this methodology. Significant challenges still exist in understanding the degeneracy in these models and the statistical noise induced by the complexity of the models.

  13. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulation and laboratory-scale experiments of complex flow dynamics in unsaturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Shigorina, E.; Noffz, T.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows us to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions in smooth and rough fractures. Due to the highly efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces can readily be obtained. We validated the model via empirical and semi-analytical solutions and conducted laboratory-scale percolation experiments of unsaturated flow through synthetic fracture systems. The setup allows us to obtain travel time distributions and identify characteristic flow mode distributions on wide aperture fractures intercepted by horizontal fracture elements.

  14. Development of a 3D circular microfluidic centrifuge for the separation of mixed particles by using their different centrifuge times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kim, D. I.; Kim, M. J.; Nguyen, X. D.; Park, D. H.; Go, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a circular microfluidic centrifuge with two inlets and two outlets to separate mixed microparticles with a specially designed sample injection hole. To separate the mixed particles, it uses a rotational flow, generated in a chamber by counter primary flows in the microchannels. The shape and sizes of the circular microfluidic centrifuge have been designed through numerical evaluation to have a large relative centrifugal force. The difference of centrifuge times of the mixed particles of 1 μm and 6 μm was determined to be 8.2 s at an inlet Reynolds number of 500 and a sample Reynolds number of 20. In the experiment, this was measured to be about 10 s. From the separation of the two polymer particles analogous to the representative sizes of platelets and red blood cells, the circular microfluidic centrifuge shows a potential to separate human blood cells size-selectively by using the difference of centrifuge times.

  15. Endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan in Concentrated Ambient Particles Induce Rapid Increase in Blood Pressure in Controlled Human Exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Thorne, Peter S; Scott, James; Liu, Ling; Brook, Robert D; Behbod, Behrooz; Gibson, Heike; Silverman, Frances; Mittleman, Murray A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Gold, Diane R

    2015-09-01

    Short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased blood pressure (BP) in epidemiological studies. Understanding the impact of specific PM components on BP is essential in developing effective risk-reduction strategies. We investigated the association between endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan-two major biological PM components-and BP. We also examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor, a vasodilatory inflammatory marker, modified these associations. We conducted a single-blind, randomized, crossover trial of controlled human exposure to concentrated ambient particles with 50 healthy adults. Particle-associated-endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan were sampled using polycarbonate-membrane-filters. Supine resting systolic BP and diastolic BP were measured pre-, 0.5-hour post-, and 20-hour postexposure. Urine vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and creatinine-corrected. Exposures to endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan for 130 minutes were associated with increases in BPs: at 0.5-hour postexposure, every doubling in endotoxin concentration was associated with 1.73 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.28, 3.18; P=0.02) and 2.07 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.74, 3.39; P=0.003); every doubling in β-1,3-d-Glucan concentration was associated with 0.80 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, -0.07, 1.67; P=0.07) and 0.88 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.09, 1.66; P=0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor rose after concentrated ambient particle endotoxin exposure and attenuated the association between endotoxin and 0.5-hour postexposure diastolic BP (Pinteraction=0.02). In healthy adults, short-term endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan exposures were associated with increased BP. Our findings suggest that the biological PM components contribute to PM-related cardiovascular outcomes, and postexposure vascular endothelial

  16. DualSPHysics: Open-source parallel CFD solver based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, A. J. C.; Domínguez, J. M.; Rogers, B. D.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Longshaw, S.; Canelas, R.; Vacondio, R.; Barreiro, A.; García-Feal, O.

    2015-02-01

    DualSPHysics is a hardware accelerated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code developed to solve free-surface flow problems. DualSPHysics is an open-source code developed and released under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a complete documentation that makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files is also distributed. The code has been shown to be efficient and reliable. The parallel power computing of Graphics Computing Units (GPUs) is used to accelerate DualSPHysics by up to two orders of magnitude compared to the performance of the serial version.

  17. The Ultraviolet View of Multi-Spin Galaxies: Insight from Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Mazzei, P.; Marino, A.; Rampazzo, R.; Galletta, G.; Buson, L. M.

    2014-05-01

    The UV images of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite revealed that about (30±3)% of early-type galaxies show UV emission indicating a rejuvenation episode. In early-type galaxies with multi-spin components this percentage increases at 50%. We present here the characteristics of this sample and our smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations with chemo-photometric implementation that provide dynamical and morphological information together with the spectral energy distribution at each evolutionary stage. We show our match of the global properties of two early-type galaxies, NGC 3626 and NGC 5173. For these galaxies we can trace their evolutionary path.

  18. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  19. Simulation of wave mitigation by coastal vegetation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iryanto; Gunawan, P. H.

    2016-02-01

    Vegetation in coastal area lead to wave mitigation has been studied by some researchers recently. The effect of vegetation forest in coastal area is minimizing the negative impact of wave propagation. In order to describe the effect of vegetation resistance into the water flow, the modified model of framework smoothed hydrodynamics particle has been constructed. In the Lagrangian framework, the Darcy, Manning, and laminar viscosity resistances are added. The effect of each resistances is given in some results of numerical simulations. Simulation of wave mitigation on sloping beach is also given.

  20. Mesh-free modeling of liquid crystals using modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yakutovich, M V; Care, C M; Newton, C J P; Cleaver, D J

    2010-10-01

    We present a generalization of the modified smooth particle hydrodynamics simulation technique capable of simulating static and dynamic liquid crystalline behavior. This generalization is then implemented in the context of the Qian-Sheng description of nematodynamics. To test the method, we first use it to simulate switching in both a Fréedericksz setup and a chiral hybrid aligned nematic cell. In both cases, the results obtained give excellent agreement with previously published results. We then apply the technique in a three-dimensional simulation of the switching dynamics of the post aligned bistable nematic device.

  1. Coupled discrete element and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the die filling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten

    2016-11-01

    Die filling is an important part of the powder compaction process chain, where defects in the final part can be introduced—or prevented. Simulation of this process is therefore a goal for many part producers and has been studied by some researchers already. In this work, we focus on the influence of the surrounding air on the powder flow. We demonstrate the implementing and coupling of the discrete element method for the granular powder and the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the gas flow. Application of the method to the die filling process is demonstrated.

  2. Variables Affecting Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of High-Velocity Flyer Plate Impact Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, Deepak S; Trabia, Mohamed; O'Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S

    2014-01-23

    This paper describes our work to characterize the variables affecting the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method in the LS-DYNA package for simulating high-velocity flyer plate impact experiments. LS-DYNA simulations are compared with one-dimensional experimental data of an oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper flyer plate impacting another plate of the same material. The comparison is made by measuring the velocity of a point on the back surface of the impact plate using the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) technique.

  3. Molecularly linked 3D plasmonic nanoparticle core/satellite assemblies: SERS nanotags with single-particle Raman sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Max; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    A fast, generic, and suspension-based route to highly SERS-active assemblies of noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag) with small core-satellite gaps and single-particle Raman sensitivity is presented. Rationally designed, heterobifunctional Raman reporters serve as molecular linkers for electrostatic conjugation of the small satellites to the large core.

  4. 3-D turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Quarterly progress report No. 4, January 15, 1992--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely or even primarily from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets are not well established, even when the characteristics of the turbulence are known. It is the purpose of this project to develop two different particle dispersion submodels (one each for dilute and dense phases), and couple them with existing fluid-dynamic heat transfer and reaction chemistry models to provide computational simulations capable of addressing industrial problems.

  5. Gold Nanoplate-Based 3D Hierarchical Microparticles: A Single Particle with High Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2016-08-01

    Formation of intended nano- and microstructures with regular building blocks has attracted much attention because of their potential applications in the fields of optics, electronics, and catalysis. Herein, we report a novel strategy to spontaneously grow three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical cabbagelike microparticles (CLMPs) constructed by individual Au nanoplates. By reducing gold precursor to gold atoms, N-(3-amidino)-aniline (NAAN) itself was oxidized to form poly(N-(3-amidino)-aniline) (PNAAN), which specifically binds on Au(111) facet as a capping agent and which leads to the formation of gold nanoplates. Because of the incomplete coverage of Au(111) facet, new gold nanoplate growth sites were spontaneously generated from the crystal plane of existing Au nanoplates for the growth of other nanoplates. This process continued until the nanoplate density reached its maximum range, eventually resulting in CLMPs with well-controlled structures. This opens a new avenue to utilize the imperfection during nanoparticle (NP) growth for the construction of microstructures. The individual CLMP shows excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performance with high enhancement factor (EF) and good reproducibility as it integrates the SERS enhancement effects of individual Au nanoplate and the nanogaps formed by the uniform and hierarchical structures. PMID:27452074

  6. Porting the 3D Gyrokinetic Particle-in-cell Code GTC to the CRAY/NEC SX-6 Vector Architecture: Perspectives and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ethier; Z. Lin

    2003-09-15

    Several years of optimization on the super-scalar architecture has made it more difficult to port the current version of the 3D particle-in-cell code GTC to the CRAY/NEC SX-6 vector architecture. This paper explains the initial work that has been done to port this code to the SX-6 computer and to optimize the most time consuming parts. Early performance results are shown and compared to the same test done on the IBM SP Power 3 and Power 4 machines.

  7. Applications of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models in the San Francisco bay-delta estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, P.E.; Donovan, J.M.; Wong, H.F.N.

    2005-01-01

    Three applications of three-dimensional hydrodynamic and particle-tracking models are currently underway by the United States Geological Survey in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. The first application is to the San Francisco Bay and a portion of the coastal ocean. The second application is to an important, gated control channel called the Delta Cross Channel, located within the northern portion of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The third application is to a reach of the San Joaquin River near Stockton, California where a significant dissolved oxygen problem exists due, in part, to conditions associated with the deep-water ship channel for the Port of Stockton, California. This paper briefly discusses the hydrodynamic and particle tracking models being used and the three applications. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  8. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and element bending group modeling of flexible fibers interacting with viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiufeng; Liu, Moubin; Peng, Shiliu

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and element bending group (EBG) coupling method for modeling the interaction of flexible fibers with moving viscous fluids. SPH is a well-developed mesh-free particle method for simulating viscous fluid flows. EBG is also a particle method for modeling flexible bodies. The interaction of flexible fibers with moving viscous fluids is rendered through the interaction of EBG particles for flexible fiber and SPH particles for fluid. In numerical simulation, flexible fibers of different lengths are immersed in a moving viscous fluid driven by a body force. The drag force on the fiber obtained from SPH-EBG simulation agrees well with experimental observations. It is shown that the flexible fiber demonstrates three typical bending modes, including the U-shaped mode, the flapping mode, and the closed mode, and that the flexible fiber experiences a drag reduction due to its reconfiguration by bending. It is also found that the U 4/3 drag scaling law for a flexible fiber is only valid for the U-shaped mode, but not valid for the flapping and closed modes. The results indicate that the reconfiguration of a flexible fiber is caused by the fluid force acting on it, while vortex shedding is of importance in the translations of bending modes.

  9. Three-dimensional simulations of dilute and concentrated suspensions using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Bian, Xin; Ellero, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional model for a suspension of rigid spherical particles in a Newtonian fluid is presented. The solvent is modeled with smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, which takes into account exactly the long-range multi-body hydrodynamic interactions between suspended spheres. Short-range lubrication forces which are necessary to simulate concentrated suspensions, are introduced pair-wisely based on the analytical solution of Stokes equations for approaching/departing objects. Given that lubrication is singular at vanishing solid particle separations, an implicit splitting integration scheme is used to obtain accurate results and at the same time to avoid prohibitively small simulation time steps. Hydrodynamic interactions between solid particles, at both long-range and short-range limits, are verified against theory in the case of two approaching spheres in a quiescent medium and under bulk shear flow, where good agreements are obtained. Finally, numerical results for the suspension viscosity of a many-particle system are shown and compared with analytical solutions available in the dilute and semi-dilute case as well as with previous numerical results obtained in the concentrated limit.

  10. Smooth- and rough-wall boundary layer structure from high spatial range particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, D. T.; Morrill-Winter, C.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Schultz, M. P.; Klewicki, J. C.

    2016-10-01

    Two particle image velocimetry arrangements are used to make true spatial comparisons between smooth- and rough-wall boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers across a very wide range of streamwise scales. Together, the arrangements resolve scales ranging from motions on the order of the Kolmogorov microscale to those longer than twice the boundary layer thickness. The rough-wall experiments were obtained above a continuous sandpaper sheet, identical to that used by Squire et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 795, 210 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.196], and cover a range of friction and equivalent sand-grain roughness Reynolds numbers (12 000 ≲δ+≲ 18000, 62 ≲ks+≲104 ). The smooth-wall experiments comprise new and previously published data spanning 6500 ≲δ+≲17 000 . Flow statistics from all experiments show similar Reynolds number trends and behaviors to recent, well-resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements above the same rough surface. Comparisons, at matched δ+, between smooth- and rough-wall two-point correlation maps and two-point magnitude-squared coherence maps demonstrate that spatially the outer region of the boundary layer is the same between the two flows. This is apparently true even at wall-normal locations where the total (inner-normalized) energy differs between the smooth and rough wall. Generally, the present results provide strong support for Townsend's [The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1956), Vol. 1] wall-similarity hypothesis in high Reynolds number fully rough boundary layer flows.

  11. Smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics modeling of dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; Antuono, Matteo; Marrone, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been used to study the evolution of free-surface Newtonian viscous flows specifically focusing on dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves. The numerical results have been compared with an analytical solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for Reynolds numbers in the range 50-5000. We found that a correct choice of the number of neighboring particles is of fundamental importance in order to obtain convergence towards the analytical solution. This number has to increase with higher Reynolds numbers in order to prevent the onset of spurious vorticity inside the bulk of the fluid, leading to an unphysical overdamping of the wave amplitude. This generation of spurious vorticity strongly depends on the specific kernel function used in the SPH model.

  12. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  13. Constrained hyperbolic divergence cleaning in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics with variable cleaning speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricco, Terrence S.; Price, Daniel J.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2016-10-01

    We present an updated constrained hyperbolic/parabolic divergence cleaning algorithm for smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) that remains conservative with wave cleaning speeds which vary in space and time. This is accomplished by evolving the quantity ψ /ch instead of ψ. Doing so allows each particle to carry an individual wave cleaning speed, ch, that can evolve in time without needing an explicit prescription for how it should evolve, preventing circumstances which we demonstrate could lead to runaway energy growth related to variable wave cleaning speeds. This modification requires only a minor adjustment to the cleaning equations and is trivial to adopt in existing codes. Finally, we demonstrate that our constrained hyperbolic/parabolic divergence cleaning algorithm, run for a large number of iterations, can reduce the divergence of the magnetic field to an arbitrarily small value, achieving ∇ ṡ B = 0 to machine precision.

  14. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K; Mundy, Christopher J; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface. PMID:27627409

  15. Simulation of drop movement over an inclined surface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Das, Arup K; Das, Prasanta K

    2009-10-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used to numerically simulate the movement of drops down an inclined plane. Diffuse interfaces have been assumed for tracking the motion of the contact line. The asymmetric shape of the three-dimensional drop and the variation of contact angle along its periphery can be calculated using the simulation. During the motion of a liquid drop down an inclined plane, an internal circulation of liquid particles is observed due to gravitational pull which causes periodic change in the drop shape. The critical angle of inclination required for the inception of drop motion is also evaluated for different fluids as a function of drop volume. The numerical predictions exhibit a good agreement with the published experimental results.

  16. Prediction of material strength and fracture of glass using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.

    1994-08-01

    The design of many military devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics, that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in truck and jeep windshields and in helicopters; and rock and concrete that are used in underground bunkers. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from one-dimensional flyer plate impacts into glass, and data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, the authors did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  17. Prediction of material strength and fracture of brittle materials using the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.A.; Wingate, C.A.; Stellingwwerf, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    The design of many devices involves numerical predictions of the material strength and fracture of brittle materials. The materials of interest include ceramics that are used in armor packages; glass that is used in windshields; and rock and concrete that are used in oil wells. As part of a program to develop advanced hydrocode design tools, the authors have implemented a brittle fracture model for glass into the SPHINX smooth particle hydrodynamics code. The authors have evaluated this model and the code by predicting data from tungsten rods impacting glass. Since fractured glass properties, which are needed in the model, are not available, they did sensitivity studies of these properties, as well as sensitivity studies to determine the number of particles needed in the calculations. The numerical results are in good agreement with the data.

  18. Loop heating by D.C. electric current and electromagnetic wave emissions simulated by 3-D EM particle zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, J. I.; Zhao, J.; Nishikawa, K.-I.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that a current-carrying plasma loop can be heated by magnetic pinch driven by the pressure imbalance between inside and outside the loop, using a 3-dimensional electromagnetic (EM) particle code. Both electrons and ions in the loop can be heated in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, therefore the perpendicular temperature can be increased about 10 times compared with the parallel temperature. This temperature anisotropy produced by the magnetic pinch heating can induce a plasma instability, by which high-frequency electromagnetic waves can be excited. The plasma current which is enhanced by the magnetic pinch can also excite a kinetic kink instability, which can heat ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The heating mechanism of ions as well as the electromagnetic emission could be important for an understanding of the coronal loop heating and the electromagnetic wave emissions from active coronal regions.

  19. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  20. The characterization and optimization of NIO1 ion source extraction aperture using a 3D particle-in-cell code.

    PubMed

    Taccogna, F; Minelli, P; Cavenago, M; Veltri, P; Ippolito, N

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of a single aperture in the extraction grid plays a relevant role for the optimization of negative ion transport and extraction probability in a hybrid negative ion source. For this reason, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model of the extraction region around the single aperture including part of the source and part of the acceleration (up to the extraction grid (EG) middle) regions has been developed for the new aperture design prepared for negative ion optimization 1 source. Results have shown that the dimension of the flat and chamfered parts and the slope of the latter in front of the source region maximize the product of production rate and extraction probability (allowing the best EG field penetration) of surface-produced negative ions. The negative ion density in the plane yz has been reported. PMID:26932027

  1. Apker Prize Lecture: Using 3D Printing and Stereoscopic Imaging to Measure the Alignment and Rotation of Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Guy; Parsa, Shima; Kramel, Stefan; Ni, Rui; Voth, Greg

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a general methodology to experimentally measure the time-resolved Lagrangian orientation and solid body rotation rate of anisotropic particles with arbitrary aspect ratio from standard stereoscopic video image data. We apply these techniques to particles advected in a Rλ ~ 110 fluid flow, where turbulence is generated by two grids oscillating in phase. We use 3D printing technology to design and fabricate neutrally buoyant rods, crosses (two perpendicular rods), and jacks (three mutually perpendicular rods) with a largest dimension of 7 times the Kolmogorov length scale, which makes them good approximations to tracer particles. We have measured the mean square rotation rate, ṗiṗi , of particles spanning the full range of aspect ratios and obtained results that agree with direct numerical simulations. By measuring the full solid-body rotation of jacks, we provide a new, extensible way to directly probe the Lagrangian vorticity of a fluid. We also present direct measurements of the alignment of crosses with the direction of their solid body rotation rate vector--in agreement with direct numerical simulations. Supported by NSF grant DMR­1208990.

  2. A variational multi-symplectic particle-in-cell algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi

    2013-10-15

    Smoothing functions are commonly used to reduce numerical noise arising from coarse sampling of particles in particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations. When applying smoothing functions to symplectic algorithms, the conservation of symplectic structure should be guaranteed to preserve good conservation properties. In this paper, we show how to construct a variational multi-symplectic PIC algorithm with smoothing functions for the Vlasov-Maxwell system. The conservation of the multi-symplectic structure and the reduction of numerical noise make this algorithm specifically suitable for simulating long-term dynamics of plasmas, such as those in the steady-state operation or long-pulse discharge of a super-conducting tokamak. The algorithm has been implemented in a 6D large scale PIC code. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the good conservation properties of the multi-symplectic algorithm and the reduction of the noise due to the application of smoothing function.

  3. 3D solutions of the Poisson-Vlasov equations for a charged plasma and particle-core model in a line of FODO cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, G.; Rambaldi, S.; Bazzani, A.; Comunian, M.; Pisent, A.

    2003-09-01

    We consider a charged plasma of positive ions in a periodic focusing channel of quadrupolar magnets in the presence of RF cavities. The ions are bunched into charged triaxial ellipsoids and their description requires the solution of a fully 3D Poisson-Vlasov equation. We also analyze the trajectories of test particles in the exterior of the ion bunches in order to estimate their diffusion rate. This rate is relevant for a high intensity linac (TRASCO project). A numerical PIC scheme to integrate the Poisson-Vlasov equations in a periodic focusing system in 2 and 3 space dimensions is presented. The scheme consists of a single particle symplectic integrator and a Poisson solver based on FFT plus tri-diagonal matrix inversion. In the 2D version arbitrary boundary conditions can be chosen. Since no analytical self-consistent 3D solution is known, we chose an initial Neuffer-KV distribution in phase space, whose electric field is close to the one generated by a uniformly filled ellipsoid. For a matched (periodic) beam the orbits of test particles moving in the field of an ellipsoidal bunch, whose semi-axis satisfy the envelope equations, is similar to the orbits generated by the self-consistent charge distribition obtained from the PIC simulation, even though it relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac-like distribution. After a transient the RMS radii and emittances have small amplitude oscillations. The PIC simulations for a mismatched (quasiperiodic) beam are no longer comparable with the ellipsoidal bunch model even though the qualitative behavior is the same, namely a stronger diffusion due to the increase of resonances.

  4. Multi-resolution flow simulations by smoothed particle hydrodynamics via domain decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Li, Zhen; Karniadakis, George Em

    2015-09-01

    We present a methodology to concurrently couple particle-based methods via a domain decomposition (DD) technique for simulating viscous flows. In particular, we select two resolutions of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method as demonstration. Within the DD framework, a simulation domain is decomposed into two (or more) overlapping sub-domains, each of which has an individual particle scale determined by the local flow physics. Consistency of the two sub-domains is achieved in the overlap region by matching the two independent simulations based on Lagrangian interpolation of state variables and fluxes. The domain decomposition based SPH method (DD-SPH) employs different spatial and temporal resolutions, and hence, each sub-domain has its own smoothing length and time step. As a consequence, particle refinement and de-refinement are performed asynchronously according to individual time advancement of each sub-domain. The proposed strategy avoids SPH force interactions between different resolutions on purpose, so that coupling, in principle, can go beyond SPH-SPH, and may allow SPH to be coupled with other mesoscopic or microscopic particle methods. The DD-SPH method is validated first for a transient Couette flow, where simulation results based on proper coupling of spatial-temporal scales agree well with analytical solutions. In particular, we find that the size of the overlap region should be at least rc,1 + 2rc,2, where rc,1 and rc,2 are cut off radii in the two sub-domains with rc,1 ≤rc,2. Subsequently, a perturbation wave is considered traveling either parallel or perpendicular to the hybrid interface. Compressibility is significant if transient behavior at short sonic-time-scale is relevant, while the fluid can be treated as quasi-incompressible at sufficiently long time scale. To this end, we propose a coupling of density fields from the two sub-domains. Finally, a steady Wannier flow is simulated, where a rotating cylinder is placed next to a

  5. Equalizing resolution in smoothed-particle hydrodynamics calculations using self-adaptive sinc kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, Domingo; Cabezón, Rubén M.; Escartín, José A.; Ebinger, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Context. The smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is a numerical method for solving gas-dynamical problems. It has been applied to simulate the evolution of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The method has a second-order accuracy, with a resolution that is usually much higher in the compressed regions than in the diluted zones of the fluid. Aims: We propose and check a method to balance and equalize the resolution of SPH between high- and low-density regions. This method relies on the versatility of a family of interpolators called sinc kernels, which allows increasing the interpolation quality by varying only a single parameter (the exponent of the sinc function). Methods: The proposed method was checked and validated through a number of numerical tests, from standard one-dimensional Riemann problems in shock tubes, to multidimensional simulations of explosions, hydrodynamic instabilities, and the collapse of a Sun-like polytrope. Results: The analysis of the hydrodynamical simulations suggests that the scheme devised to equalize the accuracy improves the treatment of the post-shock regions and, in general, of the rarefacted zones of fluids while causing no harm to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The method is robust and easy to implement with a low computational overload. It conserves mass, energy, and momentum and reduces to the standard SPH scheme in regions of the fluid that have smooth density gradients.

  6. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  7. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:25122383

  8. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  9. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  10. GPUs, a New Tool of Acceleration in CFD: Efficiency and Reliability on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Alejandro C.; Dominguez, Jose M.; Barreiro, Anxo; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Rogers, Benedict D.

    2011-01-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a numerical method commonly used in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to simulate complex free-surface flows. Simulations with this mesh-free particle method far exceed the capacity of a single processor. In this paper, as part of a dual-functioning code for either central processing units (CPUs) or Graphics Processor Units (GPUs), a parallelisation using GPUs is presented. The GPU parallelisation technique uses the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) of nVidia devices. Simulations with more than one million particles on a single GPU card exhibit speedups of up to two orders of magnitude over using a single-core CPU. It is demonstrated that the code achieves different speedups with different CUDA-enabled GPUs. The numerical behaviour of the SPH code is validated with a standard benchmark test case of dam break flow impacting on an obstacle where good agreement with the experimental results is observed. Both the achieved speed-ups and the quantitative agreement with experiments suggest that CUDA-based GPU programming can be used in SPH methods with efficiency and reliability. PMID:21695185

  11. Incompressible-compressible flows with a transient discontinuous interface using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. J.; Stansby, P. K.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-03-01

    A new two-phase incompressible-compressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed where the interface is discontinuous in density. This is applied to water-air problems with a large density difference. The incompressible phase requires surface pressure from the compressible phase and the compressible phase requires surface velocity from the incompressible phase. Compressible SPH is used for the air phase (with the isothermal stiffened ideal gas equation of state for low Mach numbers) and divergence-free (projection based) incompressible SPH is used for the water phase, with the addition of Fickian shifting to produce sufficiently homogeneous particle distributions to enable stable, accurate, converged solutions without noise in the pressure field. Shifting is a purely numerical particle regularisation device. The interface remains a true material discontinuity at a high density ratio with continuous pressure and velocity at the interface. This approach with the physics of compressibility and incompressibility represented is novel within SPH and is validated against semi-analytical results for a two-phase elongating and oscillating water drop, analytical results for low amplitude inviscid standing waves, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and a dam break problem with high interface distortion and impact on a vertical wall where experimental and other numerical results are available.

  12. Consistent temperature coupling with thermal fluctuations of smooth particle hydrodynamics and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain - internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity - are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance.

  13. An incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics method for the motion of rigid bodies in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, N.; Ozbulut, M.; Rahmat, A.; Feng, J. J.; Yildiz, M.

    2015-09-01

    A two-dimensional incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics scheme is presented for simulation of rigid bodies moving through Newtonian fluids. The scheme relies on combined usage of the rigidity constraints and the viscous penalty method to simulate rigid body motion. Different viscosity ratios and interpolation schemes are tested by simulating a rigid disc descending in quiescent medium. A viscosity ratio of 100 coupled with weighted harmonic averaging scheme has been found to provide satisfactory results. The performance of the resulting scheme is systematically tested for cases with linear motion, rotational motion and their combination. The test cases include sedimentation of a single and a pair of circular discs, sedimentation of an elliptic disc and migration and rotation of a circular disc in linear shear flow. Comparison with previous results at various Reynolds numbers indicates that the proposed method captures the motion of rigid bodies driven by flow or external body forces accurately.

  14. Simulation of explosively driven metallic tubes by the cylindrical smoothed particle hydrodynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Han, X.; Hu, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Modified cylindrical smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MCSPH) approximation equations are derived for hydrodynamics with material strength in axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates. The momentum equation and internal energy equation are represented to be in the axisymmetric form. The MCSPH approximation equations are applied to simulate the process of explosively driven metallic tubes, which includes strong shock waves, large deformations and large inhomogeneities, etc. The meshless and Lagrangian character of the MCSPH method offers the advantages in treating the difficulties embodied in these physical phenomena. Two test cases, the cylinder test and the metallic tube driven by two head-on colliding detonation waves, are presented. Numerical simulation results show that the new form of the MCSPH method can predict the detonation process of high explosives and the expansion process of metallic tubes accurately and robustly.

  15. Simulating hypervelocity impact effects on structures using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code MAGI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Libersky, Larry; Allahdadi, Firooz A.; Carney, Theodore C.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of interaction occurring between space debris and orbiting structures is of great interest to the planning and survivability of space assets. Computer simulation of the impact events using hydrodynamic codes can provide some understanding of the processes but the problems involved with this fundamental approach are formidable. First, any realistic simulation is necessarily three-dimensional, e.g., the impact and breakup of a satellite. Second, the thickness of important components such as satellite skins or bumper shields are small with respect to the dimension of the structure as a whole, presenting severe zoning problems for codes. Thirdly, the debris cloud produced by the primary impact will yield many secondary impacts which will contribute to the damage and possible breakup of the structure. The problem was approached by choosing a relatively new computational technique that has virtues peculiar to space impacts. The method is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

  16. Two-fluid dust and gas mixtures in smoothed particle hydrodynamics: a semi-implicit approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; Bate, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    A method to avoid the explicit time integration of small dust grains in the two-fluid gas/dust smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach is proposed. By assuming a very simple exponential decay model for the relative velocity between the gas and dust components, all the effective characteristics of the drag force can be reproduced. A series of tests has been performed to compare the accuracy of the method with analytical and explicit integration results. We find that the method performs well on a wide range of tests, and can provide large speed-ups over explicit integration when the dust stopping time is small. We have also found that the method is much less dissipative than conventional explicit or implicit two-fluid SPH approaches when modelling dusty shocks.

  17. Coupling of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Finite Volume method for free-surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, S.; Di Mascio, A.; Le Touzé, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of free surface flows with large front deformation and fragmentation is presented. The algorithm is obtained by coupling a classical Finite Volume (FV) approach, that discretizes the Navier-Stokes equations on a block structured Eulerian grid, with an approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, implemented in a Lagrangian framework. The coupling procedure is formulated in such a way that each solver is applied in the region where its intrinsic characteristics can be exploited in the most efficient and accurate way: the FV solver is used to resolve the bulk flow and the wall regions, whereas the SPH solver is implemented in the free surface region to capture details of the front evolution. The reported results clearly prove that the combined use of the two solvers is convenient from the point of view of both accuracy and computing time.

  18. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  19. Scattering and bound states of spinless particles in a mixed vector-scalar smooth step potential

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.G.; Castro, A.S. de

    2009-11-15

    Scattering and bound states for a spinless particle in the background of a kink-like smooth step potential, added with a scalar uniform background, are considered with a general mixing of vector and scalar Lorentz structures. The problem is mapped into the Schroedinger-like equation with an effective Rosen-Morse potential. It is shown that the scalar uniform background present subtle and trick effects for the scattering states and reveals itself a high-handed element for formation of bound states. In that process, it is shown that the problem of solving a differential equation for the eigenenergies is transmuted into the simpler and more efficient problem of solving an irrational algebraic equation.

  20. Survey of shock-wave structures of smooth-particle granular flows.

    PubMed

    Padgett, D A; Mazzoleni, A P; Faw, S D

    2015-12-01

    We show the effects of simulated supersonic granular flow made up of smooth particles passing over two prototypical bodies: a wedge and a disk. We describe a way of computationally identifying shock wave locations in granular flows and tabulate the shock wave locations for flow over wedges and disks. We quantify the shock structure in terms of oblique shock angle for wedge impediments and shock standoff distance for disk impediments. We vary granular flow parameters including upstream volume fraction, average upstream velocity, granular temperature, and the collision coefficient of restitution. Both wedges and disks have been used in the aerospace community as prototypical impediments to flowing air in order to investigate the fundamentally different shock structures emanating from sharp and blunt bodies, and we present these results in order to increase the understanding of the fundamental behavior of supersonic granular flow. PMID:26764684

  1. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  2. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics: Numerical Techniques and Applications to Accretion Disks in Close Binaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, James Charles

    1995-01-01

    Numerical techniques for the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are described for three dimensional systems in the absence of self-gravity. These include a method for locating neighboring particles using an Eulerian grid that conserves memory by partitioning the computational space into manageable layers. Further savings in memory and computational time are achieved using interparticle distances that are discretized with respect to integral increments of the smoothing length. We also present a time integration algorithm using multiple time steps which guarantees that all particles maintain phase space synchronicity to at least first order accuracy with respect to the time steps. These techniques are used to compare currently available SPH artificial viscosities in accretion disks in low mass ratio systems (q = {M_2 }over{M_1} = 0.02) using the ideal gas law and low adiabatic gamma (gamma = 1.01): radiation effects and magnetic fields are excluded. The standard artificial viscosity given by Monaghan (1992) consistently gives results which agree qualitatively with the Shukura-Sunyaev alpha -disk model. The radial temperature profile is overestimated by a factor of about 10, indicating that radiation effects must be included for a complete model. This viscosity is also used to compare accretion disks in systems with the four different extreme mass ratios: q = 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, and 0.05. These simulated disks are stable with high mass transfer rates. The outer disk edges do not extend into the regions of the low order corotation resonances, consequently no precession is observed. The disks are slightly asymmetric with spiral density waves that appear stationary in the corotating frame. These may be responsible for the double humped pulses in the light curves of these systems. Finally, the free expansion of an ideal gas into a vacuum is simulated using elastic collisions between SPH particles and impenetrable flat surfaces. After _sp{~}<100 interparticle

  3. On the local acceleration and flow trajectory of jet flows from circular and semi-circular pipes via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The distinctive differences between two jet flows that share the same hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m and Re ~ 6000, but different (nozzle) shape are explored via 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry using OpenPTV (http://www.openptv.net). The two jets are formed from circular and semicircular pipes and released in a quiescent water tank of 40 dh height, 40 dh wide, and 200 dh long. The recirculating system is seeded with 100 μm particles, where flow measurements are performed in the intermediate flow field (14.5 < x /dh <18.5) at 550Hz for a total of ~ 30,000 frames. Analysis is focused on the spatial distribution of the local flow acceleration and curvature of the Lagrangian trajectories. The velocity and acceleration of particles are estimated by low-pass filtering their position with a moving cubic spline fitting, while the curvature is obtained from the Frenet-Serret equations. Probability density functions (p.d.f.) of these quantities are obtained at various sub-volumes containing a given streamwise velocity range, and compared between the two cases to evaluate the memory effects in the intermediate flow field.

  4. A microfluidic opto-caloric switch for sorting of particles by using 3D-hydrodynamic focusing based on SLE fabrication capabilities.

    PubMed

    Meineke, G; Hermans, M; Klos, J; Lenenbach, A; Noll, R

    2016-03-01

    In a miniaturised flow switch fluid flows are controlled by reducing the local viscosity via absorption of laser radiation. Through this, the local flow rates are increased to switch the outlet port of a fluid flow carrying the analyte. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using Selective Laser-Induced Etching (SLE). SLE allows novel 3D-hydrodynamic focusing, realising circular shaped channel cross-sections and adapting interaction volume geometries to the profile of the laser radiation for optimised absorption. The performance of the switch is validated experimentally with a dyed analyte and video image processing. The ability to sort particles like cells is demonstrated at 8 Hz using polystyrene beads having a diameter of 8 μm.

  5. Global magnetosphere-like 3D structure formation in kinetics by hot magnetized plasma flow characterized by shape of the particle distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubchenko, Vladimir

    The task was to provide an analytical elementary magnetosphere-like model in kinetics for verification of the 3D EM PIC codes created for space/aerospace and HED plasmas applications. Kinetic approach versus cold MHD approach takes into account different behavior in the EM fields of resonant and non resonant particles in the velocity phase space, which appears via shape characteristics of the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) and via the spatial dispersion effect forming the collisionless dissipation in the EM fields. The external flow is a hot collisionless plasma characterized by the particle velocity distribution function (PVDF) with different shapes: Maxwellian, kappa, etc. The flow is in a “hot regime”: it can be supersonic but its velocity remains less the thermal velocity of the electrons. The “internal” part of the magnetosphere formed by trapped particles is the prescribed 3D stationary magnetization considered as a spherical “quasiparticle” with internal magnetodipole and toroidal moments represented as a broadband EM driver. We obtain after the linearization of Vlasov/Maxwell equations a self-consistent 3D large scale kinetic solution of the classic problem. Namely, we: model the “outer” part of the magnetosphere formed by external hot plasma flow of the flyby particles. Solution of the Vlasov equation expressed via a tensor of dielectric permittivity of nonmagnetized and magnetized flowing plasma. Here, we obtain the direct kinetic dissipative effect of the magnetotail formation and the opposite diamagnetic effect of the magnetosphere “dipolization”. We get MHD wave cone in flow magnetized by external guiding magnetic (GM) field. Magnetosphere in our consideration is a 3D dissipative “wave” package structure of the skinned EM fields formed by the “waves” excited at frequency bands where we obtain negative values and singularities (resonances) of squared EM refractive index of the cold plasma. The hot regime

  6. Comparison of a 3-D multi-group SN particle transport code with Monte Carlo for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Kent A; Wareing, Todd A; Failla, Gregory; Horton, John L; Eifel, Patricia J; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-03

    A patient dose distribution was calculated by a 3D multi-group S N particle transport code for intracavitary brachytherapy of the cervix uteri and compared to previously published Monte Carlo results. A Cs-137 LDR intracavitary brachytherapy CT data set was chosen from our clinical database. MCNPX version 2.5.c, was used to calculate the dose distribution. A 3D multi-group S N particle transport code, Attila version 6.1.1 was used to simulate the same patient. Each patient applicator was built in SolidWorks, a mechanical design package, and then assembled with a coordinate transformation and rotation for the patient. The SolidWorks exported applicator geometry was imported into Attila for calculation. Dose matrices were overlaid on the patient CT data set. Dose volume histograms and point doses were compared. The MCNPX calculation required 14.8 hours, whereas the Attila calculation required 22.2 minutes on a 1.8 GHz AMD Opteron CPU. Agreement between Attila and MCNPX dose calculations at the ICRU 38 points was within +/- 3%. Calculated doses to the 2 cc and 5 cc volumes of highest dose differed by not more than +/- 1.1% between the two codes. Dose and DVH overlays agreed well qualitatively. Attila can calculate dose accurately and efficiently for this Cs-137 CT-based patient geometry. Our data showed that a three-group cross-section set is adequate for Cs-137 computations. Future work is aimed at implementing an optimized version of Attila for radiotherapy calculations.

  7. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  8. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  9. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulation of Wave Overtopping Characteristics for Different Coastal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jaan Hui; Shao, Songdong

    2012-01-01

    This research paper presents an incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (ISPH) technique to investigate a regular wave overtopping on the coastal structure of different types. The SPH method is a mesh-free particle modeling approach that can efficiently treat the large deformation of free surface. The incompressible SPH approach employs a true hydrodynamic formulation to solve the fluid pressure that has less pressure fluctuations. The generation of flow turbulence during the wave breaking and overtopping is modeled by a subparticle scale (SPS) turbulence model. Here the ISPH model is used to investigate the wave overtopping over a coastal structure with and without the porous material. The computations disclosed the features of flow velocity, turbulence, and pressure distributions for different structure types and indicated that the existence of a layer of porous material can effectively reduce the wave impact pressure and overtopping rate. The proposed numerical model is expected to provide a promising practical tool to investigate the complicated wave-structure interactions. PMID:22919291

  10. Developing a weakly compressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for biological flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless particle method originally developed for astrophysics applications in 1977. Over the years, limitations of the original formulations have been addressed by different groups to extend the domain of SPH application. In biologically relevant internal flows, two of the several challenges still facing SPH are 1) treatment of inlet, outlet, and no slip boundary conditions and 2) treatment of second derivatives present in the viscous terms. In this work, we develop a 2D weakly compressible SPH (WCSPH) for simulating viscous internal flows which incorporates some of the recent advancements made by groups in the above two areas. The method is validated against several analytical and experimental benchmark solutions for both steady and unsteady laminar flows. In particular, the 2013 U.S. Food and Drug Administration benchmark test case for medical devices - steady forward flow through a nozzle with a sudden contraction and conical diffuser - is simulated for different Reynolds numbers in the laminar region and results are validated against the published experimental and CFD datasets. Support from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF GRFP) is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Resolution requirements for smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodato, Giuseppe; Clarke, C. J.

    2011-06-01

    Stimulated by recent results by Meru & Bate, we revisit the issue of resolution requirements for simulating self-gravitating accretion discs with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We show that all the results by Meru & Bate are actually consistent if they are interpreted as driven by resolution effects, therefore implying that the resolution criterion for cooling gaseous discs is a function of the imposed cooling rate. We discuss two possible numerical origins of such dependence, which are both consistent with the limited number of available data. Our results tentatively indicate that convergence for current simulations is being reached for a number of SPH particles approaching 10 million (for a disc mass of the order of 10 per cent of the central object mass), which would set the critical cooling time for fragmentation at about 15Ω-1, roughly a factor of 2 larger than previously thought. More in general, we discuss the extent to which the large number of recent numerical results are reliable or not. We argue that those results that pertain to the dynamics associated with gravitational instabilities (such as the locality of angular momentum transport, and the relationship between density perturbation and induced stress) are robust, while those pertaining to the thermodynamics of the system (such as the determination of the critical cooling time for fragmentation) can be affected by poor resolution.

  12. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. I. NUMERICAL METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Close interactions and mass transfer in binary stars can lead to the formation of many different exotic stellar populations, but detailed modeling of mass transfer is a computationally challenging problem. Here, we present an alternate smoothed particle hydrodynamics approach to the modeling of mass transfer in binary systems that allows a better resolution of the flow of matter between main-sequence stars. Our approach consists of modeling only the outermost layers of the stars using appropriate boundary conditions and ghost particles. We arbitrarily set the radius of the boundary and find that our boundary treatment behaves physically and conserves energy well. In particular, when used with our binary relaxation procedure, our treatment of boundary conditions is also shown to evolve circular binaries properly for many orbits. The results of our first simulation of mass transfer are also discussed and used to assess the strengths and limitations of our method. We conclude that it is well suited for the modeling of interacting binary stars. The method presented here represents a convenient alternative to previous hydrodynamical techniques aimed at modeling mass transfer in binary systems since it can be used to model both the donor and the accretor while maintaining the density profiles taken from realistic stellar models.

  13. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics: Applications to migration of radionuclides in confined aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Klapp, Jaime; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G

    2016-04-01

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is presented for simulating the decay chain transport of radionuclides in confined aqueous solutions. The SPH formulation is based on the open-source parallel code DualSPHysics extended to solve the advective-diffusion equation for the evolution of the concentration field coupled to the fluid-dynamic equations, including the effects of radioactive decay of the tracer contaminants. The performance of the method is demonstrated for environmental engineering problems dealing with the transport of contaminants in still and flowing water. The results from a series of benchmark test calculations are described in two- and three-space dimensions, where the advection, diffusion, and radioactive decay modes are tested separately and in combined form. The accuracy of the present SPH transport model is shown by direct comparison with the analytical solutions and results from other SPH approaches. For a given problem, convergence of the SPH solution is seen to increase with decreasing particle size and spacing. PMID:26921532

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics: Applications to migration of radionuclides in confined aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Klapp, Jaime; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G

    2016-04-01

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is presented for simulating the decay chain transport of radionuclides in confined aqueous solutions. The SPH formulation is based on the open-source parallel code DualSPHysics extended to solve the advective-diffusion equation for the evolution of the concentration field coupled to the fluid-dynamic equations, including the effects of radioactive decay of the tracer contaminants. The performance of the method is demonstrated for environmental engineering problems dealing with the transport of contaminants in still and flowing water. The results from a series of benchmark test calculations are described in two- and three-space dimensions, where the advection, diffusion, and radioactive decay modes are tested separately and in combined form. The accuracy of the present SPH transport model is shown by direct comparison with the analytical solutions and results from other SPH approaches. For a given problem, convergence of the SPH solution is seen to increase with decreasing particle size and spacing.

  15. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics: Applications to migration of radionuclides in confined aqueous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoral-Villa, Estela; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Carlos E.; Klapp, Jaime; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Di G. Sigalotti, Leonardo

    2016-04-01

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is presented for simulating the decay chain transport of radionuclides in confined aqueous solutions. The SPH formulation is based on the open-source parallel code DualSPHysics extended to solve the advective-diffusion equation for the evolution of the concentration field coupled to the fluid-dynamic equations, including the effects of radioactive decay of the tracer contaminants. The performance of the method is demonstrated for environmental engineering problems dealing with the transport of contaminants in still and flowing water. The results from a series of benchmark test calculations are described in two- and three-space dimensions, where the advection, diffusion, and radioactive decay modes are tested separately and in combined form. The accuracy of the present SPH transport model is shown by direct comparison with the analytical solutions and results from other SPH approaches. For a given problem, convergence of the SPH solution is seen to increase with decreasing particle size and spacing.

  16. A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method for domains with arbitrary-geometry solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Potami, Raffaele; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A smooth dissipative particle dynamics method with dynamic virtual particle allocation (SDPD-DV) for modeling and simulation of mesoscopic fluids in wall-bounded domains is presented. The physical domain in SDPD-DV may contain external and internal solid boundaries of arbitrary geometries, periodic inlets and outlets, and the fluid region. The SDPD-DV method is realized with fluid particles, boundary particles, and dynamically allocated virtual particles. The internal or external solid boundaries of the domain can be of arbitrary geometry and are discretized with a surface grid. These boundaries are represented by boundary particles with assigned properties. The fluid domain is discretized with fluid particles of constant mass and variable volume. Conservative and dissipative force models due to virtual particles exerted on a fluid particle in the proximity of a solid boundary supplement the original SDPD formulation. The dynamic virtual particle allocation approach provides the density and the forces due to virtual particles. The integration of the SDPD equations is accomplished with a velocity-Verlet algorithm for the momentum and a Runge-Kutta for the entropy equation. The velocity integrator is supplemented by a bounce-forward algorithm in cases where the virtual particle force model is not able to prevent particle penetration. For the incompressible isothermal systems considered in this work, the pressure of a fluid particle is obtained by an artificial compressibility formulation for liquids and the ideal gas law for gases. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained by an implementation of the generalized Einstein and the Green-Kubo relations. Field properties are obtained by sampling SDPD-DV outputs on a post-processing grid that allows harnessing the particle information on desired spatiotemporal scales. The SDPD-DV method is verified and validated with simulations in bounded and periodic domains that cover the hydrodynamic and mesoscopic regimes for

  17. Fractal and fractional calculus to model hydrological processes with application to particle-based 2D and 3D landslide simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco; Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco

    2015-04-01

    We integrate existing soil infiltration modeling with particle based methods in order to simulate two and three-dimensional setups of triggered landslides. Commonly, the infiltration models are based on continuum schemes (e.g. Eulerian approach) by means of which it is possible to define the field of the pore pressure within a soil. By contrast, the particle based methods follow a Lagrangian scheme that allows one to identify the particle trajectories and their dynamical properties. In this work, in order to simulate the triggering mechanism, we apply the classical, fractal and fractional Richards equations and the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, adapted to the molecular dynamics technique. In our scheme the (local) positive pore pressure is simply implemented as a perturbation of the rest state of each grain. Therefore, the pore pressure function can be interpreted as a time-space dependent scalar field acting on each particle. To initialize the system we generate, using a molecular dynamics based algorithm, a mechanically stable disk (2D) or sphere (3D) packing simulating the consolidated soil. In this way, we can built the micro and macro pore structure related to different infiltration time scales. The inter-particle interactions are modeled with a Lennard-Jones like potential. The particle positions are updated in time, after and during a rainfall, with standard molecular dynamics. We analyze the sensitivity of the model with respect to the variation of some parameters such as hydraulic conductivity, cohesion, slope and friction angle, soil depth and fractional order of the generalized infiltration model. In addition, we consider both regular and random particle configurations. The results of our simulations are found to be in agreement with real landslides. In particular, the mean velocity patterns of the simulated landslides appear extremely similar to the observed ones. Moreover, it is possible to apply the method of the inverse surface displacement

  18. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  19. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  20. Modelling multi-phase liquid-sediment scour and resuspension induced by rapid flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) accelerated with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourtakas, G.; Rogers, B. D.

    2016-06-01

    A two-phase numerical model using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is applied to two-phase liquid-sediments flows. The absence of a mesh in SPH is ideal for interfacial and highly non-linear flows with changing fragmentation of the interface, mixing and resuspension. The rheology of sediment induced under rapid flows undergoes several states which are only partially described by previous research in SPH. This paper attempts to bridge the gap between the geotechnics, non-Newtonian and Newtonian flows by proposing a model that combines the yielding, shear and suspension layer which are needed to predict accurately the global erosion phenomena, from a hydrodynamics prospective. The numerical SPH scheme is based on the explicit treatment of both phases using Newtonian and the non-Newtonian Bingham-type Herschel-Bulkley-Papanastasiou constitutive model. This is supplemented by the Drucker-Prager yield criterion to predict the onset of yielding of the sediment surface and a concentration suspension model. The multi-phase model has been compared with experimental and 2-D reference numerical models for scour following a dry-bed dam break yielding satisfactory results and improvements over well-known SPH multi-phase models. With 3-D simulations requiring a large number of particles, the code is accelerated with a graphics processing unit (GPU) in the open-source DualSPHysics code. The implementation and optimisation of the code achieved a speed up of x58 over an optimised single thread serial code. A 3-D dam break over a non-cohesive erodible bed simulation with over 4 million particles yields close agreement with experimental scour and water surface profiles.

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  3. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called “giant fluctuations” of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power −4 of the wavenumber—except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  4. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber—except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  5. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-02-08

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

  6. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and stochastic advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and the self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations is found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study formation of the so-called "giant fluctuations" of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lies on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field are in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity, the power spectra decay as the power -4 of the wavenumber-except for small wavenumbers that diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations, resulting in much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wavenumber. Finally, the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlaying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  7. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kordilla, Jannes; Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-14

    We propose a novel Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) discretization of the fully-coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Navier-Stokes (LLNS) and advection-diffusion equations. The accuracy of the SPH solution of the LLNS equations is demonstrated by comparing the scaling of velocity variance and self-diffusion coefficient with kinetic temperature and particle mass obtained from the SPH simulations and analytical solutions. The spatial covariance of pressure and velocity fluctuations are found to be in a good agreement with theoretical models. To validate the accuracy of the SPH method for the coupled LLNS and advection-diffusion equations, we simulate the interface between two miscible fluids. We study the formation of the so-called giant fluctuations of the front between light and heavy fluids with and without gravity, where the light fluid lays on the top of the heavy fluid. We find that the power spectra of the simulated concentration field is in good agreement with the experiments and analytical solutions. In the absence of gravity the the power spectra decays as the power -4 of the wave number except for small wave numbers which diverge from this power law behavior due to the effect of finite domain size. Gravity suppresses the fluctuations resulting in the much weaker dependence of the power spectra on the wave number. Finally the model is used to study the effect of thermal fluctuation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an unstable dynamics of the front between a heavy fluid overlying a light fluid. The front dynamics is shown to agree well with the analytical solutions.

  8. Influences of sequential cuts on micro-cutting process studied by smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongwei; Liu, Chuang; Cui, Tao; Tian, Ye; Shi, Chengli; Li, Jianping; Huang, Hu

    2013-11-01

    Machined surface properties have a great influence on the service life of component. The residual stress in machined surface layer is affected by the micro-cutting process. Sequential cuts influence the machined surface layer. In this paper, a mesh-less method called SPH (smooth particle hydrodynamic) is used to investigate the effect of sequential cuts and residual stress on chip formation, cutting force and the residual stress in machined surface for oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). In micro-cutting process the cutting edge radius plays a crucial role. The effect of the cutting edge radius on residual stress is also investigated in this paper. The simulation results showed that the chip curled severely and the minimum chip thickness decreased in the second cut because of residual stress in the machined surface after the first cut. Meanwhile, the cutting force in the second cut was smaller than the first cut, while the thrust force was nearly the same during two cuts. In addition, the tensile residual stress beneath the machined surface layer would change to compressive stress after the second cut. Therefore, the residual stress in machined surface can be changed through sequential cuts with proper machining parameters to get high quality machined surface.

  9. Modelling shear flows with smoothed particle hydrodynamics and grid-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junk, Veronika; Walch, Stefanie; Heitsch, Fabian; Burkert, Andreas; Wetzstein, Markus; Schartmann, Marc; Price, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    Given the importance of shear flows for astrophysical gas dynamics, we study the evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) analytically and numerically. We derive the dispersion relation for the two-dimensional KHI including viscous dissipation. The resulting expression for the growth rate is then used to estimate the intrinsic viscosity of four numerical schemes depending on code-specific as well as on physical parameters. Our set of numerical schemes includes the Tree-SPH code VINE, an alternative smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) formulation developed by Price and the finite-volume grid codes FLASH and PLUTO. In the first part, we explicitly demonstrate the effect of dissipation-inhibiting mechanisms such as the Balsara viscosity on the evolution of the KHI. With VINE, increasing density contrasts lead to a continuously increasing suppression of the KHI (with complete suppression from a contrast of 6:1 or higher). The alternative SPH formulation including an artificial thermal conductivity reproduces the analytically expected growth rates up to a density contrast of 10:1. The second part addresses the shear flow evolution with FLASH and PLUTO. Both codes result in a consistent non-viscous evolution (in the equal as well as in the different density case) in agreement with the analytical prediction. The viscous evolution studied with FLASH shows minor deviations from the analytical prediction.

  10. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  11. A smooth particle hydrodynamics code to model collisions between solid, self-gravitating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, C.; Riecker, S.; Maindl, T. I.; Speith, R.; Scherrer, S.; Kley, W.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) lead to a major increase in the performance of the computation of astrophysical simulations. Owing to the different nature of GPU architecture compared to traditional central processing units (CPUs) such as x86 architecture, existing numerical codes cannot be easily migrated to run on GPU. Here, we present a new implementation of the numerical method smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using CUDA and the first astrophysical application of the new code: the collision between Ceres-sized objects. Aims: The new code allows for a tremendous increase in speed of astrophysical simulations with SPH and self-gravity at low costs for new hardware. Methods: We have implemented the SPH equations to model gas, liquids and elastic, and plastic solid bodies and added a fragmentation model for brittle materials. Self-gravity may be optionally included in the simulations and is treated by the use of a Barnes-Hut tree. Results: We find an impressive performance gain using NVIDIA consumer devices compared to our existing OpenMP code. The new code is freely available to the community upon request. If you are interested in our CUDA SPH code miluphCUDA, please write an email to Christoph Schäfer. miluphCUDA is the CUDA port of miluph. miluph is pronounced [maßl2v]. We do not support the use of the code for military purposes.

  12. A two-dimensional Segmented Boundary Algorithm for complex moving solid boundaries in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasanizade, Sh.; Sousa, J. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    A Segmented Boundary Algorithm (SBA) is proposed to deal with complex boundaries and moving bodies in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Boundaries are formed in this algorithm with chains of lines obtained from the decomposition of two-dimensional objects, based on simple line geometry. Various two-dimensional, viscous fluid flow cases have been studied here using a truly incompressible SPH method with the aim of assessing the capabilities of the SBA. Firstly, the flow over a stationary circular cylinder in a plane channel was analyzed at steady and unsteady regimes, for a single value of blockage ratio. Subsequently, the flow produced by a moving circular cylinder with a prescribed acceleration inside a plane channel was investigated as well. Next, the simulation of the flow generated by the impulsive start of a flat plate, again inside a plane channel, has been carried out. This was followed by the study of confined sedimentation of an elliptic body subjected to gravity, for various density ratios. The set of test cases was completed with the simulation of periodic flow around a sunflower-shaped object. Extensive comparisons of the results obtained here with published data have demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, namely in cases involving complex geometries and moving bodies.

  13. The effect of density estimation on the conservativeness in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Pranav; Kumar, S. S. Prasanna; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a popular mesh-free method for solving a wide range of problems that involve interfaces. In SPH, the Lagrangian nature of the method enables mass conservation to be naturally satisfied. However, satisfying the conservation of momentum and energy are indeed formulation dependent. One major aspect of ensuring conservativeness comes from the density estimation. There are two distinct types of density estimation approaches, namely continuity density approach and summation density approach. Both approaches are indeed popular with single and multi-phase flow communities. In the present study, we assess the role of density evaluation on the conservativeness, using several representative numerical examples. In particular, we have simulated the Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem, Non-Boussinesq lock exchange problem, bubble rise in water column etc. Although for shorter time scales of simulation, both methods have similar conservative properties, we observe that for longer time scales, summation-density approach is better. For free surface detection and normal vector computations, efficient computational procedures have been devised.

  14. Shock-produced ejecta from tin: Comparative study by molecular dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachkov, S. A.; Parshikov, A. N.; Zhakhovsky, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental methods of observation of early stage of shock-induced ejecta from metal surface with micrometer-sized perturbations are still limited in terms of following a complete sequence of processes having microscale dimensions and nanoscale times. Therefore, simulations by the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods can shed of light on details of micro-jet evolution. The size of simulated sample is too restricted in MD, but the simulations with large enough number of atoms can be scaled well to the sizes of realistic samples. To validate such scaling the comparative MD and SPH simulations of tin samples are performed. SPH simulation takes the realistic experimental sizes, while MD uses the proportionally scaled sizes of samples. It is shown that the velocity and mass distributions along the jets simulated by MD and SPH are in a good agreement. The observed difference in velocity of spikes between MD and experiments can be partially explained by a profound effect of surface tension on jets ejected from the small-scale samples.

  15. Geometrical on-the-fly shock detection in smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A. M.; Dolag, K.; Donnert, J. M. F.

    2016-05-01

    We present an on-the-fly geometrical approach for shock detection and Mach number calculation in simulations employing smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We utilize pressure gradients to select shock candidates and define up- and downstream positions. We obtain hydrodynamical states in the up- and downstream regimes with a series of normal and inverted kernel weightings parallel and perpendicular to the shock normals. Our on-the-fly geometrical Mach detector incorporates well within the SPH formalism and has low computational cost. We implement our Mach detector into the simulation code GADGET and alongside many SPH improvements. We test our shock finder in a sequence of shock tube tests with successively increasing Mach numbers exceeding by far the typical values inside galaxy clusters. For all shocks, we resolve the shocks well and the correct Mach numbers are assigned. An application to a strong magnetized shock tube gives stable results in full magnetohydrodynamic setups. We simulate a merger of two idealized galaxy clusters and study the shock front. Shock structures within the merging clusters as well as the cluster shock are well captured by our algorithm and assigned correct Mach numbers.

  16. Deformation of Soft Tissue and Force Feedback Using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Ruiyi; Li, Yunhua; Song, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    We study the deformation and haptic feedback of soft tissue in virtual surgery based on a liver model by using a force feedback device named PHANTOM OMNI developed by SensAble Company in USA. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviors of soft tissue and implementing force feedback, it is still a challenging problem. This paper introduces a kind of meshfree method for deformation simulation of soft tissue and force computation based on viscoelastic mechanical model and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Firstly, viscoelastic model can present the mechanical characteristics of soft tissue which greatly promotes the realism. Secondly, SPH has features of meshless technique and self-adaption, which supply higher precision than methods based on meshes for force feedback computation. Finally, a SPH method based on dynamic interaction area is proposed to improve the real time performance of simulation. The results reveal that SPH methodology is suitable for simulating soft tissue deformation and force feedback calculation, and SPH based on dynamic local interaction area has a higher computational efficiency significantly compared with usual SPH. Our algorithm has a bright prospect in the area of virtual surgery. PMID:26417380

  17. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. II. ECCENTRIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Despite numerous efforts to better understand binary star evolution, some aspects of it remain poorly constrained. In particular, the evolution of eccentric binaries has remained elusive mainly because the Roche lobe formalism derived for circular binaries does not apply. Here we report the results of our smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in eccentric binaries using an alternate method in which we model only the outermost layers of the stars with appropriate boundary conditions. Using this technique, along with properly relaxed model stars, we characterize the mass transfer episodes of binaries with various orbital parameters. In particular, we show that these episodes can be described by Gaussians with an FWHM of {approx}0.12P{sub orb} and that the peak rates occur after periastron, at an orbital phase of {approx}0.58, independently of the eccentricity and mass of the stars. The accreted material is observed to form a rather sparse envelope around either or both stars. Although the fate of this envelope is not modeled in our simulations, we show that a constant fraction ({approx}5%) of the material transferred is ejected from the systems. We discuss this result in terms of the non-conservative mass transfer scenario. We suggest that our results could be incorporated in analytical and binary population synthesis studies to help better understand the evolution of eccentric binaries and the formation of exotic stellar populations.

  18. Deformation of Soft Tissue and Force Feedback Using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Ruiyi; Li, Yunhua; Song, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    We study the deformation and haptic feedback of soft tissue in virtual surgery based on a liver model by using a force feedback device named PHANTOM OMNI developed by SensAble Company in USA. Although a significant amount of research efforts have been dedicated to simulating the behaviors of soft tissue and implementing force feedback, it is still a challenging problem. This paper introduces a kind of meshfree method for deformation simulation of soft tissue and force computation based on viscoelastic mechanical model and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Firstly, viscoelastic model can present the mechanical characteristics of soft tissue which greatly promotes the realism. Secondly, SPH has features of meshless technique and self-adaption, which supply higher precision than methods based on meshes for force feedback computation. Finally, a SPH method based on dynamic interaction area is proposed to improve the real time performance of simulation. The results reveal that SPH methodology is suitable for simulating soft tissue deformation and force feedback calculation, and SPH based on dynamic local interaction area has a higher computational efficiency significantly compared with usual SPH. Our algorithm has a bright prospect in the area of virtual surgery.

  19. Ejecta from shocked metals: comparative simulations using molecular dynamics and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachkov, Sergey; Parshikov, Anatoly; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2015-06-01

    The machining of materials produces regular micrometer-sized surface perturbations. The microscopic cumulative jets can be generated from such surface under shock loading. It is a problem to trace space-time evolution of such jets with good enough resolution in experimental conditions. Comparative simulations by molecular dynamics (MD) and smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods, using an equation of state consistent with the employed interatomic potential, can shed of light on details of jet formation. The realistic experimental samples can be directly simulated by SPH method, while the linear size of a MD sample is restricted by the order of 100 nm. To compare the SPH and MD simulations the MD results must to be scaled to micrometer-sized samples. We demonstrate that the scaling provides the similar jet velocity profiles and mass distributions obtained by both methods. Furthermore, the simulated results agree well with the experimental observations with Copper and Tin. The effect of surface tension, which guides evolution of nanoscale-sized jet shape, may lead to discrepancies between MD and SPH simulations, especially for weak shocks and small surface perturbations.

  20. On the feasibility of using smoothed particle hydrodynamics for underwater explosion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.W.; Attaway, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) is a gridless Lagrangian technique which is appealing as a possible alternative to numerical techniques currently used to analyze high deformation impulsive loading events. In the present study, the SPH algorithm has been subjected to detailed testing and analysis to determine the feasibility of using PRONTO/SPH for the analysis of various types of underwater explosion problems involving fluid-structure and shock-structure interactions. Of particular interest are effects of bubble formation and collapse and the permanent deformation of thin walled structures due to these loadings. These are exceptionally difficult problems to model. Past attempts with various types of codes have not been satisfactory. Coupling SPH into the finite element code PRONTO represents a new approach to the problem. Results show that the method is well-suited for transmission of loads from underwater explosions to nearby structures, but the calculation of late time effects due to acceleration of gravity and bubble buoyancy will require additional development, and possibly coupling with implicit or incompressible methods.

  1. Computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for shared-memory parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Daisuke; Furuichi, Mikito; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2015-09-01

    The computational performance of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation is investigated for three types of current shared-memory parallel computer devices: many integrated core (MIC) processors, graphics processing units (GPUs), and multi-core CPUs. We are especially interested in efficient shared-memory allocation methods for each chipset, because the efficient data access patterns differ between compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming for GPUs and OpenMP programming for MIC processors and multi-core CPUs. We first introduce several parallel implementation techniques for the SPH code, and then examine these on our target computer architectures to determine the most effective algorithms for each processor unit. In addition, we evaluate the effective computing performance and power efficiency of the SPH simulation on each architecture, as these are critical metrics for overall performance in a multi-device environment. In our benchmark test, the GPU is found to produce the best arithmetic performance as a standalone device unit, and gives the most efficient power consumption. The multi-core CPU obtains the most effective computing performance. The computational speed of the MIC processor on Xeon Phi approached that of two Xeon CPUs. This indicates that using MICs is an attractive choice for existing SPH codes on multi-core CPUs parallelized by OpenMP, as it gains computational acceleration without the need for significant changes to the source code.

  2. On the dynamics of nonlinear, unsteady landslide flow within the smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostova, O.; Averbukh, E.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study the idea of landslide modeling by particle method is described. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics was invented in 1977 by Leon Lucy and independently by Bob Gingold and Joe Monaghan [1]. It was used for astrophysics phenomena's simulation. Later it was adapted for hydrodynamics, gas dynamics and solid body problems. Landslides can be caused by the influence of different factors. Landslides occur when the angle of inclination of the slope of the slope or if the slope is burdened with loose material. A landslide flow is a thin homogeneous layer of nearly incompressible fluid. It is considered that at the initial moment shifted part of a ground mass is splitting and turning into liquid of several layers which then is streaming down along the slope. The landslide flow motion is described with the Navie-Stocks set of equations: D→u-= - 1\\upsidedownBigTriangle P + μ \\upsidedownBigTriangle →u + g Dt ρ (1) D-ρ = 0, Dt (2) where u is velocity vector, t is time, ρ is a flow density, P is a pressure, μ is a viscosity coefficient, g is gravity. Continuum discretization by finite number of lagrangian particles is the main idea of SPH [2,3]. Particles moves with the flow and arbitrary connectivity is allowed. Therefore, SPH does not need a grid to calculate spatial derivatives. For any field A(r), involved in equation (1), e.g. pressure, density, viscosity etc., we consider an approximation with a finite function: A(r) = ∫ω A (r')W (r- r',h)dr' (3) where A is a desired field, r is a radius-vector, W is an interpolating kernel. The free boundary condition problem is discussed. Finding the particles on a free surface is described. Also the surface tension force defining is shown. Described method is implemented and mathematical modeling of landslide flows motion along slope is simulated. Different types of slopes are considered: with constant and variable steepness, long and wide. Wave-breaking effects near the wall are shown. Findings are analyzed

  3. Turbulent gas motions in galaxy cluster simulations: the role of smoothed particle hydrodynamics viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolag, K.; Vazza, F.; Brunetti, G.; Tormen, G.

    2005-12-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) employs an artificial viscosity to properly capture hydrodynamic shock waves. In its original formulation, the resulting numerical viscosity is large enough to suppress structure in the velocity field on scales well above the nominal resolution limit, and to damp the generation of turbulence by fluid instabilities. This could artificially suppress random gas motions in the intracluster medium (ICM), which are driven by infalling structures during the hierarchical structure formation process. We show that this is indeed the case by analysing results obtained with an SPH formulation where an individual, time-variable viscosity is used for each particle, following a suggestion by Morris & Monaghan. Using test calculations involving strong shocks, we demonstrate that this scheme captures shocks as well as the original formulation of SPH, but, in regions away from shocks, the numerical viscosity is much smaller. In a set of nine high-resolution simulations of cosmological galaxy cluster formation, we find that this low-viscosity formulation of SPH produces substantially higher levels of turbulent gas motions in the ICM, reaching a kinetic energy content in random gas motions (measured within a 1-Mpc cube) of up to 5-30 per cent of the thermal energy content, depending on cluster mass. This also has significant effects on radial gas profiles and bulk cluster properties. We find a central flattening of the entropy profile and a reduction of the central gas density in the low-viscosity scheme. As a consequence, the bolometric X-ray luminosity is decreased by about a factor of 2. However, the cluster temperature profile remains essentially unchanged. Interestingly, this tends to reduce the differences seen in SPH and adaptive mesh refinement simulations of cluster formation. Finally, invoking a model for particle acceleration by magnetohydrodynamics waves driven by turbulence, we find that efficient electron acceleration and thus

  4. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  5. Spherical Harmonic-based Random Fields Based on Real Particle 3D Data: Improved Numerical Algorithm and Quantitative Comparison to Real Particles

    SciTech Connect

    X Liu; E Garboczi; m Grigoriu; Y Lu; S Erdogan

    2011-12-31

    Many parameters affect the cyclone efficiency, and these parameters can have different effects in different flow regimes. Therefore the maximum-efficiency cyclone length is a function of the specific geometry and operating conditions in use. In this study, we obtained a relationship describing the minimum particle diameter or maximum cyclone efficiency by using a theoretical approach based on cyclone geometry and fluid properties. We have compared the empirical predictions with corresponding literature data and observed good agreement. The results address the importance of fluid properties. Inlet and vortex finder cross-sections, cone-apex diameter, inlet Reynolds number and surface roughness are found to be the other important parameters affecting cyclone height. The surface friction coefficient, on the other hand, is difficult to employ in the calculations.We developed a theoretical approach to find the maximum-efficiency heights for cyclones with tangential inlet and we suggested a relation for this height as a function of cyclone geometry and operating parameters. In order to generalize use of the relation, two dimensionless parameters, namely for geometric and operational variables, we defined and results were presented in graphical form such that one can calculate and enter the values of these dimensionless parameters and then can find the maximum efficiency height of his own specific cyclone.

  6. Insights from inside the spinodal: Bridging thermalization time scales with smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We report the influence of the strength of heat bath coupling on the demixing behavior in spinodal decomposing one component liquid-vapor systems. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with a van der Waals equation of state is used for the simulation. A thermostat for SPH is introduced that is based on the Berendsen thermostat. It controls the strength of heat bath coupling and allows for quenches with exponential temperature decay at a certain thermalization time scale. The present method allows us to bridge several orders of magnitude in the thermalization time scale. The early stage is highly affected by the choice of time scale. A transition from exponential growth to a 1/2 ordinary power law scaling in the characteristic lengths is observed. At high initial temperatures the growth is logarithmic. The comparison with pure thermal simulations reveals latent heat to raise the mean system temperature. Large thermalization time scales and thermal conductivity are figured out to affect a stagnation of heating, which is explained with convective processes. Furthermore, large thermalization time scales are responsible for a stagnation of growth of domains, which is temporally embedded between early and late stage of phase separation. Therefore, it is considered as an intermediate stage. We present an aspect concerning this stage, namely that choosing larger thermalization time scales increases the duration. Moreover, it is observed that diffuse interfaces are formed during this stage, provided that the stage is apparent. We show that the differences in the evolution between pure thermal simulations and simulations with an instantaneously scaled mean temperature can be explained by the thermalization process, since a variation of the time scale allows for the bridging between these cases of limit. PMID:27627369

  7. Chemo-Dynamical Evolution of Disk Galaxies, Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczik, P.

    In this paper I present, the new Chemo-Dynamical code, incorporated to the standard Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (CD-SPH). This code used to modelling the complex evolution of disk galaxy systems. The more detailed description of SPH code and the Star Formation (SF) and Super Novae (SN) algorithms you can find in our earlier work Berczik P. & Kravchuk S.G., 1996, ApSpSci, 245, 27. The galaxy presented via tree component system. The Dark Matter Halo described as an external gravitational potential with distribution of Dark Matter density (Burkert A. 1995, ApJ, 447, L25): ρDM (r) = frac ρ0 (1 + r / r0) cdot (1 + r / r0)2. The total mass of Dark Matter Halo is 1012 Modot. The second component is a hot coronal gas, with Thot ~106 K. This component presented as a uniformly distributed SPH gas with initial solid body rotation and with additisional random velocity component Δ V ~100 km/sec. The total mass of this component is 5 cdot 1010 Modot. The last component is a cold gas (Tcold ~104 K). This component presented also as a uniformly distributed SPH gas with initial solid body rotation and with additional random velocity component Δ V ~10 km/sec. The total mass of this component also is 5 cdot 1010 Modot. In the paper presented a more complex and may be more realistic incorporation of SF & SN in the SPH code. The presented calculation is clearly show, what the some interestiong and important properties of isolated disk galaxies we can explain using this simple, tree component "collapsing" model. In the frame of this approach we are able to reproduce the presently observed kinematics of star and gaseous components as well as their distributions and heavy element abundances. The developed model provide the realystic description of dynamics and chemical evolution of typical disk galaxies over the Hubble timescale.

  8. Galaxy mergers on a moving mesh: a comparison with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Christopher C.; Torrey, Paul; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Galaxy mergers have been investigated for decades using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), but recent work highlighting inaccuracies inherent in the traditional SPH technique calls into question the reliability of previous studies. We explore this issue by comparing a suite of GADGET-3 SPH simulations of idealized (i.e. non-cosmological) isolated discs and galaxy mergers with otherwise identical calculations performed using the moving-mesh code AREPO. When black hole (BH) accretion and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback are not included, the star formation histories (SFHs) obtained from the two codes agree well. When BHs are included, the code- and resolution-dependent variations in the SFHs are more significant, but the agreement is still good, and the stellar mass formed over the course of a simulation is robust to variations in the numerical method. During a merger, the gas morphology and phase structure are initially similar prior to the starburst phase. However, once a hot gaseous halo has formed from shock heating and AGN feedback (when included), the agreement is less good. In particular, during the post-starburst phase, the SPH simulations feature more prominent hot gaseous haloes and spurious clumps, whereas with AREPO, gas clumps and filaments are less apparent and the hot halo gas can cool more efficiently. We discuss the origin of these differences and explain why the SPH technique yields trustworthy results for some applications (such as the idealized isolated disc and galaxy merger simulations presented here) but not others (e.g. gas flows on to galaxies in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations).

  9. The Emergence of Negative Superhumps in Cataclysmic Variables: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David M.; Wood, Matt A.

    2015-04-01

    Negative superhumps are believed to arise in cataclysmic variable systems when the accretion disk is tilted with respect to the orbital plane. Slow retrograde precession of the line-of-nodes results in a signal—the negative superhump—with a period slightly less than the orbital period. Previous studies have shown that tilted disks exhibit negative superhumps, but a consensus on how a disk initially tilts has not been reached. Analytical work by Lai (1999, ApJ, 524, 1030) suggests that a magnetic field on the primary can lead to a tilt instability in a disk when the dipole moment is offset in angle from the spin axis of the primary and when the primary’s spin axis is, itself, not aligned with the angular momentum axis of the binary orbit. However, Lai did not apply his work to the formation of negative superhumps. In this paper, we add Lai’s model to an existing smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. Using this code, we demonstrate the emergence of negative superhumps in the “light curve” for a range of magnetic dipole moments. We show that the period deficits calculated from these negative superhumps match those in simulations using manually tilted disks. When positive superhumps appear (q≲ 0.33), we show that the period excesses calculated from these signals are also consistent with previous results. Using examples, we show that the disks are tilted, though the tilt varies periodically, and that they precess in the retrograde direction. The magnetic fields found to lead to the emergence of negative superhumps lie in the kilogauss regime.

  10. Insights from inside the spinodal: Bridging thermalization time scales with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We report the influence of the strength of heat bath coupling on the demixing behavior in spinodal decomposing one component liquid-vapor systems. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with a van der Waals equation of state is used for the simulation. A thermostat for SPH is introduced that is based on the Berendsen thermostat. It controls the strength of heat bath coupling and allows for quenches with exponential temperature decay at a certain thermalization time scale. The present method allows us to bridge several orders of magnitude in the thermalization time scale. The early stage is highly affected by the choice of time scale. A transition from exponential growth to a 1 /2 ordinary power law scaling in the characteristic lengths is observed. At high initial temperatures the growth is logarithmic. The comparison with pure thermal simulations reveals latent heat to raise the mean system temperature. Large thermalization time scales and thermal conductivity are figured out to affect a stagnation of heating, which is explained with convective processes. Furthermore, large thermalization time scales are responsible for a stagnation of growth of domains, which is temporally embedded between early and late stage of phase separation. Therefore, it is considered as an intermediate stage. We present an aspect concerning this stage, namely that choosing larger thermalization time scales increases the duration. Moreover, it is observed that diffuse interfaces are formed during this stage, provided that the stage is apparent. We show that the differences in the evolution between pure thermal simulations and simulations with an instantaneously scaled mean temperature can be explained by the thermalization process, since a variation of the time scale allows for the bridging between these cases of limit.

  11. Spherical tensor multipolar electrostatics and smooth particle mesh Ewald summation: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-07-01

    The point-charge approximation, typically used by classical molecular mechanics force-fields, can be overcome by a multipolar expansion. For decades multipole moments were only used in the context of the rigid body approximation but recently it has become possible to combine multipolar electrostatics with molecular flexibility. The program DL_MULTI, which is derived from DL_POLY_2, includes efficient multipolar Ewald functionality up to the hexadecapole moment but the code is restricted to rigid bodies. The incorporation of flexibility into DL_MULTI would cause too large an impact on its architecture whereas the package DL_POLY_4 offers a more attractive and sustainable route to handle multipolar electrostatics. This package inherently handles molecular flexibility, which warrants sufficiently transferable atoms or atoms that are "knowledgeable" about their chemical environment (as made possible by quantum chemical topology and machine learning). DL_MULTI uses the spherical multipole formalism, which is mathematically more involved than the Cartesian one but which is more compact. DL_POLY_4 uses the computationally efficient method of smooth particle mesh Ewald (SPME) summation, which has also been parallellized by others. Therefore, combining the strengths of DL_POLY_4 and DL_MULTI poses the challenge of merging SPME with multipolar electrostatics by spherical multipole. In an effort to recast as clearly as possible the principles behind DL_MULTI, its key equations have been reformulated by the more streamlined route involving the algebra of complex numbers, and some of these equations' peculiarities clarified. This article explores theoretically the repercussions of the merging of SPME with spherical multipole electrostatics (as implemented in DL_MULTI). Difficulties in design and implementation of possible future code are discussed.

  12. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  13. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (Ts≈0.96 ) is close to the theoretically derived value of Ts=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:26274283

  15. Insights from inside the spinodal: Bridging thermalization time scales with smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We report the influence of the strength of heat bath coupling on the demixing behavior in spinodal decomposing one component liquid-vapor systems. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with a van der Waals equation of state is used for the simulation. A thermostat for SPH is introduced that is based on the Berendsen thermostat. It controls the strength of heat bath coupling and allows for quenches with exponential temperature decay at a certain thermalization time scale. The present method allows us to bridge several orders of magnitude in the thermalization time scale. The early stage is highly affected by the choice of time scale. A transition from exponential growth to a 1/2 ordinary power law scaling in the characteristic lengths is observed. At high initial temperatures the growth is logarithmic. The comparison with pure thermal simulations reveals latent heat to raise the mean system temperature. Large thermalization time scales and thermal conductivity are figured out to affect a stagnation of heating, which is explained with convective processes. Furthermore, large thermalization time scales are responsible for a stagnation of growth of domains, which is temporally embedded between early and late stage of phase separation. Therefore, it is considered as an intermediate stage. We present an aspect concerning this stage, namely that choosing larger thermalization time scales increases the duration. Moreover, it is observed that diffuse interfaces are formed during this stage, provided that the stage is apparent. We show that the differences in the evolution between pure thermal simulations and simulations with an instantaneously scaled mean temperature can be explained by the thermalization process, since a variation of the time scale allows for the bridging between these cases of limit.

  16. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modeling of Gravity Currents on a Dry Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, E.; Grimaldi, S.; Bui, H.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity currents flowing over porous media occur in many environmental processes and industrial applications, such as irrigation, benthic boundary layers, and oil spills. The coupling of the flow over the porous surface and the infiltration of the fluid in the porous media is complex and difficult to model. Of particular interest is the prediction of the position of the runoff front and the depth of the infiltration front. We present here a model for the flow of a finite volume of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid over a dry, homogenous porous medium. The Navier-Stokes equations describing the runoff flow are coupled to the Volume Averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the infiltration flow. The numerical solution of these equations is challenging because of the presence of two free surfaces (runoff and infiltration waves), the lack of fixed boundary conditions at the runoff front, and the difficulties in defining appropriate conditions at the surface of the porous medium. The first two challenges were addressed by using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, which is a Lagrangian, mesh-free particle method particularly suitable for modelling free surface flows. Two different approaches were used to model the flow conditions at the surface of the porous medium. The Two Domain Approach (TDA) assumes that runoff and infiltration flows occur in two separate homogenous domains; here, we assume the continuity of velocity and stresses at the interface of the two domains. The One Domain Approach (ODA) models runoff and infiltration flows as occurring through a medium whose hydraulic properties vary continuously in space. The transition from the hydraulic properties of the atmosphere and the porous medium occur in a layer near the surface of the porous medium. Expressions listed in literature were used to compute the thickness of this transition layer and the spatial variation of porosity and permeability within it. Our results showed that ODA led to slower velocities of the runoff

  17. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  18. Digital relief generation from 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meili; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongming; Qian, Kun; Chang, Jian; He, Dongjian

    2016-09-01

    It is difficult to extend image-based relief generation to high-relief generation, as the images contain insufficient height information. To generate reliefs from three-dimensional (3D) models, it is necessary to extract the height fields from the model, but this can only generate bas-reliefs. To overcome this problem, an efficient method is proposed to generate bas-reliefs and high-reliefs directly from 3D meshes. To produce relief features that are visually appropriate, the 3D meshes are first scaled. 3D unsharp masking is used to enhance the visual features in the 3D mesh, and average smoothing and Laplacian smoothing are implemented to achieve better smoothing results. A nonlinear variable scaling scheme is then employed to generate the final bas-reliefs and high-reliefs. Using the proposed method, relief models can be generated from arbitrary viewing positions with different gestures and combinations of multiple 3D models. The generated relief models can be printed by 3D printers. The proposed method provides a means of generating both high-reliefs and bas-reliefs in an efficient and effective way under the appropriate scaling factors.

  19. Particle tracking velocimetry and particle image velocimetry study of the slow motion of rough and smooth solid spheres in a yield-stress fluid.

    PubMed

    Holenberg, Yulia; Lavrenteva, Olga M; Shavit, Uri; Nir, Avinoam

    2012-12-01

    We report experimental evidence of an effect opposite to the "solidification" of small bubbles in liquid where the surface can become immobile. Namely, it is demonstrated that smooth solid spheres falling in a yield-stress fluid under the action of gravity can behave similar to drops. Particle tracking velocimetry was used to determine the shape of the yielded region around solid spherical particles undergoing slow stationary motion in 0.07% w/w Carbopol gel due to gravity under creeping flow conditions. The flow field inside the yielded region was determined by particle image velocimetry. It was found that the shape of the yielded region and the flow field around slow-moving rough particles is similar to the published results of numerical simulations, whereas those around smooth spheres resemble the experimental results obtained for viscous drops. The effect was explained by a slip of the gel on the smooth surface. Most likely, the slip originated from seepage of clean water from the gel, forming a thin lubricating layer near the solid surface.

  20. A faster algorithm for smoothed particle hydrodynamics with radiative transfer in the flux-limited diffusion approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Stuart C.; Bate, Matthew R.; Monaghan, Joe J.

    2005-12-01

    We describe a new, faster implicit algorithm for solving the radiation hydrodynamics equations in the flux-limited diffusion approximation for smoothed particle hydrodynamics. This improves on the method elucidated in Whitehouse and Bate by using a Gauss-Seidel iterative method rather than iterating over the exchange of energy between pairs of particles. The new algorithm is typically many thousands of times faster than the old one, which will enable more complex problems to be solved. The new algorithm is tested using the same tests performed by Turner and Stone for ZEUS-2D, and repeated by Whitehouse and Bate.

  1. Improving smoothed particle hydrodynamics with an integral approach to calculating gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, D.; Cabezón, R. M.; Escartín, J. A.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is a well-known numerical method that has been applied to simulate the evolution of a wide variety of systems. Modern astrophysical applications of the method rely on the Lagrangian formulation of fluid Euler equations, which is fully conservative. A different scheme, based on a matrix approach to the SPH equations is currently being used in computational fluid dynamics. These matrix formulations achieve better interpolations of the physical magnitudes but they are, in general, not fully conservative. The matrix approach to the Euler equations has never been used in astrophysics. Aims: We develop and test a fully conservative SPH scheme based on a tensor formulation that can be applied to simulate astrophysical systems. Methods: In the proposed scheme, derivatives are calculated from an integral expression that leads to a tensor (instead of a vectorial) estimation of gradients and reduces to the standard formulation in the continuum limit. The new formulation improves the interpolation of physical magnitudes, leading to a set of conservative equations that resembles those of standard SPH. The resulting scheme is verified using a variety of well-known tests, all of them simulated in two dimensions. We also discuss an application of the proposed tensor method to astrophysics by simulating the stability of a Sun-like polytrope calculated in three dimensions. Results: The proposed scheme is able to improve the results of standard SPH in the two-dimensional tests, especially in the simulation of subsonic hydrodynamic instabilities. Our results for the stability of the Sun-like polytrope suggest that the new method can be used in astrophysics to carry out three-dimensional calculations with a computational cost that is only slightly higher (i.e. ≤50% for a serial code) than that of a standard SPH formulation. Conclusions: A formalism based on a matrix approach to Euler SPH equations was developed and checked

  2. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  3. Convergence of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs: sensitivity to the implementation of radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. K. M.; Forgan, D. H.; Armitage, P. J.

    2012-02-01

    Recent simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs, carried out using a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code by Meru & Bate, have been interpreted as implying that three-dimensional global discs fragment much more easily than would be expected from a two-dimensional local model. Subsequently, global and local two-dimensional models have been shown to display similar fragmentation properties, leaving it unclear whether the three-dimensional results reflect a physical effect or a numerical problem associated with the treatment of cooling or artificial viscosity in SPH. Here, we study how fragmentation of self-gravitating disc flows in SPH depends upon the implementation of cooling. We run disc simulations that compare a simple cooling scheme, in which each particle loses energy based upon its internal energy per unit mass, with a method in which the cooling is derived from a smoothed internal energy density field. For the simple per particle cooling scheme, we find a significant increase in the minimum cooling time-scale for fragmentation with increasing resolution, matching previous results. Switching to smoothed cooling, however, results in lower critical cooling time-scales, and tentative evidence for convergence at the highest spatial resolution tested. We conclude that precision studies of fragmentation using SPH require careful consideration of how cooling (and, probably, artificial viscosity) is implemented, and that the apparent non-convergence of the fragmentation boundary seen in prior simulations is likely a numerical effect. In real discs, where cooling is physically smoothed by radiative transfer effects, the fragmentation boundary is probably displaced from the two-dimensional value by a factor that is only of the order of unity.

  4. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  5. Swine confinement buildings: effects of airborne particles and settled dust on airway smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Demanche, Annick; Bonlokke, Jakob; Beaulieu, Marie-Josee; Assayag, Evelyne; Cormier, Yvon

    2009-01-01

    Swine confinement workers are exposed to various contaminants. These agents can cause airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. This study was undertaken to evaluate if the bronchoconstrictive effects of swine barn air and settled dust are mediated by endotoxin, and if these effects are directly mediated on airway smooth muscles. Mouse tracheas where isolated and mounted isometrically in organ baths. Tracheas, with or without epithelium, were attached to a force transducer and tension was recorded. Concentrated swine building air at 68 EU/ml or settled dust extract at 0.01 g/ml were added for 20 minutes and tracheal smooth muscle contraction was measured. Direct role of LPS was assessed by removing it from air concentrates with an endotoxin affinity resin. Swine barn air and settled dust extract caused contraction of tracheal smooth muscle by 26 and 20%, respectively, of the maximal induced by methacholine. Removal of epithelium did not affect the contractile effects. LPS alone and LPS with peptidoglycans did not induce contraction. However, when endotoxin was removed from swine barn air concentrates, it lost 24% of its contractile effect. Concentrated swine barn air and settled dust have direct effects on airway smooth muscles. This effect is partially due to LPS but a synergy with other components of the environment of swine confinement buildings is required. PMID:20047256

  6. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  7. Investigating the relationships between peristaltic contraction and fluid transport in the human colon using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, M D; Cleary, P W; Arkwright, J W; Dinning, P G

    2012-04-01

    Complex relationships exist between gut contractility and the flow of digesta. We propose here a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model coupling the flow of luminal content and wall flexure to help investigate these relationships. The model indicates that a zone of muscular relaxation preceding the contraction is an important element for transport. Low pressures in this zone generate positive thrust for low viscosity content. The viscosity of luminal content controls the localization of the flow and the magnitude of the radial pressure gradient and together with contraction amplitude they control the transport rate. For high viscosity content, high lumen occlusion is required for effective propulsion. PMID:22297431

  8. Using 3D Multi-Fluid Simulations to Investigate the Periodicity of the Auroral Brightness at Ganymede and its Dependence on Precipitating Particle Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payan, A. P.; Paty, C. S.; Retherford, K. D.; Bonfond, B.

    2011-12-01

    The electrodynamic interaction of Ganymede's mini-magnetosphere with Jupiter's co-rotating magnetospheric plasma has been shown to give rise to strong current systems closing through the moon and its ionosphere as well as through its magnetopause and magnetotail current sheet. This interaction is strongly evidenced by the presence of aurorae at Ganymede and Ganymede's bright auroral footprint in Jupiter's ionosphere. This footprint is located equatorward of the main auroral emissions, at the magnetic longitude of the field line threading Ganymede. The brightness of Ganymede's auroral footprint at Jupiter along with its latitudinal position have been shown to depend on the position of Ganymede relative to the Jovian plasma sheet and on the variations of the current flowing in the Jovian current sheet. Previous studies based on ultraviolet images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have demonstrated that the size of the auroral footprint was not limited to that of the moon alone. Rather, it mapped to a region corresponding to Ganymede's magnetosphere (Grodent et al., 2009). It was recently shown that Ganymede's auroral footprint brightness is characterized by three timescales of variations: a long 5-hour periodic variation, a non-systematic 10-40-minute variation, and a short 100-second quasi-periodic variation (Grodent et al., 2009). As for Ganymede's aurora, observations with the HST revealed longitudinally non-uniform oxygen emissions, with the brightest emissions confined to the geomagnetic latitudes defining the boundaries of the polar caps (Feldman et al., 2000). The goal of the present study is to examine the relationship between the longest and the shortest timescale periodicities of Ganymede's auroral footprint brightness and local processes occurring at Ganymede, using a 3D multi-fluid model. The model allows characterization of the interaction between Ganymede's magnetosphere and the local Jovian plasma environment by tracking the energies and

  9. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite-size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Simon; Gibert, Mathieu; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-02-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation and the rotation of finite-size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/η ≈ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ≈ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second-order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. This measurement technique has many additional advantages that will make it useful to address other problems such as particle collisions, dynamics of non-spherical solid objects, or even of wet granular matter.

  10. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, Mathieu; Klein, Simon; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-11-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that renders them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp / η ~ 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale η in a von Kármán swirling water flow (Rλ ~ 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the interaction zone between the particle and the flow develops in a spherical shell of width 2Rp around the particle of radius Rp. This we interpret as an indication of a wake induced by the particle. (http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.2181) This work was funded generously by the Max Planck Society and the Marie Curie Fellowship, Program PEOPLE - Call FP7-PEOPLE-IEF-2008 Proposal No 237521. Support from COST Action MP0806 is kindly acknowledged.

  11. Parallel Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) with improved treatment of Boundary Conditions and an application to granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Patra, A. K.; Pitman, E. B.; Chi, H.

    2013-10-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics has been successfully used for various fluid-dynamics problems, such as breaking-waves, flooding etc., since it was originally proposed. While the Lagrangian approach is naturally suitable for free-surface flows, enforcing boundary conditions and poor approximations in the presence of discontinuities in the solution are major difficulties with the method. In this paper we present an enhanced conservative Godunov SPH based on the work of Inutsuka [S. Inutsuka, Reformulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics with Riemann solver, Journal of Computational Physics 179 (2002) 238-267] that accurately resolves discontinuities without the need to use artificial viscosity, preserves partition of unity everywhere in the domain, correctly and flexibly enforces necessary essential and frictional slip boundary conditions to approximately solve free-surface granular flows. The development is motivated by the need to improve upon depth averaged grid based models of large scale debris flows and avalanches often characterized as granular flows. Simple validation of the results is obtained by comparison to table-top experiments.

  12. 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer modeling of η Carinae's colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.; Icke, V.

    We present results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system η Carinae. We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary star mass-loss rates. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing. While we initially focus on η Car, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty `pinwheel' (WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where various observed time-variable emission and absorption lines form in these unique objects.

  13. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  14. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  15. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  16. 3D Models of Stellar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Booth, R.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Harries, T.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Corradi, R.

    2014-04-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, evolved mass-losing giant and an accreting compact companion. As symbiotic nebulae show similar morphologies to those in planetary nebulae (so much so that it is often difficult to distinguish between the two), they are ideal laboratories for understanding the role a binary companion plays in shaping the circumstellar envelopes in these evolved systems. We will present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of interacting binaries, e.g. R Aquarii and Mira, and discuss the formation of spiral outflows, arcs, shells and equatorial density enhancements.We will also discuss the implications of the former for planetary nebulae, e.g. the Egg Nebula and Cat's Eye, and the latter for the formation of bipolar geometries, e.g. M2-9. We also investigate accretion and angular momentum evolution in symbiotic binaries which may be important to understand the formation of jets and more episodic mass-loss features we see in circumstellar envelopes and the orbital characteristics of binary central stars of planetary nebulae.

  17. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  18. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  19. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  20. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  1. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  2. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics with nonlinear Moving-Least-Squares WENO reconstruction to model anisotropic dispersion in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avesani, Diego; Herrera, Paulo; Chiogna, Gabriele; Bellin, Alberto; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Most numerical schemes applied to solve the advection-diffusion equation are affected by numerical diffusion. Moreover, unphysical results, such as oscillations and negative concentrations, may emerge when an anisotropic dispersion tensor is used, which induces even more severe errors in the solution of multispecies reactive transport. To cope with this long standing problem we propose a modified version of the standard Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method based on a Moving-Least-Squares-Weighted-Essentially-Non-Oscillatory (MLS-WENO) reconstruction of concentrations. This scheme formulation (called MWSPH) approximates the diffusive fluxes with a Rusanov-type Riemann solver based on high order WENO scheme. We compare the standard SPH with the MWSPH for different a few test cases, considering both homogeneous and heterogeneous flow fields and different anisotropic ratios of the dispersion tensor. We show that, MWSPH is stable and accurate and that it reduces the occurrence of negative concentrations compared to standard SPH. When negative concentrations are observed, their absolute values are several orders of magnitude smaller compared to standard SPH. In addition, MWSPH limits spurious oscillations in the numerical solution more effectively than classical SPH. Convergence analysis shows that MWSPH is computationally more demanding than SPH, but with the payoff a more accurate solution, which in addition is less sensitive to particles position. The latter property simplifies the time consuming and often user dependent procedure to define the initial dislocation of the particles.

  3. Effect of lobe pumping on human albumin: development of a lobe pump simulator using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Prakash, Mahesh; Hunt, Ben; Stokes, Nick; Cleary, Paul; Tatford, Owen C; Bertolini, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Using SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), the motion of a lobe pump under load was simulated in order to predict the level of shear stress experienced by a protein solution. By varying the gap size between the lobes and pump housing, variations in pump efficiency and shear stress were determined. The simulations indicated that pump shear was dependent on gap size, with shear stress levels (0-40 Pa) correlating with those estimated in previous albumin-pumping studies. As gap size increased, the number of fluid particles experiencing low shear (<10 Pa) increased, whereas those experiencing high shear (>20 Pa) showed a decreasing trend. The pump efficiency, however, decreased with gap size, requiring more lobe revolutions to pass a unit volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that lobe pumps operated with increased gaps between the rotors and the housing result in larger number of particles within the fluid experiencing shear stresses. Moreover, the simulations indicate that it is best to use larger lobe pumps operated at high efficiency to transfer protein-containing solutions. PMID:16246177

  4. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-05-07

    Background: The calculation of diffusion-controlled ligand binding rates is important for understanding enzyme mechanisms as well as designing enzyme inhibitors. Methods: We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) BC, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new BC treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with “imperfect” reaction rates. Results: The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and thenmore » applied to the calculation of ligand binding to a mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) monomer. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Conclusions: Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.« less

  5. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael D.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to an acetylcholinesterase monomer. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) boundary condition, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new boundary condition treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with "imperfect" reaction rates. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  6. Numerical modelling of shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Siva Prasad A. V.; Basu, Sumit

    2015-10-01

    Shock compaction of reactive powder mixtures to synthesize new materials is one of the oldest material processing techniques and has been studied extensively by several researchers over the past few decades. The quantitative connection between the shock energy imparted and the extent of reaction that can be completed in the small time window associated with the passage of the shock wave is complicated and depends on a large variety of parameters. In particular, our understanding of the complex interplay between the thermo-elasto-viscoplastic behaviour of the granular constituents and their temperature dependent, diffusion-limited reaction mechanism may be enriched through careful numerical simulations. A robust numerical model should be able to handle extremely large deformations coupled with diffusion mediated fast reaction kinetics. In this work, a meshfree discrete particle numerical method based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate shock-induced chemical reactions (SICR) in reactive powder mixtures is proposed. We present a numerical strategy to carry out reactions between reactant powder particles and partition the obtained products between the particles in a manner that accounts for the requirement that the total mass of the entire system remains constant as the reactions occur. Instead of solving the reaction-diffusion problem, we propose a ‘pseudo-diffusion’ model in which a distance dependent reaction rate constant is defined to carry out chemical reaction kinetics. This approach mimics the actual reaction-diffusion process at short times. Our numerical model is demonstrated for the well-studied reaction system Nb  +  2Si \\rightleftharpoons NbSi 2 . The predicted mass fractions of the product obtained from the simulations are in agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the effects of impact speed, particle arrangement and mixing ratio on the predicted product mass fractions are discussed.

  7. Numerical simulation of landslide-generated waves using a soil-water coupling smoothed particle hydrodynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuanqi; An, Yi; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Qingquan; Cao, Zhixian

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the generation of a landslide-induced impulse wave with a newly-developed soil-water coupling model in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. The model includes an elasto-plastic constitutive model for soil, a Navier-Stokes equation based model for water, and a bilateral coupling model at the interface. The model is tested with simulated waves induced by a slow and a fast landslide. Good agreement is obtained between simulation results and experimental data. The generated wave and the deformation of the landslide body can both be resolved satisfactorily. All parameters in our model have their physical meaning in soil mechanics and can be obtained from conventional soil mechanics experiments directly. The influence of the dilatancy angle of soil shows that the non-associated flow rule must be selected, and the value of the dilatancy angle should not be chosen arbitrarily, if it is not determined with relative experiments.

  8. Hourglass control for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics removes tensile and rank-deficiency instabilities. Hourglass control for SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, G. C.; Sauer, M.; May, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a stabilization scheme for elastoplastic Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which overcomes two major challenges: (i) the tensile instability inherent to the updated Lagrangian approach is suppressed and (ii) the rank-deficiency instability inherent to the nodal integration approach is cured. To achieve these goals, lessons learned from the Finite-Element Method are transferred to SPH. In particular, an analogue of hourglass control is derived for SPH, which locally linearizes the deformation field to obtain stable and accurate solutions, without the need to resort to stabilization via excessive artificial viscosity. The resulting SPH scheme combines the ability of updated Lagrangian SPH to model truly large deformations with the accuracy and stability needed to faithfully perform simulations. This claim is supported by the analysis of problematic cases and the simulation of an impact scenario.

  9. Application of SALSSA Framework to the Validation of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations of Low Reynolds Number Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Schuchardt, Karen L.; Chase, Jared M.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2009-06-15

    The Support Architecture for Large-Scale Subsurface Analysis (SALSSA) provides an extensible framework, sophisticated graphical user interface (GUI), and underlying data management system that simplifies the process of running subsurface models, tracking provenance information, and analyzing the model results. The SALSSA software framework is currently being applied to validating the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. SPH is a three-dimensional model of flow and transport in porous media at the pore scale. Fluid flow in porous media at velocities common in natural porous media occur at low Reynolds numbers and therefore it is important to verify that the SPH model is producing accurate flow solutions in this regime. Validating SPH requires performing a series of simulations and comparing these simulation flow solutions to analytical results or numerical results using other methods. This validation study is being facilitated by the SALLSA framework, which provides capabilities to setup, execute, analyze, and administer these SPH simulations.

  10. Calculations of the integral invariant coordinates I and L* in the magnetosphere and mapping of the regions where I is conserved, using a particle tracer (ptr3D v2.0), LANL*, SPENVIS, and IRBEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, K.; Sarris, T.

    2015-09-01

    The integral invariant coordinate I and Roederer's L or L* are proxies for the second and third adiabatic invariants, respectively, that characterize charged particle motion in a magnetic field. Their usefulness lies in the fact that they are expressed in more instructive ways than their counterparts: I is equivalent to the path length of the particle motion between two mirror points, whereas L*, although dimensionless, is equivalent to the distance from the center of the Earth to the equatorial point of a given field line, in units of Earth radii, in the simplified case of a dipole magnetic field. However, care should be taken when calculating the above invariants, as the assumption of their conservation is not valid everywhere in the Earth's magnetosphere. This is not clearly stated in state-of-the-art models that are widely used for the calculation of these invariants. The purpose of this work is thus to investigate where in the near-Earth magnetosphere we can safely calculate I and L* with tools with widespread use in the field of space physics, for various magnetospheric conditions and particle initial conditions. More particularly, in this paper we compare the values of I and L* as calculated using LANL*, an artificial neural network developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, SPENVIS, a space environment online tool, IRBEM, a software library dedicated to radiation belt modeling, and ptr3D, a 3-D particle tracing code that was developed for this study. We then attempt to quantify the variations between the calculations of I and L* of those models. The deviation between the results given by the models depends on particle initial position, pitch angle and magnetospheric conditions. Using the ptr3D v2.0 particle tracer we map the areas in the Earth's magnetosphere where I and L* can be assumed to be conserved by monitoring the constancy of I for energetic protons propagating forwards and backwards in time. These areas are found to be centered on the noon

  11. Uniform Surface Modification of 3D Bioglass(®)-Based Scaffolds with Mesoporous Silica Particles (MCM-41) for Enhancing Drug Delivery Capability.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Elena; Philippart, Anahí; Juhasz-Bortuzzo, Judith A; Beltrán, Ana M; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Spiecker, Erdmann; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-01-01

    The design and characterization of a new family of multifunctional scaffolds based on bioactive glass (BG) of 45S5 composition for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications are presented. These BG-based scaffolds are developed via a replication method of polyurethane packaging foam. In order to increase the therapeutic functionality, the scaffolds were coated with mesoporous silica particles (MCM-41), which act as an in situ drug delivery system. These sub-micron spheres are characterized by large surface area and pore volume with a narrow pore diameter distribution. The solution used for the synthesis of the silica mesoporous particles was designed to obtain a high-ordered mesoporous structure and spherical shape - both are key factors for achieving the desired controlled drug release. The MCM-41 particles were synthesized directly inside the BG-based scaffolds, and the drug-release capability of this combined system was evaluated. Moreover, the effect of MCM-41 particle coating on the bioactivity of the BG-based scaffolds was assessed. The results indicate that it is possible to obtain a multifunctional scaffold system characterized by high and interconnected porosity, high bioactivity, and sustained drug delivery capability. PMID:26594642

  12. Energetic particle spectral and compositional invariance in the 3-D Heliosphere: Comparison between Ulysses and ACE/WIND in late 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, O. E.; Tylka, A. J.; Ng, C. K.; Marsden, R. G.; Tranquille, C.; Patterson, D.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Dorrian, G.

    2012-04-01

    Basic research on Space Weather carried out at the Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics of the National Observatory of Athens within the framework of COMESEP, a collaborative project funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union is presented in this work. We carry out the first detailed examination and comparison of elemental spectra and composition in the late decay phase of two Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in the so-called 'reservoir' regions, between spacecraft widely separated in latitude, as well as in longitude and radial distance in the Heliosphere. Energetic particle data from instruments onboard the Ulysses spacecraft located at a high heliospheric latitude of ~70° N and at a heliocentric distance of ~2.5 AU and from spacecraft at L1 are used in this work. Particle intensities over time are observed to be in close agreement following the shock passage over the widely separated spacecraft. Electron measurements were used to identify the extent of the particle reservoir. Implications of the observations for models of SEP transport are also discussed. Acknowledgments: The presented work has received funding from the European Union FP7 project COMESEP (263252) and has also been supported by NASA under grants NNH09AK79I and NNX09AU98G (AJT).

  13. Solar Energetic Particle spectral and compositional invariance in the 3-D Heliosphere: Ulysses and ACE/WIND comparisons in late 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Marsden, Richard G.; Tranquille, Cecil; Patterson, Doug; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2013-04-01

    We carry out the first detailed examination and comparison of elemental spectra and composition in the late decay phase of two Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in the so-called 'reservoir' regions, between spacecraft widely separated in latitude, as well as in longitude and radial distance in the Heliosphere. Energetic particle data from instruments onboard the Ulysses spacecraft located at a high heliospheric latitude of about 70 deg N and at a heliocentric distance of about 2.5 AU and from spacecraft at L1 are used in this work. Particle intensities over time are observed to be in close agreement following the shock passage over the widely separated spacecraft. Electron measurements were used to identify the extent of the particle reservoir. In this update on reservoir composition studies, we extend our previous work to sub-MeV/nucleon energies, using measurements from HI-SCALE on Ulysses and EPAM on ACE. Implications of the observations for models of SEP transport are also discussed. Acknowledgments: The presented work has received funding from the European Union FP7 project COMESEP (263252) and has also been supported by NASA under grants NNH09AK79I and NNX09AU98G (AJT).

  14. Uniform Surface Modification of 3D Bioglass®-Based Scaffolds with Mesoporous Silica Particles (MCM-41) for Enhancing Drug Delivery Capability

    PubMed Central

    Boccardi, Elena; Philippart, Anahí; Juhasz-Bortuzzo, Judith A.; Beltrán, Ana M.; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Spiecker, Erdmann; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The design and characterization of a new family of multifunctional scaffolds based on bioactive glass (BG) of 45S5 composition for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications are presented. These BG-based scaffolds are developed via a replication method of polyurethane packaging foam. In order to increase the therapeutic functionality, the scaffolds were coated with mesoporous silica particles (MCM-41), which act as an in situ drug delivery system. These sub-micron spheres are characterized by large surface area and pore volume with a narrow pore diameter distribution. The solution used for the synthesis of the silica mesoporous particles was designed to obtain a high-ordered mesoporous structure and spherical shape – both are key factors for achieving the desired controlled drug release. The MCM-41 particles were synthesized directly inside the BG-based scaffolds, and the drug-release capability of this combined system was evaluated. Moreover, the effect of MCM-41 particle coating on the bioactivity of the BG-based scaffolds was assessed. The results indicate that it is possible to obtain a multifunctional scaffold system characterized by high and interconnected porosity, high bioactivity, and sustained drug delivery capability. PMID:26594642

  15. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  16. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  17. The Double Hierarchy Method. A parallel 3D contact method for the interaction of spherical particles with rigid FE boundaries using the DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santasusana, Miquel; Irazábal, Joaquín; Oñate, Eugenio; Carbonell, Josep Maria

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a new methodology for the treatment of the contact interaction between rigid boundaries and spherical discrete elements (DE). Rigid body parts are present in most of large-scale simulations. The surfaces of the rigid parts are commonly meshed with a finite element-like (FE) discretization. The contact detection and calculation between those DE and the discretized boundaries is not straightforward and has been addressed by different approaches. The algorithm presented in this paper considers the contact of the DEs with the geometric primitives of a FE mesh, i.e. facet, edge or vertex. To do so, the original hierarchical method presented by Horner et al. (J Eng Mech 127(10):1027-1032, 2001) is extended with a new insight leading to a robust, fast and accurate 3D contact algorithm which is fully parallelizable. The implementation of the method has been developed in order to deal ideally with triangles and quadrilaterals. If the boundaries are discretized with another type of geometries, the method can be easily extended to higher order planar convex polyhedra. A detailed description of the procedure followed to treat a wide range of cases is presented. The description of the developed algorithm and its validation is verified with several practical examples. The parallelization capabilities and the obtained performance are presented with the study of an industrial application example.

  18. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  19. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  20. Using smooth particle hydrodynamics to investigate femoral cortical bone remodelling at the Haversian level.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J W; Das, R; Cleary, P W; Hunter, P J; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G

    2013-01-01

    In the neck of the femur, about 70% of the strength is contributed by the cortical bone, which is the most highly stressed part of the structure and is the site where failure is almost certainly initiated. A better understanding of cortical bone remodelling mechanisms can help discern changes at this anatomical site, which are essential if an understanding of the mechanisms by which hips weaken and become vulnerable to fracture is to be gained. The aims of this study were to (i) examine a hypothesis that low strain fields arise because of subject-specific Haversian canal distributions causing bone resorption and reduced bone integrity and (ii) introduce the use of a meshless particle-based computational modelling approach SPH to capture bone remodelling features at the level of the Haversian canals. We show that bone remodelling initiated by strain at the Haversian level is highly influenced by the subject-specific pore distribution, bone density, loading and osteocyte density. SPH is shown to be effective at capturing the intricate bone pore shapes that evolved over time.

  1. Application of Smoothed Particle MHD (SPMHD) techniques to the simulation of magnetically confined plasma dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vela-Vela, Luis; Sanchez, Raul; Reynolds-Barredo, J. Miguel

    2015-11-01

    Magnetically confined plasmas relevant for fusion scenarios are, to first approximation, well described by ideal and resistive MHD. This includes the description of their equilibrium and stability properties, as well as their medium-to-long term nonlinear evolution under external forcing. In many of these cases, one needs to deal with magnetic topologies that include magnetic islands, stochastic regions or that require the consideration of free-moving boundaries. The present work is part of an on-going effort to develop of a numerical code capable of dealing with these situations by taking advantage of the SPMHD formalism that, although widely used in astrophysical plasmas, is not widespread within the fusion community. SPMHD is a particle (i.e., Lagrangian) method particularly well-suited to deal with complicated boundaries while retaining great parallelization benefits. Here, we will report on the adaptation of the SPMHD equations to the case of magnetically confined plasmas, several benchmarking tests typical for MHD codes, and some preliminary results obtained for more elaborate scenarios. Our results suggest that our new code (EVA) can be very advantageous to deal with problems of current interest for the fusion community, including tokamaks and stellarators.

  2. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  3. 3D Simulation of External Flooding Events for the RISMC Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Steven; Mandelli, Diego; Sampath, Ramprasad; Smith, Curtis; Lin, Linyu

    2015-09-01

    Incorporating 3D simulations as part of the Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMIC) Toolkit allows analysts to obtain a more complete picture of complex system behavior for events including external plant hazards. External events such as flooding have become more important recently – however these can be analyzed with existing and validated simulated physics toolkits. In this report, we describe these approaches specific to flooding-based analysis using an approach called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. The theory, validation, and example applications of the 3D flooding simulation are described. Integrating these 3D simulation methods into computational risk analysis provides a spatial/visual aspect to the design, improves the realism of results, and can prove visual understanding to validate the analysis of flooding.

  4. Locomotive wheel 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Luo, Zhisheng; Gao, Xiaorong; Wu, Jianle

    2010-08-01

    In the article, a system, which is used to reconstruct locomotive wheels, is described, helping workers detect the condition of a wheel through a direct view. The system consists of a line laser, a 2D camera, and a computer. We use 2D camera to capture the line-laser light reflected by the object, a wheel, and then compute the final coordinates of the structured light. Finally, using Matlab programming language, we transform the coordinate of points to a smooth surface and illustrate the 3D view of the wheel. The article also proposes the system structure, processing steps and methods, and sets up an experimental platform to verify the design proposal. We verify the feasibility of the whole process, and analyze the results comparing to standard date. The test results show that this system can work well, and has a high accuracy on the reconstruction. And because there is still no such application working in railway industries, so that it has practical value in railway inspection system.

  5. 3D radiative transfer in η Carinae: application of the SIMPLEX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations of binary colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-09-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in η Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work, we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in η Car. We use the SIMPLEX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form. We conclude that post-processing 3D SPH data with SIMPLEX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for η Car.

  6. General mechanism and dynamics of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies from 3-D particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lembège, Bertrand; Horányi, Mihály; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We present a general model of the solar wind interaction with a dipolar lunar crustal magnetic anomaly (LMA) using three-dimensional full-kinetic and electromagnetic simulations. We confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface, forming a so-called "minimagnetosphere," as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. We show that the LMA configuration is driven by electron motion because its scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. We identify a population of back-streaming ions, the deflection of magnetized electrons via the E × B drift motion, and the subsequent formation of a halo region of elevated density around the dipole source. Finally, it is shown that the presence and efficiency of the processes are heavily impacted by the upstream plasma conditions and, on their turn, influence the overall structure and evolution of the LMA system. Understanding the detailed physics of the solar wind interaction with LMAs, including magnetic shielding, particle dynamics and surface charging is vital to evaluate its implications for lunar exploration.

  7. 3D geophysical inversion for contact surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. In contrast, standard minimum-structure volumetric inversions (performed on meshes of space-filling cells) recover smooth models inconsistent with such interpretations. There are several approaches through which geophysical inversion can help recover models with the desired characteristics. Some authors have developed iterative strategies in which several volumetric inversions are performed with regularization parameters changing to achieve sharper interfaces at automatically determined locations. Another approach is to redesign the regularization to be consistent with the desired model characteristics, e.g. L1-like norms or compactness measures. A few researchers have taken approaches that limit the recovered values to lie within particular ranges, resulting in sharp discontinuities; these include binary inversion, level set methods and clustering strategies. In most of the approaches mentioned above, the model parameterization considers the physical properties in each of the many space-filling cells within the volume of interest. The exception are level set methods, in which a higher dimensional function is parameterized and the contact surface is determined from the zero-level of that function. However, even level-set methods rely on an underlying volumetric mesh. We are researching a fundamentally different type of inversion that parameterizes the Earth in terms of the contact surfaces between rock units. 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. This wireframe representation allows for flexible and efficient generation of complicated geological structures. Therefore, a natural approach for representing a geophysical model in an inversion is to parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The geological and

  8. A comparison of finite element analysis to smooth particle hydrodynamics for application to projectile impact on cementitious material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordendale, Nikolas A.; Heard, William F.; Sherburn, Jesse A.; Basu, Prodyot K.

    2016-03-01

    The response of structural components of high-strength cementitious (HSC) materials to projectile impact is characterized by high-rate fragmentation resulting from strong compressive shock waves coupled with reflected tensile waves. Accurate modeling of armor panels of such brittle materials under high-velocity projectile impact is a complex problem requiring meticulous experimental characterization of material properties. In a recent paper by the authors, an approach to handle such problems based on a modified Advanced Fundamental Concrete (AFC) constitutive model was developed. In the HSC panels considered in this study, an analogous approach is applied, and the predictions are verified with ballistic impact test data. Traditional Lagrangian finite element analysis (FEA) of these problems tends to introduce errors and suffers from convergence issues resulting from large deformations at free surfaces. Also, FEA cannot properly account for the issues of secondary impact of spalled fragments when multiple armor panels are used. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is considered to be an attractive alternative to resolve these and other issues. However, SPH-based quantitative results have been found to be less accurate than the FEA-based ones when the deformations are not sufficiently large. This paper primarily focuses on a comparison of FEA and SPH models to predict high-velocity projectile impact on single and stacked HSC panels. Results are compared to recent ballistic experiments performed as a part of this research, and conclusions are drawn based on the findings.

  9. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: smoothed particle hydrodynamics versus adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Hobbs, A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate cosmological galaxy cluster formation using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics - classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS), and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Comparing spherically averaged entropy profiles, we find that SPHS and AMR approaches result in a well-defined entropy core that converges rapidly with increasing mass and force resolution. In contrast, the central entropy profile in the SPH approach is sensitive to the cluster's assembly history and shows poor numerical convergence. We trace this disagreement to the known artificial surface tension in SPH that appears at phase boundaries. Varying systematically numerical dissipation in SPHS, we study the contributions of numerical and physical dissipation to the entropy core and argue that numerical dissipation is required to ensure single-valued fluid quantities in converging flows. However, provided it occurs only at the resolution limit and does not propagate errors to larger scales, its effect is benign - there is no requirement to build `sub-grid' models of unresolved turbulence for galaxy cluster simulations. We conclude that entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations are physical, resulting from entropy generation in shocked gas during cluster assembly.

  10. Temperature Structure of the Intracluster Medium from Smoothed-particle Hydrodynamics and Adaptive-mesh Refinement Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Borgani, Stefano; Nagai, Daisuke; Dolag, Klaus; Avestruz, Camille; Granato, Gian Luigi; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Murante, Giuseppe; Nelson, Kaylea; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2014-08-01

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R 500 the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  11. A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsang-Jung; Chang, Kao-Hua; Kao, Hong-Ming

    2014-11-01

    A new approach to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels is proposed by using a Lagrangian meshless method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The Lagrangian form of the Boussinesq equations is solved through SPH to merge the local and convective derivatives as the material derivative. In the numerical SPH procedure, the present study uses a predictor-corrector method, in which the pure space derivative terms (the hydrostatic and source terms) are explicitly solved and the mixed space and time derivatives term (the material term of B1 and B2) is computed with an implicit scheme. It is thus a convenient tool in the processes of the space discretization compared to other Eulerian approaches. Four typical benchmark problems in weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows, including solitary wave propagation, nonlinear interaction of two solitary waves, dambreak flow propagation, and undular bore development, are selected to employ model validation under the closed and open boundary conditions. Numerical results are compared with the analytical solutions or published laboratory and numerical results. It is found that the proposed approach is capable of resolving weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows. Thus, the proposed SPH approach can supplement the lack of the SPH-Boussinesq researches in the literatures, and provide an alternative to model weakly nonhydrostatic shallow water flows in open channels.

  12. Temperature structure of the intracluster medium from smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and adaptive-mesh refinement simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rasia, Elena; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke; Avestruz, Camille; Borgani, Stefano; Dolag, Klaus; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Mazzotta, Pasquale; Nelson, Kaylea

    2014-08-20

    Analyses of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters suggest that X-ray masses can be underestimated by 10%-30%. The largest bias originates from both violation of hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) and an additional temperature bias caused by inhomogeneities in the X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM). To elucidate this large dispersion among theoretical predictions, we evaluate the degree of temperature structures in cluster sets simulated either with smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) or adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) codes. We find that the SPH simulations produce larger temperature variations connected to the persistence of both substructures and their stripped cold gas. This difference is more evident in nonradiative simulations, whereas it is reduced in the presence of radiative cooling. We also find that the temperature variation in radiative cluster simulations is generally in agreement with that observed in the central regions of clusters. Around R {sub 500} the temperature inhomogeneities of the SPH simulations can generate twice the typical HE mass bias of the AMR sample. We emphasize that a detailed understanding of the physical processes responsible for the complex thermal structure in ICM requires improved resolution and high-sensitivity observations in order to extend the analysis to higher temperature systems and larger cluster-centric radii.

  13. Compact 3D flash lidar video cameras and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettner, Roger

    2010-04-01

    The theory and operation of Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc.'s (ASC) latest compact 3D Flash LIDAR Video Cameras (3D FLVCs) and a growing number of technical problems and solutions are discussed. The solutions range from space shuttle docking, planetary entry, decent and landing, surveillance, autonomous and manned ground vehicle navigation and 3D imaging through particle obscurants.

  14. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  15. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Effects of temperature on spinodal decomposition and domain growth of liquid-vapor systems with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2015-03-01

    We present a numerical method for simulations of spinodal decomposition of liquid-vapor systems. The results are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions for all expected time regimes from the initial growth of "homophase fluctuations" up to the inertial hydrodynamics regime. The numerical approach follows a modern formulation of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method with a van der Waals equation of state and thermal conduction. The dynamics and thermal evolution of instantaneously temperature-quenched systems are investigated. Therefore, we introduce a simple scaling thermostat that allows thermal fluctuations at a constant predicted mean temperature. We find that the initial stage spinodal decomposition is strongly affected by the temperature field. The separated phases react on density changes with a change in temperature. Although, the thermal conduction acts very slowly, thermal deviations are eventually compensated. The domain growth in the late stage of demixing is found to be rather unaffected by thermal fluctuations. We observe a transition from the Lifshitz-Slyozov growth rate with 1 /3 exponent to the inertial hydrodynamics regime with a rate of 2 /3 , only excepted from simulations near the critical point where the liquid droplets are observed to nucleate directly in a spherical shape. The transition between the growth regimes is found to occur earlier for higher initial temperatures. We explain this time dependency with the phase interfaces that become more diffuse and overlap with approaching the critical point. A prolonging behavior of the demixing process is observed and also expected to depend on temperature. It is further found that the observations can excellently explain the growth behavior for pure nonisothermal simulations that are performed without thermostat.

  18. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  19. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  20. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  1. FAITH 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Video Gallery

    Instantaneous velocity (30 frames at 1 Hz) measurements of a three dimensional model of a small hill in fluid flow. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow ar...

  2. Gas Flow and Star Formation in the Centre of the Milky Way : Investigations with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, William Evan

    2015-06-01

    The centre of the Milky Way, commonly referred to as the Galactic Centre, is roughly that region within 500 pc of the central black hole, Sagittarius A*. Within the innermost parsec around the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* are more than a hundred massive young stars whose orbits align to form one or possibly two discs. At about 100 pc is a ring containing more than ten million solar masses of molecular gas which could be the origin of some of the most massive star clusters in the Galaxy. I have performed a number of numerical simulations to help us understand how it is that these structures may have been formed. I firstly describe and test an improvement to the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code I used. This improves conservation of energy and momentum in certain situations such as in strong shocks from supernovae, which were to be included in a later chapter. The discs of massive stars around Sagittarius A* are believed to have been born there within fragmenting gaseous discs. This is problematic, as the formation of two stellar discs would require two gaseous counterparts. A method is described of forming multiple discs around a black hole from a single cloud's infall and subsequent tidal destruction. This is due to its prolate shape providing a naturally large distribution in the direction of the angular momentum vectors within the cloud. The resulting discs may then go on to form stars. Energetically, it would appear that a sequence of supernovae could potentially cause a giant molecular cloud to fall inwards towards the central black hole from an originally large orbit around the Galactic Centre. I simulate the impact on a giant molecular cloud of supernovae originating from a massive stellar cluster located a parsec away. Ultimately, the supernovae are found to have little effect. Finally, I simulate the formation of the dense ring of clouds observed in the Central Molecular Zone at a distance of about 100 pc from Sgr A*. Infalling gas is shown to

  3. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  4. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  5. Parallel CARLOS-3D code development

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, J.M.; Kotulski, J.D.

    1996-02-01

    CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional scattering code which was developed under the sponsorship of the Electromagnetic Code Consortium, and is currently used by over 80 aerospace companies and government agencies. The code has been extensively validated and runs on both serial workstations and parallel super computers such as the Intel Paragon. CARLOS-3D is a three-dimensional surface integral equation scattering code based on a Galerkin method of moments formulation employing Rao- Wilton-Glisson roof-top basis for triangular faceted surfaces. Fully arbitrary 3D geometries composed of multiple conducting and homogeneous bulk dielectric materials can be modeled. This presentation describes some of the extensions to the CARLOS-3D code, and how the operator structure of the code facilitated these improvements. Body of revolution (BOR) and two-dimensional geometries were incorporated by simply including new input routines, and the appropriate Galerkin matrix operator routines. Some additional modifications were required in the combined field integral equation matrix generation routine due to the symmetric nature of the BOR and 2D operators. Quadrilateral patched surfaces with linear roof-top basis functions were also implemented in the same manner. Quadrilateral facets and triangular facets can be used in combination to more efficiently model geometries with both large smooth surfaces and surfaces with fine detail such as gaps and cracks. Since the parallel implementation in CARLOS-3D is at high level, these changes were independent of the computer platform being used. This approach minimizes code maintenance, while providing capabilities with little additional effort. Results are presented showing the performance and accuracy of the code for some large scattering problems. Comparisons between triangular faceted and quadrilateral faceted geometry representations will be shown for some complex scatterers.

  6. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  7. 3D SPH numerical simulation of the wave generated by the Vajont rockslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacondio, R.; Mignosa, P.; Pagani, S.

    2013-09-01

    A 3D numerical modeling of the wave generated by the Vajont slide, one of the most destructive ever occurred, is presented in this paper. A meshless Lagrangian Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique was adopted to simulate the highly fragmented violent flow generated by the falling slide in the artificial reservoir. The speed-up achievable via General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GP-GPU) allowed to adopt the adequate resolution to describe the phenomenon. The comparison with the data available in literature showed that the results of the numerical simulation reproduce satisfactorily the maximum run-up, also the water surface elevation in the residual lake after the event. Moreover, the 3D velocity field of the flow during the event and the discharge hydrograph which overtopped the dam, were obtained.

  8. The Vajont disaster: a 3D numerical simulation for the slide and the waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Angelo; Androsov, Alexey; Vacondio, Renato; Zanchettin, Davide; Voltzinger, Naum

    2016-04-01

    A very high resolution O(5 m), 3D hydrostatic nonlinear numerical model was used to simulate the dynamics of both the slide and the surface waves produced during the Vajont disaster (north Italy, 1963), one of the major landslide-induced tsunamis ever documented. Different simulated wave phenomena like, e.g., maximum run-up on the opposite shore, maximum height, and water velocity were analyzed and compared with data available in literature, including the results of a fully 3D simulation obtained with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic code. The difference between measured and simulated after-slide bathymetries was calculated and used in an attempt to quantify the relative magnitude and extension of rigid and fluid motion components during the event.

  9. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  10. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  11. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  13. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  14. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  15. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  16. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  17. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  18. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Prediction of 3-D boundary layer in the curved inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zongwen; Wang, Jianmin

    1992-06-01

    A prediction method for 3D compressible turbulent boundary layers in curved inlets is investigated. 3D boundary layer integral equations in nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system are used and solved by lag-entrainment method with an introduced 3D entrainment coefficient equation. During numerical calculation, the prediction corrector method is employed. With the cubic spline function, the interpolation and differentiation accuracy and smoothness of discrete data is ensured. The developed program may be operated on a personal computer. The influence of cross flow on boundary layer development is clearly shown by the calculated results. The calculated pressure recovery of the inlet is in good agreement with experiment data.

  20. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  1. Modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) for the analysis of centrifugally assisted TiC-Fe-Al2O3 combustion synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, M

    2014-01-01

    A modified smoothed particle hydrodynamic (MSPH) computational technique was utilized to simulate molten particle motion and infiltration speed on multi-scale analysis levels. The radial velocity and velocity gradient of molten alumina, iron infiltration in the TiC product and solidification rate, were predicted during centrifugal self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) simulation, which assisted the coating process by MSPH. The effects of particle size and temperature on infiltration and solidification of iron and alumina were mainly investigated. The obtained results were validated with experimental microstructure evidence. The simulation model successfully describes the magnitude of iron and alumina diffusion in a centrifugal thermite SHS and Ti + C hybrid reaction under centrifugal acceleration. PMID:24430621

  2. Modified smoothed particle hydrodynamics (MSPH) for the analysis of centrifugally assisted TiC-Fe-Al2O3 combustion synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, M. A.; Mahmoodian, Reza; Hamdi, M.

    2014-01-01

    A modified smoothed particle hydrodynamic (MSPH) computational technique was utilized to simulate molten particle motion and infiltration speed on multi-scale analysis levels. The radial velocity and velocity gradient of molten alumina, iron infiltration in the TiC product and solidification rate, were predicted during centrifugal self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) simulation, which assisted the coating process by MSPH. The effects of particle size and temperature on infiltration and solidification of iron and alumina were mainly investigated. The obtained results were validated with experimental microstructure evidence. The simulation model successfully describes the magnitude of iron and alumina diffusion in a centrifugal thermite SHS and Ti + C hybrid reaction under centrifugal acceleration. PMID:24430621

  3. DRACO development for 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, Milad; Moses, Gregory

    2006-10-01

    The DRACO (r-z) lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics laser fusion simulation code is being extended to model 3D hydrodynamics in (x-y-z) coordinates with hexahedral cells on a structured grid. The equation of motion is solved with a lagrangian update with optional rezoning. The fluid equations are solved using an explicit scheme based on (Schulz, 1964) while the SALE-3D algorithm (Amsden, 1981) is used as a template for computing cell volumes and other quantities. A second order rezoner has been added which uses linear interpolation of the underlying continuous functions to preserve accuracy (Van Leer, 1976). Artificial restoring force terms and smoothing algorithms are used to avoid grid distortion in high aspect ratio cells. These include alternate node couplers along with a rotational restoring force based on the Tensor Code (Maenchen, 1964). Electron and ion thermal conduction is modeled using an extension of Kershaw's method (Kershaw, 1981) to 3D geometry. Test problem simulations will be presented to demonstrate the applicability of this new version of DRACO to the study of fluid instabilities in three dimensions.

  4. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  5. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  7. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, includ