Science.gov

Sample records for 3d solar wind

  1. 3D Location of Small Solar Wind Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Portela, C.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Panasenco, O.; Gibson, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The so-called "blobs" as defined in Sheeley et al., 1997, are small-scale structures embedded in the continuously expanding white-light solar corona and are considered to be tracers of the slow solar wind. As blobs are very faint structures, we considered long periods (around 2 to 5 days) where there were no coronal mass ejections (CME). The scarce presence of CMEs during the extended past solar minimum has permitted the identification of continuous blobs detachments, allowing us to estimate their un-projected trajectories between 2 and 15 solar radii (Mierla et al., 2008). In agreement with the idea that blobs are liberated from the cusps of helmet steamers (Wang et al., 1998), we constrained the observing region of interest in the coronagraphs field of view to ±30° from the Sun's equator. We studied cases where blobs were detected by the coronagraphs C2/LASCO and COR2/SECCHI, and inferred their source locations using two packages that implement the 3D potential field source surface (PFSS) model: (1) PFSS developed by De Rosa (2010) and (2) PFSS (De Rosa) in FORWARD (people.hao.ucar.edu/sgibson/FORWARD/). The locations of the origin of blobs that we find, support previous results that track down the origin of the slow solar wind to regions near the helmet streamers and pseudostreamers (Wang et al., 2012, Riley&Luhmann, 2012). Additionally, we found that in some cases blobs are coming from the boundaries of growing or decaying equatorial coronal holes, where the interchange reconnection issupposed to be faster.

  2. 3D implicit PIC simulations of solar wind - moon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Markidis, S.; Divin, A.; Lapenta, G.; Vapirev, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations of an unmagnetized insulating Moon-sized body immersed in the solar wind. The simulations are performed using the implicit electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code iPIC3D [Markidis, 2009]. Multiscale kinetic physics is resolved for all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) in the code, recently updated with a set of open boundary conditions designed for solar wind - body interaction studies. Particles are injected at the inflow side of the computational domain and absorbed at all others. A bow shock is not formed upstream of the body, but the obstacle generates faint dispersive waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field lines, in agreement with numerical simulations done in MHD approach. Polarization electric field is generated in the wake. In addition, plasma flows filling the wake tend to excite streaming instabilities, which lead to bipolar signatures in the parallel electric field. Our future work includes updating the physical model to include photoionization and re-emission at the object's surface.

  3. Jupiter Magnetotail Interaction with a Variable Solar Wind: A 3D MHD Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranquist, D. A.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Ma, X.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is the largest object within the heliosphere. Voyager 2 detected its influence at Saturn's orbit, 4.3 AU away. It takes considerable time, therefore, for the solar wind to propagate such lengths down the tail. This propagation time is much greater than typical periods between changes in direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). We expect these variable magnetic fields to create a jumbled structure in Jupiter's magnetotail, resulting in magnetic reconnection and other magnetic processes. We simulate the global interaction of the solar wind with Jupiter's magnetosphere using a 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code. Delamere & Bagenal (2010) argue that the interaction is largely viscous, so we simulate the jovian magnetosphere as a region where the momentum equation has an added loss term. We also use in situ data gathered by the Ulysses spacecraft near Jupiter's orbit for solar wind input. Here, we report on the simulated dynamics in Jupiter's tail region.

  4. 3D Sun-to-Earth Solar Wind Modeling by SIP-CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang

    2012-07-01

    3D Sun-to-Earth Solar Wind Modeling by SIP-CESE-MHD Model Xueshang Feng, Xiang Changqing, Jiang Chaowei State Key Lab of Space Weather/CSSAR, CAS Beijing 100190 The objective is to present our solar-interplanetary space-time conservation element and solution element (CESE) model (SIP-CESE MHD model) (Feng, Zhou and Wu, Astrophys. J. 655, 1110, 2007; Feng et al., Astrophys. J. 723, 300, 2010; Feng et al., ApJ, 734, 50, 2011) with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation under six-component/Yin-Yang grid system. In this talk, we present the results of applying the SIP-AMR-CESE MHD model for modeling the coronal mass ejection and the solar wind background of different solar activity phases by comparison with SOHO observations and other spacecraft data from OMNI. Our numerical results show overall good agreements in the solar corona and in interplanetary space with these multiple spacecraft observations. From the modeler's experience, some limitations are addressed for this kind of initial-value boundary problems in Sun-to-Earth MHD modeling, and future out-of-ecliptic and in situ observations of the Sun and solar wind will be a solution to these limitations.

  5. 3D Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Solar Wind/Earth's Magnetosphere Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalim, M. S.; Poedts, S.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present results of real-time 3D global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere using time-varying data from the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite during a few big magnetic storm events of the previous and current solar cycles, namely the 06 April 2000, 20 November 2003 and 05 April 2010 storms. We introduce a numerical magnetic storm index and compare the geo-effectiveness of these events in terms of this storm index which is a measure for the resulting global perturbation of the Earth's magnetic field. Steady simulations show that the upstream solar wind plasma parameters enter the low-β switch-on regime for some time intervals during a magnetic storm causing a complex dimpled bow shock structure. We also investigate the traces of such bow shock structures during time-dependent simulations of the events. We utilize a 3D, implicit, parallel, unstructured grid, compressible finite volume ideal MHD solver with an anisotropic grid adaptation technique for the computer simulations.

  6. 3D kinetic simulations of the global interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, Jorge; Maneva, Yana; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We performed three dimensional simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere, using the self-consistent fully kinetic code iPic3D. The main objective of our simulations is to link the global interaction phenomena to the local turbulence and reconnection processes in the magnetosphere. Other numerical approaches have been used before to study this problem, including MHD, hybrid and Vlasov codes. However, only particle-in-cell codes offer the possibility to study the kinetic effects of the diffusion regions of the Earth environment that drive the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. Previous attempts to perform such kinds of simulations were limited to unphysical thermal velocities of the ion and electron species, small simulation boxes or cell sizes that do not capture the local kinetic effects at the magnetopause. Using the implicit moment Particle-in-Cell approach we performed simulations that can capture these small scale effects and, at the same time, allow to study large scale phenomena such as the bow shock and the development of the magnetotail. We expect that these results will be used to maximize the impact of future space missions, such as THOR, MMS and BepiColombo, by improving our understanding of the planetary environment, from the conditions observed in the solar wind to the turbulence and reconnection processes downstream of the bow shock.

  7. A 3-d time-dependent ideal mhd solar wind model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Wei, F.

    A new numerical three-dimensional MHD model of solar wind is introduced in spherical coordinates by using a TVD type numerical scheme. In order to show its validation in modeling three-dimensional solar wind background, numerical tests are carried out with initiation magnetic field depending on (r, theta, phi), which is obtained from a force-free formu lation. The numerical density and velocity distributions of the solar wind at the solar surface and 20 solar radii reproduce the typical characteristics of interplanetary solar wind, and are in qualitatively accordance with those obtained from K-corona brightness observation of HAO and magnetic filed observation of WSO.

  8. 3D Reconstruction of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Remote-Sensing Data: Global Solar Wind Boundaries for Driving 3D-MHD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Wu, C.-C.; Davies, J. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-09-01

    The University of California, San Diego, time-dependent analyses of the heliosphere provide three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of solar wind velocities and densities from observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS). Using data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Japan, these reconstructions provide a real-time prediction of the global solar-wind density and velocity throughout the whole heliosphere with a temporal cadence of about one day (ips.ucsd.edu). Updates to this modeling effort continue: in the present article, near-Sun results extracted from the time-dependent 3D reconstruction are used as inner boundary conditions to drive 3D-MHD models ( e.g. ENLIL and H3D-MHD). This allows us to explore the differences between the IPS kinematic-model data-fitting procedure and current 3D-MHD modeling techniques. The differences in these techniques provide interesting insights into the physical principles governing the expulsion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we detail for the first time several specific CMEs and an induced shock that occurred in September 2011 that demonstrate some of the issues resulting from these analyses.

  9. Three-fluid, 3D MHD solar wind modeling with turbulence transport and eddy viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, A. V.; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional MHD solar wind model that includes turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a co-moving system of three species: the solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons. Separate energy equations are employed for each species. We obtain numerical solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. The integrated system of equations includes the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including turbulence parameters, throughout the heliosphere. The model results are compared with observations on WIND, Ulysses and Voyager 2 spacecraft. This work is partially supported by LWS and Heliophysics Grand Challenges programs.

  10. Fully Kinetic 3D Simulations of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaya, J.; Deca, J.; Lembege, B.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The planet Mercury has been studied by the space mission Mariner 10, in the 1970's, and by the MESSENGER mission launched in 2004. Interest in the first planet of the Solar System has now been renewed by the launch in 2017 of the BepiColombo mission. MESSENGER and BepiColombo give access to information about the local conditions of the magnetosphere of Mercury. This data must be evaluated in the context of the global interaction between the solar wind and the planet's magnetosphere. Global scale simulations of the planet's environment are necessary to fully understand the data gathered from in-situ measurements. We use three-dimensional simulations to support the scientific goals of the two missions. In contrast with the results based on MHD (Kabin et al., 2000) and hybrid codes (Kallio et Janhumen, 2003; Travnicek et al., 2007, 2010; Richer et al., 2012), the present work is based on the implicit moment Particle-in-Cell (PiC) method, which allows to use large time and space steps, while granting access to the dynamics of the smaller electron scales in the plasma. The purpose of these preliminary PIC simulations is to retrieve the top-level features of Mercury's magnetosphere and its frontiers. We compare the results obtained with the implicit moment PiC method against 3D hybrid simulations. We perform simulations of the global plasma environment of Mercury using the solar wind conditions measured by MESSENGER. We show that complex flows form around the planet, including the development of Kelvin-Helmoltz instabilities at the flanks. We evaluate the dynamics of the shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, the reconnection areas, the formation of plasma sheet and magnetotail, and the variation of ion/electron plasma flows when crossing these frontiers. The simulations also give access to detailed information about the particle dynamics and their velocity distribution at locations that can be used for comparison with data from MESSENGER and later on with the forthcoming

  11. First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  12. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  13. Validation of the 3D AMR SIP-CESE Solar Wind Model for Four Carrington Rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Yang, Liping; Xiang, Changqing; Jiang, Caowei; Ma, Xiaopeng; Wu, S. T.; Zhong, DingKun; Zhou, Yufen

    2012-07-01

    We carry out the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) implementation of our solar-interplanetary space-time conservation element and solution element (CESE) magnetohydrodynamic model (SIP-CESE MHD model) using a six-component grid system (Feng, Zhou, and Wu, Astrophys. J. 655, 1110, 2007; Feng et al., Astrophys. J. 723, 300, 2010). By transforming the governing MHD equations from the physical space ( x, y, z) to the computational space ( ξ, η, ζ) while retaining the form of conservation (Jiang et al., Solar Phys. 267, 463, 2010), the SIP-AMR-CESE MHD model is implemented in the reference coordinates with the aid of the parallel AMR package PARAMESH available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/paramesh/. Meanwhile, the volumetric heating source terms derived from the topology of the magnetic-field expansion factor and the minimum angular separation (at the photosphere) between an open-field foot point and its nearest coronal-hole boundary are also included. We show the preliminary results of applying the SIP-AMR-CESE MHD model for simulating the solar-wind background of different solar-activity phases by comparison with SOHO observations and other spacecraft data from OMNI. Our numerical results show overall good agreements in the solar corona and in interplanetary space with these multiple-spacecraft observations.

  14. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  15. A Summary of 3-D Reconstructions of the Whole Heliosphere Interval and Comparison with in-Ecliptic Solar Wind Measurements from STEREO, ACE, and Wind Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, Mario M.; Jackson, B. V.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Tokumaru, M.

    2010-11-01

    We present a summary of results from simultaneous Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab) Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS), STEREO, ACE, and Wind observations using three-dimensional reconstructions of the Whole Heliosphere Interval - Carrington rotation 2068. This is part of the world-wide IPS community's International Heliosphysical Year (IHY) collaboration. We show the global structure of the inner heliosphere and how our 3-D reconstructions compare with in-ecliptic spacecraft measurements.

  16. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  17. 3-D Hybrid Simulation of Interaction Between Solar Wind Discontinuity and Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Deng, X.; Wang, X.

    2008-12-01

    Previous simulations and observations indicate that interaction of interplanetary directional tangential discontinuities (TD), across which only the direction of magnetic field changes,with the bow shock may initiate magnetic reconnection as the TD is transmitted into the magnetosheath. We employ a 3-D electromagnetic, hybrid simulation to study such interaction between the TD and the bow shock-magnetosheath-magnetopause system, while the hybrid model treats the ions kinetically via particle-in-cell methods and the electrons as a massless fluid. We present results corresponding to different orientations of the initial IMF, TDs with various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 30 ion skin depths, and polarizations of magnetic field and senses of field rotation across the TD. Our results indicate that the reconnection rate and structure can be influenced by the width and the structure of the TD. The kinetic structure and evolution of FTEs produced by the magnetosheath reconnection, as they propagate to the magnetopause, will be studied.

  18. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 2: The Study for the Distance 9.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our paper is a 2.5D and 3D numerical plasma models of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the Solar Probe Plus spacecraft (SPPSC). These results should be interpreted as a basic plasma model for which the derived SW interaction with spacecraft (SC) could have consequences for both plasma wave and electron plasma measurements on board SC in the inner heliosphere. We observe an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of the electromagnetic field oscillation about of (0.015-0.06) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about 1.5 V/m and (12-18) V/m were also observed. The observed strong electromagnetic perturbations may be a crucial point in the electromagnetic measurements, which were planned in future Solar Probe Plus mission.

  19. SMEI 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION INTERACTING WITH A COROTATING SOLAR WIND DENSITY ENHANCEMENT: THE 2008 APRIL 26 CME

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P.; Clover, J. M.; Bisi, M. M.; Webb, D. F.

    2010-12-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) has recorded the brightness responses of hundreds of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the interplanetary medium. Using a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction technique that derives its perspective views from outward-flowing solar wind, analysis of SMEI data has revealed the shapes, extents, and masses of CMEs. Here, for the first time, and using SMEI data, we report on the 3D reconstruction of a CME that intersects a corotating region marked by a curved density enhancement in the ecliptic. Both the CME and the corotating region are reconstructed and demonstrate that the CME disrupts the otherwise regular density pattern of the corotating material. Most of the dense CME material passes north of the ecliptic and east of the Sun-Earth line: thus, in situ measurements in the ecliptic near Earth and at the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory Behind spacecraft show the CME as a minor density increase in the solar wind. The mass of the dense portion of the CME is consistent with that measured by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, and is comparable to the masses of many other three-dimensionally reconstructed solar wind features at 1 AU observed in SMEI 3D reconstructions.

  20. Solar Wind Halo Formation by the Scattering of the Strahl via Direct Cluster/PEACE Observations of the 3D Velocity Distribution Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Gurgiolo, Chris A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the solar wind electron halo can be formed by the scattering of the strahl. On frequent occasions we have observed in electron angular skymaps (Phi/Theta-plots) of the electron 3D velocity distribution functions) a bursty-filament of particles connecting the strahl to the solar wind core-halo. These are seen over a very limited energy range. When the magnetic field is well off the nominal solar wind flow direction such filaments are inconsistent with any local forces and are probably the result of strong scattering. Furthermore, observations indicates that the strahl component is frequently and significantly anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx.2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism. The empirical observational evidence between the halo and the strahl suggests that the strahl population may be, at least in part, the source of the halo component.

  1. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  2. The Interaction of the Solar Wind with Solar Probe Plus - 3D Hybrid Simulation. Report 1; The Study for the Distance 4.5Rs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, Alexander S.; Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, Richard E.; Cooper, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Our report devotes a 3D numerical hybrid model of the interaction of the solar wind with the Solar Probe spacecraft. The SPP model includes 3 main parts, namely, a non-conducting heat shield, a support system, and cylindrical section or spacecraft bus that contains the particle analysis devices and antenna. One observes an excitation of the low frequency Alfven and whistler type wave directed by the magnetic field with an amplitude of about (0.06-0.6) V/m. The compression waves and the jumps in an electric field with an amplitude of about (0.15-0.7) V/m were also observed. The wave amplitudes are comparable to or greater than previously estimated max wave amplitudes that SPP is expected to measure. The results of our hybrid simulation will be useful for understanding the plasma environment near the SPP spacecraft at the distance 4.5 Rs. Future simulation will take into account the charging of the spacecraft, the charge separation effects, an outgassing from heat shield, a photoionization and an electron impact ionization effects near the spacecraft.

  3. Solwnd: A 3D Compressible MHD Code for Solar Wind Studies. Version 1.0: Cartesian Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, Anil E.

    1996-01-01

    Solwnd 1.0 is a three-dimensional compressible MHD code written in Fortran for studying the solar wind. Time-dependent boundary conditions are available. The computational algorithm is based on Flux Corrected Transport and the code is based on the existing code of Zalesak and Spicer. The flow considered is that of shear flow with incoming flow that perturbs this base flow. Several test cases corresponding to pressure balanced magnetic structures with velocity shear flow and various inflows including Alfven waves are presented. Version 1.0 of solwnd considers a rectangular Cartesian geometry. Future versions of solwnd will consider a spherical geometry. Some discussions of this issue is presented.

  4. 3D numerical study of the propagation characteristics of a consequence of coronal mass ejections in a structured ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Feng, X. S.

    2015-12-01

    CMEs have been identified as a prime causal link between solar activity and large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storm. In order to improve geomagnetic storm predictions, a careful study of CME's propagation characteristics is important. Here, we analyze and quantitatively study the evolution and propagation characteristics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched at several positions into a structured real ambient solar wind by using a three-dimensional (3D) numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. The ambient solar wind structure during Carrington rotation 2095 is selected, which is an appropriate around activity minimum and declining phase. The CME is initiated by a simple spherical plasmoid model: a spheromak magnetic structure with high speed, high pressure and high plasma density plasmoid. We present a detailed analysis of the plasma, magnetic field, geoeffectiveness, and composition signatures of these CMEs. Results show that the motion and local appearance of a CME in interplanetary space is strongly affected by its interaction with the background solar wind structure, including its velocity, density, and magnetic structures. The simulations show that the initial launched position substantially affects the IP evolution of the CMEs influencing the propagation velocity, the shape, the trajectory and even the geo-effectiveness

  5. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  6. The 3-D effects in the long-term solar wind speed rise observed by Voyager 2 in early 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Belcher, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    In early 1994, Voyager 2 at 42-43 AU near heliolatitude 10 deg S observed over a period of approximately 100 days a remarkable sequence of quasi-recurrent stream fronts, wherein the background (ambient) speed rose steadily from approximately 450 to approximately 550 km/s while the mean period of the streams decreased from the usual 25 days down to approximately 20 days. A qualitative explanation for this effect can be derived from IMP observations, which show that the amplitude of the stream structure at 1 AU increased monotonically in late 1993, concurrent with major secular evolution in the corona. The reduction in period, then, amounts to a doppler shift due to the progressive overtaking of successively faster streams in the sequence. Attempts to model this process quantitatively with 1-D dynamic simulations falter on three accounts: (1) the reduction in period is overestimated, (2) the simulation predicts many more fronts surviving to 43 AU than are observed by Voyager; (3) the density variations are much too large. It is argued that inclusion of the 3-D geometry in the simulation would resolve most all these shortcomings. Using a series of calculations executed with 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D MHD models of hypothetical tilted-dipole flows, we show that: (1) the radial propagation velocities of 3-D fronts are less than those of 1-D or 2-D fronts, owing to the tilt of (and increased shearing across) the interaction surfaces hence the overtaking rate of successive streams is reduced; (2) in a tilted-dipole geometry, the reverse fronts should largely disappear from the equatorial plane by 43 AU, effectively halving the number of fronts to be observed (see companion paper on predominance of forward fronts at Voyager); and (3) the density enhancements would be much smaller than predicted by a 1-D model.

  7. World Wind 3D Earth Viewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Patrick; Maxwell, Christopher; Kim, Randolph; Gaskins, Tom

    2007-01-01

    World Wind allows users to zoom from satellite altitude down to any place on Earth, leveraging high-resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) elevation data to experience Earth in visually rich 3D. In addition to Earth, World Wind can also visualize other planets, and there are already comprehensive data sets for Mars and the Earth's moon, which are as easily accessible as those of Earth. There have been more than 20 million downloads to date, and the software is being used heavily by the Department of Defense due to the code s ability to be extended and the evolution of the code courtesy of NASA and the user community. Primary features include the dynamic access to public domain imagery and its ease of use. All one needs to control World Wind is a two-button mouse. Additional guides and features can be accessed through a simplified menu. A JAVA version will be available soon. Navigation is automated with single clicks of a mouse, or by typing in any location to automatically zoom in to see it. The World Wind install package contains the necessary requirements such as the .NET runtime and managed DirectX library. World Wind can display combinations of data from a variety of sources, including Blue Marble, LandSat 7, SRTM, NASA Scientific Visualization Studio, GLOBE, and much more. A thorough list of features, the user manual, a key chart, and screen shots are available at http://worldwind.arc.nasa.gov.

  8. Study of energy transfer from the solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere using the 3D- MHD BATS-R-US global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauer, P. R.; Gonzalez, W. D.; de Souza Costa, C. L.; Souza, V. M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction, transport and conversion of energy between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere have been studied for decades through in situ measurements and Magnetohydrodynamics simulation, (MHD). Nevertheless, due to the vast regions of space and nonlinearities of the physical processes there are many questions that still remain without conclusive answers. Currently, the MHD simulation is a powerful tool that helps other means of already existing research, even within its theoretical limitation; it provides information of the space regions where in situ measurements are rare or nonexistent. The aim of this work is the study of energy transfer from the solar wind through the calculation of the divergence of the Poynting vector for the inner regions of the Earth's magnetosphere, especially the magneto tail using 3D global MHD numerical code Space Weather Modelling Framework (SWMF) / (Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme) (BATS-R-US), developed by the University of Michigan. We conducted a simulation study for the event that occurred on September 21-27, 1999, for which the peak value of the interplanetary magnetic field was -22 nT, and gave rise to an intense magnetic storm with peak Dst of -160 nT. Furthermore, we compare the results of the power estimated by the model - through the integration of the Poynting vector in rectangular region of the tail, with a domain -130

  9. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  10. First 3D view of solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    loops, rather than a bubble or rope-like structure. Although this technique had been independently developed previously to study relatively static structures in the solar atmosphere during eclipses, this is the first time that it is applied to fast moving CMEs. Moran and Davila believe that their method will complement data from the upcoming NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, scheduled for launch in February 2006. STEREO will use two widely separated spacecraft to construct 3D views of CMEs by combining images from the different vantage points of the twin spacecraft. Commenting on this result, Bernhard Fleck, SOHO Project Scientist at ESA, said: "These are really amazing images. Once again scientists have come up with a clever idea for analysing SOHO data in ways that were not even dreamt of when the mission was designed." Movie: http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/soho/soho20040702.mpg 3 stills from the movie http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/soho/soho20040702c.tiff http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/soho/soho20040702d.tiff http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/soho/soho20040702e.tiff This movie shows a 3D rendering of the data in Figure 2. It starts out viewing the Sun from SOHO's perspective, then rotates the scene to view the data from the side, and finally from the top. Note that one distinct feature shown at about 11 o'clock in Figure 2 panel a has been left out of the movie, because it is a static structure and not a part of the CME. Notes to Editors: This new result by T. Moran and J. Davila is published in today’s issue of the magazine Science. More about SOHO SOHO is a project of international co-operation between ESA and NASA to study the Sun, from its deep core to the outer corona, and the solar wind. Fourteen European countries, led by the European Space Agency and prime contractor Astrium (formerly Matra-Marconi), built the SOHO spacecraft. It carries twelve instruments (nine European-led and three

  11. Cryogenic 3-D Detectors for Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. A.; Martinez-Galarce, D.; Rausch, A.; Shing, L.; Deiker, S.; Boerner, P.; Metcalf, T.; Cabrera, B.; Leman, S. W.; Brink, P.; Irwin, K.; Alexander, D.

    2005-05-01

    Cryogenic microcalorimeters operating in the sub-Kelvin temperature range provide non-dispersive energy resolution at optical through gamma ray energies (e.g, E/Δ E ~ 1500 at 6 keV). Microcalorimeters also have high time resolution (msec or better), and can be made into imaging arrays through SQUID multiplexing of individual pixels or employing position sensitive detector structures. The application of such "3-D" detector technology to solar physics will lead to significant advances in our understanding of magnetic reconnection in the Sun, including X-ray jet phenomena, and active region heating and dynamics. An Explorer-class solar mission within the next 5-10 years, based upon these detectors, is rapidly becoming technically feasible. LMSAL currently has an internally funded laboratory research program to investigate TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters; we recently saw our first X-ray photons using TES detectors supplied by NIST. In addition, we have recently been funded by NASA to begin work with NIST on position-sensitive X-ray strip detectors for solar physics applications. Finally, we are collaborating with with Stanford and NIST on a solar sounding rocket. In this presentation, we will discuss the current status of these programs and their applicability to future Explorer missions and Roadmap missions such as RAM.

  12. First 3D view of solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    arrival times and impact angles at the Earth," says Dr Thomas Moran of the Catholic University, Washington, USA. In collaboration with Dr Joseph Davila, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, USA, Moran has analysed two-dimensional images from the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) in a new way to yield 3D images. Their technique is able to reveal the complex and distorted magnetic fields that travel with the CME cloud and sometimes interact with Earth's own magnetic field, pouring tremendous amounts of energy into the space near Earth. "These magnetic fields are invisible," Moran explains, "but since the CME gas is electrified, it spirals around the magnetic fields, tracing out their shapes." Therefore, a 3D view of the CME electrified gas (called a plasma) gives scientists valuable information on the structure and behaviour of the magnetic fields powering the CME. The new analysis technique for SOHO data determines the three-dimensional structure of a CME by taking a sequence of three SOHO Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) images through various polarisers, at different angles. Whilst the light emitted by the Sun is not polarised, once it is scattered off electrons in the CME plasma it takes up some polarisation. This means that the electric fields of some of the scattered light are forced to oscillate in certain directions, whereas the electric field in the light emitted by the Sun is free to oscillate in all directions. Moran and Davila knew that light from CME structures closer to the plane of the Sun (as seen on the LASCO images) had to be more polarised than light from structures farther from that plane. Thus, by computing the ratio of polarised to unpolarised light for each CME structure, they could measure its distance from the plane. This provided the missing third dimension to the LASCO images. With this technique, the team has confirmed that the structure of CMEs directed towards Earth is an expanding arcade of

  13. 3D Winding Number: Theory and Application to Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Becciu, Alessandro; Fuster, Andrea; Pottek, Mark; van den Heuvel, Bart; ter Haar Romeny, Bart; van Assen, Hans

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new formulation, mathematically elegant, to detect critical points of 3D scalar images. It is based on a topological number, which is the generalization to three dimensions of the 2D winding number. We illustrate our method by considering three different biomedical applications, namely, detection and counting of ovarian follicles and neuronal cells and estimation of cardiac motion from tagged MR images. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation emphasizes the reliability of the results. PMID:21317978

  14. Magnetocentrifugal Winds in 3D: Nonaxisymmetric Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jeffrey M.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Blandford, Roger D.; /SLAC

    2006-11-28

    Outflows can be loaded and accelerated to high speeds along rapidly rotating, open magnetic field lines by centrifugal forces. Whether such magnetocentrifugally driven winds are stable is a longstanding theoretical problem. As a step towards addressing this problem, we perform the first large-scale 3D MHD simulations that extend to a distance {approx} 10{sup 2} times beyond the launching region, starting from steady 2D (axisymmetric) solutions. In an attempt to drive the wind unstable, we increase the mass loading on one half of the launching surface by a factor of {radical}10, and reduce it by the same factor on the other half. The evolution of the perturbed wind is followed numerically. We find no evidence for any rapidly growing instability that could disrupt the wind during the launching and initial phase of propagation, even when the magnetic field of the magnetocentrifugal wind is toroidally dominated all the way to the launching surface. The strongly perturbed wind settles into a new steady state, with a highly asymmetric mass distribution. The distribution of magnetic field strength is, in contrast, much more symmetric. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent stability, including stabilization by an axial poloidal magnetic field, which is required to bend field lines away from the vertical direction and produce a magnetocentrifugal wind in the first place.

  15. Solar Wind Five

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion were: solar corona, MHD waves and turbulence, acceleration of the solar wind, stellar coronae and winds, long term variations, energetic particles, plasma distribution functions and waves, spatial dependences, and minor ions.

  16. Solar Energetic Particle spectral and compositional invariance in the 3-D Heliosphere: Ulysses and ACE/WIND comparisons in late 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Marsden, Richard G.; Tranquille, Cecil; Patterson, Doug; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2013-04-01

    We carry out the first detailed examination and comparison of elemental spectra and composition in the late decay phase of two Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events in the so-called 'reservoir' regions, between spacecraft widely separated in latitude, as well as in longitude and radial distance in the Heliosphere. Energetic particle data from instruments onboard the Ulysses spacecraft located at a high heliospheric latitude of about 70 deg N and at a heliocentric distance of about 2.5 AU and from spacecraft at L1 are used in this work. Particle intensities over time are observed to be in close agreement following the shock passage over the widely separated spacecraft. Electron measurements were used to identify the extent of the particle reservoir. In this update on reservoir composition studies, we extend our previous work to sub-MeV/nucleon energies, using measurements from HI-SCALE on Ulysses and EPAM on ACE. Implications of the observations for models of SEP transport are also discussed. Acknowledgments: The presented work has received funding from the European Union FP7 project COMESEP (263252) and has also been supported by NASA under grants NNH09AK79I and NNX09AU98G (AJT).

  17. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  18. 3D Visualization of Solar Data: Preparing for Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Felix, S.; Meier, S.; Csillaghy, A.; Nicula, B.; Verstringe, F.; Bourgoignie, B.; Berghmans, D.; Jiggens, P.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of ESA/NASA heliophysics missions, Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, will focus on exploring the linkage between the Sun and the heliosphere. These new missions will collect unique data that will allow us to study, e.g., the coupling between macroscopic physical processes to those on kinetic scales, the generation of solar energetic particles and their propagation into the heliosphere and the origin and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Since 2010, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory returns 1.4 TB/day of high-resolution solar images, magnetograms and EUV irradiance data. Within a few years, the scientific community will thus have access to petabytes of multi­dimensional remote­sensing and complex in-situ observations from different vantage points, complemented by petabytes of simulation data. Answering overarching science questions like "How do solar transients drive heliospheric variability and space weather?" will only be possible if the community has the necessary tools at hand. As of today, there is an obvious lack of capability to both visualize these data and assimilate them into sophisticated models to advance our knowledge. A key piece needed to bridge the gap between observables, derived quantities like magnetic field extrapolations and model output is a tool to routinely and intuitively visualize large heterogeneous, multidimensional, time­dependent data sets. As of today, the space science community is lacking the means to do this (i) on a routine basis, (ii) for complex multi­dimensional data sets from various instruments and vantage points and (iii) in an extensible and modular way that is open for future improvements and interdisciplinary usage. In this contribution, we will present recent progress in visualizing the Sun and its magnetic field in 3D using the open-source JHelioviewer framework, which is part of the ESA/NASA Helioviewer Project. Among other features, JHelioviewer offers efficient region-of-interest-based data

  19. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  20. C3Winds: A Novel 3D Wind Observing System to Characterize Severe Weather Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, M. A.; Wu, D. L.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Demajistre, R.; Reynolds, E.; Tripoli, G. J.; Oman, L.; Prive, N.; Heidinger, A. K.; Wanzong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The CubeSat Constellation Cloud Winds (C3Winds) is a NASA Earth Venture Instrument (EV-I) concept with the primary objective to resolve high-resolution 3D dynamic structures of severe wind events. Rapid evolution of severe weather events highlights the need for high-resolution mesoscale wind observations. Yet mesoscale observations of severe weather dynamics are quite rare, especially over the ocean where extratropical and tropical cyclones (ETCs and TCs) can undergo explosive development. Measuring wind velocity at the mesoscale from space remains a great challenge, but is critically needed to understand and improve prediction of severe weather and tropical cyclones. Based on compact, visible/IR imagers and a mature stereoscopic technique, C3Winds has the capability to measure high-resolution (~2 km) cloud motion vectors and cloud geometric heights accurately by tracking cloud features from two formation-flying CubeSats, separated by 5-15 minutes. Complementary to lidar wind measurements from space, C3Winds will provide high-resolution wind fields needed for detailed investigations of severe wind events in occluded ETCs, rotational structures inside TC eyewalls, and ozone injections associated with tropopause folding events. Built upon mature imaging technologies and long history of stereoscopic remote sensing, C3Winds provides an innovative, cost-effective solution to global wind observations with the potential for increased diurnal sampling via CubeSat constellation.

  1. Solar wind composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have resulted in the determination of the average abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the solar wind to approximately 10%. Comparisons with solar energetic particle (SEP) abundances and galactic cosmic ray abundances have revealed many similarities, especially when compared with solar photospheric abundances. It is now well established that fractionation in the corona results in an overabundance (with respect to the photosphere) of elements with first ionization potentials less than 10 eV. These observations have in turn led to the development of fractionation models that are reasonably successful in reproducing the first ionization (FIP) effect. Under some circumstances it has been possible to relate solar wind observations to particular source regions in the corona. The magnetic topologies of the source regions appear to have a strong influence on the fractionation of elements. Comparisons with spectroscopic data are particularly useful in classifying the different topologies. Ions produced from interstellar neutral atoms are also found in the solar wind. These ions are picked up by the solar wind after ionization by solar radiation or charge exchange and can be identified by their velocity in the solar wind. The pick-up ions provide most of the pressure in the interplanetary medium at large distances. Interstellar abundances can be derived from the observed fluxes of solar wind pick-up ions.

  2. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  3. Solar wind travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    A useful rule of thumb in solar terrestrial studies is that the solar wind travels 4 Earth radii (RE) per minute. Long-term studies of solar wind velocity [e.g., Luhmann et al., 1993; 1994] show that the median velocity is about 420 km/s, corresponding to 3.96 RE min-1. The quartiles are about 370 km/s and 495 km/s, corresponding to 3.48 Re min-1 and 4.66 Re min-1 respectively. This number helps estimate the delays expected when observing a discontinuity at a solar wind monitor; one example is ISEE-3 when it was at the forward libration point (about 60 min). It is also helpful for estimating how much time passes before the dayside magnetosphere is compressed as denser solar wind flows by (about 2.5 min).

  4. Flare Particle Escape in 3D Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Masson, Sophie; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Among the most important, but least understood forms of space weather are the so-called Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, which can be especially hazardous to deep-space astronauts. These energetic particles are generally believed to be produced by the flare reconnection that is the primary driver of solar eruptive events (SEE). A key point is that in the standard model of SEEs, the particles should remain trapped in the coronal flare loops and in the ejected plasmoid, the CME. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. In previous 2.5D calculations we showed how the external reconnection that is an essential element of the breakout model for CME initiation could lead to the escape of flare-accelerated particles. The problem, however, is that in 2.5D this reconnection also tends to destroy the plasmoid, which disagrees with the observation that SEP events are often associated with well-defined plasmoids at 1 AU known as “magnetic clouds”. Consequently, we have extended our model to a fully 3D topology that includes a multi-polar coronal field suitable for a breakout SEE near a coronal hole region. We performed high-resolution 3D MHD numerical simulations with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS). Our results demonstrate that the model allows for the effective escape of energetic particles from deep within an ejecting well-defined plasmoid. We show how the complex interactions between the flare and breakout reconnection reproduce all the main observational features of SEEs and SEPs. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, which will measure SEEs and SEPs near the Sun, thereby, mitigating propagation effects.This research was supported, in part, by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  5. Flank solar wind interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Stewart L.; Greenstadt, Eugene W.; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    1994-01-01

    In this report we will summarize the results of the work performed under the 'Flank Solar Wind Interaction' investigation in support of NASA's Space Physics Guest Investigator Program. While this investigation was focused on the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind as observed by instruments on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 3 spacecraft, it also represents the culmination of decades of research performed by scientists at TRW on the rich phenomenology of collisionless shocks in space.

  6. Electric fields and field-aligned currents in polar regions of the solar corona: 3-D MHD consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanko, Yu. V.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation of the solar rotation electro-dynamical effects in the near-the-Sun solar wind seems more convenient from the non-inertial corotating reference frame. This implies some modification of the 3-D MHD equations generally on the base of the General Theory of Relativity. The paper deals with the search of stationary (in corotating non-inertial reference frame) solutions of the modified 3-D MHD equations for the in near-the-Sun high latitude sub-alfvenic solar wind. The solution is obtained requiring electric fields and field-aligned electric currents in the high latitude near-the-Sun solar wind. Various scenario are explored self-consistently via a number of numerical experiments. The analogy with the high latitude Earth's magnetosphere is used for the interpretation of the results. Possible observational manifestations are discussed.

  7. 3-D Hybrid Kinetic Modeling of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and Lunar-like Exospheric Pickup Ions in Case of Oblique/ Quasi-Parallel/Parallel Upstream Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Farrell, W. M.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between the solar wind and Moon-sized objects are determined by a set of the solar wind parameters and plasma environment of the space objects. The orientation of upstream magnetic field is one of the key factors which determines the formation and structure of bow shock wave/Mach cone or Alfven wing near the obstacle. The study of effects of the direction of the upstream magnetic field on lunar-like plasma environment is the main subject of our investigation in this paper. Photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our hybrid model. The computational model includes the self-consistent dynamics of the light (hydrogen (+), helium (+)) and heavy (sodium (+)) pickup ions. The lunar interior is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our previous 2013 lunar work, as reported in this journal, found formation of a triple structure of the Mach cone near the Moon in the case of perpendicular upstream magnetic field. Further advances in modeling now reveal the presence of strong wave activity in the upstream solar wind and plasma wake in the cases of quasiparallel and parallel upstream magnetic fields. However, little wave activity is found for the opposite case with a perpendicular upstream magnetic field. The modeling does not show a formation of the Mach cone in the case of theta(Sub B,U) approximately equal to 0 degrees.

  8. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  9. High-Performance and Omnidirectional Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Modules Achieved by 3D Geometry Design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongliang; Yin, Min; Lu, Linfeng; Zhang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Xufei; Che, Jianfei; Li, Dongdong

    2015-11-01

    High-performance thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells are achieved by combining macroscale 3D tubular substrates and nanoscaled 3D cone-like antireflective films. The tubular geometry delivers a series of advantages for large-scale deployment of photovoltaics, such as omnidirectional performance, easier encapsulation, decreased wind resistance, and easy integration with a second device inside the glass tube. PMID:26418573

  10. 3D Distribution of the Coronal Electron Density and its Evolution with Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Reginald, Nelson Leslie; Davila, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, Orville Chris

    2016-05-01

    The variability of the solar white-light corona and its connection to the solar activity has been studied for more than a half century. It is widely accepted that the temporal variation of the total radiance of the K-corona follows the solar cycle pattern (e.g., correlated with sunspot number). However, the origin of this variation and its relationships with regard to coronal mass ejections and the solar wind are yet to be clearly understood. We know that the COR1-A and –B instruments onboard the STEREO spacecraft have continued to perform high-cadence (5 min) polarized brightness measurements from two different vantage points over a long period of time that encompasses the solar minimum of Solar Cycle 23 to the solar maximum of Solar Cycle 24. This extended period of polarized brightness measurements can now be used to reconstruct 3D electron density distributions of the corona between the heliocentric heights of 1.5-4.0 solar radii. In this study we have constructed the 3D coronal density models for 100 Carrington rotations (CRs) from 2007 to 2014 using the spherically symmetric inversion (SSI) method. The validity of these 3D density models is verified by comparing with similar 3D density models created by other means such as tomography, MHD modeling, and 2D density distributions inverted from the polarized brightness images from LASCO/C2 instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft. When examining the causes for the temporal variation of the global electron content we find that its increase from the solar minimum to maximum depends on changes to both the total area and mean density of coronal streamers. We also find that the global and hemispheric electron contents show quasi-periodic variations with a period of 8-9 CRs during the ascending and maximum phases of Solar Cycle 24 through wavelet analysis. In addition, we also explore any obvious relationships between temporal variation of the global electron content with the photospheric magnetic flux, total mass of

  11. 3-D Dynamic Behavior of Generalized Polar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.; Demars, H. G.

    2003-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of the high-latitude plasma during a representative geomagnetic storm is investigated using a 3-D macroscopic particle-in-cell (mac-PIC) model. In this study, we simulate the behavior of a large number ( ˜100 to 1000) of plasma-filled geomagnetic flux tubes. Each flux tube extends from 1200 km to several Earth radii, includes ˜106 simulation particles, and is followed for ˜12 hours. The lower boundary conditions of the model are provided by a 3-D fluid-like model that extends down to 100 km. Several physical mechanisms are included such as wave-particle interactions, ion-ion collisions, low-altitude ion energization, and magnetospheric particles. The computing-intensive nature of the model requires the utilization of parallel programming techniques. We use a cluster of five nodes, with two (1.6 GHz) processors each, that is available at Utah State University, with the intention of transferring the code to a bigger facility in the future. A 3-D picture is assembled from the temporal evolution of the individual flux tubes by keeping track of their locations. This 3-D picture facilitates comparison with observations, such as radar and satellite measurements. The model and its preliminary results are presented.

  12. ISM abundances and history: a 3D, solar neighborhood view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Puspitarini, L.

    For observational reasons, the solar neighborhood is particularly suitable for the study of the multi-phase interstellar (IS) medium and the search for traces of its temporal evolution. On the other hand, by a number of aspects it seems to be a peculiar region. We use recent 3D maps of the IS dust based on color excess data as well as former maps of the gas to illustrate how such maps can be used to shed additional light on the specificity of the local medium, its history and abundance pattern. 3D maps reveal a gigantic cavity located in the third quadrant and connected to the Local Bubble, the latter itself running into an elongated cavity toward l≃ 70°. Most nearby cloud complexes of the so-called Gould belt but also more distant clouds seem to border a large fraction of this entire structure. The IS medium with the large cavity appears ionized and dust-poor, as deduced from ionized calcium and neutral sodium to dust ratios. The geometry favors the proposed scenario of Gould belt-Local Arm formation through the braking of a supercloud by interaction with a spiral density wave \\citep{olano01}. The highly variable D/H ratio in the nearby IS gas may also be spatially related to the global structure. We speculate about potential consequences of the supercloud encounter and dust-gas decoupling during its braking, in particular the formation of strong inhomogeneities in both the dust to gas abundance ratio and the dust characteristics: (i) during the ≃ 500 Myrs prior to the collision, dust within the supercloud may have been gradually, strongly enriched in D due to an absence of strong stellar formation and preferential adsorption of D \\citep{jura82,draine03} ; (ii) during its interaction with the Plane and the braking dust-rich and dust-poor regions may have formed due to differential gas drag, the dust being more concentrated in the dense areas; strong radiation pressure from OB associations at the boundary of the left-behind giant cavity may have also helped

  13. Solar Wind: Radio Techniques for Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The solar wind is a complex magnetized plasma containing large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) structures, waves and turbulence (see SOLAR WIND PLASMA WAVES and SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE). The structure of the solar wind is modulated in both time and space by solar variability. The solar activity cycle modulates the structure of the solar wind over a time scale of years while transient energetic phen...

  14. 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer modeling of η Carinae's colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.; Icke, V.

    We present results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system η Carinae. We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary star mass-loss rates. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing. While we initially focus on η Car, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty `pinwheel' (WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where various observed time-variable emission and absorption lines form in these unique objects.

  15. Radiative 3D MHD simulations of the spontaneous small-scale eruptions in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina N.

    2015-08-01

    Studying non-linear turbulent dynamics of the solar atmosphere is important for understanding mechanism of the solar and stellar brightness variations. High-resolution observations of the quiet Sun reveal ubiquitous distributions of high-speed jets, which are transport mass and energy into the solar corona and feeding the solar wind. However, the origin of these eruption events is still unknown. Using 3D realistic MHD numerical simulations we find that small-scale eruptions are produced by ubiquitous magnetized vortex tubes generated by the Sun's turbulent convection in subsurface layers. The swirling vortex tubes (resembling tornadoes) penetrate into the solar atmosphere, capture and stretch background magnetic field, and push the surrounding material up, generating shocks. Our simulations reveal complicated high-speed flow patterns and thermodynamic and magnetic structure in the erupting vortex tubes and shows that the eruptions are initiated in the subsurface layers and are driven by high-pressure gradients in the subphotosphere and photosphere and by the Lorentz force in the higher atmosphere layers. I will discuss about properties of these eruptions, their effects on brightness and spectral variations and comparison with observations.

  16. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  17. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  18. Three-Dimensional (3-D) Reconstructions of EISCAT IPS Velocity Data in the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisi, M. M.; Jackson, B. V.; Breen, A. R.; Dorrian, G. D.; Fallows, R. A.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.

    2010-08-01

    The European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT) radar has been used for remote-sensing observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) for a quarter of a century. During the April/May 2007 observing campaign, a large number of observations of IPS using EISCAT took place to give a reasonable spatial and temporal coverage of solar wind velocity structure throughout this time during the declining phase of Solar Cycle 23. Many co-rotating and transient features were observed during this period. Using the University of California, San Diego three-dimensional (3-D) time-dependent computer assisted tomography (C.A.T.) solar-wind reconstruction analysis, we show the velocity structure of the inner heliosphere in three dimensions throughout the time interval of 20 April through 20 May 2007. We also compare to white-light remote-sensing observations of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) seen by the STEREO Ahead spacecraft inner Heliospheric Imager on 16 May 2007, as well as to in-situ solar-wind measurements taken with near-Earth spacebourne instrumentation throughout this interval. The reconstructions show clear co-rotating regions during this period, and the time-series extraction at spacecraft locations compares well with measurements made by the STEREO, Wind, and ACE spacecraft. This is the first time such clear structures have been revealed using this 3-D technique with EISCAT IPS data as input.

  19. The performance & flow visualization studies of three-dimensional (3-D) wind turbine blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Prajitno, Purnomo, W., Setyawan B.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, studies on the design of 3-D wind turbine blades have a less attention even though 3-D blade products are widely sold. In contrary, advanced studies in 3-D helicopter blade tip have been studied rigorously. Studies in wind turbine blade modeling are mostly assumed that blade spanwise sections behave as independent two-dimensional airfoils, implying that there is no exchange of momentum in the spanwise direction. Moreover, flow visualization experiments are infrequently conducted. Therefore, a modeling study of wind turbine blade with visualization experiment is needed to be improved to obtain a better understanding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of 3-D wind turbine blade models with backward-forward swept and verify the flow patterns using flow visualization. In this research, the blade models are constructed based on the twist and chord distributions following Schmitz's formula. Forward and backward swept are added to the rotating blades. Based on this, the additional swept would enhance or diminish outward flow disturbance or stall development propagation on the spanwise blade surfaces to give better blade design. Some combinations, i. e., b lades with backward swept, provide a better 3-D favorable rotational force of the rotor system. The performance of the 3-D wind turbine system model is measured by a torque meter, employing Prony's braking system. Furthermore, the 3-D flow patterns around the rotating blade models are investigated by applying "tuft-visualization technique", to study the appearance of laminar, separated, and boundary layer flow patterns surrounding the 3-dimentional blade system.

  20. 3D Babcock-Leighton Solar Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Hazra, Gopal; Karak, Bidya Binay; Teweldebirhan, Kinfe; Upton, Lisa

    2016-05-01

    We present results from the new STABLE (Surface flux Transport and Babcock Leighton) Dynamo Model. STABLE is a 3D Babcock-Leighton/Flux Transport dynamo model in which the source of poloidal field is the explicit emergence, distortion, and dispersal of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). In this talk I will discuss initial results with axisymmetric flow fields, focusing on the operation of the model, the general features of the cyclic solutions, and the challenge of achieving supercritical dynamo solutions using only the Babcock-Leighton source term. Then I will present dynamo simulations that include 3D convective flow fields based on the observed velocity power spectrum inferred from photospheric Dopplergrams. I'll use these simulations to assess how the explicit transport and amplification of fields by surface convection influences the operation of the dynamo. I will also discuss the role of surface magnetic fields in regulating the subsurface toroidal flux budget.

  1. A 3-D aerodynamic method for the analysis of isolated horizontal-axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Ammara, I.; Masson, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1997-12-31

    In most existing performance-analysis methods, wind turbines are considered isolated so that interference effects caused by other rotors or by the site topography are neglected. The main objective of this paper is to propose a practical 3-D method suitable for the study of these effects, in order to optimize the arrangement and the positioning of Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs) in a wind farm. In the proposed methodology, the flow field around isolated HAWTs is predicted by solving the 3-D, time-averaged, steady-state, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations in which the turbines are represented by distributions of momentum sources. The resulting governing equations are solved using a Control-Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM). The fundamental aspects related to the development of a practical 3-D method are discussed in this paper, with an emphasis on some of the challenges that arose during its implementation. The current implementation is limited to the analysis of isolated HAWTs. Preliminary results have indicated that, the proposed 3-D method reaches the same level of accuracy, in terms of performance predictions, that the previously developed 2-D axisymmetric model and the well-known momentum-strip theory, while still using reasonable computers resources. It can be considered as a useful tool for the design of HAWTs. Its main advantages, however, are its intrinsic capacity to predict the details of the flow in the wake, and its capabilities of modelling arbitrary wind-turbine arrangements and including ground effects.

  2. Solar wind photoplate study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, B. W.; Voorhies, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An ion sensitive emulsion detection system has been considered for use in a cycloidal focusing mass spectrometer to measure the various atomic species which comprise the solar plasma. The responses of Ilford Q2 and Kodak SC7 emulsions were measured with N(+) ions at 6 keV to 10 keV, He(++) ions at 750 eV to 2500 eV, and H(+) ions at 550 eV to 1400 eV. These ions have the approximate range of velocities (about 300-500 km/sec) encountered in the solar wind. The work was carried out on a specially prepared magnetic sector mass analyzer. Characteristic response curves were generated, each one utilizing approximately 50 data points at three or more current densities. In addition to the ion response, measurements of the response of these emulsions to a photon flux simulating the visible portion of the solar spectrum were made. The results obtained will be presented in detail and interpreted in relation to other data available for these emulsions.

  3. Type II solar radio bursts predicted by 3-D MHD CME and kinetic radio emission simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2014-01-01

    Impending space weather events at Earth are often signaled by type II solar radio bursts. These bursts are generated upstream of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that move away from the Sun. We combine elaborate three-dimensional (3-D) magnetohydrodynamic predictions of realistic CMEs near the Sun with a recent analytic kinetic radiation theory in order to simulate two type II bursts. Magnetograms of the Sun are used to reconstruct initial solar magnetic and active region fields for the modeling. STEREO spacecraft data are used to dimension the flux rope of the initial CME, launched into an empirical data-driven corona and solar wind. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the two type II bursts observed by the Wind spacecraft on 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. Propagation of the simulated CME-driven shocks through coronal plasmas containing preexisting density and magnetic field structures that stem from the coronal setup and CME initiation closely reproduce the isolated islands of type II emission observed. These islands form because of a competition between the growth of the radio source due to spherical expansion and a fragmentation of the radio source due to increasingly radial fields in the nose region of the shock and interactions with streamers in the flank regions of the shock. Our study provides strong support for this theory for type II bursts and implies that the physical processes involved are understood. It also supports a near-term capability to predict and track these events for space weather predictions.

  4. 3-D simulations of solar and stellar convection and magnetoconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Å.; Stein, R. F.

    1990-05-01

    We present the key components of a 3-D code designed for simulating the hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics of stellar atmospheres and envelopes. Some particular properties of the code are: (1) the ability to handle strong stratification (extensive simulations with bottom/top pressure ratios of 3×104 have been performed, and simulations with pressure ratios of 5×106 are being initiated); (2) a detailed treatment of the radiating surface; (3) a functional form of the subgrid-scale diffusion designed to minimize the influence on resolved motions; (4) boundary conditions open to flows. The top boundary allows the transmission of short period waves, while the bottom boundary condition was designed to enforce a displacement node for radial pressure modes.

  5. Validation of US3D for Capsule Aerodynamics using 05-CA Wind Tunnel Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Several comparisons of computational fluid dynamics to wind tunnel test data are shown for the purpose of code validation. The wind tunnel test, 05-CA, uses a 7.66% model of NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle in the 11-foot test section of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind tunnel. A variety of freestream conditions over four Mach numbers and three angles of attack are considered. Test data comparisons include time-averaged integrated forces and moments, time-averaged static pressure ports on the surface, and Strouhal Number. The applicability of the US3D code to subsonic and transonic flow over a bluff body is assessed on a comprehensive data set. With close comparison, this work validates US3D for highly separated flows similar to those examined here.

  6. Solar wind composition. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have resulted in the determination of the average abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe in the solar wind to approximately 10%. Comparisons with solar energetic particle (SEP) abundances and galactic cosmic ray abundances have revealed many similarities, especially when compared with solar photospheric abundances. It is now well established that fractionation in the corona results in an overabundance (with respect to the photosphere) of elements with first ionization potentials less than 10 eV. These observations have in turn led to the development of fractionation models that are reasonably successful in reproducing the first ionization (FIP) effect. Under some circumstances it has been possible to relate solar wind observations to particular source regions in the corona. The magnetic topologies of the source regions appear to have a strong influence on the fractionation of elements. Comparisons with spectroscopic data are particularly useful in classifying the different topologies. Ions produced from interstellar neutral atoms are also found in the solar wind. These ions are picked up by the solar wind after ionization by solar radiation or charge exchange and can be identified by their velocity in the solar wind. The pick-up ions provide most of the pressure in the interplanetary medium at large distances. Interstellar abundances can be derived from the observed fluxes of solar wind pick-up ions.

  7. Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. Therefore we draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14%, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31%) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's aeroelastic wing (53%), as well as sudden changes in wing loading (16%) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95% confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square deviation) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≍0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable eddy-covariance flux measurements.

  8. Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shift microlight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. Therefore we draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14 %, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31 %) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's trim (53 %), as well as changes in the aircraft lift (16 %) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95 % confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square error) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≈0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable Eddy-Covariance flux measurements.

  9. Slow Solar Wind: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbo, L.; Ofman, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y.-K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y.-M.

    2016-06-01

    While it is certain that the fast solar wind originates from coronal holes, where and how the slow solar wind (SSW) is formed remains an outstanding question in solar physics even in the post-SOHO era. The quest for the SSW origin forms a major objective for the planned future missions such as the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. Nonetheless, results from spacecraft data, combined with theoretical modeling, have helped to investigate many aspects of the SSW. Fundamental physical properties of the coronal plasma have been derived from spectroscopic and imaging remote-sensing data and in situ data, and these results have provided crucial insights for a deeper understanding of the origin and acceleration of the SSW. Advanced models of the SSW in coronal streamers and other structures have been developed using 3D MHD and multi-fluid equations. However, the following questions remain open: What are the source regions and their contributions to the SSW? What is the role of the magnetic topology in the corona for the origin, acceleration and energy deposition of the SSW? What are the possible acceleration and heating mechanisms for the SSW? The aim of this review is to present insights on the SSW origin and formation gathered from the discussions at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) by the Team entitled "Slow solar wind sources and acceleration mechanisms in the corona" held in Bern (Switzerland) in March 2014 and 2015.

  10. 3D Modeling of the Massive Binary Wind Interaction Region in Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, T.; Owocki, S.; Okazaki, A.; Russell, C.

    2009-01-01

    We present recent work on the theoretical modeling of low excitation ([Fe II]) and high excitation ([Fe III]) wind lines observed in Eta Carinae using the HST/STIS. The spatially resolved structures seen in these lines are interpreted as the time-averaged, outer extensions of the wind from the primary star and the wind-wind interaction region of the massive binary system. For most of the orbit, the wind-wind interface can be approximated as a cone with a half-opening angle of 65° whose axis of rotation is aligned with the major axis of the binary orbit and appears to lie in the plane of the Homunculus disk. However, because the orbit is highly elliptical, this approximation breaks down at periastron and so full 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations become necessary. By analyzing the results of these 3D SPH simulations of the binary interactions and comparing them to the spectra obtained with the HST/STIS we place further constraints on the orientation of the binary orbit, and hope to eventually determine how/where UV light is escaping in the system, to search for any direct signatures of the companion star, and to ultimately establish a mass ratio for the system.

  11. Wind and solar powered turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, I. D.; Koh, J. L.; Holmes, M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A power generating station having a generator driven by solar heat assisted ambient wind is described. A first plurality of radially extendng air passages direct ambient wind to a radial flow wind turbine disposed in a centrally located opening in a substantially disc-shaped structure. A solar radiation collecting surface having black bodies is disposed above the fist plurality of air passages and in communication with a second plurality of radial air passages. A cover plate enclosing the second plurality of radial air passages is transparent so as to permit solar radiation to effectively reach the black bodies. The second plurality of air passages direct ambient wind and thermal updrafts generated by the black bodies to an axial flow turbine. The rotating shaft of the turbines drive the generator. The solar and wind drien power generating system operates in electrical cogeneration mode with a fuel powered prime mover.

  12. Effects of the LBV Primary's Mass-loss Rate on the 3D Hydrodynamics of eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Cocoran, M.; Okazaki, A.; Owocki, S.; Russell, C.; Hamaguchi, K.; Clementel, N; Groh, J.; Hillier, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of eta Carinae's spectacular "Homunculus" nebula lies an extremely luminous (L(sub Total) greater than approximately 5 × 10(exp 6) solar luminosity) colliding wind binary with a highly eccentric (e approximately 0.9), 5.54-year orbit (Figure 1). The primary of the system, a Luminous Blue Variable (LBV), is our closest (D approximately 2.3 kpc) and best example of a pre-hypernova or pre-gamma ray burst environment. The remarkably consistent and periodic RXTE X-ray light curve surprisingly showed a major change during the system's last periastron in 2009, with the X-ray minimum being approximately 50% shorter than the minima of the previous two cycles1. Between 1998 and 2011, the strengths of various broad stellar wind emission lines (e.g. Halpha, Fe II) in line-of-sight (l.o.s.) also decreased by factors of 1.5 - 3 relative to the continuum2. The current interpretation for these changes is that they are due to a gradual factor of 2 - 4 drop in the primary's mass-loss rate over the last approximately 15 years1, 2. However, while a secular change is seen for a direct view of the central source, little to no change is seen in profiles at high stellar latitudes or reflected off of the dense, circumbinary material known as the "Weigelt blobs"2, 3. Moreover, model spectra generated with CMFGEN predict that a factor of 2 - 4 drop in the primary's mass-loss rate should lead to huge changes in the observed spectrum, which thus far have not been seen. Here we present results from large- (plus or minus 1620 AU) and small- (plus or minus 162 AU) domain, full 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of eta Car's massive binary colliding winds for three different primary-star mass-loss rates (2.4, 4.8, and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr). The goal is to investigate how the mass-loss rate affects the 3D geometry and dynamics of eta Car's optically-thick wind and spatially-extended wind-wind collision (WWC) regions, both of which are known sources of

  13. Using 3D dynamic models to reproduce X-ray properties of colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. The two massive stars contained in these systems have powerful radiatively driven stellar winds, and the conversion of their kinetic energy to heat (up to 108 K) at the wind-wind collision region generates hard thermal X-rays (up to 10 keV). Rich data sets exist of several multi-year-period systems, as well as key observations of shorter period systems, and detailed models are required to disentangle the phase-locked emission and absorption processes in these systems. To interpret these X-ray light curves and spectra, this dissertation models the wind-wind interaction of CWBs using 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and solves the 3D formal solution of radiative transfer to synthesize the model X-ray properties, allowing direct comparison with the colliding-wind X-ray spectra observed by, e.g., RXTE and XMM. The multi-year-period, highly eccentric CWBs we examine are eta Carinae and WR140. For the commonly inferred primary mass loss rate of ˜10 -3 Msun/yr, eta Carinae's 3D model reproduces quite well the 2-10 keV RXTE light curve, hardness ratio, and dynamic spectra in absolute units. This agreement includes the ˜3 month X-ray minimum associated with the 1998.0 and 2003.5 periastron passages, which we find to occur as the primary wind encroaches into the secondary wind's acceleration region. This modeling provides further evidence that the observer is mainly viewing the system through the secondary's shock cone, and suggests that periastron occurs ~1 month after the onset of the X-ray minimum. The model RXTE observables of WR140 match the data well in absolute units, although the decrease in model X-rays around periastron is less than observed. There is very good agreement between the observed XMM spectrum taken on the rise before periastron and the model. We also model two short-period CWBs, HD150136, which has a wind-star collision, and delta Orionis A, the closest eclipsing

  14. Analysis of Wind Forces on Roof-Top Solar Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Yogendra; Kudav, Ganesh

    2011-03-01

    Structural loads on solar panels include forces due to high wind, gravity, thermal expansion, and earthquakes. International Building Code (IBC) and the American Society of Civil Engineers are two commonly used approaches in solar industries to address wind loads. Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-02) can be used to calculate wind uplift loads on roof-mounted solar panels. The present study is primarily focused on 2D and 3D modeling with steady, and turbulent flow over an inclined solar panel on the flat based roof to predict the wind forces for designing wind management system. For the numerical simulation, 3-D incompressible flow with the standard k- ɛ was adopted and commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT was used. Results were then validated with wind tunnel experiments with a good agreement. Solar panels with various aspect ratios for various high wind speeds and angle of attacks were modeled and simulated in order to predict the wind loads in various scenarios. The present study concluded to reduce the strong wind uplift by designing a guide plate or a deflector before the panel. Acknowledgments to Northern States Metal Inc., OH (GK & YP) and School of Graduate Studies of YSU for RP & URC 2009-2010 (YP).

  15. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in Eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in Eta Car. We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form. We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for Eta Car.

  16. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C.J.H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in eta Car.We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form.We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for eta Car.

  17. 3D Modeling of Forbidden Line Emission in the Binary Wind Interaction Region of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, T. R.; Owocki, S.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present recent work using three-dimensional (3D) Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to model the high ([Fe III], [Ar III], [Ne III] and [S III]) and low ([Fe II], [Ni II]) ionization forbidden emission lines observed in Eta Carinae using the HST/STIS. These structures are interpreted as the time-averaged, outer extensions of the primary wind and the wind-wind interaction region directly excited by the FUV of the hot companion star of this massive binary system. We discuss how analyzing the results of the 3D SPH simulations and synthetic slit spectra and comparing them to the spectra obtained with the HST/STIS helps us determine the absolute orientation of the binary orbit and helps remove the degeneracy inherent to models based solely on the observed RXTE X-ray light curve. A key point of this work is that spatially resolved observations like those with HST/STIS and comparison to 3D models are necessary to determine the alignment or misalignment of the orbital angular momentum axis with the Homunculus, or correspondingly, the alignment of the orbital plane with the Homunculus skirt.

  18. Highly Alfvenic Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly thought that fast solar wind tends to be highly Alfvenic, with strong correlations between velocity and magnetic fluctuations, but examples have been known for over 20 years in which slow wind is both Alfvenic and has many other properties more typically expected of fast solar wind. This paper will present a search for examples of such flows from more recent data, and will begin to characterize the general characteristics of them. A very preliminary search suggests that such intervals are more common in the rising phase of the solar cycle. These intervals are important for providing constraints on models of solar wind acceleration, and in particular the role waves might or might not play in that process.

  19. STATIONARITY IN SOLAR WIND FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, S.; Balogh, A. E-mail: a.balogh@imperial.ac.u

    2010-05-01

    By using single-point measurements in space physics it is possible to study a phenomenon only as a function of time. This means that we cannot have direct access to information about spatial variations of a measured quantity. However, the investigation of the properties of turbulence and of related phenomena in the solar wind widely makes use of an approximation frequently adopted in hydrodynamics under certain conditions, the so-called Taylor hypothesis; indeed, the solar wind flow has a bulk velocity along the radial direction which is much higher than the velocity of a single turbulent eddy embedded in the main flow. This implies that the time of evolution of the turbulent features is longer than the transit time of the flow through the spacecraft position, so that the turbulent field can be considered frozen into the solar wind flow. This assumption allows one to easily associate time variations with spatial variations and stationarity to homogeneity. We have investigated, applying criteria for weak stationarity to Ulysses magnetic field data in different solar wind regimes, at which timescale and under which conditions the hypothesis of stationarity, and then of homogeneity, of turbulence in the solar wind is well justified. We extend the conclusions of previous studies by Matthaeus and Goldstein to different parameter ranges in the solar wind. We conclude that the stationarity assumption in the inertial range of turbulence on timescales of 10 minutes to 1 day is reasonably satisfied in fast and uniform solar wind flows, but that in mixed, interacting fast, and slow solar wind streams the assumption is frequently only marginally valid.

  20. 3D modelling of the colliding winds in η Carinae - evidence for radiative inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, E. R.; Pittard, J. M.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Stevens, I. R.

    2009-04-01

    The X-ray emission from the supermassive star ηCar is simulated using a 3D model of the wind-wind collision. In the model the intrinsic X-ray emission is spatially extended and energy dependent. Absorption due to the unshocked stellar winds and the cooled post-shock material from the primary LBV star is calculated as the intrinsic emission is ray traced along multiple sightlines through the 3D spiral structure of the circumstellar environment. The observable emission is then compared to available X-ray data, including the light curve observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and spectra observed by XMM-Newton. The orientation and eccentricity of the orbit are explored, as are the wind parameters of the stars and the nature and physics of their close approach. Our modelling supports a viewing angle with an inclination of ~=42°, consistent with the polar axis of the Homunculus nebula, and the projection of the observer's line of sight on to the orbital plane has an angle of ~=0°-30° in the prograde direction on the apastron side of the semimajor axis. However, there are significant discrepancies between the observed and model light curves and spectra through the X-ray minimum. In particular, the hard flux in our synthetic spectra is an order of magnitude greater than observed. This suggests that the hard X-ray emission near the apex of the wind-wind collision region (WCR) `switches off' from periastron until two months afterwards. Further calculations reveal that radiative inhibition significantly reduces the pre-shock velocity of the companion wind. As a consequence the hard X-ray emission is quenched, but it is unclear whether the long duration of the minimum is due solely to this mechanism alone. For instance, it is possible that the collapse of the WCR on to the surface of the companion star, which would be aided by significant inhibition of the companion wind, could cause an extended minimum as the companion wind struggles to re-establish itself as

  1. Earth Science Research Discovery, Integration, 3D Visualization and Analysis using NASA World Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameh, N.; Hogan, P.

    2008-12-01

    NASA plays a leadership role in the world of Advanced Information Technologies. Part of our mission is to leverage those technologies to increase the usability of the growing amount of earth observation produced by the science community. NASA World Wind open source technology provides a complete 3D visualization platform that is being continually advanced by NASA, its partners and the open source community. The technology makes scientific data and observations more accessible to Earth scientists and offers them a standards-based extensible platform to manipulate and analyze that data. The API-centric architecture of World Wind's SDK allows others to readily extend or embed this technology (including in web pages). Such multiple approaches to using the technology accelerate opportunities for the research community to provide "advances in fundamental understanding of the Earth system and increased application of this understanding to serve the nation and the people of the world" (NRC Decadal Survey). The opportunities to advance this NASA Open Source Agreement (NOSA) technology by leveraging advances in web services, interoperability, data discovery mechanisms, and Sensor Web are unencumbered by proprietary constraints and therefore provide the basis for an evolving platform that can reliably service the needs of the Earth Science, Sensor Web and GEOSS communities. The ability for these communities to not only use this technology in an unrestricted manner but to also participate in advancing it leads to accelerated innovation and maximum exchange of information. 3 characteristics enable World Wind to push the frontier in Advanced Information Systems: 1- World Wind provides a unifying information browser to enable a variety of 3D geospatial applications. World Wind consists of a coherent suite of modular components to be used selectively or in concert with any number of programs. 2- World Wind technology can be embedded as part of any application and hence makes it

  2. Solar Mass Ejection Imager 3-D reconstruction of the 27-28 May 2003 coronal mass ejection sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Bisi, M. M.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Clover, J. M.; Sun, W.

    2008-03-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) has recorded the inner-heliospheric response in white-light Thomson scattering for many hundreds of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Some of these have been observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large-Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) instruments and also in situ by near-Earth spacecraft. This article presents a low-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the 27-28 May 2003 halo CME event sequence observed by LASCO and later using SMEI observations; this sequence was also observed by all in situ monitors near Earth. The reconstruction derives its perspective views from outward flowing solar wind. Analysis results reveal the shape, extent, and mass of this ICME sequence as it reaches the vicinity of Earth. The extended shape has considerable detail that is compared with LASCO images and masses for this event. The 3-D reconstructed density, derived from the remote-sensed Thomson scattered brightness, is also compared with the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and Wind spacecraft in situ plasma measurements. These agree well in peak and integrated total value for this ICME event sequence when an appropriately enhanced (˜20%) electron number density is assumed to account for elements heavier than hydrogen in the ionized plasma.

  3. Solar cycle variations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, John W.; Lopez, Ramon E.

    1986-01-01

    The solar cycle variations of various solar wind parameters are reviewed. It is shown that there is a gradual decrease in the duration of high-speed streams from the declining phase of solar cycle 20 through the ascending phase of cycle 21 and a corresponding decrease in the annual average of the proton speed toward solar maximum. Beta, the ratio of the proton thermal pressure to magnetic pressure, undergoes a significant solar cycle variation, as expected from the variation in the IMF. Individual hourly averages of beta often exceed unity with 20 cases exceeding 10 and one case as high as 25. The Alfven Mach number shows a solar cycle variation similar to beta, lower aboard solar maximum. High-speed streams can be seen clearly in epsilon and the y component of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  4. Wind in the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    As an astronomy instructor I am always looking for commonly experienced Earthly phenomena to help my students and me understand and appreciate similar occurrences elsewhere in the solar system. Recently I wrote short "TPT" articles on frost and precipitation. The present article is on winds in the solar system. A windy day or storm might motivate…

  5. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  6. Micromorph silicon tandem solar cells with fully integrated 3D photonic crystal intermediate reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üpping, J.; Bielawny, A.; Fahr, S.; Rockstuhl, C.; Lederer, F.; Steidl, L.; Zentel, R.; Beckers, T.; Lambertz, A.; Carius, R.; Wehrspohn, R. B.

    2010-05-01

    A 3D photonic intermediate reflector for textured micromorph silicon tandem solar cells has been investigated. In thin-film silicon tandem solar cells consisting of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon with two junctions of a-Si/c-Si, efficiency enhancements can be achieved by increasing the current density in the a-Si top cell providing an optimized current matching at high current densities. For an ideal photon-management between top and bottom cell, a spectrally-selective intermediate reflective layer (IRL) is necessary. We present the first fully-integrated 3D photonic thin-film IRL device incorporated on a planar substrate. Using a ZnO inverted opal structure the external quantum efficiency of the top cell in the spectral region of interest could be enhanced. As an outlook we present the design and the preparation of a 3D self organized photonic crystal structure in a textured micromorph tandem solar cell.

  7. Nanoscale Analysis of a Hierarchical Hybrid Solar Cell in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Divitini, Giorgio; Stenzel, Ole; Ghadirzadeh, Ali; Guarnera, Simone; Russo, Valeria; Casari, Carlo S; Bassi, Andrea Li; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio; Schmidt, Volker; Ducati, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative method for the characterization of nanoscale 3D morphology is applied to the investigation of a hybrid solar cell based on a novel hierarchical nanostructured photoanode. A cross section of the solar cell device is prepared by focused ion beam milling in a micropillar geometry, which allows a detailed 3D reconstruction of the titania photoanode by electron tomography. It is found that the hierarchical titania nanostructure facilitates polymer infiltration, thus favoring intermixing of the two semiconducting phases, essential for charge separation. The 3D nanoparticle network is analyzed with tools from stochastic geometry to extract information related to the charge transport in the hierarchical solar cell. In particular, the experimental dataset allows direct visualization of the percolation pathways that contribute to the photocurrent. PMID:25834481

  8. Photoionization in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Lepri, S. T.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the effects of photoionization on the charge state composition of the solar wind. Using measured solar EUV and X-ray irradiance, the Michigan Ionization Code and a model for the fast and slow solar wind, we calculate the evolution of the charge state distribution of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe with and without including photoionization for both types of wind. We find that the solar radiation has significant effects on the charge state distribution of C, N, and O, causing the ionization levels of these elements to be higher than without photoionization; differences are largest for oxygen. The ions commonly observed for elements heavier than O are much less affected, except in ICMEs where Fe ions more ionized than 16+ can also be affected by the solar radiation. We also show that the commonly used O7+/O6+ density ratio is the most sensitive to photoionization; this sensitivity also causes the value of this ratio to depend on the phase of the solar cycle. We show that the O7+/O6+ ratio needs to be used with caution for solar wind classification and coronal temperature estimates, and recommend the C6+/C4+ ratio for these purposes.

  9. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: The SimpleX Radiative Transfer Algorithm Applied to 3D SPH Simulations of Eta Car's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-04-01

    At the heart of the spectacular bipolar Homunculus nebula lies an extremely luminous (5*10^6 L_sun) colliding wind binary with a highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9), 5.54-year orbit and a total mass ~ 110 M_sun. Our closest (D ~ 2.3 kpc) and best example of a pre-hypernova environment, Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions, stellar wind-wind collisions, and massive star evolution. In order to improve our knowledge of the system, we need to generate synthetic observations and compare them with the already available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer post-processing of 3D SPH hydrodynamical simulations of the interacting winds of Eta Carinae. We use SimpleX algorithm to obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, this results in ionization maps of both species that constrain the regions where these lines can form. These results will allow us to put constraints on the number of ionizing photons coming from the companion. This construction of synthetic observations allows us to obtain insight into the highly complex 3D flows in Eta, from the shape of the ionized volume and its resulting optical/spectral appearance.

  10. Impact of the 3-D model strategy on science learning of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Mohammed

    The purpose of this mixed method study, quantitative and descriptive, was to determine whether the first-middle grade (seventh grade) students at Saudi schools are able to learn and use the Autodesk Maya software to interact and create their own 3-D models and animations and whether their use of the software influences their study habits and their understanding of the school subject matter. The study revealed that there is value to the science students regarding the use of 3-D software to create 3-D models to complete science assignments. Also, this study aimed to address the middle-school students' ability to learn 3-D software in art class, and then ultimately use it in their science class. The success of this study may open the way to consider the impact of 3-D modeling on other school subjects, such as mathematics, art, and geography. When the students start using graphic design, including 3-D software, at a young age, they tend to develop personal creativity and skills. The success of this study, if applied in schools, will provide the community with skillful young designers and increase awareness of graphic design and the new 3-D technology. Experimental method was used to answer the quantitative research question, are there significant differences applying the learning method using 3-D models (no 3-D, premade 3-D, and create 3-D) in a science class being taught about the solar system and its impact on the students' science achievement scores? Descriptive method was used to answer the qualitative research questions that are about the difficulty of learning and using Autodesk Maya software, time that students take to use the basic levels of Polygon and Animation parts of the Autodesk Maya software, and level of students' work quality.

  11. Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y. Harrington

    2012-09-21

    This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

  12. A 3-D High Speed Photographic Survey For Bomb Dropping In The Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junren, Chen; Liangyi, Chen; Yuxian, Nie; Wenxing, Chen

    1989-06-01

    High speed Stereophotography may obtain 3-D information of the motion object. This paper deals with a high speed stereophotographic survey of dropping bomb in wind tunnel and measurement of its displacement, velocity, acceleration, angle of attack and yaw angle. Two high speed cinecameras are used, the two optical axes of the cameras are perpendicular to each other and in a plane being vertical to the plumb line. The optical axis of a camera (front camera) is parallel with the aircraft body, and the another (side camera) is perpendicular. Before taking the object and image distance of the two cameras must be measured by photographic method. The photographic rate is 304 fps.

  13. STEREO's in-situ perspective on the solar minimum solar wind structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Larson, D.; Schroeder, P.; Lee, C. O.; Sauvaud, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Galvin, A. B.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L.; Arge, C. N.; Odstrcil, D.; Riley, P.; Howard, R. A.; Aschwanden, M.; MacNeice, P.; Chulaki, A.

    2007-05-01

    STEREO multipoint measurements of the solar wind structure with the IMPACT and PLASTIC investigations, near Earth but off the Sun-Earth line, allow its sources and structure to be examined at solar minimum when such studies are particularly straightforward. With the aid of 3D models of the heliosphere available at the CCMC, we map the in-situ observations to their solar sources using a combination of the open field regions inferred from the SECCHI EUVI imagers and SOHO EIT, and the magnetogram-based models of the corona and solar wind. Our ultimate goal is the continuous tracking of solar wind source regions as the STEREO mission progresses, as well as the use of the mappings to deduce the distinctive properties of solar wind from different types of sources

  14. Solar Chemical Abundances Determined with a CO5BOLD 3D Model Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Bonifacio, P.

    2011-02-01

    In the last decade, the photospheric solar metallicity as determined from spectroscopy experienced a remarkable downward revision. Part of this effect can be attributed to an improvement of atomic data and the inclusion of NLTE computations, but also the use of hydrodynamical model atmospheres seemed to play a role. This "decrease" with time of the metallicity of the solar photosphere increased the disagreement with the results from helioseismology. With a CO 5 BOLD 3D model of the solar atmosphere, the CIFIST team at the Paris Observatory re-determined the photospheric solar abundances of several elements, among them C, N, and O. The spectroscopic abundances are obtained by fitting the equivalent width and/or the profile of observed spectral lines with synthetic spectra computed from the 3D model atmosphere. We conclude that the effects of granular fluctuations depend on the characteristics of the individual lines, but are found to be relevant only in a few particular cases. 3D effects are not responsible for the systematic lowering of the solar abundances in recent years. The solar metallicity resulting from this analysis is Z=0.0153, Z/ X=0.0209.

  15. VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines) stochastic loads using a 3-D turbulence simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence are thought to be a primary cause of premature blade fatigue in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). This paper describes a computer program for the prediction of these stochastic loads, based on a full 3-D simulation of the turbulence field. Computed results using this model are compared with the deterministic (periodic) loads which occur in the absence of turbulence, and with the predictions of an earlier model which employed a 1-D simulation of the turbulence. The results show that not only are instantaneous loads significantly influenced by turbulence, but that load distributions averaged over numerous revolutions are affected as well. A particularly interesting finding is that, for the same mean wind speed, the average output power is altered by turbulence. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines) stochastic loads using a 3-D turbulence simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homicz, Gregory F.

    The stochastic (i.e., random) aerodynamic loads created by atmospheric turbulence are thought to be a primary cause of premature blade fatigue in Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs). This paper describes a computer program for the prediction of these stochastic loads, based on a full 3-D simulation of the turbulence field. Computed results using this model are compared with the deterministic (periodic) loads which occur in the absence of turbulence, and with the predictions of an earlier model which employed a 1-D simulation of the turbulence. The results show that not only are instantaneous loads significantly influenced by turbulence, but that load distributions averaged over numerous revolutions are affected as well. A particularly interesting finding is that, for the same mean wind speed, the average output power is altered by turbulence.

  17. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  18. The Solar Photospheric Oxygen Abundance and the Role of 3D Model Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.

    2008-09-01

    The solar oxygen abundance has undergone a major downward revision in the last decade, reputedly as a result of employing 3D hydrodynamical simulations to model the inhomogeneous structure of the solar photosphere. The very low oxygen abundance advocated by Asplund et al. 2004, A(O)=8.66, together with the downward revision of the abundances of other key elements, has created serious problems for solar models to explain the helioseismic measurements. In an effort to contribute to the dispute of whether the Sun has "solar" or "sub-solar" abundances, we have re-derived its photospheric abundance of oxygen, nitrogen, and other elements, independently of previous analyses. We applied a state-of-the art 3D (CO5BOLD) hydrodynamical simulation of the solar granulation as well as different 1D model atmospheres for the line by line spectroscopic abundance determinations. The analysis is based on both standard disk-center and full-disk spectral atlases; for oxygen we acquired in addition spectra at different heliocentric angles. The derived abundances are the result of equivalent width and/or line profile fitting of the available atomic lines. Our recommended oxygen abundance is A(O)=8.76+- 0.07, 0.1 dex higher than the value of Asplund et al. (2004). Our current estimate of the overall solar metallicity is 0.014< Z<0.016. Questions we discuss include: (i) Is the general downward revision of the solar abundances a 3D effect? (ii) How large are the abundance corrections due to horizontal inhomogeneities? (iii) What is the main reason for the differences between the abundances obtained in our study and those derived by Apslund and coworkers? (iv) How large are the uncertainties in the observed solar spectra? (v) What is the reason why the two forbidden oxygen lines, [OI] lambda 630 nm and [OI] lambda 636.3 nm, give significantly different answers for the solar oxygen abundance?

  19. Solar wind absorption by Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    The portion of solar wind interacting with the dayside ionosphere and atmosphere of Venus was determined based on magnetic field fluctuations in the ionosheath and the interaction with the upper neutral atmosphere above the ionopause. Fluctuations with the ratio of the number of particles intersecting the daytide ionopause to the total number of particles of 0.3 suggest that about 0.3% of solar wind may be absorbed. Most of fast H atoms resulting from the charge exchange interactions with the atmosphere escape; some of the energy deposition processes produce observable signatures (such as a narrow Lyman alpha emission region), but penetrating solar wind particles do not control the physical and/or chemical structure of the daytime Venus ionosphere.

  20. Solar wind interaction with Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, M.

    1997-08-01

    The existence of an intrinsic magnetic field at Mars is still a subject of debate. The ionospheric thermal pressure above 300 km is insufficient by itself to withstand the solar wind dynamic pressure, suggesting the presence of a magnetic field in the ionosphere of Mars which can either be a weak intrinsic magnetic field or an induced magnetic field driven by the solar wind interaction with Mars. The photodynamical model of Mahajan and Mayr (1990) for the case of a magnetic field induced by the solar wind plus ion loss via horizontal convection has been studied. It has been found that the induced magnetic field does not affect or alter the photodynamical nature of the ionosphere of Mars.

  1. Wind forcing of upland lake hydrodynamics: implementation and validation of a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L.; French, J.; Burningham, H.; Evans, C.; Battarbee, R.

    2010-12-01

    Upland lakes act as important archives of environmental change, yet inferences based on the analysis of sediment cores are frequently compromised by an incomplete understanding of the hydrodynamic processes controlling the distribution and completeness of lake sediment sequences and their linkages to wider environmental factors. Many upland lakes are characterized by complex vertical and horizontal circulation patterns induced by the action of wind on the water surface. Wind forcing is important not only for the resuspension of bottom sediments in shallow marginal areas, but may also control the broader distribution of sediment accumulation. The work presented here represents the first stage of a project aimed at elucidating the linkages between wind forcing and the distribution of bottom sediments in upland lakes and the extent to which simple 'sediment focusing' models provide an adequate basis for predicting optimal locations for the acquisition of core samples for palaeolimnological analysis. As a first step, a 3D numerical hydrodynamic model is implemented for Llyn Conwy, a small oligotrophic upland lake in North Wales, UK. This utilises the community ocean model, FVCOM, that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in 3D on an unstructured triangular mesh using the finite volume method. A new graphical user interface has been developed for FVCOM to facilitate pre- and post-processing of lake modelling problems. At Llyn Conwy, the model is forced using local meteorological data and validated against vertical temperature profiles recorded by a long-term buoy deployment and short-term observations of vertical current structure measured using an upward-looking acoustic doppler profiler and surface circulation obtained from GPS drifters. Challenges in the application of FVCOM to a small lake include the design of a mesh that ensures numerical stability whilst resolving a complex bathymetry, and the need for careful treatment of model 'spin-up'. Once calibrated, the

  2. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation (˜27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  3. Neutral solar wind evolution during solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bzowski, M.; Rucinski, D.

    1995-01-01

    The time dependent model of the expected fluxes of the neutral H and He components of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere is discussed. The model takes into account typical temporal evolution of the distribution of neutral interstellar gases (hydrogen and helium) in the interplanetary space due to solar cycle effects and the long term variability of the solar wind. The contribution of different charge exchange processes to the production of particular NSW element is presented. The distribution of the NSW flux is analysed with respect to the heliocentric distance and azimuthal angle from the Interstellar Wind apex. It demonstrates significant, time-dependent upwind/downwind H and He flux asymmentries. It is shown that the most pronounced modulation of the NSW flux is expected around the solar maximum epoch, when a strong decrease of the energetic H flux by two three orders of magnitude at 1 AU is predicted. The computations show that in the inner solar system (approx. 1 AU) energetic helium atoms production in the downwind region usually dominates the production of the hydrogen component This leads to the conclusion that the NSW composition at the Earth orbit strongly depends on time and the position of the observation point in reference to the apex direction.

  4. Constraints on Decreases in Eta Carinae's Mass-loss from 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Its Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star Eta-A in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present result from large- (+/- 1545 au) and small- (+/- 155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for three Eta-A mass-loss rates ( (dot-M(sub Eta-A) = 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) M(solar)/ yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot-M Eta-A greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star Eta-B switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (Phi approx.= 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot-M Eta-A and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of Eta-A into the acceleration zone of Eta-B's wind, plus radiative inhibition of Eta-B's wind by Eta-A. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta-A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot-M EtaA should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot- M Eta-A was likely by a factor of approx. < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot-M Eta-A may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameter of Eta-B, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta-Car's next periastron in 2014 to further

  5. Solar Wind Trends in the Current Solar Cycle (STEREO Observations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, Antoinette; Simunac, Kristin; Farrugia, Charles

    2016-04-01

    We examine solar wind ion characteristics for the current solar cycle, utilizing near-Earth (OMNI) and STEREO data. Sources of the solar wind are known to be linked to the phase of the solar cycle and include coronal holes, coronal mass ejections, and multiple cycle-dependent sources for the so-called "slow" solar wind. This past solar minimum was characterized by weak transients and sustained periods of slow solar wind, and included cases of "slow" and "slower" solar wind stream interactions. In contrast, intervals around solar maximum have included extremely fast interplanetary coronal mass ejections, with one such ICME observed in situ by STEREO A exceeding 2000 km/s at 1 AU. We will look at specific case studies of solar wind observed in situ by STEREO, particularly for solar wind proton and iron ions.

  6. Calibration of 3-D wind measurements on a single-engine research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallaun, C.; Giez, A.; Baumann, R.

    2015-08-01

    An innovative calibration method for the wind speed measurement using a boom-mounted Rosemount model 858 AJ air velocity probe is introduced. The method is demonstrated for a sensor system installed on a medium-size research aircraft which is used for measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The method encounters a series of coordinated flight manoeuvres to directly estimate the aerodynamic influences on the probe and to calculate the measurement uncertainties. The introduction of a differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) combined with a high-accuracy inertial reference system (IRS) has brought major advances to airborne measurement techniques. The exact determination of geometrical height allows the use of the pressure signal as an independent parameter. Furthermore, the exact height information and the stepwise calibration process lead to maximum accuracy. The results show a measurement uncertainty for the aerodynamic influence of the dynamic and static pressures of 0.1 hPa. The applied parametrisation does not require any height dependencies or time shifts. After extensive flight tests a correction for the flow angles (attack and sideslip angles) was found, which is necessary for a successful wind calculation. A new method is demonstrated to correct for the aerodynamic influence on the sideslip angle. For the three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector (with 100 Hz resolution) a novel error propagation scheme is tested, which determines the measurement uncertainties to be 0.3 m s-1 for the horizontal and 0.2 m s-1 for the vertical wind components.

  7. Calibration of 3-D wind measurements on a single engine research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallaun, C.; Giez, A.; Baumann, R.

    2015-02-01

    An innovative calibration method for the wind speed measurement using a boom mounted Rosemount model 858 AJ air velocity probe is introduced. The method is demonstrated for a sensor system installed on a medium size research aircraft which is used for measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The method encounters a series of coordinated flight manoeuvres to directly estimate the aerodynamic influences on the probe and to calculate the measurement uncertainties. The introduction of a differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) combined with a high accuracy Inertial Reference System (IRS) has brought major advances to airborne measurement techniques. The exact determination of geometrical height allows the use of the pressure signal as an independent parameter. Furthermore, the exact height information and the stepwise calibration process lead to maximum accuracy. The results show a measurement uncertainty for the aerodynamic influence of the dynamic and static pressures of 0.1 hPa. The applied parametrisation does not require any height dependencies or time shifts. After extensive flight tests a correction for the flow angles (attack and sideslip angles) was found, which is necessary for a successful wind calculation. A new method is demonstrated to correct for the aerodynamic influence on the sideslip angle. For the 3-D wind vector (with 100 Hz resolution) a novel error propagation scheme is tested, which determines the measurement uncertainties to be 0.3 m s-1 for the horizontal and 0.2 m s-1 for the vertical wind components.

  8. Solar wind and coronal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopic diagnostic techniques used to determine the coronal source region of the solar wind, and results of preliminary applications are examined. The topics reviewed are magnetic fields, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes, flow velocities, coronal temperatures, fine spatial structure, and future observational programs. The physical mechanisms responsible for plasma heating, solar-wind acceleration, the transport of mass momentum and energy, and the spatial differentiation of chemical abundances are also discussed. Among the data presented are Skylab's white-light coronagraph photograph of a coronal transient, X-ray photographs of the corona, and spectroheliograms showing bright points overlying polar plumes, and macrospicules.

  9. A 3-D Look at Wind-Sculpted Ridges in Aeolis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Layers of bedrock etched by wind to form sharp, elongated ridges known to geomorphologists as yardangs are commonplace in the southern Elysium Planitia/southern Amazonis region of Mars. The ridges shown in this 3-D composite of two overlapping Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images occur in the eastern Aeolis region of southern Elysium Planitia near 2.3oS, 206.8oW. To view the picture in stereo, you need red-blue 3-D glasses (red filter over the left eye, blue over the right). For wind to erode bedrock into the patterns seen here, the rock usually must consist of something that is fine-grained and of nearly uniform grain size, such as sand. It must also be relatively easy to erode. For decades, most Mars researchers have interpreted these materials to be eroded deposits of volcanic ash. Nothing in the new picture shown here can support nor refute this earlier speculation. The entire area is mantled by light-toned dust. Small landslides within this thin dust layer form dark streaks on some of the steeper slopes in this picture (for more examples and explanations for these streaks, see previous web pages listed below).

    The stereo (3-D) picture was compiled using an off-nadir view taken by the MOC during the Aerobrake-1 subphase of the mission in January 1998 with a nadir (straight-down-looking) view acquired in October 2000. The total area shown is about 6.7 kilometers (4.2 miles) wide by 2.5 kilometers (1.5 miles) high and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The relief in the stereo image is quite exaggerated: the ridges are between about 50 and 100 meters (about 165-330 feet) high. North is toward the lower right.

  10. Solar cycle variations of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.

    1983-01-01

    Throughout the course of the past one and a half solar cycles, solar wind parameters measured near the ecliptic plane at 1 AU varied in the following way: speed and proton temperature have maxima during the declining phase and minima at solar minimum and are approximately anti-correlated with number density and electron temperature, while magnetic field magnitude and relative abundance of helium roughly follow the sunspot cycle. These variations are described in terms of the solar cycle variations of coronal holes, streamers, and transients. The solar wind signatures of the three features are discussed in turn, with special emphasis on the signature of transients, which is still in the process of being defined. It is proposed that magnetic clouds be identified with helium abundance enhancements and that they form the head of a transient surrounded by streamer like plasma, with an optional shock front. It is stressed that relative values of a parameter through a solar cycle should be compared beginning with the declining phase, especially in the case of magnetic field magnitude.

  11. Powering an in-space 3D printer using solar light energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Skye; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Hirsch, Michael P.; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes how a solar power source can enable in-space 3D printing without requiring conversion to electric power and back. A design for an in-space 3D printer is presented, with a particular focus on the power generation system. Then, key benefits are presented and evaluated. Specifically, the approach facilitates the design of a spacecraft that can be built, launched, and operated at very low cost levels. The proposed approach also facilitates easy configuration of the amount of energy that is supplied. Finally, it facilitates easier disposal by removing the heavy metals and radioactive materials required for a nuclear-power solution.

  12. 3D Simulations of Solar Observations in Radio, Millimeter and Submillimeter Wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Luz, V. H.; Lara, A.; Mendoza, E.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we present 3D simulations of solar radio emission at different frequencies (1.4, 3.9, 17, 34, 43, 110GHz and 12GHz), in the centimeter - submilimeter wavelength range. We build a 3D, spherically symetric, solar model and solve the clasical equation of radiative transfer using quiet Sun temperature and electron density models. We compare our results with observations from Nobeyama Radio Heliograph and SMT submillimeter telescope at CASILEO. The 3.9 and 43 GHz images will be useful to calibrate the observations of new millimeter telescope (RT5) which is being constructed at "Sierra Negra" Volcano, in the state of Puebla, Mexico, at an altitude of 4,600 m. This project is a collaboration between Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) and Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica (INAOE).

  13. n-ZnO/p-Si 3D heterojunction solar cells in Si holey arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Fukata, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    A wafer-scale, low-cost solar cell based on n-ZnO/p-Si 3D heterojunction arrays on holey Si substrates has been fabricated. This device shows a power-conversion efficiency of 1.2% and high photosensitivity. The present n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction architectures are envisaged as potentially valuable candidates for next-generation photovoltaics.A wafer-scale, low-cost solar cell based on n-ZnO/p-Si 3D heterojunction arrays on holey Si substrates has been fabricated. This device shows a power-conversion efficiency of 1.2% and high photosensitivity. The present n-ZnO/p-Si heterojunction architectures are envisaged as potentially valuable candidates for next-generation photovoltaics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11752e

  14. 3D Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Ropes Across Scales: Solar Eruptions and Sun-Earth Plasma Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2012-10-01

    Central to the understanding of the eruptive phenomena on the Sun and their impact on the terrestrial plasma environment is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs)---a 3D magnetic flux rope configuration---and the evolution of their magnetic fields. I will discuss the basic physics of CME eruption and solar flare energy release in the context of the analytic erupting flux rope model of CMEs. In this ideal MHD model, a CME is treated as a 3D flux rope with its two stationary footpoints anchored in the Sun. The model structure is non-axisymmetric and embedded in a model corona/solar wind. The initial flux rope is driven out of equilibrium by ``injection'' of poloidal flux and propagates under the Lorentz hoop force from the Sun to 1 AU, across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Comparisons of the model results and recent STEREO observations show that the solutions that best fit the observed CME position-time data (to within 1-2% of data) also correctly replicate the temporal profiles of associated flare X-ray emissions (GOES data) and the in situ magnetic field and plasma data of the CME ejecta at 1 AU where such data are available (e.g., ACE and STEREO/IMPAXCT/PLASTIC data), providing a unified basis of understanding CME dynamics and flare energetics.

  15. Understanding the 11-year Solar Cycle Signal in Stratospheric Ozone using a 3D CTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Chipperfield, Martyn; Feng, Wuhu

    2014-05-01

    The exact structure of the 11-year solar cycle signal in stratospheric ozone is still an open scientific question. Long-term satellite data such as Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and Solar Backscatter UltraViolet (SBUV) show a positive solar response in the tropical lower stratosphere and upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere (US/LM), but a negligible signal in the tropical middle stratosphere. On the other hand, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements show a positive signal in the lower and middle stratosphere and smaller solar signal in the tropical US/LM. Currently most chemical models are able to simulate a "double-peak"-structured solar signal but the model simulated solar signals tend to show better agreement with the HALOE-derived solar signal than those from SBUV or SAGE measurements. Also, some recent studies argue that due to the significantly different solar variability during the recent solar cycle (23), the solar signal in the US/LM ozone is negative (out of phase with total solar irradiance changes) for this later period compared to previous solar cycles. We have used 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to better understand the possible mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Various model simulations have been performed for 1979-2012 time period using ERA-Interim meteorological fields as a dynamical forcing. Model output is sampled at collocated measurement points for three satellite instruments performing stratospheric ozone measurements using the solar occultation technique: SAGE II (1984-2005), HALOE (1992-2005) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE, 2003-present). Overall the modelled ozone shows good agreement with all the data sets. However, in the US/LM, modelled ozone anomalies are better correlated with HALOE and ACE than SAGE II measurements. Hence the modelled solar signal in the stratospheric and lower mesospheric ozone also shows better agreement with the solar signal derived using HALOE and

  16. Existence of two MHD reconnection modes in a solar 3D magnetic null point topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, Etienne; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, C. Richard; Dalmasse, Kévin

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic topologies with a 3D magnetic null point are common in the solar atmosphere and occur at different spatial scales: such structures can be associated with some solar eruptions, with the so-called pseudo-streamers, and with numerous coronal jets. We have recently developed a series of numerical experiments that model magnetic reconnection in such configurations in order to study and explain the properties of jet-like features. Our model uses our state-of-the-art adaptive-mesh MHD solver ARMS. Energy is injected in the system by line-tied motion of the magnetic field lines in a corona-like configuration. We observe that, in the MHD framework, two reconnection modes eventually appear in the course of the evolution of the system. A very impulsive one, associated with a highly dynamic and fully 3D current sheet, is associated with the energetic generation of a jet. Before and after the generation of the jet, a quasi-steady reconnection mode, more similar to the standard 2D Sweet-Parker model, presents a lower global reconnection rate. We show that the geometry of the magnetic configuration influences the trigger of one or the other mode. We argue that this result carries important implications for the observed link between observational features such as solar jets, solar plumes, and the emission of coronal bright points.

  17. Fabrication of solution processed 3D nanostructured CuInGaS₂ thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Van Ben; Cho, Jin Woo; Park, Se Jin; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Park, Hoo Keun; Do, Young Rag; Min, Byoung Koun

    2014-03-28

    In this study we demonstrate the fabrication of CuInGaS₂ (CIGS) thin film solar cells with a three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure based on indium tin oxide (ITO) nanorod films and precursor solutions (Cu, In and Ga nitrates in alcohol). To obtain solution processed 3D nanostructured CIGS thin film solar cells, two different precursor solutions were applied to complete gap filling in ITO nanorods and achieve the desirable absorber film thickness. Specifically, a coating of precursor solution without polymer binder material was first applied to fill the gap between ITO nanorods followed by deposition of the second precursor solution in the presence of a binder to generate an absorber film thickness of ∼1.3 μm. A solar cell device with a (Al, Ni)/AZO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/ITO nanorod/glass structure was constructed using the CIGS film, and the highest power conversion efficiency was measured to be ∼6.3% at standard irradiation conditions, which was 22.5% higher than the planar type of CIGS solar cell on ITO substrate fabricated using the same precursor solutions. PMID:24569126

  18. Variance Anisotropy of Solar Wind fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K.

    2013-12-01

    Solar wind observations at MHD scales indicate that the energy associated with velocity and magnetic field fluctuations transverse to the mean magnetic field is typically much larger than that associated with parallel fluctuations [eg, 1]. This is often referred to as variance anisotropy. Various explanations for it have been suggested, including that the fluctuations are predominantly shear Alfven waves [1] and that turbulent dynamics leads to such states [eg, 2]. Here we investigate the origin and strength of such variance anisotropies, using spectral method simulations of the compressible (polytropic) 3D MHD equations. We report on results from runs with initial conditions that are either (i) broadband turbulence or (ii) fluctuations polarized in the same sense as shear Alfven waves. The dependence of the variance anisotropy on the plasma beta and Mach number is examined [3], along with the timescale for any variance anisotropy to develop. Implications for solar wind fluctuations will be discussed. References: [1] Belcher, J. W. and Davis Jr., L. (1971), J. Geophys. Res., 76, 3534. [2] Matthaeus, W. H., Ghosh, S., Oughton, S. and Roberts, D. A. (1996), J. Geophys. Res., 101, 7619. [3] Smith, C. W., B. J. Vasquez and K. Hamilton (2006), J. Geophys. Res., 111, A09111.

  19. Characterizing the propagation of gravity waves in 3D nonlinear simulations of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvan, L.; Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Mathis, S.; Garcia, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. Aims: The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. Methods: We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of individual gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. Results: We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g-modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in different planes in the sphere, depending on their azimuthal wave number. Conclusions: We are able to isolate individual IGWs from a complex spectrum and to study their propagation in space and time. In particular, we highlight in this paper the necessity of studying the propagation of waves in 3D spherical geometry, since the distribution of their energy is not equipartitioned in the sphere.

  20. 77 FR 61597 - Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Avalon Wind, LLC; Avalon Wind 2, LLC; Catalina Solar, LLC; Catalina Solar 2, LLC; Pacific Wind Lessee, LLC; Pacific Wind 2, LLC; Valentine Solar, LLC; EDF Renewable Development, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on September 27, 2012, Avalon...

  1. Evolution of Solar Wind Heavy Ions over the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2014-05-01

    Solar wind composition has been shown to effectively discriminate between different types of solar wind, including slow, fast and ICME related wind. The composition reflects the properties of the source regions of the wind in the corona and their evolution. We present the systematic and comprehensive analysis of the ionic and elemental composition observed on ACE over solar cycle 23 from 2000 until 2010. During this period, the Sun evolved through solar maximum to solar minimum. We find significantly lower C, O, and Fe charge states as well as a 50% decrease in heavy ion abundances (He, C, O, Si, Fe) relative to H during this transition towards solar minimum. We also examined the FIP bias. We consider the implications of these findings for solar wind models and for identification of the fast and slow wind.

  2. Improvement of background solar wind predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dálya, Zsuzsanna; Opitz, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    In order to estimate the solar wind properties at any heliospheric positions propagation tools use solar measurements as input data. The ballistic method extrapolates in-situ solar wind observations to the target position. This works well for undisturbed solar wind, while solar wind disturbances such as Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) need more consideration. We are working on dedicated ICME lists to clean these signatures from the input data in order to improve our prediction accuracy. These ICME lists are created from several heliospheric spacecraft measurements: ACE, WIND, STEREO, SOHO, MEX and VEX. As a result, we are able to filter out these events from the time series. Our corrected predictions contribute to the investigation of the quiet solar wind and space weather studies.

  3. 3D radiative transfer simulations of Eta Carinae's inner colliding winds - II. Ionization structure of helium at periastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    Spectral observations of the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae show phase-dependent variations, in intensity and velocity, of numerous helium emission and absorption lines throughout the entire 5.54-yr orbit. Approaching periastron, the 3D structure of the wind-wind interaction region (WWIR) gets highly distorted due to the eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary orbit. The secondary star (ηB) at these phases is located deep within the primary's dense wind photosphere. The combination of these effects is thought to be the cause of the particularly interesting features observed in the helium lines at periastron. We perform 3D radiative transfer simulations of η Car's interacting winds at periastron. Using the SIMPLEX radiative transfer algorithm, we post-process output from 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the inner 150 au of the η Car system for two different primary star mass-loss rates (dot{M}_{η A}). Using previous results from simulations at apastron as a guide for the initial conditions, we compute 3D helium ionization maps. We find that, for higher dot{M}_{η A}, ηB He0+-ionizing photons are not able to penetrate into the pre-shock primary wind. He+ due to ηB is only present in a thin layer along the leading arm of the WWIR and in a small region close to the stars. Lowering dot{M}_{η A} allows ηB's ionizing photons to reach the expanding unshocked secondary wind on the apastron side of the system, and create a low fraction of He+ in the pre-shock primary wind. With apastron on our side of the system, our results are qualitatively consistent with the observed variations in strength and radial velocity of η Car's helium emission and absorption lines, which helps better constrain the regions where these lines arise.

  4. Comet Borrelly Slows Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Over 1300 energy spectra taken on September 22, 2001 from the ion and electron instruments on NASA's Deep Space 1 span a region of 1,400,000 kilometers (870,000 miles) centered on the closest approach to the nucleus of comet Borrelly. A very strong interaction occurs between the solar wind (horizontal red bands to left and right in figure) and the comet's surrounding cloud of dust and gas, the coma. Near Deep Space 1's closest approach to the nucleus, the solar wind picked up charged water molecules from the coma (upper green band near the center), slowing the wind sharply and creating the V-shaped energy structure at the center.

    Deep Space 1 completed its primary mission testing ion propulsion and 11 other advanced, high-risk technologies in September 1999. NASA extended the mission, taking advantage of the ion propulsion and other systems to undertake this chancy but exciting, and ultimately successful, encounter with the comet. More information can be found on the Deep Space 1 home page at http://nmp.jpl.nasa.gov/ds1/ .

    Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The California Institute of Technology manages JPL for NASA.

  5. Source regions of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Using Skylab XUV data, we examine some properties of the source regions of the solar wind. In particular, we discuss the physical nature of polar plumes and their relationship to the polar wind, the nature of the source regions of the slow solar wind, and the relationship between abundance anomalies (the FIP effect) determined from the Skylab data and the sources of fast and slow wind.

  6. Cosmic Ray and Solar Energetic Particle Observations In The 3-d Heliosphere Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    Observations from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope during Ulysses recent fast lat- itude scan have provided the first latitudinal survey of intensities of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles near solar maximum. During the previous fast latitude scan near solar minimum, no significant solar energetic particle events were observed, but the galactic and anomalous component cosmic ray intensities showed small positive latitudinal gradients organized around a southwardly displaced heliospheric current sheet. The small size of the gradients, together with observation near the poles of 26-day intensity variations impressed by near-equatorial CIR-structures, led to the conclusion that latitudinal transport across the mean Parker spiral magnetic fields was much easier than had been expected prior to Ulysses observations. During the recently completed fast latitude scan near solar maximum, galactic cosmic rays could be ob- served only occasionally in the quiet times between frequent solar energetic particle events. When cosmic ray intensities could be observed, no measurable latitude gradi- ents were found, implying that modulation became much more spherically symmetric near solar maximum. From observations of the solar energetic particle intensities, we found that almost all large gradual events produced intensity increases both at Ulysses and at IMP-8 near Earth, regardless of the latitude or longitude of the spacecrafts relative to the initiating event in the corona. Most often the intensities at Ulysses and IMP-8 became comparable a few days after the onset of the event and remained nearly equal for the rest of the decay, which in some cases lasted as much as a full solar rota- tion. Both the cosmic ray and the solar energetic particle observations imply efficient latitudinal and cross-field transport of energetic particles even in the complex inter- planetary magnetic fields of solar maximum. Recent observations suggest that the solar polar coronal holes have

  7. Wind loading on solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaduri, S.; Murphy, L.M.

    1985-06-01

    The present design methodology for the determination of wind loading on the various solar collectors has been reviewed and assessed. The total force coefficients of flat plates of aspect ratios 1.0 and 3.0, respectively, at various angles of attack obtained by using the guidelines of the ANSI A58.1-1982, have been compared with those obtained by using the methodology of the ASCE Task Committee, 1961, and the experimental results of the full-scale test of heliostats by Peglow. The turbulent energy spectra, currently employed in the building code, are compared with those of Kaimal et al., Lumley, and Ponofsky for wind velocities of 20.0 m/s and 40.24 m/s at an elevation of 9.15 m. The longitudinal spectra of the building code overestimates the Kaimal spectra in the frequency range of 0.007 Hz to 0.08 Hz and underestimates beyond the frequency of 0.08 Hz. The peak angles of attack, on the heliostat, stowed in horizontal position, due to turbulent vertical and lateral components of wind velocity, have been estimated by using Daniel's methodology for three wind velocities and compared with the value suggested by the code. The experimental results of a simple test in the laboratory indicate the feasibility of decreasing the drag forces of the flat plate by reducing the solidity ratio.

  8. MHD Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on reviewing several observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar wind, in particular on Alfvén waves, Alfvénic turbulent spectrum, and their role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. It also reviews computational models that incorporate Alfvén waves as the driving source of the wind in the lower corona (coronal holes) and in the inner heliosphere, with emphasis on multi-dimensional models. Evidence for MHD waves in the solar wind is obtained from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations using Earth-based radio telescope observations of distant (galactic) radio sources. The solar wind electron density variability in the line of sight affects the received radio signal. The propagating fluctuations and their correlations are used to estimate the solar wind velocity and the wave amplitude in the parallel and the perpendicular directions in line of sight.

  9. Fast Wave Trains Associated with Solar Eruptions: Insights from 3D Thermodynamic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Liu, W.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Ofman, L.

    2015-12-01

    EUV imaging observations during the SDO/AIA era have provided new insights into a variety of wave phenomena occurring in the low solar corona. One example is the observation of quasi-periodic, fast-propagating wave trains that are associated with solar eruptions, including flares and CMEs. While there has been considerable progress in understanding such waves from both an observational and theoretical perspective, it remains a challenge to pin down their physical origin. In this work, we detail our results from a case-study 3D thermodynamic MHD simulation of a coronal mass ejection where quasi-periodic wave trains are generated during the simulated eruption. We find a direct correlation between the onset of non-steady reconnection in the flare current sheet and the generation of quasi-periodic wave train signatures when patchy, collimated downflows interact with the flare arcade. Via forward modeling of SDO/AIA observables, we explore how the appearance of the wave trains is affected by line-of-sight integration and the multi-thermal nature of the coronal medium. We also examine how the wave trains themselves are channeled by natural waveguides formed in 3D by the non-uniform background magnetic field. While the physical association of the reconnection dynamics to the generation of quasi-periodic wave trains appears to be a compelling result, unanswered questions posed from recent observations as well as future prospects will be discussed.

  10. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  11. Simulations of Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Usmanov, A. V.; Roberts, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Recently we have restructured our approach to simulating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind. Previously, we had defined a 'virtual' heliosphere that contained, for example, a tilted rotating current sheet, microstreams, quasi-two-dimensional fluctuations as well as Alfven waves. In this new version of the code, we use the global, time-stationary, WKB Alfven wave-driven solar wind model developed by Usmanov and described in Usmanov and Goldstein [2003] to define the initial state of the system. Consequently, current sheets, and fast and slow streams are computed self-consistently from an inner, photospheric, boundary. To this steady-state configuration, we add fluctuations close to, but above, the surface where the flow become super-Alfvenic. The time-dependent MHD equations are then solved using a semi-discrete third-order Central Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (CWENO) numerical scheme. The computational domain now includes the entire sphere; the geometrical singularity at the poles is removed using the multiple grid approach described in Usmanov [1996]. Wave packets are introduced at the inner boundary such as to satisfy Faraday's Law [Yeh and Dryer, 1985] and their nonlinear evolution are followed in time.

  12. Capture of Solar Wind He++ by the Martian Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteur, G. M.; Modolo, R.; Dubinin, E.

    The quantity of helium in the Martian atmosphere can be estimated from its emission line at 58 4nm Krasnopolsky and Gladstone Icarus vol 176 395-407 2005 and references therein Considering the necessary balance between losses through escape to the interplanetary medium and sources Krasnopolsky and coworkers have established that radioactive decay of uranium and thorium provides only one third of the lost helium They argue that the remaining two thirds should be captured from the solar wind This external source of Martian helium was also suggested by Barabash et al JGR 100 A11 21307 1995 Brecht JGR 102 A6 11287 1997 has estimated the deposition of protons into the Martian atmosphere from 3d hybrid simulation of the interaction of Mars with a solar wind made of protons and electrons only From these results Brecht gave an estimate of the deposition of solar helium ions into the Martian atmosphere based on scaling arguments In the recent past we have developed a consistent multi-species 3d hybrid model of the interaction of solar wind protons and alpha particles with the Martian plasma environment taking into account the ionisation of the oxygen and hydrogen neutral coronas of Mars Modolo et al Ann Geophys 23 433 2005 Neutral species are ionised by photons and by electron impacts the two processes are simulated consistently and independently through the specification of ionisation frequencies and cross sections Charge exchange reactions of protons and oxygen ions with hydrogen and oxygen atoms are taken into account

  13. Sources of solar wind over the solar activity cycle.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Giannina

    2013-05-01

    Fast solar wind has been recognized, about 40 years ago, to originate in polar coronal holes (CHs), that, since then, have been identified with sources of recurrent high speed wind streams. As of today, however, there is no general consensus about whether there are, within CHs, preferential locations where the solar wind is accelerated. Knowledge of slow wind sources is far from complete as well. Slow wind observed in situ can be traced back to its solar source by backward extrapolation of magnetic fields whose field lines are streamlines of the outflowing plasma. However, this technique often has not the necessary precision for an indisputable identification of the region where wind originates. As the Sun progresses through its activity cycle, different wind sources prevail and contribute to filling the heliosphere. Our present knowledge of different wind sources is here summarized. Also, a Section addresses the problem of wind acceleration in the low corona, as inferred from an analysis of UV data, and illustrates changes between fast and slow wind profiles and possible signatures of changes along the solar cycle. A brief reference to recent work about the deep roots of solar wind and their changes over different solar cycles concludes the review. PMID:25685421

  14. Expansion effects on solar wind hybrid simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Tulasi N.; Velli, Marco; Goldstein, Bruce E.

    2013-06-13

    Ion kinetic simulations of the solar wind using hybrid codes can model local wave input, heating and instabilities, but generally do not include long term evolution effects in the expanding solar wind. We further develop the expanding box model used in earlier studies to include the mirror force effects and study their role in the evolution of the proton distribution functions in the outer corona and inner heliosphere. The mirror force, significant in the acceleration region of the solar wind, is required for consistency with the conservation of magnetic moment of particles in the expanding wind. We present preliminary results from the modified 1D expanding box hybrid (EBHM) simulations.

  15. Solar energy system with wind vane

    DOEpatents

    Grip, Robert E

    2015-11-03

    A solar energy system including a pedestal defining a longitudinal axis, a frame that is supported by the pedestal and that is rotateable relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis, the frame including at least one solar device, and a wind vane operatively connected to the frame to urge the frame relative to the pedestal about the longitudinal axis in response to wind acting on the wind vane.

  16. Solar- and wind-powered irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enochian, R. V.

    1982-02-01

    Five different direct solar and wind energy systems are technically feasible for powering irrigation pumps. However, with projected rates of fossil fuel costs, only two may produce significant unsubsidied energy for irrigation pumping before the turn of the century. These are photovoltaic systems with nonconcentrating collectors (providing that projected costs of manufacturing solar cells prove correct); and wind systems, especially in remote areas where adequate wind is available.

  17. 3D Solar Corona from Soho/eit to Stereo/secchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portier-Fozzani, Fabrice; Stereo Team

    While taking into account the difficulties encountered by 3D imaging specialists with usual objects over the last 20 years we derived apropriate stereoscopic methods that we could use for the very specific case of the solar corona. Tomographic methods which should be better for such optically thin EUV lines need lots of different quasi-simultaneous viewpoints which is not possible. Usual objects reconstructed by stereovision are mainly optical thick objects such as buildings with variable external luminosity. Direclty applied classical algorithms give at least big uncertainties due to the light emission integration along the line of sight. Also structures extractions and maching between images are very difficult to derived. Epipolar geometry has to be determined before all other steps and decomposing each image in wavelet spatial frequencies with Multiscale Vision Model for example improves a lot the extract/match step. Results of such automatization of the method are presented in the paper. Shorter methods for 3D loops descriptions with applications for helicity measurement of coronal structures evolutions and links to space weather are also presented.

  18. 3D Branched nanowire photoelectrochemical electrodes for efficient solar water splitting.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Alireza; Sun, Ke; Jing, Yi; Choi, Chulmin; Jeong, Huisu; Jung, Gun Young; Jin, Sungho; Wang, Deli

    2013-10-22

    We report the systematic study of 3D ZnO/Si branched nanowire (b-NW) photoelectrodes and their application in solar water splitting. We focus our study on the correlation between the electrode design and structures (including Si NW doping, dimension of the trunk Si and branch ZnO NWs, and b-NW pitch size) and their photoelectrochemical (PEC) performances (efficiency and stability) under neutral conditions. Specifically, we show that for b-NW electrodes with lightly doped p-Si NW core, larger ZnO NW branches and longer Si NW cores give a higher photocathodic current, while for b-NWs with heavily doped p-Si NW trunks smaller ZnO NWs and shorter Si NWs provide a higher photoanodic current. Interestingly, the photocurrent turn-on potential decreases with longer p-Si NW trunks and larger ZnO NW branches resulting in a significant photocathodic turn-on potential shift of ~600 mV for the optimized ZnO/p-Si b-NWs compared to that of the bare p-Si NWs. A photocathode energy conversion efficiency of greater than 2% at -1 V versus Pt counter electrode and in neutral solution is achieved for the optimized ZnO/p-Si b-NW electrodes. The PEC performances or incident photon-to-current efficiency are further improved using Si NW cores with smaller pitch size. The photoelectrode stability is dramatically improved by coating a thin TiO2 protection layer using atomic-layer deposition method. These results provide very useful guidelines in designing photoelectrodes for selective solar water oxidation/reduction and overall spontaneous solar fuel generation using low cost earth-abundant materials for practical clean solar fuel production. PMID:24040832

  19. Modelling the RXTE light curve of η Carinae from a 3D SPH simulation of its binary wind collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, A. T.; Owocki, S. P.; Russell, C. M. P.; Corcoran, M. F.

    2008-07-01

    The very massive star system η Carinae exhibits regular 5.54 yr (2024 d) period disruptive events in wavebands ranging from the radio to X-ray. There is a growing consensus that these events likely stem from periastron passage of an (as yet) unseen companion in a highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) orbit. This Letter presents 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the orbital variation of the binary wind-wind collision, and applies these to modelling the X-ray light curve observed by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). By providing a global 3D model of the phase variation of the density of the interacting winds, the simulations allow computation of the associated variation in X-ray absorption, presumed here to originate from near the apex of the wind-wind interaction cone. We find that the observed RXTE light curve can be readily fitted if the observer's line of sight is within this cone along the general direction of apastron. Specifically, the data are well fitted by an assumed inclination i = 45° for the orbit's polar axis, which is thus consistent with orbital angular momentum being along the inferred polar axis of the Homunculus nebula. The fits also constrain the position angle φ that an orbital-plane projection makes with the apastron side of the semimajor axis, strongly excluding positions φ < 9° along or to the retrograde side of the axis, with the best-fitting position given by φ = 27°. Overall the results demonstrate the utility of a fully 3D dynamical model for constraining the geometric and physical properties of this complex colliding wind binary system.

  20. Global network of slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zhao, X.; Neugebauer, M.

    2012-04-01

    The streamer belt region surrounding the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is generally treated as the primary or sole source of the slow solar wind. Synoptic maps of solar wind speed predicted by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model during selected periods of solar cycle 23, however, show many areas of slow wind displaced from the streamer belt. These areas commonly have the form of an arc that is connected to the streamer belt at both ends. The arcs mark the boundaries between fields emanating from different coronal holes of the same polarity and thus trace the paths of belts of pseudostreamers, i.e., unipolar streamers that form over double arcades and lack current sheets. The arc pattern is consistent with the predicted topological mapping of the narrow open corridor or singular separator line that must connect the holes and, thus, consistent with the separatrix-web model of the slow solar wind. Near solar maximum, pseudostreamer belts stray far from the HCS-associated streamer belt and, together with it, form a global-wide web of slow wind. Recognition of pseudostreamer belts as prominent sources of slow wind provides a new template for understanding solar wind stream structure, especially near solar maximum.

  1. Global Network of Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zhao, X.; Neugebauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The streamer belt region surrounding the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is generally treated as the primary or sole source of the slow solar wind. Synoptic maps of solar wind speed predicted by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model during selected periods of solar cycle 23, however, show many areas of slow wind displaced from the streamer belt. These areas commonly have the form of an arc that is connected to the streamer belt at both ends. The arcs mark the boundaries between fields emanating from different coronal holes of the same polarity and thus trace the paths of belts of pseudostreamers, i.e., unipolar streamers that form over double arcades and lack current sheets. The arc pattern is consistent with the predicted topological mapping of the narrow open corridor or singular separator line that must connect the holes and, thus, consistent with the separatrix-web model of the slow solar wind. Near solar maximum, pseudostreamer belts stray far from the HCS-associated streamer belt and, together with it, form a global-wide web of slow wind. Recognition of pseudostreamer belts as prominent sources of slow wind provides a new template for understanding solar wind stream structure, especially near solar maximum.

  2. 3D reconstruction and particle acceleration properties of Coronal Shock Waves During Powerful Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Vourlidas, Angelos; Tylka, Allan J.; Pinto, Rui; Rouillard, Alexis; Tirole, Margot

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the physical mechanisms that produce the most energetic particles is a long-standing observational and theoretical challenge in astrophysics. Strong pressure waves have been proposed as efficient accelerators both in the solar and astrophysical contexts via various mechanisms such as diffusive-shock/shock-drift acceleration and betatron effects. In diffusive-shock acceleration, the efficacy of the process relies on shock waves being super-critical or moving several times faster than the characteristic speed of the medium they propagate through (a high Alfven Mach number) and on the orientation of the magnetic field upstream of the shock front. High-cadence, multipoint imaging using the NASA STEREO, SOHO and SDO spacecrafts now permits the 3-D reconstruction of pressure waves formed during the eruption of coronal mass ejections. Using these unprecedented capabilities, some recent studies have provided new insights on the timing and longitudinal extent of solar energetic particles, including the first derivations of the time-dependent 3-dimensional distribution of the expansion speed and Mach numbers of coronal shock waves. We will review these recent developments by focusing on particle events that occurred between 2011 and 2015. These new techniques also provide the opportunity to investigate the enigmatic long-duration gamma ray events.

  3. Improving organic tandem solar cells based on water-processed nanoparticles by quantitative 3D nanoimaging.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, E B L; Angmo, D; Dam, H F; Thydén, K T S; Andersen, T R; Skjønsfjell, E T B; Krebs, F C; Holler, M; Diaz, A; Guizar-Sicairos, M; Breiby, D W; Andreasen, J W

    2015-08-28

    Organic solar cells have great potential for upscaling due to roll-to-roll processing and a low energy payback time, making them an attractive sustainable energy source for the future. Active layers coated with water-dispersible Landfester particles enable greater control of the layer formation and easier access to the printing industry, which has reduced the use of organic solvents since the 1980s. Through ptychographic X-ray computed tomography (PXCT), we image quantitatively a roll-to-roll coated photovoltaic tandem stack consisting of one bulk heterojunction active layer and one Landfester particle active layer. We extract the layered morphology with structural and density information including the porosity present in the various layers and the silver electrode with high resolution in 3D. The Landfester particle layer is found to have an undesired morphology with negatively correlated top- and bottom interfaces, wide thickness distribution and only partial surface coverage causing electric short circuits through the layer. By top coating a polymer material onto the Landfester nanoparticles we eliminate the structural defects of the layer such as porosity and roughness, and achieve the increased performance larger than 1 V expected for a tandem cell. This study highlights that quantitative imaging of weakly scattering stacked layers of organic materials has become feasible by PXCT, and that this information cannot be obtained by other methods. In the present study, this technique specifically reveals the need to improve the coatability and layer formation of Landfester nanoparticles, thus allowing improved solar cells to be produced. PMID:26220159

  4. Solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere: Crustal field orientation, solar cycle, and seasonal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen W.; Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Lee, Yuni; Nagy, Andrew F.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Pawlowski, Dave J.; Combi, Michael R.; Najib, Dalal

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere is presented. Three global models: the 3-D Mars multifluid Block Adaptive Tree Solar-wind Roe Upwind Scheme MHD code (MF-MHD), the 3-D Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), and the Mars exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS) were used in this study. These models are one-way coupled; i.e., the MF-MHD model uses the 3-D neutral inputs from M-GITM and the 3-D hot oxygen corona distribution from M-AMPS. By adopting this one-way coupling approach, the Martian upper atmosphere ion escape rates are investigated in detail with the combined variations of crustal field orientation, solar cycle, and Martian seasonal conditions. The calculated ion escape rates are compared with Mars Express observational data and show reasonable agreement. The variations in solar cycles and seasons can affect the ion loss by a factor of ˜3.3 and ˜1.3, respectively. The crustal magnetic field has a shielding effect to protect Mars from solar wind interaction, and this effect is the strongest for perihelion conditions, with the crustal field facing the Sun. Furthermore, the fraction of cold escaping heavy ionospheric molecular ions [(O2+ and/or O2+)/Total] are inversely proportional to the fraction of the escaping (ionospheric and corona) atomic ion [O+/Total], whereas O2+ and O2+ ion escape fractions show a positive linear correlation since both ion species are ionospheric ions that follow the same escaping path.

  5. Solar wind interaction with planets --Abstract only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1994-06-01

    The solar system displays a wide variety of solar wind interactions with the planets and satellites. The 'classic' interaction with the Earth's magnetoscope is just one special case which even now leaves important questions unanswered. We will touch on (1) the Earth's magnetospheric interaction and then go on to what are probably representative limiting cases. (2) the interaction with an unmagnetized object having no atmosphere (the Moon), (3) the interaction with unmagnetized objects having atmospheres (Mars and Venus), and (4) the interaction with bodies having so much plasma in their magnetospheres that they would probably generate winds of their own if not confined by the solar wind (Jupiter).

  6. Anisotropic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Bieber, J. W.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    Solar wind turbulence has been viewed traditionally as composed of parallel propagating ('slab' fluctuations) or otherwise as isotropic turbulence. A variety of recent investigations, reviewed here, indicate that the spectrum may contain a significant admixture of two dimensional fluctuations, having variations mainly perpendicular to the local magnetic field. These indications come from simulations, from the theory of nearly incompressible MHD, from cosmic ray transport studies and from transport theory for solar wind turbulence, as well as from interpretations of direct observations. Thus, solar wind turbulence may be more like bundles of spaghetti than like parallel phase fronts.

  7. DSCOVR High Time Resolution Solar Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), previously known as Triana, spacecraft is expected to be launched in late 2014. It will carry a fluxgate magnetometer, Faraday Cup solar wind detector and a top-hat electron electrostatic analyzer. The Faraday Cup will provide an unprecedented 10 vectors/sec time resolution measurement of the solar wind proton and alpha reduced distribution functions. Coupled with the 40 vector/sec vector magnetometer measurements, the identification of specific wave modes in the solar wind will be possible for the first time. The science objectives and data products of the mission will be discussed.

  8. On periodicity of solar wind phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, V. K.; Joshi, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the rate of occurrence of solar wind phenomena observed between 1972-1984 using power spectrum analysis. The data have been taken from the high speed solar wind (HSSW) streams catalogue published by Mavromichalaki et al. (1988). The power spectrum analysis of HSSW events indicate that HSSW stream events have a periodicity of 9 days. This periodicity of HSSW events is 1/3 of the 27 days period of coronal holes which are the major source of solar wind events. In our opinion the 9 days period may be the energy build up time to produce the HSSW stream events.

  9. Solar wind tans young asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    A new study published in Nature this week reveals that asteroid surfaces age and redden much faster than previously thought -- in less than a million years, the blink of an eye for an asteroid. This study has finally confirmed that the solar wind is the most likely cause of very rapid space weathering in asteroids. This fundamental result will help astronomers relate the appearance of an asteroid to its actual history and identify any after effects of a catastrophic impact with another asteroid. ESO PR Photo 16a/09 Young Asteroids Look Old "Asteroids seem to get a ‘sun tan' very quickly," says lead author Pierre Vernazza. "But not, as for people, from an overdose of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, but from the effects of its powerful wind." It has long been known that asteroid surfaces alter in appearance with time -- the observed asteroids are much redder than the interior of meteorites found on Earth [1] -- but the actual processes of this "space weathering" and the timescales involved were controversial. Thanks to observations of different families of asteroids [2] using ESO's New Technology Telescope at La Silla and the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, as well as telescopes in Spain and Hawaii, Vernazza's team have now solved the puzzle. When two asteroids collide, they create a family of fragments with "fresh" surfaces. The astronomers found that these newly exposed surfaces are quickly altered and change colour in less than a million years -- a very short time compared to the age of the Solar System. "The charged, fast moving particles in the solar wind damage the asteroid's surface at an amazing rate [3]", says Vernazza. Unlike human skin, which is damaged and aged by repeated overexposure to sunlight, it is, perhaps rather surprisingly, the first moments of exposure (on the timescale considered) -- the first million years -- that causes most of the aging in asteroids. By studying different families of asteroids, the team has also shown that an asteroid

  10. Dissipation of Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2010-01-01

    I will describe the first three-dimensional (3-D) dispersion relations and wavenumber spectra of magnetic turbulence in the solar wind at sub-proton scales. The analysis takes advantage of the short separations of the Cluster spacecraft (d/sim approx.200 km) to apply the {it k}-filtering technique to the frequency range where the transition to sub-proton scales occurs. The dispersion diagrams show unambiguously that the cascade is carried by highly oblique Kinetic Alfven Wave with \\omega\\leq 0.1\\omega_{ci} in the plasma rest frame down to k_\\perp\\rho_i \\sim 2. The wavenumber spectra in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field consists of two ranges of scales separated by a breakpoint in the interval [0.4,1] k_\\perp \\rho_i. Above the breakpoint, the spectra follow the Kolmogorov scaling k_\\perp^{-1.7}, consistent with existing theoretical predictions. Below the breakpoint, the spectra steepen to \\sim k_\\perp^{-4.5}. We conjecture that the turbulence undergoes a {\\it transition-range}, where part of energy is dissipated into proton heating via Landau damping, and the remaining energy cascades down to electron scales where electron Landau damping may predominate.

  11. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cell using composite photoanode on 3D electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chiew Keat; Huang, Hui; Tse, Man Siu; Tan, Ooi Kiang

    2013-12-01

    For dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), an efficient transport of electron from the dye sensitizer through the mesoporous oxide layer and to be collected by electrode is crucial for high photovoltaic conversion efficiency. In this work, two novel approaches were developed in DSSC fabrication to improve the overall photovoltaic performance. The concurrent improvement in the charge transport property and light harvesting efficiency was achieved by incorporating N-doped TiO2 in the mesoporous TiO2 layer of the photoanode. These N-doped TiO2 (TiNxOy) was formed by using the single step thermal oxidation of Titanium Nitride (TiN) nanomaterials. At the same time, the 3D electrode with SnO2 nanorods grown on the FTO glass using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system was used to enhance the charge collection efficiency. By combining these two approaches simultaneously, the DSSC with composite TiNxOy-TiO2 photoanode on SnO2 nanorods 3D electrode was successfully fabricated and characterized. As compared to the standard DSSC, an overall increment of 28 % in the conversion efficiency was achieved. Higher incident photon-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) values were also obtained, specifically for the region 400 - 500 nm due to the cosensitization effect of N-doped TiO2. Efficient transfer of electron due to the decrease in charge transfer resistance at the mesoporous oxide/dye/electrolyte interface was observed from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. With the use of SnO2 nanorods, the adhesion between the mesoporous TiO2/FTO was enhanced and the transit time of a photogenerated electron through the mesoporous layer before being collected at the FTO electrode was significantly reduced by 50 %.

  12. Solar wind drivers of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asikainen, T.; Ruopsa, M.

    2016-03-01

    Disturbances of near-Earth space are predominantly driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) mostly originating from sunspots and high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) emanating from coronal holes. Here we study the relative importance of CMEs and HSSs as well as slow solar wind in producing energetic electron precipitation. We use the recently corrected energetic electron measurements from the Medium Energy Proton Electron Detector instrument on board low-altitude NOAA/Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites from 1979 to 2013. Using solar wind observations categorized into three different flow types, we study the contributions of these flows to annual electron precipitation and their efficiencies in producing precipitation. We find that HSS contribution nearly always dominates over the other flows and peaks strongly in the declining solar cycle phase. CME contribution mostly follows the sunspot cycle but is enhanced also in the declining phase. The efficiency of both HSS and CME peaks in the declining phase. We also study the dependence of electron precipitation on solar wind southward magnetic field component, speed, and density and find that the solar wind speed is the dominant factor affecting the precipitation. Since HSSs enhance the average solar wind speed in the declining phase, they also enhance the efficiency of CMEs during these times and thus have a double effect in enhancing energetic electron precipitation.

  13. Solar wind observations by Lyman alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyroelae, E.; Summanen, T.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between the solar wind and the local interstellar matter takes place at two distinct regions. The plasma component of the interstellar matter meets the solar wind at the heliospheric interface region and it is excluded from entering into the heliosphere. The neutral component consisting mainly of the hydrogen atoms flows through the whole heliosphere. It gets, however, partly ionized by charge exchange collisions with solar wind protons and energetic photons from the Sun. The neutral atom trajectories are also affected by the radiation pressure from the Sun. While the properties of the interface region are still too sparsely known to be useful for solar wind studies the neutral H distribution near the Sun has been used successfully for this purpose. Measuring Lyman alpha light scattered by neutral hydrogen atoms can serve as a remote sensing measurement of the solar wind's three-dimensional and temporal distribution. In this work we will particularly focus on the solar cycle effects on the neutral hydrogen distribution and how it affects the solar wind monitoring.

  14. Re-entrainment around a low-rise industrial building: 2D versus 3D wind tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Adrian W. K.; Choi, Edmund C. C.; Britter, Rex E.

    We investigate the re-entrainment of pollutants around a low-rise industrial building under opposing cross winds through experimental means in a wind tunnel. Two scaled models of an industrial building for electrowinning metal extraction were tested. The first model was a two-dimensional simplified segment of the building with a scale ratio of 1:40, while the second was a 1:100 three-dimensional model of the full building. Particle image velocimetry was adopted to provide the planar velocity measurements that illustrated the flow distribution around the building. Flame ionization detection with propane tracer gas was used to measure the concentration distribution. The results of the 2D model show that the exhaust plume interacted with the opposing wind in two different stages, namely ground attachment and bent-over. The ground attachment stage occurred under low wind speeds, whereby the exhaust plume exhibited Coanda attachment with the ground surface before being lifted off by the cross wind and circulated to the leeward wake cavity. Upon further increase in the wind speed, the bent-over stage occurred with the exhaust plume being detached from the ground and deflected upward over the roof, before entrained by the wake. The re-entrainment ratio decreased with the increase in wind speed within the range of wind speeds tested, indicating that the range did not include the critical wind speed. Results from the 3D model painted a somewhat different picture and pointed to the significance of the end conditions. The maximum re-entrainment always occurred near the two ends of the building, where the pollutants mostly flowed around the ends rather than over the roof. The re-entrainment ratio was consistently higher at the two ends compared to the central sections. Finally, a building re-entrainment index, ( KR) ∞, is proposed to characterize the re-entrainment performance of a specific building geometry.

  15. Turbulence in solar wind and laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.

    2010-06-16

    Recent studies of plasma turbulence based on measurements within solar wind and laboratory plasmas has been discussed. Evidences for the presence of a turbulent energy cascade, using the Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, has been provided through data from the Ulysses spacecraft. This allows, for the first time, a direct estimate of the turbulent energy transfer rate, which can contribute to the in situ heating of the solar wind. The energy cascade has been evidenced also for ExB electrostatic turbulence in laboratory magnetized plasmas using measurements of intermittent transport (bursty turbulence) at the edge of the RFX-mod reversed field pinch plasma device. Finally the problem of the dispersive region of turbulence in solar wind above the ion-cyclotron frequency, where a spectral break is usually observed, and the problem of dissipation in a collisionless fluid as the solar wind, are briefly discussed.

  16. Electrostatic Solitary Waves in the Solar Wind: Evidence for Instability at Solar Wind Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaspina, David M.; Newman, David L.; Wilson, Lynn Bruce; Goetz, Keith; Kellogg, Paul J.; Kerstin, Kris

    2013-01-01

    A strong spatial association between bipolar electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) and magnetic current sheets (CSs) in the solar wind is reported here for the first time. This association requires that the plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, electron two stream) which generate ESWs are preferentially localized to solar wind CSs. Distributions of CS properties (including shear angle, thickness, solar wind speed, and vector magnetic field change) are examined for differences between CSs associated with ESWs and randomly chosen CSs. Possible mechanisms for producing ESW-generating instabilities at solar wind CSs are considered, including magnetic reconnection.

  17. Solar Corona/Wind Composition and Origins of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, S. T.; Gilbert, J. A.; Landi, E.; Shearer, P.; von Steiger, R.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements from ACE and Ulysses have revealed a multifaceted solar wind, with distinctly different kinetic and compositional properties dependent on the source region of the wind. One of the major outstanding issues in heliophysics concerns the origin and also predictability of quasi-stationary slow solar wind. While the fast solar wind is now proven to originate within large polar coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind remains particularly elusive and has been the subject of long debate, leading to models that are stationary and also reconnection based - such as interchange or so-called S-web based models. Our talk will focus on observational constraints of solar wind sources and their evolution during the solar cycle. In particular, we will point out long-term variations of wind composition and dynamic properties, particularly focused on the abundance of elements with low First Ionization Potential (FIP), which have been routinely measured on both ACE and Ulysses spacecraft. We will use these in situ observations, and remote sensing data where available, to provide constraints for solar wind origin during the solar cycle, and on their correspondence to predictions for models of the solar wind.

  18. Improving organic tandem solar cells based on water-processed nanoparticles by quantitative 3D nanoimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, E. B. L.; Angmo, D.; Dam, H. F.; Thydén, K. T. S.; Andersen, T. R.; Skjønsfjell, E. T. B.; Krebs, F. C.; Holler, M.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Breiby, D. W.; Andreasen, J. W.

    2015-08-01

    Organic solar cells have great potential for upscaling due to roll-to-roll processing and a low energy payback time, making them an attractive sustainable energy source for the future. Active layers coated with water-dispersible Landfester particles enable greater control of the layer formation and easier access to the printing industry, which has reduced the use of organic solvents since the 1980s. Through ptychographic X-ray computed tomography (PXCT), we image quantitatively a roll-to-roll coated photovoltaic tandem stack consisting of one bulk heterojunction active layer and one Landfester particle active layer. We extract the layered morphology with structural and density information including the porosity present in the various layers and the silver electrode with high resolution in 3D. The Landfester particle layer is found to have an undesired morphology with negatively correlated top- and bottom interfaces, wide thickness distribution and only partial surface coverage causing electric short circuits through the layer. By top coating a polymer material onto the Landfester nanoparticles we eliminate the structural defects of the layer such as porosity and roughness, and achieve the increased performance larger than 1 V expected for a tandem cell. This study highlights that quantitative imaging of weakly scattering stacked layers of organic materials has become feasible by PXCT, and that this information cannot be obtained by other methods. In the present study, this technique specifically reveals the need to improve the coatability and layer formation of Landfester nanoparticles, thus allowing improved solar cells to be produced.Organic solar cells have great potential for upscaling due to roll-to-roll processing and a low energy payback time, making them an attractive sustainable energy source for the future. Active layers coated with water-dispersible Landfester particles enable greater control of the layer formation and easier access to the printing

  19. Magnetic energy flow in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the effect of rotation (tangential flow) of the solar wind on the conclusions of Whang (1971) suggesting an increase in the solar wind velocity due to the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy. It is shown that the effect of the rotation of the sun on the magnetic energy flow results in most of the magnetic energy being transported by magnetic shear stress near the sun.

  20. Sources of the solar wind at solar activity maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Smith, E. J.; Skoug, R. M.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2002-12-01

    The photospheric sources of solar wind observed by the Ulysses and ACE spacecraft from 1998 to early 2001 are determined through a two-step mapping process. Solar wind speed measured at the spacecraft is used in a ballistic model to determine a foot point on a source surface at a solar distance of 2.5 solar radii. A potential-field source-surface model is then used to trace the field and flow from the source surface to the photosphere. Comparison of the polarity of the measured interplanetary field with the polarity of the photospheric source region shows good agreement for spacecraft latitudes equatorward of 60°. At higher southern latitudes, the mapping predicts that Ulysses should have observed only outward directed magnetic fields, whereas both polarities were observed. A detailed analysis is performed on four of the solar rotations for which the mapped and observed polarities were in generally good agreement. For those rotations, the solar wind mapped to both coronal holes and active regions. These findings for a period of high solar activity differ from the findings of a similar study of the solar wind in 1994-1995 when solar activity was very low. At solar minimum the fastest wind mapped to the interior of large polar coronal holes while slower wind mapped to the boundaries of those holes or to smaller low-latitude coronal holes. For the data examined in the present study, neither spacecraft detected wind from the small polar coronal holes when they existed and the speed was never as high as that observed by Ulysses at solar minimum. The principal difference between the solar wind from coronal holes and from active regions is that the O7+/O6+ ion ratio is lower for the coronal hole flow, but not as low as in the polar coronal hole flow at solar minimum. Furthermore, the active-region flows appear to be organized into several substreams unlike the more monolithic structure of flows from coronal holes. The boundaries between plasma flows from neighboring

  1. IMPROVED WIND AND TURBULENCE MEASUREMENTS USING A LOW-COST 3-D SONIC ANEMOMETER AT A LOW-WIND SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B

    2007-05-11

    A year of data from sonic anemometer and mechanical wind sensors was analyzed and compared at a low-wind site. Results indicate that 15-minute average and peak 1-second wind speeds (u) from the sonic agree well with data derived from a co-located cup anemometer over a wide range of speeds. Wind direction data derived from the sonic also agree closely with those from a wind vane except for very low wind speeds. Values of standard deviation of longitudinal wind speed ({sigma}{sub u}) and wind direction fluctuations ({delta}{sub {theta}}) from the sonic and mechanical sensors agree well for times with u > 2 ms{sup -1} but show significant differences with lower u values. The most significant differences are associated with the standard deviation of vertical wind fluctuations ({sigma}{sub w}): the co-located vertical propeller anemometer yields values increasingly less than those measured by the sonic anemometer as u decreases from 2.5 approaching 0 ms{sup -1}. The combination of u over-estimation and under-estimation of {sigma}{sub w} from the mechanical sensors at low wind speeds causes considerable under-estimation of the standard deviation of vertical wind angle fluctuations ({sigma}{sub {phi}}), an indicator of vertical dispersion. Calculations of {sigma}{sub {phi}} from sonic anemometer measurements are typically 5{sup o} to 10{sup o} higher when the mechanical instruments indicate that {sigma}{sub {phi}} < 5{sup o} or so. The errors in both the propeller anemometer and cup anemometer, caused by their inability to respond to higher frequency (smaller scale) turbulent fluctuations, can therefore lead to large (factors of 2 to 10 or more) errors in the vertical dispersion during stable conditions with light winds.

  2. The interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axford, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The expected characteristics of the solar wind, extrapolated from the vicinity of the earth are described. Several models are examined for the interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar plasma and magnetic field. Various aspects of the penetration of neutral interstellar gas into the solar wind are considered. The dynamic effects of the neutral gas on the solar wind are described. Problems associated with the interaction of cosmic rays with the solar wind are discussed.

  3. Evolution of M82-like starburst winds revisited: 3D radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melioli, C.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Geraissate, F. G.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we present three-dimensional radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations of galactic winds generated particularly in M82-like starburst galaxies. We have considered intermittent winds induced by supernova (SN) explosions within super star clusters randomly distributed (in space and time) in the central region of the galaxy (within a radius of R = 150 pc) and were able to reproduce the observed M82 wind conditions with its complex morphological outflow structure. We have found that the environmental conditions in the disc in the nearly recent past are crucial to determine whether the wind will develop a large-scale rich filamentary structure, as in M82 wind, or not. If a sufficiently large number of super stellar clusters are built up in a starburst mainly over a period of a few million years, then the simulations reproduce the multiphase gas observed in M82-like winds, i.e. with filaments of sizes about 20-300 pc, velocities of ˜200-500 km s-1, densities in the range 10-1-10 cm-3, embedded in a hot, low-density gas with a density smaller than 10-2 cm-3 and a velocity of ˜2000 km s-1. Otherwise, a `superbubble-like' wind develops, with very poor or no cold filamentary structures. Also, the numerical evolution of the SN ejecta has allowed us to obtain the abundance distribution over the first ˜3 kpc extension of the wind and we have found that the SN explosions change significantly the metallicity only of the hot, low-density wind component for which we obtained abundances ˜5-10 Z⊙ in fair consistency with the observations. Moreover, we have found that the SN-driven wind transports to outside the disc large amounts of energy, momentum and gas, but the more massive high-density component reaches only intermediate altitudes smaller than 1.5 kpc. Therefore, no significant amounts of gas mass are lost to the intergalactic medium and the mass evolution of the galaxy is not much affected by the starburst events occurring in the nuclear region.

  4. Comparison of a 3-D CFD-DSMC Solution Methodology With a Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    A solution method for problems that contain both continuum and rarefied flow regions is presented. The methodology is applied to flow about the 3-D Mars Sample Return Orbiter (MSRO) that has a highly compressed forebody flow, a shear layer where the flow separates from a forebody lip, and a low density wake. Because blunt body flow fields contain such disparate regions, employing a single numerical technique to solve the entire 3-D flow field is often impractical, or the technique does not apply. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) could be employed to solve the entire flow field; however, the technique requires inordinate computational resources for continuum and near-continuum regions, and is best suited for the wake region. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will solve the high-density forebody flow, but continuum assumptions do not apply in the rarefied wake region. The CFD-DSMC approach presented herein may be a suitable way to obtain a higher fidelity solution.

  5. Origin of the Ubiquitous Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Woo, R.; Fineschi, S.; O'Neal, R.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    The solar wind is a direct manifestation of the coronal heating processes which continue to elude us. For over three decades, observations in interplanetary space have identified two types of wind: a slow component with highly variable physical properties also characterized by speeds typically beow 500 kn/s, and a much less variable fast wind flowing on average at 750 km/s1.

  6. Data-driven modeling of the solar wind from 1 Rs to 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Ma, Xiaopeng; Xiang, Changqing

    2015-12-01

    We present here a time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solar wind simulation from the solar surface to the Earth's orbit driven by time-varying line-of-sight solar magnetic field data. The simulation is based on the three-dimensional (3-D) solar-interplanetary (SIP) adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) space-time conservation element and solution element (CESE) MHD (SIP-AMR-CESE MHD) model. In this simulation, we first achieve the initial solar wind background with the time-relaxation method by inputting a potential field obtained from the synoptic photospheric magnetic field and then generate the time-evolving solar wind by advancing the initial 3-D solar wind background with continuously varying photospheric magnetic field. The model updates the inner boundary conditions by using the projected normal characteristic method, inputting the high-cadence photospheric magnetic field data corrected by solar differential rotation, and limiting the mass flux escaping from the solar photosphere. We investigate the solar wind evolution from 1 July to 11 August 2008 with the model driven by the consecutive synoptic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group. We compare the numerical results with the previous studies on the solar wind, the solar coronal observations from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope board on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and the measurements from OMNI at 1 astronomical unit (AU). Comparisons show that the present data-driven MHD model's results have overall good agreement with the large-scale dynamical coronal and interplanetary structures, including the sizes and distributions of the coronal holes, the positions and shapes of the streamer belts, the heliocentric distances of the Alfvénic surface, and the transitions of the solar wind speeds. However, the model fails to capture the small-sized equatorial holes, and the modeled solar wind near 1 AU has a somewhat higher density and weaker magnetic field strength than

  7. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Piwko, R.; Jordan, G.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Freeman, L.; Milligan, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. It was initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% energy penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group of utilities in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming (see study area map). WestConnect also includes utilities in California, but these were not included because California had already completed a renewable energy integration study for the state. This study was set up to answer questions that utilities, public utilities commissions, developers, and regional planning organizations had about renewable energy use in the west: (1) Does geographic diversity of renewable energy resource help mitigate variability; (2) How do local resources compare to out-of-state resources; (3) Can balancing area cooperation help mitigate variability; (4) What is the role and value of energy storage; (5) Should reserve requirements be modified; (6) What is the benefit of forecasting; and (7) How can hydropower help with integration of renewables? The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and run by NREL with WestConnect as a partner organization. The study follows DOE's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, which did not find any technical barriers to reaching 20% wind energy in the continental United States by 2030. This study and its partner study, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, performed a more in-depth operating impact analysis to see if 20% wind energy was feasible from an operational level. In DOE/NREL's analysis, the 20% wind energy target required 25% wind energy in the western interconnection; therefore, this study considered 20% and 30% wind energy to bracket the DOE analysis. Additionally, since solar is rapidly growing in the west, 5% solar was also considered

  8. Sulfur abundances in the solar wind measured by SWICS on Ulysses. [Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, C. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Geiss, J.; Von Steiger, R.; Ogilvie, K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the nine experiments on Ulysses (launched October, 1990), the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer, utilizes an energy per charge deflection system along with time of flight technology to uniquely determine the mass and mass per charge of solar wind particles. Thus the composition of various solar wind types can be analyzed. Using the SWICS data accumulated during the in-ecliptic phase of the mission, we have determined the sulfur abundance, relative to silicon, in two different types of solar wind: transient and coronal hole associated flows. Sulfur is of extreme interest because it is one of the few elements that lies in the transitional region of the FIP-dependent relative abundance enrichment function, observed for solar energetic particles and some types of solar wind flows.

  9. Testing 3D SPH Models Of Eta Carina's Winds By HST, RXTE, VLT And VLTI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, T.; Groh, J.; Weigelt, G.; Corcoran, M.; Owocki, S.; Russell, C.; Okazaki, A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Eta Carina have been combined with three-dimensional smoothed-particle hydrodynamic (3DSPH) simulations providing considerable insight on this >100 Mo binary that may become near-term supernovae, a GRB, or a staid WR binary. Understanding how this system loses 1e-3 Mo/yr, 500 km/s will provide new understanding of massive stellar evolution, including the first progenitors of GRBs, supernovae and pseudo-supernovae. The 3DSPH models extend to 100 semi-major axes ( 2000 AU, <2” at 2300 pc). At these scales, HST/STIS resolves [Fe III] and [Fe II] spatial-velocity structures that change with orbital phase and position angle. Radiative transfer models combining temperature and density with EtaCar B's FUV lead to synthetic spectroimages of extended wind-wind interfaces. Model X-ray light curves provide orbital inclination and location of periastron but cannot determine sky PA. Synthetic spectro-images generated for a range of possible binary orientations lead to best-fit when the orbital axis is closely aligned with the Homunculus axis of symmetry, and periastron with EtaCar B on the far side of EtaCar A. VLTI/AMBER measures of the continuum, extended hydrogen and helium structures of EtaCar A demonstrate that, across periastron, EtaCar B penetrates the primary extended atmosphere. Spectroimagery observations of He 10830 by VLT/CRIRES show blue-shifted emission extending to -1500 km/s, consistent with wind-wind structures driven by the companion's fast wind. The 2009.0 RXTE X-ray recovery and return of the spectroscopic high state was much sooner than the 1998.0 and 2003.5 recoveries. What has changed? Suggestions range from a drop in the primary wind, changes in the secondary wind or line-of-sight shifting of the wind-wind boundary. We will discuss potential observational tests based upon predictions by 3DSPH models.

  10. 3D Wind Reconstruction and Turbulence Estimation in the Boundary Layer from Doppler Lidar Measurements using Particle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottner, L.; Baehr, C.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent phenomena in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are characterized by small spatial and temporal scales which make them difficult to observe and to model.New remote sensing instruments, like Doppler Lidar, give access to fine and high-frequency observations of wind in the ABL. This study suggests to use a method of nonlinear estimation based on these observations to reconstruct 3D wind in a hemispheric volume, and to estimate atmospheric turbulent parameters. The wind observations are associated to particle systems which are driven by a local turbulence model. The particles have both fluid and stochastic properties. Therefore, spatial averages and covariances may be deduced from the particles. Among the innovative aspects, we point out the absence of the common hypothesis of stationary-ergodic turbulence and the non-use of particle model closure hypothesis. Every time observations are available, 3D wind is reconstructed and turbulent parameters such as turbulent kinectic energy, dissipation rate, and Turbulent Intensity (TI) are provided. This study presents some results obtained using real wind measurements provided by a five lines of sight Lidar. Compared with classical methods (e.g. eddy covariance) our technic renders equivalent long time results. Moreover it provides finer and real time turbulence estimations. To assess this new method, we suggest computing independently TI using different observation types. First anemometer data are used to have TI reference.Then raw and filtered Lidar observations have also been compared. The TI obtained from raw data is significantly higher than the reference one, whereas the TI estimated with the new algorithm has the same order.In this study we have presented a new class of algorithm to reconstruct local random media. It offers a new way to understand turbulence in the ABL, in both stable or convective conditions. Later, it could be used to refine turbulence parametrization in meteorological meso-scale models.

  11. Capabilities of wind tunnels with two-adaptive walls to minimize boundary interference in 3-D model testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebstock, Rainer; Lee, Edwin E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An initial wind tunnel test was made to validate a new wall adaptation method for 3-D models in test sections with two adaptive walls. First part of the adaptation strategy is an on-line assessment of wall interference at the model position. The wall induced blockage was very small at all test conditions. Lift interference occurred at higher angles of attack with the walls set aerodynamically straight. The adaptation of the top and bottom tunnel walls is aimed at achieving a correctable flow condition. The blockage was virtually zero throughout the wing planform after the wall adjustment. The lift curve measured with the walls adapted agreed very well with interference free data for Mach 0.7, regardless of the vertical position of the wing in the test section. The 2-D wall adaptation can significantly improve the correctability of 3-D model data. Nevertheless, residual spanwise variations of wall interference are inevitable.

  12. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-Based 3-D Winds Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.

    2012-01-01

    We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.

  13. The Genesis Solar Wind Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, Donald S.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Sasaki, Chester; Sevilla, Donald; Stansbery, Eileen; Clark, Ben; Smith, Nick; Oldham, Lloyd

    1990-01-01

    The Genesis spacecraft was launched on August 8 from Cape Canaveral on a journey to become the first spacecraft to return from interplanetary space. The fifth in NASA's line of low-cost Discovery-class missions, its goal is to collect samples of solar wind and return them to Earth for detailed isotopic and elemental analysis. The spacecraft is to collect solar wind for over two years, while circling the L1 point 1.5 million km sunward of the earth, before heading back for a capsule-style re-entry in September, 2004. After parachute deployment, a mid-air helicopter recovery will be used to avoid a hard landing. The mission has been in the planning stages for over ten years. Its cost, including development, mission operations, and sample analysis, is approximately $209M. The Genesis science team, headed by principal investigator Donald Burnett of Caltech, consists of approximately 20 co-investigators from universities and science centers around the country and internationally. The spacecraft consists of a relatively flat spacecraft bus containing most of the subsystem components, situated below a sample return capsule (SRC) which holds the solar-wind collection substrates and an electrostatic solar wind concentrator. Some of the collectors are exposed throughout the collection period, for a sample of bulk solar wind, while others are exposed only to certain solar wind regimes, or types of flow. Ion and electron spectrometers feed raw data to the spacecraft control and data-handling (C&DH) unit, which determines ion moments and electron flux geometries in real time. An algorithm is used to robotically decide between interstream (IS), coronal hole (CH), and coronal mass ejection (CME) regimes, and to control deployment of the proper arrays to sample these wind regimes independently. This is the first time such a solar-wind decision algorithm has been used on board a spacecraft.

  14. Configuration and Evaluation of a Dual-Doppler 3-D Wind Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2014-01-01

    Current LSP, GSDO, and SLS space vehicle operations are halted when wind speeds from specific directions exceed defined thresholds and when lightning is a threat. Strong winds and lightning are difficult parameters for the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to forecast, yet are important in the protection of customer vehicle operations and the personnel that conduct them. A display of the low-level horizontal wind field to reveal areas of high winds or convergence would be a valuable tool for forecasters in assessing the timing of high winds, or convection initiation and subsequent lightning occurrence. This is especially important for areas where no weather observation platforms exist. Developing a dual-Doppler radar capability would provide such a display to assist forecasters in predicting high winds and convection initiation. The wind fields can also be used to initialize a local mesoscale numerical weather prediction model to help improve the model forecast winds, convection initiation, and other phenomena. The 45 WS and NWS MLB tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a dual- Doppler wind field display using data from the 45th Space Wing radar, known as the Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR), NWS MLB Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (KMLB), and the Orlando International Airport Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (KMCO). They also stipulated that the software used should be freely available. The AMU evaluated two software packages and, with concurrence from NWS MLB and the 45 WS, chose the Warning Decision Support System-Integrated Information (WDSS-II). The AMU collected data from two significant weather cases: a tornadic event on 14 April 2013 and a severe wind and hail event on 12 February 2014. For the 14 April case, the data were from WSR and KMLB. For the 12 February case, the data were from KMCO and KMLB. The AMU installed WDSS-II on a Linux PC, then processed and quality controlled the radar data for display and analysis using WDSS-II tools

  15. 3D Numerical Analysis of Flow Control on Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Onkar; Karaismail, Ertan

    2011-11-01

    Wind turbine blades are exposed to unsteady and spatially-varying loadings in a real field. These loadings result in fluctuating structural forces which in turn lead to failure of blades as well as gearbox. In this study, we perform numerical analysis of flow over a wind turbine blade placed in a wind tunnel; where dynamic motions are imposed to the blade in order to emulate scenarios observed in a real field. Furthermore, we also study the effect of active flow control (via synthetic-jets) on unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of the blade under dynamic motions; the idea is to be able to control aerodynamic loads and mitigate failures. Numerical analysis is based on massively parallel simulations using hybrid turbulence models. Comparisons with experimental data will also be included.

  16. The Genesis Mission Solar Wind Collection: Solar-Wind Statistics over the Period of Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barraclough, B. L.; Wiens, R. C.; Steinberg, J. E.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Neugebauer, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Gosling, J.; Bremmer, R. R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Genesis spacecraft was launched August 8, 2001 on a mission to collect samples of solar wind for 2 years and return them to earth September 8, 2004. Detailed analyses of the solar wind ions implanted into high-purity collection substrates will be carried out using various mass spectrometry techniques. These analyses are expected to determine key isotopic ratios and elemental abundances in the solar wind, and by extension, in the solar photosphere. Further, the photospheric composition is thought to be representative of the solar nebula with a few exceptions, so that the Genesis mission will provide a baseline for the average solar nebula composition with which to compare present-day compositions of planets, meteorites, and asteroids. The collection of solar wind samples is almost complete. Collection began for most substrates in early December, 2001, and is scheduled to be complete on April 2 of this year. It is critical to understand the solar-wind conditions during the collection phase of the mission. For this reason, plasma ion and electron spectrometers are continuously monitoring the solar wind proton density, velocity, temperature, the alpha/proton ratio, and angular distribution of suprathermal electrons. Here we report on the solar-wind conditions as observed by these in-situ instruments during the first half of the collection phase of the mission, from December, 2001 to present.

  17. The 3-D description of vertical current sheets with application to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Davis, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Following a brief review of the processes which have been suggested for explaining the occurrence of solar flares we suggest a new scenario which builds on the achievements of the previous suggestion that the current sheets, which develop naturally in 3-D cases with gravity from impacting independent magnetic structures (i.e., approaching current systems), do not consist of horizontal currents but are instead predominantly vertical current systems. This suggestion is based on the fact that as the subphotospheric sources of the magnetic field displace the upper photosphere and lower chromosphere regions, where plasma beta is near unity, will experience predominantly horizontal mass motions which will lead to a distorted 3-D configurations of the magnetic field having stored free energy. In our scenario, a vertically flowing current sheet separates the plasma regions associated with either of the subphotospheric sources. This reflects the balanced tension of the two stressed fields which twist around each other. This leads naturally to a metastable or unstable situation as the twisted field emerges into a low beta region where vertical motions are not inhibited by gravity. In our flare scenario the impulsive energy release occurs, initially, not by reconnection but mainly by the rapid change of the magnetic field which has become unstable. During the impulsive phase the field lines contort in such way as to realign the electric current sheet into a minimum energy horizontal flow. This contortion produces very large electric fields which will accelerate particles. As the current evolves to a horizontal configuration the magnetic field expands vertically, which can be accompanied by eruptions of material. The instability of a horizontal current is well known and causes the magnetic field to undergo a rapid outward expansion. In our scenario, fast reconnection is not necessary to trigger the flare, however, slow reconnection would occur continuously in the current layer

  18. MHD simulations for investigating interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junmo; Magara, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and ambient solar winds is one of the important issues of space weather because it affects the trajectory of a flying CME, which determines whether the CME hits the Earth and produces geomagnetic disturbances or not. In this study, two-step 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations including a spheromak-type CME and an ambient solar wind are performed to investigate their interaction processes such as deflection and rotation of a CME. We perform the 1st-step MHD simulation using averaged surface magnetic field data to construct a steady state with an ambient solar wind. A spheromak-type CME is then injected through the solar surface, and subsequent evolution is reproduced by performing the 2nd-step MHD simulation. We discuss key parameters that characterize interaction processes between a CME and ambient solar wind.

  19. Solar Wind Interaction with the Martian Upper Atmosphere at Early Mars/Extreme Solar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, C.; Bougher, S. W.; Ma, Y.; Toth, G.; Lee, Y.; Nagy, A. F.; Tenishev, V.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Combi, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The investigation of ion escape fluxes from Mars, resulting from the solar wind interaction with its upper atmosphere/ionosphere, is important due to its potential impact on the long-term evolution of Mars atmosphere (e.g., loss of water) over its history. In the present work, we adopt the 3-D Mars cold neutral atmosphere profiles (0 ~ 300 km) from the newly developed and validated Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM) and the 3-D hot oxygen profiles (100 km ~ 5 RM) from the exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS). We apply these 3-D model output fields into the 3-D BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD (MF-MHD) model (100 km ~ 20 RM) that can simulate the interplay between Mars upper atmosphere and solar wind by considering the dynamics of individual ion species. The multi-fluid MHD model solves separate continuity, momentum and energy equations for each ion species (H+, O+, O2+, CO2+). The M-GITM model together with the AMPS exosphere model take into account the effects of solar cycle and seasonal variations on both cold and hot neutral atmospheres. This feature allows us to investigate the corresponding effects on the Mars upper atmosphere ion escape by using a one-way coupling approach, i.e., both the M-GITM and AMPS model output fields are used as the input for the multi-fluid MHD model and the M-GITM is used as input into the AMPS exosphere model. In this study, we present M-GITM, AMPS, and MF-MHD calculations (1-way coupled) for 2.5 GYA conditions and/or extreme solar conditions for present day Mars (high solar wind velocities, high solar wind dynamic pressure, and high solar irradiance conditions, etc.). Present day extreme conditions may result in MF-MHD outputs that are similar to 2.5 GYA cases. The crustal field orientations are also considered in this study. By comparing estimates of past ion escape rates with the current ion loss rates to be returned by the MAVEN spacecraft (2013-2016), we can better constrain the

  20. Validation of US3D for Capsule Aerodynamics using 05-CA Wind Tunnel Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan

    2012-01-01

    RANS is ill-suited for analysis of these problems. For transonic and supersonic cases, US3D shows fairly good agreement using DES across all cases. Separation prediction and resulting backshell pressure are problems across all portions of this analysis. This becomes more of an issue at lower Mach numbers: .Stagnation pressures not as large - wake and backshell are more significant .Errors on shoulder act on a large area - small discrepancies manifest as large changes Subsonic comparisons are mixed with regard to integrated loads and merit more attention. Dominant unsteady behavior (wake shedding) resolved well, though.

  1. Are There Natural Categories of Solar Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Sipes, T.; Karimabadi, H.

    2014-12-01

    What seem to be the most obvious categories of solar wind, such as fast and slow, often turn out to be difficult to pin down on closer examination. For example, while slow winds tend to be dense and nonAlfvenic, there are significant exceptions, with some slow winds being not only very Alfvenic but also exhibiting many fast wind traits. Here we use "unsupervised" data mining to look for "natural" solar wind types. We use a set of variables to represent the state of the system and apply what are now standard algorithms to look for natural clustering of these variables. We have done this process for the solar wind density, speed, a carbon charge state ratio (6+ to 5+), the cross-helicity, and the "residual energy." When using the first three of these, we find two groups that tend to be slow and fast, but with the boundary between the groups that is a combination of speed and density. When all five variables are used, the best characterization of the states is as three basic groups in the cross-helicity vs residual energy space, i.e., in terms of "turbulence" measures rather than simple parameters. The three-variable case is largely but not completely reproduced in its subspace. We will suggest what the results could mean for the understanding of issues such as solar wind acceleration.

  2. New Horizons Solar Wind Around Pluto Solar Wind (SWAP) Measurements from 5 to 23 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.; Delamere, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    This year the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons (NH) spacecraft collected 79 days of solar wind measurements during hibernation, about 30 days of data during annual checkout operations, and has begun recording another 168 days of data in hibernation which will be played back next year. The currently available NH-SWAP solar wind observations now span from about 5.1 to 23.4 AU. We examine how the peak solar wind speed in the New Horizons measurements vary with distance, report on progress toward automating the fitting of the SWAP solar wind count rate distributions, and take an initial look at the solar wind temperature-speed relationship beyond 11 AU. Since most of the SWAP solar wind observations were collected while spinning, and ions from the entire field-of-view (10 by 276 degrees) are focused onto one pair of coincidence Channel Electron Multiplier, we need to evaluate the effect of spinning on the measured rates. By comparing the 3-axis stabilized, to the rolling and spinning measurements, we strive to assess spin variations in the observed SWAP count rates and develop techniques to account for them. To test our analysis, we fit simulated count rate distributions to quantify how well our technique recovers the input solar wind conditions.

  3. Discrete events and solar wind energization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, W.-H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Based on a multiple-magnetic-reconnection picture, an estimation of the energy flux suggests that small-scale EUV exploding events may contribute a significant amount of energy (of order of 100,000 erg/sq cm sec) to solar atmospheric heating and solar-wind acceleration. Most of the dissipated magnetic energy is converted into thermal energy and plasma turbulence. On a related aspect, a numerical study based on the nonlinear one-fluid hydrodynamic equations shows a self-smoothing effect, whereby a multistream structure of the solar wind formed near the sun can be gradually smoothed during its propagation through interplanetary space. This calculation gives support for the possible contribution of discrete energetic events to high-speed solar wind streams.

  4. Solar wind origin in coronal funnels.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chuan-Yi; Zhou, Cheng; Marsch, Eckart; Xia, Li-Dong; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Wilhelm, Klaus

    2005-04-22

    The origin of the solar wind in solar coronal holes has long been unclear. We establish that the solar wind starts flowing out of the corona at heights above the photosphere between 5 megameters and 20 megameters in magnetic funnels. This result is obtained by a correlation of the Doppler-velocity and radiance maps of spectral lines emitted by various ions with the force-free magnetic field as extrapolated from photospheric magnetograms to different altitudes. Specifically, we find that Ne7+ ions mostly radiate around 20 megameters, where they have outflow speeds of about 10 kilometers per second, whereas C3+ ions with no average flow speed mainly radiate around 5 megameters. Based on these results, a model for understanding the solar wind origin is suggested. PMID:15845846

  5. PULSED ALFVEN WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J. T.; Tian, H.; Phan, T. D.

    2011-08-20

    Using 3 s plasma and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft located in the solar wind well upstream from Earth, we report observations of isolated, pulse-like Alfvenic disturbances in the solar wind. These isolated events are characterized by roughly plane-polarized rotations in the solar wind magnetic field and velocity vectors away from the directions of the underlying field and velocity and then back again. They pass over Wind on timescales ranging from seconds to several minutes. These isolated, pulsed Alfven waves are pervasive; we have identified 175 such events over the full range of solar wind speeds (320-550 km s{sup -1}) observed in a randomly chosen 10 day interval. The large majority of these events are propagating away from the Sun in the solar wind rest frame. Maximum field rotations in the interval studied ranged from 6 Degree-Sign to 109 Degree-Sign . Similar to most Alfvenic fluctuations in the solar wind at 1 AU, the observed changes in velocity are typically less than that predicted for pure Alfven waves (Alfvenicity ranged from 0.28 to 0.93). Most of the events are associated with small enhancements or depressions in magnetic field strength and small changes in proton number density and/or temperature. The pulse-like and roughly symmetric nature of the magnetic field and velocity rotations in these events suggests that these Alfvenic disturbances are not evolving when observed. They thus appear to be, and probably are, solitary waves. It is presently uncertain how these waves originate, although they may evolve out of Alfvenic turbulence.

  6. The solar cycle variation of the solar wind helium abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Hirshberg, J.

    1974-01-01

    A critical survey was made of the experimental evidence for a variation of the relative abundance by number h, (n alpha/np), of helium in the solar wind. The abundance is found to vary by delta h = 0.01 + or - 0.01 from 0.035 to 0.045 over solar cycle 20. Changes in the average bulk speed during the solar activity cycle was insufficient to account for this increase in h with the solar cycle. The slope of the linear relation between h and the plasma bulk speed is also found to vary, being greatest around solar maximum. An attempt is made to explain the 30% variation in h as the result of the variation in the number of major solar flares over a solar cycle. These obvious transients are apparently not numerous enough to explain the observed variation, but the reasonable expectation remains that the transients observed recently by Skylab which may occur more frequently than major flares could augment those associated with major flares. Since the solar wind flux is not observed to increase at solar maximum, the abundance of Helium cannot be proportional to the proton flux leaving the sun unless the solar wind comes from a smaller area of the sun at maximum than at minimum.

  7. Compact, High Energy 2-micron Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development for NASA's Future 3-D Winds Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Demoz, Belay B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of 2-micron laser transmitter development at NASA Langley Research Center for coherent-detection lidar profiling of winds. The novel high-energy, 2-micron, Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser technology developed at NASA Langley was employed to study laser technology currently envisioned by NASA for future global coherent Doppler lidar winds measurement. The 250 mJ, 10 Hz laser was designed as an integral part of a compact lidar transceiver developed for future aircraft flight. Ground-based wind profiles made with this transceiver will be presented. NASA Langley is currently funded to build complete Doppler lidar systems using this transceiver for the DC-8 aircraft in autonomous operation. Recently, LaRC 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar system was selected to contribute to the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Earth Science Division (ESD) hurricane field experiment in 2010 titled Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The Doppler lidar system will measure vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds from the DC-8 aircraft using NASA Langley s existing 2-micron, pulsed, coherent detection, Doppler wind lidar system that is ready for DC-8 integration. The measurements will typically extend from the DC-8 to the earth s surface. They will be highly accurate in both wind magnitude and direction. Displays of the data will be provided in real time on the DC-8. The pulsed Doppler wind lidar of NASA Langley Research Center is much more powerful than past Doppler lidars. The operating range, accuracy, range resolution, and time resolution will be unprecedented. We expect the data to play a key role, combined with the other sensors, in improving understanding and predictive algorithms for hurricane strength and track. 1

  8. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  9. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties.

  10. Characterizing microscale aluminum composite layer properties on silicon solar cells with hybrid 3D scanning force measurements.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Kuk; Choi, Beomjoon; Chung, Haseung; Shin, Seungwon; Song, Hee-Eun; Seo, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel technique to estimate the mechanical properties of the aluminum composite layer on silicon solar cells by using a hybrid 3-dimensional laser scanning force measurement (3-D LSFM) system. The 3-D LSFM system measures the material properties of sub-layers constituting a solar cell. This measurement is critical for realizing high-efficient ultra-thin solar cells. The screen-printed aluminum layer, which significantly affects the bowing phenomenon, is separated from the complete solar cell by removing the silicon (Si) layer with deep reactive ion etching. An elastic modulus of ~15.1 GPa and a yield strength of ~35.0 MPa for the aluminum (Al) composite layer were obtained by the 3-D LSFM system. In experiments performed for 6-inch Si solar cells, the bowing distances decreased from 12.02 to 1.18 mm while the Si layer thicknesses increased from 90 to 190 μm. These results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions for ultra-thin Si thickness (90 μm) based on the obtained Al composite layer properties. PMID:26948248

  11. Observed Properties of the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2008-11-01

    The earliest measurements of the solar wind fully supported Gene Parker's theory. The wind was persistent and nearly radial, its speed was hundreds of km/s, the density was as predicted, and, on average, the interplanetary magnetic field was consistent with an Archimedian spiral. The fastest wind, with speed >700 km/s, traced back to Bartel's unipolar M regions rather than to the hotter active regions, and the highest densities could be explained by compression where the fast wind plowed into the slower wind in its path. But, even in the early data, there were mysteries, some of which are not yet completely resolved. Understanding the alpha particles has been a challenge. Their abundance is highly variable, in the fast wind their temperature is generally > 4 times the proton temperature, and, despite their greater mass, they flow away from the Sun faster than the protons. To complicate the picture further, the protons, alphas, and electrons all have complex, anisotropic distribution functions, often with double peaks. The expanding wind cools more slowly than adiabatically, suggesting a zoo of wave-particle interactions probably responsible for marginal stabilities of the particle distributions. The study of interplanetary waves and turbulence is an active field of research. Recent decades have also seen the study of ions heavier than alphas, including particles in the wind that did not originate at the Sun. Fifty years after Parker's landmark paper, solar-wind physics is still an active area of research.

  12. The Three-Dimenstional Solar Wind at Solar Activity Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.

    1998-01-01

    In late 1997, the Ulysses spacecraft completed its first orbit around the Sun, observing the properties of the heliosphere at all latitudes between 80 degrees South and 80 degrees North. Because the mission occurred during a period of near-minimum solar activity, the configuration of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field were particularly simple, thus allowing confident comparisons between the properties of the polar corona observed by instruments of the Spartan and SOHO spacecraft and the resulting properties of the solar wind.

  13. FUN3D Airload Predictions for the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids, FUN3D, is used to compute the rotor performance and airloads of the UH-60A Airloads Rotor in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel. The flow solver is loosely coupled to a rotorcraft comprehensive code, CAMRAD-II, to account for trim and aeroelastic deflections. Computations are made for the 1-g level flight speed-sweep test conditions with the airloads rotor installed on the NFAC Large Rotor Test Apparatus (LRTA) and in the 40- by 80-ft wind tunnel to determine the influence of the test stand and wind-tunnel walls on the rotor performance and airloads. Detailed comparisons are made between the results of the CFD/CSD simulations and the wind tunnel measurements. The computed trends in solidity-weighted propulsive force and power coefficient match the experimental trends over the range of advance ratios and are comparable to previously published results. Rotor performance and sectional airloads show little sensitivity to the modeling of the wind-tunnel walls, which indicates that the rotor shaft-angle correction adequately compensates for the wall influence up to an advance ratio of 0.37. Sensitivity of the rotor performance and sectional airloads to the modeling of the rotor with the LRTA body/hub increases with advance ratio. The inclusion of the LRTA in the simulation slightly improves the comparison of rotor propulsive force between the computation and wind tunnel data but does not resolve the difference in the rotor power predictions at mu = 0.37. Despite a more precise knowledge of the rotor trim loads and flight condition, the level of comparison between the computed and measured sectional airloads/pressures at an advance ratio of 0.37 is comparable to the results previously published for the high-speed flight test condition.

  14. Clouds blown by the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, M.; Usoskin, I.; Condurache-Bota, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this letter we investigate possible relationships between the cloud cover (CC) and the interplanetary electric field (IEF), which is modulated by the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field. We show that CC at mid-high latitudes systematically correlates with positive IEF, which has a clear energetic input into the atmosphere, but not with negative IEF, in general agreement with predictions of the global electric circuit (GEC)-related mechanism. Thus, our results suggest that mid-high latitude clouds might be affected by the solar wind via the GEC. Since IEF responds differently to solar activity than, for instance, cosmic ray flux or solar irradiance, we also show that such a study allows distinguishing one solar-driven mechanism of cloud evolution, via the GEC, from others.

  15. The Solar Wind Ion Analyzer for MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Taylor, E. R.; Dalton, G.; Johnson, G.; Curtis, D. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) on the MAVEN mission will measure the solar wind ion flows around Mars, both in the upstream solar wind and in the magneto-sheath and tail regions inside the bow shock. The solar wind flux provides one of the key energy inputs that can drive atmospheric escape from the Martian system, as well as in part controlling the structure of the magnetosphere through which non-thermal ion escape must take place. SWIA measurements contribute to the top level MAVEN goals of characterizing the upper atmosphere and the processes that operate there, and parameterizing the escape of atmospheric gases to extrapolate the total loss to space throughout Mars' history. To accomplish these goals, SWIA utilizes a toroidal energy analyzer with electrostatic deflectors to provide a broad 360∘×90∘ field of view on a 3-axis spacecraft, with a mechanical attenuator to enable a very high dynamic range. SWIA provides high cadence measurements of ion velocity distributions with high energy resolution (14.5 %) and angular resolution (3.75∘×4.5∘ in the sunward direction, 22.5∘×22.5∘ elsewhere), and a broad energy range of 5 eV to 25 keV. Onboard computation of bulk moments and energy spectra enable measurements of the basic properties of the solar wind at 0.25 Hz.

  16. Laboratory Facility for Simulating Solar Wind Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Ikkoh; Ueno, Kazuma; Oshio, Yuya; Ayabe, Tomohiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic sail (MagSail) is a deep space propulsion system, in which an artificial magnetic cavity captures the energy of the solar wind to propel a spacecraft in the direction leaving the sun. For a scale-model experiment of the plasma flow of MagSail, we employed a magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet as a solar wind simulator. It is observed that a plasma flow from the solar wind simulator reaches a quasi-steady state of about 0.8 ms duration after a transient phase when initiating the discharge. During this initial phase of the discharge, a blast-wave was observed to develop radially in a vacuum chamber. When a solenoidal coil (MagSail scale model) is immersed into the quasi-steady flow where the velocity is 45 km/s, and the number density is 1019 m-3, a bow shock as well as a magnetic cavity were formed in front of the coil. As a result of the interaction between the plasma flow and the magnetic cavity, the momentum of the simulated solar wind is decreased, and it is found from the thrust measurement that the solar wind momentum is transferred to the coil simulating MagSail.

  17. Laboratory Facility for Simulating Solar Wind Sails

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Ikkoh; Ayabe, Tomohiro; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2008-12-31

    Magnetic sail (MagSail) is a deep space propulsion system, in which an artificial magnetic cavity captures the energy of the solar wind to propel a spacecraft in the direction leaving the sun. For a scale-model experiment of the plasma flow of MagSail, we employed a magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet as a solar wind simulator. It is observed that a plasma flow from the solar wind simulator reaches a quasi-steady state of about 0.8 ms duration after a transient phase when initiating the discharge. During this initial phase of the discharge, a blast-wave was observed to develop radially in a vacuum chamber. When a solenoidal coil (MagSail scale model) is immersed into the quasi-steady flow where the velocity is 45 km/s, and the number density is 10{sup 19} m-3, a bow shock as well as a magnetic cavity were formed in front of the coil. As a result of the interaction between the plasma flow and the magnetic cavity, the momentum of the simulated solar wind is decreased, and it is found from the thrust measurement that the solar wind momentum is transferred to the coil simulating MagSail.

  18. Constraints on decreases in η Carinae's mass-loss from 3D hydrodynamic simulations of its binary colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star ηA in the massive colliding wind binary η Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present results from large- (±1545 au) and small- (±155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of η Car's colliding winds for three ηA mass-loss rates (dot{M}_{η A}= 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10-4 M⊙ yr-1), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot{M}_{η A} greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star ηB switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (φ ≈ 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot{M}_{η A} and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of ηA into the acceleration zone of ηB's wind, plus radiative inhibition of ηB's wind by ηA. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of ηA's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot{M}_{η A} should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot{M}_{η A} was likely by a factor of ≲2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in η Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot{M}_{η A} may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameters of ηB, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during η Car's next periastron in 2014 to further test for decreases in dot{M}_{η A}. If

  19. Evidence for solar wind modulation of lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C. J.; Harrison, R. G.; Owens, M. J.; Lockwood, M.; Barnard, L.

    2014-05-01

    The response of lightning rates over Europe to arrival of high speed solar wind streams at Earth is investigated using a superposed epoch analysis. Fast solar wind stream arrival is determined from modulation of the solar wind V y component, measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft. Lightning rate changes around these event times are determined from the very low frequency arrival time difference (ATD) system of the UK Met Office. Arrival of high speed streams at Earth is found to be preceded by a decrease in total solar irradiance and an increase in sunspot number and Mg II emissions. These are consistent with the high speed stream’s source being co-located with an active region appearing on the Eastern solar limb and rotating at the 27 d period of the Sun. Arrival of the high speed stream at Earth also coincides with a small (˜1%) but rapid decrease in galactic cosmic ray flux, a moderate (˜6%) increase in lower energy solar energetic protons (SEPs), and a substantial, statistically significant increase in lightning rates. These changes persist for around 40 d in all three quantities. The lightning rate increase is corroborated by an increase in the total number of thunder days observed by UK Met stations, again persisting for around 40 d after the arrival of a high speed solar wind stream. This result appears to contradict earlier studies that found an anti-correlation between sunspot number and thunder days over solar cycle timescales. The increase in lightning rates and thunder days that we observe coincides with an increased flux of SEPs which, while not being detected at ground level, nevertheless penetrate the atmosphere to tropospheric altitudes. This effect could be further amplified by an increase in mean lightning stroke intensity that brings more strokes above the detection threshold of the ATD system. In order to remove any potential seasonal bias the analysis was repeated for daily solar wind triggers occurring during the summer

  20. Simulations of Solar Wind Plasma Flow Around a Simple Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Wang, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, a number of solar sail missions of various designs and sizes have been proposed (e.g., Geostorm). Of importance to these missions is the interaction between the ambient solar wind plasma environment and the sail. Assuming a typical 1 AU solar wind environment of 400 km/s velocity, 3.5 cu cm density, ion temperature of approx.10 eV, electron temperature of 40 eV, and an ambient magnetic field strength of 10(exp -4) G, a first order estimate of the plasma interaction with square solar sails on the order of the sizes being considered for a Geostorm mission (50 m x 50 m and 75 m x 75 m corresponding to approx.2 and approx.3 times the Debye length in the plasma) is carried out. First, a crude current balance for the sail surface immersed in the plasma environment and in sunlight was used to estimate the surface potential of the model sails. This gave surface potentials of approx.10 V positive relative to the solar wind plasma. A 3-D, Electrostatic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code was then used to simulate the solar wind flowing around the solar sail. It is assumed in the code that the solar wind protons can be treated as particles while the electrons follow a Boltzmann distribution. Next, the electric field and particle trajectories are solved self-consistently to give the proton flow field, the electrostatic field around the sail, and the plasma density in 3-D. The model sail was found to be surrounded by a plasma sheath within which the potential is positive compared to the ambient plasma and followed by a separate plasma wake which is negative relative to the plasma. This structure departs dramatically from a negatively charged plate such as might be found in the Earth s ionosphere on the night side where both the plate and its negative wake are contiguous. The implications of these findings are discussed as they apply to the proposed Geostorm solar sail mission.

  1. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single–crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  2. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-03-01

    The single-crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment.

  3. Significant enhancement of power conversion efficiency for dye sensitized solar cell using 1D/3D network nanostructures as photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Baoyuan; Yu, Jichao; Hu, Yunxia; Xia, Chen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The single-crystalline TiO2 nanorod arrays with rutile phase have attracted much attention in the dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) applications because of their superior chemical stability, better electron transport properties, higher refractive index and low production cost. However, it suffers from a low surface area as compared with TiO2 nanoparticle films. In order to enlarge the surface area of TiO2 nanorod arrays, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes sample was synthesized using a facile two-step hydrothermal process involving hydrothermal growth 1D/3D nanorods and followed by post-etching treatment. In such bi-layer structure, the oriented TiO2 nanorods layer could provide direct pathway for fast electron transportation, and the 3D nanotubes layer offers a higher surface area for dye loading, therefore, the 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode exhibited faster electron transport and higher surface area than either 1D or 3D nanostructures alone, and an highest efficiency of 7.68% was achieved for the DSSCs based on 1D nanorods/3D nanotubes photoanode with further TiCl4 treatment. PMID:25800933

  4. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear. time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that nonlinear waves are generated in coronal holes by torsional Alfv\\'{e}n waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the, fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature. and magnetic field geometry,) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  5. Acceleration of the Fast Solar Wind by Solitary Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to develop a new model for the acceleration of the fast solar wind by nonlinear, time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations of waves in solar coronal holes. Preliminary computational studies indicate that solitary-like waves are generated in coronal holes nonlinearly by torsional Alfven waves. These waves in addition to thermal conduction may contribute considerably to the accelerate the solar wind. Specific goals of this proposal are to investigate the generation of nonlinear solitary-like waves and their effect on solar wind acceleration by numerical 2.5D MHD simulation of coronal holes with a broad range of plasma and wave parameters; to study the effect of random disturbances at the base of a solar coronal hole on the fast solar wind acceleration with a more advanced 2.5D MHD model and to compare the results with the available observations; to extend the study to a full 3D MHD simulation of fast solar wind acceleration with a more realistic model of a coronal hole and solar boundary conditions. The ultimate goal of the three year study is to model the fast solar wind in a coronal hole, based on realistic boundary conditions in a coronal hole near the Sun, and the coronal hole structure (i.e., density, temperature, and magnetic field geometry) that will become available from the recently launched SOHO spacecraft.

  6. Solar wind ion composition and charge states

    SciTech Connect

    Vonsteiger, R.

    1995-06-01

    The solar wind, a highly tenuous plasma streaming from the Sun into interplanetary space at supersonic speed, is roughly composed of 95% hydrogen and 5% helium by number. All other, heavy elements contribute less than 0.1% by number and thus are truly test particles Nevertheless, these particles provide valuable information not present in the main components. The authors first discuss the importance of the heavy ions as tracers for processes in the solar atmosphere. Specifically, their relative abundances are found to be different in the solar wind as compared to the photosphere. This fractionation, which is best organized as a function of the first ionization time (FIT) of the elements under solar surface conditions, provides information on the structure of the chromosphere, where it is imparted on the partially ionized material by an atom-ion separation mechanism. Moreover, the charge states of the heavy ions can be used to infer the coronal temperature, since they are frozen-in near the altitude where the expansion time scale overcomes the ionization/recombination time scales. Next, the authors review the published values of ion abundances in the solar wind, concentrating on the recent results of the SWICS instrument on Ulysses. About 8 elements and more than 20 charge states can be routinely analyzed by this sensor. There is clear evidence that both the composition and the charge state distribution is significantly different in the fast solar wind from the south polar coronal hole, traversed by Ulysses in 1993/94, as compared to the solar wind normally encountered near the ecliptic plane. The fractionation between low- and high-FIT elements is reduced, and the charge states indicate a lower, more uniform coronal temperature in the hole. Finally, the authors discuss these results in the framework of existing theoretical models of the chromosphere and corona, attempting to identify differences between the low- and high-latitude regions of the solar atmosphere.

  7. Accretion of Supersonic Winds onto Black Holes in 3D: Stability of the Shock Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia-Linares, M.; Guzmán, F. S.

    2015-10-01

    Using numerical simulations we present the accretion of supersonic winds onto a rotating black hole in three dimensions. We study five representative directions of the wind with respect to the axis of rotation of the black hole and focus on the evolution and stability of the high-density shock cone that is formed during the process. We explore both the regime in which the shock cone is expected to be stable in order to confirm previous results obtained with two-dimensional simulations, and the regime in which the shock cone is expected to show a flip-flop (FF) type of instability. The methods used to attempt a triggering of the instability were (i) the accumulation of numerical errors and (ii) the explicit application of a perturbation on the velocity field after the shock cone was formed. The result is negative, that is, we did not find the FF instability within the parameter space we explored, including cases that are expected to be unstable.

  8. Genesis Capsule Yields Solar Wind Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Burnett, Donald S.; Stansbery, Eileen K.; McNamara, Karen M.

    2004-11-01

    NASA's Genesis capsule, carrying the first samples ever returned from beyond the Moon, took a hard landing in the western Utah desert on 8 September after its parachutes failed to deploy. Despite the impact, estimated at 310 km per hour, some valuable solar wind collector materials have been recovered. With these samples, the Genesis team members are hopeful that nearly all of the primary science goals may be met. The Genesis spacecraft was launched in August 2001 to collect and return samples of solar wind for precise isotopic and elemental analysis. The spacecraft orbited the Earth-Sun Lagrangian point (L1), ~1.5 million km sunward of the Earth, for 2.3 years. It exposed ultrapure materials-including wafers of silicon, silicon carbide, germanium, chemically deposited diamond, gold, aluminum, and metallic glass-to solar wind ions, which become embedded within the substrates' top 100 nm of these materials.

  9. Energy Dissipation Processes in Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Xu, X. J.; Zhang, J.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  10. Magnetofluid Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2008-01-01

    The solar wind shows striking characteristics that suggest that it is a turbulent magnetofluid, but the picture is not altogether simple. From the earliest observations, a strong correlation between magnetic fluctuations and plasma velocity fluctuations was noted. The high corrections suggest that the fluctuations are Alfven waves. In addition, the power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuation showed evidence of an inertial range that resembled that seen in fully-developed fluid turbulence. Alfven waves, however, are exact solutions of the equations of incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. Thus, there was a puzzle: how can a magnetofluid consisting of Alfven waves be turbulent? The answer lay in the role of velocity shears in the solar wind that could drive turbulent evolution. Puzzles remain: for example, the power spectrum of the velocity fluctuations is less steep than the slope of the magnetic fluctuations, nor do we understand even now why the solar wind appears to be nearly incompressible with a -5/3 power-spectral index.

  11. Comparative Validation of Realtime Solar Wind Forecasting Using the UCSD Heliospheric Tomography Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Taktakishvili, Alexandra; Jackson, Bernard; Clover, John; Bisi, Mario; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego 3D Heliospheric Tomography Model reconstructs the evolution of heliospheric structures, and can make forecasts of solar wind density and velocity up to 72 hours in the future. The latest model version, installed and running in realtime at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center(CCMC), analyzes scintillations of meter wavelength radio point sources recorded by the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory(STELab) together with realtime measurements of solar wind speed and density recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer(ACE) Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor(SWEPAM).The solution is reconstructed using tomographic techniques and a simple kinematic wind model. Since installation, the CCMC has been recording the model forecasts and comparing them with ACE measurements, and with forecasts made using other heliospheric models hosted by the CCMC. We report the preliminary results of this validation work and comparison with alternative models.

  12. Solar wind-magnetosphere energy input functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bargatze, L.F.; McPherron, R.L.; Baker, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    A new formula for the solar wind-magnetosphere energy input parameter, P/sub i/, is sought by applying the constraints imposed by dimensional analysis. Applying these constraints yields a general equation for P/sub i/ which is equal to rho V/sup 3/l/sub CF//sup 2/F(M/sub A/,theta) where, rho V/sup 3/ is the solar wind kinetic energy density and l/sub CF//sup 2/ is the scale size of the magnetosphere's effective energy ''collection'' region. The function F which depends on M/sub A/, the Alfven Mach number, and on theta, the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle is included in the general equation for P/sub i/ in order to model the magnetohydrodynamic processes which are responsible for solar wind-magnetosphere energy transfer. By assuming the form of the function F, it is possible to further constrain the formula for P/sub i/. This is accomplished by using solar wind data, geomagnetic activity indices, and simple statistical methods. It is found that P/sub i/ is proportional to (rho V/sup 2/)/sup 1/6/VBG(theta) where, rho V/sup 2/ is the solar wind dynamic pressure and VBG(theta) is a rectified version of the solar wind motional electric field. Furthermore, it is found that G(theta), the gating function which modulates the energy input to the magnetosphere, is well represented by a ''leaky'' rectifier function such as sin/sup 4/(theta/2). This function allows for enhanced energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented southward. This function also allows for some energy input when the interplanetary magnetic field is oriented northward. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1995-01-01

    The fluctuations in magnetic field and plasma velocity in solar wind, which possess many features of fully developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, are discussed. Direct spacecraft observations from 0.3 to over 20 AU, remote sensing radio scintillation observations, numerical simulations, and various models provide complementary methods that show that the fluctuations in the wind parameters undergo significant dynamical evolution independent of whatever turbulence might exist in the solar photosphere and corona. The Cluster mission, with high time resolution particle and field measurements and its variable separation strategies, should be able to provide data for answering many questions on MHD turbulence.

  14. Solar Wind Change Exchange from the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a long (approximately 100 ks) XMM-Newton observation designed to observe solar wind charge exchange emission (SWCX) from Earth's magnetosheath. By luck, the observation took place during a period of minimal solar wind flux so the SWCX emission was also minimal. Never-the-less, there is a significant if not stunning correlation between the observed O VIII count rate and our model for magnetosheath emission. We also report on the observed O VII and O VII emission.

  15. Solar cycle evolution of the solar wind in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickett, B. J.; Coles, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the solar wind speed both in and out of the ecliptic are presented for 1971-82. The speed estimates, which were made with the interplanetary scintillation system at UC San Diego, have been compared to in situ for large, slowly evolving structures, and thus such structures can be studied up to 60 degrees north and south heliographic latitude. Annual average wind speeds are presented versus latitude for an entire solar cycle. Fast wind streams from the poles persisted through declining and low solar activity, but were closed off during four years of high activity. This evolution follows that of the polar coronal holes, as displayed by comparing averaged speed and coronal density over latitude and longitude. The most recent data (1982) show the reestablishment of large tilted polar holes and associated fast streams. Coronal magnetic field data show that the neutral sheet is confined to low latitudes at solar minimum and extends to high latitudes at solar maximum; thus the slow solar wind comes from the same latitude range as that of the neutral sheet.

  16. The photospheric solar oxygen project. IV. 3D-NLTE investigation of the 777 nm triplet lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, M.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.; Cayrel, R.; Kučinskas, A.; Livingston, W. C.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The solar photospheric oxygen abundance is still widely debated. Adopting the solar chemical composition based on the "low" oxygen abundance, as determined with the use of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical model atmospheres, results in a well-known mismatch between theoretical solar models and helioseismic measurements that is so far unresolved. Aims: We carry out an independent redetermination of the solar oxygen abundance by investigating the center-to-limb variation of the O i IR triplet lines at 777 nm in different sets of spectra. Methods: The high-resolution and high signal-to-noise solar center-to-limb spectra are analyzed with the help of detailed synthetic line profiles based on 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres and 3D non-LTE line formation calculations with NLTE3D. The idea is to exploit the information contained in the observations at different limb angles to simultaneously derive the oxygen abundance, A(O), and the scaling factor SH that describes the cross-sections for inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen relative to the classical Drawin formula. Using the same codes and methods, we compare our 3D results with those obtained from the semi-empirical Holweger-Müller model atmosphere as well as from different one-dimensional (1D) reference models. Results: With the CO5BOLD 3D solar model, the best fit of the center-to-limb variation of the triplet lines is obtained when the collisions by neutral hydrogen atoms are assumed to be efficient, i.e., when the scaling factor SH is between 1.2 and 1.8, depending on the choice of the observed spectrum and the triplet component used in the analysis. The line profile fits achieved with standard 1D model atmospheres (with fixed microturbulence, independent of disk position μ) are clearly of inferior quality compared to the 3D case, and give the best match to the observations when ignoring collisions with neutral hydrogen (SH = 0). The results derived with the Holweger-Müller model are

  17. Solar wind observations at STEREO: 2007 - 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C.

    2013-06-01

    We have observed the solar wind extensively using the twin STEREO spacecraft in 2007 - 2011, covering the deep solar minimum 23/24 and the rising phase of solar cycle 24. Hundreds of large-scale solar wind structures have been surveyed, including stream interaction regions (SIRs), interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), and interplanetary shocks. The difference in location can cause one STEREO spacecraft to encounter 1/3 more of the above structures than the other spacecraft in a single year, even of the quasi-steady SIRs. In contrast with the rising phase of cycle 23, SIRs and ICMEs have weaker field and pressure compression in this rising phase, and ICMEs drive fewer shocks. Although the majority of shocks are driven by SIRs and ICMEs, we find ~13% of shocks without clear drivers observed in situ.

  18. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  19. Solar wind composition from the Moon;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochsler, P.

    1994-06-01

    The lunar regolith contains the best accessible record of the solar wind composition of the past few billion years. Interpreting this record crucially depends on our understanding of the implantation mechanisms, potential alternative sources other than the solar wind, storage and degradation processes, and transport- and loss-mechanisms of trapped particles in the regolith. We therefore suggest that a future mission to the Moon should contain the following objectives: (1) A thorough in-situ investigation of the contemporary solar wind composition by means of long-duration exposure experiments with various techniques as baseline for investigation of the historic and ancient solar wind. (2) A multidisciplinary program, involving an experimental investigation of implantation-, storage- and loss-processes of solar particles at the conditions of the lunar environment. This program is complementary to an elaborated systematic sampling of all layers of the lunar regolith, based on the experience from the Apollo- and the Luna-missions. Difficulties with the interpretation of the lunar record are illuminated in the case of surface correlated nitrogen. (3) A complementary goal for the extensive sampling of the lunar surface is the documentation of the lunar regolith for future generations, prior to extended human activites which could have detrimental effects to the lunar environment.

  20. Solar Wind Sources in the Late Declining Phase of Cycle 23: Effects of the Weak Solar Polar Field on High Speed Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Lee, C. O.; Li, Yan; Arge, C. N.; Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K.; Russell, C. T.; Howard, R. A.; Petrie, G.

    2009-05-01

    The declining phases of solar cycles are known for their high speed solar wind streams that dominate the geomagnetic responses during this period. Outstanding questions about these streams, which can provide the fastest winds of the solar cycle, concern their solar origins, persistence, and predictability. The declining phase of cycle 23 has lasted significantly longer than the corresponding phases of the previous two cycles. Solar magnetograph observations suggest that the solar polar magnetic field is also ˜ 2 - 3 times weaker. The launch of STEREO in late 2006 provided additional incentive to examine the origins of what is observed at 1 AU in the recent cycle, with the OMNI data base at the NSSDC available as an Earth/L1 baseline for comparisons. Here we focus on the year 2007 when the solar corona exhibited large, long-lived mid-to-low latitude coronal holes and polar hole extensions observed by both SOHO and STEREO imagers. STEREO provides in situ measurements consistent with rigidly corotating solar wind stream structure at up to ˜ 45° heliolongitude separation by late 2007. This stability justifies the use of magnetogram-based steady 3D solar wind models to map the observed high speed winds back to their coronal sources. We apply the WSA solar wind model currently running at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center with the expectation that it should perform its best at this quiet time. The model comparisons confirm the origins of the observed high speed streams expected from the solar images, but also reveal uncertainties in the solar wind source mapping associated with this cycle’s weaker solar polar fields. Overall, the results illustrate the importance of having accurate polar fields in synoptic maps used in solar wind forecast models. At the most fundamental level, they demonstrate the control of the solar polar fields over the high speed wind sources, and thus one specific connection between the solar dynamo and the solar wind character.

  1. Workshop on Solar Activity, Solar Wind, Terrestrial Effects, and Solar Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings from the workshop are presented. The areas covered were solar activity, solar wind, terrestrial effects, and solar acceleration. Specific topics addressed include: (1) solar cycle manifestations, both large and small scale, as well as long-term and short-term changes, including transients such as flares; (2) sources of solar wind, as identified by interplanetary observations including coronal mass ejections (CME's) or x-ray bright points, and the theory for and evolution of large-scale and small-scale structures; (3) magnetosphere responses, as observed by spacecraft, to variable solar wind and transient energetic particle emissions; and (4) origin and propagation of solar cosmic rays as related to solar activity and terrestrial effects, and solar wind coronal-hole relationships and dynamics.

  2. Wind/solar resource in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Gaines, H.

    1997-12-31

    Data are being collected at 17 sites to delineate a baseline for the wind and solar resource across Texas. Wind data are being collected at 10, 25, and 40 m (in some cases at 50 m) to determine wind shear and power at hub heights of large turbines. Many of the sites are located in areas of predicted terrain enhancement. The typical day in a month for power and wind turbine output was calculated for selected sites and combination of sites; distributed systems. Major result to date is that there is the possibility of load matching in South Texas during the summer months, even though the average values by month indicate a low wind potential.

  3. New Insights about Meridional Circulation Dynamics from 3D MHD Global Simulations of Solar Convection and Dynamo Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, D.; Charbonneau, P.; Miesch, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The solar meridional circulation is a "slow", large scale flow that transports magnetic field and plasma throughout the convection zone in the (r,θ) plane and plays a crucial role in controlling the magnetic cycle solutions presented by flux transport dynamo models. Observations indicate that this flow speed varies in anti-phase with the solar cycle at the solar surface. A possible explanation for the source of this variation is based on the fact that inflows into active regions alter the global surface pattern of the meridional circulation. In this work we examine the meridional circulation profile that emerges from a 3D global simulation of the solar convection zone, and its associated dynamics. We find that at the bottom of the convection zone, in the region where the toroidal magnetic field accumulates, the meridional circulation is highly modulated through the action of a magnetic torques and thus provides evidence for a new mechanism to explain the observed cyclic variations.

  4. Identification and characterisation of small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere from 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nuno; Haberreiter, Margit; Hansteen, Viggo; Schmutz, Werner

    2015-04-01

    We study the properties of the small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere in the nano flare and micro flare energy scale using 3D MHD simulations. We put forward a method to identify and track the heating events in time to study their life times, frequency distributions and spectral signatures. These results aim to better understand the observations from future space missions such as the EUI and SPICE instruments onboard Solar Orbiter and improve our knowledge of the role of small-scale heating events in the heating of the corona.

  5. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Villante, Francesco L.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger & Zurbuchen (2016, vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically-inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009, AGSS09). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with spectroscopic abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted 8B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and 7Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances fare worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present astrophysical and spectroscopic arguments showing the vSZ16 composition to be an implausible representation of the solar interior, identifying the first ionisation potential effect in the outer solar atmosphere and wind as the likely culprit.

  6. Magnetic Influences on the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    The steady, supersonic outflow from the Sun we call the solar wind was first posited in the 1950s and initial theories rightly linked the acceleration of the wind to the existence of the million-degree solar corona. Still today, the wind acceleration mechanisms and the coronal heating processes remain unsolved challenges in solar physics. In this work, I seek to answer a portion of the mystery by focusing on a particular acceleration process: Alfven waves launched by the motion of magnetic field footpoints in the photosphere. The entire corona is threaded with magnetic loops and flux tubes that open up into the heliosphere. I have sought a better understanding of the role these magnetic fields play in determining solar wind properties in open flux tubes. After an introduction of relevant material, I discuss my parameter study of magnetic field profiles and the statistical understanding we can draw from the resulting steady-state wind. In the chapter following, I describe how I extended this work to consider time dependence in the turbulent heating by Alfven waves in three dimensional simulations. The bursty nature of this heating led to a natural next step that expands my work to include not only the theoretical, but also a project to analyze observations of small network jets in the chromosphere and transition region, and the underlying photospheric magnetic field that forms thresholds in jet production. In summary, this work takes a broad look at the extent to which Alfven-wave-driven turbulent heating can explain measured solar wind properties and other observed phenomena.

  7. Reconstructing the Solar Wind from Its Early History to Current Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir S.; Usmanov, Arcadi V.

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds from active solar-type stars can play a crucial role in removal of stellar angular momentum and erosion of planetary atmospheres. However, major wind properties except for mass-loss rates cannot be directly derived from observations. We employed a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén wave driven solar wind model, ALF3D, to reconstruct the solar wind parameters including the mass-loss rate, terminal velocity, and wind temperature at 0.7, 2, and 4.65 Gyr. Our model treats the wind thermal electrons, protons, and pickup protons as separate fluids and incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating to properly describe proton and electron temperatures of the solar wind. To study the evolution of the solar wind, we specified three input model parameters, the plasma density, Alfvén wave amplitude, and the strength of the dipole magnetic field at the wind base for each of three solar wind evolution models that are consistent with observational constrains. Our model results show that the velocity of the paleo solar wind was twice as fast, ∼50 times denser and 2 times hotter at 1 AU in the Sun's early history at 0.7 Gyr. The theoretical calculations of mass-loss rate appear to be in agreement with the empirically derived values for stars of various ages. These results can provide realistic constraints for wind dynamic pressures on magnetospheres of (exo)planets around the young Sun and other active stars, which is crucial in realistic assessment of the Joule heating of their ionospheres and corresponding effects of atmospheric erosion.

  8. Coronal Plumes in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of approximately 50 km/s, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large di stances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  9. CORONAL PLUMES IN THE FAST SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Velli, Marco; Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran E-mail: lionel@predsci.com E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com

    2011-07-20

    The expansion of a coronal hole filled with a discrete number of higher density coronal plumes is simulated using a time-dependent two-dimensional code. A solar wind model including an exponential coronal heating function and a flux of Alfven waves propagating both inside and outside the structures is taken as a basic state. Different plasma plume profiles are obtained by using different scale heights for the heating rates. Remote sensing and solar wind in situ observations are used to constrain the parameter range of the study. Time dependence due to plume ignition and disappearance is also discussed. Velocity differences of the order of {approx}50 km s{sup -1}, such as those found in microstreams in the high-speed solar wind, may be easily explained by slightly different heat deposition profiles in different plumes. Statistical pressure balance in the fast wind data may be masked by the large variety of body and surface waves which the higher density filaments may carry, so the absence of pressure balance in the microstreams should not rule out their interpretation as the extension of coronal plumes into interplanetary space. Mixing of plume-interplume material via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability seems to be possible within the parameter ranges of the models defined here, only at large distances from the Sun, beyond 0.2-0.3 AU. Plasma and composition measurements in the inner heliosphere, such as those which will become available with Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, should therefore definitely be able to identify plume remnants in the solar wind.

  10. High Sensitive Precise 3D Accelerometer for Solar System Exploration with Unmanned Spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenko, Y. V.; Demyanenko, P. O.; Zinkovskiy, Y. F.

    Solutions of several space and geophysical tasks require creating high sensitive precise accelerometers with sensitivity in order of 10 -13 g. These several tasks are following: inertial navigation of the Earth and Space; gravimetry nearby the Earth and into Space; geology; geophysics; seismology etc. Accelerometers (gravimeters and gradientmeters) with required sensitivity are not available now. The best accelerometers in the world have sensitivity worth on 4-5 orders. It has been developed a new class of fiber-optical sensors (FOS) with light pulse modulation. These sensors have super high threshold sensitivity and wide (up to 10 orders) dynamic range, and can be used as a base for creating of measurement units of physical values as 3D superhigh sensitive precise accelerometers of linear accelerations that is suitable for highest requirements. The principle of operation of the FOS is organically combined with a digital signal processing. It allows decreasing hardware of the accelerometer due to using a usual air-borne or space-borne computer; correcting the influence of natural, design, technological drawbacks of FOS on measured results; neutralising the influence of extraordinary situations available during using of FOS; decreasing the influence of internal and external destabilising factors (as for FOS), such as oscillation of environment temperature, instability of pendulum cycle frequency of sensitive element of the accelerometer etc. We were conducted a quantitative estimation of precise opportunities of analogue FOS in structure of fiber optical measuring devices (FOMD) for elementary FOMD with analogue FOS built on modern element basis of fiber optics (FO), at following assumptions: absolute parameter stability of devices of FOS measuring path; single transmission band of registration path; maximum possible inserted in optical fiber (OF) a radiated power. Even at such idealized assumptions, a calculated value in limit reached minimum inaccuracy of

  11. Particle propagation channels in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.; Dougherty, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The intensities of low energy solar-interplanetary electrons and ions at 1 AU occasionally change in a square wave manner. The changes may be increases or decreases and they typically have durations of from one hour to a few hours. In some cases these channels are bounded by discontinuities in the interplanetary field and the plasma properties differ from the surrounding solar wind. In one case solar flare particles were confined to a channel of width 3 x 10 to the 6th km at Earth. At the Sun this dimension extrapolates to about 12,000 km, a size comparable to small flares.

  12. The power spectrum of solar convection flows from high-resolution observations and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelles Chaouche, L.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Bonet, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Understanding solar surface magnetoconvection requires the study of the Fourier spectra of the velocity fields. Nowadays, observations are available that resolve very small spatial scales, well into the subgranular range, almost reaching the scales routinely resolved in numerical magnetoconvection simulations. Comparison of numerical and observational data at present can provide an assessment of the validity of the observational proxies. Aims: Our aims are: (1) to obtain Fourier spectra for the photospheric velocity fields using the spectropolarimetric observations with the highest spatial resolution so far (~120 km), thus reaching for the first time spatial scales well into the subgranular range; (2) to calculate corresponding Fourier spectra from realistic 3D numerical simulations of magnetoconvection and carry out a proper comparison with their observational counterparts considering the residual instrumental degradation in the observational data; and (3) to test the observational proxies on the basis of the numerical data alone, by comparing the actual velocity field in the simulations with synthetic observations obtained from the numerical boxes. Methods: (a) For the observations, data from the SUNRISE/IMaX spectropolarimeter are used. (b) For the simulations, we use four series of runs obtained with the STAGGER code for different average signed vertical magnetic field values (0, 50, 100, and 200 G). Spectral line profiles are synthesized from the numerical boxes for the same line observed by IMaX (Fe I 5250.2 Å) and degraded to match the performance of the IMaX instrument. Proxies for the velocity field are obtained via Dopplergrams (vertical component) and local correlation tracking (LCT, for the horizontal component). Fourier power spectra are calculated and a comparison between the synthetic and observational data sets carried out. (c) For the internal comparison of the numerical data, velocity values on constant optical depth surfaces are used

  13. Energy Primer: Solar, Water, Wind, and Biofuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portola Inst., Inc., Menlo Park, CA.

    This is a comprehensive, fairly technical book about renewable forms of energy--solar, water, wind, and biofuels. The biofuels section covers biomass energy, agriculture, aquaculture, alcohol, methane, and wood. The focus is on small-scale systems which can be applied to the needs of the individual, small group, or community. More than one-fourth…

  14. THOR Cold Solar Wind (CSW) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavraud, Benoit; De Keyser, Johan; Amoros, Carine; Neef, Eddy; Anciaux, Michel; Andre, Nicolas; Baruah, Rituparna; Berkenbosch, Sophie; Bonnewijn, Sabrina; Cara, Antoine; Echim, Marius; Fedorov, Andrei; Genot, Vincent; Licciardi, Lucas; Louarn, Philippe; Maes, Jeroen; Maggiolo, Romain; Mathon, Romain; Ranvier, Sylvain; Wong, King-Wah

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to the study of plasma turbulence. We present the Cold Solar Wind (CSW) instrument that is being designed for THOR. CSW will measure the full three dimensional distribution functions of solar wind protons and alphas with unprecedented accuracies. It will measure solar wind proton distributions in 150 ms with energy resolution of 5-7% and angular resolution of 3°. CSW is based on a top-hat electrostatic analyzer (with very large geometric factor) design with deflectors at the entrance. The particle detection system uses Channel Electron Multipliers (CEM) and an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) for charge amplification. CSW electronics comprises a fast sweeping high voltage board, as well as an FPGA and low voltage power supply boards to perform its operations. CSW is designed to address many of the key science objectives of THOR, in particular regarding ion-scale kinetic aspects of solar wind turbulence.

  15. Whistler Wave Turbulence in Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-01

    Whistler waves are present in solar wind plasma. These waves possess characteristic turbulent fluctuations that are characterized typically by the frequency and length scales that are respectively bigger than ion gyro frequency and smaller than ion gyro radius. The electron inertial length is an intrinsic length scale in whistler wave turbulence that distinguishably divides the high frequency solar wind turbulent spectra into scales smaller and bigger than the electron inertial length. We present nonlinear three dimensional, time dependent, fluid simulations of whistler wave turbulence to investigate their role in solar wind plasma. Our simulations find that the dispersive whistler modes evolve entirely differently in the two regimes. While the dispersive whistler wave effects are stronger in the large scale regime, they do not influence the spectral cascades which are describable by a Kolmogorov-like k-7/3 spectrum. By contrast, the small scale turbulent fluctuations exhibit a Navier-Stokes like evolution where characteristic turbulent eddies exhibit a typical k-5/3 hydrodynamic turbulent spectrum. By virtue of equipartition between the wave velocity and magnetic fields, we quantify the role of whistler waves in the solar wind plasma fluctuations.

  16. Solar Wind Drivers for Steady Magnetospheric Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; O'Brien, T. Paul; Thompson, Scott; Lui, A. T. Y. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) also known as convection bays, is a particular mode of response of the magnetosphere to solar wind coupling. It is characterized by convection lasting for times longer than a typical substorm recovery during which no substorms expansions can be identified. It is generally believed that the solar wind must be unusually steady for the magnetosphere to enter this state. However, most previous studies have assumed this is true and have used such conditions to identify events. In a preliminary investigation using only the AE and AL indices to select events we have shown that these expectations are generally correct. SMC events seem to be associated with slow speed solar wind and moderate, stable IMF Bz. In this report we extend our previous study including additional parameters and the time variations in various statistical quantities. For the intervals identified as SMCs we perform a detailed statistical analysis of the properties of different solar wind variables. We compare these statistics to those determined from all data, and from intervals in which substorms but not SMCs are present. We also consider the question of whether substorms are required to initiate and terminate an SMC. We conclude that the intervals we have identified as SMC are likely to be examples of the original Dungey concept of balanced reconnection at a pair of x-lines on the day and night side of the Earth.

  17. The energy balance of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of modifying some of the 'classical' assumptions underlying many of the solar wind models constructed over the past 20 years are examined in an effort to obtain both a better fit with the observations and a deeper understanding of the relevant physical processes.

  18. Recent insights in solar wind MHD turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R.; Bavassano, B.; Carbone, V.; Marino, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Noullez, A.; Pietropaolo, E.

    2008-08-25

    In this short review we report about recent findings related to two fundamental points in the study of solar wind turbulence: a) the verification of the equivalent of the -4/5 law in the solar wind and b) the estimate of the energy cascade along the spectrum and its comparison with the heating rate necessary to heat the solar wind during its expansion as deduced from in-situ measurements. As a matter of fact, a Yaglom-like scaling relation has recently been found in both high-latitude and in-ecliptic data samples. However, analogous scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, has been observed in a much more extended fraction of the same data set recorded at high latitude. Thus, it seems that large scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, play a major role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The compressive turbulent cascade, moreover, seems to be able to supply the energy needed to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solar wind.

  19. Electrodynamic sailing - Beating into the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.; Fahleson, U.; Alfven, H.

    1972-01-01

    The recent suggestion by Alfven (1972) of a novel means of spacecraft propulsion based upon energy extraction from the electromagnetic field of the solar wind is critically reviewed. In response to this review, the original suggestion is somewhat amplified and clarified by its author.

  20. Identifying Wind and Solar Ramping Events: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.

    2013-01-01

    Wind and solar power are playing an increasing role in the electrical grid, but their inherent power variability can augment uncertainties in power system operations. One solution to help mitigate the impacts and provide more flexibility is enhanced wind and solar power forecasting; however, its relative utility is also uncertain. Within the variability of solar and wind power, repercussions from large ramping events are of primary concern. At the same time, there is no clear definition of what constitutes a ramping event, with various criteria used in different operational areas. Here the Swinging Door Algorithm, originally used for data compression in trend logging, is applied to identify variable generation ramping events from historic operational data. The identification of ramps in a simple and automated fashion is a critical task that feeds into a larger work of 1) defining novel metrics for wind and solar power forecasting that attempt to capture the true impact of forecast errors on system operations and economics, and 2) informing various power system models in a data-driven manner for superior exploratory simulation research. Both allow inference on sensitivities and meaningful correlations, as well as the ability to quantify the value of probabilistic approaches for future use in practice.

  1. Combined Solar and Wind Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Souliotis, M.; Makris, Th.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the new concept of combined solar and wind energy systems for buildings applications. Photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines (WTs) can be install on buildings, in case of sufficient wind potential, providing the building with electricity. PVs can be combined with thermal collectors to form the hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) systems. The PVs (or the PV/Ts) and WT subsystems can supplement each other to cover building electrical load. In case of using PV/T collectors, the surplus of electricity, if not used or stored in batteries, can increase the temperature of the thermal storage tank of the solar thermal unit. The description of the experimental set-up of the suggested PV/T/WT system and experimental results are presented. In PV/T/WT systems the output from the solar part depends on the sunshine time and the output of the wind turbine part depends on the wind speed and is obtained any time of day or night. The use of the three subsystems can cover a great part of building energy load, contributing to conventional energy saving and environment protection. The PV/T/WT systems are considered suitable in rural and remote areas with electricity supply from stand-alone units or mini-grid connection. PV/T/WT systems can also be used in typical grid connected applications.

  2. Material Interactions with Solar Wind Ion Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; McWilliams, Brett

    2006-01-01

    Solar wind composition is dominated by hydrogen (approx.96%) and helium (approx.3 to 4%) with a minor fraction (less than or equal to 1%) of heavy ions. Hydrogen (helium) ions impact spacecraft surfaces with energies from 0.5 to 5 keV (1.8 to 21 keV) due to variations in solar wind velocity from 300 km/s to 1000 km/sec with extremes of a few 10 s keV during periods of extremely high solar wind velocity exceeding 1000 km/sec. Mean impact energies are typically on the order of approximately 1 keV and 4 keV for hydrogen ions and helium ions, respectively. These energies are typically of the peak of the energy dependent light ion sputter yields for hydrogen and helium on many metals. In addition, light ions with kilovolt energies have been shown to produce blister (or exfoliation) damage to metal surfaces due to formation of high pressure gas bubbles within the materials when exposed to ion fluences on the order of 10(exp 16 to (10(exp 17 ions/sq cm. A number of spacecraft designs for current and future missions include gossamer polymer structures with thin metallic reflection coatings to shield instruments from the Sun or solar sail propulsion systems for use in a variety of locations in the inner solar system from 0.5 to 1 AU. In addition, there is interest in designing spacecraft for solar physics missions requiring operations as close to the Sun as 0.16 to 0.2 AU. Integrity of the metallic coatings is critical in many of these applications since degradation will result in modification of material thermal properties or exposure of polymers to solar UV photons which can compromise mission requirements. This paper will evaluate the relative contributions of sputtering and blister formation to material degradation in solar wind environments over a range of radial distances from the Sun to demonstrate where solar wind environments become important for materials selection. We will first review the physics and results from laboratory measurements of light ion sputtering

  3. The origin of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axford, W. I.; McKenzie, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    The high speed solar wind, which is associated with coronal holes and unipolar interplanetary magnetic field, has now been observed in situ beyond 0.3 a.u. and at latitudes up to 80 degrees. Its important characteristics are that it is remarkably steady in terms of flow properties and composition and that the ions, especially minor species, are favored in terms of heating and acceleration. We have proposed that the high speed wind, with its associated coronal holes, forms the basic mode of solar wind flow. In contrast, the low speed wind is inherently non-stationary, filamentary and not in equilibrium with conditions at the coronal base. It is presumably the result of continual reconfigurations of the force-free magnetic field in the low-latitude closed corona which allow trapped plasma to drain away along transiently open flux tubes. Observations of high speed solar wind close to its source are hampered by the essential heterogeneity of the corona, even at sunspot minimum. In particular it is difficult to determine more than limits to the density, temperature and wave amplitude near the coronal base as a result of contamination from fore- and back-ground plasma. We interpret the observations as indicating that the high speed solar wind originates in the chromospheric network, covering only about 1% of the surface of the sun, where the magnetic field is complex and not unipolar. As a result of small-scale reconnection events in this 'furnace', Alfven waves are generated with a flat spectrum covering the approximate range 10 kHz to 10 Hz. The plasma is likely to be produced as a result of downwards thermal conduction and possibly photoionization at the top of the low density chromospheric interface to the furnace, thus controlling the mass flux in the wind. The immediate source of free (magnetic) energy is in the form of granule-sized loops which are continually carried into the network from the sides. The resulting wave spectrum is such that energy can be

  4. Solar Radiation Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere: A 3D Perspective on Observations and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  5. Solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere: a 3D perspective on observations and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  6. New light-trapping concept by means of several optical components applied to compact holographic 3D concentration solar module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamarín Villegas, Ayalid M.; Pérez López, Francisco J.; Calo López, Antonio; Rodríguez San Segundo, Hugo-José

    2014-05-01

    A new light-trapping concept is presented, which joins broad bandwidth volume phase reflection holograms (VPRH) working together with three other optical components: specifically designed three-dimensional (3D) cavities, Total Internal Reflection (TIR) within an optical medium, and specular reflection by means of a highly reflective surface. This concept is applied to the design and development of both low concentration photovoltaic (LCPV) and solar thermal modules reaching a concentration factor of up to 3X. Higher concentrations are feasible for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) devices. The whole system is entirely made of polymeric materials (except for the solar cells or fluid carrying pipes), thus reducing cost by up to 40%. The module concentrates solar light onto solar cells - or fluid carrying pipes - with no need for active tracking of the sun, covering the whole seasonal and daily incident angle spectrum while it also minimizes optical losses. In this work we analyze the first experimentally measured optical characteristics and performance of VPRH in dichromated gelatin film (DCG) in our concept. The VPRH can reach high diffraction efficiencies (˜98%, ignoring Fresnel reflection losses). Thanks to specifically designed raw material, coating and developing process specifications, also very broad selective spectral (higher than 300 nm) and angular bandwidths (˜+20º) per grating are achieved. The VPRH was optimized to use silicon solar cells, but designs for other semiconductor devices or for fluid heating are feasible. The 3D shape, the hologram's and reflective surface's optical quality, the TIR effect and the correct coupling of all the components are key to high performance of the concentration solar module.

  7. Electric solar wind sail mass budget model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janhunen, P.; Quarta, A. A.; Mengali, G.

    2013-02-01

    The electric solar wind sail (E-sail) is a new type of propellantless propulsion system for Solar System transportation, which uses the natural solar wind to produce spacecraft propulsion. The E-sail consists of thin centrifugally stretched tethers that are kept charged by an onboard electron gun and, as such, experience Coulomb drag through the high-speed solar wind plasma stream. This paper discusses a mass breakdown and a performance model for an E-sail spacecraft that hosts a mission-specific payload of prescribed mass. In particular, the model is able to estimate the total spacecraft mass and its propulsive acceleration as a function of various design parameters such as the number of tethers and their length. A number of subsystem masses are calculated assuming existing or near-term E-sail technology. In light of the obtained performance estimates, an E-sail represents a promising propulsion system for a variety of transportation needs in the Solar System.

  8. Solar wind modification upstream of the bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbář, J.; Němeček, Z.; Přech, L.; Šafránková, J.; Jelínek, K.

    2013-06-01

    A spacecraft configuration with two monitors near L1 and a fleet of the spacecraft orbiting in front of the bow shock brings a great opportunity to test the propagation techniques for the solar wind and the assumption on a negligible solar wind parameter evolution. We use multi-point observations of the THEMIS-ARTEMIS mission and compare them with data from the Wind solar wind monitor in order to estimate different factors influencing solar wind speed evolution. We have found a significant deceleration (up to 6%) of the solar wind close to the bow shock and the effect extends up to 30 RE from the Earth. It is controlled by the level of magnetic field fluctuations and by the flux of reflected and accelerated particles. We can conclude that the reflected particles not only excite waves of large amplitudes but also modify mean values of the solar wind speed measured in an unperturbed solar wind.

  9. 3D Blade Vibration Measurements on an 80 m Diameter Wind Turbine by Using Non-contact Remote Measurement Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Muammer; Rixen, Daniel J.

    Non-contact optical measurement systems photogrammetry and laser interferometry are introduced as cost efficient alternatives to the conventional wind turbine/farm monitoring systems that are currently in use. The proposed techniques are proven to provide an accurate measurement of the dynamic behavior of a 2.5 MW—80 m diameter—wind turbine. Several measurements are taken on the test turbine by using 4 CCD cameras and 1 laser vibrometer and the response of the turbine is monitored from a distance of 220 m. The results of the infield tests and the corresponding analyses show that photogrammetry (also can be called as videogrammetry or computer vision technique) enable the 3D deformations of the rotor to be measured at 33 different points simultaneously with an average accuracy of ±25 mm, while the turbine is rotating. Several important turbine modes can also be extracted from the recorded data. Similarly, laser interferometry (used for the parked turbine only) provides very valuable information on the dynamic properties of the turbine structure. Twelve different turbine modes can be identified from the obtained response data.

  10. Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. Y.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Omidi, N.

    2016-02-01

    The ion cyclotron waves (ICWs) refer to electromagnetic transverse waves with nearly field-aligned propagation, circular polarization, and frequencies near the proton gyro-frequency. This chapter presents the ICW studies observed in the solar wind over a wide range of heliocentric distances, at all solar longitudes, and at locations far from planets or comets. To better understand the wave source region, case studies have been performed on a special group of ICW storm events, in which the left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) waves were observed simultaneously in the spacecraft frame. The study in the chapter assumes the waves are generated through one possible mechanism (i.e., the temperature anisotropy instability). The variations of the wave properties with heliocentric distances may also provide information on the possible wave generation sources and the effects of the wave to the solar wind plasma.

  11. Coronal magnetic fields and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Current information is presented on coronal magnetic fields as they bear on problems of the solar wind. Both steady state fields and coronal transient events are considered. A brief critique is given of the methods of calculating coronal magnetic fields including the potential (current free) models, exact solutions for the solar wind and field interaction, and source surface models. These solutions are compared with the meager quantitative observations which are available at this time. Qualitative comparisons between the shapes of calculated magnetic field lines and the forms visible in the solar corona at several recent eclipses are displayed. These suggest that: (1) coronal streamers develop above extended magnetic arcades which connect unipolar regions of opposite polarity; and (2) loops, arches, and rays in the corona correspond to preferentially filled magnetic tubes in the approximately potential field.

  12. Slow Solar Wind: Observable Characteristics for Constraining Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Abbo, L.; Antiochos, S. K.; Hansteen, V. H.; Harra, L.; Ko, Y. K.; Lapenta, G.; Li, B.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.; von Steiger, R.; Wang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Slow Solar Wind (SSW) origin is an open issue in the post SOHO era and forms a major objective for planned future missions such as the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus.Results from spacecraft data, combined with theoretical modeling, have helped to investigate many aspects of the SSW. Fundamental physical properties of the coronal plasma have been derived from spectroscopic and imaging remote-sensing data and in-situ data, and these results have provided crucial insights for a deeper understanding of the origin and acceleration of the SSW.Advances models of the SSW in coronal streamers and other structures have been developed using 3D MHD and multi-fluid equations.Nevertheless, there are still debated questions such as:What are the source regions of SSW? What are their contributions to the SSW?Which is the role of the magnetic topology in corona for the origin, acceleration and energy deposition of SSW?Which are the possible acceleration and heating mechanisms for the SSW?The aim of this study is to present the insights on the SSW origin and formationarisen during the discussions at the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) by the Team entitled ''Slowsolar wind sources and acceleration mechanisms in the corona'' held in Bern (Switzerland) in March2014--2015. The attached figure will be presented to summarize the different hypotheses of the SSW formation.

  13. Observations and models of the slow solar wind in coronal streamers during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2013-05-01

    A quiescent dipolar streamer belt often dominated the coronal streamer structures during past solar minima. Past UV observations with SOHO/UVCS show that the intensity of heavy ion emission lines (such as O VI and Mg X) is dimmer at the cores than at the streamer edges. Three-fluid 2.5D models indicated that the observed emission variability is the signature of slow solar wind outflow regions, where Coulomb coupling between the electron, protons, and heavy ions leads to enhanced emission of heavy ions at the edges of streamers. Recently, Ofman et al (2011, 2012) have modeled in detail the three-fluid interactions and the emission in a quiescent streamer due to Ly α, O 5+, and Mg 9+ ions at solar minimum, and used the model results to synthesize the corresponding line emissions. They found that the model results are in good agreement with observations, provided that the heavy ions experience preferential heating compared to protons. Similar results were found to hold for He++ ions in quiescent streamers. Recently, the 2.5D three-fluid model was extended to full 3D, allowing modeling the ion abundance variations in tilted dipole streamer belt, and eventually in solar maximum streamers. I will discuss the implication of heavy ion emission structure in streamers and the corresponding three-fluid models on the understanding of the slow solar wind sources.

  14. Martian ionosphere response to solar wind variability during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Lester, Mark; Witasse, Olivier; Mays, M. Leila; Hall, Benjamin E. S.; Milan, Stephen E.; Cartacci, Marco; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Andrews, David; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable density changes in the Martian ionosphere. In addition to this long-term variability, there are numerous short-term and non-recurrent solar events that hit Mars which need to be considered, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), Co-Rotation Interaction Regions (CIRs), solar flares, or solar wind high speed streams. The response of the Martian plasma system to each of these events is often unusual, especially during the long period of extreme low solar activity in 2008 and 2009. This work shows the long-term solar cycle impact on the ionosphere of Mars using data from The Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), and The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3), and with empirical and numerical models on Mars Express. Particular attention is given to the different ionospheric responses observed during the last, extended solar minimum. Mars' ionospheric response followed a similar pattern to the response observed in the Earth's ionosphere, despite the large differences related to the inner-origin of the magnetic field of both planets. The ionospheric temperature was cooler, the topside scale height was smaller and almost constant with altitude, the secondary ionospheric layer practically disappeared and the whole atmospheric total electron content (TEC) suffered an extreme reduction of about 30-40%, not predicted before by models. Moreover, there is a larger probability for the induced magnetic field to be present in the ionosphere, than in other phases of the solar cycle. The short-term variability is also addressed with the study of an ICME followed by a fast stream that hit Mars in March 2008, where solar wind data are provided by ACE and STEREO-B and supported by simulations using the WSA-ENLIL Model. The solar wind conditions lead to the formation of a CIR centred on the interface of the fast and the slow solar wind streams. Mars' system reacted to

  15. Wind and IMP 8 Solar Wind, Magnetosheath and Shock Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide the community access to magnetosheath data near Earth. We provided 27 years of IMP 8 magnetosheath proton velocities, densities, and temperatures with our best (usually 1-min.) time resolution. IMP 8 crosses the magnetosheath twice each 125 day orbit, and we provided magnetosheath data for the roughly 27 years of data for which magnetometer data are also available (which are needed to reliably pick boundaries). We provided this 27 years of IMP 8 magnetosheath data to the NSSDC; this data is now integrated with the IMP 8 solar wind data with flags indicating whether each data point is in the solar wind, magnetosheath, or at the boundary between the two regions. The plasma speed, density, and temperature are provided for each magnetosheath point. These data are also available on the MIT web site ftp://space .mit.edu/pub/plasma/imp/www/imp.html. We provide ASCII time-ordered rows of data giving the observation time, the spacecraft position in GSE, the velocity is GSE, the density and temperature for protons. We also have analyzed and archived on our web site the Wind magnetosheath plasma parameters. These consist of ascii files of the proton and alpha densities, speeds, and thermal speeds. These data are available at ftp://space.mit.edu/pub/plasma/wind/sheath These are the two products promised in the work statement and they have been completed in full.

  16. The Genesis Mission: Solar Wind Conditions, and Implications for the FIP Fractionation of the Solar Wind.

    SciTech Connect

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Wiens, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Steinberg, J. T; Dekoning, C. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Genesis mission collected solar wind on ultrapure materials between November 30, 2001 and April 1, 2004. The samples were returned to Earth September 8, 2004. Despite the hard landing that resulted from a failure of the avionics to deploy the parachute, many samples were returned in a condition that will permit analyses. Sample analyses of these samples should give a far better understanding of the solar elemental and isotopic composition (Burnett et al. 2003). Further, the photospheric composition is thought to be representative of the solar nebula, so that the Genesis mission will provide a new baseline for the average solar nebula composition with which to compare present-day compositions of planets, meteorites, and asteroids. Sample analysis is currently underway. The Genesis samples must be placed in the context of the solar and solar wind conditions under which they were collected. Solar wind is fractionated from the photosphere by the forces that accelerate the ions off of the Sun. This fractionation appears to be ordered by the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements, with the tendency for low-FIP elements to be over-abundant in the solar wind relative to the photosphere, and high-FIP elements to be under-abundant (e.g. Geiss, 1982; von Steiger et al., 2000). In addition, the extent of elemental fractionation differs across different solarwind regimes. Therefore, Genesis collected solar wind samples sorted into three regimes: 'fast wind' or 'coronal hole' (CH), 'slow wind' or 'interstream' (IS), and 'coronal mass ejection' (CME). To carry this out, plasma ion and electron spectrometers (Barraclough et al., 2003) continuously monitored the solar wind proton density, velocity, temperature, the alpha/proton ratio, and angular distribution of suprathermal electrons, and those parameters were in turn used in a rule-based algorithm that assigned the most probable solar wind regime (Neugebauer et al., 2003). At any given time, only one of three

  17. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  18. Interpretation of solar irradiance monitor measurements through analysis of 3D MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Criscuoli, S.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2014-06-20

    Measurements from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment mission indicate that solar spectral irradiance at visible and IR wavelengths varies in counter phase with the solar activity cycle. The sign of these variations is not reproduced by most of the irradiance reconstruction techniques based on variations of surface magnetism employed so far, and it is not yet clear whether SIM calibration procedures need to be improved or if instead new physical mechanisms must be invoked to explain such variations. We employ three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere to investigate the dependence of solar radiance in SIM visible and IR spectral ranges on variations of the filling factor of surface magnetic fields. We find that the contribution of magnetic features to solar radiance is strongly dependent on the location on the disk of the features, which are negative close to disk center and positive toward the limb. If features are homogeneously distributed over a region around the equator (activity belt), then their contribution to irradiance is positive with respect to the contribution of HD snapshots, but decreases with the increase of their magnetic flux for average magnetic flux larger than 50 G in at least two of the visible and IR spectral bands monitored by SIM. Under the assumption that the 50 G snapshots are representative of quiet-Sun regions, we thus find that the Spectral Irradiance can be in counter-phase with the solar magnetic activity cycle.

  19. Solar Energetic Particle Observations and Propagation in the 3-D Heliosphere in December 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga E.; Marsden, Richard G.; Lario, David; Tranquille, Cecil; Heber, Bernd; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Forsyth, Robert B.; Elliott, Heather A.

    2010-05-01

    Ulysses is the first spacecraft to fly over the poles of the Sun. Although the Sun was again close to its activity minimum during the recently completed third polar orbit of Ulysses, solar activity has been more prevalent during the declining phase of solar cycle 23 than was the case in the declining phase of the 22nd solar cycle, when the first polar passes occurred (1994-1995). In December 2006, an unexpected rise of solar activity occurred. Active Region 10930 produced a series of major solar flares with the strongest one (X9.0) recorded on December 5, after it rotated into view on the east limb of the Sun. In this work, we present in detail energetic particle observations obtained by various instruments onboard Ulysses, located at > 70 degrees south heliographic latitude during this period and discuss their implications for particle propagation to solar polar regions. The observed events are also compared with high latitudes measurements obtained previously by Ulysses close to solar maximum. Furthermore, comparisons with data acquired by the STEREO and ACE spacecraft near the ecliptic plane are discussed.

  20. On Solar-Wind Electron Heating at Large Solar Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashei, Igor V.; Fahr, Hans J.

    2014-04-01

    We study the temperature of electrons advected with the solar wind to large solar distances far beyond 1 AU. Almost nothing is known about the thermodynamics of these electrons from in-situ plasma observations at these distances, and usually it is tacitly assumed that electrons, due to adiabatic behaviour and vanishing heat conduction, rapidly cool off to very low temperatures at larger distances. In this article we show, however, that electrons on their way to large distances undergo non-adiabatic interactions with travelling shocks and solar-wind bulk-velocity jumps and thereby are appreciably heated. Examining this heating process on an average statistical basis, we find that solar-wind electrons first cool down to a temperature minimum, which depending on the occurrence frequency of bulk velocity jumps is located between 3 and 6 AU, but beyond this the lowest electron temperature again starts to increase with increasing solar distance, finally achieving temperatures of about 7×104 K to 7×105 K at the location of the termination shock. Hence these electrons are unexpectedly shown to play an important dynamical role in structuring this shock and in determining the downstream plasma properties.

  1. Elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. A distinguishing characteristic of the slow solar wind is the high variability of the plasma parameters, such as magnetic field, velocity, density, composition, and charge state. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and using data with comparatively low temporal resolution. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of the charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE SWICS science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability of coherent structures at relatively small scales (<2000 Mm, or ~ 90 minutes at slow wind speeds). We use an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi pressure-balanced, periodic number density structures previously studied by Kepko et al and shown to be important in solar wind-magnetospheric coupling. The combination of high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to probe the elemental slow solar wind flux tubes/structures. We use this train of 2000Mm periodic density structures as tracers of solar wind origin and/or acceleration. We find that each 2000 Mm parcel of slow solar wind, though its speed is steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, in a repeated sequence. Each parcel cycles through three states: 1) 'normal' slow wind, 2) compositionally slow wind with very high density, and 3) compositionally fast but typical slow solar wind density. We conclude by suggesting these structures form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind, and discuss whether it is necessary to decouple separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  2. Solar sources of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, R. H.; Altschuler, M. D.; Harvey, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Open magnetic field lines, those which extend from the solar photosphere to interplanetary space, are traced in the current-free (potential field) approximation using measured photospheric fields as a boundary condition. It is found that (1) only a relatively small fraction of the photospheric area connects via open field lines to the interplanetary magnetic field; (2) those photospheric areas which do contribute open field lines lie beneath coronal holes and within the boundaries of the holes as projected onto the photosphere or else between loop systems of an active region; (3) the interplanetary magnetic field in the plane of the sun's equator, essentially the field in the ecliptic plane, may connect to photospheric regions of high latitude; and (4) the fastest solar wind streams are correlated with those magnetic flux tubes which expand least in cross-sectional area over the distance between the photosphere and the coronal height where the solar wind begins.

  3. Corotation of an intermittent solar wind source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    The measured electron content of the solar wind in mid-1970 exhibited a region of relatively high electron density that reappeared at intervals of about 27.8 days. It is shown that the repeating event cannot be reconciled with the concept of a long-enduring steady flow, even though the recurrence period is close to the rotation period of the sun. This evidence of transients is inferred from the short duration of each appearance of the interval of higher density; each should last for roughly one corotation interval if it is caused by a steady stream. The radio path was approximately 0.8 AU long, and the corotation interval exceeded 3 days. Other aspects of the content data patterns support the view that such transient events are common in the solar wind. The mid-1970 repeating event is an unusually good example of the intermittent character of flow regions in the solar wind that fluctuate on a time scale of days but endure as identifiable regions for many months. A sputtering corotating source of thin solar plasma streams could explain this series of events; it could also be explained in terms of a stream that is steady in density and speed but undulating north-south so that it passes into and out of the 0.8 AU radio path in a matter of a day or less.

  4. Application of a 3D model Mixfor-3D for description of solar radiation regime in a tropical monsoon forest in the Cat Tien National Park in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Kurbatova, J.; Radler, K.; Khanh, Pham Huu; Khoi, Vu Xuan; Kuznetsov, A.

    2009-04-01

    The radiation regime of lowland lagerstroemia tropical monsoon forests in the Cat Tien National Park in Vietnam was described using a 3D process-based model Mixfor-3D (Olchev et al. 2009). The Cat Tien National Park is situated in the south of Vietnam, approximately 150 km north of Ho Chi Minh City. It is unique area that protects one of the largest areas of lowland tropical rainforests left in Vietnam. The main concept of the used Mixfor-3D model is a combined description of the physical and biological processes on the different spatial levels of a plant ecosystem, i.e. from individual leaf and plant (tree) to the entire ecosystem. The model effectively integrates a very high (3D) spatial resolution of ecosystem structure with 3D algorithms sophistically describing the processes of radiation, turbulent exchange of sensible heat and water vapour, water and heat transfer in plant canopy and soil. The Mixfor-3D model consists of several closely coupled 3D sub-models describing: structure of a forest stand; radiative transfer in a forest canopy; turbulent transfer of sensible heat and water vapour between ground surface, trees and the atmospheric surface layer; heat and moisture transfer in soil. Reasonable computing time and a number of input parameters are important factors that were taken into account during development of the model. Mixfor-3D has a horizontal resolution of 2 m x 2 m, a vertical canopy resolution of 1 m, a vertical soil resolution of 0.1 m and a primary time step of 1 hour. These spatial and temporal resolutions allow us to take into account small scale heterogeneity of the canopy and soil structure and to reproduce the 3D flux distribution and canopy microclimate. For modeling experiments three different forest plots have been selected. They are characterized by very heterogeneous and diverse structure. Tree density of the forest plots is up to 660 trees per hectare, and number of tree species is ranged between 19 and 23. Upper canopy layer of the

  5. CdS sensitized 3D hierarchical TiO2/ZnO heterostructure for efficient solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Xie, Wen; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; You, Lu; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    For conventional dye or quantum dot sensitized solar cells, which are fabricated using mesoporous films, the inefficient electron transport due to defects such as grain boundaries and surface traps is a major drawback. To simultaneously increase the carrier transport efficiency as well as the surface area, optimal-assembling of hierarchical nanostructures is an attractive approach. Here, a three dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructure, consisting of CdS sensitized one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods deposited on two dimensional (2D) TiO2 (001) nanosheet, is prepared via a solution-process method. Such heterstructure exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectric and photocatalytic H2 evolution performance compared with CdS sensitized 1D ZnO nanorods/1D TiO2 nanorods photoanode, as a result of the more efficient light harvesting over the entire visible light spectrum and the effective electron transport through a highly connected 3D network. PMID:25030846

  6. CdS sensitized 3D hierarchical TiO2/ZnO heterostructure for efficient solar energy conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhaoke; Xie, Wen; Lim, Zhi Shiuh; You, Lu; Wang, Junling

    2014-01-01

    For conventional dye or quantum dot sensitized solar cells, which are fabricated using mesoporous films, the inefficient electron transport due to defects such as grain boundaries and surface traps is a major drawback. To simultaneously increase the carrier transport efficiency as well as the surface area, optimal-assembling of hierarchical nanostructures is an attractive approach. Here, a three dimensional (3D) hierarchical heterostructure, consisting of CdS sensitized one dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorods deposited on two dimensional (2D) TiO2 (001) nanosheet, is prepared via a solution-process method. Such heterstructure exhibits significantly enhanced photoelectric and photocatalytic H2 evolution performance compared with CdS sensitized 1D ZnO nanorods/1D TiO2 nanorods photoanode, as a result of the more efficient light harvesting over the entire visible light spectrum and the effective electron transport through a highly connected 3D network. PMID:25030846

  7. Investigation of the Large Scale Evolution and Topology of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is concerned with the large-scale evolution and topology of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. During this reporting period we have analyzed a series of low density intervals in the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) plasma data set that bear many similarities to CMEs. We have begun a series of 3D, MHD (Magnetohydrodynamics) coronal models to probe potential causes of these events. We also edited two manuscripts concerning the properties of CMEs in the solar wind. One was re-submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  8. Coronal and transition-region Doppler shifts of an active region 3D-MHD model as indicator for the magnetic activity cycle of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Philippe A.

    2015-08-01

    For the Sun and solar-like stars, Doppler blueshifts are observed in the hot corona, while in average redshifts are seen in the cooler transition region layer below the corona. This clearly contradicts the idea of a continuous flow-equilibrium starting from a star's atmosphere and forming the stellar wind. To explain this, we implement a 3D-MHD model of the solar corona above an observed active region and use an atomic database to obtain the emission from the million Kelvin hot plasma. The generated EUV-bright loops system from the model compares well to the observed coronal loops. Therefore, we have access to realistic plasma parameters, including the flow dynamics within the active region core, and can derive total spectra as if we look the Sun as a star. We compare the model spectra to actual statistical observations of the Sun taken at different magnetic activity levels. We find characteristic Doppler-shift statistics that can be used to identify the magnetic activity state of the Sun and solar-like stars. This should help to model the variability of such stars by inferring their activity level from total spectra of coronal and transition-region emission lines.

  9. Initial Comparison Between a 3D MHD Model and the HAFv2 Kinematic 3D Model: The October/November 2003 Events from the Sun to 6 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Detman, Thomas; Fry, Craig D.; Sun Wei; Deehr, Charles; Intriligator, James

    2005-08-01

    A first-generation 3D kinematic, space weather forecasting solar wind model (HAFv2) has been used to show the importance of solar generated disturbances in Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observations in the outer heliosphere. We extend this work by using a 3D MHD model (HHMS) that, like HAFv2, incorporates a global, pre-event, inhomogeneous, background solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field. Initial comparisons are made between the two models of the solar wind out to 6 AU and with in-situ observations at the ACE spacecraft before and after the October/November 2003 solar events.

  10. Heliolatitude structure of the solar wind proton speed and density at 1 AU for heliospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Justyna Maria; Swaczyna, Pawel; Bzowski, Maciej; Tokumaru, Munetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The heliolatitudinal structure of solar wind proton speed and density varies with solar activity. A model of its variation with time is needed for heliospheric studies and modeling. It is important for the global heliospheric structure, allows for an assessment of ionization rates of neutral species in the heliosphere and interpretation of observations of the energetic neutral atoms and neutral interstellar atoms. Sokół et al. 2013 presented a model of the heliolatitudinal and time variations of solar wind structure based on results of the computer assisted tomography analysis of the solar wind speed enabled by remote-sensing observations of interplanetary scintillations, in-situ measurements from Ulysses, and in-ecliptic measurements from various missions gathered in the OMNI2 database. They determined the 3D structure of solar wind on a yearly time grid from 1990 to 2011. Now we increase the time resolution of the grid used in the model. Because of the weather conditions in Japan, where the interplanetary scintillation observations are carried out, the solar wind data sets contain systematic gaps. For the purposes of the increase of the time resolution of the model for heliospheric studies the method of filling of these gap is needed. We present a comparison of various methods of gap filling. We present results of the investigation of the procedures of reconstruction of the solar wind density with the use of the solar wind invariants published in the literature. Additionally we study various algorithms of extrapolation of the heliolatitudinal time series of the solar wind proton speed and number density in time.

  11. Properties of Minor Ions in the Solar Wind and Implications for the Background Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William (Technical Monitor); Esser, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The scope of the investigation is to extract information on the properties of the bulk solar wind from the minor ion observations that are provided by instruments on board NASA space craft and theoretical model studies. Ion charge states measured in situ in interplanetary space are formed in the inner coronal regions below 5 solar radii, hence they carry information on the properties of the solar wind plasma in that region. The plasma parameters that are important in the ion forming processes are the electron density, the electron temperature and the flow speeds of the individual ion species. In addition, if the electron distribution function deviates from a Maxwellian already in the inner corona, then the enhanced tail of that distribution function, also called halo, greatly effects the ion composition. This study is carried out using solar wind models, coronal observations, and ion calculations in conjunction with the in situ observations.

  12. Properties of Minor Ions in the Solar Wind and Implications for the Background Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esser, Ruth; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Ion charge states measured in situ in interplanetary space are formed in the inner coronal regions below 5 solar radii, hence they carry information on the properties of the solar wind plasma in that region. The plasma parameters that are important in the ion forming processes are the electron density, the electron temperature and the flow speeds of the individual ion species. In addition, if the electron distribution function deviates from a Maxwellian already in the inner corona, then the enhanced tail of that distribution function, also called halo, greatly effects the ion composition. The goal of the proposal is to make use of ion fractions observed in situ in the solar wind to learn about both, the plasma conditions in the inner corona and the expansion and ion formation itself. This study is carried out using solar wind models, coronal observations, and ion fraction calculations in conjunction with the in situ observations.

  13. Fast solar wind measurements from the Bright Monitor of the Solar Wind instrument on Spektr-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbo, J. L.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Zastenker, G. N.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Richardson, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fast solar wind measurements from the Bright Monitor of the Solar Wind instrumentonboard the Spektr-R spacecraft are presented. This instrument measures plasmaparameters with time resolution as high as 30 ms. These measurements provide a preview of what the fast Faraday cup detectors on Triana and Solar Probe Plus will observe. We will compare solar wind structures observed at Spektr-R at high time-resolution with lower cadence observations from Wind. We will describe the small-scale plasma parameters in these solar wind structures.

  14. Observations of Plasma Turbulence and Heating from the Solar Wind and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    The cascade of energy by plasma turbulence has been shown to occur in, and heat, the solar wind. Recent work in the study of solar wind turbulence has focussed, in the most part, on advanced data analysis techniques, such as third moment structure functions, wavelets, conditional data sampling, multi-spacecraft observations and reconstruction of 2D k-spectra with tomography, and statistical studies from long time series of spacecraft observations. These techniques are complex and contain different assumptions about the qualities of the data underpinning the measurements. Here, we will review recent advances and discoveries in the study of plasma turbulence from solar wind data analysis and discuss how benchmarking of techniques against one another could be pursued and how simulations can be used to aid in the understanding of the results of solar wind data analysis, in particular in the framework of the "Turbulence Dissipation Challenge" (Parashar et al., Journal of Plasma Physics, Volume 81, Issue 05, 905810513, 2015). We will pay particular attention to observing two different heating mechanisms: stochastic heating and resonant wave-particle interactions. The magnetic helicity of the solar wind is shown to separate into two distinct components, one originating from pseudo-Alfvenic (k may have a component parallel to the magnetic field) and one from the Alfvenic fluctuations (k is strictly perpendicular). The solar wind results are compared with "pseudo-spacecraft" data from large 3D PIC simulations.

  15. Magnetic latitude effects in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winge, C. R., Jr.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The Weber-Davis model of the solar wind is generalized to include the effects of latitude. The principal assumptions of high electrical conductivity, rotational symmetry, the polytropic relation between pressure and density, and a flow-alined field in a system rotating with the sun, are retained. An approximate solution to the resulting equations for spherical boundary conditions at the base of the corona indicates a small component of latitudinal flow toward the solar poles at large distances from the sun as result of latitudinal magnetic forces.

  16. 3D self-assembly of aluminium nanoparticles for plasmon-enhanced solar desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Tan, Yingling; Wang, Jingyang; Xu, Weichao; Yuan, Ye; Cai, Wenshan; Zhu, Shining; Zhu, Jia

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonics has generated tremendous excitement because of its unique capability to focus light into subwavelength volumes, beneficial for various applications such as light harvesting, photodetection, sensing, catalysis and so on. Here we demonstrate a plasmon-enhanced solar desalination device, fabricated by the self–assembly of aluminium nanoparticles into a three-dimensional porous membrane. The formed porous plasmonic absorber can float naturally on water surface, efficiently absorb a broad solar spectrum (>96%) and focus the absorbed energy at the surface of the water to enable efficient (∼90%) and effective desalination (a decrease of four orders of magnitude). The durability of the devices has also been examined, indicating a stable performance over 25 cycles under various illumination conditions. The combination of the significant desalination effect, the abundance and low cost of the materials, and the scalable production processes suggest that this type of plasmon-enhanced solar desalination device could provide a portable desalination solution.

  17. Driving mechanisms for the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pneuman, G. W.

    1986-02-01

    In this review, the author considers the central physical aspects pertinent to the acceleration of the solar wind. Special importance is placed on the high-speed streams since the properties of these structures seem to strain the various theoretical explanations the most. Heavy emphasis is also given to the observations - particularly as to what constraints they place on the theories. The author also discusses certain sporadic events such as spicules, macrospicules, X-ray bright points, and outflows seen in the EUV associated with the explosive events, jets, and coronal bullets which could be of relevance to this problem. Three theoretical concepts pertaining to the solar wind acceleration process are examined - purely thermal acceleration with and without extended heating, acceleration due to Alfvén wave pressure, and diamagnetic acceleration. Emphasis is given to how well these theories meet the contraints imposed by the observations.

  18. Latitudinal Variation of Solar Wind Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthakrishnan, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Janardhan, P.

    1995-04-01

    Single station solar wind velocity measurements using the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) in India (operating at 327 MHz) are reported for the period August 1992 to August 1993. Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations on a large number of compact radio sources covering a latitudinal range of ±80° were used to derive solar wind velocities using the method of fitting a power law model to the observed IPS spectra. The data shows a velocity versus heliographic latitude pattern which is similar to that reported by Rickett and Coles (1991) for the 1981 1982 period. However, the average of the measured equatorial velocities are higher, being about 470 km s-1 compared to their value of 400 km s-1. The distribution of electron density variations (ΔN e ) between 50R⊙ and 90R⊙ was also determined and it was found that ΔN e was about 30% less at the poles as compared to the equator.

  19. The solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic processes involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. The evolution of models of the magnetosphere is first surveyed. The existence of the auroral substorm and the cyclical polar magnetic substorm is evidence that the magnetosphere is a dynamic system. The dynamic changes occurring in the magnetosphere, including erosion of the magnetopause, changes in the size of the polar cap, variations in the flaring angle of the tail, neutral point formation, plasma sheet motions, and the inward collapse of the midnight magnetosphere, are discussed. The cyclical variations of geomagnetic activity are explained in terms of the control of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction by the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Present phenomenological models allow prediction of geomagnetic activity from interplanetary measurements, but modeling of detailed magnetospheric processes is still in its infancy.

  20. Suprathermal Solar Wind Electrons and Langmuir Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunjung; Yoon, Peter H.; Choe, G. S.; moon, Y.-J.

    2016-09-01

    The steady-state model recently put forth for the solar wind electron velocity distribution function during quiet time conditions, was originally composed of three population electrons (core, halo, and superhalo) with the core remaining nonresonant with any plasma waves while the halo and superhalo separately maintained steady-state resonance with whistler- and Langmuir-frequency range fluctuations, respectively. However, a recent paper demonstrates that whistler-range fluctuations in fact have no significant contribution. The present paper represents a consummation of the model in that a self-consistent model of the suprathermal electron population, which encompasses both the halo and the superhalo, is constructed solely on the basis of the Langmuir fluctuation spectrum. Numerical solutions to steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations are obtained on the basis of an initial trial electron distribution and Langmuir wave spectrum. Such a finding offers a self-consistent explanation for the observed steady-state electron distribution in the solar wind.

  1. Turbulence and waves in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.A.; Goldstein, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of turbulence and waves in the solar wind is discussed. Consideration is given to the observations and theory concerning the origin and evolution of interplanetary MHD fluctuations and to the observations, theory, and simulations of compressive fluctuations. Particular attention is given to extrapolations to near-sun and polar fields regions. Results obtained on turbulence at comets and magnetic turbulence of low-frequency waves excited by unstable distributions of ions are discussed. 230 refs.

  2. Solar Wind Electron Energization by Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, P. H.

    2015-09-01

    The solar wind electrons are made of the low-energy Maxwellian core, intermediate-energy halo, field-aligned strahl, and the highly-energetic super-halo electrons. The present paper discusses a model in which the halo electrons interact with the whistler fluctuation via cyclotron wave-particle resonance, and the super-halo electrons interact through Landau resonance with the Langmuir fluctuation, thus maintaining a local steady state.

  3. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together into larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.

  4. 3D cloud detection and tracking system for solar forecast using multiple sky imagers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peng, Zhenzhou; Yu, Dantong; Huang, Dong; Heiser, John; Yoo, Shinjae; Kalb, Paul

    2015-06-23

    We propose a system for forecasting short-term solar irradiance based on multiple total sky imagers (TSIs). The system utilizes a novel method of identifying and tracking clouds in three-dimensional space and an innovative pipeline for forecasting surface solar irradiance based on the image features of clouds. First, we develop a supervised classifier to detect clouds at the pixel level and output cloud mask. In the next step, we design intelligent algorithms to estimate the block-wise base height and motion of each cloud layer based on images from multiple TSIs. Thus, this information is then applied to stitch images together intomore » larger views, which are then used for solar forecasting. We examine the system’s ability to track clouds under various cloud conditions and investigate different irradiance forecast models at various sites. We confirm that this system can 1) robustly detect clouds and track layers, and 2) extract the significant global and local features for obtaining stable irradiance forecasts with short forecast horizons from the obtained images. Finally, we vet our forecasting system at the 32-megawatt Long Island Solar Farm (LISF). Compared with the persistent model, our system achieves at least a 26% improvement for all irradiance forecasts between one and fifteen minutes.« less

  5. Cometary ion instabilities in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hellinger, P.

    2015-12-01

    We review some of the processes that characterize the interaction of the solar wind with newborn cometary ions. Instabilities generated by the typical ring-beam velocity-space configuration of the pick-up ions in the solar wind frame are studied by means of one- and two-dimensional hybrid numerical simulations. In agreement with previous studies, we find that instabilities generated by the cometary ions play an important role in shaping the properties of the plasma. The resulting ion distributions are in good agreement with observations, showing the presence of energy shells in velocity space. Bi-spherical shells for the heavy oxygen ions are also observed in the late phase of the simulations. Moreover, we also investigate some new aspects of the dynamics, such as the generation of turbulent cascade from the initial spectra of unstable waves, and the related heating and back reaction of the solar wind plasma. We also consider the case of initial non-gyrotropic pick-up ion distributions, and we focus on the polarization of the associated waves, suggesting that linear polarization can be a signature of this configuration, possibly observed by the Rosetta spacecraft in orbit around comet 67P/CG.

  6. Automated classification of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, Susanne; Leer, Kristoffer

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic storms are known to be caused by solar wind disturbances associated with the passage of either interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) or stream interaction regions (SIRs) associated with high-speed streams from coronal holes. We present and assess a new method for automated detection and subsequent classification of solar wind disturbances arriving at L1. The method requires solar wind in situ plasma and magnetic field observations, currently provided in near real-time by NOAA/NASA from the ACE SWEPAM and MAG instruments. Periods of significantly enhanced magnetic field are identified and classified according to their most likely cause, being either ICMEs or high speed streams creating stream interaction regions SIRs. In the output the disturbed intervals are thus classified either as "ICME"-related, "SIR"-related or "NO ID". We compare the results statistically with existing lists of ICMEs and SIRs derived manually, and assess the usefulness of the service for providing early warnings of upcoming geomagnetic storms.

  7. Magnetic pumping of the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egedal, Jan; Lichko, Emily; Daughton, William

    2015-11-01

    The transport of matter and radiation in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosphere is a complicated problem involving competing processes of charged particles interacting with electric and magnetic fields. Given the rapid expansion of the solar wind, it would be expected that superthermal electrons originating in the corona would cool rapidly as a function of distance to the Sun. However, this is not observed, and various models have been proposed as candidates for heating the solar wind. In the compressional pumping mechanism explored by Fisk and Gloeckler particles are accelerated by random compressions by the interplanetary wave turbulence. This theory explores diffusion due to spatial non-uniformities and provides a mechanism for redistributing particle. For investigation of a related but different heating mechanism, magnetic pumping, in our work we include diffusion of anisotropic features that develops in velocity space. The mechanism allows energy to be transferred to the particles directly from the turbulence. Guided by kinetic simulations a theory is derived for magnetic pumping. At the heart of this work is a generalization of the Parker Equation to capture the role of the pressure anisotropy during the pumping process. Supported by NASA grant NNX15AJ73G.

  8. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  9. The MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Thocaven, J.-J.; Rouzaud, J.; Fedorov, A.; Rouger, P.; Toublanc, D.; Taylor, E.; Gordon, D.; Robinson, M.; Heavner, S.; Turin, P.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Curtis, D. W.; Lin, R. P.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-04-01

    The MAVEN Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) is a symmetric hemispheric electrostatic analyzer with deflectors that is designed to measure the energy and angular distributions of 3-4600-eV electrons in the Mars environment. This energy range is important for impact ionization of planetary atmospheric species, and encompasses the solar wind core and halo populations, shock-energized electrons, auroral electrons, and ionospheric primary photoelectrons. The instrument is mounted at the end of a 1.5-meter boom to provide a clear field of view that spans nearly 80 % of the sky with ˜20° resolution. With an energy resolution of 17 % (Δ E/E), SWEA readily distinguishes electrons of solar wind and ionospheric origin. Combined with a 2-second measurement cadence and on-board real-time pitch angle mapping, SWEA determines magnetic topology with high (˜8-km) spatial resolution, so that local measurements of the plasma and magnetic field can be placed into global context.

  10. Quasi-steady solar wind dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in understanding the large scale dynamics of quasisteady, corotating solar wind structure was reviewed. The nature of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances preliminary calculations from a 2-D MHD model are used to demonstrate theoretical expectations of corotating structure out to 30 AU. It is found that the forward and reverse shocks from adjacent CIR's begin to interact at about 10 AU, producing new shock pairs flanking secondary CIR's. These sawtooth secondary CIR's interact again at about 20 AU and survive as visible entities to 30 AU. The model predicts the velocity jumps at the leading edge of the secondary CIR's at 30 AU should be very small but there should still be sizable variations in the thermodynamic and magnetic parameters. The driving dynamic mechanism in the distant solar wind is the relaxation of pressure gradients. The second topic is the influence of weak, nonimpulsive time dependence in quasisteady dynamics. It is suggested that modest large scale variations in the coronal flow speed on periods of several hours to a day may be responsible for many of the remaining discrepancies between theory and observation. Effects offer a ready explanation for the apparent rounding of stream fronts between 0.3 and 1.0 AU discovered by Helios.

  11. The Solar Wind and the Sun in the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.

    2006-10-01

    Exposure to the solar wind can have significant long term consequences for planetary atmospheres, especially for planets such as Mars that are not protected by global magnetospheres. Estimating the effects of solar wind exposure requires knowledge of the history of the solar wind. Much of what we know about the Sun’s past behavior is based on inferences from observations of young solar-like stars. Stellar analogs of the weak solar wind cannot be detected directly, but the interaction regions between these winds and the interstellar medium have been detected and used to estimate wind properties. I here review these observations, with emphasis on what they suggest about the history of the solar wind.

  12. The Solar Wind and The Sun in the Past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.

    Exposure to the solar wind can have significant long term consequences for planetary atmospheres, especially for planets such as Mars that are not protected by global magnetospheres. Estimating the effects of solar wind exposure requires knowledge of the history of the solar wind. Much of what we know about the Sun's past behavior is based on inferences from observations of young solar-like stars. Stellar analogs of the weak solar wind cannot be detected directly, but the interaction regions between these winds and the interstellar medium have been detected and used to estimate wind properties. I here review these observations, with emphasis on what they suggest about the history of the solar wind.

  13. Solar Wind Associated with Near Equatorial Coronal Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, M.; Hiremath, K. M.; Doddamani, Vijayakumar H.; Gurumath, Shashanka R.

    2015-09-01

    Present study probes temporal changes in the area and radiative flux of near equatorial coronal hole associated with solar wind parameters such as wind speed, density, magnetic field and temperature. Using high temporal resolution data from SDO/AIA for the two wavelengths 193 Å and 211 Å, area and radiative flux of coronal holes are extracted and are examined for the association with high speed solar wind parameters. We find a strong association between different parameters of coronal hole and solar wind. For both the wavelength bands, we also compute coronal hole radiative energy near the earth and it is found to be of similar order as that of solar wind energy. However, for the wavelength 193 Å, owing to almost similar magnitudes of energy emitted by coronal hole and energy due to solar wind, it is conjectured that solar wind might have originated around the same height where 193 Å line is formed in the corona.

  14. From Coronal Observations to MHD Simulations, the Building Blocks for 3D Models of Solar Flares (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares are energetic events taking place in the Sun's atmosphere, and their effects can greatly impact the environment of the surrounding planets. In particular, eruptive flares, as opposed to confined flares, launch coronal mass ejections into the interplanetary medium, and as such, are one of the main drivers of space weather. After briefly reviewing the main characteristics of solar flares, we summarise the processes that can account for the build-up and release of energy during their evolution. In particular, we focus on the development of recent 3D numerical simulations that explain many of the observed flare features. These simulations can also provide predictions of the dynamical evolution of coronal and photospheric magnetic field. Here we present a few observational examples that, together with numerical modelling, point to the underlying physical mechanisms of the eruptions.

  15. Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Reiner Gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Wang, Xu; Lembège, Bertrand; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Horányi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Discovered by early astronomers during the Renaissance, the Reiner Gamma formation is one of the most peculiar lunar surface features. Observations have shown that the tadpole-shaped albedo marking, the so-called swirl, found on the Oceanus Procellarum is co-located with one of the strongest magnetic anomalies (LMA) on our Moon. In previous work, using a horizontal dipole model [Deca et al. 2014, 2015], we have described the formation of a mini-magnetosphere structure surrounding the swirl pattern, locally shielding the underlying lunar surface from the impinging solar wind, and hinting at a correlation with its main surface albedo brightness marking in a distinctive concentric oval shape. Using the observed magnetic field model [Tsunakawa et al. 2015] in our full-kinetic electromagnetic framework, iPic3D, we reproduce a surface weathering pattern closely resembling the details of the Reiner Gamma swirls. This work therefore provides strong evidence that the solar wind standoff theory for lunar swirl formation is the dominant process to explain the albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma region. This work was supported by NASA's SSSERVI/IMPACT and by the Swedish National Space Board, Grant No. 136/11. Resources supporting this work were provided by the NASA High-End Computing (HEC) Program through the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Division at Ames Research Center. Test simulations utilised the Janus supercomputer, supported by NSF (CNS-0821794) and CU Boulder.

  16. Variance Anisotropy of Solar Wind Velocity and Magnetic Field Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    At MHD scales in the solar wind, velocity and magnetic fieldfluctuations are typically observed to have much more energy in thecomponents transverse to the mean magnetic field, relative to theparallel components [eg, 1,2]. This is often referred to asvariance anisotropy. Various explanations for it have been suggested,including that the fluctuations are predominantly shear Alfvén waves[1] and that turbulent dynamics leads to such states [eg, 3].Here we investigate the origin and strength of such varianceanisotropies, using spectral method simulations of thecompressible (polytropic) 3D MHD equations. We report on results from runs with several different classes ofinitial conditions. These classes include(i) fluctuations polarized only in the same sense as shear Alfvénwaves (aka toroidal polarization),(ii) randomly polarized fluctuations, and(iii) fluctuations restricted so that most of the energy is inmodes which have their wavevectors perpendicular, or nearly so, to thebackground magnetic field: quasi-2D modes. The plasma beta and Mach number dependence [4] of quantities like the variance anisotropy, Alfven ratio, and fraction of the energy in the toroidal fluctuations will be examined, along with the timescales for the development of any systematic features.Implications for solar wind fluctuations will be discussed. References:[1] Belcher & Davis 1971, J. Geophys. Res, 76, 3534.[2] Oughton et al 2015, Phil Trans Roy Soc A, 373, 20140152.[3] Matthaeus et al 1996, J. Geophys. Res, 101, 7619.[4] Smith et al 2006, J. Geophys. Res, 111, A09111.

  17. CHARGE STATE EVOLUTION IN THE SOLAR WIND. RADIATIVE LOSSES IN FAST SOLAR WIND PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.

    2012-10-10

    We study the effects of departures from equilibrium on the radiative losses of the accelerating fast, coronal hole-associated solar wind plasma. We calculate the evolution of the ionic charge states in the solar wind with the Michigan Ionization Code and use them to determine the radiative losses along the wind trajectory. We use the velocity, electron temperature, and electron density predicted by Cranmer et al. as a benchmark case even though our approach and conclusions are more broadly valid. We compare non-equilibrium radiative losses to values calculated assuming ionization equilibrium at the local temperature, and we find that differences are smaller than 20% in the corona but reach a factor of three in the upper chromosphere and transition region. Non-equilibrium radiative losses are systematically larger than the equilibrium values, so that non-equilibrium wind plasma radiates more efficiently in the transition region. Comparing the magnitude of the dominant energy terms in the Cranmer et al. model, we find that wind-induced departures from equilibrium are of the same magnitude as the differences between radiative losses and conduction in the energy equation. We investigate which ions are most responsible for such effects, finding that carbon and oxygen are the main source of departures from equilibrium. We conclude that non-equilibrium effects on the wind energy equation are significant and recommend that they are included in theoretical models of the solar wind, at least for carbon and oxygen.

  18. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Initiated in 2007 to examine the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) energy on the electric power system, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) is one of the largest regional wind and solar integration studies to date. The goal is to understand the effects of variability and uncertainty of wind, PV, and CSP on the grid. In the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 1, solar penetration was limited to 5%. Utility-scale PV was not included because of limited capability to model sub-hourly, utility-scale PV output . New techniques allow the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 to include high penetrations of solar - not only CSP and rooftop PV but also utility-scale PV plants.

  19. Solar wind effects on atmosphere evolution at Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Bauer, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    The weak intrinsic magnetism of Venus and Mars leaves these planets subject to some unique atmospheric loss processes. This paper reviews the ways in which material seems to be removed by the solar wind interaction, including atmospheric ion pickup by the solar wind, bulk removal and outflow of ionospheric plasma, and atmospheric sputtering by pickup ions. The factors in the planets' and sun's histories, such as planetary magnetism, solar luminosity, and past solar wind properties, that must ultimately be folded into considerations of the effects of the solar wind interaction on atmosphere evolution are discussed.

  20. Electron energy flux in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.; Sugiura, M.

    1971-01-01

    Description of studies of electrons between 10 eV and 9.9 keV in the solar wind. The transport of energy in the rest frame of the plasma is evaluated and shown to be parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The presence of electrons from solar events causes this energy-flux density to exceed the heat flow due to thermal electrons. In one such event, the observations are shown to be consistent with the solar-electron observations made at higher energies. When observations are made at a point connected to the earth's bow shock by an interplanetary-field line, a comparatively large energy flux along the field toward the sun is observed, but the heat flow remains outwardly directed during this time interval. In either situation the heat flow is found to be consistent with measurements made on Vela satellites by a different method. These values, less than .01 ergs/sq cm/sec, are sufficiently low to require modifications to the Spitzer-Harm conductivity formula for use in solar-wind theories.

  1. Solar wind and its interaction with the magnetosphere - Measured parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenn, R.

    The sun and the solar wind are considered in terms of the 'ballerina' model first proposed by Alfven (1977), taking into account high speed streams, the slow solar wind, stream-stream interactions, the relation of streams and magnetic structure, and transients caused by solar activity. The main features of the solar wind behavior are illustrated with the aid of data, covering one complete solar rotation in 1974/1975, which were obtained with instruments aboard the Helios-1 solar probe. It is pointed out that the solar wind acts like a huge buffer pushing onto the earth's magnetosphere with a highly variable pressure. Of the energy in the highly variable solar wind reservoir only a tiny fraction is absorbed by the magnetosphere in an obviously very nonstationary way.

  2. Solar wind interaction with the terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Milillo, Anna; Radioti, Aikaterini

    2015-09-01

    This issue entitled "Solar wind interaction with the terrestrial planets" follows the recurrent session PS5.1 (Planetary Plasma Physics and Interactions in the Solar System) held at the European Geophysical Union conference. The EGU session hosts original studies on all aspects of planetary plasma physics and interactions in the Solar System. This issue more specifically includes studies presented at several international meetings during the recent years on the physics of magnetospheres, ionospheres, auroras, and also the surface-plasma or atmosphere-plasma interactions, at inner planets such as Mercury, Earth (and Moon), Mars and Venus. The following papers, in fact, cover all of these aspects, and are based on a variety of techniques: space and ground-based observations, numerical modeling and even laboratory measurements.

  3. Cosmic ray modulation by solar wind disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbović, M.; Vršnak, B.; Čalogović, J.; Karlica, M.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: We perform a systematic statistical study of the relationship between characteristics of solar wind disturbances, caused by interplanetary coronal mass ejections and corotating interaction regions, and properties of Forbush decreases (FDs). Since the mechanism of FDs is still being researched, this analysis should provide a firm empirical basis for physical interpretations of the FD phenomenon. Methods: The analysis is based on the ground-based neutron monitor data and the solar wind data recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer, where the disturbances were identified as increases in proton speed, magnetic field, and magnetic field fluctuations. We focus on the relative timing of FDs, as well as on the correlations between various FD and solar wind parameters, paying special attention to the statistical significance of the results. Results: It was found that the onset, the minimum, and the end of FDs are delayed after the onset, the maximum, and the end of the magnetic field enhancement. The t-test shows that at the 95% significance level the average lags have to be longer than 3, 7, and 26 h, respectively. FD magnitude (| FD|) is correlated with the magnetic field strength (B), magnetic field fluctuations (δB), and speed (v), as well as with combined parameters, BtB, Bv, vtB, and BvtB, where tB is the duration of the magnetic field disturbance. In the |FD|(B) dependence, a "branching" effect was observed, i.e., two different trends exist. The analysis of the FD duration and recovery period reveals a correlation with the duration of the magnetic field enhancement. The strongest correlations are obtained for the dependence on combined solar wind parameters of the product of the FD duration and magnitude, implying that combined parameters are in fact true variables themselves, rather than just a product of variables. Conclusions: From the time lags we estimate that "the penetration depth" in the disturbance, at which FD onset becomes recognizable, is on

  4. 3D Polarized Radiative Transfer for Solar System Applications Using the public-domain HYPERION Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Robitaille, T.; Whitney, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a public-domain radiative transfer tool that will allow researchers to examine a wide-range of interesting solar system applications. Hyperion is a new three-dimensional continuum Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is designed to be as general as possible, allowing radiative transfer to be computed through a variety of three-dimensional grids (Robitaille, 2011, Astronomy & Astrophysics 536 A79). The main part of the code is problem-independent, and only requires the user to define the three-dimensional density structure, and the opacity and the illumination properties (as well as a few parameters that control execution and output of the code). Hyperion is written in Fortran 90 and parallelized using the MPI-2 standard. It is bundled with Python libraries that enable very flexible pre- and post-processing options (arbitrary shapes, multiple aerosol components, etc.). These routines are very amenable to user-extensibility. The package is currently distributed at www.hyperion-rt.org. Our presentation will feature 1) a brief overview of the code, including a description of the solar system-specific modifications that we have made beyond the capabilities in the original release; 2) Several solar system applications (i.e., Deep Impact Plume, Martian atmosphere, etc.); 3) discussion of availability and distribution of code components via www.hyperion-rt.org.

  5. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-15

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  6. Topological Origins of the Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro

    2008-01-01

    Although the slow solar wind has been studied for decades with both in situ and remote sensing observations, its origin is still a matter of intense debate. In the standard quasi-steady model, the slow wind is postulated to originate near coronal hole boundaries that define topologically well-behaved separatrices between open and closed field regions. In the interchange model, on the other hand, the slow wind is postulated to originate on open flux that is dynamically diffusing throughout the seemingly closed-field corona. We argue in favor of the quasi-steady scenario and propose that the slow wind is due to two effects: First, the open-closed boundary is highly complex due to the complexity of the photospheric flux distribution. Second, this boundary is continuously driven by the transport of magnetic helicity from the closed field region into the open. The implications of this model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and slow wind are discussed, and observational tests of the mode

  7. Investigating Coronal Origin of the Solar Wind, a Joint SOHO/UVCS and ACE/SWICS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y.; Zurbuchen, T.; Raymond, J. C.; Riley, P.; Strachan, L.

    2005-05-01

    The solar wind ion composition is generally 'frozen-in' within 5 solar radii of the Sun. Many characteristics in the elemental abundances measured in the solar wind are believed to be set in the chromospheric and low coronal levels. Therefore solar wind ion and elemental composition data combined with spectroscopic observations of the inner corona such as those from SOHO/UVCS, are ideal for investigating the coronal origin of the solar wind. We present such joint analysis using SOHO/UVCS and ACE/SWICS data along with a 3-D MHD traceback model. In October 1999, UVCS observed the west limb for 7 consecutive days with the passing of an equatorial coronal hole followed by an active region. This corresponds to a rarefaction transition from fast to slow wind seen by ACE. We present a correlation study of the electron temperature and elemental abundances between the corona and the solar wind from these two datasets. The solar wind ion and elemental composition measured by PLASTIC onboard STEREO would be valuable in conducting such analysis for investigating the formation of the solar wind.

  8. Coronal Holes and Solar Wind High-Speed Streams: I. Forecasting the Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2007-02-01

    We analyze the relationship between the coronal hole (CH) area/position and physical characteristics of the associated corotating high-speed stream (HSS) in the solar wind at 1 AU. For the analysis we utilize the data in the period DOY 25 125 of 2005, characterized by a very low coronal mass ejection (CME) activity. Distinct correlations between the daily averaged CH parameters and the solar wind characteristics are found, which allows us to forecast the solar wind velocity v, proton temperature T, proton density n, and magnetic field strength B, several days in advance in periods of low CME activity. The forecast is based on monitoring fractional areas A, covered by CHs in the meridional slices embracing the central meridian distance ranges [-40°,-20°], [-10°,10°], and [20°,40°]. On average, the peaks in the daily values of n, B, T, and v appear delayed by 1, 2, 3, and 4 days, respectively, after the area A attains its maximum in the central-meridian slice. The peak values of the solar wind parameters are correlated to the peak values of A, which provides also forecasting of the peak values of n, B, T, and v. The most accurate prediction can be obtained for the solar wind velocity, for which the average relative difference between the calculated and the observed peak values amounts to overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈10 %. The forecast reliability is somewhat lower in the case of T, B, and n ( overline{\\vertδ\\vert}≈20 , 30, and 40%, respectively). The space weather implications are discussed, including the perspectives for advancing the real-time calculation of the Sun Earth transit times of coronal mass ejections and interplanetary shocks, by including more realistic real-time estimates of the solar wind characteristics.

  9. Nanostructured p-type CZTS thin films prepared by a facile solution process for 3D p-n junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Nae; Sung, Shi-Joon; Sim, Jun-Hyoung; Yang, Kee-Jeong; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Kim, JunHo; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2015-07-01

    Nanoporous p-type semiconductor thin films prepared by a simple solution-based process with appropriate thermal treatment and three-dimensional (3D) p-n junction solar cells fabricated by depositing n-type semiconductor layers onto the nanoporous p-type thin films show considerable photovoltaic performance compared with conventional thin film p-n junction solar cells. Spin-coated p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films prepared using metal chlorides and thiourea show unique nanoporous thin film morphology, which is composed of a cluster of CZTS nanograins of 50-500 nm, and the obvious 3D p-n junction structure is fabricated by the deposition of n-type CdS on the nanoporous CZTS thin films by chemical bath deposition. The photovoltaic properties of 3D p-n junction CZTS solar cells are predominantly affected by the scale of CZTS nanograins, which is easily controlled by the sulfurization temperature of CZTS precursor films. The scale of CZTS nanograins determines the minority carrier transportation within the 3D p-n junction between CZTS and CdS, which are closely related with the photocurrent of series resistance of 3D p-n junction solar cells. 3D p-n junction CZTS solar cells with nanograins below 100 nm show power conversion efficiency of 5.02%, which is comparable with conventional CZTS thin film solar cells. PMID:26061271

  10. Variations of the solar wind and solar cycle in the last 300 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.; Silverman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The past history of the solar wind and solar cycle, inferred from records of geomagnetics and aurora, is examined. Records show that the solar wind apparently varied in a systematic manner throughout the period from 1770 to 1857 and that the period around 1810 resembled the 1901 minimum geomagnetic disturbance. Results show that the solar wind and hence the Sun changes on a time scale long compared to a solar cycle and short compared to the Maunder minimum. The inclusion of a study on the solar wind and solar cycle variations for the SCADM mission is discussed.

  11. On Determination of 3D Morphology and Plasma Properties of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Davis, John M.; Moore, Ronald; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An earlier analysis preformed and published will be revisited and applied to SECCHI's observations. Using coronal models and imaging-rendering techniques we will investigate several important facts regarding the solar stereographic mission. A synthesized image will be presented formed from integrating the emission from the volume elements along the line-of-sight path through a three-dimensional volume. We used analysis of pairs of these synthesized images with various angular perspectives to investigate the effect of angular separation on mission objectives. The resulting images and analysis provide guidelines for developing a stereographic mission analysis program.

  12. ISEE-1 and ISEE-2 fast plasma experiment and the ISEE-1 solar wind experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Felthauser, H. E.; Glore, J. P.; Paschmann, G.; Hemmerich, P.; Lehmann, K.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    Identical fast plasma experiment (FPE) systems were placed on the ISEE-1 and ISEE-2 spacecraft. The FPE consists of three high efficiency 90 deg spherical section electrostatic analyzers using large secondary emitters and discrete dynode multipliers to detect analyzed particles. Two of them, viewing in opposite directions, produce complete 2D velocity distribution measurements of both protons and electrons every spacecraft revolution. A third FPE analyzer with a divided emitter measures 3D distributions at a slower rate. ISEE-1 also carries a solar-wind experiment (SWE) to measure solar-wind ions with high resolution. The SWE is composed of two 150 deg spherical section analyzers using the same set of plates. The two acceptance fans are tilted with respect to each other so that 3D characteristics of the ion distributions can be derived.

  13. Solar Prominences Embedded in Flux Ropes: Morphological Features and Dynamics from 3D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Luna, M.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Wright, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    The temporal evolution of a solar prominence inserted in a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope is investigated numerically. Using the model of Titov & Démoulin under the regime of weak twist, the cold and dense prominence counteracts gravity by modifying the initially force-free magnetic configuration. In some cases a quasi-stationary situation is achieved after the relaxation phase, characterized by the excitation of standing vertical oscillations. These oscillations show a strong attenuation with time produced by the mechanism of continuum damping due to the inhomogeneous transition between the prominence and solar corona. The characteristic period of the vertical oscillations does not depend strongly on the twist of the flux rope. Nonlinearity is responsible for triggering the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with the vertical oscillations and that eventually produces horizontal structures. Contrary to other configurations in which the longitudinal axis of the prominence is permeated by a perpendicular magnetic field, like in unsheared arcades, the orientation of the prominence along the flux rope axis prevents the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and therefore the appearance of vertical structuring along this axis.

  14. MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION DYNAMICS FROM 3D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dário; Charbonneau, Paul; Miesch, Mark

    2015-02-10

    The form of solar meridional circulation is a very important ingredient for mean field flux transport dynamo models. However, a shroud of mystery still surrounds this large-scale flow, given that its measurement using current helioseismic techniques is challenging. In this work, we use results from three-dimensional global simulations of solar convection to infer the dynamical behavior of the established meridional circulation. We make a direct comparison between the meridional circulation that arises in these simulations and the latest observations. Based on our results, we argue that there should be an equatorward flow at the base of the convection zone at mid-latitudes, below the current maximum depth helioseismic measures can probe (0.75 R{sub ⊙}). We also provide physical arguments to justify this behavior. The simulations indicate that the meridional circulation undergoes substantial changes in morphology as the magnetic cycle unfolds. We close by discussing the importance of these dynamical changes for current methods of observation which involve long averaging periods of helioseismic data. Also noteworthy is the fact that these topological changes indicate a rich interaction between magnetic fields and plasma flows, which challenges the ubiquitous kinematic approach used in the vast majority of mean field dynamo simulations.

  15. Steady state asymmetric planetary electrical induction. [by solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horning, B. L.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic solution is presented for the steady state electric and magnetic fields induced by the motional electric field of the solar wind in the atmosphere or interior of a planet that is asymmetrically surrounded by solar wind plasma. The electrically conducting ionosphere or interior must be in direct electrical contact with the solar wind over the day side of the planet. The conducting region of the planet is modeled by a sphere or a spherical shell of arbitrarily stratified electrical conductivity. A monoconducting cylindrical cavity is assumed to extend downstream on the night side of the planet. The solar wind is assumed to be highly conducting so that the induced fields are confined to the planet and cavity. Induced currents close as sheet currents at the solar wind-cavity and solar wind-planet interfaces. Numerical evaluations of the analytic formulas are carried out for a uniformly conducting spherical model.

  16. Interpretation of Solar Wind Ion Composition Measurements from Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esser, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The ion compositions measured in situ in the solar wind are important since the ion fractions carry information on the plasma conditions in the inner corona. The conditions in the inner corona define the properties of the solar wind plasma flow. Thus, if the ion fraction measurements can be used to unravel some of the plasma parameters in the inner corona, they will provide a valuable contribution to solving the heating and acceleration problem of the solar wind. The ion charge states in the solar wind carry information on electron temperature, electron density and ion flow speed. They are also sensitive to the shape of the electron distribution function. Through carefully modeling the solar wind and calculating the ion fractions predicted for different solar wind conditions, constraints on the electron temperature and ion flow speeds can be placed if the electron density is measured using polarization brightness measurements.

  17. Variations of Strahl Properties with Fast and Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Gurgiolo, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The interplanetary solar wind electron velocity distribution function generally shows three different populations. Two of the components, the core and halo, have been the most intensively analyzed and modeled populations using different theoretical models. The third component, the strahl, is usually seen at higher energies, is confined in pitch-angle, is highly field-aligned and skew. This population has been more difficult to identify and to model in the solar wind. In this work we make use of the high angular, energy and time resolution and three-dimensional data of the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer to identify and analyze this component in the ambient solar wind during high and slow speed solar wind. The moment density and fluid velocity have been computed by a semi-numerical integration method. The variations of solar wind density and drift velocity with the general build solar wind speed could provide some insight into the source, origin, and evolution of the strahl.

  18. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  19. Morphology of Pseudostreamers and Solar Wind Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The solar dynamo and photospheric convection lead to three main types of structures extending from the solar surface into the corona – active regions, solar filaments (prominences when observed at the limb) and coronal holes. These structures exist over a wide range of scales, and are interlinked with each other in evolution and dynamics. Active regions can form clusters of magnetic activity and the strongest overlie sunspots. In the decay of active regions, the boundaries separating opposite magnetic polarities (neutral lines) develop the specific structures called filament channels above which filaments form. In the presence of flux imbalance decaying active regions can also give birth to lower latitude coronal holes. The accumulation of magnetic flux at coronal hole boundaries also creates the conditions for filament formation: polar crown filaments are permanently present at the boundaries of the polar coronal holes. Middle-latitude and equatorial coronal holes - the result of active region evolution - can create pseudostreamers (PSs) if other coronal holes of the same polarity are present. While helmet streamers form between open fields of opposite polarities, the pseudostreamer, characterized by a smaller coronal imprint, typically shows a more prominent straight ray or stalk extending from the corona. The pseudostreamer base at photospheric heights is multipolar; often one observes tripolar magnetic configurations with two neutral lines - where filaments can form - separating the coronal holes. Here we discuss the specific role of filament channels on pseudostreamer topology and on solar wind properties. 1D numerical analysis of PSs shows that the properties of the solar wind from around PSs depend on the presence/absence of filament channels, number of channels and chirality at the PS base low in the corona.

  20. Solar wind interaction with comets - Lessons from Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Neugebauer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Data on the solar wind interaction with Venus are examined for the purpose of comparison with similar processes that may occur in comets. Attention is given to bow shock, magnetosheath, ionopause, ionosphere, and magnetotail of Venus. These features are compared with, respectively, the bow shock, magnetosheath, contact surface, coma, and plasma tail of a comet. It is concluded that observations of the solar wind interaction with Venus should provide new insight into the solar wind interaction with comets.

  1. Radial evolution of the energy density of solar wind fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of transport theories appropriate to a radially expanding solar wind, we describe new results for the radial evolution of the energy density in solar wind fluctuations at MHD scales. These models include the effects of 'mixing' and driving as well as the possibility of non-isotropic MHD turbulence. Implications of these results for solar wind heating, cosmic ray diffusion and interstellar pick-up ions will also be addressed.

  2. MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES FROM 3D MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Luna, M.

    2015-01-20

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability.

  3. What Determines the Solar Wind Speed ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. K.; Fujiki, K.; Kojima, M.; Tokumaru, M.; Hirano, M.; Baba, D.; Yamasita, M.; Hakamada, K.

    2005-05-01

    Recent observations by Interplanetary Scintillation measurements by Nagoya-STEL group (Hirano et al.2003; Kojima et al.2004) show that solar wind speed is well-correlated with B/f, where B is radial magnetic field strength at the solar surface and f is a super-radial expansion factor of open flux tubes. We show that this correlation is nicely explained by dissipation of Alfven waves no matter what types of the wave dissipation processes operate. B determines the input energy flux of Alfven waves and f controls adiabatic loss of the wave energy, so that B/f is an important control parameter which determines the solar wind speed. (reference ) [1] Hirano, M., Kojima, M., Tokumaru, M., Fujiki, K., Ohmi, T., Yamashita, M, Hakamada, K., and Hayashi, K. 2003,, Eos Trans. AGU, 84(46), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SH21B-0164 [2] Kojima, M., K. Fujiki, M. Hirano, M. Tokumaru, T. Ohmi, and K. Hakamada, 2004, "The Sun and the heliosphere as an Integrated System", Giannina Poletto and Steven T. Suess, Eds. Kluwer Academic Publishers, in press

  4. Supersonic Solutions of the Solar Wind Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1994-12-01

    We re-examine the inviscid solar-wind equations with heat conduction from below, and establish a fundamentally new approach for finding solar and plane- tary solutions. Although the problem is fourth order, only two independent integration constants can be assigned, since two boundary conditions that are required to specify well-behaved supersonic solutions determine the values of the other two constants. The solar-wind models of Noble and Scarf (Ap. J., 1963-65), are essentially accurate for practical purposes, but in a fundamental sense they are not self-consistent. At the supersonic point, the ratio of thermal energy to gravitational potential, (kTr/GMm), must lie in a narrow range, between 0.4375 and about 0.40, to permit well-behaved supersonic solutions for ionized hydrogen. For a super- sonic solution, this ratio uniquely determines the escape flux, the energy flux per particle, and the temperature gradient at infinity. For blowoff of the atmospheres of planets with diatomic molecular atmo- spheres, this range is lower but still quite narrow. These limits seriously constrain the physical conditions wherein hydrodynamic "blowoff" of planetary atmospheres can develop. In addition, an atmosphere having blowoff conditions is adiabatically unstable just above the sonic level.

  5. Elemental and charge state composition of the fast solar wind observed with SMS instruments on WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Galvin, A. B.; Ipavich, F. M.; Hamilton, D. C.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.; Fisk, L. A.; Wilken, B.

    1995-01-01

    The elemental composition and charge state distributions of heavy ions of the solar wind provide essential information about: (1) atom-ion separation processes in the solar atmosphere leading to the 'FIP effect' (the overabundance of low First Ionization potential (FIP) elements in the solar wind compared to the photosphere); and (2) coronal temperature profiles, as well as mechanisms which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. This information is required for solar wind acceleration models. The SWICS instrument on Ulysses measures for all solar wind flow conditions the relative abundance of about 8 elements and 20 charge states of the solar wind. Furthermore, the Ulysses high-latitude orbit provides an unprecedented look at the solar wind from the polar coronal holes near solar minimum conditions. The MASS instrument on the WIND spacecraft is a high-mass resolution solar wind ion mass spectrometer that will provide routinely not only the abundances and charge state of all elements easily measured with SWICS, but also of N, Mg, S. The MASS sensor was fully operational at the end of 1994 and has sampled the in-ecliptic solar wind composition in both the slow and the corotating fast streams. This unique combination of SWICS on Ulysses and MASS on WIND allows us to view for the first time the solar wind from two regions of the large coronal hole. Observations with SWICS in the coronal hole wind: (1) indicate that the FIP effect is small; and (2) allow us determine the altitude of the maximum in the electron temperature profile, and indicate a maximum temperature of approximately 1.5 MK. New results from the SMS instruments on Wind will be compared with results from SWICS on Ulysses.

  6. Self-assembly synthesis of precious-metal-free 3D ZnO nano/micro spheres with excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production from solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Si-yao; Zhao, Tie-jun; Jin, Zu-quan; Wan, Xiao-mei; Wang, Peng-gang; Shang, Jun; Han, Song

    2015-10-01

    A simple and straightforward solution growth routine is developed to prepare microporous 3D nano/micro ZnO microsphere with a large BET surface area of 288 m2 g-1 at room temperature. The formation mechanism of the hierarchical 3D nano/micro ZnO microsphere and its corresponding hydrogen evolution performance has been deeply discussed. In particular, this novel hierarchical 3D ZnO microspheres performs undiminished hydrogen evolution for at least 24 h under simulated solar light illumination, even under the condition of no precious metal as cocatalyst. Since the complex production process of photocatalysts and high cost of precious metal cocatalyst remains a major constraint that hinders the application of solar water splitting, this 3D nano/micro ZnO microspheres could be expected to be applicable in the precious-metal-free solar water splitting system due to its merits of low cost, simple procedure and high catalytic activity.

  7. Magnetic effects in Venus/solar wind interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program is to better understand the interaction of a magnetized solar wind with the Venus atmosphere through the use of numerical solutions of the time-dependent, 2-D and 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Due to the more modest CPU requirements for the 2-D simulations, they were used for studies in which useful information not dependent on the third dimension could be obtained. The 2-D simulations served several purposes in addition to providing useful physical insight. They were used to determine the numerical parameters required in the 3-D studies, such as the grid spacing required to resolve particular features, and the damping that must be included to remove high-frequency oscillations. Among the specific studies performed with support from this grant that are discussed in this report are the following: comparison with other available models for purposes of testing the code and obtaining a baseline with which to evaluate the effects of additional physical processes, effects of a finite planet conductivity, bow shock standoff distance, and formation of the magnetic barrier and slippage of the magnetic field around the planet. A brief description of the methodology is presented before discussing the results.

  8. Global Magnetospheric Simulations: coupling with ionospheric and solar wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Amaya, Jorge; Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Vapirev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    We present results on the global fully kinetic model of the magnetosphere of the Earth. The simulations are based on the iPic3D code [1] that treats kinetically all plasma species solving implicitly the equations of motion for electrons and ions, coupled with the Maxwell equations. We present results of our simulations and discuss the coupling at the inner boundary near the Earth with models of the ionosphere and at the outer boundary with models of the arriving solar wind. The results are part of the activities of the Swiff FP7 project: www.swiff.eu [1] Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin, Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Volume 80, Issue 7, March 2010, Pages 1509-1519, ISSN 0378-4754, 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038 [2] Giovanni Lapenta, Particle simulations of space weather, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 231, Issue 3, 1 February 2012, Pages 795-821, ISSN 0021-9991, 10.1016/j.jcp.2011.03.035.

  9. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Marissa; Gyalay, Szilard; Withers, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is often said to be rotationally driven, with strong centrifugal stresses due to large spatial scales and a rapid planetary rotation period. For example, the main auroral emission at Jupiter is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction but is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma. Additionally, processes like tail reconnection are also thought to be driven, at least in part, by processes internal to the magnetosphere. While the solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. We will report on the results of a comprehensive, quantitative study of the influence of the solar wind on various magnetospheric data sets measured by the Galileo mission from 1996 to 2003. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter, we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure. We can use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration, which in turn will affect the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission. We also consider whether there is evidence that reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions or that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the magnetic field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  10. The solar wind during current and past solar minima and maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbo, J.-L.; Richardson, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents solar wind data from the last five solar cycles. We review solar wind parameters over the four solar minima and five maxima for which spacecraft data are available and show the recovery from the last very weak minimum to the current solar maximum. The solar wind magnetic field, speed, and density have remained anomalously low in this time period. However, the distributions of these parameters about the (lower than normal) average are similar to those from previous solar minima and maxima. This result suggests that the acceleration mechanism for the recent weak solar wind is probably not significantly different from earlier solar cycles. The He++/H+ ratio variation with solar cycle continues to be a function of speed, but the most recent solar minimum has significantly lower ratios than in the previous solar cycle.

  11. The very slow solar wind: Properties, origin and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Diaz, Eduardo; Rouillard, Alexis P.; Lavraud, Benoit; Segura, Kevin; Tao, Chihiro; Pinto, Rui; Sheeley, N. R.; Plotnikov, Illya

    2016-04-01

    Solar wind slower than 300 km/s, hereafter termed very slow solar wind (VSSW), is seldom observed at 1 AU. It was, however, commonly measured inside 0.7 AU by the two Helios spacecraft, particularly during solar maximum. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling reveals that the disappearance of VSSW at 1 AU is the result of its interaction with faster solar wind. The acceleration and compression of the VSSW contributes to the observed highly variable structure of the slow solar wind at 1 AU. The VSSW usually contains the heliospheric plasma sheet and current sheet. It has higher density and lower temperature than the regular slow solar wind, extending the known scaling laws below 300 km/s. Its helium abundance increases with solar activity even more significantly than the slow solar wind. Contrary to faster solar winds, the helium ions in the VSSW are slower than the dominant protons. Combining a Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model with ballistic back tracing, we study the source region of the VSSW. We show that the proton density flux for the VSSW is much higher than for the faster winds, particularly at solar maximum.

  12. Corrigendum to "Measuring the 3-D wind vector with a weight-shiftmicrolight aircraft" published in Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 1421-1444, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Junkermann, W.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Schmid, H. P.; Foken, T.

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates whether the 3-D wind vector can be measured reliably from a highly transportable and low-cost weight-shift microlight aircraft. We draw up a transferable procedure to accommodate flow distortion originating from the aircraft body and -wing. This procedure consists of the analysis of aircraft dynamics and seven successive calibration steps. For our aircraft the horizontal wind components receive their greatest single amendment (14 %, relative to the initial uncertainty) from the correction of flow distortion magnitude in the dynamic pressure computation. Conversely the vertical wind component is most of all improved (31 %) by subsequent steps considering the 3-D flow distortion distribution in the flow angle computations. Therein the influences of the aircraft's trim (53 %), as well as changes in the aircraft lift (16 %) are considered by using the measured lift coefficient as explanatory variable. Three independent lines of analysis are used to evaluate the quality of the wind measurement: (a) A wind tunnel study in combination with the propagation of sensor uncertainties defines the systems input uncertainty to ≈0.6 m s-1 at the extremes of a 95 % confidence interval. (b) During severe vertical flight manoeuvres the deviation range of the vertical wind component does not exceed 0.3 m s-1. (c) The comparison with ground based wind measurements yields an overall operational uncertainty (root mean square error) of ≈0.4 m s-1 for the horizontal and ≈0.3 m s-1 for the vertical wind components. No conclusive dependence of the uncertainty on the wind magnitude (<8 m s-1) or true airspeed (ranging from 23-30 m s-1) is found. Hence our analysis provides the necessary basis to study the wind measurement precision and spectral quality, which is prerequisite for reliable Eddy-Covariance flux measurements.

  13. Pluto's interaction with the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Elliott, H. A.; Weidner, S.; Valek, P.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Bagenal, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Ebert, R. W.; Funsten, H. O.; Horanyi, M.; McNutt, R. L.; Moser, C.; Schwadron, N. A.; Strobel, D. F.; Young, L. A.; Ennico, K.; Olkin, C. B.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.

    2016-05-01

    This study provides the first observations of Plutogenic ions and their unique interaction with the solar wind. We find ~20% solar wind slowing that maps to a point only ~4.5 RP upstream of Pluto and a bow shock most likely produced by comet-like mass loading. The Pluto obstacle is a region of dense heavy ions bounded by a "Plutopause" where the solar wind is largely excluded and which extends back >100 RP into a heavy ion tail. The upstream standoff distance is at only ~2.5 RP. The heavy ion tail contains considerable structure, may still be partially threaded by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and is surrounded by a light ion sheath. The heavy ions (presumably CH4+) have average speed, density, and temperature of ~90 km s-1, ~0.009 cm-3, and ~7 × 105 K, with significant variability, slightly increasing speed/temperature with distance, and are N-S asymmetric. Density and temperature are roughly anticorrelated yielding a pressure ~2 × 10-2 pPa, roughly in balance with the interstellar pickup ions at ~33 AU. We set an upper bound of <30 nT surface field at Pluto and argue that the obstacle is largely produced by atmospheric thermal pressure like Venus and Mars; we also show that the loss rate down the tail (~5 × 1023 s-1) is only ~1% of the expected total CH4 loss rate from Pluto. Finally, we observe a burst of heavy ions upstream from the bow shock as they are becoming picked up and tentatively identify an IMF outward sector at the time of the NH flyby.

  14. Elemental composition variations in the solar wind: Comparisons between Ulysses and ACE within different solar wind regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilleri, P.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Wiens, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The elemental composition of the solar wind is likely established at the base of the corona, a conclusion based on the observed dependence of solar wind abundances on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. Although the plasma conditions within the ecliptic solar wind are highly variable, the elemental composition is less so, and is an indicator of the nature of the solar source. In particular, coronal hole (CH, fast) solar wind tends to have less of a FIP enhancement of the low -FIP elements (e.g., Fe, Mg, Si) than interstream (IS, slow) solar wind. The elemental composition of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is more variable, but tends to be similar to IS composition. The question we address here is how much does the average composition of the different solar wind regimes vary over the course of the solar cycle and between solar cycles. For the most recent solar cycle, which included the unusually deep and prolonged solar minimum (2006 - 2010) Lepri et al. (2013) have shown measurable drifts in the elemental composition within solar wind regimes using data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS). In contrast, von Steiger and Zurbuchen (2011) have shown using Ulysses SWIC data that the composition of the very fast polar coronal hole flow has remained constant. Here, we extend the Lepri et al. ecliptic analysis to include data from Ulysses, which allows us to expand the analysis to the previous solar cycle (1990 - 2001), as well as check consistency with their recent solar cycle results. (Note that although Ulysses was nominally a polar mission, it spent considerable time at low latitudes as well.) A major driver for this investigation is the Genesis Mission solar wind sample analysis. Namely, was the solar wind sampled by Genesis between late 2001 and early 2004 typical of the solar wind over longer time scales, and hence a representative sample of the long-term solar wind, or was it somehow unique

  15. 3D Solarweb: A solar cadaster in the Italian Alpine landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nex, F.; Remondino, F.; Agugiaro, G.; De Flippi, R.; Poletti, M.; Furlanello, C.; Menegon, S.; Dallago, G.; Fontanari, S.

    2013-10-01

    The paper presents the research carried out in the on-going 3DSolarWeb project to test and implement a complete pipeline for the generation of a solar cadastre of building roofs located in alpine areas. The project aims at providing reliable results in a costeffective way, using (low resolution) available data and new aerial imagery acquisitions as input. The environmental context is digitally represented using already existing low resolution LiDAR data (1-2 m resolution), while the urban area is modelled using high resolution aerial images (10-20 cm GSD) and photogrammetric DSM. Reliable models and algorithms for the estimation of the incoming sun radiance are then adopted and a WebGIS is set up for the interactive calculation of the photovoltaic (PV) potential in a raster-based form. The paper summarizes the entire pipeline and the results (Figure 1) achieved on the test areas to show the potentialities of the method and the web-based service.

  16. Genesis Solar Wind Samples: Update of Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.; Allton, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind atoms for 28 months with a variety of collectors. The array wafer collector availability is displayed in the online catalog. The purpose of this report is to update the community on availability of array wafer samples and to preview other collectors which are in the process of being added to the online catalog. A total of fifteen pure materials were selected based on engineering and science requirements. Most of the materials were semiconductor wafers which were mounted on the arrays.

  17. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  18. MODELING STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS THROUGH DIRECT NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF 3D-MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Malapaka, Shiva Kumar; Mueller, Wolf-Christian

    2013-09-01

    Statistical properties of the Sun's photospheric turbulent magnetic field, especially those of the active regions (ARs), have been studied using the line-of-sight data from magnetograms taken by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and several other instruments. This includes structure functions and their exponents, flatness curves, and correlation functions. In these works, the dependence of structure function exponents ({zeta}{sub p}) of the order of the structure functions (p) was modeled using a non-intermittent K41 model. It is now well known that the ARs are highly turbulent and are associated with strong intermittent events. In this paper, we compare some of the observations from Abramenko et al. with the log-Poisson model used for modeling intermittent MHD turbulent flows. Next, we analyze the structure function data obtained from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of homogeneous, incompressible 3D-MHD turbulence in three cases: sustained by forcing, freely decaying, and a flow initially driven and later allowed to decay (case 3). The respective DNS replicate the properties seen in the plots of {zeta}{sub p} against p of ARs. We also reproduce the trends and changes observed in intermittency in flatness and correlation functions of ARs. It is suggested from this analysis that an AR in the onset phase of a flare can be treated as a forced 3D-MHD turbulent system in its simplest form and that the flaring stage is representative of decaying 3D-MHD turbulence. It is also inferred that significant changes in intermittency from the initial onset phase of a flare to its final peak flaring phase are related to the time taken by the system to reach the initial onset phase.

  19. Chandra Observations and Modeling of Geocoronal Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission During Solar Wind Gusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbleuth, Marc; Wargelin, Bradford J.; Juda, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O7+ collide with neutral gas. The best known examples of this occur around comets, but SWCX emission also arises in the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere and throughout the heliosphere as neutral H and He from the interstellar medium flows into the solar system. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises much of the soft X-ray background and is seen in every X-ray observation. Geocoronal emission, although usually weaker than heliospheric emission, arises within a few tens of Earth radii and therefore responds much more quickly (on time scales of less than an hour) to changes in solar wind intensity than the widely distributed heliospheric emission.We have studied a dozen Chandra observations when the flux of solar wind protons and O7+ ions was at its highest. These gusts of wind cause correspondingly abrupt changes in geocoronal SWCX X-ray emission,which may or may not be apparent in Chandra data depending on a given observation's line of sight through the magnetosphere. We compare observed changes in the X-ray background with predictions from a fully 3D analysis of SWCX emission based on magnetospheric simulations using the BATS-R-US model.

  20. On rotational forces in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Isenberg, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    Solar rotational forces affecting the flow of minor ions in the solar wind are considered as corotating with the sun. Cold, noninteracting charged particles in the magnetic and gravitational fields of the sun rotate with the angular velocity of the sun, and calculations of lowest bulk order velocities show that differences in particle velocities decrease with increasing distance from the sun. A centrifugal potential in the corotating frame implies that ion motion is independent of protons, with velocities determined by the potential, which monotonically decreases without limit. The potential dominates the initial kinetic energy of the particles, and the equality of velocities within the potential is not due to interactions between particles as claimed by Mackenzie et al. (1979).

  1. Solar wind turbulence as a driver of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikechukwu Ugwu, Ernest Benjamin; Nneka Okeke, Francisca; Ugonabo, Obiageli Josephine

    2016-07-01

    We carried out simultaneous analyses of interplanetary and geomagnetic datasets for the period of (solar Maunder) least (2009) and maximum (2002) solar activity to determine the nature of solar wind turbulence on geomagnetic activity using AE, ASY-D, and ASY-H indices. We determined the role played by Alfvénic fluctuations in the solar wind so as to find out the nature of the turbulence. Our analyses showed that solar wind turbulence play a role in geomagnetic processes at high latitudes during periods of low and high solaractivity but does not have any effect at mid-low latitudes.

  2. Plasmon-induced efficiency enhancement on dye-sensitized solar cell by a 3D TNW-AuNP layer.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yin-Cheng; Chen, Po-Hung; Chen, Jing-Zhi; Chen, Jau-An; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh

    2015-01-28

    A new 3D TNW-AuNP plasmonic electrode consists of antireflective (AR) TiO2 nanowires (TNWs) (∼600 nm thickness) serving as light-harvesting antennae coupling with Au nanoparticles (NPs). A huge red-shift of 55 nm is observed in surface plasmon spectra for the Au (11 nm) plasmonic electrode that has 11 nm size Au NPs, whereby (111) lattice planes have a specific bonding with the TiO2 (101) planes. Remarkable red-shift is mainly attributed to the localized electric field improvement resulting from the plasmonic coupling effect between the Au NPs and the Au-TiO2 hybrids. After TiCl4 treatment, this favorable Au (11 nm) nanostructure takes advantage of harvesting photons to increase the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) from 6.25% to 9.73%. PMID:25548958

  3. Magnetic Influences on the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2016-01-01

    The Sun is our closest star, and even with the ability to resolve fine structure, there are several large mysteries that remain unsolved. One of these unanswered questions is how the supersonic outflow from the Sun, the solar wind, is generated and accelerated. In this dissertation, I have investigated the role of Alfvén waves in heating the corona and accelerating the wind. I focus on modeling of flux tubes that are open to the heliosphere, i.e. bundles of magnetic field that stretch beyond a few solar radii into the heliosphere. In these flux tubes, Alfvén waves are launched by the shaking of the footpoints from the convective motions of granulation on the solar photosphere. I present results of modeling efforts in one dimension that investigate how this process changes for a variety of different magnetic field structures over a solar cycle and three-dimensional modeling of time-dependent processes that unlock a connection between pico- and nanoflare-scale events and the turbulent heating generated by counter-propagating Alfvén waves. In addition to computational modeling, I also present efforts to find magnetic thresholds in observations of small-scale network jets seen with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). These jets were first discovered by IRIS due to their short lifetimes (10s of seconds) and small size (widths of 100s of kilometers). The findings for this project suggest that the modeled Alfvén-wave-driven turbulence is consistent with these network jets.

  4. Suprathermal Tails in Solar Wind Oxygen and Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popecki, M. A.; Galvin, A.; Klecker, B.; Kucharek, H.; Kistler, L.; Bochsler, P.; Blush, L.; Möbius, E.

    2008-12-01

    High speed suprathermal tails with a fixed energy spectrum have been observed in solar wind H and He2+, as well as in He+ pickup ions (e.g. Gloeckler et al., 2007). These tails appear to have a persistent and constant power law energy spectrum, unchanged in a variety of solar conditions. The presence of the tails have implications for particle injection into the interplanetary shock acceleration process. The suprathermal tails of solar wind Fe and O have been investigated with the STEREO/PLASTIC mass spectrometer. The energy spectra of solar wind O and Fe will be presented for periods of slow and fast solar wind. Variations in energy spectra are observed in both species at speeds up to 1.8 times the solar wind speed.

  5. QBO in solar wind speed and its relation to ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocke, Klemens

    2009-02-01

    Corotating coronal holes of the Sun induce fluctuations of the solar wind speed in the vicinity of the Earth. The fluctuations of solar wind speed are closely correlated with geomagnetic activity. Solar wind speed has been monitored by satellites since the mid 1960s. The long-term series of solar wind speed show enhanced amplitudes at the solar rotation period 27.3 days and at its harmonics 13.6 and 9.1 days. The amplitude series are modulated by a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) with a period of 1.75a (21 months) as bispectral analysis reveals. A 1.75a QBO component is also present in the equatorial, zonal wind of the stratosphere at 30 hPa, in addition to the well-known QBO component at the period 2.4a (29 months). The solar wind QBO may influence the stratospheric QBO, the global electric circuit, and cloud cover by modulation of ionospheric electric fields, cosmic ray flux, and particle precipitation. For a further analysis, the series of solar wind speed fluctuations are bandpass-filtered at the period 1.75a. The filtered series provide the amplitude of the solar wind QBO as function of time. The maxima of the solar wind QBO series are correlated with those of the ENSO index. The analysis indicate that the solar wind QBO may trigger the ENSO activity. This result is speculative at the moment. However, the focus of the study is on the investigation of the long-term modulations of the short-term (4-45 days) oscillations of the solar wind speed which are quite unexplored yet.

  6. Latitudinal Dependence of Coronal Hole-Associated Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-05-01

    The fast solar wind can have at least two different coronal sources: high-latitude, polar coronal holes (PCH) and low-latitude, equatorial coronal holes (ECH). The in-situ differences in the PCH and ECH winds have not been well studied, nor have the differences in their evolution over the solar cycles. Ulysses' 19 years of observations from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present, provide us with measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles, which allow us to study the in-situ properties and evolution of the coronal hole-associated solar wind at different latitudes. In this work, we focus on the PCH and ECH solar winds during the minima between solar cycles 22-23 and 23-24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses, and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton dynamics, heavy ion composition, elemental abundance, and magnetic field properties of the PCH wind and ECH wind, with a special focus on their differences during the recent two solar minima. We also include the slow and hot, streamer-associated (ST) wind as a reference in the comparison. The comparison of PCH and ECH wind shows that: 1) the in-situ properties of ECH and PCH winds are significantly different during the two solar minima, and 2) the two types of coronal hole-associated solar wind respond differently to changes in solar activity strength from cycle 23 to cycle 24.

  7. The floor in the solar wind: status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    Cliver & Ling (2010) recently suggested that the solar wind had a floor or ground-state magnetic field strength at Earth of ~2.8 nT and that the source of the field was the slow solar wind. This picture has recently been given impetus by the evidence presented by Schrijver et al. (2011) that the Sun has a minimal magnetic state that was approached globally in 2009, a year in which Earth was imbedded in slow solar wind ~70% of the time. A precursor relation between the solar dipole field strength at solar minimum and the peak sunspot number (SSN MAX ) of the subsequent 11-yr cycle suggests that during Maunder-type minima (when SSN MAX was ~0), the solar polar field strength approaches zero - indicating weak or absent polar coronal holes and an increase to nearly ~100% in the time that Earth spends in slow solar wind.

  8. Are Solar Wind Reconnection Events Fossil Sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Karimabadi, H.; Scudder, J. D.; Roytershteyn, V.; Daughton, W. S.; Gosling, J. T.; Egedal, J.

    2010-12-01

    Studies of reconnection in the solar wind led by Gosling and collaborators have revealed surprising results that are posing serious challenges to current theoretical understanding of the reconnection process. This include observations of prolonged quasi-steady reconnection, low magnetic shear angles, and no real bulk heating (i.e., full thermalization rather than appearance of heating due to two beams) or substantial particle acceleration. In contrast, the theoretical expectations have been that reconnection leads to significant bulk heating and particle acceleration. Similarly, recent full particle simulations indicate that reconnection is generally time dependent. We have recently re-examined this apparent discrepancy between observations and theory and propose a resolution to these puzzling observations based on the concept of fossil reconnection site. We have performed large scale 2D fully kinetic simulations of reconnection to very long times to gain an understanding of reconnection structure as they would be seen in the observations. We find that reconnection weakens in time and approaches an asymptotic state which we refer to as fossil state. The properties of the fossil reconnection state explain several of the puzzling aspects of the observations. The implications of these findings for studies of solar wind reconnection are discussed.

  9. An asymmetric solar wind termination shock.

    PubMed

    Stone, Edward C; Cummings, Alan C; McDonald, Frank B; Heikkila, Bryant C; Lal, Nand; Webber, William R

    2008-07-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the solar wind termination shock at 83.7 au in the southern hemisphere, approximately 10 au closer to the Sun than found by Voyager 1 in the north. This asymmetry could indicate an asymmetric pressure from an interstellar magnetic field, from transient-induced shock motion, or from the solar wind dynamic pressure. Here we report that the intensity of 4-5 MeV protons accelerated by the shock near Voyager 2 was three times that observed concurrently by Voyager 1, indicating differences in the shock at the two locations. (Companion papers report on the plasma, magnetic field, plasma-wave and lower energy particle observations at the shock.) Voyager 2 did not find the source of anomalous cosmic rays at the shock, suggesting that the source is elsewhere on the shock or in the heliosheath. The small intensity gradient of Galactic cosmic ray helium indicates that either the gradient is further out in the heliosheath or the local interstellar Galactic cosmic ray intensity is lower than expected. PMID:18596802

  10. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  11. Electric conductivity of plasma in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important parameters in MHD description of the solar wind is the electric conductivity of plasma. There exist now two quite different approaches to the evaluation of this parameter. In the first one a value of conductivity taken from the most elaborated current theory of plasma should be used in calculations. The second one deals with the empirical, phenomenological value of conductivity. E.g.: configuration of interplanetary magnetic field, stretched by the expanding corona, depends on the magnitude of electrical conductivity of plasma in the solar wind. Knowing the main empirical features of the field configuration, one may estimate the apparent phenomenological value of resistance. The estimations show that the electrical conductivity should be approximately 10(exp 13) times smaller than that calculated by Spitzer. It must be noted that the empirical value should be treated with caution. Due to the method of its obtaining it may be used only for 'large-scale' description of slow processes like coronal expansion. It cannot be valid for 'quick' processes, changing the state of plasma, like collisions with obstacles, e.g., planets and vehicles. The second approach is well known in large-scale planetary hydrodynamics, stemming from the ideas of phenomenological thermodynamics. It could formulate real problems which should be solved by modern plasma physics, oriented to be adequate for complicated processes in space.

  12. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  13. Solar wind minor ions: Recent observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Systematic studies show that the minor ions generally travel with a common bulk speed and have temperatures roughly proportional to their masses. It was determined that (3)He(++) content varies greatly; (3)He(++)/(4)He(++) ranges from as high as 10(-12) values to below 2 x 10(-4). In some solar wind flows which can be related to energetic coronal events, the minor ions are found in unusual ionization states containing Fe(16+) as a prominent ion, showing that the states were formed at unusually high temperatures. Unexpectedly, in a few flows substantial quantities of (4)He(+) were detected, sometimes with ions identifiable as O(2+) and O(3+). Surprisingly, in some of these examples the ionization state is mixed showing that part of the plasma escaped the corona without attaining the usual million-degree temperatures while other parts were heated more nearly in the normal manner. Additionally, detailed studies of the minor ions increased our understanding of the coronal expansion. For example, such studies contributed to identifying near equatorial coronal streamers as the source of solar wind flows between high speed streams.

  14. Ulysses Composition, Plasma and Magnetic Field Observations of High Speed Solar wind Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    During 1992-3 as the Ulysses spacecraft passed in and out of the southern high speed solar wind stream, the Solar Wind Ion Spectrometer, SWICS made continuous composition and temperature measurements of all major solar wind ions.

  15. Using the Low Freeze-in Height of Heavy Elements to Validate a Global 3D Solar Model with an Upper Chromospheric Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, R.; van der Holst, B.; Landi, E.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Sokolov, I.; Manchester, W. B.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model extending from the top of the chromosphere to the inner heliosphere, combined with an ionic charge state evolution model for Carbon, Oxygen, Silicon and Iron ions. The MHD model is driven by Alfvenic turbulence, which is the sole source of heating. The inner boundary of the model is set at the top of the chromosphere with a temperature of 20,000K. Non ideal-MHD processes such as radiative cooling and electron heat conduction are included, as well as separate electron and proton temperatures. The speed, electron temperature and density distribution along magnetic field lines are extracted from the MHD solution and used as input to a charge state evolution model (Michigan Ionization Code, Landi et al. [2012]). Compared to similar analysis based on MHD models starting at the coronal base, where the electron temperature is already in the 1MK range, setting the inner boundary at 20,000K will allow us to fully characterize the evolution of the charge state distribution of the heavy elements accelerated into the slow and fast solar wind. In fact, the transition region is critical to the evolution of elements like Carbon and Oxygen, which are the most abundant heavy species observed by in-situ mass spectrometers. The predicted charge state distribution will be used to validate the global model in two ways. First, the predicted frozen-in charge state distribution can be directly compared to in-situ measurements in the heliosphere made by the SWICS instrument on board ACE and Ulysses. Second, the charge state values predicted in the inner corona (below 1.5 solar radii) can be combined with the CHIANTI database and the global model's 3D temperature and density distributions to calculate spectral line intensities and narrow-band images along any line of sight, to be compared with observations from the SOHO/EIT, STEREO/EUVI, Hinode/EIS and SDO/AIA instruments. We analyze both the solar minimum and maximum cases

  16. Solar wind velocity and temperature in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    At the end of 1992, the Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, and Voyager 2 spacecraft were at heliocentric distances of 56.0, 37.3, and 39.0 AU and heliographic latitudes of 3.3 deg N, 17.4 deg N, and 8.6 deg S, respectively. Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 are at similar celestial longitudes, while Pioneer 10 is on the opposite side of the Sun. All three spacecraft have working plasma analyzers, so intercomparison of data from these spacecraft provides important information about the global character of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. The averaged solar wind speed continued to exhibit its well-known variation with solar cycle: Even at heliocentric distances greater than 50 AU, the average speed is highest during the declining phase of the solar cycle and lowest near solar minimum. There was a strong latitudinal gradient in solar wind speed between 3 deg and 17 deg N during the last solar minimum, but this gradient has since disappeared. The solar wind temperature declined with increasing heliocentric distance out to a heliocentric distance of at least 20 AU; this decline appeared to continue at larger heliocentric distances, but temperatures in the outer heliosphere were suprisingly high. While Pioneer 10 and Voyager 2 observed comparable solar wind temperatures, the temperature at Pioneer 11 was significantly higher, which suggests the existence of a large-scale variation of temperature with heliographic longitude. There was also some suggestion that solar wind temperatures were higher near solar minimum.

  17. The solar wind in the third dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, M.

    1996-07-20

    For many years, solar-wind physicists have been using plasma and field data acquired near the ecliptic plane together with data on the scintillation of radio sources and remote sensing of structures in the solar corona to estimate the properties of the high-latitude solar wind. Because of the highly successful Ulysses mission, the moment of truth is now here. This paper summarizes the principal agreements and differences between the Ulysses observations and expectations. The speed of the high-latitude solar wind was even greater than anticipated. The strength of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field was found to be independent of latitude. The tilt of the heliospheric current sheet caused reverse corotating shocks to be observed to higher latitudes than forward corotating shocks. The energetic particles accelerated in these shocks were detected well poleward of the latitudes at which Ulysses observed the interaction regions themselves. As anticipated, there was a strong flux of outward propagating Alfven waves throughout the polar flow. Those waves were probably largely responsible for the smaller-than-anticipated increase of galactic cosmic rays with increasing latitude. As expected, the charge state or ionization temperature of heavy ions was lower in the polar flow than in low-latitude interstream flows. What was not anticipated was the correlation of elemental abundances with ionization temperatures; the Ulysses data revealed a connection between the first ionization time in the upper chromosphere and the final ionization state in the corona. As expected, transient events were detected to {approx}60 deg. latitude, but the properties of those high latitude transient flows held some surprises. At high latitudes, the speeds of the transient interplanetary plasma clouds were approximately the same as the speed of the ambient plasma and the expansion of the clouds drove forward and reverse shock pairs that had never been seen at low latitudes. At

  18. Turbulence in the solar wind: Kinetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Although a casual look at the fluctuating magnetic and velocity fields in the solar wind may be reminiscent of a chaotic and disordered flow, there is, nonetheless. considerable organization and structure in the temporal and spatial evolution of those fluctuations. Much of that evolution is controlled by processes operating on rather large scales for example, in the inner heliosphere, the fluctuations in magnetic and velocity are highly correlated in the sense of outward propagating Alfven waves. This correlation can be destroyed both in time and distance by the velocity gradients present between fast and slow streams and by other nonlinear processes which stir the medium, producing a turbulent cascade of energy from large to small scales. Many aspects of this turbulent evolution can be described using fluid models; however, at some scale the fluid approximation breaks down and a more detailed paradigm is necessary. The breakdown is evident in the power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations at scales approaching the wavelength of ion cyclotron waves. At those scales, as evident in Mariner 10 and other magnetometer data, the spectrum bends over and the fluctuations damp, possibly heating the ambient plasma. Some evidence for heating of the solar wind is present in the Voyager data. Fluid models can be modified to some extent to incorporate aspects of a kinetic treatment. This is done by modifying the dissipation terms in the fluid equations and by including extra terms, such as the Hall term. As the scale lengths of phenomena shrink further and approach the spatial and temporal scales characteristic of electron phenomena, the fluid description must be abandoned altogether and a fully kinetic treatment is required. One example is the generation of Langmuir solitons produced by the electron beams that generate type 3 solar radio bursts.

  19. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  20. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3: Technical Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-01

    Technical fact sheet outlining the key findings of Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3). NREL and GE find that with good system planning, sound engineering practices, and commercially available technologies, the Western grid can maintain reliability and stability during the crucial first minute after grid disturbances with high penetrations of wind and solar power.

  1. Solar and wind energy utilization in broiler production

    SciTech Connect

    Brinsfield, R.B.; Yaramanoglu, M.; Wheaton, F.

    1984-01-01

    Available solar and wind energy and both the electrical and thermal energy demand of a typical broiler facility were mathematically modeled based on 10 years of weather data for Salisbury, Maryland. The available energy was then compared with the broiler facility demands as a means of sizing solar and wind energy collection equipment to meet the demands.

  2. Correlations between solar wind parameters and auroral kilometric radiation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Dangelo, N.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between solar wind properties and the influx of energy into the nightside auroral region as indicated by the intensity of auroral kilometric radiation is investigated. Smoothed Hawkeye satellite observations of auroral radiation at 178, 100 and 56.2 kHz for days 160 through 365 of 1974 are compared with solar wind data from the composite Solar Wind Plasma Data Set, most of which was supplied by the IMP-8 spacecraft. Correlations are made between smoothed daily averages of solar wind ion density, bulk flow speed, total IMF strength, electric field, solar wind speed in the southward direction, solar wind speed multiplied by total IMF strength, the substorm parameter epsilon and the Kp index. The greatest correlation is found between solar wind bulk flow speed and auroral radiation intensity, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.78 for the 203 daily averages examined. A possible mechanism for the relationship may be related to the propagation into the nightside magnetosphere of low-frequency long-wavelength electrostatic waves produced in the magnetosheath by the solar wind.

  3. Feasibility study of a solar and wind powered desalinization device (SOWIDE). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garstang, M.; David, D.C.; Snow, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    The scope, need and feasibility of a solar-wind desalinization (SOWIDE) system is examined. A climatological study shows the scope and need where a water deficit, a saline source and solar and wind power coincide. Representative stations around the globe serve as examples. When climatological data are used, relatively few locations meet all requirements. Optimization of wind and solar energy through careful site selection would, however, greatly extend the use of an alternate energy powered desalinization system such as SOWIDE. The technical feasibility of SOWIDE is described in terms of the conceptual design which uses solar energy to heat impounded water, saturating a volume of air above the impoundment at the temperature of the water. The water vapor is extracted by condensation through a wind powered refrigerator. Latent heat is returned to the impoundment by the refrigerator fluid with additional heat provided by a pre-heater using heat from the brine discharge and by a resistance heater or stirrer driven by the wind generator. The important considerations of the design include the joint use of solar and wind power, optimization of the heat balance and the fact that the system operates at a low temperature which inhibits scaling and efficiency losses. Results show that the system will deliver 1 m/sup 3/ d/sup -1/ of fresh water at operating temperatures of 42 to 70/sup 0/C. At an operating temperature of 60/sup 0/C, the total power required is about 8 kW, equally partitioned between the solar and wind inputs. The operating temperatures and power requirements suggest that the SOWIDE system is technically feasible. Application of the system must await the testing of a prototype and an economic study.

  4. Feasibility study of a solar-and-wind-powered desalinization device (SOWIDE). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garstang, M.; David, D.C.; Snow, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    The scope, need and feasibility of a solar-wind desalinization (SOWIDE) system is examined. A climatological study shows the scope and need where a water deficit, a saline source and solar and wind power coincide. Representative stations around the globe serve as examples. When climatological data are used, relatively few locations meet all requirements. Optimization of wind and solar energy through careful site selection would, however, greatly extend the use of an alternate energy powered desalinization system such as SOWIDE. The technical feasibility of SOWIDE is described in terms of the conceptual design which uses solar energy to heat impounded water, saturating a volume of air above the impoundment at the temperature of the water. The water vapor is extracted by condensation through a wind powered refrigerator. Latent heat is returned to the impoundment by the refrigerator fluid with additional heat provided by a pre-heater using heat from the brine discharge and by a resistance heater or stirrer driven by the wind generator. The important considerations of the design include the joint use of solar and wind power, optimization of the heat balance and the fact that the system operates at a low temperature which inhibits scaling and efficiency losses. Results show that the system will deliver 1 m/sup 3/ d/sup -1/ of fresh water at operating temperatures of 42 to 70/sup 0/C. At an operating temperature of 60/sup 0/C, the total power required is about 8 kW, equally partitioned between the solar and wind inputs. The operating temperatures and power requirements suggest that the SOWIDE system is technically feasible. Application of the system must await the testing of a prototype and an economic study.

  5. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Hummon, M.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West.

  6. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Debra; Brinkman, Greg; Ibanez, E.; Florita, A.; Heaney, M.; Hodge, B. -M.; Hummon, M.; Stark, G.; King, J.; Lefton, S. A.; Kumar, N.; Agan, D.; Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

    2013-09-01

    The electric grid is a highly complex, interconnected machine, and changing one part of the grid can have consequences elsewhere. Adding wind and solar affects the operation of the other power plants and adding high penetrations can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) evaluated these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This built on Phase 1, one of the largest wind and solar integration studies ever conducted, which examined operational impacts of high wind and solar penetrations in the West(GE Energy 2010).

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, A. V.; Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2012-05-01

    We present initial results from a solar wind model that accounts for transport of turbulence and treats pickup protons as a separate fluid. The model is based on a numerical solution of the coupled set of mean-field Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations and small-scale turbulence transport equations in the region from 0.3-100 AU. The pickup protons are assumed to be comoving with the solar wind flow and described by separate mass and energy equations. The equations include the terms for energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons and for the plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. The momentum equation contains a term that describes the loss of momentumby the solar wind flow due to the charge exchangewith the interstellar neutral hydrogen.

  8. Geomagnetic responses to the solar wind and the solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.

    1975-01-01

    Following some historical notes, the formation of the magnetosphere and the magnetospheric tail is discussed. The importance of electric fields is stressed and the magnetospheric convection of plasma and magnetic field lines under the influence of large-scale magnetospheric electric fields is outlined. Ionospheric electric fields and currents are intimately related to electric fields and currents in the magnetosphere and the strong coupling between the two regions is discussed. The energy input of the solar wind to the magnetosphere and upper atmosphere is discussed in terms of the reconnection model where interplanetary magnetic field lines merge or connect with the terrestrial field on the sunward side of the magnetosphere. The merged field lines are then stretched behind earth to form the magnetotail so that kinetic energy from the solar wind is converted into magnetic energy in the field lines in the tail. Localized collapses of the crosstail current, which is driven by the large-scale dawn/dusk electric field in the magnetosphere, divert part of this current along geomagnetic field lines to the ionosphere, causing substorms with auroral activity and magnetic disturbances. The collapses also inject plasma into the radiation belts and build up a ring current. Frequent collapses in rapid succession constitute the geomagnetic storm.

  9. Solar-wind tritium limit and nuclear processes in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.; Damico, J.; Defelice, J.

    1975-01-01

    Tritium in Surveyor 3 material is measured, and the resulting H-3/H-1 ratio for the solar wind is applied in a solar flare-solar wind relation to investigate the mixing requirements for the solar atmosphere. The flare-wind relation is derived. None of the tritium can be attributed to solar-wind implantation. The upper limit for the H-3/He ratio in the solar wind is 4 times 10 to the minus tenth power and corresponds to a H-3/H-1 limit of 2 times 10 to the minus eleventh power. This limit imposes a requirement on the mixing rate in the solar atmosphere if the H-3 production rate in solar-surface nuclear reactions is greater than 160/sq cm per sec.

  10. Nanostructured p-type CZTS thin films prepared by a facile solution process for 3D p-n junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Si-Nae; Sung, Shi-Joon; Sim, Jun-Hyoung; Yang, Kee-Jeong; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Kim, Junho; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2015-06-01

    Nanoporous p-type semiconductor thin films prepared by a simple solution-based process with appropriate thermal treatment and three-dimensional (3D) p-n junction solar cells fabricated by depositing n-type semiconductor layers onto the nanoporous p-type thin films show considerable photovoltaic performance compared with conventional thin film p-n junction solar cells. Spin-coated p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films prepared using metal chlorides and thiourea show unique nanoporous thin film morphology, which is composed of a cluster of CZTS nanograins of 50-500 nm, and the obvious 3D p-n junction structure is fabricated by the deposition of n-type CdS on the nanoporous CZTS thin films by chemical bath deposition. The photovoltaic properties of 3D p-n junction CZTS solar cells are predominantly affected by the scale of CZTS nanograins, which is easily controlled by the sulfurization temperature of CZTS precursor films. The scale of CZTS nanograins determines the minority carrier transportation within the 3D p-n junction between CZTS and CdS, which are closely related with the photocurrent of series resistance of 3D p-n junction solar cells. 3D p-n junction CZTS solar cells with nanograins below 100 nm show power conversion efficiency of 5.02%, which is comparable with conventional CZTS thin film solar cells.Nanoporous p-type semiconductor thin films prepared by a simple solution-based process with appropriate thermal treatment and three-dimensional (3D) p-n junction solar cells fabricated by depositing n-type semiconductor layers onto the nanoporous p-type thin films show considerable photovoltaic performance compared with conventional thin film p-n junction solar cells. Spin-coated p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films prepared using metal chlorides and thiourea show unique nanoporous thin film morphology, which is composed of a cluster of CZTS nanograins of 50-500 nm, and the obvious 3D p-n junction structure is fabricated by the deposition of n-type CdS on the

  11. A three-dimensional MHD simulation analysis of the origin of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Nakamizo, A.; Tanaka, T.; Kojima, M.; Kubo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a 3D MHD simulation model for the study of the solar-wind acceleration mechanism and for reproducing a realistic configuration of solar wind plasma by using observed photospheric magnetic field at each Carrington rotation cycle. Using an unstructured mesh coordinate system on spherical surface with fine spacing in radial direction, we aim to reproduce a wide range of solar-wind plasma configuration from the photosphere to 1AU. We have incorporated external source terms into the momentum and energy equations in our MHD simulation. The energy source term consists of two volumetric heating functions: one is a new term, as a new development from our original model (Nakamizo et al. JGR 114, A07109, 2009), for the heating in a very narrow region around the transition region. The other one is an additional heating source which probably comes from some nonlinear wave phenomena which are effective over a radial distance of an order of the solar radius in the corona. The Spitzer-type thermal conduction term is also taken into account. The momentum source term is given in a form similar to that of the nonlinear wave heating function noted above. Using this MHD simulation system, we will study the origin of the slow solar wind from nearby regions of some isolated active regions during CR1900-CR1913 in some details.

  12. Surface-effect corrections for solar-like oscillations using 3D hydrodynamical simulations. I. Adiabatic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoi, T.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Mosser, B.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions have provided us with a wealth of high-quality observational data that allows for seismic inferences of stellar interiors. This requires the computation of precise and accurate theoretical frequencies, but imperfect modeling of the uppermost stellar layers introduces systematic errors. To overcome this problem, an empirical correction has been introduced by Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175) and is now commonly used for seismic inferences. Nevertheless, we still lack a physical justification allowing for the quantification of the surface-effect corrections. Aims: Our aim is to constrain the surface-effect corrections across the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram using a set of 3D hydrodynamical simulations. Methods: We used a grid of these simulations computed with the CO5BOLD code to model the outer layers of solar-like stars. Upper layers of the corresponding 1D standard models were then replaced by the layers obtained from the horizontally averaged 3D models. The frequency differences between these patched models and the 1D standard models were then calculated using the adiabatic approximation and allowed us to constrain the Kjeldsen et al. power law, as well as a Lorentzian formulation. Results: We find that the surface effects on modal frequencies depend significantly on both the effective temperature and the surface gravity. We further provide the variation in the parameters related to the surface-effect corrections using their power law as well as a Lorentzian formulation. Scaling relations between these parameters and the elevation (related to the Mach number) is also provided. The Lorentzian formulation is shown to be more robust for the whole frequency spectrum, while the power law is not suitable for the frequency shifts in the frequency range above νmax. Finally, we show that, owing to turbulent pressure, the elevation of the uppermost layers modifies the location of the hydrogen ionization zone and

  13. Polar solar wind and interstellar wind properties from interplanetary Lyman-alpha radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, N.; Blum, P. W.; Ajello, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of Mariner 10 observations of Lyman-alpha resonance radiation shows an increase of interplanetary neutral hydrogen densities above the solar poles. This increase is caused by a latitudinal variation of the solar wind velocity and/or flux. Using both the Mariner 10 results and other solar wind observations, the values of the solar wind flux and velocity with latitude are determined for several cases of interest. The latitudinal variation of interplanetary hydrogen gas, arising from the solar wind latitudinal variation, is shown to be most pronounced in the inner solar system. From this result it is shown that spacecraft Lyman-alpha observations are more sensitive to the latitudinal anisotropy for a spacecraft location in the inner solar system near the downwind axis.

  14. Implications of L1 observations for slow solar wind formation by solar reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Antiochos, S. K.; Lepri, S. T.; Kasper, J. C.; Weberg, M.

    2016-05-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is known to be coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained a mystery. Long time scale trends in the composition and charge states show strong correlations between solar wind velocity and plasma parameters, yet these correlations have proved ineffective in determining the slow wind source. We take advantage of new high time resolution (12 min) measurements of solar wind composition and charge state abundances at L1 and previously identified 90 min quasiperiodic structures to probe the fundamental timescales of slow wind variability. The combination of new high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to utilize these distinct solar wind parcels as tracers of slow wind origin and acceleration. We find that each 90 min (2000 Mm) parcel of slow wind has near-constant speed yet exhibits repeatable, systematic charge state and composition variations that span the entire range of statistically determined slow solar wind values. The classic composition-velocity correlations do not hold on short, approximately hourlong, time scales. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that these structures were created by magnetic reconnection. Our results impose severe new constraints on slow solar wind origin and provide new, compelling evidence that the slow wind results from the sporadic release of closed field plasma via magnetic reconnection at the boundary between open and closed flux in the Sun's atmosphere.

  15. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Howard W.; Kato, Serji; Wehr, T.

    2012-01-01

    The main point of this study was to use realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE satellite mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 60 km wide by 13,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances for each (1 km)2 column where then produced by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and independent column approximation mode (i.e., a 1D model).

  16. Solar Energetic Particle Events in Different Types of Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2014-08-01

    We examine statistically some properties of 96 20 MeV gradual solar energetic proton (SEP) events as a function of three different types of solar wind (SW) as classified by Richardson and Cane. Gradual SEP (E > 10 MeV) events are produced in shocks driven by fast (V >~ 900 km s-1) and wide (W > 60°) coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We find no differences among the transient, fast, and slow SW streams for SEP 20 MeV proton event timescales. It has recently been found that the peak intensities Ip of these SEP events scale with the ~2 MeV proton background intensities, which may be a proxy for the near-Sun shock seed particles. Both the intensities Ip and their 2 MeV backgrounds are significantly enhanced in transient SW compared to those of fast and slow SW streams, and the values of Ip normalized to the 2 MeV backgrounds only weakly correlate with CME V for all SW types. This result implies that forecasts of SEP events could be improved by monitoring both the Sun and the local SW stream properties and that the well known power-law size distributions of Ip may differ between transient and long-lived SW streams. We interpret an observed correlation between CME V and the 2 MeV background for SEP events in transient SW as a manifestation of enhanced solar activity.

  17. Solar Energetic Particle Events in Different Types of Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, Stephen W.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2014-06-01

    We examine statistically some properties of 96 20 MeV gradual solar energetic proton (SEP) events as a function of three different types of solar winds (SWs) as classified by Richardson and Cane (2012). Gradual SEP (E > 10 MeV) events are produced in shocks driven by fast (V > 900 km/s) and wide (W > 60 deg) coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We find no differences between transient and fast or slow SW streams for SEP 20-MeV event timescales. It has recently been found that the peak intensities Ip of these SEP events scale with the ~ 2 MeV proton background intensities, which may be a proxy for the near-Sun shock seed particles. Both the intensities Ip and their 2 MeV backgrounds are significantly enhanced in transient SW compared to those of fast and slow SW streams, and the values of Ip normalized to the 2 MeV backgrounds only weakly correlate with CME V for all SW types. This result implies that forecasts of SEP events could be improved by monitoring both the Sun and the local SW stream properties and that the well known power-law size distributions of Ip may differ between transient and long-lived SW streams. We interpret an observed correlation between CME V and the 2 MeV background for SEP events in transient SW as a manifestation of enhanced solar activity.

  18. Solar energetic particle events in different types of solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.; Vourlidas, A.

    2014-08-10

    We examine statistically some properties of 96 20 MeV gradual solar energetic proton (SEP) events as a function of three different types of solar wind (SW) as classified by Richardson and Cane. Gradual SEP (E > 10 MeV) events are produced in shocks driven by fast (V ≳ 900 km s{sup –1}) and wide (W > 60°) coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We find no differences among the transient, fast, and slow SW streams for SEP 20 MeV proton event timescales. It has recently been found that the peak intensities Ip of these SEP events scale with the ∼2 MeV proton background intensities, which may be a proxy for the near-Sun shock seed particles. Both the intensities Ip and their 2 MeV backgrounds are significantly enhanced in transient SW compared to those of fast and slow SW streams, and the values of Ip normalized to the 2 MeV backgrounds only weakly correlate with CME V for all SW types. This result implies that forecasts of SEP events could be improved by monitoring both the Sun and the local SW stream properties and that the well known power-law size distributions of Ip may differ between transient and long-lived SW streams. We interpret an observed correlation between CME V and the 2 MeV background for SEP events in transient SW as a manifestation of enhanced solar activity.

  19. Solar Coronal Plumes and the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Bhola N.; Wilhelm, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    The spectral profiles of the coronal Ne viii line at 77 nm have different shapes in quiet-Sun regions and Coronal Holes (CHs). A single Gaussian fit of the line profile provides an adequate approximation in quiet-Sun areas, whereas, a strong shoulder on the long-wavelength side is a systematic feature in CHs. Although this has been noticed since 1999, no physical reason for the peculiar shape could be given. In an attempt to identify the cause of this peculiarity, we address three problems that could not be conclusively resolved, in a review article by a study team of the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) (Wilhelm et al. 2011): (1) The physical processes operating at the base and inside of plumes, as well as their interaction with the Solar Wind (SW). (2) The possible contribution of plume plasma to the fast SW streams. (3) The signature of the First-Ionization Potential (FIP) effect between plumes and inter-plume regions (IPRs). Before the spectroscopic peculiarities in IPRs and plumes in Polar Coronal Holes (PCHs) can be further investigated with the instrument Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), it is mandatory to summarize the results of the review to place the spectroscopic observations into context. Finally, a plume model is proposed that satisfactorily explains the plasma flows up and down the plume field lines and leads to the shape of the neon line in PCHs.

  20. KOLMOGOROV VECTORIAL LAW FOR SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galtier, Sebastien

    2012-02-20

    We investigate a class of axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic turbulence which satisfies the exact relation for third-order Elsaesser structure functions. Following the critical balance conjecture, we assume the existence of a power-law relation between correlation length scales along and transverse to the local mean magnetic field direction. The flow direction of the vector third-order moments F{sup {+-}} is then along axisymmetric concave/convex surfaces, the axis of symmetry being given by the mean magnetic field. Under this consideration, the vector F{sup {+-}} satisfies a simple Kolmogorov law which depends on the anisotropic parameter a{sup {+-}}, which measures the concavity of the surfaces. A comparison with recent in situ multispacecraft solar wind observations is made; it is concluded that the underlying turbulence is very likely convex. A discussion is given about the physical meaning of such an anisotropy.

  1. Innovations in Wind and Solar PV Financing

    SciTech Connect

    Cory, K.; Coughlin, J.; Jenkin, T.; Pater, J.; Swezey, B.

    2008-02-01

    There is growing national interest in renewable energy development based on the economic, environmental, and security benefits that these resources provide. Historically, greater development of our domestic renewable energy resources has faced a number of hurdles, primarily related to cost, regulation, and financing. With the recent sustained increase in the costs and associated volatility of fossil fuels, the economics of renewable energy technologies have become increasingly attractive to investors, both large and small. As a result, new entrants are investing in renewable energy and new business models are emerging. This study surveys some of the current issues related to wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) energy project financing in the electric power industry, and identifies both barriers to and opportunities for increased investment.

  2. Bidirectional solar wind electron heat flux events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Zwickl, R. D.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    ISEE 3 plasma and magnetic field data are used here to document the general characteristics of bidirectional electron heat flux events (BEHFEs). Significant field rotations often occur at the beginning and/or end of such events and, at times, the large-field rotations characteristic of 'magnetic clouds' are present. Approximately half of all BEHFEs are associated with and follow interplanetary shocks, while the other events have no obvious shock associations. When shock-associated, the delay from shock passage typically is about 13 hours, corresponding to a radial separation of about 0.16 AU. When independent of any shock association, BEHFEs typically are about 0.13 AU thick in the radial direction. It is suggested that BEHFEs are one of the more prominent signatures of coronal mass ejection events in the solar wind at 1 AU.

  3. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  4. Magnetic clouds in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two interplanetary magnetic clouds, characterized by anomalous magnetic field directions and unusually high magnetic field strengths with a scale of the order of 0.25 AU, are identified and described. As the clouds moved past a spacecraft located in the solar wind near Earth, the magnetic field direction changed by rotating approximately 180 deg nearly parallel to a plane which was essentially perpendicular to the ecliptic. The configuration of the magnetic field in the clouds might be that of a tightly wound cylindrical helix or a series of closed circular loops. One of the magnetic clouds was in a cold stream preceded by a shock, and it caused both a geomagnetic storm and a depression in the galactic cosmic ray intensity. No stream, geomagnetic storm, or large cosmic ray decrease was associated with the other magnetic cloud.

  5. Nonaxisymmetric anisotropy of solar wind turbulence.

    PubMed

    Turner, A J; Gogoberidze, G; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Müller, W-C

    2011-08-26

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, nonaxisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range nonaxisymmetry is reproduced by a "fly through" sampling of a direct numerical simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, fly through sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in nonaxisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed nonaxisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor's hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself. PMID:21929247

  6. Microstructures in the Polar Solar Wind: Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruyani, Bruce T.; Arballo, J. K.; Galvan, C.; Goldstein, B. E.; Lakhina, G. S.; Sakurai, R.; Smith, E. J.; Neugebauer, M.

    1999-01-01

    We find that small (10-200 rP) magnetic decreases comprise a dominant part of the polar solar wind microstructure at Ulysses distances (2.2 AU). These magnetic field dips are almost always bounded by tangential discontinuities, a feature which is not well understood at this time. Hundreds of these events have been examined in detail and a variety of types have been found. These will be described. It is speculated that these structures have been generated by perpendicular heating of ions closer to the Sun and have then been convected to distances of Ulysses. Such structures may be very important for the rapid cross- field diffusion of ions in the polar regions of the heliosphere.

  7. Genesis Solar Wind Array Collector Cataloging Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkett, P.J.; Rodriguez, M.C.; Calaway, M.C.; Allton, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis solar wind array collectors were fractured upon landing hard in Utah in 2004. The fragments were retrieved from the damaged canister, imaged, repackaged and shipped to the Johnson Space Center curatorial facility [1]. As of January 2009, the collection consists of 3460 samples. Of these, 442 are comprised into "multiple" sample groupings, either affixed to adhesive paper (177) or collected in jars (17), culture trays (87), or sets of polystyrene vials (161). A focused characterization task was initiated in May 2008 to document the largest samples in the collection. The task consisted of two goals: to document sapphire based fragments greater than 2 cm in one dimension, and to document silicon based fragments greater than 1 cm in one direction.

  8. Active region plasma outflows as sources of slow/intermediate solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia M.

    2015-08-01

    L. van Driel-Gesztelyi (1,2,3), D. Baker (1), P. Démoulin (2), Culhane, J.L. (1), M.L. DeRosa (4) C.H. Mandrini (5,6), D.H. Brooks (7), A.N. Fazakerley (1), L.K. Harra (1), L. Zhao (7), T.H. Zurbuchen (7), F.A. Nuevo (5,6), A.M. Vásquez (5,6), G.D. Cristiani (5,6) M. Pick (2)1) UCL/MSSL, UK, (2) Paris Observatory, LESIA, CNRS, France, (3) Konkoly Observatory, Hungary, (4) Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, USA, (5) IAFE, CONICET-UBA, Argentina (6) FCEN, UBA, Argentina (7) Dept. of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, USAWe analyse plasma upflows of tens of km/s from the edges of solar active regions discovered by Hinode/EIS and investigate whether or not they become outflows, i.e. find their way into the solar wind. We analyse two magnetic configurations: bipolar and quadrupolar and find that the active region plasma may be directly channeled into the solar wind via interchange reconnection at a high-altitude null point above the active region especially when active regions are located besides coronal holes or in a more complex way via multiple reconnections even from under a closed helmet streamer. We relate the solar observations to in-situ slow/intermediate solar wind streams.

  9. Stationarity of extreme bursts in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Moloney, N R; Davidsen, J

    2014-05-01

    Recent results have suggested that the statistics of bursts in the solar wind vary with solar cycle. Here, we show that this variation is basically absent if one considers extreme bursts. These are defined as threshold-exceeding events over the range of high thresholds for which their number decays as a power law. In particular, we find that the distribution of duration times and energies of extreme bursts in the solar wind ε parameter and similar observables are independent of the solar cycle and in this sense stationary, and show robust asymptotic power laws with exponents that are independent of the specific threshold. This is consistent with what has been observed for solar flares and, thus, provides evidence in favor of a link between solar flares and extreme bursts in the solar wind. PMID:25353849

  10. 78 FR 76609 - Genesis Solar, LLC; NRG Delta LLC; Mountain View Solar, LLC; Pheasant Run Wind, LLC; Pheasant Run...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...-000; EG13-63-000; EG13-64-000; FC13-13-000] Genesis Solar, LLC; NRG Delta LLC; Mountain View Solar, LLC; Pheasant Run Wind, LLC; Pheasant Run Wind II, LLC; Tuscola Wind II, LLC; Mountain Wind Power, LLC; Mountain Wind Power II, LLC; Summerhaven Wind, LP; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator...

  11. Evolution of solar wind turbulence and intermittency over the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Väisänen, Pauli; Virtanen, Ilpo; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-04-01

    Solar wind is a natural, near-by plasma physics laboratory, which offers possibilities to study plasma physical phenomena over a wide range of parameter values that are difficult to reach in ground-based laboratories. Accordingly, the solar wind is subject of many studies of, e.g., intermittency, turbulence and other nonlinear space plasma phenomena. Turbulence is an important feature of the solar wind dynamics, e.g., for the energy transfer mechanisms and their scale invariance, the solar wind evolution, the structure of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF), the particle energization and heating, and for phenomena related to solar wind interaction with the planetary plasma systems. Here we analyse high resolution measurements of the solar wind and the heliospheric magnetic field provided by several ESA and NASA satellites, including ACE, STEREO, Ulysses and Cluster. This collection of satellites allows us to compile and study nearly 20 years of high-resolution solar wind and HMF measurements from the start of solar cycle 23 to the current declining phase of solar cycle 24. Long-term studies require homogeneity and, therefore, we pay great attention to the reliability and consistency of the data, in particular to instrumental defects like spin harmonics, the purity of the solar wind and its possible contamination in the foreshock by magnetospheric ions. We study how the different key-descriptors of turbulence like the slope of the power law of power spectral density and the kurtosis of the fluctuations of the heliospheric magnetic field vary over the solar cycle.

  12. The abundances of elements and isotopes in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Gloeckler, G. ); Geiss, J. )

    1989-03-01

    Solar wind abundances have now been measured for eleven elements and the isotopes of the noble gases. The composition of all elements up to and including Ni, as well as most of their isotopes, should become known when new high-mass-resolution solar wind spectrometers are launched in the next decade. Aside from solar wind protons and alpha particles, which have been studied extensively since the 1960's, our information for heavier elements is limited. Nevertheless, two effects stand out. First is the enrichment of abundances of elements with low first ionizaiton potential (FIP), most likely the combined result of (a) an atom-ion separation process in the upper chromosphere, and (b) a marginal coupling of low-charge-state heavy ions to protons and alphas during the acceleration of the solar wind. Second, there is variability in the solar wind composition over a whole range of time scales. Recent measurements carried out in the Earth's magnetosheath during times that included high-speed coronal-hole-associated flows indicate a significantly lower overabundance of low FIP elements. Given the fact that the He/H ratio is remarkably constant in the coronal hole solar wind, this result suggests that both enrichment and variability are reduced in such flows. Studies by the ULYSSES spacecraft of the characteristics and composition of the least complicated solar wind, i.e., the flow emanating from the polar coronal holes, should significantly increase our understanding of coronal processes and solar wind acceleration. By combining these studies with measurements of the complete elemental and isotopic composition of the solar wind, we will be able to derive solar abundances for elements and isotopes that otherwise are poorly known.

  13. COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR CORONA, SOLAR WIND, AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Reames, D. V.; Von Steiger, R.; Basu, S.

    2012-08-10

    Along with temperature and density, the elemental abundance is a basic parameter required by astronomers to understand and model any physical system. The abundances of the solar corona are known to differ from those of the solar photosphere via a mechanism related to the first ionization potential of the element, but the normalization of these values with respect to hydrogen is challenging. Here, we show that the values used by solar physicists for over a decade and currently referred to as the 'coronal abundances' do not agree with the data themselves. As a result, recent analysis and interpretation of solar data involving coronal abundances may need to be revised. We use observations from coronal spectroscopy, the solar wind, and solar energetic particles as well as the latest abundances of the solar photosphere to establish a new set of abundances that reflect our current understanding of the coronal plasma.

  14. RESIDUAL ENERGY SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Bale, S. D.; Salem, C. S.; Maruca, B. A.

    2013-06-20

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 yr of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of {sigma}{sub r} = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r{sub A} = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cross helicity were also investigated, showing that globally balanced intervals with small residual energy contain local patches of larger imbalance and larger residual energy at all scales, as expected for nonlinear turbulent interactions.

  15. Solar irradiance in the heterogeneous albedo environment of the Arctic coast: measurements and a 3-D model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, A.; Buras, R.; Mayer, B.; Webb, A.; Kift, R.; Bais, A.; Kouremeti, N.; Blumthaler, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a unique case study of the solar global irradiance in a highly heterogeneous albedo environment at the Arctic coast. Diodearray spectroradiometers were deployed at three sites around Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, and spectral irradiances were simultaneously measured under clear-sky conditions during a 24 h period. The 3-D radiative transfer model MYSTIC is applied to simulate the measurements in various model scenarios. First, we model the effective albedos of ocean and snow and consequently around each measurement site. The effective albedos at 340 nm increase from 0.57 to 0.75, from the coastal site in the west towards the site 20 km east, away from the coast. The observed ratios of the global irradiance indicate a 15% higher average irradiance, at 340 nm east relative to west, due to the higher albedo. The comparison of our model scenarios suggest a snow albedo of > 0.9 and confirm the observation that drift ice has moved into the Fjord during the day. The local time shift between the locations causes a hysteresis-like behavior of these east-west ratios with solar zenith angle (SZA). The observed hysteresis, however, is larger and, at 340 nm, can be explained by the drift ice. At 500 nm, a plausible explanation is a detector tilt of about 1°. The ratios between afternoon and morning irradiances at the same SZA are investigated, which confirm the above conclusions. At the coastal site, the measured irradiance is significantly higher in the afternoon than in the morning. Besides the effect of changing drift ice and detector tilt, the small variations of the aerosol optical depth have to be considered also at the other stations to reduce the discrepancies between model and observations. Remaining discrepancies are possibly due to distant high clouds.

  16. Solar irradiance in the heterogeneous albedo environment of the Arctic coast: measurements and a 3-D-model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, A.; Buras, R.; Mayer, B.; Webb, A.; Kift, R.; Bais, A.; Kouremeti, N.; Blumthaler, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present a unique case study of the solar global irradiance in a highly heterogeneous albedo environment at the arctic coast. Diodearray spectroradiometers were deployed at three sites around Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, and spectral irradiances were simultaneously measured under clear sky conditions during a 24 h period. The 3-D radiative transfer model MYSTIC is applied to simulate the measurements in various model scenarios. First, we model the effective albedos of ocean and snow and consequently around each measurement site. The effective albedos at 340 nm increase from 0.57 to 0.75, from the coastal site in the west towards the site 20 km east, away from the coast. The observed ratios of the global irradiance indicate a 15% higher average irradiance at east relative to west at 340 nm due to the higher albedo. The comparison to our model scenarios suggest a snow albedo of >0.9 and confirm the observation that drift ice has moved into the Fjord during the day. The local time shift between the locations causes a hysteresis-like behavior of these east-west ratios with solar zenith angle (SZA). The observed hysteresis, however, is larger and, at 340 nm, can be explained by the drift ice. At 500 nm, a plausible explanation is a detector tilt of about 1°. The ratios between afternoon and morning irradiances at the same SZA are investigated, which confirm the above conclusions. At the coastal site, the measured irradiance is significantly higher in the afternoon than in the morning. Besides the effect of changing drift ice and detector tilt, the small variations of the aerosol optical depth have to be considered also at the other stations to reduce the discrepancies between model and observations. Remaining discrepancies are possibly due to high thin clouds.

  17. CONDITIONED ANALYSIS OF HIGH-LATITUDE SOLAR WIND INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amicis, R.; Consolini, G.; Bavassano, B.; Bruno, R.

    2012-08-10

    The solar wind is a turbulent medium displaying intermittency. Its intermittent features have been widely documented and studied, showing how the intermittent character is different in fast and slow wind. In this paper, a statistical conditioned analysis of the solar wind intermittency for a period of high-latitude fast solar wind is presented. In particular, the intermittent features are investigated as a function of the Alfvenic degree of fluctuations at a given scale. The results show that the main contribution to solar wind intermittency is due to non-Alfvenic structures, while Alfvenic increments are found to be characterized by a smaller level of intermittency than the previous ones. Furthermore, the lifetime statistics of Alfvenic periods are discussed in terms of a multiscale texture of randomly oriented flux tubes.

  18. Solar wind ion distribution broadening by waves and transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, M. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Case, A. W.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Biesecker, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal plasma spectra in the solar wind are subject to peak-broadening by plasma waves and small-scale structures at effective frequencies faster than the measurement rate. Under strong turbulence conditions, the non-thermal contribution to proton peak broadening in many commonly-used solar wind measurements becomes comparable to that of the kinetic temperature. The DSCOVR spacecraft, which arrived at the first Earth-Sun Lagrange point in June 2015, bears the PLASMAG Faraday Cup Experiment. That instrument is identical in most respects to the Wind SWE Faraday Cup instrument that has been measuring 92-second proton spectra in the solar wind for the last twenty years. In this paper, the effective proton VDF peak width is compared at 92-second and 1-second resolution as a function of the ambient magnetic fluctuation amplitude on relevant timescales. This work will enable a more accurate understanding of the energy partition in the solar wind plasma.

  19. A three-dimensional model of corotating streams in the solar wind. 1: Theoretical foundations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical and mathematical background pertinent to the study of steady, corotating solar wind structure in all three spatial dimensions (3-D) is discussed. The dynamical evolution of the plasma in interplanetary space (defined as the region beyond roughly 35 solar radii where the flow is supersonic) is approximately described by the nonlinear, single fluid, polytropic (magneto-) hydrodynamic equations. Efficient numerical techniques for solving this complex system of coupled, hyperbolic partial differential equations are outlined. The formulation is inviscid and nonmagnetic, but methods allow for the potential inclusion of both features with only modest modifications. One simple, highly idealized, hydrodynamic model stream is examined to illustrate the fundamental processes involved in the 3-D dynamics of stream evolution. Spatial variations in the rotational stream interaction mechanism were found to produce small nonradial flows on a global scale that lead to the transport of mass, energy, and momentum away from regions of relative compression and into regions of relative rarefaction.

  20. Wind and radiant solar energy for drying fruits and vegetables

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, C.J. Jr.; Coleman, R.L.; Berry, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of wind with radiant solar energy for drying fruits and vegetables can help promote conservation of food and nonrenewable energy resources. Low-cost, small-scale solar dryers have been developed with the potential for developing larger dryers. These dryers depend on natural air convection to remove moisture. Designing the dryers to incorporate natural wind currents, providing forced air circulation, could increase drying rates. Preliminary studies to provide information for such designs included: (1) comparing drying tests with and without forced air circulation, (2) monitoring wind speeds on-site, and (3) testing wind collecting devices. Average wind speeds during solar periods were higher than air velocities from unassisted air convection in these small food dryers. Drying rates were increased by 6 to 11% when the natural convection dryer was provided with a small electric fan. Either of two wind collecting devices also could increase drying rates.

  1. A real-time solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field model for space radiation analysis and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, C. D.; Detman, T. R.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Wu, C.-C.

    We describe an observation-driven model for assessing and predicting the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) environment. High energy particles generated during solar/interplanetary disturbances will pose a serious hazard to crew members traveling beyond low-Earth orbit. In order to provide warnings of dangerous radiation conditions, mission operators will need accurate forecasts of solar energetic particle (SEP) fluxes and fluences in interplanetary space. However, physics-based models for accelerating and propagating SEPs require specifications and predictions of the solar wind conditions and IMF configuration near the evolving interplanetary shock region, and along the IMF lines connecting the shock to the observation point. We are presently using the Hakamada-Akasofu-Fry kinematic solar wind model to predict, in real time, solar wind conditions in the heliosphere, including at the location of Mars, and beyond. This model is being extended via a hybrid approach to include a 3D MHD model, the Interplanetary Global Model, Vectorized (IGMV). We present our modeling results and conclude that uncertainties in determining, from real-time solar observations, the physical parameters used for model inputs are the biggest factors limiting the accuracy of solar wind models used for space radiation analysis and prediction.

  2. Simulation of period doubling of recurrent solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    Based on satellite observations of a recurrent solar wind structure conducted in 1974, an MHD simulation model, and input functions generated from plasma and magnetic field data, the continuing evolution of the solar wind structure outside 5 AU is studied. The model uses the Rankine-Hugoniot relations to describe the jumps in flow properties across the shocks, and it treats shocks as surfaces of discontinuity with zero thickness. Two interaction processes (the collision and the merging of shocks) play important roles in restructuring the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. The simulation result shows that period doubling occurs between 5 and 10 AU. The recurrent solar wind appears to be a persistent new structure between 10 and 20 AU, and it consists of one merged interaction region per solar rotation.

  3. Evidence for solar wind control of Saturn radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Using data collected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in 1980 and 1981, strong evidence is presented for a direct correlation between variations in the solar wind at Saturn and the level of activity of Saturn's nonthermal radio emission. Correlation coefficients of 57 to 58% are reached at lag times of 0 to 1 days between the arrival at Saturn of high pressure solar wind streams and the onset of increased radio emission. The radio emission exhibits a long-term periodicity of 25 days, identical to the periodicity seen in the solar wind at this time and consistent with the solar rotation period. The energy coupling efficiency between the solar wind with the Saturn radio emission is estimated and compared with that for Earth.

  4. Validation of solar wind high-speed stream predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Martin; Temmer, Manuela; Veronig, Astrid; Nikolic, Ljubomir; Schöngassner, Florian; Vennerstrøm, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Solar wind high-speed streams emanating from coronal holes are frequently impinging on the Earth's magnetosphere causing recurrent, medium-level geomagnetic storm activity. As major contributors to space weather disturbances at times of low solar activity, prediction models of solar wind high-speed streams are becoming highly desirable. We present a verification analysis of two operational solar wind prediction models (empirical model, Wang-Sheeley-Arge like model) by comparing the model runs for the period 2011 to 2014 with in-situ plasma measurements from the ACE spacecraft located at 1 AU. We find that both prediction models achieve a similar accuracy but demonstrate the tendency to under-predict and over-predict events of solar wind high-speed streams, respectively. General advantages and disadvantages of both models are diagnosed and outlined.

  5. Suprathermal Tails in Solar Wind Oxygen and Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popecki, M.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Klecker, B.; Bochsler, P.; Kucharek, H.; Blush, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Moebius, E.

    2008-05-01

    High speed suprathermal tails with a fixed energy spectrum have been observed in solar wind H and He2+, as well as in He+ pickup ions (e.g. Gloeckler et al., 2007). These tails appear to have a persistent and constant power law energy spectrum, unchanged in a variety of solar conditions. The presence of the tails have implications for particle injection into the interplanetary shock acceleration process. The suprathermal tails of ions heavier than H and He may be investigated with the STEREO/PLASTIC mass spectrometer, for speeds up to several times the solar wind speed. The energy spectra of solar wind O and Fe are presented for periods of slow and fast solar wind. Variations in energy spectra will be discussed.

  6. Comparison of Coronal Streamer Properties to Solar Wind Models For The Last Two Solar Cycle Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Mari Paz; Landi, E.; Cranmer, S. R.; Raymond, J. C.; Cohen, O.; Oran, R.

    2013-07-01

    We characterize the physical properties of two coronal streamers during Earth/Ulysses quadrature configurations for the previous two solar minimum periods. Comparisons between coronal remote-sensing observations and in situ measurements of solar wind plasma properties are being used to characterize the origin of slow wind streams. In order to investigate slow solar wind heating and acceleration, we compare the measurements with predictions from MHD models. We aim to use the empirical measurements to distinguish between different proposed physical processes for the slow solar wind. This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AQ58G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  7. Solar wind evolution since 1990 and H ENA ionization rates and survival probabilities in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K.; McComas, D. J.; Bochsler, P.

    2012-04-01

    We derive the solar wind speed and density evolution in heliolatitude and time from 1990 to the end of 2011 based on remote-sensing and in-situ data sources in and out of the ecliptic plane and use it to calculate survival probabilities of heliospheric Energetic Neutral H Atoms (H ENA) in the energy range observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). We determine the heliolatitude structure of the solar wind speed using remote-sensing radio observations of interplanetary scintillations processed using the Computer Assisted Tomography algorithm and obtain yearly profiles on a 10-degree heliolatitude grid, which agree well with the in-situ measurements by Ulysses. Since the in-situ information on the solar wind density structure out of ecliptic is only available from the Ulysses data, we derive correlation formulae between solar wind speed and density profiles from Ulysses fast latitude scans and calculate the 3D structure of solar wind density. For the ecliptic heliolatitude band we use in-situ measurements from the OMNI-2 collection. Having obtained evolution of solar wind speed and density in time and heliolatitude, to calculate the ionization rate of H ENA we need the photoionization rate of H, which we obtain from TIMED SEE and SOHO CELIAS/SEM measurements supplemented with proxies. With the history of evolution of the solar factors responsible for the ionization of H ENA derived, we calculate the survival probabilities of H ENA observed by IBEX. To that end, we employ an atom-tracing approach. We track the atom trajectories from IBEX backwards in time up to the termination shock, solving the equation of motion and simultaneously calculating the survival probability against ionization. The equation of motion includes the forces of solar gravity and radiation pressure, which is a function of the total solar flux in the Lyman-alpha line and of radial velocity of the atom relative to the Sun due to the Doppler effect. To model the radiation pressure, we

  8. Little or no solar wind enters Venus' atmosphere at solar minimum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T L; Delva, M; Baumjohann, W; Auster, H-U; Carr, C; Russell, C T; Barabash, S; Balikhin, M; Kudela, K; Berghofer, G; Biernat, H K; Lammer, H; Lichtenegger, H; Magnes, W; Nakamura, R; Schwingenschuh, K; Volwerk, M; Vörös, Z; Zambelli, W; Fornacon, K-H; Glassmeier, K-H; Richter, I; Balogh, A; Schwarzl, H; Pope, S A; Shi, J K; Wang, C; Motschmann, U; Lebreton, J-P

    2007-11-29

    Venus has no significant internal magnetic field, which allows the solar wind to interact directly with its atmosphere. A field is induced in this interaction, which partially shields the atmosphere, but we have no knowledge of how effective that shield is at solar minimum. (Our current knowledge of the solar wind interaction with Venus is derived from measurements at solar maximum.) The bow shock is close to the planet, meaning that it is possible that some solar wind could be absorbed by the atmosphere and contribute to the evolution of the atmosphere. Here we report magnetic field measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft in the plasma environment surrounding Venus. The bow shock under low solar activity conditions seems to be in the position that would be expected from a complete deflection by a magnetized ionosphere. Therefore little solar wind enters the Venus ionosphere even at solar minimum. PMID:18046399

  9. Effects of Solar Magnetic Activity on the Charge States of Minor Ions of Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuyu

    We present an investigation of the effects of solar magnetic activity on the charge states of minor ions (Fe, Si, Mg, Ne, O, C) in the solar wind using ACE solar wind data, the Current Sheet Source Surface (CSSS) model of the corona and SoHO/MDI data during the 23rd solar cycle. We found that the mean charge states indicate a clear trend to increase with the solar activity when the solar wind speed is above 550 km/s. Below this speed, no significant solar activity dependence is found. When displayed as a function of solar wind speed, iron is different from other elements in that it displays lower charge states in slow wind than in fast wind. The percentages of the high charge states for species with higher m/q (Fe) increase with the solar wind speed, while for the species with lower m/q (Si,Mg, O, C), the percentages of the high charge states decrease with the solar wind speed.

  10. Iron charge states in the solar wind as measured by SMS on Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Chotoo, K.; Balsiger, H.; Sheldon, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Wind spacecraft was launched in November 1994. In the first half of 1995 it was in the interplanetary medium upstream of the Earth. The Solar Wind and Suprathermal Ion Composition Experiment (SMS) on Wind consists of three sensors, the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS), the Suprathermal Ion Composition Spectrometer (STICS), and the high mass resolution spectrometer (MASS). All three instruments utilize electrostatic deflection combined with time-of-flight measurement. The data from these three sensors allows the determination of the ionic composition of the solar wind in a variety of solar wind conditions over a large energy/charge range (0.5 to 230 keV/e). We have examined the Wind database for time periods conducive to observing solar wind iron. With the high mass resolution of the MASS spectrometer (M/Delta-M greater than 100) iron is easily identified while the electrostatic deflection provides information concerning the mass/charge distribution. We present here the relative abundance of iron charge states in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  11. Systematic Measurements of Ion-Proton Differential Streaming in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Gloeckler, G.

    2011-04-15

    The small amount of heavy ions in the highly rarefied solar wind are sensitive tracers for plasma-physics processes, which are usually not accessible in the laboratory. We have analyzed differential streaming between heavy ions and protons in the solar wind at 1 AU. 3D velocity vector and magnetic field measurements from the Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor and the Magnetometer aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer were used to reconstruct the ion-proton difference vector v{sub ip}=v{sub i}-v{sub p} from the 12 min 1D Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer observations. We find that all 44 analyzed heavy ions flow along the interplanetary magnetic field at velocities which are smaller than, but comparable to, the local Alfven speed C{sub A}. The flow speeds of 35 of the 44 ion species lie within the range of {+-}0.15C{sub A} around 0.55C{sub A}, the flow speed of He{sup 2+}.

  12. Systematic measurements of ion-proton differential streaming in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Berger, L; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Gloeckler, G

    2011-04-15

    The small amount of heavy ions in the highly rarefied solar wind are sensitive tracers for plasma-physics processes, which are usually not accessible in the laboratory. We have analyzed differential streaming between heavy ions and protons in the solar wind at 1 AU. 3D velocity vector and magnetic field measurements from the Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor and the Magnetometer aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer were used to reconstruct the ion-proton difference vector v(ip) = v(i) - v(p) from the 12 min 1D Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer observations. We find that all 44 analyzed heavy ions flow along the interplanetary magnetic field at velocities which are smaller than, but comparable to, the local Alfvén speed C(A). The flow speeds of 35 of the 44 ion species lie within the range of ±0.15C(A) around 0.55C(A), the flow speed of He(2+). PMID:21568542

  13. Solar wind control of Jupiter's hectometric radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.; Desch, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Radio, plasma, and magnetic field data obtained by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 were used to examine the manner in which the Jovian hectometric radio emission (HOM) is controlled by the solar wind. Using the method of superposed epochs, it was found that the higher energy HOM is correlated with the IMF as well as with the solar wind density and pressure. However, unlike the Io-independent decametric radio emission (Non-Io DAM), the HOM displayed no correlation with the solar wind velocity, although this radio component appear to be also influenced by the IMF. The results suggest separate HOM amd Non-Io DAM sources.

  14. MEASUREMENTS OF RAPID DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, D. M.; Ergun, R. E.; Kellogg, P. J.; Bale, S. D.

    2010-03-01

    The power spectrum of density fluctuations in the solar wind is inferred by tracking small timescale changes in the electron plasma frequency during periods of strong Langmuir wave activity. STEREO electric field waveform data are used to produce time profiles of plasma density from which the density power spectrum is derived. The power spectra obtained by this method extend the observed frequency range by an order of magnitude while remaining consistent with previous results near a few Hertz. Density power spectral indices are found to be organized by the angle between the local magnetic field and the solar wind direction, indicating significant anisotropy in solar wind high-frequency density turbulence.

  15. Measurements of lunar magnetic field interaction with the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Snyder, C. W.; Clay, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the compression of the remanent lunar magnetic field by the solar wind, based on measurements of remanent magnetic fields at four Apollo landing sites and of the solar wind at two of these sites. Available data show that the remanent magnetic field at the lunar surface is compressed as much as 40% above its initial value by the solar wind, but the total remanent magnetic pressure is less than the stagnation pressure by a factor of six, implying that a local shock is not formed.

  16. Coupling of the solar wind to measures of magnetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Fay, R. A.; Garrity, C. R.; Bargatze, L. F.; Clauer, C. R.; Searls, C.; Baker, D. N.

    1984-01-01

    Linear prediction filtering was used to generate empirical response functions relating the solar wind electric field to the magnetic indices, AL, AU, Dst and ASYM. The empirical response functions were convolved with solar wind observations obtained during the International Magnetospheric Study to predict the indices. The predictions are compared with the observed indices during two, 3-day intervals. Differences between the observed and predicted indices are discussed in terms of the linear assumption and in terms of physical processes other than direct solar wind-magnetosphere interaction.

  17. The solar wind interaction with unmagnetized planets - A tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of the solar wind with the Venus ionosphere induces currents which can substantially exclude the solar wind and IMF from the dayside ionosphere beneath the 'ionopause', where ionosphere thermal pressure equals incident solar wind dynamic pressure. The field then diffuses through the ionopause with increasing speed at decreasing altitudes, and is weakest in the subpolar region. Once within the ionopause, the magnetic field is redistributed by ionospheric convection, and then decays at low altitudes via collisional dissipation of the associated currents. The maximum ionospheric field magnitudes observed, of about 150 nT, furnish magnetic pressures exceeding the ionospheric thermal pressure by a factor of about 3.

  18. The Energy Spectra of Suprathermal Tails in Solar Wind Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popecki, M. A.; Galvin, A.; Bochsler, P.; Klecker, B.; Kucharek, H.; Kistler, L.; Blush, L.; Moebius, E.

    2009-05-01

    High speed suprathermal tails with a fixed energy spectrum have been observed in solar wind H+ and He2+, as well as in He+ pickup ions (e.g. Gloeckler et al., 2007). The presence of the tails have implications for particle injection into the interplanetary shock acceleration process. The suprathermal tails of solar wind Fe have been investigated with the STEREO/PLASTIC mass spectrometer. The energy spectra will be presented for periods of slow and fast solar wind, and for the entire STEREO mission.

  19. Wind loading on solar concentrators: some general considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Roschke, E. J.

    1984-05-01

    A survey has been completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view; current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed; recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly. Wind loads, i.e., forces and moments, are proportional to the square of the mean wind velocity. Forces are proportional to the square of concentrator diameter, and moments are proportional to the cube of diameter. Thus, wind loads have an important bearing on size selection from both cost and performance standpoints. It is concluded that sufficient information exists so that reasonably accurate predictions of wind loading are possible for a given paraboloidal concentrator configuration, provided that reliable and relevant wind conditions are specified. Such predictions will be useful to the design engineer and to the systems engineer as well. Information is lacking, however, on wind effects in field arrays of paraboloidal concentrators. Wind tunnel tests have been performed on model heliostat arrays, but there are important aerodynamic differences between heliostats and paraboloidal dishes.

  20. Chandrayaan-1 observations of backscattered solar wind protons from the lunar regolith: Dependence on the solar wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Charles; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wieser, Martin; Bhardwaj, Anil; Wurz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We study the backscattering of solar wind protons from the lunar regolith using the Solar Wind Monitor of the Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer on Chandrayaan-1. Our study focuses on the component of the backscattered particles that leaves the regolith with a positive charge. We find that the fraction of the incident solar wind protons that backscatter as protons, i.e., the proton-backscattering efficiency, has an exponential dependence on the solar wind speed that varies from ~0.01% to ~1% for solar wind speeds of 250 km/s to 550 km/s. We also study the speed distribution of the backscattered protons in the fast (~550 km/s) solar wind case and find both a peak speed at ~80% of the solar wind speed and a spread of ~85 km/s. The observed flux variations and speed distribution of the backscattered protons can be explained by a speed-dependent charge state of the backscattered particles.

  1. Sources of the solar wind - the heliospheric point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Steiger, Rudolf; Shearer, Paul; Zurbuchen, Thomas

    The solar wind as observed in the heliosphere has several properties that can be interpreted as signatures of conditions and processes at its source in the solar atmosphere. Traditionally it has been customary to distinguish between solar wind types solely based on its speed, "fast" and "slow" wind. Over the last couple of decades new instruments resolving not only the main constituents (protons and alpha particles) but also heavy ions from C to Fe have added new observables, in particular the charge state and elemental composition of these ions. The charge states are indicators of the coronal temperature at the source region; they have confirmed that the "fast" wind emanates from the relatively cool coronal hole regions, while the "slow" wind originates from hotter sources such as the streamer belt and active regions. Thus they are more reliable indicators of solar wind source than the speed alone could be because they readily discriminate between "fast" wind from coronal holes and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The elemental composition in the solar wind compared to the abundances in the photosphere shows a typical fractionation that depends on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. Since that fractionation occurs beneath the corona, in the chromosphere, its strength is indicative of the conditions in that layer. While the "fast" wind is very similar to photospheric composition, the fractionation of the "slow" wind and of CMEs is higher and strongly variable. We will review the observations of the SWICS composition instruments on both the ACE and the Ulysses missions, which have made composition observations between 1 and 5 AU and at all latitudes in the heliosphere over the last two decades. Specifically, analysis of the "slow" wind observations at all time scales, from hours to complete solar cycles, will be used to better characterize its source regions.

  2. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Ion and Electron Dynamics Under Varying Solar Wind Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Lapenta, G.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions, and focus afterwards on the ion and electron kinetic behavior of the system. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. The dominant LMA interaction mechanism is also highly dependent on the solar wind and IMF conditions. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is also unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2011050747 (Curie) and 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported

  3. Large-scale properties of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga; Obridko, Vladimir; Zharkova, Valentina; Veselov, Mikhail

    Since the solar wind phenomenon has been revealed and confirmed, one of the most intriguing problems was to understand processes in the solar atmosphere and their relation with the solar wind characteristics at different distances from the Sun. Analysis of multi-spacecraft measurements of plasma parameters and the interplanetary magnetic field provides us with knowledge about the heliosphere from global to small scales. Comparisons of observations with models, describing small-scale processes, usually give more positive results than in the case of models comparison with the solar wind properties at the scales larger than several proton gyroradii. For example, Parker-like models face with big problems in their attempts to predict the solar wind plasma and, especially, the behaviour of the interplanetary magnetic field. Observations show that the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field depends on heliolatitude and radially decreases with a slope of -5/3 instead of the predicted slope of -2 (Khabarova, Obridko, ApJ, 2012; Khabarova, Astronomy Reports, 2013). This may be determined by small-scale processes occurring in some vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet and related to the magnetic reconnection (Zharkova, Khabarova, ApJ, 2012). In this report we present results of data analysis of eight spacecraft to study variations of plasma, the electric and magnetic field with distance and heliolatitude. begin{enumerate} Zharkova V., Khabarova O., Particle Acceleration in the Reconnecting Heliospheric Current Sheet: Solar Wind Data Versus 3D PIC Simulations, Astrophysical Journal, 2012, V.752, 1, 35 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/752/1/35 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga, and Obridko Vladimir, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82 begin{enumerate} Khabarova Olga V., The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences. Astronomy Reports, 2013

  4. Stationarity of magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    Solar wind research and studies of charged particle propagation often assume that the interplanetary magnetic field represents a stationary random process. The extent to which ensemble averages of the solar wind magnetic fields follow the asymptotic behavior predicted by the ergodic theorem was investigated. Several time periods, including a span of nearly two years, are analyzed. Data intervals which span many solar rotations satisfy the conditions of weak stationarity if the effects of solar rotation are included in the asymptotic analysis. Shorter intervals which include a small integral number of interplanetary sectors also satisfy weak stationarity. The results are illustrated using magnetometer data from the ISEE-3, Voyager and IMP spacecraft.

  5. Implementation of the Blade Element Momentum Method into a High-Resolution 3-D Atmospheric Model: Evaluating a Parameterization for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sta. Maria, M.; Ketefian, G. S.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    In order to simulate better the effects of wind turbines on meteorology and climate, a parameterization based on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory was developed and integrated into a high-resolution 3-D non-hydrostatic atmospheric model that conserves several domain-integrated quantities. The BEM model calculates the forces the blade exerts on the atmosphere and feeds it back as body forces in the momentum equations of the atmospheric model. Since the BEM method calculates these forces along a turbine blade, the parameterization allows for model spatial resolutions on the order of a few to tens of meters. This study examines the advantages and limitations of such a parameterization. The BEM calculates the rotational force that the blades exert on the air, and this study investigates whether this parameterization is able to capture rotation in the wake. The dependency on model resolution is also studied to determine the optimum model resolution for simulating wind turbine-atmosphere interactions. The atmospheric model is also used to estimate the distance downwind of a turbine at which wind speeds recover. This is an important parameter for determining optimal wind farm spacing. Model results will be compared with previous parameterizations and wake data gathered in the field and from wind tunnel studies.

  6. Dependence of CME Propagation on Parameters of the Ejecta and Ambient Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Lynch, B. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Thernisien, A.; Vourlidas, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    CME propagation through the heliosphere has been one of the most uncertain problems, due to its complex nature and sparse observations in the vast space. CME travel time, speed and trajectory have been often unpredictable, because they may be modified going through ambient solar wind streams and IMF structure. All of these parameters are important for understanding CMEs and their space weather consequences. Direct observations of CME propagation through to 1AU have only become a reality since the recent STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. Based on a few strategically selected CMEs that vary in parameter space and situated in different solar wind/IMF conditions, we perform several CCMC ENLIL with cone model simulations to study the propagation. Comparisons between modeling results including CME driven shock properties, travel time, 3D trajectory, and distortion of the ejecta (limited to the model approximation) will be made. Comparisons are also made between modeling, HI imaging results, and observed in-situ parameters when available.

  7. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  8. Using Solar Wind Composition As A Tracer For Solar Processes: Applications For Plastic On Stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Allegrini, Frédéric; Blush, Lisa; Bochsler, Peter; Fischer, Josef; Wurz, Peter; Galvin, A. B.; Moebius, E.; Klecker, B.; Thompson, B.; Plastic Team

    Solar wind composition is increasingly being used as a tracer for various processes in the solar atmosphere and in interplanetary space. We will discuss applications of solar wind composition measurements that are relevant for the STEREO mission and that will be supplied by the PLASTIC sensor. Solar wind elemental abundances are affected by processes acting in the solar interior, chromosphere, and in the corona, while charge-state composition is largely determined in the corona. Farther out in the inner heliosphere, composition measurements can give information about interplanetary processes and serves as an excellent tracer for the coronal and chromospheric origin of the measured solar wind. Coronal mass ejections often exhibit unusual charge-state and elemental composition that is indicative of unusual conditions in the solar atmosphere prior and during the launch of the ejection. We will discuss observational opportunities unique to collaborative studies with vari- ous instruments on STEREO.

  9. He abundance variations in the solar wind: Observations from Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.; McComas, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Goldstein, B.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Ulysses mission is providing the first opportunity to observe variations in solar wind plasma parameters at heliographic latitudes far removed from the ecliptic plane. We present an overview of the solar wind speed and the variability in helium abundance, [He] data on [He] in six high latitude coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and a superposed epoch analysis of [He] variations at the seven heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings made during the rapid-latitude-scan portion of the mission. The differences in the variability of the solar wind speed and [He] in high latitude and equatorial regions are quite striking. Solar wind speed is generally low but highly variable near the solar equator, while at higher latitudes the average speed is quite high with little variability. [He] can vary over nearly two decades at low solar latitudes, while at high latitudes it varies only slightly. In contrast to the high [He] that is commonly associated with CMEs observed in the ecliptic, none of the six high-speed CMEs encountered at high southern heliographic latitudes showed any significant variation in helium content. A superposed epoch analysis of the [He] during all seven HCS crossings made as Ulysses passed from the southern to northern solar hemisphere shows the expected [He] minimum near the crossing and a broad region of low [He] around the crossing time. We discuss how our solar wind [He] observations may provide an accurate measure of the helium composition for the entire convective zone of the Sun.

  10. Transient flows of the solar wind associated with small-scale solar activity in solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Igor; Kuzin, Sergey; Gburek, Szymon; Ulyanov, Artyom; Kirichenko, Alexey; Shugay, Yulia; Goryaev, Farid

    The data obtained by the modern high sensitive EUV-XUV telescopes and photometers such as CORONAS-Photon/TESIS and SPHINX, STEREO/EUVI, PROBA2/SWAP, SDO/AIA provide good possibilities for studying small-scale solar activity (SSA), which is supposed to play an important role in heating of the corona and producing transient flows of the solar wind. During the recent unusually weak solar minimum, a large number of SSA events, such as week solar flares, small CMEs and CME-like flows were observed and recorded in the databases of flares (STEREO, SWAP, SPHINX) and CMEs (LASCO, CACTUS). On the other hand, the solar wind data obtained in this period by ACE, Wind, STEREO contain signatures of transient ICME-like structures which have shorter duration (<10h), weaker magnetic field strength (<10 nT) and lower proton temperature than usual ICMEs. To verify the assumption that ICME-like transients may be associated with the SSA events we investigated the number of weak flares of C-class and lower detected by SPHINX in 2009 and STEREO/EUVI in 2010. The flares were classified on temperature and emission measure using the diagnostic means of SPHINX and Hinode/EIS and were confronted with the parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density, ion composition and temperature, magnetic field, pitch angle distribution of the suprathermal electrons). The outflows of plasma associated with the flares were identified by their coronal signatures - CMEs (only in few cases) and dimmings. It was found that the mean parameters of the solar wind projected to the source surface for the times of the studied flares were typical for the ICME-like transients. The results support the suggestion that weak flares can be indicators of sources of transient plasma flows contributing to the slow solar wind at solar minimum, although these flows may be too weak to be considered as separate CMEs and ICMEs. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Programme

  11. Particle acceleration in 3D single current sheets formed in the solar corona and heliosphere: PIC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Siversky, T.

    2015-09-01

    Acceleration of protons and electrons in a reconnecting current sheet (RCS) is investigated with the test particle and particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches in a 3D magnetic topology. PIC simulations confirm a spatial separation of electrons and protons with respect to the midplane depending on the guiding field. Simulation reveals that the separation occurs in magnetic topologies with strong guiding fields and lasts as long as the particles are kept dragged into a current sheet. This separation produces a polarisation electric field induced by the plasma feedback to a presence of accelerated particles, which shape can change from symmetric towards the midplane (for weak guiding field) to fully asymmetric (for strong guiding field). Particles are found accelerated at a midplane of any current sheets present in the heliosphere to the energies up to hundred keV for electrons and hundred MeV for protons. The maximum energy gained by particles during their motion inside the current sheet is defined by its magnetic field topology (the ratio of magnetic field components), the side and location from the X-nullpoint, where the particles enter a current sheet. In strong magnetic fields of the solar corona with weaker guiding fields, electrons are found circulating about the midplane to large distances where proton are getting accelerated, creating about the current sheet midplane clouds of high energy electrons, which can be the source of hard X-ray emission in the coronal sources of flares. These electrons are ejected into the same footpoint as protons after the latter reach the energy sufficicent to break from a current sheet. In a weaker magnetic field of the heliosphere the bounced electrons with lower energies cannot reach the midplane turning instead at some distance D before the current sheet midplane by 180 degrees from their initial motion. Also the beams of accelerated transit and bounced particles are found to generate turbulent electric fields in a form of Langmuir

  12. Solar wind flow upstream of the coronal slow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1986-01-01

    Slow shocks have been predicted to exist embedded in large coronal holes at low altitude. Two or more curved slow shocks may link together to form a composite discontinuity surface around the sun which may be called the coronal slow shock (CSS). Here a solar-wind model is studied under the assumption that a standing CSS exists and cororates with the sun at a constant angular velocity. A steady, axisymmetrical one-fluid model is introduced to study the expansion of solar wind in the open-field region upstream of the CSS. The model requires that the conditions downstream of the CSS near the equatorial plane can produce a solar wind agreeable with the observations made near the earth's orbit. The paper presents an illustrative calculation in which the polar caps within 60 deg of the polar angle are assumed to be the source region of the solar wind.

  13. Genesis Solar Wind Sample Curation: A Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Hittle, J. D.; Wentworth, S. J.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    In the year since the Genesis solar wind collector fragments were returned, early science samples, specimens for cleaning experiments, and science allocations have been distributed. Solar wind samples are stored under nitrogen and handled in an ISO Class 4 (Class 10) laboratory. For array collector fragments, a basic characterization process has been established. This characterization consists of identification of solar wind regime, whole fragment image for identification and surface quality, higher magnification images for contaminant particle density, and assessment of molecular film contaminant thickness via ellipsometry modeling. Compilations of this characterization data for AuOS (gold film on sapphire), and sapphire from the bulk solar wind for fragments greater than 2 cm are available. Removal of contaminant particles using flowing ultrapure water (UPW) energized megasonically is provided as requested.

  14. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, M.D.; Rucker, H.O.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field. 10 references.

  15. Solar wind alpha particle capture at Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, Gabriella; Barabash, Stas; Nilsson, Hans; Fedorov, Andrei; Brain, Dave

    2010-05-01

    Helium is detected in the atmospheres of both Mars and Venus. It is believed that radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in the interior of the planets' is not sufficient to account for the abundance of helium observed. Alpha particles in the solar wind are suggested to be an additional source of helium, especially at Mars. Recent hybrid simulations show that as much as 30% of the alpha particles can be lost from the solar wind due to charge-exchange processes associated with the Mars/solar wind interaction. We use ion data from the ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 instruments on Mars and Venus Express to estimate how efficient solar wind alpha particles are captured in the atmospheres of the two planets.

  16. Magnetic fields of Mars and Venus - Solar wind interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1974-01-01

    Recent USSR studies of the magnetic field and solar wind flow in the vicinity of Mars and Venus confirm earlier U.S. reports of a bow shock wave developed as the solar wind interacts with these planets. Mars 2 and 3 magnetometer experiments report the existence of an intrinsic planetary magnetic field, sufficiently strong to form a magnetopause, deflecting the solar wind around the planet and its ionosphere. This is in contrast to the case for Venus, where it is assumed to be the ionosphere and processes therein which are responsible for the solar wind deflection. An empirical relationship appears to exist between planetary dipole magnetic moments and their angular momentum for the Moon, Mars, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter. Implications for the magnetic fields of Mercury and Saturn are discussed.

  17. Formation of a steady supersonic solar wind flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotova, N. A.; Subaev, I. A.; Korelov, O. A.

    2014-10-01

    A consistent study of the solar wind has been extended to a wide region of interplanetary space, up to distances from the Sun R ≥ 90 R s. Experiments are carried out with the radio telescopes of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory (Astrospace Center, Lebedev physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences): DKR-1000 (λ ≃ 2.7-2.9 m) and RT-22 (λ ≃ 1.35 cm), respectively. The radio-wave scattering characteristics, the scattering angle θ(R) and the scintillation index m(R), are studied. The formation of a steady supersonic solar wind is associated with a sequence of four stages whose scale in different solar wind streams changes within the range 10-23 R s , depending on the initial stream speed. These circumstances should be taken into account when predicting the state of the near space using data on the solar wind in regions of the interplanetary medium close to the Sun.

  18. Electrodynamics of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Joseph R.; Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a coherent picture of fundamental physical processes in three basic elements of the solar-wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling system: (1) the field-aligned potential structure which leads to the formation of auroral arcs, (2) the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling which leads to the onset of magnetospheric substorms, and (3) the solar-wind/magnetosphere dynamo which supplies the power driving various magnetospheric processes. Process (1) is forced into existence by the loss-cone constriction effect when the upward field-aligned current density exceeds the loss-cone thermal flux limit. Substorm onset occurs when the ionosphere responds fully to the enhanced magnetospheric convection driven by the solar wind. Energy is transferred from the solar wind to the magnetosphere by a dynamo process, primarily on open field lines.

  19. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  20. Charge exchange in solar wind-cometary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Horanyi, M.; Kecskemety, K.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model of a cometary spherically symmetrical atmosphere and ionosphere is considered. An analytic solution of the governing equations describing the radial distribution of the neutral and ion densities is found. The new solution is compared to the well-known solution of the equations containing only ionization terms. Neglecting recombination causes a significant overestimate of the ion density in the vicinity of the comet. An axisymmetric model of the solar wind-cometary interaction is considered, taking into account the loss of solar wind ions due to charge exchange. The calculations predict that for active comets, solar wind absorption due to charge exchange becomes important at a few thousand kilometers from the nucleus, and a surface separating the shocked solar wind from the cometary ionosphere develops in this region. These calculations are in reasonable agreement with the few observations available for the ionopause location at comets.

  1. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Phase 2 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Lefton, S.; Kumar, N.; Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation summarizes the scope and results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  2. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Rucker, H. O.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field.

  3. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    This is one-page, two-sided fact sheet presents high-level summary results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  4. A parametric study of the solar wind interaction with comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Le, G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fedder, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory's magnetohydrodynamic simulation code is used to simulate the solar wind interction with comet Halley for two different outgassing rates and several different solar wind states. The magnetic field is more strongly draped for fast solar wind conditions than slow. For higher mass loading rates, the tail becomes wider and contains more magnetic flux. The visual appearance of the comet differs for the case in which the interplanetary magnetic field lies in the plane of the sky from the case when it lies along the line of sight. The ion tail appears shorter in the latter case. Thus variation in the IMF direction can cause significant changes in the appearance of comets. The comet also creates a large momentum flux deficit in the solar wind with a narrow enhanced region within it corresponding to the ion tail.

  5. The visual appearance of comets under varying solar wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Guan, L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fedder, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional MHD simulations have been performed for four different sets of solar wind conditions and cometary outgassing rates appropriate to the Halley encounters. Even though the simulations are single fluid calculations, it is possible to separate the solar wind and cometary ions using the divergenceless nature of the solar wind ions. The cometary ion density is then integrated along the line-of-sight from the observer through the comet to determine how the comet would look to a distant observer under these different conditions. In general, comet tails appear longer when the interplanetary magnetic field lies in the plane of the sky rather than along the line-of-sight. Also, the tail shrinks as the speed of the solar wind increases and/or the mass loading rate decreases.

  6. Electron energetics in the expanding solar wind via Helios observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å tverák, Å. těpán.; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-10-01

    We present an observational analysis of electron cooling/heating rates in the fast and slow solar wind between 0.3 and 1 AU. We fit electron velocity distribution functions acquired in situ by Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft by a three-component (core-halo-strahl) analytical model. The resulting radial profiles of macroscopic characteristics (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes) are employed to examine properties of theoretical energy balance equations and to estimate external cooling/heating terms. Our analysis indicates that in contrast to solar wind protons the electrons do not require important heating mechanisms to explain the observed temperature gradients. The electron heating rates are actually found to be negative for both the slow and fast solar wind, namely, due to the significant degradation of the electron heat flux with increasing radial distance from the Sun. Cooling mechanisms acting on electrons are found to be significantly stronger in the slow wind than in the fast wind streams.

  7. A view of solar magnetic fields, the solar corona, and the solar wind in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    In the last few years it has been recognized that the solar corona and the solar wind are three-dimensional. The deviations from spherical or even cylindrical symmetry are first-order effects, which are important for a basic description and physical understanding of the coronal expansion. Models of coronal magnetic fields are considered along with the characteristics of large-scale solar structure, the interplanetary magnetic field, coronal holes, geomagnetic activity, cosmic rays, and polar fields of the sun. It is pointed out that the present understanding of coronal and interplanetary morphology is based on data acquired during the descending part and the minimum of the considered sunspot cycle.

  8. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  9. Calculation of solar wind flows about terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A computational model was developed for the determination of the plasma and magnetic field properties of the global interaction of the solar wind with terrestrial planetary magneto/ionospheres. The theoretical method is based on an established single fluid, steady, dissipationless, magnetohydrodynamic continuum model, and is appropriate for the calculation of supersonic, super Alfvenic solar wind flow past terrestrial planets. A summary is provided of the important research results.

  10. On Electron-scale Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.; Giles, B.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Burch, J. L.; Nariyuki, Y.; Saito, S.; Gary, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    For the first time, the dispersion relation for turbulence magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly on small scales of the order of the electron inertial length, using four-point magnetometer observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The data are analyzed using the high-resolution adaptive wave telescope technique. Small-scale solar wind turbulence is primarily composed of highly obliquely propagating waves, with dispersion consistent with that of the whistler mode.

  11. Solar Wind Charge State Composition Results from PLASTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popecki, M.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Moebius, E.; Klecker, B.; Kucharek, H.; Simunac, K.; Bochsler, P.; Blush, L.; Karrer, R.; Daoudi, H.; Opitz, A.; Giammanco, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.

    2007-12-01

    The PLASTIC instrument on the STEREO spacecraft provides solar wind proton moments and heavy ion composition. Using an electrostatic analyzer with a time of flight and residual energy measurement, it can supply mass and ionic charge state for solar wind heavy ions. Preliminary results for iron will be shown for selected events, including the possible flux rope passage on May 21-22, 2007, and a near-magnetotail passage in February, 2007.

  12. STEREO Observations of Solar Wind in 2007-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Lan; Luhmann, Janet; Russell, Christopher; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Kilpua, Emilia; Li, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Since the launch of twin STEREO spacecraft, we have been monitoring the solar wind and providing the Level 3 event lists of large-scale solar wind and particle events to public (http://www-ssc.igpp.ucla.edu/forms/stereo/stereo_level_3.html). The interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), stream interaction regions (SIRs), interplanetary shocks, and solar energetic particles (based on high energy telescope data) have been surveyed for 2007-2014 before STEREO A went to the superior solar conjunction and STEREO B was lost in contact. In conjunction with our previous observations of same solar wind structures in 1995-2009 using Wind/ACE data and the same identification criteria, we study the solar cycle variations of these structures, especially compare the same phase of solar cycles 23 and 24. Although the sunspot number at solar maximum 24 is only 60% of the level at last solar maximum, Gopalswamy et al. (2015a, b) found there were more halo CMEs in cycle 24 and the number of magnetic clouds did not decline either. We examine if the two vantage points of STEREO provide a consistent view with the above finding. In addition, because the twin STEREO spacecraft have experienced the full-range longitudinal separation of 0-360 degree, they have provided us numerous opportunities for multipoint observations. We will report the findings on the spatial scope of ICMEs including their driven shocks, and the stability of SIRs from the large event base.

  13. Interaction of Comets and the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2003-01-01

    We had originally planned to analyze UVCS observations of Comet Machholz, but we obtained higher quality observations of Comet Kudo-Fujikawa in January 2003 at its 0.19 AU perihelion. Besides a large and rapidly increasing water outgassing rate, we detected a bright tail in doubly ionized carbon. The amount of carbon was greater than could be accounted for by GO photodissociation, and we attribute the carbon to evaporation of organics from dust. A spectacular disconnection event was apparent in the C III tail, and it coincides within the uncertainties with the position of the heliospheric current sheet. A paper is in press in Science, and it will be the subject of a press release. We are also analyzing two sungrazing comets. Comet C/2001 C2 shows evidence for sub-fragments and for a very long lasting source of neutrals, which we tentatively identify as evaporation of pyroxene dust grains. Comet C/2002 S2 shows a sudden 2 magnitude drop in optical brightness and an equally sudden recovery. UVCS observations during that time show a steadily increasing outgassing rate. We have derived solar wind densities for both comets, but we are still sorting out the ambiguities involving the fragmentation and optical behavior. We are collaborating with Philippe Lamy on the LASCO measurements.

  14. Interaction of Comets and the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William (Technical Monitor); Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of Comet Kudo-Fujikawa at perihelion was published and picked up by Der Spiegel. Besides a large and rapidly increasing water outgassing rate, we detected a bright tail in doubly ionized carbon. The amount of carbon was greater than could be accounted for by CO photodissociation, and we attribute it to evaporation of organics from dust. A spectacular disconnection event was apparent in the C III tail, and it coincides within the uncertainties to the position of the heliospheric current sheet. The analysis of the sungrazing comet C2001 C2 is in press. It showed evidence for subfragments and for a very long lasting source of neutrals, which we identify as evaporation of pyroxene dust grains. Results were also presented at COSPAR. We are working on observations of another sungrazer, comet C2002 S2, which shows a sudden 2 magnitude drop in optical brightness and an equally sudden recovery. UVCS observations during that time show a steadily increasing outgassing rate. We have derived solar wind densities for both comets, but we are still sorting out the ambiguities involving the fragmentation and optical behavior.

  15. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  16. The dynamic character of the polar solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B. V.; Yu, H.-S.; Buffington, A.; Hick, P. P. E-mail: hsyu@ucsd.edu E-mail: pphick@ucsd.edu

    2014-09-20

    The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph C2 and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR2A coronagraph images, when analyzed using correlation tracking techniques, show a surprising result in places ordinarily thought of as 'quiet' solar wind above the poles in coronal hole regions. Instead of the static well-ordered flow and gradual acceleration normally expected, coronagraph images show outflow in polar coronal holes consisting of a mixture of intermittent slow and fast patches of material. We compare measurements of this highly variable solar wind from C2 and COR2A images and show that both coronagraphs measure essentially the same structures. Measurements of the mean velocity as a function of height of these structures are compared with mass flux determinations of the solar wind outflow in the large polar coronal hole regions and give similar results.

  17. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  18. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  19. Solar wind: The solar wind and the Sun-Earth link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifia; Woo, Richard

    2004-08-01

    The solar wind fills the space between the Sun and its planets, shapes the planetary environments and the heliosphere, and comes to a screeching halt at the heliopause, the boundary with the interstellar medium. This tenuous medium is a fertile environment for exotic plasma processes, most of which are not fully understood. It also holds the intimate secrets of the mechanisms heating the corona that continue to elude us. As the only accessible space plasma laboratory, we must continue its exploration in search of the processes that impact the Earth's environment and govern the evolution of stars and their planetary systems.

  20. Wind loading on solar concentrators: Some general considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey was completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view. Current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed. Recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly.

  1. Investigation of Solar Wind Correlations and Solar Wind Modifications Near Earth by Multi-Spacecraft Observations: IMP 8, WIND and INTERBALL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paularena, Karolen I.; Richardson, John D.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2002-01-01

    The foundation of this Project is use of the opportunity available during the ISTP (International Solar-Terrestrial Physics) era to compare solar wind measurements obtained simultaneously by three spacecraft - IMP 8, WIND and INTERBALL-1 at wide-separated points. Using these data allows us to study three important topics: (1) the size and dynamics of near-Earth mid-scale (with dimension about 1-10 million km) and small-scale (with dimension about 10-100 thousand km) solar wind structures; (2) the reliability of the common assumption that solar wind conditions at the upstream Lagrangian (L1) point accurately predict the conditions affecting Earth's magnetosphere; (3) modification of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field in the regions near the Earth magnetosphere, the foreshock and the magnetosheath. Our Project was dedicated to these problems. Our research has made substantial contributions to the field and has lead others to undertake similar work.

  2. Modeling the Acceleration Process of Dust in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. D.; Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies we have identified structures created by nano-dust in the solar wind, and we have observed the expected draping and diverting signatures of such structures using well-spaced multi-spacecraft observations. In this study, we reproduce such an interaction event with our multi-fluid MHD model, modeling the dust particles as a fluid. When the number density of dust particles is comparable to the solar wind ions, a significant draping in the IMF is created, with amplitude larger than the ambient fluctuations. We note that such a density is well above several nano dust particles per Debye sphere and a dusty fluid is appropriate for modeling the dust-solar wind interaction. We assume a spherical cloud of dust travelling with 90% solar wind speed. In addition to reproducing the IMF response to the nano-dust at the end-stage of dust acceleration, we model the entire process of such acceleration in the gravity field of the inner heliosphere. It takes hours for the smallest dust with 3000 amu per proton charge to reach the solar wind speed. We find the dust cloud stretched along the solar wind flow. Such stretching enhances the draping of IMF, compared to the spherical cloud we used in an earlier stage of this study. This model will be further used to examine magnetic perturbations at an earlier stage of dust cloud acceleration, and then determine the size, density, and total mass of dust cloud, as well as its creation and acceleration.

  3. Solar wind precipitation - a comparison between Mars and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg Wieser, Gabriella; Nilsson, Hans; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Holmström, Mats; Barabash, Stas

    2015-04-01

    Mars and Venus both have atmospheres but both lack a substantial intrinsic magnetic field. Hence, their interaction with the solar wind is similar. Due to currents set up in the ionospheres the interplanetary magnetic field embedded in the solar wind drapes around the planets forming induced magnetospheres. The plasma instrument packages ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 on the two spacecraft Mars Express and Venus Express are very similar and invite to a comparison between the two plasma environments. In this study we used the Ion Mass Analyser (IMA) on both spacecraft to investigate the solar wind precipitation onto the upper atmospheres. We focus on the differences between the two planets. We conclude that on Mars we regularly observe precipitating solar wind ions (H+ and He2+) inside the induced magnetosphere boundary (IMB). The precipitation is clearly guided by the solar wind convection electric field and He2+ and H+ are seen independently of each other. On Venus precipitation of He2+ is only observed close to the IMB and always together with H+. The precipitation events on Venus have no clear correlation with the solar wind electric field.

  4. Sputtering by the Solar Wind: Effects of Variable Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R. M.; Arrell, W. M.; Sarantos, M.; Delory, G. T.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that there is no increase in the sputtering yield caused by highly charged heavy ions for metallic and for semiconducting surfaces, but the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. Recently measurements of the solar wind composition have become available. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. Whereas many previous calculations of sputtering were limited to the effects of proton bombardment. we show that the heavy ion component. especially the He++ component. can greatly enhance the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced. We will discuss sputtering of both neutrals and ions.

  5. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Hodge, B.-M.; King, J.

    2012-09-01

    The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) investigates the impacts of high penetrations of wind and solar power into the Western Interconnection of the United States. WWSIS2 builds on the Phase 1 study but with far greater refinement in the level of data inputs and production simulation. It considers the differences between wind and solar power on systems operations. It considers mitigation options to accommodate wind and solar when full costs of wear-and-tear and full impacts of emissions rates are taken into account. It determines wear-and-tear costs and emissions impacts. New data sets were created for WWSIS2, and WWSIS1 data sets were refined to improve realism of plant output and forecasts. Four scenarios were defined for WWSIS2 that examine the differences between wind and solar and penetration level. Transmission was built out to bring resources to load. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate wind and solar impacts at timescales ranging from seasonal down to 5 minutes.

  6. Structure of magnetic field in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    This work is concerned with empirical data on magnetic field in the solar wind in frame of a concept of dissipative solar wind, developed in papers (Solar Wind 7 Conf., Pergamon Press, 1992, 165 and 1992 STEP/5th COSPAR Coll. Pergamon Press, 1994, 117; 235; 803). Interplanetary magnetic fields should be classified with respect to their origin. It is very important for all the theoretical problems from the necessity to specify correctly boundary and initial conditions: the magnetic field must be sewed with its source. One should select the field, connected directly with the Sun (stretched out from it), and the field of moving electric currents. It occured central in discussion about the velocity of Alfven waves, probably warming up the solar wind, relative to the Sun, the magnetic field and solar wind plasma. The selection problem corresponds to an inverse problem and obviously has no single solution. The dissipative model of the solar wind introduce the slipping and leakage of plasma relative to magnetic field. There are no 'interplanetary current sheets' in it. But temporal fluctuations from the filamentation of electric currents play the key role. As a whole, the new concept requires the re-interpretation of main objects in the interplanetary magnetic field.

  7. Prediction of solar energetic particle event histories using real-time particle and solar wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Gold, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The comparatively well-ordered magnetic structure in the solar corona during the decline of Solar Cycle 20 revealed a characteristic dependence of solar energetic particle injection upon heliographic longitude. When analyzed using solar wind mapping of the large scale interplanetary magnetic field line connection from the corona to the Earth, particle fluxes display an approximately exponential dependence on heliographic longitude. Since variations in the solar wind velocity (and hence the coronal connection longitude) can severely distort the simple coronal injection profile, the use of real-time solar wind velocity measurements can be of great aid in predicting the decay of solar particle events. Although such exponential injection profiles are commonplace during 1973-1975, they have also been identified earlier in Solar Cycle 20, and hence this structure may be present during the rise and maximum of the cycle, but somewhat obscured by greater temporal variations in particle injection.

  8. Impacts of wind stilling on solar radiation variability in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changgui; Yang, Kun; Huang, Jianping; Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Lu, Ning; Fu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Solar dimming and wind stilling (slowdown) are two outstanding climate changes occurred in China over the last four decades. The wind stilling may have suppressed the dispersion of aerosols and amplified the impact of aerosol emission on solar dimming. However, there is a lack of long-term aerosol monitoring and associated study in China to confirm this hypothesis. Here, long-term meteorological data at weather stations combined with short-term aerosol data were used to assess this hypothesis. It was found that surface solar radiation (SSR) decreased considerably with wind stilling in heavily polluted regions at a daily scale, indicating that wind stilling can considerably amplify the aerosol extinction effect on SSR. A threshold value of 3.5 m/s for wind speed is required to effectively reduce aerosols concentration. From this SSR dependence on wind speed, we further derived proxies to quantify aerosol emission and wind stilling amplification effects on SSR variations at a decadal scale. The results show that aerosol emission accounted for approximately 20% of the typical solar dimming in China, which was amplified by approximately 20% by wind stilling. PMID:26463748

  9. Impacts of wind stilling on solar radiation variability in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Changgui; Yang, Kun; Huang, Jianping; Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Lu, Ning; Fu, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Solar dimming and wind stilling (slowdown) are two outstanding climate changes occurred in China over the last four decades. The wind stilling may have suppressed the dispersion of aerosols and amplified the impact of aerosol emission on solar dimming. However, there is a lack of long-term aerosol monitoring and associated study in China to confirm this hypothesis. Here, long-term meteorological data at weather stations combined with short-term aerosol data were used to assess this hypothesis. It was found that surface solar radiation (SSR) decreased considerably with wind stilling in heavily polluted regions at a daily scale, indicating that wind stilling can considerably amplify the aerosol extinction effect on SSR. A threshold value of 3.5 m/s for wind speed is required to effectively reduce aerosols concentration. From this SSR dependence on wind speed, we further derived proxies to quantify aerosol emission and wind stilling amplification effects on SSR variations at a decadal scale. The results show that aerosol emission accounted for approximately 20% of the typical solar dimming in China, which was amplified by approximately 20% by wind stilling.

  10. Impacts of wind stilling on solar radiation variability in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Changgui; Yang, Kun; Huang, Jianping; Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Niu, Xiaolei; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Lu, Ning; Fu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Solar dimming and wind stilling (slowdown) are two outstanding climate changes occurred in China over the last four decades. The wind stilling may have suppressed the dispersion of aerosols and amplified the impact of aerosol emission on solar dimming. However, there is a lack of long-term aerosol monitoring and associated study in China to confirm this hypothesis. Here, long-term meteorological data at weather stations combined with short-term aerosol data were used to assess this hypothesis. It was found that surface solar radiation (SSR) decreased considerably with wind stilling in heavily polluted regions at a daily scale, indicating that wind stilling can considerably amplify the aerosol extinction effect on SSR. A threshold value of 3.5 m/s for wind speed is required to effectively reduce aerosols concentration. From this SSR dependence on wind speed, we further derived proxies to quantify aerosol emission and wind stilling amplification effects on SSR variations at a decadal scale. The results show that aerosol emission accounted for approximately 20% of the typical solar dimming in China, which was amplified by approximately 20% by wind stilling. PMID:26463748

  11. Using the fingerprints of solar magnetic reconnection to identify the elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, Larry; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Kasper, Justin; Lepri, Sue

    2015-04-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and found strong relationships between the solar wind velocity and these plasma parameters. These relationships have been used to constrain models of solar wind source and acceleration. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of solar wind composition and charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability at relatively small scales. We study an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi-periodic 90 minute structures and show that they are remnants of solar magnetic reconnection. Each 90-minute parcel of slow solar wind, though the speed remains steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, which is repeated again in the next 90-minute interval. These observations show that previous statistical results break down on these shorter timescales, and impose new and important constraints on models of slow solar wind creation. We conclude by suggesting these structures were created through interchange magnetic reconnection and form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind. We also discuss the necessity of decoupling separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  12. Constraints on neon and argon isotopic fractionation in solar wind.

    PubMed

    Meshik, Alex; Mabry, Jennifer; Hohenberg, Charles; Marrocchi, Yves; Pravdivtseva, Olga; Burnett, Donald; Olinger, Chad; Wiens, Roger; Reisenfeld, Dan; Allton, Judith; McNamara, Karen; Stansbery, Eileen; Jurewicz, Amy J G

    2007-10-19

    To evaluate the isotopic composition of the solar nebula from which the planets formed, the relation between isotopes measured in the solar wind and on the Sun's surface needs to be known. The Genesis Discovery mission returned independent samples of three types of solar wind produced by different solar processes that provide a check on possible isotopic variations, or fractionation, between the solar-wind and solar-surface material. At a high level of precision, we observed no significant inter-regime differences in 20Ne/22Ne or 36Ar/38Ar values. For 20Ne/22Ne, the difference between low- and high-speed wind components is 0.24 +/- 0.37%; for 36Ar/38Ar, it is 0.11 +/- 0.26%. Our measured 36Ar/38Ar ratio in the solar wind of 5.501 +/- 0.005 is 3.42 +/- 0.09% higher than that of the terrestrial atmosphere, which may reflect atmospheric losses early in Earth's history. PMID:17947578

  13. Electron energy transport in the solar wind: Ulysses observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scime, Earl; Gary, S. Peter; Phillips, J. L.; Corniileau-Wehrlin, N.; Solomon, J.

    1995-01-01

    The electron heat flux in the solar wind has been measured by the Ulysses solar wind plasma experiment in the ecliptic from 1 to 5 AU and out of the ecliptic during the recently completed pass over the solar south pole and the ongoing pass over the solar north pole. Although the electron heat flux contains only a fraction of the kinetic energy of the solar wind. the available energy is sufficient to account for the non-adiabatic expansion of the solar wind electrons. The Ulysses measurements indicate that the electron heat flux is actively dissipated in the solar wind. The exact mechanism or mechanisms is unknown. but a model based on the whistler heat flux instability predicts radial gradients for the electron heat flux in good agreement with the data. We will present measurements of the correlation between wave activity measured by the unified radio and plasma experiment (URAP) and the electron heat flux throughout the Ulysses mission. The goal is to determine if whistler waves are a good candidate for the observed electron heat flux dissipation. The latitudinal gradients of the electron heat flux. wave activity. and electron pressure will be discussed in light of the changes in the magnetic field geometry from equator to poles.

  14. Photoconversion of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with a 3D-Structured Photoelectrode Consisting of Both TiO2 Nanofibers and Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Tae; Choi, Won-Youl

    2016-03-01

    In dye-sensitized solar cells, a three-dimensional (3-D)-structured photoelectrode of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles was successfully fabricated by electro-spinning and screen-printing processes. Structures with one-dimensional nanofibers can be expected to improve the charge transport in a photoelectrode. The microstructure and crystalline structure were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and with an x-ray diffractometer, respectively. The particle size of the TiO2 particles and the diameters of the TiO2 nanofiber in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode were ~30 nm and ~500 nm, respectively. The total thickness of the TiO2 layer in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode, which is composed of a nanoparticle layer of ~12 μm and a nanofiber layer of ~8 μm, was ~20 μm. The crystalline, anatase phase was also determined. In these dye-sensitized solar cells with a 3-D-structured layer, a short-circuit current density of 12.36 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.74 V, a fill factor of 0.46, and an energy conversion efficiency of 4.18% were observed. These values are higher than those of dye-sensitized solar cells with a conventional TiO2 nanoparticle layer. The proposed 3-D-structured photoelectrode consisting of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles can help improve the performance of commercial dye-sensitized solar cells.

  15. Photoconversion of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with a 3D-Structured Photoelectrode Consisting of Both TiO2 Nanofibers and Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Tae; Choi, Won-Youl

    2016-06-01

    In dye-sensitized solar cells, a three-dimensional (3-D)-structured photoelectrode of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles was successfully fabricated by electro-spinning and screen-printing processes. Structures with one-dimensional nanofibers can be expected to improve the charge transport in a photoelectrode. The microstructure and crystalline structure were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and with an x-ray diffractometer, respectively. The particle size of the TiO2 particles and the diameters of the TiO2 nanofiber in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode were ~30 nm and ~500 nm, respectively. The total thickness of the TiO2 layer in the 3-D-structured photoelectrode, which is composed of a nanoparticle layer of ~12 μm and a nanofiber layer of ~8 μm, was ~20 μm. The crystalline, anatase phase was also determined. In these dye-sensitized solar cells with a 3-D-structured layer, a short-circuit current density of 12.36 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.74 V, a fill factor of 0.46, and an energy conversion efficiency of 4.18% were observed. These values are higher than those of dye-sensitized solar cells with a conventional TiO2 nanoparticle layer. The proposed 3-D-structured photoelectrode consisting of TiO2 nanofibers and nanoparticles can help improve the performance of commercial dye-sensitized solar cells.

  16. Solar flare acceleration of solar wind - Influence of active region magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstedt, H.; Wilcox, J. M.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    The direction of the photospheric magnetic field at the site of a solar flare is a good predictor of whether the flare will accelerate solar wind plasma. If the field has a southward component, high-speed solar wind plasma is usually observed near the earth about 4 days later. If the field has a northward component, such high-speed solar wind is almost never observed. Southward-field flares may then be expected to have much larger terrestrial effects than northward flares.

  17. On the Relationship Between Solar Wind Speed, Geomagnetic Activity, and the Solar Cycle Using Annual Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The aa index can be decomposed into two separate components: the leading sporadic component due to solar activity as measured by sunspot number and the residual or recurrent component due to interplanetary disturbances, such as coronal holes. For the interval 1964-2006, a highly statistically important correlation (r = 0.749) is found between annual averages of the aa index and the solar wind speed (especially between the residual component of aa and the solar wind speed, r = 0.865). Because cyclic averages of aa (and the residual component) have trended upward during cycles 11-23, cyclic averages of solar wind speed are inferred to have also trended upward.

  18. A non-CFD modeling system for computing 3D wind and concentration fields in urban environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Matthew A; Brown, Michael J; Williams, Michael D; Gowardhan, Akshay; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2010-01-01

    The Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) Dispersion Modeling System has been developed to rapidly compute the transport and dispersion of toxic agent releases in the vicinity of buildings. It is composed of an empirical-diagnostic wind solver, an 'urbanized' Lagrangian random-walk model, and a graphical user interface. The code has been used for homeland security and environmental air pollution applications. In this paper, we discuss the wind solver methodology and improvements made to the original Roeckle schemes in order to better capture flow fields in dense built-up areas. The mode1-computed wind and concentration fields are then compared to measurements from several field experiments. Improvements to the QUIC Dispersion Modeling System have been made to account for the inhomogeneous and complex building layouts found in large cities. The logic that has been introduced into the code is described and comparisons of model output to full-scale outdoor urban measurements in Oklahoma City and New York City are given. Although far from perfect, the model agreed fairly well with measurements and in many cases performed equally to CFD codes.

  19. Detection of small-scale folds at a solar wind reconnection exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, R.; Eastwood, J. P.; Hietala, H.

    2015-01-01

    of reconnection in the solar wind over the last few years appear to indicate that the majority of large-scale reconnecting current sheets are roughly planar, and that reconnection itself is quasi-steady. Most studies of solar wind exhausts have used spacecraft with large separations and relatively low time cadence ion measurements. Here we present multipoint Cluster observations of a reconnection exhaust and the associated current sheet at ACE and Wind, enabling it to be studied on multiple length scales and at high time resolution. While analysis shows that on large scales the current sheet is planar, detailed measurements using the four closely spaced Cluster spacecraft show that the trailing edge of the reconnection jet is nonplanar with folds orthogonal to the reconnection plane, with length scales of approximately 230 ion inertial lengths. Our findings thus suggest that while solar wind current sheets undergoing reconnection may be planar on large scales, they may also exhibit complex smaller-scale structure. Such structure is difficult to observe and has rarely been detected because exhausts are rapidly convected past the spacecraft in a single cut; there is therefore a limited set of spacecraft trajectories through the exhaust which would allow the nonplanar features to be intercepted. We consider how such nonplanar reconnection current sheets can form and the processes which may have generated the 3-D structure that was observed.

  20. Solar wind ion trends and signatures: STEREO PLASTIC observations approaching solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvin, A. B.; Popecki, M. A.; Simunac, K. D. C.; Kistler, L. M.; Ellis, L.; Barry, J.; Berger, L.; Blush, L. M.; Bochsler, P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Jian, L. K.; Kilpua, E. K. J.; Klecker, B.; Lee, M.; Liu, Y. C.-M.; Luhmann, J. L.; Moebius, E.; Opitz, A.; Russell, C. T.; Thompson, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Wurz, P.

    2009-10-01

    STEREO has now completed the first two years of its mission, moving from close proximity to Earth in 2006/2007 to more than 50 degrees longitudinal separation from Earth in 2009. During this time, several large-scale structures have been observed in situ. Given the prevailing solar minimum conditions, these structures have been predominantly coronal hole-associated solar wind, slow solar wind, their interfaces, and the occasional transient event. In this paper, we extend earlier solar wind composition studies into the current solar minimum using high-resolution (1-h) sampling times for the charge state analysis. We examine 2-year trends for iron charge states and solar wind proton speeds, and present a case study of Carrington Rotation 2064 (December 2007) which includes minor ion (He, Fe, O) kinetic and Fe composition parameters in comparison with proton and magnetic field signatures at large-scale structures observed during this interval.

  1. Element Abundances in the Sun and Solar Wind Along the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    Element abundances are a critical parameter in almost every aspect of solar physics, from regulating the energy flow and the structure of the solar interior, to shaping the energy losses of the solar atmosphere, ruling the radiative output of the UV, EUV and X-rays solar radiation which impacts the Earth's upper atmosphere, and determining the composition of the solar wind.In this work we study the evolution of the element abundances in the solar corona and in the solar wind from 1996 to date using data from SoHO, Hinode, Ulysses and ACE satellites, in order to determine their variability along the solar cycle, and the relationship between solar abundance variations in the solar wind and in its source regions in the solar atmosphere. We study all the most abundant elements, with a special emphasis on Ne and O. We discuss our results in light of the source region of the solar wind, and of the radiative output of the solar corona.

  2. Velocity shear layers in solar winds affect Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Human society is increasingly reliant on technology that can be disrupted by space weather. For instance, geomagnetic storms can cause high-latitude air fights to be rerouted, costing as much as $100,000 per fight; induce errors of up to 46 meters in GPS systems; and affect satellites and the International Space Station. Space weather is determined by how the solar wind, a stream of hot plasma from the Sun, interacts with Earth's magnetic field. In studying space weather, scientists have largely neglected the fact that the solar wind contains layers of very strong velocity shear. Scientists understand very little about how these wind shears affect space weather.

  3. Velocity Distributions and Proton Beam Production in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Pierrard, Viviane; Voitenko, Yuriy

    2010-03-25

    Helios, Ulysses, and Wind spacecraft have observed the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of solar wind particles deviating significantly from Maxwellians. We review recent models using different approximations and mechanisms that determine various observed characteristics of the VDFs for the electrons, protons and minor ions. A new generation mechanism is proposed for super-Alfvenic