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Sample records for 3d space charge

  1. Quasi-3D space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The longitudinal space charge effect is simulated by binning the longitudinal beam profile in order to calculate the force on the bins using the binned particle distribution via FFT, and applying momentum kick based upon this space charge force to macro-particles. Usually, the longitudinal space charge kick is calculated once per turn since the longitudinal profile doesn't change much in a single turn. Besides, the longitudinal profile is used as a weighting factor for the transverse space charge force. The transverse space charge effect is simulated by projecting the 3-D beam to a 2-D Gaussian distribution in order to use the complex error function to compute the transverse space charge force, and applying this space charge force to macro-particles. One transverse space charge calculation per scale length of the beam shape variation requires at least ten transverse space charge force calculations per betatron oscillation.

  2. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  3. 3D particle simulations of space-charge-dominated beams in HIF accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.P.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S.M.; Haber, I.

    1997-05-01

    The development of a high current, heavy-ion beam for inertial confinement fusion requires a detailed understanding of the behavior of the beam, including effects of the large self-fields. This necessity makes particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation the appropriate tool, and for this reason, the three-dimensional PIC/accelerator code WARP3d is being developed. WARP3d has been used extensively to study the creation and propagation of ion beams both to support experiments and for the understanding of basic beam physics. An overview of the structure of the code is presented along with a discussion of features that make the code an effective tool in the understanding of space-charge dominated beam behavior. A number of applications where WARP3d has played an important role is discussed, emphasizing the need of three-dimensional, first principles simulations. Results and comparisons with experiment are presented.

  4. PARALLEL 3-D SPACE CHARGE CALCULATIONS IN THE UNIFIED ACCELERATOR LIBRARY.

    SciTech Connect

    D'IMPERIO, N.L.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MALITSKY, N.

    2006-06-26

    The paper presents the integration of the SIMBAD space charge module in the UAL framework. SIMBAD is a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code. Its 3-D Parallel approach features an optimized load balancing scheme based on a genetic algorithm. The UAL framework enhances the SIMBAD standalone version with the interactive ROOT-based analysis environment and an open catalog of accelerator algorithms. The composite package addresses complex high intensity beam dynamics and has been developed as part of the FAIR SIS 100 project.

  5. Parametric instabilities in 3D periodically focused beams with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Parametric resonances of beam eigenmodes with a periodic focusing system under the effect of space charge—also called structural instabilities—are the collective counterparts to parametric resonances of single particles or of mechanical systems. Their common feature is that an exponential instability is driven by a temporal modulation of a system parameter. Thus, they are complementary to the more commonly considered space charge single particle resonances, where space charge pseudo-multipole terms are assumed to exist already at finite level in the initial distribution. This article elaborates on the characteristics of such parametric instabilities in 3D bunched beams—as typical in linear accelerators—for modes of second (envelope), third and fourth order, including the transverse coupled "sum envelope instabilities" recently discovered for 2D beams. Noteworthy results are the finding that parametric resonances can be in competition with single particle resonances of twice the order due to overlapping stopbands; furthermore the surprisingly good applicability of the stopband positions and widths obtained from previously published 2D linearised Vlasov stability theory to the 3D non-Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij particle-in-cell code studies presented here.

  6. SPACE CHARGE DYNAMICS SIMULATED IN 3 - D IN THE CODE ORBIT.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO,A.U.; DIMPERIO,N.L.; BEEBE - WANG,J.

    2002-06-02

    Several improvements have been done on space charge calculations in the PIC code ORBIT, specialized for high intensity circular hadron accelerators. We present results of different Poisson solvers in the presence of conductive walls.

  7. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics.more » In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.« less

  8. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  9. A parallel 3D poisson solver for space charge simulation in cylindrical coordinates.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Nolen, J.; Physics

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the development of a parallel three-dimensional Poisson solver in cylindrical coordinate system for the electrostatic potential of a charged particle beam in a circular tube. The Poisson solver uses Fourier expansions in the longitudinal and azimuthal directions, and Spectral Element discretization in the radial direction. A Dirichlet boundary condition is used on the cylinder wall, a natural boundary condition is used on the cylinder axis and a Dirichlet or periodic boundary condition is used in the longitudinal direction. A parallel 2D domain decomposition was implemented in the (r,{theta}) plane. This solver was incorporated into the parallel code PTRACK for beam dynamics simulations. Detailed benchmark results for the parallel solver and a beam dynamics simulation in a high-intensity proton LINAC are presented. When the transverse beam size is small relative to the aperture of the accelerator line, using the Poisson solver in a Cartesian coordinate system and a Cylindrical coordinate system produced similar results. When the transverse beam size is large or beam center located off-axis, the result from Poisson solver in Cartesian coordinate system is not accurate because different boundary condition used. While using the new solver, we can apply circular boundary condition easily and accurately for beam dynamic simulations in accelerator devices.

  10. A fast parallel 3D Poisson solver with longitudinal periodic and transverse open boundary conditions for space-charge simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2017-10-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) Poisson solver with longitudinal periodic and transverse open boundary conditions can have important applications in beam physics of particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a fast efficient method to solve the Poisson equation using a spectral finite-difference method. This method uses a computational domain that contains the charged particle beam only and has a computational complexity of O(Nu(logNmode)) , where Nu is the total number of unknowns and Nmode is the maximum number of longitudinal or azimuthal modes. This saves both the computational time and the memory usage of using an artificial boundary condition in a large extended computational domain. The new 3D Poisson solver is parallelized using a message passing interface (MPI) on multi-processor computers and shows a reasonable parallel performance up to hundreds of processor cores.

  11. A Hybrid 3D Indoor Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Ali; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    GIS integrates spatial information and spatial analysis. An important example of such integration is for emergency response which requires route planning inside and outside of a building. Route planning requires detailed information related to indoor and outdoor environment. Indoor navigation network models including Geometric Network Model (GNM), Navigable Space Model, sub-division model and regular-grid model lack indoor data sources and abstraction methods. In this paper, a hybrid indoor space model is proposed. In the proposed method, 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. This research proposes a method of indoor space modeling for the buildings which do not have proper 2D/3D geometrical models or they lack semantic or topological information. The proposed hybrid model consists of topological, geometrical and semantical space.

  12. 3D space analysis of dental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Joon H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Kondo, Toshiaki; Foong, Kelvin W. C.; Yong, Than F.

    2001-05-01

    Space analysis is an important procedure by orthodontists to determine the amount of space available and required for teeth alignment during treatment planning. Traditional manual methods of space analysis are tedious and often inaccurate. Computer-based space analysis methods that work on 2D images have been reported. However, as the space problems in the dental arch exist in all three planes of space, a full 3D analysis of the problems is necessary. This paper describes a visualization and measurement system that analyses 3D images of dental plaster models. Algorithms were developed to determine dental arches. The system is able to record the depths of the Curve of Spee, and quantify space liabilities arising from a non-planar Curve of Spee, malalignment and overjet. Furthermore, the difference between total arch space available and the space required to arrange the teeth in ideal occlusion can be accurately computed. The system for 3D space analysis of the dental arch is an accurate, comprehensive, rapid and repeatable method of space analysis to facilitate proper orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

  13. Conserved charges in 3D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2010-06-15

    The covariant canonical expression for the conserved charges, proposed by Nester, is tested on several solutions in three-dimensional gravity with or without torsion and topologically massive gravity. In each of these cases, the calculated values of energy momentum and angular momentum are found to satisfy the first law of black hole thermodynamics.

  14. Flexible 3D pharmacophores as descriptors of dynamic biological space.

    PubMed

    Nettles, James H; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Williams, Chris; Clark, Alex M; Bender, Andreas; Deng, Zhan; Davies, John W; Glick, Meir

    2007-10-01

    Development of a pharmacophore hypothesis related to small-molecule activity is pivotal to chemical optimization of a series, since it defines features beneficial or detrimental to activity. Although crystal structures may provide detailed 3D interaction information for one molecule with its receptor, docking a different ligand to that model often leads to unreliable results due to protein flexibility. Graham Richards' lab was one of the first groups to utilize "fuzzy" pattern recognition algorithms taken from the field of image processing to solve problems in protein modeling. Thus, descriptor "fuzziness" was partly able to emulate conformational flexibility of the target while simultaneously enhancing the speed of the search. In this work, we extend these developments to a ligand-based method for describing and aligning molecules in flexible chemical space termed FEature POint PharmacophoreS (FEPOPS), which allows exploration of dynamic biological space. We develop a novel, combinatorial algorithm for molecular comparisons and evaluate it using the WOMBAT dataset. The new approach shows superior retrospective virtual screening performance than earlier shape-based or charge-based algorithms. Additionally, we use target prediction to evaluate how FEPOPS alignments match the molecules biological activity by identifying the atoms and features that make the key contributions to overall chemical similarity. Overall, we find that FEPOPS are sufficiently fuzzy and flexible to find not only new ligand scaffolds, but also challenging molecules that occupy different conformational states of dynamic biological space as from induced fits.

  15. Measuring the 3D motion space of the human ankle.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jinzhuang; Zhang, Yunchao; Zhao, Shuai; Wang, Hongrui

    2017-07-20

    The 3D motion space of the human ankle is an important area of study in medicine. The 3D motion space can provide significant information for establishing more reasonable rehabilitation procedures and standards of ankle injury care. This study aims to measure the 3D motion space of the human ankle and to use mathematical methods to quantify it. A motion capturing system was used to simultaneously capture the 3D coordinates of points marked on the foot, and convert these coordinate values into rotation angles through trigonometric functions and vectors. The mathematical expression of the ankle's motion space was obtained by screening, arranging, and fitting the converted data. The mathematical expression of the 3D motion space of the participants was obtained. We statistically analyzed the data and learned that, in terms of 3D motion space, the right foot is more flexible than the left foot and the female foot is more flexible than the male foot. The adduction and abduction rotation ranges are affected by the plantar flexion or dorsal flexure rotation angles. This relationship can be expressed mathematically, which is significant in the study of the ankle joint.

  16. Double Negativity in 3D Space Coiling Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Santosh K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials displaying negative refractive index has remarkable potential to facilitate the manipulation of incident waves for wide variety of applications such as cloaking, superlensing and the like. Space-coiling approach is a recently explored technique to achieve extreme properties. The space coiling phenomena cause less energy absorption as compared to local resonating phenomena for obtaining extreme parameters. Here we show extreme properties in doubly negative 3D space coiling acoustic metamaterials. Frequency dispersive spectrum of extreme constitutive parameters has been calculated for 2D maze and 3D space coiling labyrinthine structure. This is in good agreement to the calculated acoustic band dispersion. PMID:27649966

  17. Double Negativity in 3D Space Coiling Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Santosh K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Shukla, Shobha; Saxena, Sumit

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials displaying negative refractive index has remarkable potential to facilitate the manipulation of incident waves for wide variety of applications such as cloaking, superlensing and the like. Space-coiling approach is a recently explored technique to achieve extreme properties. The space coiling phenomena cause less energy absorption as compared to local resonating phenomena for obtaining extreme parameters. Here we show extreme properties in doubly negative 3D space coiling acoustic metamaterials. Frequency dispersive spectrum of extreme constitutive parameters has been calculated for 2D maze and 3D space coiling labyrinthine structure. This is in good agreement to the calculated acoustic band dispersion.

  18. Custom 3D Printers Revolutionize Space Supply Chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Under a series of SBIR contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, start-up company Made In Space, located on the center's campus, developed a high-precision 3D printer capable of manufacturing items in microgravity. The company will soon have a printer installed on the International Space Station, altering the space supply chain. It will print supplies and tools for NASA, as well as nanosatellite shells and other items for public and private entities.

  19. Space Partitioning for Privacy Enabled 3D City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippovska, Y.; Wichmann, A.; Kada, M.

    2016-10-01

    Due to recent technological progress, data capturing and processing of highly detailed (3D) data has become extensive. And despite all prospects of potential uses, data that includes personal living spaces and public buildings can also be considered as a serious intrusion into people's privacy and a threat to security. It becomes especially critical if data is visible by the general public. Thus, a compromise is needed between open access to data and privacy requirements which can be very different for each application. As privacy is a complex and versatile topic, the focus of this work particularly lies on the visualization of 3D urban data sets. For the purpose of privacy enabled visualizations of 3D city models, we propose to partition the (living) spaces into privacy regions, each featuring its own level of anonymity. Within each region, the depicted 2D and 3D geometry and imagery is anonymized with cartographic generalization techniques. The underlying spatial partitioning is realized as a 2D map generated as a straight skeleton of the open space between buildings. The resulting privacy cells are then merged according to the privacy requirements associated with each building to form larger regions, their borderlines smoothed, and transition zones established between privacy regions to have a harmonious visual appearance. It is exemplarily demonstrated how the proposed method generates privacy enabled 3D city models.

  20. 3D Network Analysis for Indoor Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiliakou, E.; Dimopoulou, E.

    2016-10-01

    Indoor space differs from outdoor environments, since it is characterized by a higher level of structural complexity, geometry, as well as topological relations. Indoor space can be considered as the most important component in a building's conceptual modelling, on which applications such as indoor navigation, routing or analysis are performed. Therefore, the conceptual meaning of sub spaces or the activities taking place in physical building boundaries (e.g. walls), require the comprehension of the building's indoor hierarchical structure. The scope of this paper is to perform 3D network analysis in a building's interior and is structured as follows: In Section 1 the definition of indoor space is provided and indoor navigation requirements are analysed. Section 2 describes the processes of indoor space modeling, as well as routing applications. In Section 3, a case study is examined involving a 3D building model generated in CityEngine (exterior shell) and ArcScene (interior parts), in which the use of commercially available software tools (ArcGIS, ESRI), in terms of indoor routing and 3D network analysis, are explored. The fundamentals of performing 3D analysis with the ArcGIS Network Analyst extension were tested. Finally a geoprocessing model was presented, which was specifically designed to be used to interactively find the best route in ArcScene. The paper ends with discussion and concluding remarks on Section 4.

  1. Demonstration of a 3D vision algorithm for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, Rui J. P. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports an extension of the MIAG algorithm for recognition and motion parameter determination of general 3-D polyhedral objects based on model matching techniques and using movement invariants as features of object representation. Results of tests conducted on the algorithm under conditions simulating space conditions are presented.

  2. NASA's 3D Flight Computer for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, Leon

    2000-01-01

    The New Millennium Program (NMP) Integrated Product Development Team (IPDT) for Microelectronics Systems was planning to validate a newly developed 3D Flight Computer system on its first deep-space flight, DS1, launched in October 1998. This computer, developed in the 1995-97 time frame, contains many new computer technologies previously never used in deep-space systems. They include: advanced 3D packaging architecture for future low-mass and low-volume avionics systems; high-density 3D packaged chip-stacks for both volatile and non-volatile mass memory: 400 Mbytes of local DRAM memory, and 128 Mbytes of Flash memory; high-bandwidth Peripheral Component Interface (Per) local-bus with a bridge to VME; high-bandwidth (20 Mbps) fiber-optic serial bus; and other attributes, such as standard support for Design for Testability (DFT). Even though this computer system did not complete on time for delivery to the DS1 project, it was an important development along a technology roadmap towards highly integrated and highly miniaturized avionics systems for deep-space applications. This continued technology development is now being performed by NASA's Deep Space System Development Program (also known as X2000) and within JPL's Center for Integrated Space Microsystems (CISM).

  3. Systems biology in 3D space--enter the morphome.

    PubMed

    Lucocq, John M; Mayhew, Terry M; Schwab, Yannick; Steyer, Anna M; Hacker, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Systems-based understanding of living organisms depends on acquiring huge datasets from arrays of genes, transcripts, proteins, and lipids. These data, referred to as 'omes', are assembled using 'omics' methodologies. Currently a comprehensive, quantitative view of cellular and organellar systems in 3D space at nanoscale/molecular resolution is missing. We introduce here the term 'morphome' for the distribution of living matter within a 3D biological system, and 'morphomics' for methods of collecting 3D data systematically and quantitatively. A sampling-based approach termed stereology currently provides rapid, precise, and minimally biased morphomics. We propose that stereology solves the 'big data' problem posed by emerging wide-scale electron microscopy (EM) and can establish quantitative links between the newer nanoimaging platforms such as electron tomography, cryo-EM, and correlative microscopy.

  4. 3D RISM theory with fast reciprocal-space electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, Jochen; Kast, Stefan M.

    2015-03-21

    The calculation of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions in 3D RISM (“three-dimensional reference interaction site model”) integral equation theory is recast in a form that allows for a computational treatment analogous to the “particle-mesh Ewald” formalism as used for molecular simulations. In addition, relations that connect 3D RISM correlation functions and interaction potentials with thermodynamic quantities such as the chemical potential and average solute-solvent interaction energy are reformulated in a way that calculations of expensive real-space electrostatic terms on the 3D grid are completely avoided. These methodical enhancements allow for both, a significant speedup particularly for large solute systems and a smoother convergence of predicted thermodynamic quantities with respect to box size, as illustrated for several benchmark systems.

  5. Spacecraft charging analysis with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D

    SciTech Connect

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Marchand, R.; Markidis, S.

    2013-10-15

    We present the first results on the analysis of spacecraft charging with the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, designed for running on massively parallel supercomputers. The numerical algorithm is presented, highlighting the implementation of the electrostatic solver and the immersed boundary algorithm; the latter which creates the possibility to handle complex spacecraft geometries. As a first step in the verification process, a comparison is made between the floating potential obtained with iPic3D and with Orbital Motion Limited theory for a spherical particle in a uniform stationary plasma. Second, the numerical model is verified for a CubeSat benchmark by comparing simulation results with those of PTetra for space environment conditions with increasing levels of complexity. In particular, we consider spacecraft charging from plasma particle collection, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The influence of a background magnetic field on the floating potential profile near the spacecraft is also considered. Although the numerical approaches in iPic3D and PTetra are rather different, good agreement is found between the two models, raising the level of confidence in both codes to predict and evaluate the complex plasma environment around spacecraft.

  6. Exchange charge model of crystal field for 3d ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brik, M. G.; Avram, N. M.; Avram, C. N.

    In the second chapter of the book the authors present the results of theoretical studies ofthe energy levels schemes of all 3dn (n=1, 9) ionsin various crystals at the substitutionalsites. Systematic calculations are described in all details; they include the overlap integrals between the impurityions' and ligands' wave functions; the crystal field parameters calculations, and diagonalization of the crystal field Hamiltonians for each considered case. The calculated results arediscussed and compared with experimental data and with similar results from literature. The chapter also contains a comprehensive literature review on the properties of 3d-ions doped crystals.

  7. Towards a 3D Space Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathl, R. K.; Cicomptta, F. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2002-01-01

    High-speed computational procedures for space radiation shielding have relied on asymptotic expansions in terms of the off-axis scatter and replacement of the general geometry problem by a collection of flat plates. This type of solution was derived for application to human rated systems in which the radius of the shielded volume is large compared to the off-axis diffusion limiting leakage at lateral boundaries. Over the decades these computational codes are relatively complete and lateral diffusion effects are now being added. The analysis for developing a practical full 3D space shielding code is presented.

  8. 3D hand tracking using Kalman filter in depth space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangheon; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-12-01

    Hand gestures are an important type of natural language used in many research areas such as human-computer interaction and computer vision. Hand gestures recognition requires the prior determination of the hand position through detection and tracking. One of the most efficient strategies for hand tracking is to use 2D visual information such as color and shape. However, visual-sensor-based hand tracking methods are very sensitive when tracking is performed under variable light conditions. Also, as hand movements are made in 3D space, the recognition performance of hand gestures using 2D information is inherently limited. In this article, we propose a novel real-time 3D hand tracking method in depth space using a 3D depth sensor and employing Kalman filter. We detect hand candidates using motion clusters and predefined wave motion, and track hand locations using Kalman filter. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compare the performance of the proposed method with the visual-based method. Experimental results show that the performance of the proposed method out performs visual-based method.

  9. Sonification of range information for 3-D space perception.

    PubMed

    Milios, Evangelos; Kapralos, Bill; Kopinska, Agnieszka; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios

    2003-12-01

    We present a device that allows three-dimensional (3-D) space perception by sonification of range information obtained via a point laser range sensor. The laser range sensor is worn by a blindfolded user, who scans space by pointing the laser beam in different directions. The resulting stream of range measurements is then converted to an auditory signal whose frequency or amplitude varies with the range. Our device differs from existing navigation aids for the visually impaired. Such devices use sonar ranging whose primary purpose is to detect obstacles for navigation, a task to which sonar is well suited due to its wide beam width. In contrast, the purpose of our device is to allow users to perceive the details of 3-D space that surrounds them, a task to which sonar is ill suited, due to artifacts generated by multiple reflections and due to its limited range. Preliminary trials demonstrate that the user is able to easily and accurately detect corners and depth discontinuities and to perceive the size of the surrounding space.

  10. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  11. Dispersion and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-05

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  12. Dispersion and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Kishek, R.A.; Reiser, M.

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Characterizing 3D Vegetation Structure from Space: Mission Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Bergen, Kathleen; Blair, James B.; Dubayah, Ralph; Houghton, Richard; Hurtt, George; Kellndorfer, Josef; Lefsky, Michael; Ranson, Jon; Saatchi, Sasan; Shugart, H. H.; Wickland, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Human and natural forces are rapidly modifying the global distribution and structure of terrestrial ecosystems on which all of life depends, altering the global carbon cycle, affecting our climate now and for the foreseeable future, causing steep reductions in species diversity, and endangering Earth s sustainability. To understand changes and trends in terrestrial ecosystems and their functioning as carbon sources and sinks, and to characterize the impact of their changes on climate, habitat and biodiversity, new space assets are urgently needed to produce high spatial resolution global maps of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of vegetation, its biomass above ground, the carbon stored within and the implications for atmospheric green house gas concentrations and climate. These needs were articulated in a 2007 National Research Council (NRC) report (NRC, 2007) recommending a new satellite mission, DESDynI, carrying an L-band Polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-SAR) and a multi-beam lidar (Light RAnging And Detection) operating at 1064 nm. The objectives of this paper are to articulate the importance of these new, multi-year, 3D vegetation structure and biomass measurements, to briefly review the feasibility of radar and lidar remote sensing technology to meet these requirements, to define the data products and measurement requirements, and to consider implications of mission durations. The paper addresses these objectives by synthesizing research results and other input from a broad community of terrestrial ecology, carbon cycle, and remote sensing scientists and working groups. We conclude that: (1) current global biomass and 3-D vegetation structure information is unsuitable for both science and management and policy. The only existing global datasets of biomass are approximations based on combining land cover type and representative carbon values, instead of measurements of actual biomass. Current measurement attempts based on radar and multispectral

  14. The Digital Space Shuttle, 3D Graphics, and Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Julian E.; Keller, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Shuttle is a knowledge management project that seeks to define symbiotic relationships between 3D graphics and formal knowledge representations (ontologies). 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content, in 2D and 3D CAD forms, and the capability to display systems knowledge. Because the data is so heterogeneous, and the interrelated data structures are complex, 3D graphics combined with ontologies provides mechanisms for navigating the data and visualizing relationships.

  15. The Digital Space Shuttle, 3D Graphics, and Knowledge Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Julian E.; Keller, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    The Digital Shuttle is a knowledge management project that seeks to define symbiotic relationships between 3D graphics and formal knowledge representations (ontologies). 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content, in 2D and 3D CAD forms, and the capability to display systems knowledge. Because the data is so heterogeneous, and the interrelated data structures are complex, 3D graphics combined with ontologies provides mechanisms for navigating the data and visualizing relationships.

  16. 3D Space Radiation Transport in a Shielded ICRU Tissue Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  17. 3D thin film microstructures for space microrobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, Isao

    1995-01-01

    Micromechanisms of locomotion and a manipulator with an external skeleton like the structure of an insect are proposed. Several micro-sized models were built on silicon wafers by using polysilicon for rigid plates and polyimide for elastic joints. Due to scale effects, friction in micromechanical components is dominant as compared to the inertial forces because friction is proportional to L(exp 2) while mass is proportional to L(exp 3). Therefore, to ensure efficient motion, rotational joint that exhibits rubbing should be avoided. In this paper, paper models of a robot leg and a micro-manipulator are presented to show structures with external skeletons and elastic joints. Then the large scale implementation using plastic plates, springs, and solenoids is demonstrated. Since the assembly technique is based on paper folding, it is compatible with thin film micro-fabrication and integrated circuit (IC) planar processes. Finally, several micromechanisms were fabricated on silicon wafers to demonstrate the feasibility of building a 3D microstructure from a single planar structure that can be used for space microrobots.

  18. 3D thin film microstructures for space microrobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, Isao

    1995-01-01

    Micromechanisms of locomotion and a manipulator with an external skeleton like the structure of an insect are proposed. Several micro-sized models were built on silicon wafers by using polysilicon for rigid plates and polyimide for elastic joints. Due to scale effects, friction in micromechanical components is dominant as compared to the inertial forces because friction is proportional to L(exp 2) while mass is proportional to L(exp 3). Therefore, to ensure efficient motion, rotational joint that exhibits rubbing should be avoided. In this paper, paper models of a robot leg and a micro-manipulator are presented to show structures with external skeletons and elastic joints. Then the large scale implementation using plastic plates, springs, and solenoids is demonstrated. Since the assembly technique is based on paper folding, it is compatible with thin film micro-fabrication and integrated circuit (IC) planar processes. Finally, several micromechanisms were fabricated on silicon wafers to demonstrate the feasibility of building a 3D microstructure from a single planar structure that can be used for space microrobots.

  19. A high efficiency all-PMOS charge pump for 3D NAND flash memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyin, Fu; Yu, Wang; Qi, Wang; Zongliang, Huo

    2016-07-01

    For 3D vertical NAND flash memory, the charge pump output load is much larger than that of the planar NAND, resulting in the performance degradation of the conventional Dickson charge pump. Therefore, a novel all PMOS charge pump with high voltage boosting efficiency, large driving capability and high power efficiency for 3D V-NAND has been proposed. In this circuit, the Pelliconi structure is used to enhance the driving capability, two auxiliary substrate bias PMOS transistors are added to mitigate the body effect, and the degradation of the output voltage and boost efficiency caused by the threshold voltage drop is eliminated by dynamic gate control structure. Simulated results show that the proposed charge pump circuit can achieve the maximum boost efficiency of 86% and power efficiency of 50%. The output voltage of the proposed 9 stages charge pump can exceed 2 V under 2 MHz clock frequency in 2X nm 3D V-NAND technology. Our results provide guidance for the peripheral circuit design of high density 3D V-NAND integration.

  20. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  1. Mental Representation of Spatial Cues During Space Flight (3D-Space) experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-30

    ISS019-E-012429 (30 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, prepares to perform the Mental Representation of Spatial Cues During Space Flight (3D-Space) experiment in the Columbus module of the International Space Station. The experiment is designed to investigate the effects of exposure to microgravity on the mental representation of spatial cues by astronauts during and after spaceflight.

  2. Mental Representation of Spatial Cues During Space Flight (3D-Space) experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-30

    ISS019-E-012428 (30 April 2009) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 19/20 flight engineer, prepares to perform the Mental Representation of Spatial Cues During Space Flight (3D-Space) experiment in the Columbus module of the International Space Station. The experiment is designed to investigate the effects of exposure to microgravity on the mental representation of spatial cues by astronauts during and after spaceflight.

  3. Communicating Experience of 3D Space: Mathematical and Everyday Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Candia; Alshwaikh, Jehad

    2012-01-01

    In this article we consider data arising from student-teacher-researcher interactions taking place in the context of an experimental teaching program making use of multiple modes of communication and representation to explore three-dimensional (3D) shape. As teachers/researchers attempted to support student use of a logo-like formal language for…

  4. A new 3D computational model for shaped charge jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E.J.; Mosso, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews prior 1D and 2D axisymmetric, analytical and computational studies, as well as empirical studies of the shaped charge jet particulation problem and discusses their associated insights and problems. It proposes a new 3D computational model of the particulation process, based upon a simplified version of the observed counter-rotating, double helical surface perturbations, found on softly recovered shaped charge jet particles, from both copper and tantalum jets. This 3D approach contrasts with the random, axisymmetric surface perturbations which have previously been used, to try to infer the observed length distribution of jet particles, on the basis of the most unstable wavelength concept, which leads to the expectation of a continuous distribution of particle lengths. The 3D model, by its very nature, leads to a non-random, periodic distribution of potential initial necking loci, on alternate sides of the stretching jet. This in turn infers a potentially periodic, overlapping, multi-modal distribution of associated jet particle lengths. Since it is unlikely that all potential initial necking sites will be activated simultaneously, the 3D model also suggests that longer jet particles containing partial, but unseparated necks, should be observed fairly often. The computational analysis is in its very early stages and the problems involved in inserting the two helical grooves and in defining the initial conditions and boundary conditions for the computation will be discussed. Available initial results from the 3D computation will be discussed and interpreted.

  5. Longitudinal space charge amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2013-05-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) driven microbunching instability in electron beam formation systems of X-ray FELs is a recently discovered effect hampering beam instrumentation and FEL operation. The instability was observed in different facilities in infrared and visible wavelength ranges. In this paper we propose to use such an instability for generation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray radiation. A typical longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA) consists of few amplification cascades (drift space plus chicane) with a short undulator behind the last cascade. If the amplifier starts up from the shot noise, the amplified density modulation has a wide band, on the order of unity. The bandwidth of the radiation within the central cone is given by inverse number of undulator periods. A wavelength compression could be an attractive option for LSCA since the process is broadband, and a high compression stability is not required. LSCA can be used as a cheap addition to the existing or planned short-wavelength FELs. In particular, it can produce the second color for a pump-probe experiment. It is also possible to generate attosecond pulses in the VUV and X-ray regimes. Some user experiments can profit from a relatively large bandwidth of the radiation, and this is easy to obtain in LSCA scheme. Finally, since the amplification mechanism is broadband and robust, LSCA can be an interesting alternative to self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL) in the case of using laser-plasma accelerators as drivers of light sources.

  6. Transferring of speech movements from video to 3D face space.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yuru; Zha, Hongbin

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel method for transferring speech animation recorded in low quality videos to high resolution 3D face models. The basic idea is to synthesize the animated faces by an interpolation based on a small set of 3D key face shapes which span a 3D face space. The 3D key shapes are extracted by an unsupervised learning process in 2D video space to form a set of 2D visemes which are then mapped to the 3D face space. The learning process consists of two main phases: 1) Isomap-based nonlinear dimensionality reduction to embed the video speech movements into a low-dimensional manifold and 2) K-means clustering in the low-dimensional space to extract 2D key viseme frames. Our main contribution is that we use the Isomap-based learning method to extract intrinsic geometry of the speech video space and thus to make it possible to define the 3D key viseme shapes. To do so, we need only to capture a limited number of 3D key face models by using a general 3D scanner. Moreover, we also develop a skull movement recovery method based on simple anatomical structures to enhance 3D realism in local mouth movements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve realistic 3D animation effects with a small number of 3D key face models.

  7. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California was created from data taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This image was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C radar image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The interferometry data were acquired on April 13,1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR instrument. The color composite radar image was taken in October and was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is the large dark feature in the foreground. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are

  8. Measuring 3D point configurations in pictorial space

    PubMed Central

    Wagemans, Johan; van Doorn, Andrea J; Koenderink, Jan J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel method to probe the depth structure of the pictorial space evoked by paintings. The method involves an exocentric pointing paradigm that allows one to find the slope of the geodesic connection between any pair of points in pictorial space. Since the locations of the points in the picture plane are known, this immediately yields the depth difference between the points. A set of depth differences between all pairs of points from an N-point (N > 2) configuration then yields the configuration in depth up to an arbitrary depth offset. Since an N-point configuration implies N(N−1) (ordered) pairs, the number of observations typically far exceeds the number of inferred depths. This yields a powerful check on the geometrical consistency of the results. We report that the remaining inconsistencies are fully accounted for by the spread encountered in repeated observations. This implies that the concept of ‘pictorial space’ indeed has an empirical significance. The method is analyzed and empirically verified in considerable detail. We report large quantitative interobserver differences, though the results of all observers agree modulo a certain affine transformation that describes the basic cue ambiguities. This is expected on the basis of a formal analysis of monocular optical structure. The method will prove useful in a variety of potential applications. PMID:23145227

  9. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California - 3-D view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This view was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle and, which then, are compared to obtain elevation information. The data were acquired on April 13, 1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR radar instrument. The color composite radar image was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is off the image to the left. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01757

  10. Space Radar Image of Long Valley, California in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view of Long Valley, California was created from data taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. This image was constructed by overlaying a color composite SIR-C radar image on a digital elevation map. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process by which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. The interferometry data were acquired on April 13,1994 and on October 3, 1994, during the first and second flights of the SIR-C/X-SAR instrument. The color composite radar image was taken in October and was produced by assigning red to the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization; green to the C-band (vertically transmitted and received) polarization; and blue to the ratio of the two data sets. Blue areas in the image are smooth and yellow areas are rock outcrops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. The view is looking north along the northeastern edge of the Long Valley caldera, a volcanic collapse feature created 750,000 years ago and the site of continued subsurface activity. Crowley Lake is the large dark feature in the foreground. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01769

  11. Interaction of 3d transition metal atoms with charged ion projectiles from Electron Nuclear Dynamics computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Computational results on atomic scattering between charged projectiles and transition metal target atoms are presented. This work aims at obtaining detailed information about charge, spin and energy transfer processes that occur between the interacting particles. An in-depth understanding of these phenomena is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the interpretation of various types of ion beam experiments, ranging from gas phase chromatography to spectroscopic observations of fast ions in ferromagnetic media. This contribution focuses on the scattering of light projectiles ranging from He to O, that are prepared in various initial charge states, by 3d transition metal atoms. The presented computations are performed in the framework of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END)^1 theory which incorporates the coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom without reliance on the computationally cumbersome and frequently intractable determination of potential energy surfaces. In the present application of END theory to ion - transition metal atom scattering, a supermolecule approach is utilized in conjunction with a spin-unrestricted single determinantal wave function describing the electronic system. Integral scattering, charge and spin exchange cross sections are discussed as functions of the elementary parameters of the problem, such as projectile and target atomic numbers as well as projectile charge and initial kinetic energy. ^1 E.Deumens, A.Diz, R.Longo, Y.Oehrn, Rev.Mod.Phys. 66, 917 (1994)

  12. Resonant x-ray scattering in 3d-transition-metal oxides: Anisotropy and charge orderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subías, G.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Herrero-Martín, J.; Sánchez, M. C.

    2009-11-01

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of transition metal oxides reflect in atomic charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) allows us to perform an accurate investigation of all these electronic degrees. RXS combines high-Q resolution x-ray diffraction with the properties of the resonance providing information similar to that obtained by atomic spectroscopy (element selectivity and a large enhancement of scattering amplitude for this particular element and sensitivity to the symmetry of the electronic levels through the multipole electric transitions). Since electronic states are coupled to the local symmetry, RXS reveals the occurrence of symmetry breaking effects such as lattice distortions, onset of electronic orbital ordering or ordering of electronic charge distributions. We shall discuss the strength of RXS at the K absorption edge of 3d transition-metal oxides by describing various applications in the observation of local anisotropy and charge disproportionation. Examples of these resonant effects are (I) charge ordering transitions in manganites, Fe3O4 and ferrites and (II) forbidden reflections and anisotropy in Mn3+ perovskites, spinel ferrites and cobalt oxides. In all the studied cases, the electronic (charge and/or anisotropy) orderings are determined by the structural distortions.

  13. Charged D3-D7 plasmas: novel solutions, extremality and stability issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigazzi, Francesco; Cotrone, Aldo L.; Tarrío, Javier

    2013-07-01

    We study finite temperature Super Yang-Mills (and more general gauge theories realized on intersecting D3-D7 branes) in the presence of dynamical massless fundamental matter fields at finite baryon charge density. We construct the holographic dual charged black hole solutions at first order in the flavor backreaction but exact in the charge density. The thermodynamical properties of the dual gauge theories coincide with the ones found in the usual charged D7-probe limit and the system turns out to be thermodynamically stable. By analyzing the higher order correction in the flavor backreaction, we provide a novel argument for the un-reliability of the charged probe approximation (and the present solution) in the extremality limit, i.e. at zero temperature. We then consider scalar mesonic-like bound states, whose spectrum is dual to that of linearized fluctuations of D7-brane worldvolume fields around our gravity backgrounds. In particular we focus on a scalar field saturating the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound in the flavorless limit, and coupled to fields dual to irrelevant operators. By looking at quasinormal modes of this scalar, we find no signals of instabilities in the regime of validity of the solutions.

  14. Space Radar Image Isla Isabela in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional view of Isabela, one of the Galapagos Islands located off the western coast of Ecuador, South America. This view was constructed by overlaying a Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) image on a digital elevation map produced by TOPSAR, a prototype airborne interferometric radar which produces simultaneous image and elevation data. The vertical scale in this image is exaggerated by a factor of 1.87. The SIR-C/X-SAR image was taken on the 40th orbit of space shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about 0.5 degree south latitude and 91 degrees west longitude and covers an area of 75 by 60 kilometers (47 by 37 miles). The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees. The western Galapagos Islands, which lie about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles)west of Ecuador in the eastern Pacific, have six active volcanoes similar to the volcanoes found in Hawaii and reflect the volcanic processes that occur where the ocean floor is created. Since the time of Charles Darwin's visit to the area in 1835, there have been more than 60 recorded eruptions on these volcanoes. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. Vertical exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (for example, faults, and fractures) and topography. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data

  15. Space Radar Image of Missoula, Montana in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Missoula, Montana, created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this are useful because they show scientists the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. This technique helps to clarify the relationships of the different types of materials on the surface detected by the radar. The view is looking north-northeast. The blue circular area at the lower left corner is a bend of the Bitterroot River just before it joins the Clark Fork, which runs through the city. Crossing the Bitterroot River is the bridge of U.S. Highway 93. Highest mountains in this image are at elevations of 2,200 meters (7,200 feet). The city is about 975 meters (3,200 feet) above sea level. The bright yellow areas are urban and suburban zones, dark brown and blue-green areas are grasslands, bright green areas are farms, light brown and purple areas are scrub and forest, and bright white and blue areas are steep rocky slopes. The two radar images were taken on successive days by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue are differences seen in the L-band data between the two days. This image is centered near 46.9 degrees north latitude and 114.1 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA

  16. Space Radar Image of Missoula, Montana in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of Missoula, Montana, created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this are useful because they show scientists the shapes of the topographic features such as mountains and valleys. This technique helps to clarify the relationships of the different types of materials on the surface detected by the radar. The view is looking north-northeast. The blue circular area at the lower left corner is a bend of the Bitterroot River just before it joins the Clark Fork, which runs through the city. Crossing the Bitterroot River is the bridge of U.S. Highway 93. Highest mountains in this image are at elevations of 2,200 meters (7,200 feet). The city is about 975 meters (3,200 feet) above sea level. The bright yellow areas are urban and suburban zones, dark brown and blue-green areas are grasslands, bright green areas are farms, light brown and purple areas are scrub and forest, and bright white and blue areas are steep rocky slopes. The two radar images were taken on successive days by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The digital elevation map was produced using radar interferometry, a process in which radar data are acquired on different passes of the space shuttle. The two data passes are compared to obtain elevation information. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue are differences seen in the L-band data between the two days. This image is centered near 46.9 degrees north latitude and 114.1 degrees west longitude. No vertical exaggeration factor has been applied to the data. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA

  17. Space Radar Image of Mammoth, California in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective of Mammoth Mountain, California. This view was constructed by overlaying a Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. Vertical exaggeration is 1.87 times. The image is centered at 37.6 degrees north, 119.0 degrees west. It was acquired from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard space shuttle Endeavour on its 67th orbit on April 13, 1994. In this color representation, red is C-band HV-polarization, green is C-band VV-polarization and blue is the ratio of C-band VV to C-band HV. Blue areas are smooth, and yellow areas are rock out-crops with varying amounts of snow and vegetation. Crowley Lake is in the foreground, and Highway 395 crosses in the middle of the image. Mammoth Mountain is shown in the upper right. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI).

  18. Comparison of post-contrast 3D-T1-MPRAGE, 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR MR images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities at 3-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandham, Balaji; Kalyanpur, Tejas; Gupta, Prashant; Cherian, Mathew

    2017-06-01

    This study was to assess the usefulness of newer three-dimensional (3D)-T1 sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and 3D-T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities. 78 patients who presented with high suspicion of meningeal abnormalities were evaluated using post-contrast 3D-T2-FLAIR, 3D-T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) and 3D-T1-SPACE sequences. The images were evaluated independently by two radiologists for cortical gyral, sulcal space, basal cisterns and dural enhancement. The diagnoses were confirmed by further investigations including histopathology. Post-contrast 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR images yielded significantly more information than MPRAGE images (p < 0.05 for both SPACE and FLAIR images) in detection of meningeal abnormalities. SPACE images best demonstrated abnormalities in dural and sulcal spaces, whereas FLAIR was useful for basal cisterns enhancement. Both SPACE and FLAIR performed equally well in detection of gyral enhancement. In all 10 patients, where both SPACE and T2-FLAIR images failed to demonstrate any abnormality, further analysis was also negative. The 3D-T1-SPACE sequence best demonstrated abnormalities in dural and sulcal spaces, whereas FLAIR was useful for abnormalities in basal cisterns. Both SPACE and FLAIR performed holds good for detection of gyral enhancement. Post-contrast SPACE and FLAIR sequences are superior to the MPRAGE sequence for evaluation of meningeal abnormalities and when used in combination have the maximum sensitivity for leptomeningeal abnormalities. The negative-predictive value is nearly 100%, where no leptomeningeal abnormality was detected on these sequences. Advances in knowledge: Post-contrast 3D-T1-SPACE and 3D-T2-FLAIR images are more useful than 3D-T1-MPRAGE images in evaluation of meningeal abnormalities.

  19. Space Radar Image of Karakax Valley, China 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective of the remote Karakax Valley in the northern Tibetan Plateau of western China was created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this are helpful to scientists because they reveal where the slopes of the valley are cut by erosion, as well as the accumulations of gravel deposits at the base of the mountains. These gravel deposits, called alluvial fans, are a common landform in desert regions that scientists are mapping in order to learn more about Earth's past climate changes. Higher up the valley side is a clear break in the slope, running straight, just below the ridge line. This is the trace of the Altyn Tagh fault, which is much longer than California's San Andreas fault. Geophysicists are studying this fault for clues it may be able to give them about large faults. Elevations range from 4000 m (13,100 ft) in the valley to over 6000 m (19,700 ft) at the peaks of the glaciated Kun Lun mountains running from the front right towards the back. Scale varies in this perspective view, but the area is about 20 km (12 miles) wide in the middle of the image, and there is no vertical exaggeration. The two radar images were acquired on separate days during the second flight of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The interferometry technique provides elevation measurements of all points in the scene. The resulting digital topographic map was used to create this view, looking northwest from high over the valley. Variations in the colors can be related to gravel, sand and rock outcrops. This image is centered at 36.1 degrees north latitude, 79.2 degrees east longitude. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: Red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted

  20. Calculating Least Risk Paths in 3d Indoor Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, A.; De Maeyer, Ph.; Fack, V.; Van de Weghe, N.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last couple of years, research on indoor environments has gained a fresh impetus; more specifically applications that support navigation and wayfinding have become one of the booming industries. Indoor navigation research currently covers the technological aspect of indoor positioning and the modelling of indoor space. The algorithmic development to support navigation has so far been left mostly untouched, as most applications mainly rely on adapting Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to an indoor network. However, alternative algorithms for outdoor navigation have been proposed adding a more cognitive notion to the calculated paths and as such adhering to the natural wayfinding behaviour (e.g. simplest paths, least risk paths). These algorithms are currently restricted to outdoor applications. The need for indoor cognitive algorithms is highlighted by a more challenged navigation and orientation due to the specific indoor structure (e.g. fragmentation, less visibility, confined areas…). As such, the clarity and easiness of route instructions is of paramount importance when distributing indoor routes. A shortest or fastest path indoors not necessarily aligns with the cognitive mapping of the building. Therefore, the aim of this research is to extend those richer cognitive algorithms to three-dimensional indoor environments. More specifically for this paper, we will focus on the application of the least risk path algorithm of Grum (2005) to an indoor space. The algorithm as proposed by Grum (2005) is duplicated and tested in a complex multi-storey building. The results of several least risk path calculations are compared to the shortest paths in indoor environments in terms of total length, improvement in route description complexity and number of turns. Several scenarios are tested in this comparison: paths covering a single floor, paths crossing several building wings and/or floors. Adjustments to the algorithm are proposed to be more aligned to the

  1. Space Radar Image of Karakax Valley, China 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective of the remote Karakax Valley in the northern Tibetan Plateau of western China was created by combining two spaceborne radar images using a technique known as interferometry. Visualizations like this are helpful to scientists because they reveal where the slopes of the valley are cut by erosion, as well as the accumulations of gravel deposits at the base of the mountains. These gravel deposits, called alluvial fans, are a common landform in desert regions that scientists are mapping in order to learn more about Earth's past climate changes. Higher up the valley side is a clear break in the slope, running straight, just below the ridge line. This is the trace of the Altyn Tagh fault, which is much longer than California's San Andreas fault. Geophysicists are studying this fault for clues it may be able to give them about large faults. Elevations range from 4000 m (13,100 ft) in the valley to over 6000 m (19,700 ft) at the peaks of the glaciated Kun Lun mountains running from the front right towards the back. Scale varies in this perspective view, but the area is about 20 km (12 miles) wide in the middle of the image, and there is no vertical exaggeration. The two radar images were acquired on separate days during the second flight of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour in October 1994. The interferometry technique provides elevation measurements of all points in the scene. The resulting digital topographic map was used to create this view, looking northwest from high over the valley. Variations in the colors can be related to gravel, sand and rock outcrops. This image is centered at 36.1 degrees north latitude, 79.2 degrees east longitude. Radar image data are draped over the topography to provide the color with the following assignments: Red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is the average of L-band vertically transmitted

  2. Space Radar Image of Kilauea, Hawaii in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of a false-color image of the eastern part of the Big Island of Hawaii. It was produced using all three radar frequencies -- X-band, C-band and L-band -- from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the space shuttle Endeavour, overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. Visible in the center of the image in blue are the summit crater (Kilauea Caldera) which contains the smaller Halemaumau Crater, and the line of collapse craters below them that form the Chain of Craters Road. The image was acquired on April 12, 1994 during orbit 52 of the space shuttle. The area shown is approximately 34 by 57 kilometers (21 by 35 miles) with the top of the image pointing toward northwest. The image is centered at about 155.25 degrees west longitude and 19.5 degrees north latitude. The false colors are created by displaying three radar channels of different frequency. Red areas correspond to high backscatter at L-HV polarization, while green areas exhibit high backscatter at C-HV polarization. Finally, blue shows high return at X-VV polarization. Using this color scheme, the rain forest appears bright on the image, while the green areas correspond to lower vegetation. The lava flows have different colors depending on their types and are easily recognizable due to their shapes. The flows at the top of the image originated from the Mauna Loa volcano. Kilauea volcano has been almost continuously active for more than the last 11 years. Field teams that were on the ground specifically to support these radar observations report that there was vigorous surface activity about 400 meters (one-quartermile) inland from the coast. A moving lava flow about 200 meters (650 feet) in length was observed at the time of the shuttle overflight, raising the possibility that subsequent images taken during this mission will show changes in the landscape. Currently, most of the lava that is

  3. Space Radar Image of Death Valley in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This picture is a three-dimensional perspective view of Death Valley, California. This view was constructed by overlaying a SIR-C radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. The SIR-C image is centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude and 117.069 degrees west longitude. We are looking at Stove Pipe Wells, which is the bright rectangle located in the center of the picture frame. Our vantage point is located atop a large alluvial fan centered at the mouth of Cottonwood Canyon. In the foreground on the left, we can see the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells. In the background on the left, the Valley floor gradually falls in elevation toward Badwater, the lowest spot in the United States. In the background on the right we can see Tucki Mountain. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the Valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help the answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans helps scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are built up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information

  4. Space Radar Image of Death Valley in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This picture is a three-dimensional perspective view of Death Valley, California. This view was constructed by overlaying a SIR-C radar image on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. The SIR-C image is centered at 36.629 degrees north latitude and 117.069 degrees west longitude. We are looking at Stove Pipe Wells, which is the bright rectangle located in the center of the picture frame. Our vantage point is located atop a large alluvial fan centered at the mouth of Cottonwood Canyon. In the foreground on the left, we can see the sand dunes near Stove Pipe Wells. In the background on the left, the Valley floor gradually falls in elevation toward Badwater, the lowest spot in the United States. In the background on the right we can see Tucki Mountain. This SIR-C/X-SAR supersite is an area of extensive field investigations and has been visited by both Space Radar Lab astronaut crews. Elevations in the Valley range from 70 meters (230 feet) below sea level, the lowest in the United States, to more than 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level. Scientists are using SIR-C/X-SAR data from Death Valley to help the answer a number of different questions about Earth's geology. One question concerns how alluvial fans are formed and change through time under the influence of climatic changes and earthquakes. Alluvial fans are gravel deposits that wash down from the mountains over time. They are visible in the image as circular, fan-shaped bright areas extending into the darker valley floor from the mountains. Information about the alluvial fans helps scientists study Earth's ancient climate. Scientists know the fans are built up through climatic and tectonic processes and they will use the SIR-C/X-SAR data to understand the nature and rates of weathering processes on the fans, soil formation and the transport of sand and dust by the wind. SIR-C/X-SAR's sensitivity to centimeter-scale (inch-scale) roughness provides detailed maps of surface texture. Such information

  5. Interaction Design and Usability of Learning Spaces in 3D Multi-user Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shailey; Reeves, Ahmad John

    Three-dimensional virtual worlds are multimedia, simulated environments, often managed over the Web, which users can 'inhabit' and interact via their own graphical, self-representations known as 'avatars'. 3D virtual worlds are being used in many applications: education/training, gaming, social networking, marketing and commerce. Second Life is the most widely used 3D virtual world in education. However, problems associated with usability, navigation and way finding in 3D virtual worlds may impact on student learning and engagement. Based on empirical investigations of learning spaces in Second Life, this paper presents design guidelines to improve the usability and ease of navigation in 3D spaces. Methods of data collection include semi-structured interviews with Second Life students, educators and designers. The findings have revealed that design principles from the fields of urban planning, Human- Computer Interaction, Web usability, geography and psychology can influence the design of spaces in 3D multi-user virtual environments.

  6. Extraction of the 3D Free Space from Building Models for Indoor Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakité, A. A.; Zlatanova, S.

    2016-10-01

    For several decades, indoor navigation has been exclusively investigated in a 2D perspective, based on floor plans, projection and other 2D representations of buildings. Nevertheless, 3D representations are closer to our reality and offer a more intuitive description of the space configuration. Thanks to recent advances in 3D modelling, 3D navigation is timidly but increasingly gaining in interest through the indoor applications. But, because the structure of indoor environment is often more complex than outdoor, very simplified models are used and obstacles are not considered for indoor navigation leading to limited possibilities in complex buildings. In this paper we consider the entire configuration of the indoor environment in 3D and introduce a method to extract from it the actual navigable space as a network of connected 3D spaces (volumes). We describe how to construct such 3D free spaces from semantically rich and furnished IFC models. The approach combines the geometric, the topological and the semantic information available in a 3D model to isolate the free space from the rest of the components. Furthermore, the extraction of such navigable spaces in building models lacking of semantic information is also considered. A data structure named combinatorial maps is used to support the operations required by the process while preserving the topological and semantic information of the input models.

  7. Design of Learning Spaces in 3D Virtual Worlds: An Empirical Investigation of "Second Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Reeves, Ahmad John

    2010-01-01

    "Second Life" (SL) is a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world, and educational institutions are adopting SL to support their teaching and learning. Although the question of how 3D learning spaces should be designed to support student learning and engagement has been raised among SL educators and designers, there is hardly any guidance or…

  8. The space of vacua of 3d N=3 abelian theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assel, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    We use brane techniques to study the space of vacua of abelian 3d N=3 gauge theories. The coordinates on these spaces are the vevs of chiral monopole and meson operators, which are realized in the type IIB brane configuration of the theory by adding semi-infinite (1 , k) strings or F1 strings. The study of various brane setups allows us to determine a basis of chiral operators and chiral ring relations relevant to each branch of vacua, leading to the algebraic description of these branches. The method is mostly graphical and does not require actual computations. We apply it and provide explicit results in various examples. For linear quivers we find that the space of vacua has in general a collection of Coulomb-like branches, a Higgs branch and mixed branches. For circular quivers we find an extra branch, the geometric branch, parametrized by monopoles with equal magnetic charges in all U(1) nodes and meson operators. We explain how to include FI and mass deformations. We also study N=3 theories realized with ( p, q) 5-branes.

  9. Indoor space 3D visual reconstruction using mobile cart with laser scanner and cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashongore, Prince Dukundane; Kawasue, Kikuhito; Yoshida, Kumiko; Aoki, Ryota

    2017-02-01

    Indoor space 3D visual reconstruction has many applications and, once done accurately, it enables people to conduct different indoor activities in an efficient manner. For example, an effective and efficient emergency rescue response can be accomplished in a fire disaster situation by using 3D visual information of a destroyed building. Therefore, an accurate Indoor Space 3D visual reconstruction system which can be operated in any given environment without GPS has been developed using a Human-Operated mobile cart equipped with a laser scanner, CCD camera, omnidirectional camera and a computer. By using the system, accurate indoor 3D Visual Data is reconstructed automatically. The obtained 3D data can be used for rescue operations, guiding blind or partially sighted persons and so forth.

  10. Evaluation of Home Delivery of Lectures Utilizing 3D Virtual Space Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishide, Ryo; Shima, Ryoichi; Araie, Hiromu; Ueshima, Shinichi

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation experiments have been essential in exploring home delivery of lectures for which users can experience campus lifestyle and distant learning through 3D virtual space. This paper discusses the necessity of virtual space for distant learners by examining the effects of virtual space. The authors have pursued the possibility of…

  11. Evaluation of Home Delivery of Lectures Utilizing 3D Virtual Space Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishide, Ryo; Shima, Ryoichi; Araie, Hiromu; Ueshima, Shinichi

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation experiments have been essential in exploring home delivery of lectures for which users can experience campus lifestyle and distant learning through 3D virtual space. This paper discusses the necessity of virtual space for distant learners by examining the effects of virtual space. The authors have pursued the possibility of…

  12. Enablement of defense missions with in-space 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Hirsch, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Outer space has the potential to become the battlefield of the 21st century. If this occurs, the United States will need to invest heavily into research and development regarding space assets, construction approaches, and anti-satellite technologies in order to ensure the requisite level of offensive and deterrent capabilities exist. One challenge that the U.S. faces is the expense of inserting satellites into orbit. With an in-space 3D printer, engineers would not need to incur the design and construction costs for developing a satellite that can survive the launch into orbit. Instead, they could just create the best design for their application and the in-space 3D printer could print and deploy it in orbit. This paper considers the foregoing and other uses for a 3D printer in space that advance national security.

  13. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  14. 3-D Particle Simulation of Strongly-Coupled Chains of Charged Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toyoichi; Tanaka, Motohiko; Pande, V.; Grosberg, A.

    1996-11-01

    The behaviors of the polyampholyte (PA) which is a connected chain of charged beads (molecules) submerged in the neutral solvent is studied using the 3-D particle simulation code. The major issue is how an equilibrium and kinetics of the PA depend on the thermal and electrostatic forces, i.e., the coupling constant Γ= e^2/aT . We follow a dynamical evolution of the PA, considering the electrostatic force, (2) the binding force between the adjacent beads, (3) the random thermal force exerted by the solvent, and (4) the frictional force: m fracdv_idt = sumj fracZ_iZj e^2 |ri -r_j|^2 hatr_ij - frac3Ta^2(2 ri -r_i+1 -r_i-1) + F^(th) - m ν v_i. Preliminary runs show that, when the excess charge δ N on the chain is larger than N^1/2 ( N : the number of the beads), the size of the polyampholyte increases as in the Monte Carlo simulation using the energy principle [Kantor, Kardar and Li, Phys.Rev.E, 49, 1383 (1994)]. The measured time rate of the size increase for the fixed value of Γ is scaled as, d/dt ~ δ N - N^1/2 for δ N > N^1/2 , and d/dt ~ 0 otherwise.

  15. Parkinson's patients can rely on perspective cues to perceive 3D space.

    PubMed

    Séverac Cauquil, Alexandra; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Jardiné, Vincent; Galitzky, Monique; Rosito, Maxime; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Celebrini, Simona

    2017-05-15

    3D perception, which is necessary for an optimal navigation in our environment, relies on 2 complementary kinds of cues; binocular cues allowing precise depth localization near the point of visual interest and monocular ones that are necessary for correct global perception of visual space. Recent studies described deficient binocular 3D vision in PD patients; here we tested 3D vision in PD patients when based on monocular cues (m3D). Sixteen PD patients and 16 controls had to categorize visual stimuli as perceived in 2D (flat) or 3D (with depth). Both performance and response times were measured. EEGs were recorded to extract Visual Evoked Potentials. Effects of PD were tested by comparing psychometric and electrophysiological data obtained in controls and PD patients evaluated without dopaminergic treatment. Effects of Levodopa were tested by comparing data in PD patients with and without dopaminergic treatment. We didn't find statistical differences between PD patients and controls' performance. Severity of PD (UPDRS III) in OFF condition is positively correlated with P1 amplitudes and latencies for both 2D and m3D stimuli. Levodopa administration didn't modify either PD patients' performances although it increases principal visual components latencies for both 2D and m3D stimuli. Unlike binocular 3D vision, monocular 3D vision does not seem to get affected by PD. However given the correlation between severity of PD and VEPs' modifications, alteration of visual cortical processing might have nonetheless begun. PD patients reporting trouble in perceiving space must rely more on m3D cues present in the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  17. Embodied collaboration support system for 3D shape evaluation in virtual space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Masashi; Watanabe, Tomio

    2005-12-01

    Collaboration mainly consists of two tasks; one is each partner's task that is performed by the individual, the other is communication with each other. Both of them are very important objectives for all the collaboration support system. In this paper, a collaboration support system for 3D shape evaluation in virtual space is proposed on the basis of both studies in 3D shape evaluation and communication support in virtual space. The proposed system provides the two viewpoints for each task. One is the viewpoint of back side of user's own avatar for the smooth communication. The other is that of avatar's eye for 3D shape evaluation. Switching the viewpoints satisfies the task conditions for 3D shape evaluation and communication. The system basically consists of PC, HMD and magnetic sensors, and users can share the embodied interaction by observing interaction between their avatars in virtual space. However, the HMD and magnetic sensors, which are put on the users, would restrict the nonverbal communication. Then, we have tried to compensate the loss of nodding of partner's avatar by introducing the speech-driven embodied interactive actor InterActor. Sensory evaluation by paired comparison of 3D shapes in the collaborative situation in virtual space and in real space and the questionnaire are performed. The result demonstrates the effectiveness of InterActor's nodding in the collaborative situation.

  18. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  19. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  20. Learning 3D Object Templates by Quantizing Geometry and Appearance Spaces.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenze; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2015-06-01

    While 3D object-centered shape-based models are appealing in comparison with 2D viewer-centered appearance-based models for their lower model complexities and potentially better view generalizabilities, the learning and inference of 3D models has been much less studied in the recent literature due to two factors: i) the enormous complexities of 3D shapes in geometric space; and ii) the gap between 3D shapes and their appearances in images. This paper aims at tackling the two problems by studying an And-Or Tree (AoT) representation that consists of two parts: i) a geometry-AoT quantizing the geometry space, i.e. the possible compositions of 3D volumetric parts and 2D surfaces within the volumes; and ii) an appearance-AoT quantizing the appearance space, i.e. the appearance variations of those shapes in different views. In this AoT, an And-node decomposes an entity into constituent parts, and an Or-node represents alternative ways of decompositions. Thus it can express a combinatorial number of geometry and appearance configurations through small dictionaries of 3D shape primitives and 2D image primitives. In the quantized space, the problem of learning a 3D object template is transformed to a structure search problem which can be efficiently solved in a dynamic programming algorithm by maximizing the information gain. We focus on learning 3D car templates from the AoT and collect a new car dataset featuring more diverse views. The learned car templates integrate both the shape-based model and the appearance-based model to combine the benefits of both. In experiments, we show three aspects: 1) the AoT is more efficient than the frequently used octree method in space representation; 2) the learned 3D car template matches the state-of-the art performances on car detection and pose estimation in a public multi-view car dataset; and 3) in our new dataset, the learned 3D template solves the joint task of simultaneous object detection, pose/view estimation, and part

  1. Hydrogen Atom as AN Eigenvalue Problem in 3-D Spaces of Constant Curvature and Minimal Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, L. M.; Santander, M.; Rosu, H. C.

    An old result of Stevenson [Phys. Rev. 59, 842 (1941)] concerning the Kepler-Coulomb quantum problem on the three-dimensional (3-D) hypersphere is considered from the perspective of the radial Schrödinger equations on 3-D spaces of any (either positive, zero or negative) constant curvature. Further to Stevenson, we show in detail how to get the hypergeometric wave function for the hydrogen atom case. Finally, we make a comparison between the "space curvature" effects and minimal length effects for the hydrogen spectrum.

  2. Powering an in-space 3D printer using solar light energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Skye; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Hirsch, Michael P.; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes how a solar power source can enable in-space 3D printing without requiring conversion to electric power and back. A design for an in-space 3D printer is presented, with a particular focus on the power generation system. Then, key benefits are presented and evaluated. Specifically, the approach facilitates the design of a spacecraft that can be built, launched, and operated at very low cost levels. The proposed approach also facilitates easy configuration of the amount of energy that is supplied. Finally, it facilitates easier disposal by removing the heavy metals and radioactive materials required for a nuclear-power solution.

  3. An Encoding Method for Compressing Geographical Coordinates in 3d Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, C.; Jiang, R.; Li, M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposed an encoding method for compressing geographical coordinates in 3D space. By the way of reducing the length of geographical coordinates, it helps to lessen the storage size of geometry information. In addition, the encoding algorithm subdivides the whole space according to octree rules, which enables progressive transmission and loading. Three main steps are included in this method: (1) subdividing the whole 3D geographic space based on octree structure, (2) resampling all the vertices in 3D models, (3) encoding the coordinates of vertices with a combination of Cube Index Code (CIC) and Geometry Code. A series of geographical 3D models were applied to evaluate the encoding method. The results showed that this method reduced the storage size of most test data by 90 % or even more under the condition of a speed of encoding and decoding. In conclusion, this method achieved a remarkable compression rate in vertex bit size with a steerable precision loss. It shall be of positive meaning to the web 3d map storing and transmission.

  4. Usage of Underground Space for 3D Cadastre Purposes and Related Problems in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Cevdet C.

    2008-01-01

    Modern cities have been trying to meet their needs for space by using not only surface structures but also by considering subsurface space use. It is also anticipated that without planning of underground spaces for supporting surface city life in the years and generations to come, there will be serious and unavoidable problems with growing populations. The current Turkish cadastral system, including land right registrations, has been trying to meet users' needs in all aspects since 1924. Today Turkey's national cadastre services are carried out by the General Directorate of Land Titles and Cadastre (TKGM). The Cadastre Law, Number 3402, was approved in 1985 to eliminate problems by gathering all existing cadastral regulations under one law and also to produce 3D cadastral bases to include underground spaces and determine their legal status in Turkey. Although the mandate for 3D cadastre works is described and explained by the laws, until now the bases have been created in 2D and the reality is that legal gaps and deficiencies presently exist in them. In this study, the usage of underground spaces for the current cadastral system in Turkey was briefly evaluated, the concept of 3D cadastral data is examined and the need for using subsurface and 3D cadastre in addition to the traditional 2D register system, related problems and registration are mentioned with specific examples, but without focusing on a specific model. PMID:27873910

  5. Usage of Underground Space for 3D Cadastre Purposes and Related Problems in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cevdet C

    2008-11-05

    Modern cities have been trying to meet their needs for space by using not only surface structures but also by considering subsurface space use. It is also anticipated that without planning of underground spaces for supporting surface city life in the years and generations to come, there will be serious and unavoidable problems with growing populations. The current Turkish cadastral system, including land right registrations, has been trying to meet users' needs in all aspects since 1924. Today Turkey's national cadastre services are carried out by the General Directorate of Land Titles and Cadastre (TKGM). The Cadastre Law, Number 3402, was approved in 1985 to eliminate problems by gathering all existing cadastral regulations under one law and also to produce 3D cadastral bases to include underground spaces and determine their legal status in Turkey. Although the mandate for 3D cadastre works is described and explained by the laws, until now the bases have been created in 2D and the reality is that legal gaps and deficiencies presently exist in them. In this study, the usage of underground spaces for the current cadastral system in Turkey was briefly evaluated, the concept of 3D cadastral data is examined and the need for using subsurface and 3D cadastre in addition to the traditional 2D register system, related problems and registration are mentioned with specific examples, but without focusing on a specific model.

  6. Electrostatic analyzer with a 3-D instantaneous field of view for fast measurements of plasma distribution functions in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, X.; Berthomier, M.; Berthelier, J.-J.

    2017-03-01

    We describe the concept and properties of a new electrostatic optic which aims to provide a 2π sr instantaneous field of view to characterize space plasmas. It consists of a set of concentric toroidal electrodes that form a number of independent energy-selective channels. Charged particles are deflected toward a common imaging planar detector. The full 3-D distribution function of charged particles is obtained through a single energy sweep. Angle and energy resolution of the optics depends on the number of toroidal electrodes, on their radii of curvature, on their spacing, and on the angular aperture of the channels. We present the performances, as derived from numerical simulations, of an initial implementation of this concept that would fit the need of many space plasma physics applications. The proposed instrument has 192 entrance windows corresponding to eight polar channels each with 24 azimuthal sectors. The initial version of this 3-D plasma analyzer may cover energies from a few eV up to 30 keV, typically with a channel-dependent energy resolution varying from 10% to 7%. The angular acceptance varies with the direction of the incident particle from 3° to 12°. With a total geometric factor of two sensor heads reaching 0.23 cm2 sr eV/eV, this "donut" shape analyzer has enough sensitivity to allow very fast measurements of plasma distribution functions in most terrestrial and planetary environments on three-axis stabilized as well as on spinning satellites.

  7. Echolocation of multiple targets in 3-d space from a single emission.

    PubMed

    Yano, M; Matsuo, I; Tani, J

    2002-09-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation sound, bat can capture a moving target in real three-dimensional (3-D) space. It is impossible to locate multiple targets in 3-D space by using only the delay time between an emission and the resultingechoes received at two points (i.e., two ears). To locate multiple targets in 3-D space requires directional information for each target. The spectrum of the echoes from nearly equidistant targets includes spectral components of both the interference between the echoes and the interference resulting from the physical process of reception at the external ear. The frequency of the spectral notch, which is the frequency corresponding to the minimum of the external ear's transfer function (EEDNF), provides a crucial cue for directional localization. In the model we present, a computational model todiscriminate multiple close targets in 3-D space utilizing echoes evoked by a single emission by distinguishing the interference of echoes from each object and the EEDNF corresponding to each target.

  8. Fusion of laser and image sensory data for 3-D modeling of the free navigation space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mass, M.; Moghaddamzadeh, A.; Bourbakis, N.

    1994-01-01

    A fusion technique which combines two different types of sensory data for 3-D modeling of a navigation space is presented. The sensory data is generated by a vision camera and a laser scanner. The problem of different resolutions for these sensory data was solved by reduced image resolution, fusion of different data, and use of a fuzzy image segmentation technique.

  9. A Secret 3D Model Sharing Scheme with Reversible Data Hiding Based on Space Subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuan-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Secret sharing is a highly relevant research field, and its application to 2D images has been thoroughly studied. However, secret sharing schemes have not kept pace with the advances of 3D models. With the rapid development of 3D multimedia techniques, extending the application of secret sharing schemes to 3D models has become necessary. In this study, an innovative secret 3D model sharing scheme for point geometries based on space subdivision is proposed. Each point in the secret point geometry is first encoded into a series of integer values that fall within [0, p - 1], where p is a predefined prime number. The share values are derived by substituting the specified integer values for all coefficients of the sharing polynomial. The surface reconstruction and the sampling concepts are then integrated to derive a cover model with sufficient model complexity for each participant. Finally, each participant has a separate 3D stego model with embedded share values. Experimental results show that the proposed technique supports reversible data hiding and the share values have higher levels of privacy and improved robustness. This technique is simple and has proven to be a feasible secret 3D model sharing scheme.

  10. A model of echolocation of multiple targets in 3D space from a single emission.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, I; Tani, J; Yano, M

    2001-07-01

    Bats, using frequency-modulated echolocation sounds, can capture a moving target in real 3D space. The process by which they are able to accomplish this, however, is not completely understood. This work offers and analyzes a model for description of one mechanism that may play a role in the echolocation process of real bats. This mechanism allows for the localization of targets in 3D space from the echoes produced by a single emission. It is impossible to locate multiple targets in 3D space by using only the delay time between an emission and the resulting echoes received at two points (i.e., two ears). To locate multiple targets in 3D space requires directional information for each target. The frequency of the spectral notch, which is the frequency corresponding to the minimum of the external ear's transfer function, provides a crucial cue for directional localization. The spectrum of the echoes from nearly equidistant targets includes spectral components of both the interference between the echoes and the interference resulting from the physical process of reception at the external ear. Thus, in order to extract the spectral component associated with the external ear, this component must first be distinguished from the spectral components associated with the interference of echoes from nearly equidistant targets. In the model presented, a computation that consists of the deconvolution of the spectrum is used to extract the external-ear-dependent component in the time domain. This model describes one mechanism that can be used to locate multiple targets in 3D space.

  11. 3D camera technology trade-off and breadboard demonstration for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Julien; Bohn, Preben; Schumann-Olsen, Henrik; Biggio, Andrea; Kowaltschek, Steeve

    2015-06-01

    In previous decades, the vision-based navigation problem based on 2D imaging has been largely studied and applied in space, for rendezvous and docking, as well as rover navigation, or entry, descent and landing. By providing measurement of the third dimension (range), 3D camera technology looks a promising alternative for many applications. Stereoscopic camera is one option to measure the third coordinate, but relies on significant CPU capabilities, which are generally not available for space applications. Scanning LIDAR (LIght detection and ranging) is also an existing solution, but it is relatively large and heavy and the refresh rate, lifetime and reliability are mainly determined by moving parts. 3D time-of-flight (TOF) technology (including flash LIDARs) offers a reliable alternative. By illuminating a whole scene at a time and thus providing a whole array image, there is no need for complex processing nor moving mechanisms, which clearly appears as an advantage for space applications. This paper presents the ongoing study conducted under ESA contract in the field of 3D TOF technology. Its goal is to evaluate the suitability of a 3D TOF camera for space applications, to derive requirements and a preliminary design, and finally to create and test a breadboard model. Performance budget, cost, and a development plan of a versatile spatialized 3D TOF camera are also outputs of the study, in addition to a high-fidelity simulator, allowing further studies by generating representative images and depth maps. To fulfill this project, a European team has been created, gathering Thales Alenia Space, Terma and SINTEF.

  12. A client–server framework for 3D remote visualization of radiotherapy treatment space

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Anand P.; Min, Yugang; Dou, Tai H.; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is safely employed for treating wide variety of cancers. The radiotherapy workflow includes a precise positioning of the patient in the intended treatment position. While trained radiation therapists conduct patient positioning, consultation is occasionally required from other experts, including the radiation oncologist, dosimetrist, or medical physicist. In many circumstances, including rural clinics and developing countries, this expertise is not immediately available, so the patient positioning concerns of the treating therapists may not get addressed. In this paper, we present a framework to enable remotely located experts to virtually collaborate and be present inside the 3D treatment room when necessary. A multi-3D camera framework was used for acquiring the 3D treatment space. A client–server framework enabled the acquired 3D treatment room to be visualized in real-time. The computational tasks that would normally occur on the client side were offloaded to the server side to enable hardware flexibility on the client side. On the server side, a client specific real-time stereo rendering of the 3D treatment room was employed using a scalable multi graphics processing units (GPU) system. The rendered 3D images were then encoded using a GPU-based H.264 encoding for streaming. Results showed that for a stereo image size of 1280 × 960 pixels, experts with high-speed gigabit Ethernet connectivity were able to visualize the treatment space at approximately 81 frames per second. For experts remotely located and using a 100 Mbps network, the treatment space visualization occurred at 8–40 frames per second depending upon the network bandwidth. This work demonstrated the feasibility of remote real-time stereoscopic patient setup visualization, enabling expansion of high quality radiation therapy into challenging environments. PMID:23440605

  13. Impact of continuing scaling on the device performance of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinkai, Li; Zongliang, Huo; Lei, Jin; Dandan, Jiang; Peizhen, Hong; Qiang, Xu; Zhaoyun, Tang; Chunlong, Li; Tianchun, Ye

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a comprehensive analysis of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory device performance regarding continuous scaling of the structure dimensions. The key device performance, such as program/erase speed, vertical charge loss, and lateral charge migration under high temperature are intensively studied using the Sentaurus 3D device simulator. Although scaling of channel radius is beneficial for operation speed improvement, it leads to a retention challenge due to vertical leakage, especially enhanced charge loss through TPO. Scaling of gate length not only decreases the program/erase speed but also leads to worse lateral charge migration. Scaling of spacer length is critical for the interference of adjacent cells and should be carefully optimized according to specific cell operation conditions. The gate stack shape is also found to be an important factor affecting the lateral charge migration. Our results provide guidance for high density and high reliability 3D CTM integration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474137, 61176073, 61306107).

  14. Internal charging analysis tools, NUMIT 2.0 and 3D NUMIT, and those applications on Europa Clipper and Juno missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Chinn, J. Z.; Katz, I.; Jun, I.; Garrett, H. B.

    2016-12-01

    One of the major concerns in the spacecraft design due to natural space environment interaction is the internal charging in dielectric materials and floating conductors, especially for missions encountering a high radiation environment such as NASA's Juno and proposed Europa Clipper Missions. Sufficiently energetic electrons can penetrate the spacecraft structure or electronics chassis and stop within dielectrics and floating conductors. Electrons can accumulate in dielectrics over time due to the dielectrics' very low conductivity. If the electric field resulting from a charge buildup becomes higher than the breakdown threshold of the dielectric, discharge may occur, potentially damaging near-by sensitive electronics. Indeed, numerous spacecraft anomalies and failures have been attributed to this phenomenon, referred to as internal electrostatic discharge (iESD). Therefore, accurate assessment of the risk of iESD for a given space environment and dielectric geometry is important for spacecraft reliability. To evaluate the risk of iESD, we developed a general three dimensional internal charge analyses method, 3D NUMIT by combining a Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation tool such as MCNPX or GEANT4 and a commercial FEA software such as COMSOL. Also for a simple and fast internal charging assessment, we significantly improved the widely used one dimensional internal charging assessment code, NUMIT and named NUMIT 2.0. We will show the new features of NUMIT 2.0 and the capability of 3D NUMIT with several examples of applications of those tools to iESD assessments on Juno and Europa Clipper Missions.

  15. Mental Representation of Spatial Cues During Spaceflight (3D-SPACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Gilles; Lathan, Corinna; Skinner, Anna; Lorigny, Eric

    2008-06-01

    The 3D-SPACE experiment is a joint effort between ESA and NASA to develop a simple virtual reality platform to enable astronauts to complete a series of tests while aboard the International Space Station (ISS). These tests will provide insights into the effects of the space environment on: (a) depth perception, by presenting 2D geometric illusions and 3D objects that subjects adjust with a finger trackball; (b) distance perception, by presenting natural or computer-generated 3D scenes where subjects estimate and report absolute distances or adjust distances; and (c) handwriting/drawing, by analyzing trajectories and velocities when subjects write or draw memorized objects with an electronic pen on a digitizing tablet. The objective of these tasks is to identify problems associated with 3D perception in astronauts with the goal of developing countermeasures to alleviate any associated performance risks. The equipment has been uploaded to the ISS in April 2008, and the first measurements should take place during Increment 17.

  16. Energy loss of a heavy particle near 3D charged rotating hairy black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider a charged rotating black hole in three dimensions with a scalar charge and discuss the energy loss of a heavy particle moving near the black-hole horizon. We also study quasi-normal modes and find the dispersion relations. We find that the effect of scalar charge and electric charge increases the energy loss.

  17. Etiology of phantom limb syndrome: Insights from a 3D default space consciousness model.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W; Jensen, Mike

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we examine phantom limb syndrome to gain insights into how the brain functions as the mind and how consciousness arises. We further explore our previously proposed consciousness model in which consciousness and body schema arise when information from throughout the body is processed by corticothalamic feedback loops and integrated by the thalamus. The parietal lobe spatially maps visual and non-visual information and the thalamus integrates and recreates this processed sensory information within a three-dimensional space termed the "3D default space." We propose that phantom limb syndrome and phantom limb pain arise when the afferent signaling from the amputated limb is lost but the neural circuits remain intact. In addition, integration of conflicting sensory information within the default 3D space and the loss of inhibitory afferent feedback to efferent motor activity from the amputated limb may underlie phantom limb pain.

  18. International Space Station (ISS) 3D Printer Performance and Material Characterization Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Q. A.; Cooper, K. G.; Edmunson, J. E.; Johnston, M. M.; Werkheiser, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In order for human exploration of the Solar System to be sustainable, manufacturing of necessary items on-demand in space or on planetary surfaces will be a requirement. As a first step towards this goal, the 3D Printing In Zero-G (3D Print) technology demonstration made the first items fabricated in space on the International Space Station. From those items, and comparable prints made on the ground, information about the microgravity effects on the printing process can be determined. Lessons learned from this technology demonstration will be applicable to other in-space manufacturing technologies, and may affect the terrestrial manufacturing industry as well. The flight samples were received at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center on 6 April 2015. These samples will undergo a series of tests designed to not only thoroughly characterize the samples, but to identify microgravity effects manifested during printing by comparing their results to those of samples printed on the ground. Samples will be visually inspected, photographed, scanned with structured light, and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples will be analyzed with computed tomography; some will be assessed using ASTM standard tests. These tests will provide the information required to determine the effects of microgravity on 3D printing in microgravity.

  19. Enablement of scientific remote sensing missions with in-space 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the capability of a 3D printer to successfully operate in-space to create structures and equipment useful in the field of scientific remote sensing. Applications of this printer involve oceanography, weather tracking, as well as space exploration sensing. The design for the 3D printer includes a parabolic array to collect and focus thermal energy. This thermal energy then be used to heat the extrusion head, allowing for the successful extrusion of the print material. Print material can range from plastics to metals, with the hope of being able to extrude aluminum for its low-mass structural integrity and its conductive properties. The printer will be able to print structures as well as electrical components. The current process of creating and launching a remote sensor into space is constrained by many factors such as gravity on earth, the forces of launch, the size of the launch vehicle, and the number of available launches. The design intent of the in-space 3D printer is to ease or eliminate these constraints, making space-based scientific remote sensors a more readily available resource.

  20. Structure-From-Motion in 3D Space Using 2D Lidars

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Geol; Bok, Yunsu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Shim, Inwook; Kweon, In So

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel structure-from-motion methodology using 2D lidars (Light Detection And Ranging). In 3D space, 2D lidars do not provide sufficient information for pose estimation. For this reason, additional sensors have been used along with the lidar measurement. In this paper, we use a sensor system that consists of only 2D lidars, without any additional sensors. We propose a new method of estimating both the 6D pose of the system and the surrounding 3D structures. We compute the pose of the system using line segments of scan data and their corresponding planes. After discarding the outliers, both the pose and the 3D structures are refined via nonlinear optimization. Experiments with both synthetic and real data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28165372

  1. 3D Modelling of Interior Spaces: Learning the Language of Indoor Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshelham, K.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.

    2014-06-01

    3D models of indoor environments are important in many applications, but they usually exist only for newly constructed buildings. Automated approaches to modelling indoor environments from imagery and/or point clouds can make the process easier, faster and cheaper. We present an approach to 3D indoor modelling based on a shape grammar. We demonstrate that interior spaces can be modelled by iteratively placing, connecting and merging cuboid shapes. We also show that the parameters and sequence of grammar rules can be learned automatically from a point cloud. Experiments with simulated and real point clouds show promising results, and indicate the potential of the method in 3D modelling of large indoor environments.

  2. CAD Tools for Creating Space-filing 3D Escher Tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Sequin, Carlo H.

    2009-04-10

    We discuss the design and implementation of CAD tools for creating decorative solids that tile 3-space in a regular, isohedral manner. Starting with the simplest case of extruded 2D tilings, we describe geometric algorithms used for maintaining boundary representations of 3D tiles, including a Java implementation of an interactive constrained Delaunay triangulation library and a mesh-cutting algorithm used in layering extruded tiles to create more intricate designs. Finally, we demonstrate a CAD tool for creating 3D tilings that are derived from cubic lattices. The design process for these 3D tiles is more constrained, and hence more difficult, than in the 2D case, and it raises additional user interface issues.

  3. 3D imaging of translucent media with a plenoptic sensor based on phase space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuanzhe; Shu, Bohong; Du, Shaojun

    2015-05-01

    Traditional stereo imaging technology is not working for dynamical translucent media, because there are no obvious characteristic patterns on it and it's not allowed using multi-cameras in most cases, while phase space optics can solve the problem, extracting depth information directly from "space-spatial frequency" distribution of the target obtained by plenoptic sensor with single lens. This paper discussed the presentation of depth information in phase space data, and calculating algorithms with different transparency. A 3D imaging example of waterfall was given at last.

  4. Performance of a 3d Imaging Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the AMS02 Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Coignet, G.; Girard, L.; Goy, C.; Kossakowski, R.; Lees-Rosier, S.; Pochon, J.; Vialle, J. P.; Cervelli, F.; di Falco, S.; Galeotti, S.; Incagli, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Spinella, F.; Venanzoni, G.; Falchini, E.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Paoletti, R.; Pilo, F.; Turini, N.; Valle, G.; Bolmont, J.; Jacholkowska, A.; Piron, F.; Sapinski, M.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Lu, Y.; Yang, C.

    2005-02-01

    A 3D imaging electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) based on a lead/scintillating-fiber sandwich has been developed for the AMS-02 experiment on the International Space Station. This calorimeter should fulfill the constraints due to the launch and to the operation conditions in space. The engineering model of the ECAL was put through space qualification tests. Results of the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests are presented. To satisfy the physics aims, precise energy measurement and high discrimination between hadronic and electromagnetic cascades are required on a large dynamic range. The ECAL performances were checked by exposing the engineering model to a test beam at CERN in July 2002.

  5. Second order superintegrable systems in conformally flat spaces. IV. The classical 3D Staeckel transform and 3D classification theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, E.G.; Kress, J.M.; Miller, W. Jr.

    2006-04-15

    This article is one of a series that lays the groundwork for a structure and classification theory of second order superintegrable systems, both classical and quantum, in conformally flat spaces. In the first part of the article we study the Staeckel transform (or coupling constant metamorphosis) as an invertible mapping between classical superintegrable systems on different three-dimensional spaces. We show first that all superintegrable systems with nondegenerate potentials are multiseparable and then that each such system on any conformally flat space is Staeckel equivalent to a system on a constant curvature space. In the second part of the article we classify all the superintegrable systems that admit separation in generic coordinates. We find that there are eight families of these systems.

  6. Uniformly spaced 3D modeling of human face from two images using parallel particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yau-Zen; Hou, Jung-Fu; Tsao, Yi Hsiang; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2011-09-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for finding the correspondence between uniformly spaced locations on the images of human face captured from different viewpoints at the same instant. The correspondence is dedicated for 3D reconstruction to be used in the registration procedure for neurosurgery where the exposure to projectors must be seriously restricted. The approach utilizes structured light to enhance patterns on the images and is initialized with the scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT). Successive locations are found according to spatial order using a parallel version of the particle swarm optimization algorithm. Furthermore, false locations are singled out for correction by searching for outliers from fitted curves. Case studies show that the scheme is able to correctly generate 456 evenly spaced 3D coordinate points in 23 seconds from a single shot of projected human face using a PC with 2.66 GHz Intel Q9400 CPU and 4GB RAM.

  7. Diffusion Constant and Shear Viscosity in the Charged 3D Hairy Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Jalil

    2014-06-01

    A charged hairy black hole in 3 dimensions considered to study hydrodynamics. Specially, we calculate diffusion constant and obtain the effect of black hole electric charge and scalar charge on it. This parameter help us to obtain information about black hole and will be useful to study shear viscosity of dual picture by using AdS/CFT.

  8. The Space {B^{-1}_{∞, ∞}}, Volumetric Sparseness, and 3D NSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Aseel; Grujić, Zoran; Leitmeyer, Keith

    2017-09-01

    In the context of the {L^\\infty}-theory of the 3D NSE, it is shown that smallness of a solution in Besov space {B^{-1}_{\\infty, \\infty}} suffices to prevent a possible blow-up. In particular, it is revealed that the aforementioned condition implies a particular local spatial structure of the regions of high velocity magnitude, namely, the structure of local volumetric sparseness on the scale comparable to the radius of spatial analyticity measured in {L^\\infty}.

  9. Application Of Metric Space Technique (mst) In 2-d And 3-d To Sdss Dr5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongfeng; Batuski, D. J.; Khalil, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Metric Space Technique (MST) is a 2-D analysis method using multiple measures for quantitative analysis of any type of structure in an `image'. All potential values of the measures for such distributions are thus coordinates in a multi-parameter space, and the analysis is based on considering a sample's measures (called `output functions'), and their distance from the origin, which corresponds to the measures of the observed SDSS sample, in this multi-parameter space. Applications of this method to thin (approximately 2-D) slices of SDSS DR5 have yielded a detailed comparison of numerical models (Berlind et al. 2006, Croton et al. 2005) against the SDSS galaxy 2-D distribution structure in multi-parameter space. We present those results, including discussion of the effects of transforming from physical space to redshift space on the statistics at different scales. We also extended this 2-D method into 3-D, and we present comparisons of the SDSS galaxy 3-D distribution versus the same numerical simulations.

  10. Characterization of 3D joint space morphology using an electrostatic model (with application to osteoarthritis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images (e.g. cone-beam CT (CBCT)) using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g. the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g. the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies.

  11. Characterization of 3D Joint Space Morphology Using an Electrostatic Model (with Application to Osteoarthritis)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qian; Thawait, Gaurav; Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Reigel, Thomas; Brown, Tyler; Corner, Brian; Demehri, Shadpour; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Joint space morphology can be indicative of the risk, presence, progression, and/or treatment response of disease or trauma. We describe a novel methodology of characterizing joint space morphology in high-resolution 3D images [e.g., cone-beam CT (CBCT)] using a model based on elementary electrostatics that overcomes a variety of basic limitations of existing 2D and 3D methods. The method models each surface of a joint as a conductor at fixed electrostatic potential and characterizes the intra-articular space in terms of the electric field lines resulting from the solution of Gauss’ Law and the Laplace equation. As a test case, the method was applied to discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic subjects (N = 39) in 3D images of the knee acquired on an extremity CBCT system. The method demonstrated improved diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, AUC > 0.98) compared to simpler methods of quantitative measurement and qualitative image-based assessment by three expert musculoskeletal radiologists (AUC = 0.87, p-value = 0.007). The method is applicable to simple (e.g., the knee or elbow) or multi-axial joints (e.g., the wrist or ankle) and may provide a useful means of quantitatively assessing a variety of joint pathologies. PMID:25575100

  12. Consideration of materials for creating 3D printed space sensors and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Jacob; Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printing (also known as additive manufacturing) in space is a practical solution to reducing the mass and volume required for bringing materials into orbit and beyond. Materials can be launched in their raw form and transformed into the requisite parts and structures, as needed. This provides flexibility, allows structures to be designed to only support microgravity and allows sensing systems to be configured (and reconfigured) based on needs identified during the mission. This paper presents work undertaken to identify materials that are well-suited to in-space 3D printing. Materials commonly used for aerospace hardware were examined to assess their suitability.

  13. Virtual performer: single camera 3D measuring system for interaction in virtual space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Taneji, Shoto

    2006-10-01

    The authors developed interaction media systems in the 3D virtual space. In these systems, the musician virtually plays an instrument like the theremin in the virtual space or the performer plays a show using the virtual character such as a puppet. This interactive virtual media system consists of the image capture, measuring performer's position, detecting and recognizing motions and synthesizing video image using the personal computer. In this paper, we propose some applications of interaction media systems; a virtual musical instrument and superimposing CG character. Moreover, this paper describes the measuring method of the positions of the performer, his/her head and both eyes using a single camera.

  14. Progressive Transmission of 3D Building Models based on String Grammars and Planar Half-Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, M.

    2014-11-01

    As there are numerous applications for 3D city models with a wide range of model requirements regarding geometric accuracy and granularity, there is also a high demand for such models at different levels of detail (LOD). And although their reconstruction and cartographic generalization has been widely studied, particularly with regard to 3D building models, their encoding for a progressive storage and transmission is up to now not profoundly explored and sufficiently solved. Most often building models at different LODs are considered as discrete entities that are not related to each other. In this paper we present a progressive encoding and transmission scheme for 3D building models that is easy to understand and implement for the end user as well as flexible and extensible for the model producer. The progressive scheme is based on string grammars and describes a sequence of successive LODs as a dynamic set of production rules. In order to restrict the effects of LOD changes on a local range of the progressive string representation, we use a solid modelling approach based on planar half-spaces to construct 3D buildings. The generation of such progressive string grammars is shown and examples are given.

  15. Rapid object indexing using locality sensitive hashing and joint 3D-signature space estimation.

    PubMed

    Matei, Bogdan; Shan, Ying; Sawhney, Harpreet S; Tan, Yi; Kumar, Rakesh; Huber, Daniel; Hebert, Martial

    2006-07-01

    We propose a new method for rapid 3D object indexing that combines feature-based methods with coarse alignment-based matching techniques. Our approach achieves a sublinear complexity on the number of models, maintaining at the same time a high degree of performance for real 3D sensed data that is acquired in largely uncontrolled settings. The key component of our method is to first index surface descriptors computed at salient locations from the scene into the whole model database using the Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH), a probabilistic approximate nearest neighbor method. Progressively complex geometric constraints are subsequently enforced to further prune the initial candidates and eliminate false correspondences due to inaccuracies in the surface descriptors and the errors of the LSH algorithm. The indexed models are selected based on the MAP rule using posterior probability of the models estimated in the joint 3D-signature space. Experiments with real 3D data employing a large database of vehicles, most of them very similar in shape, containing 1,000,000 features from more than 365 models demonstrate a high degree of performance in the presence of occlusion and obscuration, unmodeled vehicle interiors and part articulations, with an average processing time between 50 and 100 seconds per query.

  16. Compilation of 3D global conductivity model of the Earth for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Dmitry; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Palshin, Nikolay

    2015-07-01

    We have compiled a global three-dimensional (3D) conductivity model of the Earth with an ultimate goal to be used for realistic simulation of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC), posing a potential threat to man-made electric systems. Bearing in mind the intrinsic frequency range of the most intense disturbances (magnetospheric substorms) with typical periods ranging from a few minutes to a few hours, the compiled 3D model represents the structure in depth range of 0-100 km, including seawater, sediments, earth crust, and partly the lithosphere/asthenosphere. More explicitly, the model consists of a series of spherical layers, whose vertical and lateral boundaries are established based on available data. To compile a model, global maps of bathymetry, sediment thickness, and upper and lower crust thicknesses as well as lithosphere thickness are utilized. All maps are re-interpolated on a common grid of 0.25×0.25 degree lateral spacing. Once the geometry of different structures is specified, each element of the structure is assigned either a certain conductivity value or conductivity versus depth distribution, according to available laboratory data and conversion laws. A numerical formalism developed for compilation of the model, allows for its further refinement by incorporation of regional 3D conductivity distributions inferred from the real electromagnetic data. So far we included into our model four regional conductivity models, available from recent publications, namely, surface conductance model of Russia, and 3D conductivity models of Fennoscandia, Australia, and northwest of the United States.

  17. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  18. ORBXYZ: A 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. V.; Cohen, R. H.; Ferguson, J. R.; Johnston, B. M.; Sharp, C. B.; Willmann, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, was modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications.

  19. Universal bounds on charged states in 2d CFT and 3d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, Nathan; Dyer, Ethan; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kachru, Shamit

    2016-08-04

    We derive an explicit bound on the dimension of the lightest charged state in two dimensional conformal field theories with a global abelian symmetry. We find that the bound scales with c and provide examples that parametrically saturate this bound. We also prove that any such theory must contain a state with charge-to-mass ratio above a minimal lower bound. As a result, we comment on the implications for charged states in three dimensional theories of gravity.

  20. Bird's Eye View - A 3-D Situational Awareness Tool for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dershowitz, Adam; Chamitoff, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Even as space-qualified computer hardware lags well behind the latest home computers, the possibility of using high-fidelity interactive 3-D graphics for displaying important on board information has finally arrived, and is being used on board the International Space Station (ISS). With the quantity and complexity of space-flight telemetry, 3-D displays can greatly enhance the ability of users, both onboard and on the ground, to interpret data quickly and accurately. This is particularly true for data related to vehicle attitude, position, configuration, and relation to other objects on the ground or in-orbit Bird's Eye View (BEV) is a 3-D real-time application that provides a high degree of Situational Awareness for the crew. Its purpose is to instantly convey important motion-related parameters to the crew and mission controllers by presenting 3-D simulated camera views of the International Space Station (ISS) in its actual environment Driven by actual telemetry, and running on board, as well as on the ground, the user can visualize the Space Station relative to the Earth, Sun, stars, various reference frames, and selected targets, such as ground-sites or communication satellites. Since the actual ISS configuration (geometry) is also modeled accurately, everything from the alignment of the solar panels to the expected view from a selected window can be visualized accurately. A virtual representation of the Space Station in real time has many useful applications. By selecting different cameras, the crew or mission control can monitor the station's orientation in space, position over the Earth, transition from day to night, direction to the Sun, the view from a particular window, or the motion of the robotic arm. By viewing the vehicle attitude and solar panel orientations relative to the Sun, the power status of the ISS can be easily visualized and understood. Similarly, the thermal impacts of vehicle attitude can be analyzed and visually confirmed. Communication

  1. Isotropic Landau levels of relativistic and non-relativistic fermions in 3D flat space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Wu, Congjun

    2012-02-01

    The usual Landau level quantization, as demonstrated in the 2D quantum Hall effect, is crucially based on the planar structure. In this talk, we explore its 3D counterpart possessing the full 3D rotational symmetry as well as the time reversal symmetry. We construct the Landau level Hamiltonians in 3 and higher dimensional flat space for both relativistic and non-relativistic fermions. The 3D cases with integer fillings are Z2 topological insulators. The non-relativistic version describes spin-1/2 fermions coupling to the Aharonov-Casher SU(2) gauge field. This system exhibits flat Landau levels in which the orbital angular momentum and the spin are coupled with a fixed helicity. Each filled Landau level contributes one 2D helical Dirac Fermi surface at an open boundary, which demonstrates the Z2 topological nature. A natural generalization to Dirac fermions is found as a square root problem of the above non-relativistic version, which can also be viewed as the Dirac equation defined on the phase space. All these Landau level problems can be generalized to arbitrary high dimensions systematically. [4pt] [1] Yi Li and Congjun Wu, arXiv:1103.5422.[0pt] [2] Yi Li, Ken Intriligator, Yue Yu and Congjun Wu, arXiv:1108.5650.

  2. FMRI 3D registration based on Fourier space subsets using neural networks.

    PubMed

    Freire, Luis C; Gouveia, Ana R; Godinho, Fernando M

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a neural network (NN) based method designed for 3D rigid-body registration of FMRI time series, which relies on a limited number of Fourier coefficients of the images to be aligned. These coefficients, which are comprised in a small cubic neighborhood located at the first octant of a 3D Fourier space (including the DC component), are then fed into six NN during the learning stage. Each NN yields the estimates of a registration parameter. The proposed method was assessed for 3D rigid-body transformations, using DC neighborhoods of different sizes. The mean absolute registration errors are of approximately 0.030 mm in translations and 0.030 deg in rotations, for the typical motion amplitudes encountered in FMRI studies. The construction of the training set and the learning stage are fast requiring, respectively, 90 s and 1 to 12 s, depending on the number of input and hidden units of the NN. We believe that NN-based approaches to the problem of FMRI registration can be of great interest in the future. For instance, NN relying on limited K-space data (possibly in navigation echoes) can be a valid solution to the problem of prospective (in frame) FMRI registration.

  3. 3D Imaging of Rapidly Spinning Space Targets Based on a Factorization Method

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanxian; Wei, Shaoming; Wang, Jun; Mao, Shiyi

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of space targets can provide crucial information about the target shape and size, which are significant supports for the application of automatic target classification and recognition. In this paper, a new 3D imaging of space spinning targets via a factorization method is proposed. Firstly, after the translational compensation, the scattering centers two-dimensional (2D) range and range-rate sequence induced by the target spinning is extracted using a high resolution spectral estimation technique. Secondly, measurement data association is implemented to obtain the scattering center trajectory matrix by using a range-Doppler tracker. Then, we use an initial coarse angular velocity to generate the projection matrix, which consists of the scattering centers range and cross-range, and a factorization method is applied iteratively to the projection matrix to estimate the accurate angular velocity. Finally, we use the accurate estimate spinning angular velocity to rescale the projection matrix and the well-scaled target 3D geometry is reconstructed. Compared to the previous literature methods, ambiguity in the spatial axes can be removed by this method. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28216588

  4. 3D Imaging of Rapidly Spinning Space Targets Based on a Factorization Method.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanxian; Wei, Shaoming; Wang, Jun; Mao, Shiyi

    2017-02-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of space targets can provide crucial information about the target shape and size, which are significant supports for the application of automatic target classification and recognition. In this paper, a new 3D imaging of space spinning targets via a factorization method is proposed. Firstly, after the translational compensation, the scattering centers two-dimensional (2D) range and range-rate sequence induced by the target spinning is extracted using a high resolution spectral estimation technique. Secondly, measurement data association is implemented to obtain the scattering center trajectory matrix by using a range-Doppler tracker. Then, we use an initial coarse angular velocity to generate the projection matrix, which consists of the scattering centers range and cross-range, and a factorization method is applied iteratively to the projection matrix to estimate the accurate angular velocity. Finally, we use the accurate estimate spinning angular velocity to rescale the projection matrix and the well-scaled target 3D geometry is reconstructed. Compared to the previous literature methods, ambiguity in the spatial axes can be removed by this method. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Accurate Automatic Detection of Densely Distributed Cell Nuclei in 3D Space

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Terumasa; Kanamori, Manami; Teramoto, Takayuki; Jang, Moon Sun; Kuge, Sayuri; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo; Iino, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    To measure the activity of neurons using whole-brain activity imaging, precise detection of each neuron or its nucleus is required. In the head region of the nematode C. elegans, the neuronal cell bodies are distributed densely in three-dimensional (3D) space. However, no existing computational methods of image analysis can separate them with sufficient accuracy. Here we propose a highly accurate segmentation method based on the curvatures of the iso-intensity surfaces. To obtain accurate positions of nuclei, we also developed a new procedure for least squares fitting with a Gaussian mixture model. Combining these methods enables accurate detection of densely distributed cell nuclei in a 3D space. The proposed method was implemented as a graphical user interface program that allows visualization and correction of the results of automatic detection. Additionally, the proposed method was applied to time-lapse 3D calcium imaging data, and most of the nuclei in the images were successfully tracked and measured. PMID:27271939

  6. Space charge studies in FFAG using the tracking code Zgoubi

    SciTech Connect

    Tahar, M. Haj; Meot, F.; Tsoupas, N.

    2015-05-03

    A method is implemented in Zgoubi that allows the computation of space charge effects in 2D distributions and with some restrictions in 3D distributions. It relies on decomposing field maps or analytical elements into slices and applying a space charge kick to the particles. The aim of this study is to investigate the accuracy of this technique, its limitations/advantages by comparisons with other linear/nonlinear computation methods and codes, and to apply it to high power fixed field ring design studies.

  7. Longitudinal phase space tomography with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, S.; Lindroos, M.; Koscielniak, S.

    2000-12-01

    Tomography is now a very broad topic with a wealth of algorithms for the reconstruction of both qualitative and quantitative images. In an extension in the domain of particle accelerators, one of the simplest algorithms has been modified to take into account the nonlinearity of large-amplitude synchrotron motion. This permits the accurate reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density from one-dimensional bunch profile data. The method is a hybrid one which incorporates particle tracking. Hitherto, a very simple tracking algorithm has been employed because only a brief span of measured profile data is required to build a snapshot of phase space. This is one of the strengths of the method, as tracking for relatively few turns relaxes the precision to which input machine parameters need to be known. The recent addition of longitudinal space charge considerations as an optional refinement of the code is described. Simplicity suggested an approach based on the derivative of bunch shape with the properties of the vacuum chamber parametrized by a single value of distributed reactive impedance and by a geometrical coupling coefficient. This is sufficient to model the dominant collective effects in machines of low to moderate energy. In contrast to simulation codes, binning is not an issue since the profiles to be differentiated are measured ones. The program is written in Fortran 90 with high-performance Fortran extensions for parallel processing. A major effort has been made to identify and remove execution bottlenecks, for example, by reducing floating-point calculations and recoding slow intrinsic functions. A pointerlike mechanism which avoids the problems associated with pointers and parallel processing has been implemented. This is required to handle the large, sparse matrices that the algorithm employs. Results obtained with and without the inclusion of space charge are presented and compared for proton beams in the CERN protron synchrotron booster. Comparisons

  8. Parallel Imaging of 3D Surface Profile with Space-Division Multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Seok; Cho, Soon-Woo; Kim, Gyeong Hun; Jeong, Myung Yung; Won, Young Jae; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a modified optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system that performs parallel imaging of three-dimensional (3D) surface profiles by using the space division multiplexing (SDM) method with dual-area swept sourced beams. We have also demonstrated that 3D surface information for two different areas could be well obtained in a same time with only one camera by our method. In this study, double field of views (FOVs) of 11.16 mm × 5.92 mm were achieved within 0.5 s. Height range for each FOV was 460 µm and axial and transverse resolutions were 3.6 and 5.52 µm, respectively. PMID:26805840

  9. Gust Acoustics Computation with a Space-Time CE/SE Parallel 3D Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Himansu, A.; Chang, S. C.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The benchmark Problem 2 in Category 3 of the Third Computational Aero-Acoustics (CAA) Workshop is solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This problem concerns the unsteady response of an isolated finite-span swept flat-plate airfoil bounded by two parallel walls to an incident gust. The acoustic field generated by the interaction of the gust with the flat-plate airfoil is computed by solving the 3D (three-dimensional) Euler equations in the time domain using a parallel version of a 3D CE/SE solver. The effect of the gust orientation on the far-field directivity is studied. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, showing a reasonable agreement.

  10. PSF Rotation with Changing Defocus and Applications to 3D Imaging for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S.; Kumar, R.

    2013-09-01

    For a clear, well corrected imaging aperture in space, the point-spread function (PSF) in its Gaussian image plane has the conventional, diffraction-limited, tightly focused Airy form. Away from that plane, the PSF broadens rapidly, however, resulting in a loss of sensitivity and transverse resolution that makes such a traditional best-optics approach untenable for rapid 3D image acquisition. One must scan in focus to maintain high sensitivity and resolution as one acquires image data, slice by slice, from a 3D volume with reduced efficiency. In this paper we describe a computational-imaging approach to overcome this limitation, one that uses pupil-phase engineering to fashion a PSF that, although not as tight as the Airy spot, maintains its shape and size while rotating uniformly with changing defocus over many waves of defocus phase at the pupil edge. As one of us has shown recently [1], the subdivision of a circular pupil aperture into M Fresnel zones, with the mth zone having an outer radius proportional to m and impressing a spiral phase profile of form m? on the light wave, where ? is the azimuthal angle coordinate measured from a fixed x axis (the dislocation line), yields a PSF that rotates with defocus while keeping its shape and size. Physically speaking, a nonzero defocus of a point source means a quadratic optical phase in the pupil that, because of the square-root dependence of the zone radius on the zone number, increases on average by the same amount from one zone to the next. This uniformly incrementing phase yields, in effect, a rotation of the dislocation line, and thus a rotated PSF. Since the zone-to-zone phase increment depends linearly on defocus to first order, the PSF rotates uniformly with changing defocus. For an M-zone pupil, a complete rotation of the PSF occurs when the defocus-induced phase at the pupil edge changes by M waves. Our recent simulations of reconstructions from image data for 3D image scenes comprised of point sources at

  11. Assessment of third ventriculostomy patency with the 3D-SPACE technique: a preliminary multicenter research study.

    PubMed

    Algin, Oktay; Ucar, Murat; Ozmen, Evrim; Borcek, Alp Ozgun; Ozisik, Pinar; Ocakoglu, Gokhan; Tali, E Turgut

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the value of the 3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (3D-SPACE) technique in the evaluation of endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) patency. Twenty-six patients with ETV were examined using 3-T MRI units. Sagittal-plane 3D-SPACE with variant flip-angle mode, 3D T1-weighted (T1W), and 3D heavily T2-weighted (T2W) images were obtained with isotropic voxel sizes. Also, sagittal-axial plane phase-contrast cine (PC)-MR images were obtained. The following findings were evaluated: diameters of stoma and third ventricle, flow-void sign on 3D-SPACE and PC-MR images, integrity of the third ventricle on heavily T2W images, and quantitative PC-MRI parameters of the stoma. Obtained sequences were evaluated singly, in combination with one another, and all together. The mean area, flow, and velocity values measured at the level of stoma in patients with patent stoma were significantly higher than those measured in patients with closed stoma (p < 0.05). There was significant correlation among PC-MRI, 3D-SPACE, and 3D heavily T2W techniques regarding assessment of ETV patency (p < 0.001). The 3D-SPACE technique provided the lowest rate of ambiguous results. The 3D-SPACE technique seems to be the most efficient one for determination of ETV patency. The authors suggest the use of 3D-SPACE as a stand-alone first-line sequence in addition to routine brain MRI protocols in assessing patients with ETV, thereby decreasing scan time and reserving the use of a combination of additional sequences such as PC-MRI and 3D heavily T2W images in suspicious or complex cases.

  12. 3D printed micro/nanofluidic preconcentrator for charged sample based on ion concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Hailong; Tong, Jianhua; Bian, Chao; Xia, Shanhong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel and simple method to fabricate a preconcentrator based on the ion concentration polarization phenomenon (ICP). Using a three-dimensional printed layer, the microchannels could be easily integrated with an ion exchange membrane which plays the role of the nanoporous junction needed for ICP. To demonstrate the preconcentration ability of the devices, we conducted experiments with negatively charged fluorescein sodium and positively charged rhodamine 6G. As a result, the negatively charged sample could be preconcentrated more than 18 fold by using a cation exchange membrane. The positively charged sample could be preconcentrated more than 40 fold by using an anion exchange membrane. This preconcentrator with a simple fabrication process could be implemented in various microfluidic systems for biochemical assays.

  13. Theoretical Analysis of Spacing Parameters of Anisotropic 3D Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzitis, J.; Bulaha, N.; Lungevics, J.; Linins, O.; Berzins, K.

    2017-04-01

    The authors of the research have analysed spacing parameters of anisotropic 3D surface roughness crosswise to machining (friction) traces RSm1 and lengthwise to machining (friction) traces RSm2. The main issue arises from the RSm2 values being limited by values of sampling length l in the measuring devices; however, on many occasions RSm2 values can exceed l values. Therefore, the mean spacing values of profile irregularities in the longitudinal direction in many cases are not reliable and they should be determined by another method. Theoretically, it is proved that anisotropic surface roughness anisotropy coefficient c=RSm1/RSm2 equals texture aspect ratio Str, which is determined by surface texture standard EN ISO 25178-2. This allows using parameter Str to determine mean spacing of profile irregularities and estimate roughness anisotropy.

  14. Reservoir lithofacies analysis using 3D seismic data in dissimilarity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, M.; Riahi, M. A.; Hashemi, H.

    2013-06-01

    Seismic data interpretation is one of the most important steps in exploration seismology. Seismic facies analysis (SFA) with emphasis on lithofacies can be used to extract more information about structures and geology, which results in seismic interpretation enhancement. Facies analysis is based on unsupervised and supervised classification using seismic attributes. In this paper, supervised classification by a support vector machine using well logs and seismic attributes is applied. Dissimilarity as a new measuring space is employed, after which classification is carried out. Often, SFA is carried out in a feature space in which each dimension stands as a seismic attribute. Different facies show lots of class overlap in the feature space; hence, high classification error values are reported. Therefore, decreasing class overlap before classification is a necessary step to be targeted. To achieve this goal, a dissimilarity space is initially created. As a result of the definition of the new space, the class overlap between objects (seismic samples) is reduced and hence the classification can be done reliably. This strategy causes an increase in the accuracy of classification, and a more trustworthy lithofacies analysis is attained. For applying this method, 3D seismic data from an oil field in Iran were selected and the results obtained by a support vector classifier (SVC) in dissimilarity space are presented, discussed and compared with the SVC applied in conventional feature space.

  15. SVD-GFD scheme to simulate complex moving body problems in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Yu, P.; Yeo, K. S.; Khoo, B. C.

    2010-03-01

    The present paper presents a hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid method for simulating moving body incompressible viscous flow problems in 3D space. The method combines the merits of cost-efficient and accurate conventional finite difference approximations on Cartesian grids with the geometric freedom of generalized finite difference (GFD) approximations on meshfree grids. Error minimization in GFD is carried out by singular value decomposition (SVD). The Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) form of the Navier-Stokes equations on convecting nodes is integrated by a fractional-step projection method. The present hybrid grid method employs a relatively simple mode of nodal administration. Nevertheless, it has the geometrical flexibility of unstructured mesh-based finite-volume and finite element methods. Boundary conditions are precisely implemented on boundary nodes without interpolation. The present scheme is validated by a moving patch consistency test as well as against published results for 3D moving body problems. Finally, the method is applied on low-Reynolds number flapping wing applications, where large boundary motions are involved. The present study demonstrates the potential of the present hybrid meshfree-and-Cartesian grid scheme for solving complex moving body problems in 3D.

  16. 3D model-based detection and tracking for space autonomous and uncooperative rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yang; Zhang, Yueqiang; Liu, Haibo

    2015-10-01

    In order to fully navigate using a vision sensor, a 3D edge model based detection and tracking technique was developed. Firstly, we proposed a target detection strategy over a sequence of several images from the 3D model to initialize the tracking. The overall purpose of such approach is to robustly match each image with the model views of the target. Thus we designed a line segment detection and matching method based on the multi-scale space technology. Experiments on real images showed that our method is highly robust under various image changes. Secondly, we proposed a method based on 3D particle filter (PF) coupled with M-estimation to track and estimate the pose of the target efficiently. In the proposed approach, a similarity observation model was designed according to a new distance function of line segments. Then, based on the tracking results of PF, the pose was optimized using M-estimation. Experiments indicated that the proposed method can effectively track and accurately estimate the pose of freely moving target in unconstrained environment.

  17. Multi-scale simulations of space problems with iPIC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bettarini, Lapo; Markidis, Stefano

    The implicit Particle-in-Cell method for the computer simulation of space plasma, and its im-plementation in a three-dimensional parallel code, called iPIC3D, are presented. The implicit integration in time of the Vlasov-Maxwell system removes the numerical stability constraints and enables kinetic plasma simulations at magnetohydrodynamics scales. Simulations of mag-netic reconnection in plasma are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithm. In particular we will show a number of simulations done for large scale 3D systems using the physical mass ratio for Hydrogen. Most notably one simulation treats kinetically a box of tens of Earth radii in each direction and was conducted using about 16000 processors of the Pleiades NASA computer. The work is conducted in collaboration with the MMS-IDS theory team from University of Colorado (M. Goldman, D. Newman and L. Andersson). Reference: Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Available online 17 October 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  18. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2017-08-30

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  19. Designing a multicellular organotypic 3D liver model with a detachable, nanoscale polymeric Space of Disse.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Adam L; Rodrigues, Richard R; Murali, T M; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2013-11-01

    The design of in vitro models that mimic the stratified multicellular hepatic microenvironment continues to be challenging. Although several in vitro hepatic cultures have been shown to exhibit liver functions, their physiological relevance is limited due to significant deviation from in vivo cellular composition. We report the assembly of a novel three-dimensional (3D) organotypic liver model incorporating three different cell types (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and Kupffer cells) and a polymeric interface that mimics the Space of Disse. The nanoscale interface is detachable, optically transparent, derived from self-assembled polyelectrolyte multilayers, and exhibits a Young's modulus similar to in vivo values for liver tissue. Only the 3D liver models simultaneously maintain hepatic phenotype and elicit proliferation, while achieving cellular ratios found in vivo. The nanoscale detachable polymeric interfaces can be modulated to mimic basement membranes that exhibit a wide range of physical properties. This facile approach offers a versatile new avenue in the assembly of engineered tissues. These results demonstrate the ability of the tri-cellular 3D cultures to serve as an organotypic hepatic model that elicits proliferation and maintenance of phenotype and in vivo-like cellular ratios.

  20. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters reasonably reproduce real human bone tissue in vivo. An experimental demonstration of a possible use of the optical phantom, utilizing a laser-Doppler flowmeter, is also presented. PMID:25136496

  1. 3D polyaniline porous layer anchored pillared graphene sheets: enhanced interface joined with high conductivity for better charge storage applications.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Pandiaraj; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-04-15

    Here, we report synthesis of a 3-dimensional (3D) porous polyaniline (PANI) anchored on pillared graphene (G-PANI-PA) as an efficient charge storage material for supercapacitor applications. Benzoic acid (BA) anchored graphene, having spatially separated graphene layers (G-Bz-COOH), was used as a structure controlling support whereas 3D PANI growth has been achieved by a simple chemical oxidation of aniline in the presence of phytic acid (PA). The BA groups on G-Bz-COOH play a critical role in preventing the restacking of graphene to achieve a high surface area of 472 m(2)/g compared to reduced graphene oxide (RGO, 290 m(2)/g). The carboxylic acid (-COOH) group controls the rate of polymerization to achieve a compact polymer structure with micropores whereas the chelating nature of PA plays a crucial role to achieve the 3D growth pattern of PANI. This type of controlled interplay helps G-PANI-PA to achieve a high conductivity of 3.74 S/cm all the while maintaining a high surface area of 330 m(2)/g compared to PANI-PA (0.4 S/cm and 60 m(2)/g). G-PANI-PA thus conceives the characteristics required for facile charge mobility during fast charge-discharge cycles, which results in a high specific capacitance of 652 F/g for the composite. Owing to the high surface area along with high conductivity, G-PANI-PA displays a stable specific capacitance of 547 F/g even with a high mass loading of 3 mg/cm(2), an enhanced areal capacitance of 1.52 F/cm(2), and a volumetric capacitance of 122 F/cm(3). The reduced charge-transfer resistance (RCT) of 0.67 Ω displayed by G-PANI-PA compared to pure PANI (0.79 Ω) stands out as valid evidence of the improved charge mobility achieved by the system by growing the 3D PANI layer along the spatially separated layers of the graphene sheets. The low RCT helps the system to display capacitance retention as high as 65% even under a high current dragging condition of 10 A/g. High charge/discharge rates and good cycling stability are the other

  2. Combining scale-space and similarity-based aspect graphs for fast 3D object recognition.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Markus; Wiedemann, Christian; Steger, Carsten

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an approach for recognizing instances of a 3D object in a single camera image and for determining their 3D poses. A hierarchical model is generated solely based on the geometry information of a 3D CAD model of the object. The approach does not rely on texture or reflectance information of the object's surface, making it useful for a wide range of industrial and robotic applications, e.g., bin-picking. A hierarchical view-based approach that addresses typical problems of previous methods is applied: It handles true perspective, is robust to noise, occlusions, and clutter to an extent that is sufficient for many practical applications, and is invariant to contrast changes. For the generation of this hierarchical model, a new model image generation technique by which scale-space effects can be taken into account is presented. The necessary object views are derived using a similarity-based aspect graph. The high robustness of an exhaustive search is combined with an efficient hierarchical search. The 3D pose is refined by using a least-squares adjustment that minimizes geometric distances in the image, yielding a position accuracy of up to 0.12 percent with respect to the object distance, and an orientation accuracy of up to 0.35 degree in our tests. The recognition time is largely independent of the complexity of the object, but depends mainly on the range of poses within which the object may appear in front of the camera. For efficiency reasons, the approach allows the restriction of the pose range depending on the application. Typical runtimes are in the range of a few hundred ms.

  3. Analysis of spectra of 3s-3p and 3p-3d transitions of highly-charged copper ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M. G.; Min, Q.; He, S. Q.; Wu, L.; Sun, R.; Ding, X. B.; Sun, D. X.

    2017-08-01

    Beam-foil excited spectra in the range of 160-360 Å from highly charged copper ions were identified with the aid of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Atomic Spectra Database and theoretical calculations with Cowan and Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) calculations. Spectra arising from 3s-3p and 3p-3d transitions of Cu13+-Cu22+ ions were considered. The ion fraction at an ion beam energy of 110 MeV was estimated from the equilibrium charge distribution of the fast ion beams after passing through the solid. The corresponding simulated spectra were in good agreement with the experimental result. Our Cowan and FAC calculation results should be useful for further spectral identification and lifetime measurements of highly charged copper ions.

  4. Representing geometric structures in 3D tomography soil images: Application to pore-space modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Olivier; Ndeye Ngom, Fatou; François Delerue, Jean

    2007-09-01

    Only in the last decade have geoscientists started to use 3D computed tomography (CT) images of soil for better understanding and modeling of soil properties. In this paper, we propose one of the first approaches to allow the definition and computation of stable (intrinsic) geometric representations of structures in 3D CT soil images. This addresses the open problem set by the description of volume shapes from discrete traces without any a priori information. The basic concept involves representing the volume shape by a piecewise approximation using simple volume primitives (bowls, cylinders, cones, etc.). This typical representation is assumed to optimize a criterion ensuring its stability. This criterion includes the representation scale, which characterizes the trade-off between the fitting error and the number of patches. We also take into account the preservation of topological properties of the initial shape: the number of connected components, adjacency relationships, etc. We propose an efficient computation method for this piecewise approximation using cylinders or bowls. For cylinders, we use optimal region growing in a valuated adjacency graph that represents the primitives and their adjacency relationships. For bowls, we compute a minimal set of Delaunay spheres recovering the skeleton. Our method is applied to modeling of a coarse pore space extracted from 3D CT soil images. The piecewise bowls approximation gives a geometric formalism corresponding to the intuitive notion of pores and also an efficient way to compute it. This geometric and topological representation of coarse pore space can be used, for instance, to simulate biological activity in soil.

  5. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  6. 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment, In Space Manufacturing (LPS, 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Quincy; Cooper, Ken; Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    The 3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment has been an ongoing effort for several years. In June 2014 the technology demonstration 3D printer was launched to the International Space Station. In November 2014 the first 21 parts were manufactured in orbit marking the beginning of a paradigm shift that will allow astronauts to be more self-sufficient and pave the way to larger scale orbital manufacturing. Prior to launch the 21 parts were built on the ground with the flight unit with the same feedstock. These ground control samples are to be tested alongside the flight samples in order to determine if there is a measurable difference between parts built on the ground vs. parts built in space. As of this writing, testing has not yet commenced. Tests to be performed are structured light scanning for volume and geometric discrepancies, CT scanning for density measurement, destructive testing of mechanical samples, and SEM analysis for inter-laminar adhesion discrepancies. Additionally, an ABS material characterization was performed on mechanical samples built from the same CAD files as the flight and ground samples on different machine / feedstock combinations. The purpose of this testing was twofold: first to obtain mechanical data in order to have a baseline comparison for the flight and ground samples and second to ascertain if there is a measurable difference between machines and feedstock.

  7. On Efficient Deployment of Wireless Sensors for Coverage and Connectivity in Constrained 3D Space.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chase Q; Wang, Li

    2017-10-10

    Sensor networks have been used in a rapidly increasing number of applications in many fields. This work generalizes a sensor deployment problem to place a minimum set of wireless sensors at candidate locations in constrained 3D space to k-cover a given set of target objects. By exhausting the combinations of discreteness/continuousness constraints on either sensor locations or target objects, we formulate four classes of sensor deployment problems in 3D space: deploy sensors at Discrete/Continuous Locations (D/CL) to cover Discrete/Continuous Targets (D/CT). We begin with the design of an approximate algorithm for DLDT and then reduce DLCT, CLDT, and CLCT to DLDT by discretizing continuous sensor locations or target objects into a set of divisions without sacrificing sensing precision. Furthermore, we consider a connected version of each problem where the deployed sensors must form a connected network, and design an approximation algorithm to minimize the number of deployed sensors with connectivity guarantee. For performance comparison, we design and implement an optimal solution and a genetic algorithm (GA)-based approach. Extensive simulation results show that the proposed deployment algorithms consistently outperform the GA-based heuristic and achieve a close-to-optimal performance in small-scale problem instances and a significantly superior overall performance than the theoretical upper bound.

  8. CheS-Mapper - Chemical Space Mapping and Visualization in 3D

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Analyzing chemical datasets is a challenging task for scientific researchers in the field of chemoinformatics. It is important, yet difficult to understand the relationship between the structure of chemical compounds, their physico-chemical properties, and biological or toxic effects. To that respect, visualization tools can help to better comprehend the underlying correlations. Our recently developed 3D molecular viewer CheS-Mapper (Chemical Space Mapper) divides large datasets into clusters of similar compounds and consequently arranges them in 3D space, such that their spatial proximity reflects their similarity. The user can indirectly determine similarity, by selecting which features to employ in the process. The tool can use and calculate different kind of features, like structural fragments as well as quantitative chemical descriptors. These features can be highlighted within CheS-Mapper, which aids the chemist to better understand patterns and regularities and relate the observations to established scientific knowledge. As a final function, the tool can also be used to select and export specific subsets of a given dataset for further analysis. PMID:22424447

  9. Planned development of a 3D computer based on free-space optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, John A.; Guarino, David R.

    1994-05-01

    Free-space optical interconnection has the potential to provide upwards of a million data channels between planes of electronic circuits. This may result in the planar board and backplane structures of today giving away to 3-D stacks of wafers or multi-chip modules interconnected via channels running perpendicular to the processor planes, thereby eliminating much of the packaging overhead. Three-dimensional packaging is very appealing for tightly coupled fine-grained parallel computing where the need for massive numbers of interconnections is severely taxing the capabilities of the planar structures. This paper describes a coordinated effort by four research organizations to demonstrate an operational fine-grained parallel computer that achieves global connectivity through the use of free space optical interconnects.

  10. Evaluation of hydrocephalus patients with 3D-SPACE technique using variant FA mode at 3T.

    PubMed

    Algin, Oktay

    2017-09-26

    The major advantages of three-dimensional sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolution (3D-SPACE) technique are its high resistance to artifacts that occurs as a result of radiofrequency or static field, the ability of providing images with sub-millimeter voxel size which allows obtaining reformatted images in any plane due to isotropic three-dimensional data with lower specific absorption rate values. That is crucial during examination of cerebrospinal-fluid containing complex structures, and the acquisition time, which is approximately 5 min for scanning of entire cranium. Recent data revealed that T2-weighted (T2W) 3D-SPACE with variant flip-angle mode (VFAM) imaging allows fast and accurate evaluation of the hydrocephalus patients during both pre- and post-operative period for monitoring the treatment. For a better assessment of these patients; radiologists and neurosurgeons should be aware of the details and implications regarding to the 3D-SPACE technique, and they should follow the updates in this field. There could be a misconception about the difference between T2W-VFAM and routine heavily T2W 3D-SPACE images. T2W 3D-SPACE with VFAM imaging is only a subtype of 3D-SPACE technique. In this review, we described the details of T2W 3D-SPACE with VFAM imaging and comprehensively reviewed its recent applications.

  11. Charge spreading effects during 3D tunneling through a supported carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márk, Géza I.; Biró, László P.; Koós, Antal; Osváth, Zoltán; Gyulai, József; Benito, Ana M.; Thiry, Paul A.; Lambin, Philippe

    2001-11-01

    Investigating the distribution of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) current through a nanostructured material is a subject of great current interest. In this work, the transmission of an electron wave packet was calculated through a jellium potential model of a carbon nanotube under the tip of a STM. Snapshots of the full three-dimensional (3D) probability density of the wave packet enabled us to study in detail the tunneling event. The theory shows that the wave packet spreads along the nanotube while it tunnels through it and the nanotube-support tunneling channel is also extended along the direction of the tube as compared to the tip-nanotube channel which remains narrow. We demonstrate how can this spread explain the characteristics of the apparent height measured by STM of a nanotube crossing a step on graphite.

  12. 3D-HST: A WIDE-FIELD GRISM SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Nelson, Erica; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Labbe, Ivo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Kriek, Mariska; Erb, Dawn K.; Fan, Xiaohui; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Dan; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present 3D-HST, a near-infrared spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope for studying the physical processes that shape galaxies in the distant universe. 3D-HST provides rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of {approx}7000 galaxies at 1 < z < 3.5, the epoch when {approx}60% of all star formation took place, the number density of quasars peaked, the first galaxies stopped forming stars, and the structural regularity that we see in galaxies today must have emerged. 3D-HST will cover three quarters (625 arcmin{sup 2}) of the CANDELS Treasury survey area with two orbits of primary WFC3/G141 grism coverage and two to four orbits with the ACS/G800L grism in parallel. In the IR, these exposure times yield a continuum signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}5 per resolution element at H{sub 140} {approx} 23.1 and a 5{sigma} emission-line sensitivity of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for typical objects, improving by a factor of {approx}2 for compact sources in images with low sky background levels. The WFC3/G141 spectra provide continuous wavelength coverage from 1.1 to 1.6 {mu}m at a spatial resolution of {approx}0.''13, which, combined with their depth, makes them a unique resource for studying galaxy evolution. We present an overview of the preliminary reduction and analysis of the grism observations, including emission-line and redshift measurements from combined fits to the extracted grism spectra and photometry from ancillary multi-wavelength catalogs. The present analysis yields redshift estimates with a precision of {sigma}(z) = 0.0034(1 + z), or {sigma}(v) Almost-Equal-To 1000 km s{sup -1}. We illustrate how the generalized nature of the survey yields near-infrared spectra of remarkable quality for many different types of objects, including a quasar at z = 4.7, quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2, and the most distant T-type brown dwarf star known. The combination of the CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys will

  13. Longitudinal emittance growth due to nonlinear space charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Yu, Simon S.; Barnard, John J.; Seidl, Peter A.

    2012-03-01

    Emittance posts limits on the key requirements of final pulse length and spot size on target in heavy ion fusion drivers. In this paper, we show studies on the effect of nonlinear space charge on longitudinal emittance growth in the drift compression section. We perform simulations, using the 3D PIC code WARP, for a high current beam under conditions of bends and longitudinal compression. The linear growth rate for longitudinal emittance turns out to depend only on the peak line charge density, and is independent of pulse length, velocity tilt, and/or the pipe and beam size. This surprisingly simple result is confirmed by simulations and analytic calculations.

  14. Anisotropic magnification distortion of the 3D galaxy correlation. II. Fourier and redshift space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Lam; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Loverde, Marilena

    2008-03-01

    In paper I of this series we discuss how magnification bias distorts the 3D correlation function by enhancing the observed correlation in the line-of-sight (LOS) orientation, especially on large scales. This lensing anisotropy is distinctive, making it possible to separately measure the galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-magnification and magnification-magnification correlations. Here we extend the discussion to the power spectrum and also to redshift space. In real space, pairs oriented close to the LOS direction are not protected against nonlinearity even if the pair separation is large; this is because nonlinear fluctuations can enter through gravitational lensing at a small transverse separation (or i.e. impact parameter). The situation in Fourier space is different: by focusing on a small wave number k, as is usually done, linearity is guaranteed because both the LOS and transverse wave numbers must be small. This is why magnification distortion of the galaxy correlation appears less severe in Fourier space. Nonetheless, the effect is non-negligible, especially for the transverse Fourier modes, and should be taken into account in interpreting precision measurements of the galaxy power spectrum, for instance those that focus on the baryon oscillations. The lensing induced anisotropy of the power spectrum has a shape that is distinct from the more well-known redshift space anisotropies due to peculiar motions and the Alcock-Paczynski effect. The lensing anisotropy is highly localized in Fourier space while redshift space distortions are more spread out. This means that one could separate the magnification bias component in real observations, implying that potentially it is possible to perform a gravitational lensing measurement without measuring galaxy shapes.

  15. Model-assisted development of microfabricated 3D Ni(OH)2 electrodes with rapid charging capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenpeng; Armutlulu, Andac; Allen, Mark G.; Allen, Sue Ann Bidstrup

    2017-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nickel hydroxide electrodes based on well-ordered and laminated structures are prepared via an electrochemical route combined with microfabrication technologies. The electrodes exhibit enhanced rate capabilities owing to their large surface area and reduced diffusion and conduction path lengths for the charge transfer. Highly laminated electrodes enable areal capacities as high as 2.43 mAh cm-2. When charged at fast rates of 150C, the electrodes are able to deliver more than 50% of their initial capacity. The electrochemical performance of the fabricated electrodes is predicted with close approximation by means of a mathematical model developed by employing fundamental mass transport and reaction kinetics principles. This model is then used to optimize the characteristic dimensions of the electrodes and make projections of performance for various energy and power needs.

  16. Quantum (in)stability of 2D charged dilaton black holes and 3D rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    1999-02-01

    The quantum properties of charged black holes (BHs) in two-dimensional (2D) dilaton-Maxwell gravity (spontaneously compactified from heterotic string) with N dilaton coupled scalars are studied. We first investigate 2D BHs found by McGuigan, Nappi, and Yost. Kaluza-Klein reduction of 3D gravity with minimal scalars leads also to 2D dilaton-Maxwell gravity with dilaton coupled scalars and the rotating BH solution found by Bañados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli, which can be also described by 2D charged dilatonic BHs. Evaluating the one-loop effective action for dilaton coupled scalars in large N (and the s-wave approximation for the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli case), we show that quantum-corrected BHs may evaporate or else antievaporate similarly to 4D Nariai BHs as is observed by Bousso and Hawking. Higher modes may cause the disintegration of BHs in accordance with recent observation by Bousso.

  17. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  18. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  19. Space-time hole filling with random walks in view extrapolation for 3D video.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Ham, Bumsub; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a space-time hole filling approach is presented to deal with a disocclusion when a view is synthesized for the 3D video. The problem becomes even more complicated when the view is extrapolated from a single view, since the hole is large and has no stereo depth cues. Although many techniques have been developed to address this problem, most of them focus only on view interpolation. We propose a space-time joint filling method for color and depth videos in view extrapolation. For proper texture and depth to be sampled in the following hole filling process, the background of a scene is automatically segmented by the random walker segmentation in conjunction with the hole formation process. Then, the patch candidate selection process is formulated as a labeling problem, which can be solved with random walks. The patch candidates that best describe the hole region are dynamically selected in the space-time domain, and the hole is filled with the optimal patch for ensuring both spatial and temporal coherence. The experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to state-of-the-art methods and provides both spatially and temporally consistent results with significantly reduced flicker artifacts.

  20. Three-body problem in 3D space: ground state, (quasi)-exact-solvability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbiner, Alexander V.; Miller, Willard, Jr.; Escobar-Ruiz, Adrian M.

    2017-05-01

    We study aspects of the quantum and classical dynamics of a 3-body system in 3D space with interaction depending only on mutual distances. The study is restricted to solutions in the space of relative motion which are functions of mutual distances only. It is shown that the ground state (and some other states) in the quantum case and the planar trajectories in the classical case are of this type. The quantum (and classical) system for which these states are eigenstates is found and its Hamiltonian is constructed. It corresponds to a three-dimensional quantum particle moving in a curved space with special metric. The kinetic energy of the system has a hidden sl(4, R) Lie (Poisson) algebra structure, alternatively, the hidden algebra h (3) typical for the H 3 Calogero model. We find an exactly solvable three-body generalized harmonic oscillator-type potential as well as a quasi-exactly-solvable three-body sextic polynomial type potential; both models have an extra integral.

  1. Global Solutions to the 3-D Incompressible Anisotropic Navier-Stokes System in the Critical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paicu, Marius; Zhang, Ping

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the global wellposedness of the 3-D incompressible anisotropic Navier-Stokes equations with initial data in the critical Besov-Sobolev type spaces {mathcal{B}} and {mathcal{B}^{-frac12,frac12}_4} (see Definitions 1.1 and 1.2 below). In particular, we proved that there exists a positive constant C such that ( ANS ν ) has a unique global solution with initial data {u_0 = (u_0^h, u_0^3)} which satisfies {\\|u_0^h\\|_{mathcal{B}} expbigl(C/ν^4 \\|u_0^3\\|_{mathcal{B}}^4bigr) ≤ c_0ν} or {\\|u_0^h\\|_{mathcal{B}^{-frac12,frac12}4} exp bigl(C/ν^4 \\|u_0^3\\|_{mathcal{B}^{-frac12,frac12}4}^4bigr)≤ c_0ν} for some c 0 sufficiently small. To overcome the difficulty that Gronwall's inequality can not be applied in the framework of Chemin-Lerner type spaces, {widetilde{L^p_t}(mathcal{B})}, we introduced here sort of weighted Chemin-Lerner type spaces, {widetilde{L^2_{t, f}}(mathcal{B})} for some apropriate L 1 function f( t).

  2. Effects of Presence, Copresence, and Flow on Learning Outcomes in 3D Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassell, Martin D.; Goyal, Sandeep; Limayem, Moez; Boughzala, Imed

    2012-01-01

    The level of satisfaction and effectiveness of 3D virtual learning environments were examined. Additionally, 3D virtual learning environments were compared with face-to-face learning environments. Students that experienced higher levels of flow and presence also experienced more satisfaction but not necessarily more effectiveness with 3D virtual…

  3. 3D solutions of the Poisson-Vlasov equations for a charged plasma and particle-core model in a line of FODO cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, G.; Rambaldi, S.; Bazzani, A.; Comunian, M.; Pisent, A.

    2003-09-01

    We consider a charged plasma of positive ions in a periodic focusing channel of quadrupolar magnets in the presence of RF cavities. The ions are bunched into charged triaxial ellipsoids and their description requires the solution of a fully 3D Poisson-Vlasov equation. We also analyze the trajectories of test particles in the exterior of the ion bunches in order to estimate their diffusion rate. This rate is relevant for a high intensity linac (TRASCO project). A numerical PIC scheme to integrate the Poisson-Vlasov equations in a periodic focusing system in 2 and 3 space dimensions is presented. The scheme consists of a single particle symplectic integrator and a Poisson solver based on FFT plus tri-diagonal matrix inversion. In the 2D version arbitrary boundary conditions can be chosen. Since no analytical self-consistent 3D solution is known, we chose an initial Neuffer-KV distribution in phase space, whose electric field is close to the one generated by a uniformly filled ellipsoid. For a matched (periodic) beam the orbits of test particles moving in the field of an ellipsoidal bunch, whose semi-axis satisfy the envelope equations, is similar to the orbits generated by the self-consistent charge distribition obtained from the PIC simulation, even though it relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac-like distribution. After a transient the RMS radii and emittances have small amplitude oscillations. The PIC simulations for a mismatched (quasiperiodic) beam are no longer comparable with the ellipsoidal bunch model even though the qualitative behavior is the same, namely a stronger diffusion due to the increase of resonances.

  4. LONGITUDINAL SPACE CHARGE EFFECT FOR SNS

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.; WENG,W.T.

    1998-06-22

    One of performance requirements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is to keep the uncontrolled beam loss in the storage ring to less than 2 x 10{sup {minus}4} per pulse. For 2 MW SNS, the maximum beam intensity is N = 2 x 10{sup 14} protons per ring. Since the bunch lengthening has impact on both the extraction beam loss and the lowering of e-p instability threshold, the longitudinal space charge effect requires attentions. Such a space charge effect has been studied both analytically and using computer simulations. The longitudinal space charge effect, which is a defocusing force below transition, is a plausible source of the bunch leakage. In this article, the total RF potential, which takes into account the space charge effect together with the RF power, is used to provide analytical predictions for the bunch lengthening. The prediction is confirmed by the computer simulation. It is found that for 2 MW SNS storage ring, the longitudinal space charge induced bunch leakage into the interbunch gap is not significant. Therefore, corrections to the longitudinal space charge impedance, such as the proposed ferrite insertion in the PSR ring, are probably not necessary. Applying an RF voltage ramping from 20 KV to 40 KV during the multiturn injection can further cut the bunch leakage to a negligible degree. The same approach applied to the PSR shows that the longitudinal space charge effect does cause sizable bunch leakage at the intensity limit encountered there.

  5. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  6. Models of anxiety: responses of mice to novelty and open spaces in a 3D maze.

    PubMed

    Ennaceur, A; Michalikova, S; van Rensburg, R; Chazot, P L

    2006-11-01

    The present report describes the emotional responses of different strains of mice to exposure to a novel open space model of anxiety using a 3D spatial navigation task. The 3D maze is modification of the radial maze with flexible arms that can be raised above or lowered below the horizontal level of a central platform. To access the arms animals need to cross a bridge linking the arms to the central platform. In this model, mice are exposed to novelty in an unfamiliar open space setting with no safe alternative. Fear from novelty is compounded with the need to explore. The drive to escape and the drive to approach are intermingled making this open space model radically different from the current models of anxiety which provide animals with the choice between safe and anxiogenic spaces. In a series of experiments, we examined the behaviour of different groups of mice from C57, C3H, CD1 and Balb/c strains. In the first experiment, different groups of C57 mice were tested in one of the three arms configurations. In the second experiment, C57 mice were compared to C3H mice. In the third experiment, C57 mice were compared to CD1 and Balb/c mice in the raised arm configuration over three successive sessions. In the fourth experiment, we examined the behaviour of C57 mice in the lowered arm configuration with an open and an enclosed central. In the final experiment, we examined the difference between C57 and C3H mice of both genders. Using several spatio-temporal parameters of the transition responses between central platform, bridges and arms, we have been able to show consistent results demonstrating significant differences between C57 and C3H mice, and between Balb/c and both C57 and CD1 mice. C3H appear more anxious than C57 mice, and Balb/c mice seem more anxious than C57 and CD1 mice. We also observed significant differences between sexes in C3H mice but not in C57 mice. C3H male mice appear more anxious than C3H female mice and than both C57 male and female mice

  7. Permuting input for more effective sampling of 3D conformer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, Giorgio; Onnis, Valeria; Knox, Andrew J. S.; Fayne, Darren; Lloyd, David G.

    2006-03-01

    SMILES strings and other classic 2D structural formats offer a convenient way to represent molecules as a simplistic connection table, with the inherent advantages of ease of handling and storage. In the context of virtual screening, chemical databases to be screened are often initially represented by canonicalised SMILES strings that can be filtered and pre-processed in a number of ways, resulting in molecules that occupy similar regions of chemical space to active compounds of a therapeutic target. A wide variety of software exists to convert molecules into SMILES format, namely, Mol2smi (Daylight Inc.), MOE (Chemical Computing Group) and Babel (Openeye Scientific Software). Depending on the algorithm employed, the atoms of a SMILES string defining a molecule can be ordered differently. Upon conversion to 3D coordinates they result in the production of ostensibly the same molecule. In this work we show how different permutations of a SMILES string can affect conformer generation, affecting reliability and repeatability of the results. Furthermore, we propose a novel procedure for the generation of conformers, taking advantage of the permutation of the input strings—both SMILES and other 2D formats, leading to more effective sampling of conformation space in output, and also implementing fingerprint and principal component analyses step to post process and visualise the results.

  8. An automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Wenrong; Bi, Lie

    2017-03-01

    Micro-particle is hard to be observed as small scale and hard to be gripped as micro-force from substrate, an automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in the guide of microscopic vision systems is proposed in the paper to grip micro-particle. First, the micro-gripper driven by electrostatic force is introduced and forces in gripping process are analyzed. Second, a micro-assembly robot composed of two microscopic vision systems is established to monitor micro-operation process and to operate micro-particle. Image features of micro-particle and micro-gripper end-effector are extracted by image feature extraction method to calculate relative position of micro-particle and micro-gripper in image space. Last, a movement control strategy in 3D space based on image Jacobian matrix is studied to control micro-gripper approach and align with micro-particle. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of proposed methods.

  9. Understanding WCAG2.0 Colour Contrast Requirements Through 3D Colour Space Visualisation.

    PubMed

    Sandnes, Frode Eika

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient contrast between text and background is needed to achieve sufficient readability. WCAG2.0 provides a specific definition of sufficient contrast on the web. However, the definition is hard to understand and most designers thus use contrast calculators to validate their colour choices. Often, such checks are performed after design and this may be too late. This paper proposes a colour selection approach based on three-dimensional visualisation of the colour space. The complex non-linear relationships between the colour components become comprehendible when viewed in 3D. The method visualises the available colours in an intuitive manner and allows designers to check a colour against the set of other valid colours. Unlike the contrast calculators, the proposed method is proactive and fun to use. A colour space builder was developed and the resulting models were viewed with a point cloud viewer. The technique can be used as both a design tool and a pedagogical aid to teach colour theory and design.

  10. Revitalizing the Space Shuttle's Thermal Protection System with Reverse Engineering and 3D Vision Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Brad; Galatzer, Yishai

    2008-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is protected by a Thermal Protection System (TPS) made of tens of thousands of individually shaped heat protection tile. With every flight, tiles are damaged on take-off and return to earth. After each mission, the heat tiles must be fixed or replaced depending on the level of damage. As part of the return to flight mission, the TPS requirements are more stringent, leading to a significant increase in heat tile replacements. The replacement operation requires scanning tile cavities, and in some cases the actual tiles. The 3D scan data is used to reverse engineer each tile into a precise CAD model, which in turn, is exported to a CAM system for the manufacture of the heat protection tile. Scanning is performed while other activities are going on in the shuttle processing facility. Many technicians work simultaneously on the space shuttle structure, which results in structural movements and vibrations. This paper will cover a portable, ultra-fast data acquisition approach used to scan surfaces in this unstable environment.

  11. Pore Space Geometry and Seismic Anisotropy of Rocks: 3-D Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spacek, P.; Melichar, R.; Ulrich, S.

    2004-12-01

    Pressure-driven closing of the pores in the rock sample results in changes of its effective physical properties. We use 3-D ultrasonic pulse-transmission method to characterize the relationships between the spatial distribution of microcracks and elastic anisotropy of the rock. With the use of apparatus developed in Geophysical Institute, Prague, the P-wave velocities and amplitudes ({\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP}) are measured in 132 directions on spherical rock samples. The measurements are carried out at several steps of confining pressure within pressure-increasing and pressure-decreasing paths (0.1-400, 400-0.1 MPa). Then the directions of maximum and minimum velocities and amplitudes are found for which the measurements is repeated under continually changing pressure. As the measurements are repeated at the same position under various pressures, the data can be processed so that the change of the {\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP} between the individual pressure-steps and the hysteresis at particular pressure can be seen directly. The resulting differential diagrams show the magnitude of {\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP} changes in 3-D which are mainly due to the pressure-induced closing of microcracks, and respectively, the flexibility of the microcracks. Using the data measured at high confining pressure or those computed with averaging method we are able to distinguish the influence the deformation-induced lattice re-orientations from the pore-related properties. Numerous measurements carried out on various rock samples show that the anisotropic patterns of {\\IT VP} and {\\IT AP} changes due to the closing of oriented microcracks and other pores highly correlate with the macroscopic structural features of the rock (preferred grain-shape orientation, fracture cleavage, stretching lineation) and are sensitive to them. It is believed that in such cases where the structural features associated with porosity can not be observed directly, the above outlined method will be applicable as a

  12. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  13. View generation for 3D-TV using image reconstruction from irregularly spaced samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Carlos

    2007-02-01

    Three-dimensional television (3D-TV) will become the next big step in the development of advanced TV systems. One of the major challenges for the deployment of 3D-TV systems is the diversity of display technologies and the high cost of capturing multi-view content. Depth image-based rendering (DIBR) has been identified as a key technology for the generation of new views for stereoscopic and multi-view displays from a small number of views captured and transmitted. We propose a disparity compensation method for DIBR that does not require spatial interpolation of the disparity map. We use a forward-mapping disparity compensation with real precision. The proposed method deals with the irregularly sampled image resulting from this disparity compensation process by applying a re-sampling algorithm based on a bi-cubic spline function space that produces smooth images. The fact that no approximation is made on the position of the samples implies that geometrical distortions in the final images due to approximations in sample positions are minimized. We also paid attention to the occlusion problem. Our algorithm detects the occluded regions in the newly generated images and uses simple depth-aware inpainting techniques to fill the gaps created by newly exposed areas. We tested the proposed method in the context of generation of views needed for viewing on SynthaGram TM auto-stereoscopic displays. We used as input either a 2D image plus a depth map or a stereoscopic pair with the associated disparity map. Our results show that this technique provides high quality images to be viewed on different display technologies such as stereoscopic viewing with shutter glasses (two views) and lenticular auto-stereoscopic displays (nine views).

  14. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W; Barnes, Vernon A

    2015-01-01

    The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information may be filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system.

  15. A unified 3D default space consciousness model combining neurological and physiological processes that underlie conscious experience

    PubMed Central

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W.; Barnes, Vernon A.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Workspace Theory and Information Integration Theory are two of the most currently accepted consciousness models; however, these models do not address many aspects of conscious experience. We compare these models to our previously proposed consciousness model in which the thalamus fills-in processed sensory information from corticothalamic feedback loops within a proposed 3D default space, resulting in the recreation of the internal and external worlds within the mind. This 3D default space is composed of all cells of the body, which communicate via gap junctions and electrical potentials to create this unified space. We use 3D illustrations to explain how both visual and non-visual sensory information may be filled-in within this dynamic space, creating a unified seamless conscious experience. This neural sensory memory space is likely generated by baseline neural oscillatory activity from the default mode network, other salient networks, brainstem, and reticular activating system. PMID:26379573

  16. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  17. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  18. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2016-03-11

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered in frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as the basis for solution of the equations with the wake field included. Dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in the form of an infinite continued fraction. It is shown that influence of space charge on the instability essentially depends on the wake sign. In particular, threshold of the negative wake increases in absolute value until the space charge tune shift is rather small, and goes to zero at higher space charge. The explanation of this behavior is developed by analysis of the bunch spectrum. A comparison of the results with published articles is represented.

  19. Space charge effect in isochronous rings

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F.; York, R.

    2008-08-25

    Cyclotrons, rings for precise nuclear mass spectrometry, and some light sources with extremely short bunches are operated or planned to be operated in the isochronous or almost isochronous regime. Also, many hadron synchrotrons run in the isochronous regime for a short period of time during transition crossing. The longitudinal motion is frozen in the isochronous regime that leads to accumulation of the integral of the longitudinal space charge force. In low-gamma hadron machines, this can cause a fast growth of the beam energy spread even at modest beam intensities. Additionally, the transverse component of the space charge effectively modifies the dispersion function and the slip factor shifting the isochronous (transition) point. In this paper, we discuss space charge effects in the isochronous regime and present experimental results obtained in the Small Isochronous Ring, developed at Michigan State University specifically for studies of space charge in the isochronous regime.

  20. Tetrapeptide-coumarin conjugate 3D networks based on hydrogen-bonded charge transfer complexes: gel formation and dye release.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongxia; Gong, Ruiying; Jiang, Yi; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-08-14

    Oligopeptide-based derivatives are important synthons for bio-based functional materials. In this article, a Gly-(L-Val)-Gly-(L-Val)-coumarin (GVGV-Cou) conjugate was synthesized, which forms 3D networks in ethanol. The gel nanostructures were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and TEM. It is suggested that the formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes between the coumarin moieties is the main driving force for the gel formation. The capability of the gel to encapsulate and release dyes was explored. Both Congo Red (CR) and Methylene Blue (MB) can be trapped in the CT gel matrix and released over time. The present gel might be used as a functional soft material for guest encapsulation and release.

  1. Comparing an accelerated 3D fast spin-echo sequence (CS-SPACE) for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with traditional 3D fast spin-echo (SPACE) and routine 2D sequences.

    PubMed

    Altahawi, Faysal F; Blount, Kevin J; Morley, Nicholas P; Raithel, Esther; Omar, Imran M

    2017-01-01

    To compare a faster, new, high-resolution accelerated 3D-fast-spin-echo (3D-FSE) acquisition sequence (CS-SPACE) to traditional 2D and high-resolution 3D sequences for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty patients received knee MRIs that included routine 2D (T1, PD ± FS, T2-FS; 0.5 × 0.5 × 3 mm(3); ∼10 min), traditional 3D FSE (SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm(3); ∼7.5 min), and accelerated 3D-FSE prototype (CS-SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm(3); ∼5 min) acquisitions on a 3-T MRI system (Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra). Three musculoskeletal radiologists (MSKRs) prospectively and independently reviewed the studies with graded surveys comparing image and diagnostic quality. Tissue-specific signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also compared. MSKR-perceived diagnostic quality of cartilage was significantly higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE and 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Assessment of diagnostic quality of menisci and synovial fluid was higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE (p < 0.001). CS-SPACE was not significantly different from SPACE but had lower assessments than 2D sequences for evaluation of bones, ligaments, muscles, and fat (p ≤ 0.004). 3D sequences had higher spatial resolution, but lower overall assessed contrast (p < 0.001). Overall image quality from CS-SPACE was assessed as higher than SPACE (p = 0.007), but lower than 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Compared to SPACE, CS-SPACE had higher fluid SNR and CNR against all other tissues (all p < 0.001). The CS-SPACE prototype allows for faster isotropic acquisitions of knee MRIs over currently used protocols. High fluid-to-cartilage CNR and higher spatial resolution over routine 2D sequences may present a valuable role for CS-SPACE in the evaluation of cartilage and menisci.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy studies and modeling of 3D reciprocal space of ω forming alloy.

    PubMed

    Alphy George; Sharma, Vinayak; Divakar, R; Sabeena, M; Mohandas, E

    2017-09-12

    Initial stage of ω phase formation and associated anomalous features that appear in diffraction patterns of a metastable β transition metal alloy have been investigated in this study with the aid of transmission electron microscopy, simulation and modeling. The paper explores discrete features that emerge in selected area diffraction patterns of quenched Ti-15wt%Mo alloy and analyzes the correlation between ω reflections and diffuse arcs by considering all variants of ω phase as per the formation kinetics of ω phase in β matrix while quenching. Superimposed simulated diffraction patterns have been compared with experimental counterparts and it is deduced that there is lack of congruence between ω reflections and diffuse arcs even after considering trigonal ω with varying degrees of displacement. Direct lattice imaging of trigonal ω in β matrix has been demonstrated by phase contrast microscopy coupled with Fourier filtering techniques. By investigating the nature of ω reflections and diffuse arcs with the aid of electron diffraction pattern calculations and phase contrast microscopy, it is shown that, existing model of three-dimensional (3D) reciprocal space of ω forming alloy at quenched stage is not complete. A new model incorporating a patterned intensity distribution is fitted at the octahedral sites of an fcc reciprocal lattice whose planar intersections with Ewald's sphere show a better fit with the observed experimental diffraction patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Holographic display system for dynamic synthesis of 3D light fields with increased space bandwidth product.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2016-06-27

    We present a new method for the generation of a dynamic wave field with high space bandwidth product (SBP). The dynamic wave field is generated from several wave fields diffracted by a display which comprises multiple spatial light modulators (SLMs) each having a comparably low SBP. In contrast to similar approaches in stereoscopy, we describe how the independently generated wave fields can be coherently superposed. A major benefit of the scheme is that the display system may be extended to provide an even larger display. A compact experimental configuration which is composed of four phase-only SLMs to realize the coherent combination of independent wave fields is presented. Effects of important technical parameters of the display system on the wave field generated across the observation plane are investigated. These effects include, e.g., the tilt of the individual SLM and the gap between the active areas of multiple SLMs. As an example of application, holographic reconstruction of a 3D object with parallax effects is demonstrated.

  4. Scale Space Graph Representation and Kernel Matching for Non Rigid and Textured 3D Shape Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Garro, Valeria; Giachetti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object retrieval that relies on tree-based shape representations (TreeSha) derived from the analysis of the scale-space of the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) and on specialized graph kernels designed for their comparison. By coupling maxima of the Auto Diffusion Function with the related basins of attraction, we can link the information at different scales encoding spatial relationships in a graph description that is isometry invariant and can easily incorporate texture and additional geometrical information as node and edge features. Using custom graph kernels it is then possible to estimate shape dissimilarities adapted to different specific tasks and on different categories of models, making the procedure a powerful and flexible tool for shape recognition and retrieval. Experimental results demonstrate that the method can provide retrieval scores similar or better than state-of-the-art on textured and non textured shape retrieval benchmarks and give interesting insights on effectiveness of different shape descriptors and graph kernels.

  5. Space Charge Measurement System Using Sensor Array and Semiconductor Analog Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Masumi

    Real time space charge measurement systems are also required to observe the localized space charge distribution in insulating materials. Since the space charge behavior is generally transient, a real time measurement system will be also required in the two or three dimensional (2D or 3D) space charge measurement systems. A 2D sensor array PEA system has been developed. However, the number of sensors is limited by A/D converter channel, because the cost of A/D converter is expensive. So, an improved 2D space charge measurement system in lateral and thickness direction for transient space charge has been developed by using the sensor array and semiconductor analog switch unit in the PEA method.

  6. Simulations of space charge in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-03-01

    The Fermilab Project X plan for future high intensity operation relies on the Main Injector as the engine for delivering protons in the 60-120 GeV energy range. Project X plans call for increasing the number of protons per Main Injector bunch from the current value of 1.0 x 10{sup 11} to 3.0 x 10{sup 11}. Space charge effects at the injection energy of 8 GeV have the potential to seriously disrupt operations. We report on ongoing simulation efforts with Synergia, MARYLIE/Impact, and IMPACT, which provide comprehensive capabilities for parallel, multi-physics modeling of beam dynamics in the Main Injector including 3D space-charge effects.

  7. Internal space charge measurement of materials in a space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griseri, V.; Fukunaga, K.; Maeno, T.; Payan, D.; Laurent, C.; Levy, L.

    2003-09-01

    The charging/discharging effect produced by space environment on space vehicles are known but not fully identified yet. Experiments performed in laboratory in vacuum chamber that simulates spatial environment and the most realistic charge condition occurring in space have been developed in the last past forty years. A very small Pulse Electro-Acoustic space charge detection unit (mini-PEA) that can be mounted in a vacuum chamber, to measure internal space charges of materials in-situ during the irradiation has been developed. Several materials used in spatial environment such as Teflon®, and Kapton ® films on addition to PMMA films have been studied. The comparison and the good agreement between measured and calculated depth of penetration for electrons of given energy depending on the material nature contribute in the validation of the detection system and encourage us for further studies and development.

  8. Emittance growth from space-charge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1991-01-01

    Space-charge-induced emittance growth has become a topic of much recent interest for designing the low-velocity sections of high- intensity, high-brightness accelerators and beam-transport channels. In this paper we review the properties of the space-charge force, and discuss the concepts of matching, space-charge and emittance-dominated beams, and equilibrium beams and their characteristics. This is followed by a survey of some of the work over the past 25 years to identify the mechanisms of this emittance growth in both ion and electron accelerators. We summarize the overall results in terms of four distinct mechanisms whose characteristics we describe. Finally, we show numerical simulation results for the evolution of initial rms-mismatched laminar beams. The examples show that for space-charge dominated beams, the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a highly choatic filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. In the examples we have studied the halo contains only a few percent of the particles, but contributes about half of the emittance growth. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    PubMed

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity.

  10. Characterizing Marine Habitat Space on a Snowball Earth with a 3D Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.; Lingo, F.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of long-term, severe cold conditions during the Neoproterozoic glacial events ( 715-635 Ma) on the origins and evolution of metazoans remains unclear, even as recent paleobiological analyses lend support to the notion that metazoans appeared and diversified long before their first definitive appearance in the Ediacaran fossil record (Cohen and MacDonald, Paleobiology 41:610, 2015; Spence et al., Sedimentology 63:253, 2016). Cumulative geologic evidence for active hydrologic cycling and the presence of open waters in near-shore environments suggests that a fully ice-covered ocean (a "hard" Snowball) at this time in Earth history is unlikely, opening up the possibility that life did more than just survive in a few localized refugia. Here we present results from 3D climate simulations of a Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth, using the NASA/GISS global climate model (GCM) ModelE2 to explore oceanographic conditions during the Sturtian glacial interval. The GCM was allowed to run to an equilibrium state, with forcings (reduced solar luminosity, CO2) that yielded a stable sea ice front at approximately 30 degrees latitude. Among the prognostic variables available for analysis are ocean temperature and salinity gradients in three dimensions, and rates and regions of vertical mixing that enhance the distribution of heat and nutrients in the oceans. Using information derived from physical limitations of certain modern organisms likely related to early complex life (e.g., demosponges) we review the geographic distribution of potential habitat space. Our preliminary analysis suggests that salinity rather than temperature could be a key constraint on the distribution of complex life, a contrast to the expectation of temperature as a key limiting factor.

  11. TRICE - A program for reconstructing 3D reciprocal space and determining unit-cell parameters.

    PubMed

    Zou, X D Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Anders; Hovmöller, Sven

    2004-01-01

    A program system-Trice-for reconstructing the 3D reciprocal lattice from an electron diffraction tilt series is described. The unit-cell parameters can be determined from electron diffraction patterns directly by Trice. The unit cell can be checked and the lattice type and crystal system can be determined from the 3D reciprocal lattice. Trice can be applied to all crystal systems and lattice types.

  12. Parametric modeling of the intervertebral disc space in 3D: application to CT images of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Korez, Robert; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-10-01

    Gradual degeneration of intervertebral discs of the lumbar spine is one of the most common causes of low back pain. Although conservative treatment for low back pain may provide relief to most individuals, surgical intervention may be required for individuals with significant continuing symptoms, which is usually performed by replacing the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study, we propose a method for parametric modeling of the intervertebral disc space in three dimensions (3D) and show its application to computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The initial 3D model of the intervertebral disc space is generated according to the superquadric approach and therefore represented by a truncated elliptical cone, which is initialized by parameters obtained from 3D models of adjacent vertebral bodies. In an optimization procedure, the 3D model of the intervertebral disc space is incrementally deformed by adding parameters that provide a more detailed morphometric description of the observed shape, and aligned to the observed intervertebral disc space in the 3D image. By applying the proposed method to CT images of 20 lumbar spines, the shape and pose of each of the 100 intervertebral disc spaces were represented by a 3D parametric model. The resulting mean (±standard deviation) accuracy of modeling was 1.06±0.98mm in terms of radial Euclidean distance against manually defined ground truth points, with the corresponding success rate of 93% (i.e. 93 out of 100 intervertebral disc spaces were modeled successfully). As the resulting 3D models provide a description of the shape of intervertebral disc spaces in a complete parametric form, morphometric analysis was straightforwardly enabled and allowed the computation of the corresponding

  13. Survey of International Space Station Charging Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, P. D.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Parker, Linda N.

    2009-01-01

    With the negative grounding of the 160V Photovoltaic (PV) arrays, the International Space Station (ISS) can experience varied and interesting charging events. Since August 2006, there has been a multi-probe p ackage, called the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), availa ble to provide redundant measurements of the floating potential of th e ISS as well as the density and temperature of the local plasma environment. The FPMU has been operated during intermittent data campaigns since August 2006 and has collected over 160 days of information reg arding the charging of the ISS as it has progressed in configuration from one to three PV arrays and with various additional modules such as the European Space Agency?s Columbus laboratory and the Japan Aeros pace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. This paper summarizes the charging of the ISS and the local environmental conditions that contr ibute to those charging events, both as measured by the FPMU.

  14. Wavelength Dependence on the Space Charge Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Teague, L.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

    2012-05-31

    The distribution of the internal electric field in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) materials has significant effects on the charge collection ability. Light exposure at various wavelengths is a relatively unexplored process that alters charge collection at the anode contact. The use of multiple wavelengths can target charge carriers at various trap energies and positions throughout the crystal. The controlled illumination increases charge collection by releasing trapped electron and hole carriers in the crystal despite differences in light energy. Our study presents the results from our investigation of the effect of external illumination of CZT on the internal electric field via the Pockels effect. The space charge collection is further analyzed based on location and intensity relative to the specific wavelength of illumination.

  15. Droplet Charging Effects in the Space Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Thomas B.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.

    2011-05-20

    Several applications exist for transiting liquid droplets through the near-Earth space environment. Numerical results are presented for the charging of liquid droplets of trimethyl pentaphenyl siloxane (DC705) in three different plasma environments: ionosphere, auroral, and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Nominal and high geomagnetic activity cases are investigated. In general, high levels of droplet charging (>100 V) exist only in GEO during periods of high geomagnetic or solar activity. An experiment was conducted to assess the charging of silicon-oil droplets due to photoemission. The photoemission yield in the 120-200 nm wavelength range was found to be approximately 0.06.

  16. Possible reappearance of the charge density wave transition in MxTiSe2 compounds intercalated with 3d metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, N. V.; Maksimov, V. I.; Mesot, J.; Pleschov, V. G.; Podlesnyak, A.; Pomjakushin, V.; Selezneva, N. V.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical resistivity have been performed on MxTiSe2 compounds intercalated with 3d metals (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni) up to x = 0.5. The charge density wave (CDW) transition which is observed in pure TiSe2 below ~200 K disappears for intercalation x>0.1, while a further increase of the intercalant content (x>=0.25, M = Cr, Mn or Fe) leads to the appearance of pronounced anomalies in the temperature dependences of the resistivity in the same temperature range where the CDW transition takes place in the pure TiSe2 compound. These anomalies in highly intercalated MxTiSe2 are associated with the reappearance of a superstructure formation and associated CDW state. For Mn0.33TiSe2, the structural phase transition was evidenced from both powder neutron diffraction measurements and specific heat data. The observed results are discussed in terms of the degree of deformation of Se-Ti-Se sandwiches, which we believe play a key role in the disappearance and reappearance of the CDW state in MxTiSe2 as a function of increasing M concentration. The change in the electronic structure due to the intercalation seems not to strongly influence the presence of the CDW.

  17. 3D printing of surgical instruments for long-duration space missions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Julielynn Y; Pfahnl, Andreas C

    2014-07-01

    The first off-Earth fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer will explore thermoplastic manufacturing capabilities in microgravity. This study evaluated the feasibility of FDM 3D printing 10 acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic surgical instruments on Earth. Three-point bending tests compared stiffness and yield strength between FDM 3D printed and conventionally manufactured ABS thermoplastic. To evaluate the relative speed of using four printed instruments compared to conventional instruments, 13 surgeons completed simulated prepping, draping, incising, and suturing tasks. Each surgeon ranked the performance of six printed instruments using a 5-point Likert scale. At a thickness of 5.75 mm or more, the FDM printing process had a less than 10% detrimental effect on the tested yield strength and stiffness of horizontally printed ABS thermoplastic relative to conventional ABS thermoplastic. Significant weakness was observed when a bending load was applied transversely to a 3D printed layer. All timed tasks were successfully performed using a printed sponge stick, towel clamp, scalpel handle, and toothed forceps. There was no substantial difference in time to completion of simulated surgical tasks with control vs. 3D printed instruments. Of the surgeons, 100%, 92%, 85%, 77%, 77%, and 69% agreed that the printed smooth and tissue forceps, curved and straight hemostats, tissue and right angle clamps, respectively, would perform adequately. It is feasible to 3D print ABS thermoplastic surgical instruments on Earth. Loadbearing structures were designed to be thicker, when possible. Printing orientations were selected so that the printing layering direction of critical structures would not be transverse to bending loads.

  18. Stereoscopic 3D Projections with MITAKA An Important Tool to Get People Interested in Astronomy and Space Science in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Nemoto; Shoichi, Itoh; Hidehiko, Agata; Mario, Zegarra; Jose, Ishitsuka; Edwin, Choque; Adita, Quispe; Tsunehiko, Kato

    2014-02-01

    National Astronomical Observatory of Japan has developed space simulation software "Mitaka". By using Mitaka on two PCs and two projectors with polarizing filter, and look through polarized glasses, we can enjoy space travel in three dimensions. Any one can download Mitaka from anywhere in the world by Internet. But, it has been prepared only Japanese and English versions now. We improved a Mitaka Spanish version, and now we are making projections for local people. The experience of the universe in three dimensions is a very memorable for people, and it has become an opportunity to get interested in astronomy and space sciences. A 40 people capacity room, next o to our Planetarium, has been conditioned for 3D projections; also a portable system is available. Due to success of this new outreach system more 3D show rooms will be implemented within the country.

  19. Movement-Based Estimation and Visualization of Space Use in 3D for Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Sheppard, James; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fuwen; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species – giant panda, dugong, and California condor – to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research. PMID:24988114

  20. Movement-based estimation and visualization of space use in 3D for wildlife ecology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Jeff A; Sheppard, James; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fuwen; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Fisher, Robert N

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species--giant panda, dugong, and California condor--to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research.

  1. Movement-based estimation and visualization of space use in 3D for wildlife ecology and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Sheppard, James; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fu-Wen; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species – giant panda, dugong, and California condor – to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of a Lunar Space Reactor with the Computer Code RELAP5-3D/ATHENA

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, Juan J; Qualls, A L

    2008-01-01

    The transient analysis 3-dimensional (3-D) computer code RELAP5-3D/ATHENA has been employed to model and analyze a space reactor of 180 kW(thermal), 40 kW (net, electrical) with eight Stirling engines (SEs). Each SE will generate over 6 kWe; the excess power will be needed for the pumps and other power management devices. The reactor will be cooled by NaK (a eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium which is liquid at ambient temperature). This space reactor is intended to be deployed over the surface of the Moon or Mars. The reactor operating life will be 8 to 10 years. The RELAP5-3D/ATHENA code is being developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The code can employ a variety of coolants in addition to water, the original coolant employed with early versions of the code. The code can also use 3-D volumes and 3-D junctions, thus allowing for more realistic representation of complex geometries. A combination of 3-D and 1-D volumes is employed in this study. The space reactor model consists of a primary loop and two secondary loops connected by two heat exchangers (HXs). Each secondary loop provides heat to four SEs. The primary loop includes the nuclear reactor with the lower and upper plena, the core with 85 fuel pins, and two vertical heat exchangers (HX). The maximum coolant temperature of the primary loop is 900 K. The secondary loops also employ NaK as a coolant at a maximum temperature of 877 K. The SEs heads are at a temperature of 800 K and the cold sinks are at a temperature of ~400 K. Two radiators will be employed to remove heat from the SEs. The SE HXs surrounding the SE heads are of annular design and have been modeled using 3-D volumes. These 3-D models have been used to improve the HX design by optimizing the flows of coolant and maximizing the heat transferred to the SE heads. The transients analyzed include failure of one or more Stirling engines, trip of the reactor pump, and trips of the secondary loop pumps feeding the HXs of the

  3. Space Charge Compensation (SSC) in hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal space-charge fields can generate substantial distortion of the rf-generated potential wells, fill the extraction kicker gap in the beam, affect the incoherent synchrotron tune spread, and have the potential for causing instability and longitudinal emittance growth. The net effective voltage per turn resulting from the space-charge self voltage and the ring inductive wall impedance ?0L is proportional to the slope of the beam current distribution e{beta}c {lambda}(s) and can be expressed as: V{sub s} = {partial_derivative}{lambda}(s)/{partial_derivative}s [g{sub 0}Z{sub 0}/2{beta}{gamma}{sup 2} - {omega}{sub 0}L]e{beta}cR where R = c/{omega}{sub 0} is the average machine radius, Z{sub 0} = 377 Ohm and g{sub 0} = 1 + 2ln(b/a) is the geometric space-charge constant, a and b are the beam radii and vacuum-chamber aperture. By introduction a tunable inductance L, e.g. of ferrite rings, the term in brackets and, consequently, the space-charge effect may be substantially reduced or canceled at some chosen energy [1]. This concept has been experimentally proven at the LANL Proton Storage Ring at LANL where three inductive inserts, each consisting of 30 'cores' of a cylindrically shaped ferrite with thickness of 1 inch, inner diameter of 5 inches, and an outer diameter of 8 inches, were installed. The magnetic permeability of the ferrite could be adjusted by introducing current into solenoids wound around the ferrite so that in the MHz range of frequencies the longitudinal space charge impedance of the machine was compensated. A strong longitudinal instability was noticed at much higher frequencies of about 75 MHz, but it was later suppressed by heating the ferrite to a temperature of 130 C to make it more lossy.

  4. A 3-D CFD Analysis of the Space Shuttle RSRM With Propellant Fins @ 1 sec. Burn-Back

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morstadt, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) runs have been made for the Space Shuttle RSRM using 2 different grids and 4 different turbulent models, which were the Standard KE, the RNG KE, the Realizable KE, and the Reynolds stress model. The RSRM forward segment consists of 11 fins. By taking advantage of the forward fin symmetry only half of one fin along the axis had to be used in making the grid. This meant that the 3-D model consisted of a pie slice that encompassed 1/22nd of the motor circumference and went along the axis of the entire motor. The 3-D flow patterns in the forward fin region are of particular interest. Close inspection of these flow patterns indicate that 2 counter-rotating axial vortices emerge from each submerged solid propellant fin. Thus, the 3-D CFD analysis allows insight into complicated internal motor flow patterns that are not available from the simpler 2-D axi-symmetric studies. In addition, a comparison is made between the 3-D bore pressure drop and the 2-D axi-symmetric pressure drop.

  5. Podosomes in space: macrophage migration and matrix degradation in 2D and 3D settings.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Christiane; Le-Cabec, Véronique; El Azzouzi, Karim; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Linder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Migration of macrophages is a key process for a variety of physiological functions, such as pathogen clearance or tissue homeostasis. However, it can also be part of pathological scenarios, as in the case of tumor-associated macrophages. This review presents an overview of the different migration modes macrophages can adopt, depending on the physical and chemical properties of specific environments, and the constraints they impose upon cells. We discuss the importance of these environmental and also of cellular parameters, as well as their relative impact on macrophage migration and on the formation of matrix-lytic podosomes in 2D and 3D. Moreover, we present an overview of routinely used and also newly developed assays for the study of macrophage migration in both 2D and 3D contexts, their respective advantages and limitations, and also their potential to reliably mimic in vivo situations.

  6. Two stages of programming eye gaze shifts in 3-D space.

    PubMed

    Pérez Zapata, L; Aznar-Casanova, J A; Supèr, H

    2013-06-28

    Accurate saccadic and vergence eye movements towards selected visual targets are fundamental to perceive the 3-D environment. Despite this importance, shifts in eye gaze are not always perfect given that they are frequently followed by small corrective eye movements. The oculomotor system receives distinct information from various visual cues that may cause incongruity in the planning of a gaze shift. To test this idea, we analyzed eye movements in humans performing a saccade task in a 3-D setting. We show that saccades and vergence movements towards peripheral targets are guided by monocular (perceptual) cues. Approximately 200ms after the start of fixation at the perceived target, a fixational saccade corrected the eye positions to the physical target location. Our findings suggest that shifts in eye gaze occur in two phases; a large eye movement toward the perceived target location followed by a corrective saccade that directs the eyes to the physical target location. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D Analysis of Remote-Sensed Heliospheric Data for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. S.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Bisi, M. M.; Odstrcil, D.; Hong, S.; Kim, J.; Yi, J.; Tokumaru, M.; Gonzalez-Esparza, A.

    2015-12-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) time-dependent iterative kinematic reconstruction technique has been used and expanded upon for over two decades. It currently provides some of the most accurate predictions and three-dimensional (3D) analyses of heliospheric solar-wind parameters now available using interplanetary scintillation (IPS) data. The parameters provided include reconstructions of velocity, density, and magnetic fields. Precise time-dependent results are obtained at any solar distance in the inner heliosphere using current Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab), Nagoya University, Japan IPS data sets, but the reconstruction technique can also incorporate data from other IPS systems from around the world. With access using world IPS data systems, not only can predictions using the reconstruction technique be made without observation dead times due to poor longitude coverage or system outages, but the program can itself be used to standardize observations of IPS. Additionally, these analyses are now being exploited as inner-boundary values to drive an ENLIL 3D-MHD heliospheric model in real time. A major potential of this is that it will use the more realistic physics of 3D-MHD modeling to provide an automatic forecast of CMEs and corotating structures up to several days in advance of the event/features arriving at Earth, with or without involving coronagraph imagery or the necessity of magnetic fields being used to provide the background solar wind speeds.

  8. PLANETARY NEBULAE DETECTED IN THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE GLIMPSE 3D LEGACY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Kwok, Sun E-mail: xiazh@hku.hk

    2012-01-20

    We used the data from the Spitzer Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) to investigate the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of planetary nebulae (PNs) and PN candidates. In previous studies of GLIMPSE I and II data, we have shown that these MIR data are very useful in distinguishing PNs from other emission-line objects. In the present paper, we focus on the PNs in the field of the GLIMPSE 3D survey, which has a more extensive latitude coverage. We found a total of 90 Macquarie-AAO-Strasbourg (MASH) and MASH II PNs and 101 known PNs to have visible MIR counterparts in the GLIMPSE 3D survey area. The images and photometry of these PNs are presented. Combining the derived IRAC photometry at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m with the existing photometric measurements from other infrared catalogs, we are able to construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these PNs. Among the most notable objects in this survey is the PN M1-41, whose GLIMPSE 3D image reveals a large bipolar structure of more than 3 arcmin in extent.

  9. Projecting 2D gene expression data into 3D and 4D space.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Victor E; Katsuyama, Kaori; Snyder, Kevin A; Bowes, Jeff B; Kitayama, Atsushi; Ueno, Naoto; Vize, Peter D

    2007-04-01

    Video games typically generate virtual 3D objects by texture mapping an image onto a 3D polygonal frame. The feeling of movement is then achieved by mathematically simulating camera movement relative to the polygonal frame. We have built customized scripts that adapt video game authoring software to texture mapping images of gene expression data onto b-spline based embryo models. This approach, known as UV mapping, associates two-dimensional (U and V) coordinates within images to the three dimensions (X, Y, and Z) of a b-spline model. B-spline model frameworks were built either from confocal data or de novo extracted from 2D images, once again using video game authoring approaches. This system was then used to build 3D models of 182 genes expressed in developing Xenopus embryos and to implement these in a web-accessible database. Models can be viewed via simple Internet browsers and utilize openGL hardware acceleration via a Shockwave plugin. Not only does this database display static data in a dynamic and scalable manner, the UV mapping system also serves as a method to align different images to a common framework, an approach that may make high-throughput automated comparisons of gene expression patterns possible. Finally, video game systems also have elegant methods for handling movement, allowing biomechanical algorithms to drive the animation of models. With further development, these biomechanical techniques offer practical methods for generating virtual embryos that recapitulate morphogenesis.

  10. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE PAGES

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; ...

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge-induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  11. Auroral Charging of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minow, J. I.; Chandler, M. O.; Wright, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    Electrostatic potential variations of the International Space Station (ISS) relative to the space plasma environment are dominated by biased surfaces of the 160 volt photovoltaic power system with the low Earth orbit plasma environment in sunlight and inductive potential variations across the ISS structure generated by motion of the large vehicle across the geomagnetic field. We have seen little or no evidence to date of daytime ISS potential variations due to space weather events that generate short term variations in ionospheric plasma density or temperature since the primary result of geomagnetic storms at ISS altitudes is depletion of plasma density which suppresses charging levels due to the photovoltaic array controlled current collection process. Auroral charging is also a source of potential variations because the 51.6 degree orbital inclination of ISS takes the vehicle to sufficiently high magnetic latitudes to encounter precipitating electrons during geomagnetic storms. We present observations of transient ISS floating potential, plasma density, and electron temperature variations obtained from the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) suite of plasma instruments on board the ISS which exhibit characteristics consistent with auroral charging. The events occur primarily at night when the solar arrays are unbiased and cannot therefore be due to solar array current collection. ISS potential decreases to more negative values during the events indicating electron current collection and the events are always observed at the highest latitudes along the ISS trajectory. Comparison of the events with integral >30 keV electron flux measurements from NOAA TIROS spacecraft demonstrate they occur within regions of precipitating electron flux at levels consistent with the energetic electron thresholds reported for onset of auroral charging of the DMSP and Freja satellites. Properties of the charging events similar to those reported for DSMP and Freja satellites

  12. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    Introduction After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) disaster (04.26.1986) a huge amount (over 2000 sq. km) of nuclear wastes appeared within so-called "Cher- nobyl Exclusion Zone" (CEZ). At present there are not enough storage facilities in the Ukraine for safe disposal of nuclear wastes and hazardous chemical wastes. The urgent problem now is safe isolation of these dangerous wastes. According to the developed state program of radioactive waste management, the construction of a na- tional storage facility of nuclear wastes is planned. It is also possible to create regional storage facilities for hazardous chemical wastes. The region of our exploration cov- ers the eastern part of the Korosten Plutone and its slope, reaching the CNPP. 3D Space-Time Surface Imaging of Geophysical Fields. There are only three direct meth- ods of stress field reconstruction in present practice, namely the field investigations based on the large-scale fracturing tests, petrotectonic and optical polarization meth- ods. Unfortunately, all these methods are extremely laborious and need the regular field tests, which is difficult to conduct in the areas of anisotropic rock outcrops. A compilation of magnetic and gravity data covering the CNPP area was carried out as a prelude to an interpretation study. More than thirty map products were generated from magnetic, gravity and geodesy data to prepare the 3D Space-Time Surface Images (3D STSI). Multi-layer topography and geophysic surfaces included: total magnetic intensity, isostatically-corrected Bouguer gravity, aspect and slope, first and second derivatives, vertical and horizontal curvature, histogram characteristics and space cor- relation coefficients between the gradient fields. Many maps shows the first and sec- ond derivatives of the potential fields, with the results of lineament (edge) structure detection superimposed. The lineament or edges of the potential fields are located from maximal gradient in many directions

  13. Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) 3-Dimensional (3-D) Global Tracer Transport Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Fung, I.

    1993-01-01

    This directory contains the input files used in simulations of atmospheric CO2 using the GISS 3-D global tracer transport model. The directory contains 16 files including a help file (CO2FUNG.HLP), 12 files containing monthly exchanges with vegetation and soils (CO2VEG.JAN . . . DEC), 1 file containing releases of CO2 from fossil fuel burning (CO2FOS.MRL), 1 file containing releases of CO2 from land transformations (CO2DEF.HOU), and 1 file containing the patterns of CO2 exchange with the oceans (CO2OCN.TAK).

  14. Real Space Demonstration of Induced Crystalline 3D Nanostructuration of Organic Layers.

    PubMed

    Paradinas, Markos; Pérez-Rodríguez, Ana; Barrena, Esther; Ocal, Carmen

    2017-08-03

    The controlled 3D nanostructuration of molecular layers of the semiconducting molecules C22H14 (pentacene) and N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI-C8) is addressed. A tip-assisted method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is developed for removing part of the organic material and relocating it in up to six layer thick nanostructures. Moreover, unconventional molecular scale imaging combining diverse friction force microscopy modes reveals the stacking sequence of the piled layers. In particular, we unambiguously achieve epitaxial growth, an issue of fundamental importance in thin film strategies for the nanostructuration of more efficient organic nanodevices.

  15. Space charge and screening in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.; Abrams, Daniel L.

    2016-11-01

    Undoped bilayer graphene is a two-dimensional semimetal with a low-energy excitation spectrum that is parabolic in the momentum. As a result, the screening of an arbitrary external charge Ze is accompanied by a reconstruction of the ground state: valence band electrons (for Z  >  0) are promoted to form a space charge around the charge while the holes leave the physical picture. The outcome is a flat neutral object resembling the regular atom except that for Z\\gg 1 it is described by a strictly linear Thomas-Fermi theory. This theory also predicts that the bilayer’s static dielectric constant is the same as that of a two-dimensional electron gas in the long-wavelength limit.

  16. Effect of space balance 3D training using visual feedback on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ko, YoungJun; Ha, HyunGeun; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, WanHee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of balance training with Space Balance 3D, which is a computerized measurement and visual feedback balance assessment system, on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This was a randomized controlled trial in which 52 subjects were assigned randomly into either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group, which contained 26 subjects, received balance training with a Space Balance 3D exercise program and conventional physical therapy interventions 5 times per week during 3 weeks. Outcome measures were examined before and after the 3-week interventions using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS). The data were analyzed by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 19.0. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant interaction effect between group and time period for both groups before and after the interventions in the BBS score, TUG score, and PASS score. In addition, the experimental group showed more improvement than the control group in the BBS, TUG and PASS scores, but the differences were not significant. In the comparisons within the groups by time, both groups showed significant improvement in BBS, TUG, and PASS scores. [Conclusion] The Space Balance 3D training with conventional physical therapy intervention is recommended for improvement of balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. PMID:26157270

  17. 3D Modeling of Building Indoor Spaces and Closed Doors from Imagery and Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vilariño, Lucía; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    3D models of indoor environments are increasingly gaining importance due to the wide range of applications to which they can be subjected: from redesign and visualization to monitoring and simulation. These models usually exist only for newly constructed buildings; therefore, the development of automatic approaches for reconstructing 3D indoors from imagery and/or point clouds can make the process easier, faster and cheaper. Among the constructive elements defining a building interior, doors are very common elements and their detection can be very useful either for knowing the environment structure, to perform an efficient navigation or to plan appropriate evacuation routes. The fact that doors are topologically connected to walls by being coplanar, together with the unavoidable presence of clutter and occlusions indoors, increases the inherent complexity of the automation of the recognition process. In this work, we present a pipeline of techniques used for the reconstruction and interpretation of building interiors based on point clouds and images. The methodology analyses the visibility problem of indoor environments and goes in depth with door candidate detection. The presented approach is tested in real data sets showing its potential with a high door detection rate and applicability for robust and efficient envelope reconstruction. PMID:25654723

  18. 3D modeling of building indoor spaces and closed doors from imagery and point clouds.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vilariño, Lucía; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2015-02-03

    3D models of indoor environments are increasingly gaining importance due to the wide range of applications to which they can be subjected: from redesign and visualization to monitoring and simulation. These models usually exist only for newly constructed buildings; therefore, the development of automatic approaches for reconstructing 3D indoors from imagery and/or point clouds can make the process easier, faster and cheaper. Among the constructive elements defining a building interior, doors are very common elements and their detection can be very useful either for knowing the environment structure, to perform an efficient navigation or to plan appropriate evacuation routes. The fact that doors are topologically connected to walls by being coplanar, together with the unavoidable presence of clutter and occlusions indoors, increases the inherent complexity of the automation of the recognition process. In this work, we present a pipeline of techniques used for the reconstruction and interpretation of building interiors based on point clouds and images. The methodology analyses the visibility problem of indoor environments and goes in depth with door candidate detection. The presented approach is tested in real data sets showing its potential with a high door detection rate and applicability for robust and efficient envelope reconstruction.

  19. Space-charge limitations in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Heimerle, M.

    2010-08-03

    Design of several projects which envision hadron colliders operating at low energies such as NICA at JINR [1] and Electron-Nucleon Collider at FAIR [2] is under way. In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a new physics program requires operation of Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with heavy ions at low energies at g=2.7-10 [3]. In a collider, maximum achievable luminosity is typically limited by beam-beam effects. For heavy ions significant luminosity degradation, driving bunch length and transverse emittance growth, comes from Intrabeam Scattering (IBS). At these low energies, IBS growth can be effectively counteracted, for example, with cooling techniques. If IBS were the only limitation, one could achieve small hadron beam emittance and bunch length with the help of cooling, resulting in a dramatic luminosity increase. However, as a result of low energies, direct space-charge force from the beam itself is expected to become the dominant limitation. Also, the interplay of both beambeam and space-charge effects may impose an additional limitation on achievable maximum luminosity. Thus, understanding at what values of space-charge tune shift one can operate in the presence of beam-beam effects in a collider is of great interest for all of the above projects. Operation of RHIC for Low-Energy physics program started in 2010 which allowed us to have a look at combined impact of beam-beam and space-charge effects on beam lifetime experimentally. Here we briefly discuss expected limitation due to these effects with reference to recent RHIC experience.

  20. Longitudinal space charge effects near transition

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F.; York, R.C.

    2009-05-04

    Experimental and numerical studies of the longitudinal beam dynamics in the Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) at Michigan State University revealed a fast, space-charge driven instability that did not fit the model of the negative mass instability. This paper proposes a simple analytical model explaining these results. Also, the paper compares the model to result s of experimental and numerical studies of the longitudinal beam dynamics in SIR.

  1. Photoelectric Charging of Dust in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickafoose, A. A.; Robertson, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Horanyi, M.

    1999-09-01

    Illumination of surfaces in space by solar ultraviolet light produces photoelectrons which form a plasma sheath near the surface. Dust particles on the surface can acquire a charge and be transported horizontally and vertically by electric fields within the sheath. On the moon, suspended dust grains have been observed on multiple occasions, and there is evidence for horizontal lunar dust transport. Photoelectron production and dust particle charging are also expected to be significant near the surface of Mars. Understanding the photoelectric charging properties of dust can help explain the observed dynamics of lunar dust and help predict the behavior of dust on surfaces of planetary satellites, asteroids, planetary ring particles, and planetesimals. In addition, any human or spacecraft activity on planetary bodies is affected by dust dynamics near the surface. We have examined the photoelectric charging of dust dropped through UV illumination and dust dropped past a UV illuminated surface having a photoelectron sheath. Experiments are performed in vacuum with illumination from a 1 kW Hg-Xe arc lamp. The lamp produces a spectrum down to ~ 200 nm ( ~ 6.2 eV), and the photoemitter is a 12 cm diameter zirconium plate. Dust dropped through UV illumination loses electrons due to photoemission, while dust dropped past an illuminated surface gains electrons from the photoelectron sheath. Initial results are consistent with expected charge calculated from the work function of the materials, the energy of incoming photons, and the capacitance of the grains. Photoelectric charging experiments have been done for several different kinds of dust 90-106 mu m in diameter. We will present the results of these experiments and compare the charging properties of zinc, copper, graphite, Martian regolith simulant (JSC Mars-1), lunar regolith simulant (JSC-1), and lunar soil from an Apollo 17 sample. This research is supported by NASA.

  2. Space-time evolution of a growth fold (Betic Cordillera, Spain). Evidences from 3D geometrical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, Ivan; Alfaro, Pedro; Estévez, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    We present a study that encompasses several software tools (iGIS©, ArcGIS©, Autocad©, etc.) and data (geological mapping, high resolution digital topographic data, high resolution aerial photographs, etc.) to create a detailed 3D geometric model of an active fault propagation growth fold. This 3D model clearly shows structural features of the analysed fold, as well as growth relationships and sedimentary patterns. The results obtained permit us to discuss the kinematics and structural evolution of the fold and the fault in time and space. The study fault propagation fold is the Crevillente syncline. This fold represents the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin, an intermontane basin in the Eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) developed from upper Miocene on. 3D features of the Crevillente syncline, including growth pattern, indicate that limb rotation and, consequently, fault activity was higher during Messinian than during Tortonian; consequently, fault activity was also higher. From Pliocene on our data point that limb rotation and fault activity steadies or probably decreases. This in time evolution of the Crevillente syncline is not the same all along the structure; actually the 3D geometric model indicates that observed lateral heterogeneity is related to along strike variation of fault displacement.

  3. Nondestructive testing of 3D disperse systems with micro- and nano-particles: N-dimensional space of optical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukova, Alexandra G.

    2006-04-01

    The simultaneous analysis of 3D disperse systems (DS) with micro- and nano- particles by refractometry, absorbency, fluorescence and by different types of light scattering, can help to elaborate the sensing elements for specffic impurity control. Our research has investigated by complex of optical methods different 3D DS such as: proteins, nucleoproteids, lipoproteids, liposomes, viruses, virosomes, lipid emulsions, blood substitutes, latexes, liquid crystals, biological cells with various form and size (including bacterial cells), metallic powders, clays, kimberlites, zeolites, oils, crude oils, samples of natural and water-supply waters, etc. This experience suggests that each 3D DS can be charactensed by N-dimensional vector in N-dimensional space of optical parameters. Due to the fusion of various optical data it is possible to solve the inverse physical problem on the presence of impurity in mixtures of 3D DS by information statistical theory methods. It is important that in this case polymodality of particle size distribution is not an obstacle.

  4. On the Blow-up Criterion of 3D-NSE in Sobolev-Gevrey Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benameur, Jamel; Jlali, Lotfi

    2016-12-01

    In Benameur (Methods Appl 103:87-97, 2014), Benameur proved a blow-up result of the non regular solution of ( NSE) in the Sobolev-Gevrey spaces. In this paper we improve this result, precisely we give an exponential type explosion in Sobolev-Gevrey spaces with less regularity on the initial condition. Fourier analysis and standard techniques are used.

  5. Theory of Space Charge Limited Current in Fractional Dimensional Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ang, L. K.

    The concept of fractional dimensional space has been effectively applied in many areas of physics to describe the fractional effects on the physical systems. We will present some recent developments of space charge limited (SCL) current in free space and solid in the framework of fractional dimensional space which may account for the effect of imperfectness or roughness of the electrode surface. For SCL current in free space, the governing law is known as the Child-Langmuir (CL) law. Its analogy in a trap-free solid (or dielectric) is known as Mott-Gurney (MG) law. This work extends the one-dimensional CL Law and MG Law for the case of a D-dimensional fractional space with 0 < D <= 1 where parameter D defines the degree of roughness of the electrode surface. Such a fractional dimensional space generalization of SCL current theory can be used to characterize the charge injection by the imperfectness or roughness of the surface in applications related to high current cathode (CL law), and organic electronics (MG law). In terms of operating regime, the model has included the quantum effects when the spacing between the electrodes is small.

  6. Modeling of mass and charge transport in a solid oxide fuel cell anode structure by a 3D lattice Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Hedvig; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    A 3D model at microscale by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for part of an anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to analyze the interaction between the transport and reaction processes and structural parameters. The equations of charge, momentum, heat and mass transport are simulated in the model. The modeling geometry is created with randomly placed spheres to resemble the part of the anode structure close to the electrolyte. The electrochemical reaction processes are captured at specific sites where spheres representing Ni and YSZ materials are present with void space. This work focuses on analyzing the effect of structural parameters such as porosity, and percentage of active reaction sites on the ionic current density and concentration of H2 using LBM. It is shown that LBM can be used to simulate an SOFC anode at microscale and evaluate the effect of structural parameters on the transport processes to improve the performance of the SOFC anode. It was found that increasing the porosity from 30 to 50 % decreased the ionic current density due to a reduction in the number of reaction sites. Also the consumption of H2 decreased with increasing porosity. When the percentage of active reaction sites was increased while the porosity was kept constant, the ionic current density increased. However, the H2 concentration was slightly reduced when the percentage of active reaction sites was increased. The gas flow tortuosity decreased with increasing porosity.

  7. GARN: Sampling RNA 3D Structure Space with Game Theory and Knowledge-Based Scoring Strategies.

    PubMed

    Boudard, Mélanie; Bernauer, Julie; Barth, Dominique; Cohen, Johanne; Denise, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes involve large numbers of RNA molecules. The functions of these RNA molecules and their binding to molecular machines are highly dependent on their 3D structures. One of the key challenges in RNA structure prediction and modeling is predicting the spatial arrangement of the various structural elements of RNA. As RNA folding is generally hierarchical, methods involving coarse-grained models hold great promise for this purpose. We present here a novel coarse-grained method for sampling, based on game theory and knowledge-based potentials. This strategy, GARN (Game Algorithm for RNa sampling), is often much faster than previously described techniques and generates large sets of solutions closely resembling the native structure. GARN is thus a suitable starting point for the molecular modeling of large RNAs, particularly those with experimental constraints. GARN is available from: http://garn.lri.fr/.

  8. Fast 3D inversion of gravity data using solution space priorconditioned lanczos bidiagonalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaie, Mohammad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Kalateh, Ali Nejati

    2017-01-01

    Inversion of gravity data is one of the most important steps in the quantitative interpretation of practical data. Inversion is a mathematical technique that automatically constructs a subsurface geophysical model from measured data, incorporating some priori information. Inversion of gravity data is time consuming because of increase in data and model parameters. Some efforts have been made to deal with this problem, one of them is using fast algorithms for solving system of equations in inverse problem. Lanczos bidiagonalization method is a fast algorithm that works based on Krylov subspace iterations and projection method, but cannot always provide a good basis for a projection method. So in this study, we combined the Krylov method with a regularization method applied to the low-dimensional projected problem. To achieve the goal, the orthonormal basis vectors of the discrete cosine transform (DCT) were used to build the low-dimensional subspace. The forward operator matrix replaced with a matrix of lower dimension, thus, the required memory and running time of the inverse modeling is decreased by using the proposed algorithm. It is shown that this algorithm can be appropriate to solve a Tikhonov cost function for inversion of gravity data. The proposed method has been applied on a noise-corrupted synthetic data and field gravity data (Mobrun gravity data) to demonstrate its reliability for three dimensional (3D) gravity inversion. The obtained results of 3D inversion both synthetic and field gravity data (Mobrun gravity data) indicate the proposed inversion algorithm could produce density models consistent with true structures.

  9. Automated 3D modelling of buildings from aerial and space imagery using image understanding techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taejung

    The development of a fully automated mapping system is one of the fundamental goals in photogrammetry and remote sensing. As an approach towards this goal, this thesis describes the work carried out in the automated 3D modelling of buildings in urban scenes. The whole work is divided into three parts: the development of an automated height extraction system, the development of an automated building detection system, and the combination of these two systems. After an analysis of the key problems of urban-area imagery for stereo matching, buildings were found to create isolated regions and blunders. From these findings, an automated building height extraction system was developed. This stereoscopic system is based on a pyramidal (area-based) matching algorithm with automatic seed points and a tile-based control strategy. To remove possible blunders and extract buildings from other background objects, a series of "smart" operations using linear elements from buildings were also applied. A new monoscopic building detection system was developed based on a graph constructed from extracted lines and their relations. After extracting lines from a single image using low-level image processing techniques, line relations are searched for and a graph constructed. By finding closed loops in the graph, building hypotheses are generated. These are then merged and verified using shadow analysis and perspective geometry. After verification, each building hypothesis indicates either a building or a part of a building. By combining results from these two systems, 3D building roofs can be modelled automatically. The modelling is performed using height information obtained from the height extraction system and interpolation boundaries obtained from the building detection system. Other fusion techniques and the potential improvements due to these are also discussed. Quantitative analysis was performed for each algorithm presented in this thesis and the results support the newly

  10. Studies of a new class of high electro-thermal performing Polyimide embedded with 3D scaffold in the harsh environment of outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeblein, Manuela; Bolker, Asaf; Tsang, Siu Hon; Atar, Nurit; Uzan-Saguy, Cecile; Verker, Ronen; Gouzman, Irina; Grossman, Eitan; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    The polymer class of Polyimides (PIs) has been wide-spread in the use of outer space coatings due to their chemical stability and flexibility. Nevertheless, their poor thermal conductivity and completely electrically insulating characteristics have caused severe limitations, such as thermal management challenges and spacecraft electrostatic charging, which forces the use of additional materials such as brittle ITO in order to completely resist the harsh environment of space. For this reason, we developed a new composite material via infiltration of PI with a 3D scaffold which improves PIs performance and resilience and enables the use of only a single flexible material to protect spacecraft. Here we present a study of this new material based on outer-space environment simulated on ground. It includes an exhaustive range of tests simulating space environments in accordance with European Cooperation for Space Standard (ECSS), which includes atomic oxygen (AO) etching, Gamma-ray exposure and outgassing properties over extended periods of time and under strenuous mechanical bending and thermal annealing cycles. Measurement methods for the harsh environment of space and the obtained results will be presented.

  11. The impacts of open-mouth breathing on upper airway space in obstructive sleep apnea: 3-D MDCT analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joong; Choi, Ji Ho; Kim, Kang Woo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Hag; Lee, Heung Man; Shin, Chol; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2011-04-01

    Open-mouth breathing during sleep is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and is associated with increased disease severity and upper airway collapsibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of open-mouth breathing on the upper airway space in patients with OSA using three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3-D MDCT). The study design included a case-control study with planned data collection. The study was performed at a tertiary medical center. 3-D MDCT analysis was conducted on 52 patients with OSA under two experimental conditions: mouth closed and mouth open. Under these conditions, we measured the minimal cross-sectional area of the retropalatal and retroglossal regions (mXSA-RP, mXSA-RG), as well as the upper airway length (UAL), defined as the vertical dimension from hard palate to hyoid. We also computed the volume of the upper airway space by 3-D reconstruction of both conditions. When the mouth was open, mXSA-RP and mXSA-RG significantly decreased and the UAL significantly increased, irrespective of the severity of OSA. However, between the closed- and open-mouth states, there was no significant change in upper airway volume at any severity of OSA. Results suggest that the more elongated and narrow upper airway during open-mouth breathing may aggravate the collapsibility of the upper airway and, thus, negatively affect OSA severity.

  12. Finding Space in Second Life, NASA Education and Public Outreach in a 3D Metaverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F. M.

    2007-12-01

    Second Life (SL) is a virtual 3D simulation or metaverse with almost eight million users worldwide. SL has seen explosive growth in the four years it has been available and hosts a number of educational and institutional "islands" or sims. Federal agencies with an SL presence include NASA and NOAA. There are several educational institutions and education specific sims in SL. At any one time there may be as many as 40,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars are able to move around the sim islands by walking or flying and move from island to island or remote locations by teleporting. While a big part of the Second Life experience deals with avatar interactions and exploring, there is an active community of builders who create the scenery, buildings, and other artifacts of the SL world including clothing and other personal items. SL builders start with basic shapes and through size manipulation on three axis and adding texture to the shapes create a myriad of objects - a 3D world. This paper will deal with the design and creation of exhibits halls for NASA's LRO/LCROSS mission slated for launch October 2008 and a NASA sponsored aeronautical engineering student challenge contest. The exhibit halls will be placed on the NASA sponsored Co-Lab sim and will feature models of the spacecraft and the instruments carried on board and student exhibits. There also will be storyboards with information about the mission and contest. Where appropriate there will be links to external websites for further information. The exhibits will be interactive to support the outreach efforts associated with the mission and the contest. Upon completion of the visit to the LRO/LCROSS hall participants will have the opportunity to visit a near by sandbox - SL parlance for a building area - to design and build a spacecraft from a suite of instruments provided for them depending on their area of interest. Real limitations such as mass

  13. Exogenous orienting of crossmodal attention in 3-D space: support for a depth-aware crossmodal attentional system.

    PubMed

    Van der Stoep, Nathan; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate exogenous crossmodal orienting of attention in three-dimensional (3-D) space. Most studies in which the orienting of attention has been examined in 3-D space concerned either exogenous intramodal or endogenous crossmodal attention. Evidence for exogenous crossmodal orienting of attention in depth is lacking. Endogenous and exogenous attention are behaviorally different, suggesting that they are two different mechanisms. We used the orthogonal spatial-cueing paradigm and presented auditory exogenous cues at one of four possible locations in near or far space before the onset of a visual target. Cues could be presented at the same (valid) or at a different (invalid) depth from the target (radial validity), and on the same (valid) or on a different (invalid) side (horizontal validity), whereas we blocked the depth at which visual targets were presented. Next to an overall validity effect (valid RTs < invalid RTs) in horizontal space, we observed an interaction between the horizontal and radial validity of the cue: The horizontal validity effect was present only when the cue and the target were presented at the same depth. No horizontal validity effect was observed when the cue and the target were presented at different depths. These results suggest that exogenous crossmodal attention is "depth-aware," and they are discussed in the context of the supramodal hypothesis of attention.

  14. Assessing quality of urban underground spaces by coupling 3D geological models: The case study of Foshan city, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weisheng; Yang, Liang; Deng, Dongcheng; Ye, Jing; Clarke, Keith; Yang, Zhijun; Zhuang, Wenming; Liu, Jianxiong; Huang, Jichun

    2016-04-01

    Urban underground spaces (UUS), especially those containing natural resources that have not yet been utilized, have been recognized as important for future sustainable development in large cities. One of the key steps in city planning is to estimate the quality of urban underground space resources, since they are major determinants of suitable land use. Yet geological constraints are rarely taken into consideration in urban planning, nor are the uncertainties in the quality of the available assessments. Based on Fuzzy Set theory and the analytic hierarchy process, a 3D stepwise process for the quality assessment of geotechnical properties of natural resources in UUS is presented. The process includes an index system for construction factors; area partitioning; the extraction of geological attributes; the creation of a relative membership grade matrix; the evaluation of subject and destination layers; and indeterminacy analysis. A 3D geological model of the study area was introduced into the process that extracted geological attributes as constraints. This 3D geological model was coupled with borehole data for Foshan City, Guangdong province, South China, and the indeterminacies caused by the cell size and the geological strata constraints were analyzed. The results of the case study show that (1) a relatively correct result can be obtained if the cell size is near to the average sampling distance of the boreholes; (2) the constraints of the 3D geological model have a major role in establishing the UUS quality level and distribution, especially at the boundaries of the geological bodies; and (3) the assessment result is impacted by an interaction between the cell resolution and the geological model used.

  15. Cartesia: automated 3-point setup for metrology instruments in 3D CAD space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierre, Pierre

    2005-02-01

    CAD-driven metrology applications using laser guns, scanners or cameras require situating the instruments in CAD coordinates, both positionally and rotationally. The new Cartesia instrument setup technique overcomes the requirement for surveying skill. The CAD coordinate system is pinned to the site by emplacing point emitters or retroreflectors at 3 CAD-specified reference points. Then, instruments may be set out at unknown locations and orientations. No leveling is required. An instrument interacts directionally with each reference point, acquiring raw, instrument-based polar angles. The Cartesia algorithm processes these observations to solve for the instrument's 3D position and rotational attitude. These data enable the instrument to think and work in CAD coordinates for data acquisition and point shooting. Correlation of data from multiple instruments may be solved elegantly at the outset, by setting up on a common reference pointset. This work uses recent advances in algorithmic geometry. The Cartesia system shifts the role of surveying expertise toward one-time emplacement of optical reference points, and away from daily instrument operation. The major benefit is that future automated metrology instruments can be designed for less technically skilled workers, lowering daily operational costs, and serving a broader base of users and applications.

  16. Development and comparison of projection and image space 3D nodule insertion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and compare two methods of inserting computerized virtual lesions into CT datasets. 24 physical (synthetic) nodules of three sizes and four morphologies were inserted into an anthropomorphic chest phantom (LUNGMAN, KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was scanned (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) with and without nodules present, and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) at 0.6 mm slice thickness using a standard thoracic CT protocol at multiple dose settings. Virtual 3D CAD models based on the physical nodules were virtually inserted (accounting for the system MTF) into the nodule-free CT data using two techniques. These techniques include projection-based and image-based insertion. Nodule volumes were estimated using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.). Differences were tested using paired t-tests and R2 goodness of fit between the virtually and physically inserted nodules. Both insertion techniques resulted in nodule volumes very similar to the real nodules (<3% difference) and in most cases the differences were not statistically significant. Also, R2 values were all <0.97 for both insertion techniques. These data imply that these techniques can confidently be used as a means of inserting virtual nodules in CT datasets. These techniques can be instrumental in building hybrid CT datasets composed of patient images with virtually inserted nodules.

  17. Visualization of high-density 3D graphs using nonlinear visual space transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Garg, Pankaj; Machiraju, Vijay

    2002-03-01

    The real world data distribution is seldom uniform. Clutter and sparsity commonly occur in visualization. Often, clutter results in overplotting, in which certain data items are not visible because other data items occlude them. Sparsity results in the inefficient use of the available display space. Common mechanisms to overcome this include reducing the amount of information displayed or using multiple representations with a varying amount of detail. This paper describes out experiments on Non-Linear Visual Space Transformations (NLVST). NLVST encompasses several innovative techniques: (1) employing a histogram for calculating the density of data distribution; (2) mapping the raw data values to a non-linear scale for stretching a high-density area; (3) tightening the sparse area to save the display space; (4) employing different color ranges of values on a non-linear scale according to the local density. We have applied NLVST to several web applications: market basket analysis, transactions observation, and IT search behavior analysis.

  18. Use and Evaluation of 3D GeoWall Visualizations in Undergraduate Space Science Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. E.; Hamed, K. M.; Lopez, R. E.; Mitchell, E. J.; Gray, C. L.; Corralez, D. S.; Robinson, C. A.; Soderlund, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many astronomy students face is the lack of 3- dimensional mental model of the systems being studied, in particular the Sun-Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause, for example, the cycle of lunar phases or the pattern of seasons. The GeoWall is a recently developed and affordable projection mechanism for three-dimensional stereo visualization which is becoming a popular tool in classrooms and research labs for use in geology classes, but as yet very little work has been done involving the GeoWall for astronomy classes. We present results from a large study involving over 1000 students of varied backgrounds: some students were tested at the University of Texas at El Paso, a large public university on the US-Mexico border and other students were from the Florida Institute of Technology, a small, private, technical school in Melbourne Florida. We wrote a lecture tutorial-style lab to go along with a GeoWall 3D visual of the Earth-Moon system and tested the students before and after with several diagnostics. Students were given pre and post tests using the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI) as well as a separate evaluation written specifically for this project. We found the lab useful for both populations of students, but not equally effective for all. We discuss reactions from the students and their improvement, as well as whether the students are able to correctly assess the usefullness of the project for their own learning.

  19. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression.

  20. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: Negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression. PMID:26301444

  1. Cardiac-induced physiological noise in 3D gradient echo brain imaging: Effect of k -space sampling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, Anders; Goa, Pål Erik

    2011-09-01

    The physiological noise in 3D image acquisition is shown to depend strongly on the sampling scheme. Five sampling schemes are considered: Linear, Centric, Segmented, Random and Tuned. Tuned acquisition means that data acquisition at k-space positions k and - k are separated with a specific time interval. We model physiological noise as a periodic temporal oscillation with arbitrary spatial amplitude in the physical object and develop a general framework to describe how this is rendered in the reconstructed image. Reconstructed noise can be decomposed in one component that is in phase with the signal (parallel) and one that is 90° out of phase (orthogonal). Only the former has a significant influence on the magnitude of the signal. The study focuses on fMRI using 3D EPI. Each k-space plane is acquired in a single shot in a time much shorter than the period of the physiological noise. The above mentioned sampling schemes are applied in the slow k-space direction and noise propagates almost exclusively in this direction. The problem then, is effectively one-dimensional. Numerical simulations and analytical expressions are presented. 3D noise measurements and 2D measurements with high temporal resolution are conducted. The measurements are performed under breath-hold to isolate the effect of cardiac-induced pulsatile motion. We compare the time-course stability of the sampling schemes and the extent to which noise propagates from a localized source into other parts of the imaging volume. Tuned and Linear acquisitions perform better than Centric, Segmented and Random.

  2. 3D micro-lenses for free space intra-chip coupling in photonic-integrated circuits (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert; Williams, Gwilym I.; Ladak, Sam; Smowton, Peter M.

    2017-02-01

    The integration of multiple optical elements on a common substrate to create photonic integrated circuits (PIC) has been successfully applied in: fibre-optic communications, photonic computing and optical sensing. The push towards III-Vs on silicon promises a new generation of integrated devices that combine the advantages of both integrated electronics and optics in a single substrate. III-V edge emitting laser diodes offer high efficiency and low threshold currents making them ideal candidates for the optically active elements of the next generation of PICs. Nevertheless, the highly divergent and asymmetric beam shapes intrinsic to these devices limits the efficiency with which optical elements can be free space coupled intra-chip; a capability particularly desirable for optical sensing applications e.g. [1]. Furthermore, the monolithic nature of the integrated approach prohibits the use of macroscopic lenses to improve coupling. However, with the advent of 3D direct laser writing, three dimensional lenses can now be manufactured on a microscopic-scale [2], making the use of micro-lens technology for enhanced free space coupling of integrated optical elements feasible. Here we demonstrate the first use of 3D micro-lenses to improve the coupling efficiency of monolithically integrated lasers. Fabricated from IP-dip photoresist using a Nanoscribe GmbH 3D lithography tool, the lenses are embedded directly onto a structured GaInP/AlGaInP substrate containing arrays of ridge lasers free space coupled to one another via a 200 μm air gap. We compare the coupling efficiency of these lasers with and without micro-lenses through photo-voltage and beam profile measurements and discuss optimisation of lens design.

  3. Global strong solution to the 3D incompressible magnetohydrodynamic system in the scaling invariant Besov-Sobolev-type spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haitao; Zhai, Xiaoping; Yan, Wei; Li, Yongsheng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study the global well posedness of the 3D incompressible magnetohydrodynamic system with horizontal dissipation and horizontal magnetic diffusion in the scaling invariant Besov-Sobolev-type spaces. We first get a unique global solution to this system with small initial data by the classical Friedrich's regularization method. Then using a weighted Chemin-Lerner-type norm, we prove the system also can generate a global solution if the horizontal components of the initial data are small enough compared to the vertical components. In particular, our results imply the global large solutions with highly oscillating initial data.

  4. Fermilab booster modeling and space charge study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Booster is a bottleneck limiting the proton beam intensity in the accelerator complex. A study group has been formed in order to have a better understanding of this old machine and seek possible improvements. The work includes lattice modeling, numerical simulations, bench measurements and beam studies. Based on newly obtained information, it has been found that the machine acceptance is severely compromised by the orbit bump and dogleg magnets. This, accompanied by emittance dilution from space charge at injection, is a major cause of the large beam loss at the early stage of the cycle. Measures to tackle this problem are being pursued.

  5. Anisotropic magnification distortion of the 3D galaxy correlation. I. Real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Lam; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Loverde, Marilena

    2007-11-01

    It has long been known that gravitational lensing, primarily via magnification bias, modifies the observed galaxy (or quasar) clustering. Such discussions have largely focused on the 2D angular correlation function. Here and in paper II [L. Hui, E. Gaztañaga, and M. LoVerde, arXiv:0710.4191] we explore how magnification bias distorts the 3D correlation function and power spectrum, as first considered by Matsubara [Astrophys. J. Lett. 537, L77 (2000).AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/312762]. The interesting point is that the distortion is anisotropic. Magnification bias in general preferentially enhances the observed correlation in the line-of-sight (LOS) orientation, especially on large scales. For instance, at a LOS separation of ˜100Mpc/h, where the intrinsic galaxy-galaxy correlation is rather weak, the observed correlation can be enhanced by lensing by a factor of a few, even at a modest redshift of z˜0.35. This effect presents an interesting opportunity as well as a challenge. The opportunity: this lensing anisotropy is distinctive, making it possible to separately measure the galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-magnification, and magnification-magnification correlations, without measuring galaxy shapes. The anisotropy is distinguishable from the well-known distortion due to peculiar motions, as will be discussed in paper II. The challenge: the magnification distortion of the galaxy correlation must be accounted for in interpreting data as precision improves. For instance, the ˜100Mpc/h baryon acoustic oscillation scale in the correlation function is shifted by up to ˜3% in the LOS orientation, and up to ˜0.6% in the monopole, depending on the galaxy bias, redshift, and number count slope. The corresponding shifts in the inferred Hubble parameter and angular diameter distance, if ignored, could significantly bias measurements of the dark energy equation of state. Lastly, magnification distortion offers a plausible explanation for the well-known excess correlations seen in

  6. Microwave and camera sensor fusion for the shape extraction of metallic 3D space objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Scott W.; Defigueiredo, Rui J. P.; Krishen, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum of space presents special problems for optical image sensors. Metallic objects in this environment can produce intense specular reflections and deep shadows. By combining the polarized RCS with an incomplete camera image, it has become possible to better determine the shape of some simple three-dimensional objects. The radar data are used in an iterative procedure that generates successive approximations to the target shape by minimizing the error between computed scattering cross-sections and the observed radar returns. Favorable results have been obtained for simulations and experiments reconstructing plates, ellipsoids, and arbitrary surfaces.

  7. Microwave and camera sensor fusion for the shape extraction of metallic 3D space objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Scott W.; Defigueiredo, Rui J. P.; Krishen, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum of space presents special problems for optical image sensors. Metallic objects in this environment can produce intense specular reflections and deep shadows. By combining the polarized RCS with an incomplete camera image, it has become possible to better determine the shape of some simple three-dimensional objects. The radar data are used in an iterative procedure that generates successive approximations to the target shape by minimizing the error between computed scattering cross-sections and the observed radar returns. Favorable results have been obtained for simulations and experiments reconstructing plates, ellipsoids, and arbitrary surfaces.

  8. Random center vortex lines in continuous 3D space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Höllwieser, Roman; Altarawneh, Derar; Engelhardt, Michael

    2016-01-22

    We present a model of center vortices, represented by closed random lines in continuous 2+1-dimensional space-time. These random lines are modeled as being piece-wise linear and an ensemble is generated by Monte Carlo methods. The physical space in which the vortex lines are defined is a cuboid with periodic boundary conditions. Besides moving, growing and shrinking of the vortex configuration, also reconnections are allowed. Our ensemble therefore contains not a fixed, but a variable number of closed vortex lines. This is expected to be important for realizing the deconfining phase transition. Using the model, we study both vortex percolation and the potential V(R) between quark and anti-quark as a function of distance R at different vortex densities, vortex segment lengths, reconnection conditions and at different temperatures. We have found three deconfinement phase transitions, as a function of density, as a function of vortex segment length, and as a function of temperature. The model reproduces the qualitative features of confinement physics seen in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory.

  9. Neural correlates of visuospatial consciousness in 3D default space: insights from contralateral neglect syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W

    2014-08-01

    One of the most compelling questions still unanswered in neuroscience is how consciousness arises. In this article, we examine visual processing, the parietal lobe, and contralateral neglect syndrome as a window into consciousness and how the brain functions as the mind and we introduce a mechanism for the processing of visual information and its role in consciousness. We propose that consciousness arises from integration of information from throughout the body and brain by the thalamus and that the thalamus reimages visual and other sensory information from throughout the cortex in a default three-dimensional space in the mind. We further suggest that the thalamus generates a dynamic default three-dimensional space by integrating processed information from corticothalamic feedback loops, creating an infrastructure that may form the basis of our consciousness. Further experimental evidence is needed to examine and support this hypothesis, the role of the thalamus, and to further elucidate the mechanism of consciousness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 5D Data Modelling: Full Integration of 2D/3D Space, Time and Scale Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosterom, Peter; Stoter, Jantien

    This paper proposes an approach for data modelling in five dimensions. Apart from three dimensions for geometrical representation and a fourth dimension for time, we identify scale as fifth dimensional characteristic. Considering scale as an extra dimension of geographic information, fully integrated with the other dimensions, is new. Through a formal definition of geographic data in a conceptual 5D continuum, the data can be handled by one integrated approach assuring consistency across scale and time dimensions. Because the approach is new and challenging, we choose to step-wise studying several combinations of the five dimensions, ultimately resulting in the optimal 5D model. We also propose to apply mathematical theories on multidimensional modelling to well established principles of multidimensional modelling in the geo-information domain. The result is a conceptual full partition of the 3Dspace+time+scale space (i.e. no overlaps, no gaps) realised in a 5D data model implemented in a Database Management System.

  11. Multiresolutional schemata for unsupervised learning of autonomous robots for 3D space operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacaze, Alberto; Meystel, Michael; Meystel, Alex

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the development of a learning control system for autonomous space robot (ASR) which presents the ASR as a 'baby' -- that is, a system with no a priori knowledge of the world in which it operates, but with behavior acquisition techniques that allows it to build this knowledge from the experiences of actions within a particular environment (we will call it an Astro-baby). The learning techniques are rooted in the recursive algorithm for inductive generation of nested schemata molded from processes of early cognitive development in humans. The algorithm extracts data from the environment and by means of correlation and abduction, it creates schemata that are used for control. This system is robust enough to deal with a constantly changing environment because such changes provoke the creation of new schemata by generalizing from experiences, while still maintaining minimal computational complexity, thanks to the system's multiresolutional nature.

  12. A mapping of an ensemble of mitochondrial sequences for various organisms into 3D space based on the word composition.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    To visualize a bird's-eye view of an ensemble of mitochondrial genome sequences for various species, we recently developed a novel method of mapping a biological sequence ensemble into Three-Dimensional (3D) vector space. First, we represented a biological sequence of a species s by a word-composition vector x(s), where its length [absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the sequence length, and its unit vector x(s)/[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the relative composition of the K-tuple words through the sequence and the size of the dimension, N=4(K), is the number of all possible words with the length of K. Second, we mapped the vector x(s) to the 3D position vector y(s), based on the two following simple principles: (1) [absolute value]y(s)[absolute value]=[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] and (2) the angle between y(s) and y(t) maximally correlates with the angle between x(s) and x(t). The mitochondrial genome sequences for 311 species, including 177 Animalia, 85 Fungi and 49 Green plants, were mapped into 3D space by using K=7. The mapping was successful because the angles between vectors before and after the mapping highly correlated with each other (correlation coefficients were 0.92-0.97). Interestingly, the Animalia kingdom is distributed along a single arc belt (just like the Milky Way on a Celestial Globe), and the Fungi and Green plant kingdoms are distributed in a similar arc belt. These two arc belts intersect at their respective middle regions and form a cross structure just like a jet aircraft fuselage and its wings. This new mapping method will allow researchers to intuitively interpret the visual information presented in the maps in a highly effective manner.

  13. Multi-hole seismic modeling in 3-D space and cross-hole seismic tomography analysis for boulder detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Fei; Liu, Jiangping; Wang, Jing; Zong, Yuquan; Yu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    A boulder stone, a common geological feature in south China, is referred to the remnant of a granite body which has been unevenly weathered. Undetected boulders could adversely impact the schedule and safety of subway construction when using tunnel boring machine (TBM) method. Therefore, boulder detection has always been a key issue demanded to be solved before the construction. Nowadays, cross-hole seismic tomography is a high resolution technique capable of boulder detection, however, the method can only solve for velocity in a 2-D slice between two wells, and the size and central position of the boulder are generally difficult to be accurately obtained. In this paper, the authors conduct a multi-hole wave field simulation and characteristic analysis of a boulder model based on the 3-D elastic wave staggered-grid finite difference theory, and also a 2-D imaging analysis based on first arrival travel time. The results indicate that (1) full wave field records could be obtained from multi-hole seismic wave simulations. Simulation results describe that the seismic wave propagation pattern in cross-hole high-velocity spherical geological bodies is more detailed and can serve as a basis for the wave field analysis. (2) When a cross-hole seismic section cuts through the boulder, the proposed method provides satisfactory cross-hole tomography results; however, when the section is closely positioned to the boulder, such high-velocity object in the 3-D space would impact on the surrounding wave field. The received diffracted wave interferes with the primary wave and in consequence the picked first arrival travel time is not derived from the profile, which results in a false appearance of high-velocity geology features. Finally, the results of 2-D analysis in 3-D modeling space are comparatively analyzed with the physical model test vis-a-vis the effect of high velocity body on the seismic tomographic measurements.

  14. Two imaging techniques for 3D quantification of pre-cementation space for CAD/CAM crowns.

    PubMed

    Rungruanganunt, Patchanee; Kelly, J Robert; Adams, Douglas J

    2010-12-01

    Internal three-dimensional (3D) "fit" of prostheses to prepared teeth is likely more important clinically than "fit" judged only at the level of the margin (i.e. marginal "opening"). This work evaluates two techniques for quantitatively defining 3D "fit", both using pre-cementation space impressions: X-ray microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and quantitative optical analysis. Both techniques are of interest for comparison of CAD/CAM system capabilities and for documenting "fit" as part of clinical studies. Pre-cementation space impressions were taken of a single zirconia coping on its die using a low viscosity poly(vinyl siloxane) impression material. Calibration specimens of this material were fabricated between the measuring platens of a micrometre. Both calibration curves and pre-cementation space impression data sets were obtained by examination using micro-CT and quantitative optical analysis. Regression analysis was used to compare calibration curves with calibration sets. Micro-CT calibration data showed tighter 95% confidence intervals and was able to measure over a wider thickness range than for the optical technique. Regions of interest (e.g., lingual, cervical) were more easily analysed with optical image analysis and this technique was more suitable for extremely thin impression walls (<10-15μm). Specimen preparation is easier for micro-CT and segmentation parameters appeared to capture dimensions accurately. Both micro-CT and the optical method can be used to quantify the thickness of pre-cementation space impressions. Each has advantages and limitations but either technique has the potential for use as part of clinical studies or CAD/CAM protocol optimization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Expanding the Design Space: Forging the Transition from 3D Printing to Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, Matthew

    The synergy of Additive Manufacturing and Computational Geometry has the potential to radically expand the "design space" of solutions available to designers. Additive Manufacturing (AM) is capable of fabricating objects that are highly complex both in geometry and material properties. However, the introduction of any new technology can have a disruptive effect on established design practices and organizations. Before "Design for Additive Manufacturing" (DFAM) is a commonplace means of producing objects employed in "real world" products, appropriate design knowledge must be sufficiently integrated within industry. First, materials suited to additive manufacturing methods must be developed to satisfy existing industry standards and specifications, or new standards must be developed. Second, a new class of design representation (CAD) tools will need to be developed. Third, designers and design organizations will need to develop strategies for employing such tools. This thesis describes three DFAM exercises intended to demonstrate the potential for innovative design when using advanced additive materials, tools, and printers. These design exercises included 1) a light-weight composite layup mold developed with topology optimization, 2) a low-pressure fluid duct enhanced with an external lattice structure, and 3) an airline seat tray designed using a non-uniform lattice structure optimized with topology optimization.

  16. AMITIS: A 3D GPU-Based Hybrid-PIC Model for Space and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Shahab; Poppe, Andrew R.; Delory, Gregory T.; Farrell, William M.

    2017-05-01

    We have developed, for the first time, an advanced modeling infrastructure in space simulations (AMITIS) with an embedded three-dimensional self-consistent grid-based hybrid model of plasma (kinetic ions and fluid electrons) that runs entirely on graphics processing units (GPUs). The model uses NVIDIA GPUs and their associated parallel computing platform, CUDA, developed for general purpose processing on GPUs. The model uses a single CPU-GPU pair, where the CPU transfers data between the system and GPU memory, executes CUDA kernels, and writes simulation outputs on the disk. All computations, including moving particles, calculating macroscopic properties of particles on a grid, and solving hybrid model equations are processed on a single GPU. We explain various computing kernels within AMITIS and compare their performance with an already existing well-tested hybrid model of plasma that runs in parallel using multi-CPU platforms. We show that AMITIS runs ∼10 times faster than the parallel CPU-based hybrid model. We also introduce an implicit solver for computation of Faraday’s Equation, resulting in an explicit-implicit scheme for the hybrid model equation. We show that the proposed scheme is stable and accurate. We examine the AMITIS energy conservation and show that the energy is conserved with an error < 0.2% after 500,000 timesteps, even when a very low number of particles per cell is used.

  17. Head direction cell firing properties and behavioural performance in 3-D space.

    PubMed

    Taube, Jeffrey S

    2011-02-15

    Previous studies have identified a population of neurons in the rat brain that discharge as a function of the animal's directional heading in the horizontal plane, independent of their location and on-going behaviour. Most studies on head direction (HD) cells have explored how they respond in two-dimensional environments within the horizontal plane. Many animals, however, live and locomote in a three-dimensional world. This paper reviews how HD cells respond when the animal locomotes on a vertical surface or inverted on a ceiling. We found that HD cells fire in a normal, direction-dependent manner when the rat is in the vertical plane, but not when the animal is inverted. Recent behavioural studies reported that rats are capable of accurately performing a navigational task when inverted, but only when the task was simple and started from not more than one or two entry points. Probe trials found that they did not have a flexible, map-like representation of space when inverted. The loss of the directional signal when the animal is in an inverted orientation may account for the absence of the map-like representation. Taken together, these findings indicate that a normal otolith signal contributes an important role to HD cell discharge.

  18. Commentary on accessing 3-D currents in space: Experiences from Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, M. W.; Haaland, S.; Escoubet, P. C.; Dong, X.-C.

    2016-08-01

    The curlometer was introduced to estimate the electric current density from four-point measurements in space; anticipating the realization of the four spacecraft Cluster mission which began full science operations in February 2001. The method uses Ampère's law to estimate current from the magnetic field measurements, suitable for the high-conductivity plasma of the magnetosphere and surrounding regions. The accuracy of the method is limited by the spatial separation knowledge, accuracy of the magnetic field measurement, and the relative scale size of the current structures sampled but nevertheless has proven to be robust and reliable in many regions of the magnetosphere. The method has been applied successfully and has been a key element, in studies of the magnetopause currents; the magnetotail current sheet; and the ring current, as well as allowing other current structures such as flux tubes and field aligned currents to be determined. The method is also applicable to situations where less than four spacecraft are closely grouped or where special assumptions (particularly stationarity) can be made. In view of the new four-point observations of the MMS mission taking place now, which cover a dramatically different spatial regime, we comment on the performance, adaptability, and lessons learnt from the curlometer technique. We emphasize the adaptability of the method, in particular, to the new sampling regime offered by the MMS mission; thereby offering a tool to address open questions on small-scale current structures.

  19. Synergia: a hybrid, parallel beam dynamics code with 3D space charge

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Amundson; Panagiotis Spentzouris

    2003-06-10

    The authors report on high-dose irradiation studies performed with a 200 MeV proton beam on a 140 Mbit/s pixel-data serializer prototype realized in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology. The data serializer was implemented recently for the BTeV pixel readout chip developed at Fermilab.

  20. 1D-3D hybrid modeling-from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time.

    PubMed

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator-which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to the

  1. 1D-3D hybrid modeling—from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M.; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator—which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to

  2. The DOSIS and DOSIS 3D Experiments onboard the International Space Station - Results from the Active DOSTEL Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Beaujean, Rudolf; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes; Kortmann, Onno

    2012-07-01

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems experienced in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18th. It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The DOSTELs measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 18th 2009 to June 16th 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the DOSIS-3D experiment. The hardware will be launched with the Soyuz 30S flight to the ISS on May 15th 2012 and activated approximately ten days later. Data will be transferred from the DOSTEL units to ground via the EPM rack which is activated approximately every four weeks for this action. First Results for the active DOSIS-3D measurements such as count rate profiles

  3. Investigation of space-charge-limited currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baedke, William

    In this work, the limiting currents associated with charged particle beam transport are investigated for several different scenarios using various numerical techniques. The topic of limiting currents are of interest for essentially all applications that utilize charged particle beam formation and transport such as high-power microwave and x-ray generation, field-emitter-arrays in connection with vacuum microelectronics, semiconductor diodes, and ion acceleration, to name a few. In the first part of this dissertation, the limiting currents of charged particle beams drifting through hollow grounded conductors along applied magnetic fields is investigated. A self-consistent limiting current theory originally developed for solid beams in vacuum is extended to a scenario which allows for annular beams in the presence of a dielectric load. This extension to the limiting current theory is followed by an analysis of it's validity by comparison to PIC simulations. It is found that when considering annular beams in the presence of a dielectric load, this expression is more accurate than more commonly used expressions. Following this, a mechanism which can enhance the limiting currents of a particle beam in a hollow drift-tube is investigated for solid and annular beams with and without a dielectric load present. This mechanism involves using the ponderomotive energy of an externally applied waveguide mode to thwart the beam space charge potential depression. It is found that for reasonable values of the electric field strength, the limiting current can be enhanced. Following the work done with particle beams drifting through hollow cylindrical structures, the second part of this dissertation investigates limiting currents associated with coaxial cylindrical structures. An approximation is developed which describes the limiting currents of a finite-width annular beam drifting through a coaxial structure when an external voltage is applied to the inner conductor. This external

  4. Educational use of 3D models and photogrammetry content: the Europeana space project for Cypriot UNESCO monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannides, M.; Chatzigrigoriou, P.; Bokolas, V.; Nikolakopoulou, V.; Athanasiou, V.

    2016-08-01

    Digital heritage data are now more accessible through crowdsourcing platforms, social media and blogs. At the same time, evolving technology on 3D modelling, laser scanning and 3D reconstruction is constantly upgrading and multiplying the information that we can use from heritage digitalisation. The question of reusing the information in different aspects rises. Educators and students are potential users of the digital content; developing for them an adaptable environment for applications and services is our challenge. One of the main objective of the EU Europeana Space project is the development of a holistic approach for educating people (grown ups and kids) on Monuments that are listed at UNESCO world heritage list, in Cyprus. The challenge was the use of Europeana Data (Pictures and the 3D objects) in a way that the information on the platform would be comprehensible by the users. Most of the data have little metadata information and they lack history and cultural value description (semantics). The proposed model ction is based on the cross cultural approach which responds to the multicultural features of present era but at the same time to the contemporary pedagogical and methodological directions. The system uses all innovative digital heritage resources, in order to help the user, in a UX friendly way, to learn about the different phases of the monument, the history, the pathology state, the architectural value and the conservation stage. The result is a responsive platform, accessible through smart devices and desktop computers, (in the frame of "Bring Your Own Device" a.k.a. BYOD) where every Monument is a different course and every course is addressed to different age groups (from elementary level to adults' vocational training).

  5. Plasma Charging of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikatarian, R.; Kern, J. W.; Barsamian, H. R.; Koontz, S.; Roussel, J.-R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses electron and ion current collection on the International Space Station (ISS). A theoretical model of spacecraft charging is presented and the basis for its theoretical development discussed. A review of on-orbit ISS measurements of ISS potentials with and without an operating Plasma Contactor Unit is discussed. Additionally, correlations of in-orbit measurements with various ionospheric properties, i.e. electron temperature, plasma concentration, vxB etc., are discussed. It is shown how these on-orbit measurements are utilized in developing the theoretical model. The theoretical model accounts for orbital conditions, solar array shunting/unshunting, vehicle attitude and solar array position, ionosphereric properties, etc. Calculational results for the theoretical model are compared against available flight data for the exiting ISS configuration. Additionally, predictions are made for future ISS mission builds. Sensitivities of model predictions to expected variations of ionospheric properties are also examined.

  6. Space charge emission in cylindrical diode

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Córdoba, Rafael; Martínez-García, Edgar

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, a mathematical model to describe cylindrical electron current emissions through a physics approximation method is presented. The proposed mathematical approximation consists of analyzing and solving the nonlinear Poisson's equation, with some determined mathematical restrictions. Our findings tackle the problem when charge-space creates potential barrier that disable the steady-state of the beam propagation. In this problem, the potential barrier effects of electron's speed with zero velocity emitted through the virtual cathode happens. The interaction between particles and the virtual cathode have been to find the inter-atomic potentials as boundary conditions from a quantum mechanics perspective. Furthermore, a non-stationary spatial solution of the electrical potential between anode and cathode is presented. The proposed solution is a 2D differential equation that was linearized from the generalized Poisson equation. A single condition was used solely, throughout the radial boundary conditions of the current density formation.

  7. CAIPIRINHA accelerated SPACE enables 10-min isotropic 3D TSE MRI of the ankle for optimized visualization of curved and oblique ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vivek; Fritz, Benjamin; Johnson, Rory; Gilson, Wesley D; Raithel, Esther; Fritz, Jan

    2017-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that a fourfold CAIPIRINHA accelerated, 10-min, high-resolution, isotropic 3D TSE MRI prototype protocol of the ankle derives equal or better quality than a 20-min 2D TSE standard protocol. Following internal review board approval and informed consent, 3-Tesla MRI of the ankle was obtained in 24 asymptomatic subjects including 10-min 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE TSE prototype and 20-min 2D TSE standard protocols. Outcome variables included image quality and visibility of anatomical structures using 5-point Likert scales. Non-parametric statistical testing was used. P values ≤0.001 were considered significant. Edge sharpness, contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, fat suppression and magic angle effects were without statistical difference on 2D and 3D TSE images (p > 0.035). Fluid was mildly brighter on intermediate-weighted 2D images (p < 0.001), whereas 3D images had substantially less partial volume, chemical shift and no pulsatile-flow artifacts (p < 0.001). Oblique and curved planar 3D images resulted in mildly-to-substantially improved visualization of joints, spring, bifurcate, syndesmotic, collateral and sinus tarsi ligaments, and tendons (p < 0.001, respectively). 3D TSE MRI with CAIPIRINHA acceleration enables high-spatial resolution oblique and curved planar MRI of the ankle and visualization of ligaments, tendons and joints equally well or better than a more time-consuming anisotropic 2D TSE MRI. • High-resolution 3D TSE MRI improves visualization of ankle structures. • Limitations of current 3D TSE MRI include long scan times. • 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE allows now a fourfold-accelerated data acquisition. • 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE enables high-spatial-resolution ankle MRI within 10 min. • 10-min 3D CAIPIRINHA SPACE produces equal-or-better quality than 20-min 2D TSE.

  8. Reliable underwater dipole source characterization in 3D space by an optimally designed artificial lateral line system.

    PubMed

    Ahrari, Ali; Lei, Hong; Sharif, Montassar Aidi; Deb, Kalyanmoy; Tan, Xiaobo

    2017-04-19

    Inspired by the lateral line of aquatic vertebrates, an artificial lateral line (ALL) system can localize and track an underwater moving object by analyzing the ambient flow caused by its motion. There are several studies on object detection, localization and tracking by ALL systems, but only a few have investigated the optimal design of the ALL system, the one that on average provides the highest characterization accuracy. Design optimization is particularly important because the uncertainties in the employed flow model and in sensor measurements deteriorate the reliability of sensing. This study investigates the optimal design of the ALL system in three-dimensional (3D) space for dipole source characterization. It highlights some challenges specific to the 3D setting and demonstrates the shortcomings of the designs in which all sensors and their sensing directions are in the same plane. As an alternative, it proposes two design concepts, called 'Offset Strategy' and 'Angle Strategy' to overcome these shortcomings. It investigates potentials of having a swarm of cooperative ALLs as well. It performs design optimization in the presence of sensor and model uncertainties and analyzes the trade-off between the number of sensors and characterization accuracy. The obtained solutions are analyzed to reveal their strategies in solving the problem efficiently. The dependency of the optimized solutions on the uncertainties is also demonstrated.

  9. Morphology Effects on Space Charge Characteristics of Low Density Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou; Yuanxiang; Wang; Yunshan; Zahn, Markus; Wang; Ninghua; Sun; Qinghua; Liang; Xidong; Guan; Zhichen

    2011-01-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) film samples with different morphology were prepared by three kinds of annealing methods which were different in cooling rates in this study. A pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) space charge measurement system was improved to solve the surface discharge problems for small samples applied with a high voltage. Negative direct current (DC) fields from 50 to above 220 kV/mm were applied to the samples. The influences of morphologies on space charge and space charge packet characteristics were measured by the improved high voltage withstand (HVW) PEA system. Mobility and trap depth of released charges were calculated by space charge decay. It was found that there is a different probability of space charge packet initiation under applied field from -60 to -100 kV/mm. Average velocity and mobility of the space charge packets were calculated by space charge packet dynamics. It was found that the lower cooling rate samples have higher crystallinity, more homo-charge accumulation, lower mobility and deeper trap depth. The mechanism of morphological effects on space charge phenomena have been presumed to give a plausible explanation for their inherent relationships. The morphology in the metal-dielectric interface and in the bulk is convincingly suggested to be responsible for the injection and propagation processes of space charge. A model of positive space charge initiation in LDPE samples was also suggested and analyzed. The mechanism of morphological effects and the charge injection model are well fit with the injection and propagation processes of space charge. The different effects of morphology in the metal-dielectric interface and in the bulk of polymers are stressed.

  10. Bulk Charging of Dielectrics in Cryogenic Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, J. I.; Coffey, V. N.; Blackwell, W. C., Jr.; Parker, L. N.; Jun, I.; Garrett, H. B.

    2007-01-01

    We use a 1-D bulk charging model to evaluate dielectric charging at cryogenic temperatures relevant to space systems using passive cooling to <100K or extended operations in permanently dark lunar craters and the lunar night.

  11. Spin splitting and reemergence of charge compensation in monolayer WTe2 by 3d transition-metal adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Wang, Xiaocha; Mi, Wenbo

    2017-03-15

    The semimetallic WTe2 has sparked intense interest owing to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, pressure-driven superconductivity and possession of type-II Weyl fermions. The unexpected and fascinating quantum properties are thought to be closely related to its delicate Fermi surface and a special electron-hole-pocket structure. However, in the single-layer limit, the electron-hole-pocket structure is missing owing to the lack of interlayer interaction. Herewith, we demonstrate that 3d transition-metal adsorption is an effective method to modify the electronic properties of monolayer WTe2 by density functional theory. Spin-splitting and spin-degenerate bands are realized in Ti-, V-, Cr-, Mn-, Fe-, and Co- and Sc-, Ni-, Cu-, and Zn-adsorbed systems, respectively. Especially, the reemergence of the electron-hole pockets appears in the Ni-adsorbed system. The calculated results are robust against inclusion of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb interaction.

  12. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited).

    PubMed

    Meusel, O; Droba, M; Noll, D; Schulte, K; Schneider, P P; Wiesner, C

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  13. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Meusel, O. Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-02-15

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  14. Fast and Forceful: Modulation of Response Activation Induced by Shifts of Perceived Depth in Virtual 3D Space

    PubMed Central

    Plewan, Thorsten; Rinkenauer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) can strongly be influenced by a number of stimulus properties. For instance, there was converging evidence that perceived size rather than physical (i.e., retinal) size constitutes a major determinant of RT. However, this view has recently been challenged since within a virtual three-dimensional (3D) environment retinal size modulation failed to influence RT. In order to further investigate this issue in the present experiments response force (RF) was recorded as a supplemental measure of response activation in simple reaction tasks. In two separate experiments participants’ task was to react as fast as possible to the occurrence of a target located close to the observer or farther away while the offset between target locations was increased from Experiment 1 to Experiment 2. At the same time perceived target size (by varying the retinal size across depth planes) and target type (sphere vs. soccer ball) were modulated. Both experiments revealed faster and more forceful reactions when targets were presented closer to the observers. Perceived size and target type barely affected RT and RF in Experiment 1 but differentially affected both variables in Experiment 2. Thus, the present findings emphasize the usefulness of RF as a supplement to conventional RT measurement. On a behavioral level the results confirm that (at least) within virtual 3D space perceived object size neither strongly influences RT nor RF. Rather the relative position within egocentric (body-centered) space presumably indicates an object’s behavioral relevance and consequently constitutes an important modulator of visual processing. PMID:28018273

  15. A 3d-3d appetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-01

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 "Lens space theory" T [ L( p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L( p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S 3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[ L( p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[ L( p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere S b 3 . This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G ℂ complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  16. Non-uniform space charge controlled KTN beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ju-Hung; Zhu, Wenbin; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Stuart; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    A non-uniform space charge-controlled KTN beam deflector is presented and analyzed. We found that a non-uniform space charge can result in a non-uniform beam deflection angles. This effect can be useful for some applications such as electric field controlled beam separation. However, a non-uniform space charge needs to be avoided if one wants uniform beam deflection throughout the entire crystal.

  17. Semi-automatic characterization of fractured rock masses using 3D point clouds: discontinuity orientation, spacing and SMR geomechanical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Adrian; Tomas, Roberto; Abellan, Antonio; Cano, Miguel; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of fractured rock masses for different geological applications (e.g. fractured reservoir exploitation, rock slope instability, rock engineering, etc.) requires a deep geometric understanding of the discontinuity sets affecting rock exposures. Recent advances in 3D data acquisition using photogrammetric and/or LiDAR techniques currently allow a quick and an accurate characterization of rock mass discontinuities. This contribution presents a methodology for: (a) use of 3D point clouds for the identification and analysis of planar surfaces outcropping in a rocky slope; (b) calculation of the spacing between different discontinuity sets; (c) semi-automatic calculation of the parameters that play a capital role in the Slope Mass Rating geomechanical classification. As for the part a) (discontinuity orientation), our proposal identifies and defines the algebraic equations of the different discontinuity sets of the rock slope surface by applying an analysis based on a neighbouring points coplanarity test. Additionally, the procedure finds principal orientations by Kernel Density Estimation and identifies clusters (Riquelme et al., 2014). As a result of this analysis, each point is classified with a discontinuity set and with an outcrop plane (cluster). Regarding the part b) (discontinuity spacing) our proposal utilises the previously classified point cloud to investigate how different outcropping planes are linked in space. Discontinuity spacing is calculated for each pair of linked clusters within the same discontinuity set, and then spacing values are analysed calculating their statistic values. Finally, as for the part c) the previous results are used to calculate parameters F_1, F2 and F3 of the Slope Mass Rating geomechanical classification. This analysis is carried out for each discontinuity set using their respective orientation extracted in part a). The open access tool SMRTool (Riquelme et al., 2014) is then used to calculate F1 to F3 correction

  18. Advanced morphological 3D magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring using a new isotropic 3D proton-density, turbo spin echo sequence with variable flip angle distribution (PD-SPACE) compared to an isotropic 3D steady-state free precession sequence (True-FISP) and standard 2D sequences.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Goetz H; Zak, Lukas; Mamisch, Tallal C; Paul, Dominik; Lauer, Lars; Mauerer, Andreas; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate a new isotropic 3D proton-density, turbo-spin-echo sequence with variable flip-angle distribution (PD-SPACE) sequence compared to an isotropic 3D true-fast-imaging with steady-state-precession (True-FISP) sequence and 2D standard MR sequences with regard to the new 3D magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score. Sixty consecutive MR scans on 37 patients (age: 32.8 ± 7.9 years) after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee were prospectively included. The 3D MOCART score was assessed using the standard 2D sequences and the multiplanar-reconstruction (MPR) of both isotropic sequences. Statistical, Bonferroni-corrected correlation as well as subjective quality analysis were performed. The correlation of the different sequences was significant for the variables defect fill, cartilage interface, bone interface, surface, subchondral lamina, chondral osteophytes, and effusion (Pearson coefficients 0.514-0.865). Especially between the standard sequences and the 3D True-FISP sequence, the variables structure, signal intensity, subchondral bone, and bone marrow edema revealed lower, not significant, correlation values (0.242-0.383). Subjective quality was good for all sequences (P ≥ 0.05). Artifacts were most often visible on the 3D True-FISP sequence (P < 0.05). Different isotropic sequences can be used for the 3D evaluation of cartilage repair with the benefits of isotropic 3D MRI, MPR, and a significantly reduced scan time, where the 3D PD-SPACE sequence reveals the best results. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Space dosimetry with the application of a 3D silicon detector telescope: response function and inverse algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pázmándi, Tamás; Deme, Sándor; Láng, Edit

    2006-01-01

    One of the many risks of long-duration space flights is the excessive exposure to cosmic radiation, which has great importance particularly during solar flares and higher sun activity. Monitoring of the cosmic radiation on board space vehicles is carried out on the basis of wide international co-operation. Since space radiation consists mainly of charged heavy particles (protons, alpha and heavier particles), the equivalent dose differs significantly from the absorbed dose. A radiation weighting factor (w(R)) is used to convert absorbed dose (Gy) to equivalent dose (Sv). w(R) is a function of the linear energy transfer of the radiation. Recently used equipment is suitable for measuring certain radiation field parameters changing in space and over time, so a combination of different measurements and calculations is required to characterise the radiation field in terms of dose equivalent. The objectives of this project are to develop and manufacture a three-axis silicon detector telescope, called Tritel, and to develop software for data evaluation of the measured energy deposition spectra. The device will be able to determine absorbed dose and dose equivalent of the space radiation.

  20. Controllable transition from positive space charge to negative space charge in an inverted cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Rane, R. Ranjan, M.; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2016-01-15

    The combined effect of magnetic field (B), gas pressure (P), and the corresponding discharge voltage on the discharge properties of argon in inverted cylindrical magnetron has been investigated. In the experiment, anode is biased with continuous 10 ms sinusoidal half wave. It is observed that at a comparatively higher magnetic field (i.e., >200 gauss) and lower operating pressure (i.e., <1 × 10{sup −3} mbar), the discharge extinguishes and demands a high voltage to reignite. Discharge current increases with increase in magnetic field and starts reducing at sufficiently higher magnetic field for a particular discharge voltage due to restricted electron diffusion towards the anode. It is observed that B/P ratio plays an important role in sustaining the discharge and is constant for a discharge voltage. The discharge is transformed to negative space charge regime from positive space charge regime at certain B/P ratio and this ratio varies linearly with the discharge voltage. The space charge reversal is indicated by the radial profile of the floating potential and plasma potential in between two electrodes for different magnetic fields. At a particular higher magnetic field (beyond 100 gauss), the floating potential increases gradually with the radial distance from cathode, whereas it remains almost constant at lower magnetic field.

  1. Controllable transition from positive space charge to negative space charge in an inverted cylindrical magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, R.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Ranjan, M.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of magnetic field (B), gas pressure (P), and the corresponding discharge voltage on the discharge properties of argon in inverted cylindrical magnetron has been investigated. In the experiment, anode is biased with continuous 10 ms sinusoidal half wave. It is observed that at a comparatively higher magnetic field (i.e., >200 gauss) and lower operating pressure (i.e., <1 × 10-3 mbar), the discharge extinguishes and demands a high voltage to reignite. Discharge current increases with increase in magnetic field and starts reducing at sufficiently higher magnetic field for a particular discharge voltage due to restricted electron diffusion towards the anode. It is observed that B/P ratio plays an important role in sustaining the discharge and is constant for a discharge voltage. The discharge is transformed to negative space charge regime from positive space charge regime at certain B/P ratio and this ratio varies linearly with the discharge voltage. The space charge reversal is indicated by the radial profile of the floating potential and plasma potential in between two electrodes for different magnetic fields. At a particular higher magnetic field (beyond 100 gauss), the floating potential increases gradually with the radial distance from cathode, whereas it remains almost constant at lower magnetic field.

  2. Search for space charge effects in the ICARUS T600 LAr-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torti, Marta

    2016-11-01

    Space charge in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber is due to the accumu- lation of positive ions, produced by ionizing tracks crossing the detector, which slowly flow toward the cathode. As a consequence, electric field distortions may arise, thus hindering the possibility to produce faithful 3D images of the ionizing events. The presence of space charge becomes relevant for large TPCs operating at surface or at shallow depths, where cosmic ray flux is high. These effects could interest the next phase of the ICARUS T600 detector, which will be deployed at shallow depths as a Far Detector for Short Baseline Neutrino experiment at FNAL dedicated to sterile neutrino searches. In 2001, the first ICARUS T600 module (T300) operated at surface in Pavia (Italy), recording cosmic ray data. In this work, a sample of cosmic muon tracks from the 2001 run was analyzed and results on space charge effects in LAr-TPCs are shown.

  3. Gain length fitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, G.; Hemsing, E.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2011-08-01

    We present a power-fit formula, obtained from a variational analysis using three-dimensional free-electron laser theory, for the gain length of a high-gain free-electron laser’s fundamental mode in the presence of diffraction, uncorrelated energy spread, and longitudinal space-charge effects. The approach is inspired by the work of Xie [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 445, 59 (2000)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/S0168-9002(00)00114-5], and provides a useful shortcut for calculating the gain length of the fundamental Gaussian mode of a free-electron laser having strong space-charge effects in the 3D regime. The results derived from analytic theory are in good agreement with detailed numerical particle simulations that also include higher-order space-charge effects, supporting the assumptions made in the theoretical treatment and the variational solutions obtained in the single-mode limit.

  4. Accelerated simulation study of space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps using GPU techniques.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingchuang; Xu, Wei; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Yulin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in the performance of various types of mass analyzers. Simulation of space charge effects is often limited by the computation capability. In this study, we evaluate the method of using graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate ion trajectory simulation. Simulation using GPU has been compared with multi-core central processing unit (CPU), and an acceleration of about 390 times have been obtained using a single computer for simulation of up to 10(5) ions in quadrupole ion traps. Characteristics of trapped ions can be investigated at detailed levels within a reasonable simulation time. Space charge effects on the trapping capacities of linear and 3D ion traps, ion cloud shapes, ion motion frequency shift, mass spectrum peak coalescence effects between two ion clouds of close m/z are studied with the ion trajectory simulation using GPU.

  5. Accelerated Simulation Study of Space Charge Effects in Quadrupole Ion Traps Using GPU Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xingchuang; Xu, Wei; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Yulin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in the performance of various types of mass analyzers. Simulation of space charge effects is often limited by the computation capability. In this study, we evaluate the method of using graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate ion trajectory simulation. Simulation using GPU has been compared with multi-core central processing unit (CPU), and an acceleration of about 390 times have been obtained using a single computer for simulation of up to 105 ions in quadrupole ion traps. Characteristics of trapped ions can be investigated at detailed levels within a reasonable simulation time. Space charge effects on the trapping capacities of linear and 3D ion traps, ion cloud shapes, ion motion frequency shift, mass spectrum peak coalescence effects between two ion clouds of close m/z are studied with the ion trajectory simulation using GPU.

  6. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: long-term dose monitoring onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther; Burmeister, Sönke; Labrenz, Johannes; Bilski, Pawel; Horwacik, Tomasz; Twardak, Anna; Hajek, Michael; Fugger, Manfred; Hofstätter, Christina; Sihver, Lembit; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Szabo, Julianna; Stradi, Andrea; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Brabcova, Katerina Pachnerova; Vanhavere, Filip; Cauwels, Vanessa; Van Hoey, Olivier; Schoonjans, Werner; Parisi, Alessio; Gaza, Ramona; Semones, Edward; Yukihara, Eduardo G.; Benton, Eric R.; Doull, Brandon A.; Uchihori, Yukio; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Boehme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on Earth, consisting mostly of highly energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on Earth for occupational radiation workers. Since the beginning of the space era, the radiation exposure during space missions has been monitored with various active and passive radiation instruments. Also onboard the International Space Station (ISS), a number of area monitoring devices provide data related to the spatial and temporal variation of the radiation field in and outside the ISS. The aim of the DOSIS (2009-2011) and the DOSIS 3D (2012-ongoing) experiments was and is to measure the radiation environment within the European Columbus Laboratory of the ISS. These measurements are, on the one hand, performed with passive radiation detectors mounted at 11 locations within Columbus for the determination of the spatial distribution of the radiation field parameters and, on the other, with two active radiation detectors mounted at a fixed position inside Columbus for the determination of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. Data measured with passive radiation detectors showed that the absorbed dose values inside the Columbus Laboratory follow a pattern, based on the local shielding configuration of the radiation detectors, with minimum dose values observed in the year 2010 of 195-270 μGy/day and maximum values observed in the year 2012 with values ranging from 260 to 360 μGy/day. The absorbed dose is modulated by (a) the variation in solar activity and (b) the changes in ISS altitude.

  7. Development of charge structure in a short live convective cell observed by a 3D lightning mapper and a phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Adachi, T.; Kusunoki, K.; Wu, T.; Ushio, T.; Yoshikawa, E.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorm observation has been conducted in Osaka, Japan, with a use of a 3D lightning mapper, called Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorm (BOLT), and an X-band phased array radar (PAR). BOLT is a LF sensor network that receives LF emission associated with lightning discharges and locates LF radiation sources in 3D. PAR employs mechanical and electrical scans, respectively, in azimuthal and elevation direction, succeeding in quite high volume scan rate. In this presentation, we focus on lightning activity and charge structure in convective cells that lasted only short time (15 minutes or so). Thunderstorms that consisted of several convective cells developed near the radar site. Precipitation structure of a convective cell in the thunderstorm was clearly observed by PAR. A reflectivity core of the convective cell appeared at an altitude of 6 km at 2245 (JST). After that the core descended and reached the ground at 2256 (JST), resulting in heavy precipitation on surface. The echo top height (30dBZ) increased intermittently between 2245 (JST) and 2253 (JST) and it reached at the altitude of 12 km. The convective cell dissipated at 2300. Many intra-cloud (IC) flashes were initiated within the convective cell. Most IC flashes that were initiated in the convective cell occurred during the time when the echo top height increased, while a few IC flashes were initiated in the convective cell after the cease of the echo top vertical development. These facts indicate that strong updraft at upper levels (about 8 km or higher) plays an important role on thunderstorm electrification for IC flashes. Moreover, initiation altitudes of the IC flashes and the positive charge regions removed by the IC flashes increased, as the echo top height increased. This fact implies that the strong updraft at the upper levels blew up positively-charged ice pellets and negatively-charged graupel, and lifted IC flash initiation altitudes and positive charge regions

  8. Space-charge-limited flow in quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Lay Kee

    2005-10-01

    Space-charge-limited (SCL) flow has been an area of active research in the development of non-neutral plasma physics, high current diodes, high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics and sheath physics. According to the classical Child-Langmuir (CL) law for the planar diodes, the current density scales as 3/2's power of gap voltage and to the inverse squared power of gap spacing. In the past decade, there have been renewed interests in extending the classical CL law to multi-dimensional models both numerically and analytically. The study of SCL flow in quantum regime has also attracted considerable interests in the past 3 years [1-3]. With the recent advances in nanotechnology, electron beam with very high current density may be transported in a nano-scale gap with a relatively low gap voltage. In this new operating regime, where the electron wavelength is comparable or larger than the gap spacing, the quantum effects become important. In this talk, the quantum theory of CL law will be introduced to reveal that the classical CL law is enhanced by a large factor due to electron tunneling and exchange-correlation effects, and there is a new quantum scaling for the current density, which is proportional to the 1/2's power of gap voltage, and to the inverse fourth-power of gap spacing [1-2]. Quasi-2D and 3D models with finite emission area will be shown [3]. We will also show that the classical properties of the SCL flow such as bipolar flow, beam-loaded capacitance, transit time and noise will require a complete revision in the quantum regime. The implications of the emission law of Fowler-Nordheim in the presence of intense space charge over the nanometer scale will be discussed.[1] L. K. Ang, T. J. T. Kwan, and Y. Y. Lau, ``New Scaling of Child-Langmuir Law in the Quantum Regime,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 208303 (2003). [2] L. K. Ang, Y. Y. Lau, and T. J. T. Kwan, ``Simple Derivation of Quantum Scaling in Child-Langmuir law,'' IEEE Trans Plasma Sci. 32, 410

  9. Splitting of the Ti-3d bands of TiSe2 in the charge-density wave phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafari, A.; Petaccia, L.; Janowitz, C.

    2017-02-01

    Very high resolution angular resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra on TiSe2 in two distinct polarization geometries (vertical and horizontal) at temperatures between 300 K and 22 K enabled the observation of details of bands near the Fermi level not reported so far. Calculations of the electronic band structure based on density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP hybrid functional and MBJ potential (with and without spin-orbit coupling) were performed to obtain the orbital symmetry and dispersion. Two degenerate conduction bands (CB's) were observed at the Γ-point, a weak CB- emission at the A-point, and two non degenerate CB's (i.e. splitting of CB) at the M/L-point of the Brillouin Zone (BZ). The splitting was detected at L for both polarizations, while at M remarkably only for horizontal polarization. These results cannot be fully accounted for by current theories for the charge density wave (CDW) and point to a reduced symmetry of the electronic states, possibly due to the chiral CDW.

  10. Modelling space-charge limited transport in discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lever, L.; Bushby, R. J.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2006-05-01

    Using a self-consistent Monte Carlo/Poisson algorithm, we investigate space-charge limited conduction in discotic liquid crystal time of flight (TOF) experiments. The charge transport mechanism is via a semi-delocalised banding process, and two mechanisms of photo-generation of charge carriers are considered: excitons generated by the laser pulse, which quench at the anode, and processes, such as the Onsager mechanism, that lead to direct generation of free electron/hole pairs within the bulk. The nature of the space-charge limited TOF transient is investigated as a function of quantum yield of charge carriers and as a function of applied potential.

  11. Formation of the Surface Space Charge Layer in Fair Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redin, Alexander; Kupovykh, Gennady; Boldyreff, Anton

    2014-05-01

    It is widely known that the positive space charge, caused by electrode effect action, is obtained near surface in fair weather. Space charge density depends on the different local features: meteorological conditions, aerosol particles concentration, convective transfer of the surface layer. Namely space charge determines the local variations of electric field. Space charge could be negative in condition of strong ionization rate in thin air layer near surface. The electrodynamic model, consisting of transfer equations of light ions and nucleuses, generated by interactions between lights ions and aerosol particles, and Poisson equation. The turbulent transfer members, electric field near the surface, the mobility of positive and negative ions, recombination coefficient, ionization rate, the number of elementary charges on the nuclei were took into account in the model equations. The time-space variations of positive and negative small and heavy ions, electric field, electrical conductivity, current density and space charge, depending on aerosol particles concentrations, turbulence and convective transfer ionization rate, aerosol particles size and number of charged on the particles are calculated. The mechanisms of turbulent and convection-turbulent surface layer electrodynamic structure forming in dependence of single and multi-charged aerosol particles for different physical and meteorological conditions are investigated. Increasing of turbulent mixing intensity leads to increasing of character electrode layer thickness, decreasing of space charge density value, decreasing of electric current conductivity value. The electrode effect of the whole layer remains constant. Increasing of aerosol particles concentration leads to decreasing of electrode effect within the whole electrode layer and increasing of electric field values, decreasing of space charge density values and current conductivity density. It was received that increasing of the aerosol particles

  12. Understanding the effect of space charge on instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Chao, A.; Chin, Y. H.

    2015-05-03

    The combined effect of space charge and wall impedance on transverse instabilities is an important consideration in the design and operation of high intensity hadron machines as well as an intrinsic academic interest. This study explores the combined effects of space charge and wall impedance using various simplified models in an attempt to produce a better understanding of their interplay.

  13. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  14. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1-5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1-5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C-V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole-Frenkel charge-emission mechanism.

  15. Research progress on space charge characteristics in polymeric insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibo; Christen, Thomas; Meng, Xing; Chen, Jiansheng; Rocks, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Due to their excellent electrical insulation properties and processability, polymer materials are used in many electrical products. It is widely believed that space charge plays an important role for the electric field distribution, conduction, ageing, and electric breakdown of polymeric insulation. This paper reviews measurements and characteristics of space charge behavior which mainly determined by the pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurement technique. Particular interests are the effects of the applied voltage, the electrodes, temperature, humidity, microstructure, additives, and filler materials on accumulation, distribution, transport, and the decay of space charge in polymeric materials. This review paper is to provide an overview on various space charge effects under different conditions, and also to summarize the information for polymeric materials with suppressed space charge and improved electrical behavior.

  16. Modeling Semantic Emotion Space Using a 3D Hypercube-Projection: An Innovative Analytical Approach for the Psychology of Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Trnka, Radek; Lačev, Alek; Balcar, Karel; Kuška, Martin; Tavel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm. The main goal was to map and project semantic emotion space in terms of mutual positions of various emotion prototypical categories. Participants (N = 187; 54.5% females) judged 16 discrete emotions in terms of valence, intensity, controllability and utility. The results revealed that these four dimensional input measures were uncorrelated. This implies that valence, intensity, controllability and utility represented clearly different qualities of discrete emotions in the judgments of the participants. Based on this data, we constructed a 3D hypercube-projection and compared it with various two-dimensional projections. This contrasting enabled us to detect several sources of bias when working with the traditional, two-dimensional analytical approach. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections revealed that the 2D models provided biased insights about how emotions are conceptually related to one another along multiple dimensions. The results of the present study point out the reductionist nature of the two-dimensional paradigm in the psychological theory of emotions and challenge the widely accepted circumplex model. PMID:27148130

  17. Modeling Semantic Emotion Space Using a 3D Hypercube-Projection: An Innovative Analytical Approach for the Psychology of Emotions.

    PubMed

    Trnka, Radek; Lačev, Alek; Balcar, Karel; Kuška, Martin; Tavel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The widely accepted two-dimensional circumplex model of emotions posits that most instances of human emotional experience can be understood within the two general dimensions of valence and activation. Currently, this model is facing some criticism, because complex emotions in particular are hard to define within only these two general dimensions. The present theory-driven study introduces an innovative analytical approach working in a way other than the conventional, two-dimensional paradigm. The main goal was to map and project semantic emotion space in terms of mutual positions of various emotion prototypical categories. Participants (N = 187; 54.5% females) judged 16 discrete emotions in terms of valence, intensity, controllability and utility. The results revealed that these four dimensional input measures were uncorrelated. This implies that valence, intensity, controllability and utility represented clearly different qualities of discrete emotions in the judgments of the participants. Based on this data, we constructed a 3D hypercube-projection and compared it with various two-dimensional projections. This contrasting enabled us to detect several sources of bias when working with the traditional, two-dimensional analytical approach. Contrasting two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections revealed that the 2D models provided biased insights about how emotions are conceptually related to one another along multiple dimensions. The results of the present study point out the reductionist nature of the two-dimensional paradigm in the psychological theory of emotions and challenge the widely accepted circumplex model.

  18. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  19. Comparison of 3D turbo spin-echo SPACE sequences with conventional 2D MRI sequences to assess the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Jost Karsten; Winterstein, Marianne; Akbar, Michael; Meyer, Esther; Paul, Dominik; Kauczor, Haus-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2014-10-01

    To determine the accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional (3D) T1- and proton density (PD)-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolution (SPACE) compared with conventional 2D sequences in assessment of the shoulder-joint. Ninety-three subjects were examined on a 3-T MRI system with both conventional 2D-TSE sequences in T1-, T2- and PD-weighting and 3D SPACE sequences in T1- and PD-weighting. All examinations were assessed independently by two reviewers for common pathologies of the shoulder-joint. Agreement between 2D- and 3D-sequences and inter-observer-agreement was evaluated using kappa-statistics. Using conventional 2D TSE sequences as standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 3D SPACE were 81.8%, 95.1%, and 93.5% for injuries of the supraspinatus-tendon (SSP), 81.3%, 93.5%, and 91.4% for the cartilage layer and 82.4%, 98.5%, and 97.5% for the long biceps tendon. Concordance between 2D and 3D was almost perfect for tendinopathies of the SSP (κ=0.85), osteoarthritis (κ=1), luxation of the biceps tendon (κ=1) and adjacent bone marrow (κ=0.92). Inter-observer-agreement was generally higher for conventional 2D TSE sequences (κ, 0.23-1.0), when compared to 3D SPACE sequences (κ, -0.33 to 1.0) except for disorders of the long biceps tendon and supraspinatus tendon rupture. Because of substantial and almost perfect concordance with conventional 2D TSE sequences for common shoulder pathologies, MRI examination-time can be reduced by nearly 40% (up to 11 min) using 3D-SPACE without loss of information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Space-charge dynamics in ultra-cold ion bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Robert; Murphy, Dene; Speirs, Rory; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Cold ion sources based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms provide a unique system for investigating Coulomb interactions within complex charged particle bunches. Space-charge driven expansion in charged particle beams is of critical importance for applications including electron and ion microscopy, mass spectrometry, synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers, and in electron diffraction where space-charge effects constrain the capacity to obtain diffraction information. Self-field effects are often difficult to observe because of thermal diffusion with traditional sources. Cold atom sources produce ions with temperatures of a few mK, such that subtle space-charge effects are apparent. We illustrate the capabilities through detailed investigation of a complex ion bunch shape, showing collective behaviour including high density caustics and shockwave structures arising from long-range interactions between small charge bunches.

  1. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer.

    PubMed

    Dell'Angela, M; Anniyev, T; Beye, M; Coffee, R; Föhlisch, A; Gladh, J; Kaya, S; Katayama, T; Krupin, O; Nilsson, A; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Sellberg, J A; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Öström, H; Ogasawara, H; Wolf, M; Wurth, W

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  2. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; Nordlund, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Sellberg, J. A.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Turner, J. J.; Öström, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Wolf, M.; Wurth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse. PMID:26798795

  3. Space Charge Models for Particle Tracking on Long Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Jeffrey A; Cousineau, Sarah M; Shishlo, Andrei P; Potts III, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently track charged particles over long times, most tracking codes use either analytic charge distributions or particle-in-cell (PIC) methods based on fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). While useful for theoretical studies, analytic distribution models do not allow accurate simulation of real machines. PIC calculations can utilize realistic space charge distributions, but these methods suffer from the presence of discretization errors. We examine the situation for particle tracking with space charge over long times, and consider possible ideas to improve the accuracy of such calculations.

  4. Free-space coherent optical communication with orbital angular, momentum multiplexing/demultiplexing using a hybrid 3D photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Guan, Binbin; Scott, Ryan P; Qin, Chuan; Fontaine, Nicolas K; Su, Tiehui; Ferrari, Carlo; Cappuzzo, Mark; Klemens, Fred; Keller, Bob; Earnshaw, Mark; Yoo, S J B

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrate free-space space-division-multiplexing (SDM) with 15 orbital angular momentum (OAM) states using a three-dimensional (3D) photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The hybrid device consists of a silica planar lightwave circuit (PLC) coupled to a 3D waveguide circuit to multiplex/demultiplex OAM states. The low excess loss hybrid device is used in individual and two simultaneous OAM states multiplexing and demultiplexing link experiments with a 20 Gb/s, 1.67 b/s/Hz quadrature phase shift keyed (QPSK) signal, which shows error-free performance for 379,960 tested bits for all OAM states.

  5. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  6. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  7. Space charge and charge trapping characteristics of cross-linked polyethylene subjected to ac electric stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. L.; Chen, G.; Miyake, H.; Matsui, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, T.

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports on the result of space charge evolution in cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) planar samples approximately 220 µm thick. The space charge measurement technique used in this study is the pulsed electroacoustic method. There are two phases to this experiment. In the first phase, the samples were subjected to dc 30 kVdc mm-1 and ac (sinusoidal) electric stress levels of 30 kVpk mm-1 at frequencies of 1, 10 and 50 Hz ac. In addition, ac space charge under 30 kVrms mm-1 and 60 kVpk mm-1 electric stress at 50 Hz was also investigated. The volts-off results showed that the amount of charge trapped in XLPE sample under dc electric stress is significantly bigger than samples under ac stress even when the applied ac stresses are substantially higher. The second phase of the experiment involves studying the dc space charge evolution in samples that were tested under ac stress during the first phase of the experiment. Ac ageing causes positive charge to become more dominant over negative charge. It was also discovered that ac ageing creates deeper traps, particularly for negative charge. This paper also gives a brief overview of the data processing methods used to analyse space charge under ac electric stress.

  8. Validating Air Force Weather Satellite Retrieved 3D Cloud Products against Independent Ground and Space-Based Assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.; Conner, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for global cloud analyses and forecasts to support DoD missions around the world. Cloud analyses are constructed using passive cloud detection algorithms from 17 different near real time satellite sources. The algorithms are run on individual satellite transmissions at native satellite resolution in near real time. These native resolution products are then used to construct an hourly global merge on a 24km grid. AFW has also recently started creation of a time-delayed global cloud reanalysis to produce a `best possible' analysis for climatology and verification purposes. Cloud forecasts include global short-range cloud forecasts created using advection techniques as well as statistically post-processed cloud forecast products derived from various global and regional numerical weather forecast models. The result is a mix of cloud products covering different spatial and temporal resolutions with varying latency requirements. AFW has started to aggressively benchmark the performance of their current capabilities. Cloud information collected from so called `active' sensors on the ground at the DOE-ARM sites and from space by such instruments as CloudSat, CALIPSO and CATS are being utilized to characterize the performance of AFW products derived largely by passive means. The goal is to understand the performance of the 3D cloud analysis and forecast products of today to help shape the requirements and standards for a future Numerical Weather Model driven cloud analysis and forecast system driven by advanced 4DVAR techniques. This presentation will present selected results from these benchmarking efforts and highlight insights and observations between passively and actively derived observations and the impacts of varying spatial and temporal depictions of clouds.

  9. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of the upper airway space of patients undergoing mandibular distraction osteogenesis for micrognathia.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A; Betti, E; Badiali, G; Ricotta, F; Marchetti, C; Tarsitano, A

    2015-10-01

    Mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) is currently an accepted method of treatment for patients requiring reconstruction of hypoplastic mandibles. To date one of the unsolved problems is how to assess the quantitative increase of mandible length needed to achieve a significant change in the volume of the posterior airway space (PAS) in children with mandibular micrognathia following distraction osteogenesis. The purpose of this study is to present quantitative volumetric evaluation of PAS in young patients having distraction osteogenesis for micrognathia using 3D-CT data sets and compare it with pre-operative situation. In this observational retrospective study, we report our experience in five consecutive patients who underwent MDO in an attempt to relieve severe upper airway obstruction. Each patient was evaluated before treatment (T0) and at the end of distraction procedure (T1) with computer tomography (CT) in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes and three-dimensional CT of the facial bones and upper airway. Using parameters to extract only data within anatomic constraints, a digital set of the edited upper airway volume was obtained. The volume determination was used for volumetric qualification of upper airway. The computed tomographic digital data were used to evaluate the upper airway volumes both pre-distraction and post-distraction. The mean length of distraction was 23 mm. Quantitative assessment of upper airway volume before and after distraction demonstrated increased volumes ranging from 84% to 3,087% with a mean of 536%. In conclusion, our study seems to show that DO can significantly increase the volume of the PAS in patients with upper airway obstruction following micrognathia, by an average of 5 times. Furthermore, the worse is the starting volume, the greater the increase in PAS to equal distraction.

  10. Space charge neutralization in inertial electrostatic confinement plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Evstatiev, E. G.; Nebel, R. A.; Chacon, L.; Park, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2007-04-15

    A major issue for electron injected inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices is space charge neutralization. A new formalism is developed that will allow this neutralization to occur for both oscillating and steady-state IEC plasmas. Results indicate that there are limits on the amount of compression that can be achieved by oscillating plasmas while simultaneously maintaining space charge neutralization and parabolic background potential. For steady-state plasmas, there are no such limits and space charge neutralization can be achieved even when the plasma becomes quasineutral.

  11. Development of a Space-charge-sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Hazmi, Ariadi; Takagi, Nobuyuki; Wang, Daohong; Watanabe, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    A system for remotely measuring the distribution of air space charge in real time is developed. The system consists of a loudspeaker and an electric field antenna. By propagating a burst of directional sound wave from the speaker, a modulation in the space charge and, therefore, an electric field change at ground is produced. The distribution of the space charge density is derived from the E-field change which can be measured by the E-field antenna. The developed system has been confirmed by both laboratory and field experiments. PMID:28903279

  12. Observation and simulation of space-charge effects in a radio-frequency photoinjector using a transverse multibeamlet distribution.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; Rihaoui, M.; Piot, P.

    2009-12-29

    We report on an experimental study of space-charge effects in a radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. A 5 MeV electron bunch, consisting of a number of beamlets separated transversely, was generated in an rf photocathode gun and propagated in the succeeding drift space. The collective interaction of these beamlets was studied for different experimental conditions. The experiment allowed the exploration of space-charge effects and its comparison with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Our observations also suggest the possible use of a multibeam configuration to tailor the transverse distribution of an electron beam.

  13. Preparation and photo-induced charge transfer of the composites based on 3D structural CdS nanocrystals and MEH-PPV

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Dan; Shi, Minmin; Chen, Fei; Chen, Lin; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hongzheng

    2010-05-15

    We report the synthesis of 3D structural CdS nanocrystals by a simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal process. The CdS nanocrystals are composed of many branched nanorods with the diameter of about 50 nm, and the length of about 250 nm. The phase and crystallographic properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The composites based on CdS nanocrystals and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (MEH-PPV) have been prepared by spin-coating of the mixture in the common solvent. The optical properties of the composites are investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. A significant fluorescence quenching of MEH-PPV in the composites is observed at high CdS nanocrystals/MEH-PPV ratios, indicating that the photo-induced charge transfer occurred due to the energy level offset between the donor MEH-PPV and the acceptor CdS nanocrystals. The obvious photovoltaic behavior of the solar cell made from this composite further demonstrates the mentioned photo-induced charge transfer process. (author)

  14. 3D-QSAR Studies on Barbituric Acid Derivatives as Urease Inhibitors and the Effect of Charges on the Quality of a Model.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Ashraf, Sajda; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Barakat, Assem

    2016-04-30

    Urease enzyme (EC 3.5.1.5) has been determined as a virulence factor in pathogenic microorganisms that are accountable for the development of different diseases in humans and animals. In continuance of our earlier study on the helicobacter pylori urease inhibition by barbituric acid derivatives, 3D-QSAR (three dimensional quantitative structural activity relationship) advance studies were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Different partial charges were calculated to examine their consequences on the predictive ability of the developed models. The finest developed model for CoMFA and CoMSIA were achieved by using MMFF94 charges. The developed CoMFA model gives significant results with cross-validation (q²) value of 0.597 and correlation coefficients (r²) of 0.897. Moreover, five different fields i.e., steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic, H-bond acceptor and H-bond donors were used to produce a CoMSIA model, with q² and r² of 0.602 and 0.98, respectively. The generated models were further validated by using an external test set. Both models display good predictive power with r²pred ≥ 0.8. The analysis of obtained CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided detailed insight for the promising modification of the barbituric acid derivatives with an enhanced biological activity.

  15. 3D-QSAR Studies on Barbituric Acid Derivatives as Urease Inhibitors and the Effect of Charges on the Quality of a Model

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Ashraf, Sajda; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Barakat, Assem

    2016-01-01

    Urease enzyme (EC 3.5.1.5) has been determined as a virulence factor in pathogenic microorganisms that are accountable for the development of different diseases in humans and animals. In continuance of our earlier study on the helicobacter pylori urease inhibition by barbituric acid derivatives, 3D-QSAR (three dimensional quantitative structural activity relationship) advance studies were performed by Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Different partial charges were calculated to examine their consequences on the predictive ability of the developed models. The finest developed model for CoMFA and CoMSIA were achieved by using MMFF94 charges. The developed CoMFA model gives significant results with cross-validation (q2) value of 0.597 and correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.897. Moreover, five different fields i.e., steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic, H-bond acceptor and H-bond donors were used to produce a CoMSIA model, with q2 and r2 of 0.602 and 0.98, respectively. The generated models were further validated by using an external test set. Both models display good predictive power with r2pred ≥ 0.8. The analysis of obtained CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps provided detailed insight for the promising modification of the barbituric acid derivatives with an enhanced biological activity. PMID:27144563

  16. Early transverse decoherence of bunches with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Ivan; Kornilov, Vladimir; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The transverse decoherence of injected bunches is an important phenomenon in synchrotrons and storage rings. The initial stage of this process determines the transverse emittance blowup, which should be taken into account for the design of feedback systems, for example. The interplay of different high-intensity effects can strongly affect the initial decoherence stage. We present a model that explains decoherence and emittance growth with chromaticity, space charge, and image charges within the first synchrotron period. We compare the model for different combinations of parameters with self-consistent particle tracking simulations and measurements in the SIS18 synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt. Generally, space charge slows down the decoherence process and can cause the loss of decoherence. Chromaticity and image charges can partly compensate this loss and restore the decoherence. We also analyze the single-particle excitation driven by space charge during the decoherence process. Particles gain large amplitudes from the coherent beam oscillation, which leads to halo buildup and losses.

  17. Space charge effects and aberrations on electron pulse compression in a spherical electrostatic capacitor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Haibo; Wan, Weishi; Wei, Zheng; Grzelakowski, Krzysztof P; Tromp, Rudolf M; Tang, Wen-Xin

    2017-07-06

    The effects of space charge, aberrations and relativity on temporal compression are investigated for a compact spherical electrostatic capacitor (α-SDA). By employing the three-dimensional (3D) field simulation and the 3D space charge model based on numerical General Particle Tracer and SIMION, we map the compression efficiency for a wide range of initial beam size and single-pulse electron number and determine the optimum conditions of electron pulses for the most effective compression. The results demonstrate that both space charge effects and aberrations prevent the compression of electron pulses into the sub-ps region if the electron number and the beam size are not properly optimized. Our results suggest that α-SDA is an effective compression approach for electron pulses under the optimum conditions. It may serve as a potential key component in designing future time-resolved electron sources for electron diffraction and spectroscopy experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  19. A 3d-3d appetizer

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us tomore » see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.« less

  20. A 3d-3d appetizer

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  1. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: • D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. • Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. • To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} to 3.66 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  2. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density. PMID:28052105

  3. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  4. Assessment and control of electrostatic charges. [hazards to space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, M.

    1974-01-01

    The experience is described of NASA and DOD with electrostatic problems, generation mechanisms, and type of electrostatic hazards. Guidelines for judging possible effects of electrostatic charges on space missions are presented along with mathematical formulas and definitions.

  5. Space charge induced velocity spread in a gyrotron MIG

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Liu, C.; Levush, B.; Kimura, T.; Danly, B.

    1995-12-31

    The perpendicular velocity spread associated with phase mixing due to DC space charge in a Magnetron Injection Gun is investigated. A simple model is introduced to describe the mixing process. Results for the MIT 170 GHz gun are obtained and compared with EGUN simulations. This new model provides a more accurate and efficient approach for analyzing the space charge induced velocity spread in MIG`s.

  6. Landau damping of space-charge dominated Fermilab Booster beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space-charge making Landau damping impossible. However, it is shown that the bunching structure of the beam reduces the mean space-charge tune shift. As a result, the beam can be stabilized by suitable octupole-driven tune spread.

  7. Space-Charge Effects in a Gas Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2010-12-03

    Discussion of space-charge effects in a photoluminescence cell that will be used as a nondisruptive total energy monitor at the LCLS facility is presented. Regimes where primary photoelectrons will be confined within the X-ray beam aperture are identified. Effects of the space-charge on the further evolution of the electron and ion populations are discussed. Parameters of the afterglow plasma are evaluated. Conditions under which the detector output will be proportional to the pulse energy are defined.

  8. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  9. Formation of High Charge State Heavy Ion Beams with intense Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.

    2011-03-01

    High charge-state heavy-ion beams are of interest and used for a number of accelerator applications. Some accelerators produce the beams downstream of the ion source by stripping bound electrons from the ions as they pass through a foil or gas. Heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF) would benefit from low-emittance, high current ion beams with charge state >1. For these accelerators, the desired dimensionless perveance upon extraction from the emitter is {approx}10{sup -3}, and the electrical current of the beam pulse is {approx}1 A. For accelerator applications where high charge state and very high current are desired, space charge effects present unique challenges. For example, in a stripper, the separation of charge states creates significant nonlinear space-charge forces that impact the beam brightness. We will report on the particle-in-cell simulation of the formation of such beams for HIF, using a thin stripper at low energy.

  10. Space-charge limits of ion sensitive probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Ochoukov, R.; Sullivan, R.; Whyte, D.

    2013-12-01

    Ion sensitive probes (ISPs) are used to measure ion temperature and plasma potential in magnetized plasmas. Their operation relies on the difference in electron and ion Larmor radii to preferentially collect the ion species on a recessed electrode. Because of their simple two-electrode construction and optimal geometry for heat flux handling they are an attractive probe to use in the high heat flux boundary of magnetic confinement fusion experiments. However, the integrity of its measurements is rarely, if ever, checked under such conditions. Recent measurements with an ISP in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have shown that its ion current is space-charge limited and thus its current-voltage (I-V) response does not contain information on the ion temperature. We numerically solve a 1D Vlasov-Poisson model of ion collection to determine how much bias is needed to overcome space-charge effects and regain the classic I-V characteristic with an exponential decay. Prompted by the observations of space charge in C-Mod, we have performed a survey of ISP measurements reported in the literature. Evidence of space-charge limited current collection is found on many probes, with few authors noting its presence. Some probes are able to apparently exceed the classic 1D space-charge limit because electrons can E × B drift into the probe volume, partially reducing the net ion charge; it is argued that this does not, however, change the basic problem that space charge compromises the measurement of ion temperature. Guidance is given for design of ISPs to minimize the effects of space charge.

  11. Less Is More: Efficacy of Rapid 3D-T2 SPACE in ED Patients with Acute Atypical Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Nicholas A; Wiggins, Richard H; Mills, Megan K; McLaughlin, Michael S; Pigman, Elaine C; Anzai, Yoshimi; Shah, Lubdha M

    2017-08-01

    Emergency department (ED) patients with acute low back pain (LBP) may present with ambiguous clinical findings that pose diagnostic challenges to exclude cauda equina syndrome (CES). As a proof of concept, we aimed to determine the efficacy of a rapid lumbar spine (LS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening protocol consisting of a single 3D-T2 SPACE FS (3D-T2 Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution fat saturated) sequence relative to conventional LS MRI to exclude emergently treatable pathologies in this complex patient population. LS MRI protocol including a sagittal 3D-T2 SPACE FS pulse sequence was added to the routine for ED patients presenting with acute atypical LBP over a 12-month period. Imaging findings were categorically scored on the 3D-T2 SPACE FS sequence and separately on the reference standard conventional LS MRI sequences. Patients' symptoms were obtained from review of the electronic medical record. Descriptive test statistics were performed. Of the 206 ED patients who obtained MRI for acute atypical LBP, 118 (43.3 ± 13.5 years of age; 61 female) were included. Specific pathologies detected on reference standard conventional MRI included disc herniation (n = 30), acute fracture (n = 3), synovial cyst (n = 3), epidural hematoma (n = 2), cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 1), and leptomeningeal metastases (n = 1), and on multiple occasions these pathologies resulted in nerve root impingement (n = 36), severe spinal canal stenosis (n = 13), cord/conus compression (n = 2), and cord signal abnormality (n = 2). The 3D-T2 SPACE FS sequence was an effective screen for fracture (sensitivity [sens] = 100%, specificity [spec] = 100%), cord signal abnormality (sens = 100%, spec = 99%), and severe spinal canal stenosis (sens = 100%, spec = 96%), and identified cord compression not seen on reference standard. Motion artifact was not seen on

  12. Space charge neutralization by electron-transparent suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Srisonphan, Siwapon; Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene possesses many fascinating properties originating from the manifold potential for interactions at electronic, atomic, or molecular levels. Here we report measurement of electron transparency and hole charge induction response of a suspended graphene anode on top of a void channel formed in a SiO2/Si substrate. A two-dimensional (2D) electron gas induced at the oxide interface emits into air and makes a ballistic transport toward the suspended graphene. A small fraction (>~0.1%) of impinging electrons are captured at the edge of 2D hole system in graphene, demonstrating good transparency to very low energy (<3 eV) electrons. The hole charges induced in the suspended graphene anode have the effect of neutralizing the electron space charge in the void channel. This charge compensation dramatically enhances 2D electron gas emission at cathode to the level far surpassing the Child-Langmuir's space-charge-limited emission. PMID:24441774

  13. Space charge neutralization by electron-transparent suspended graphene.

    PubMed

    Srisonphan, Siwapon; Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo

    2014-01-20

    Graphene possesses many fascinating properties originating from the manifold potential for interactions at electronic, atomic, or molecular levels. Here we report measurement of electron transparency and hole charge induction response of a suspended graphene anode on top of a void channel formed in a SiO2/Si substrate. A two-dimensional (2D) electron gas induced at the oxide interface emits into air and makes a ballistic transport toward the suspended graphene. A small fraction (>~0.1%) of impinging electrons are captured at the edge of 2D hole system in graphene, demonstrating good transparency to very low energy (<3 eV) electrons. The hole charges induced in the suspended graphene anode have the effect of neutralizing the electron space charge in the void channel. This charge compensation dramatically enhances 2D electron gas emission at cathode to the level far surpassing the Child-Langmuir's space-charge-limited emission.

  14. Numerical Study of Three Dimensional Effects in Longitudinal Space-Charge Impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    Longitudinal space-charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as detrimental in free-electron lasers as they can seed instabilities. Such “microbunching instabilities” were recently shown to be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation pulses [1, 2]. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beamlines capable of sustaining this LSC instability as a mechanism to produce a coherent light source. To date most of these studies have been carried out with a one-dimensional impedance model for the LSC. In this paper we use a N-body “Barnes-Hut” algorithm [3] to simulate the 3D space charge force in the beam combined with elegant [4] and explore the limitation of the 1D model often used

  15. Correction of the deterministic part of space-charge interaction in momentum microscopy of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Schönhense, G; Medjanik, K; Tusche, C; de Loos, M; van der Geer, B; Scholz, M; Hieke, F; Gerken, N; Kirschner, J; Wurth, W

    2015-12-01

    Ultrahigh spectral brightness femtosecond XUV and X-ray sources like free electron lasers (FEL) and table-top high harmonics sources (HHG) offer fascinating experimental possibilities for analysis of transient states and ultrafast electron dynamics. For electron spectroscopy experiments using illumination from such sources, the ultrashort high-charge electron bunches experience strong space-charge interactions. The Coulomb interactions between emitted electrons results in large energy shifts and severe broadening of photoemission signals. We propose a method for a substantial reduction of the effect by exploiting the deterministic nature of space-charge interaction. The interaction of a given electron with the average charge density of all surrounding electrons leads to a rotation of the electron distribution in 6D phase space. Momentum microscopy gives direct access to the three momentum coordinates, opening a path for a correction of an essential part of space-charge interaction. In a first experiment with a time-of-flight momentum microscope using synchrotron radiation at BESSY, the rotation in phase space became directly visible. In a separate experiment conducted at FLASH (DESY), the energy shift and broadening of the photoemission signals were quantified. Finally, simulations of a realistic photoemission experiment including space-charge interaction reveals that a gain of an order of magnitude in resolution is possible using the correction technique presented here.

  16. Use of high-resolution X-ray computed tomography and 3D image analysis to quantify mineral dissemination and pore space in oxide copper ore particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bao-hua; Wu, Ai-xiang; Narsilio, Guillermo A.; Miao, Xiu-xiu; Wu, Shu-yue

    2017-09-01

    Mineral dissemination and pore space distribution in ore particles are important features that influence heap leaching performance. To quantify the mineral dissemination and pore space distribution of an ore particle, a cylindrical copper oxide ore sample (ϕ4.6 mm × 5.6 mm) was scanned using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT), a nondestructive imaging technology, at a spatial resolution of 4.85 μm. Combined with three-dimensional (3D) image analysis techniques, the main mineral phases and pore space were segmented and the volume fraction of each phase was calculated. In addition, the mass fraction of each mineral phase was estimated and the result was validated with that obtained using traditional techniques. Furthermore, the pore phase features, including the pore size distribution, pore surface area, pore fractal dimension, pore centerline, and the pore connectivity, were investigated quantitatively. The pore space analysis results indicate that the pore size distribution closely fits a log-normal distribution and that the pore space morphology is complicated, with a large surface area and low connectivity. This study demonstrates that the combination of HRXCT and 3D image analysis is an effective tool for acquiring 3D mineralogical and pore structural data.

  17. Tracking Efficiency And Charge Sharing of 3D Silicon Sensors at Different Angles in a 1.4T Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Gjersdal, H.; Bolle, E.; Borri, M.; Da Via, C.; Dorholt, O.; Fazio, S.; Grenier, P.; Grinstein, S. Hansson, P.; Hasi, J.; Hugging, F.; Jackson, P.; Kenney, C.; Kocian, M.; La Rosa, A.; Mastroberardino, A.; Nordahl, P.; Rivero, F.; Rohne, O.; Sandaker, H.; Sjobaek, K.; /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /SLAC /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2012-05-07

    A 3D silicon sensor fabricated at Stanford with electrodes penetrating throughout the entire silicon wafer and with active edges was tested in a 1.4 T magnetic field with a 180 GeV/c pion beam at the CERN SPS in May 2009. The device under test was bump-bonded to the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 readout electronics chip. Three readout electrodes were used to cover the 400 {micro}m long pixel side, this resulting in a p-n inter-electrode distance of {approx} 71 {micro}m. Its behavior was confronted with a planar sensor of the type presently installed in the ATLAS inner tracker. Time over threshold, charge sharing and tracking efficiency data were collected at zero and 15{sup o} angles with and without magnetic field. The latest is the angular configuration expected for the modules of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) currently under study for the LHC phase 1 upgrade expected in 2014.

  18. Reconstruction of the 3D charge distribution of an electron bunch using a novel variable-polarization transverse deflecting structure (TDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, D.; Assmann, R.; Craievich, P.; Dorda, U.; Grudiev, A.; Marchetti, B.

    2017-07-01

    A TDS is a well-known device for the characterization of the longitudinal properties of an electron bunch in a linear accelerator. So far, the correlation of the slice properties in the horizontal/vertical planes of the electron bunch distribution has been characterized by using a TDS system deflecting in the vertical/horizontal directions respectively and analysing the image on a subsequent screen. Recently, an innovative design for a TDS structure has been proposed, which includes the possibility of continuously varying the angle of the transverse streaking field inside a TDS structure. This allows the beam distribution to be characterized in all transverse directions. By collecting measurements of bunches streaked at different angles and combining them using tomographic techniques, it is possible to retrieve 3D distributions of the charge density. In this paper, a method is proposed and simulation results are presented to show the feasibility of such an approach at the upcoming accelerator R&D facility, SINBAD, at DESY.

  19. Space charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Mahale, N.K.; Mehta, N.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.; York, R.C.

    1991-05-01

    By means of multi-particle tracking, we explore space charge effects in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) which has a strong requirement for small transverse emittance. Macro-particles are tracked in a self-consistent manner in six dimensional phase space with transverse space charge kicks so that the emittance evolution as well as the particle distribution are simulated as a function of time. Among recent improvements of the code, the longitudinal motion, i.e. synchrotron oscillations as well as acceleration, makes it possible to simulate the capture process of linac microbunches. The code was calibrated by comparing with the experimental results at the Fermilab Booster. Preliminary results of the LEB show slow emittance growth due to the space charge. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 3D Reconstructed Cyto-, Muscarinic M2 Receptor, and Fiber Architecture of the Rat Brain Registered to the Waxholm Space Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Nicole; Axer, Markus; Schober, Martin; Huynh, Anh-Minh; Huysegoms, Marcel; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Leergaard, Trygve B.; Kirlangic, Mehmet E.; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution multiscale and multimodal 3D models of the brain are essential tools to understand its complex structural and functional organization. Neuroimaging techniques addressing different aspects of brain organization should be integrated in a reference space to enable topographically correct alignment and subsequent analysis of the various datasets and their modalities. The Waxholm Space (http://software.incf.org/software/waxholm-space) is a publicly available 3D coordinate-based standard reference space for the mapping and registration of neuroanatomical data in rodent brains. This paper provides a newly developed pipeline combining imaging and reconstruction steps with a novel registration strategy to integrate new neuroimaging modalities into the Waxholm Space atlas. As a proof of principle, we incorporated large scale high-resolution cyto-, muscarinic M2 receptor, and fiber architectonic images of rat brains into the 3D digital MRI based atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat in Waxholm Space. We describe the whole workflow, from image acquisition to reconstruction and registration of these three modalities into the Waxholm Space rat atlas. The registration of the brain sections into the atlas is performed by using both linear and non-linear transformations. The validity of the procedure is qualitatively demonstrated by visual inspection, and a quantitative evaluation is performed by measurement of the concordance between representative atlas-delineated regions and the same regions based on receptor or fiber architectonic data. This novel approach enables for the first time the generation of 3D reconstructed volumes of nerve fibers and fiber tracts, or of muscarinic M2 receptor density distributions, in an entire rat brain. Additionally, our pipeline facilitates the inclusion of further neuroimaging datasets, e.g., 3D reconstructed volumes of histochemical stainings or of the regional distributions of multiple other receptor types, into the Waxholm Space

  1. 3D Reconstructed Cyto-, Muscarinic M2 Receptor, and Fiber Architecture of the Rat Brain Registered to the Waxholm Space Atlas.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Nicole; Axer, Markus; Schober, Martin; Huynh, Anh-Minh; Huysegoms, Marcel; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Bjaalie, Jan G; Leergaard, Trygve B; Kirlangic, Mehmet E; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution multiscale and multimodal 3D models of the brain are essential tools to understand its complex structural and functional organization. Neuroimaging techniques addressing different aspects of brain organization should be integrated in a reference space to enable topographically correct alignment and subsequent analysis of the various datasets and their modalities. The Waxholm Space (http://software.incf.org/software/waxholm-space) is a publicly available 3D coordinate-based standard reference space for the mapping and registration of neuroanatomical data in rodent brains. This paper provides a newly developed pipeline combining imaging and reconstruction steps with a novel registration strategy to integrate new neuroimaging modalities into the Waxholm Space atlas. As a proof of principle, we incorporated large scale high-resolution cyto-, muscarinic M2 receptor, and fiber architectonic images of rat brains into the 3D digital MRI based atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat in Waxholm Space. We describe the whole workflow, from image acquisition to reconstruction and registration of these three modalities into the Waxholm Space rat atlas. The registration of the brain sections into the atlas is performed by using both linear and non-linear transformations. The validity of the procedure is qualitatively demonstrated by visual inspection, and a quantitative evaluation is performed by measurement of the concordance between representative atlas-delineated regions and the same regions based on receptor or fiber architectonic data. This novel approach enables for the first time the generation of 3D reconstructed volumes of nerve fibers and fiber tracts, or of muscarinic M2 receptor density distributions, in an entire rat brain. Additionally, our pipeline facilitates the inclusion of further neuroimaging datasets, e.g., 3D reconstructed volumes of histochemical stainings or of the regional distributions of multiple other receptor types, into the Waxholm Space

  2. A method of 3D reconstruction via ISAR Sequences based on scattering centers association for space rigid object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zou, Jiangwei; Xu, Shiyou; Tian, Biao; Chen, Zengping

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the effects of orbits motion makes for scattering centers trajectory is analyzed, and introduced to scattering centers association, as a constraint. A screening method of feature points is presented to analysis the false points of reconstructed result, and the wrong association which lead these false points. The loop iteration between 3D reconstruction and association result makes the precision of final reconstructed result have a further improvement. The simulation data shows the validity of the algorithm.

  3. Electrostatic behaviour of materials in a charging space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, Jean-Pierre; Payan, Denis

    2003-09-01

    Electrostatics is one of major concerns of spacecraft technology. Space is filled with hot and low-density plasma building up high differential voltages resulting in electrostatic discharges, sometimes causing an anomalous behavior of spacecraft electronics. The interaction of the satellite with its environment induces a static charge of the various materials which it is made of. The flow and the evacuation of the charges would require a conductive satellite. Unfortunately, the reality is different and satellites are covered with dielectric materials highly resistant for thermo-optic specific purpose. It is resulting in a absolute charge value of the structure of the satellite and in a differential charge built-up between its components that can be at the origin of electrostatic discharges which consequences can end up in the loss of the satellite itself. Typical anomalies will be reviewed, it will be shown how they can be recognized as consequences of environmental induced discharges. The distribution of charges over different parts of the spacecraft is depending of ambient conditions: plasma temperature and density and sun illumination. Surface and internal charging are possible; they result in dielectric or metal arcing discharges. Understanding of charging phenomena allows us to define mitigation techniques by controlling charging, electromagnetic interference. At last, we will end with the presentation of what it is done in France and in Europe though activities in the domain of space environment in order to take into account problems in a more general context.

  4. Detection of Leptomeningeal Metastasis by Contrast-Enhanced 3D T1-SPACE: Comparison with 2D FLAIR and Contrast-Enhanced 2D T1-Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Bomi; Hwang, Eo-Jin; Lee, Song; Jang, Jinhee; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced 3D(dimensional) T1-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions (T1-SPACE), 2D fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image in detection of leptomeningeal metastasis except for invasive procedures such as a CSF tapping. Materials and Methods Three groups of patients were included retrospectively for 9 months (from 2013-04-01 to 2013-12-31). Group 1 patients with positive malignant cells in CSF cytology (n = 22); group 2, stroke patients with steno-occlusion in ICA or MCA (n = 16); and group 3, patients with negative results on MRI, whose symptom were dizziness or headache (n = 25). A total of 63 sets of MR images are separately collected and randomly arranged: (1) CE 3D T1-SPACE; (2) 2D FLAIR; and (3) CE T1-GRE using a 3-Tesla MR system. A faculty neuroradiologist with 8-year-experience and another 2nd grade trainee in radiology reviewed each MR image- blinded by the results of CSF cytology and coded their observations as positives or negatives of leptomeningeal metastasis. The CSF cytology result was considered as a gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity of each MR images were calculated. Diagnostic accuracy was compared using a McNemar’s test. A Cohen's kappa analysis was performed to assess inter-observer agreements. Results Diagnostic accuracy was not different between 3D T1-SPACE and CSF cytology by both raters. However, the accuracy test of 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE was inconsistent by the two raters. The Kappa statistic results were 0.657 (3D T1-SPACE), 0.420 (2D FLAIR), and 0.160 (2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE). The 3D T1-SPACE images showed the highest inter-observer agreements between the raters. Conclusions Compared to 2D FLAIR and 2D contrast-enhanced T1-weighted GRE, contrast-enhanced 3D T1 SPACE showed a better detection rate of

  5. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Marty-Dessus, D. Ziani, A. C.; Berquez, L.; Petre, A.

    2015-04-15

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  6. Analytical theory of the space-charge region of lateral p-n junctions in nanofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2015-07-21

    There is growing interest in fabricating conventional semiconductor devices in a nanofilm which could be a 3D material with one reduced dimension (e.g., silicon-on-insulator (SOI) film), or single/multiple layers of a 2D material (e.g., MoS{sub 2}), or a two dimensional electron gas/two dimensional hole gas (2DEG/2DHG) layer. Lateral p-n junctions are essential parts of these devices. The space-charge region electrostatics in these nanofilm junctions is strongly affected by the surrounding field, unlike in bulk junctions. Current device physics of nanofilms lacks a simple analytical theory of this 2D electrostatics of lateral p-n junctions. We present such a theory taking into account the film's thickness, permittivity, doping, interface charge, and possibly different ambient permittivities on film's either side. In analogy to the textbook theory of the 1D electrostatics of bulk p-n junctions, our theory yields simple formulas for the depletion width, the extent of space-charge tails beyond this width, and the screening length associated with the space-charge layer in nanofilm junctions; these formulas agree with numerical simulations and measurements. Our theory introduces an electrostatic thickness index to classify nanofilms into sheets, bulk and intermediate sized.

  7. Effect of water on the space charge formation in XLPE

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ayako; Takahashi, Tohru; Yamamaoto, Syuji

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the authors describe the effect of water on the space charge in crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE). In order to study the effects of water and by-products of crosslinking, they prepared two types of samples. The water in the first one (Type A) is controlled by immersing in water after removing the by-products, and the water in the other type (Type B) of samples is controlled by the water from the decomposition of cumyl-alcohol by heating. The authors measured the space charge formation by pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. A large difference was observed between Type A and Type B. In Type A samples (containing only water) the space charge distribution changes from homogeneous to heterogeneous as the water content increases, whereas in Type B (containing water and by-product) all samples exhibit heterogeneous space charge distribution. However, merely the effect of water for both types was almost the same, including peculiar space charge behavior near the water solubility limit.

  8. Large Space Structure Charging during Eclipse Passage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-15

    ADDRESS(It different fron Controllng Olfc1 ) IS. SECURITY ::LASS (of In$. report) Unclassified IS.. DE’.LASSIFICATION ’DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 16 ...as a Function of Vmax, the Eclipse Potential 15 10. Ohmic Power Loss in Solar Power Satellite as a Function of Resistivity 16 Tables 1. Space Plasma...total drop between the ends of the structure 6V. The high-resistance curve is nearly linear, owing to the fact 12 - pHo 4 X10- 6 A/M 2 DA1.0 16 800

  9. Quantum theory of space charge limited current in solids

    SciTech Connect

    González, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    We present a quantum model of space charge limited current transport inside trap-free solids with planar geometry in the mean field approximation. We use a simple transformation which allows us to find the exact analytical solution for the steady state current case. We use our approach to find a Mott-Gurney like behavior and the mobility for single charge carriers in the quantum regime in solids.

  10. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  11. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng; Zhang, He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2012-02-01

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  12. Fourier-Space Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Sadot, O.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-12-05

    Nonlinear growth of 3-D broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and later amplified during acceleration by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation velocities are measured for the first time and are found to be in excellent agreement with Haan predictions. The measured growth of long-wavelength modes is consistent with enhanced, nonlinear, long-wavelength generation in ablatively driven targets.

  13. Fourier-space nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor growth measurements of 3D laser-imprinted modulations in planar targets.

    PubMed

    Smalyuk, V A; Sadot, O; Delettrez, J A; Meyerhofer, D D; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C

    2005-11-18

    Nonlinear growth of 3D broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and later amplified during acceleration by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation velocities are measured for the first time and are found to be in excellent agreement with Haan predictions. The measured growth of long-wavelength modes is consistent with enhanced, nonlinear, long-wavelength generation in ablatively driven targets.

  14. Enhancements to the opera-3d suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Christopher P.

    1997-02-01

    The OPERA-3D suite of programs has been enhanced to include 2 additional 3 dimensional finite element based solvers, with complimentary features in the pre- and postprocessing. SOPRANO computes electromagnetic fields at high frequency including displacement current effects. It has 2 modules—a deterministic solution at a user defined frequency and an eigenvalue solution for modal analysis. It is suitable for designing microwave structures and cavities found in particle accelerators. SCALA computes electrostatic fields in the presence of space charge from charged particle beams. The user may define the emission characteristics of electrodes or plasma surfaces and compute the resultant space charge limited beams, including the presence of magnetic fields. Typical applications in particle accelerators are electron guns and ion sources. Other enhancements to the suite include additional capabilities in TOSCA and ELEKTRA, the static and dynamic solvers.

  15. Charging of space debris in the LEO and GEO regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Abhijit; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar

    The near exponential rise of space debris at the satellite orbital altitudes (particularly in the low earth orbit (LEO) region) and the risk they pose for space assets is a source of major concern for all nations engaged in space activities. Considerable efforts are therefore being expended into accurate modeling and tracking of these objects and various ideas for the safe removal of these debris are being explored. The debris objects are likely to acquire a large amount of charge since they are typically found in a plasma environment - such as the earth’s ionospheric plasma in the LEO region (100 kms to 1000 kms) and the radiation belts in the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) region. The consequent flow of electron and ion currents on them lead to the accumulation of a large amount of surface charge and the development of a surface potential on these objects. The influence of the plasma environment on the dynamics and charging of the debris is a relatively unexplored area of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Space Debris (SD) research and can be potentially important for the accurate prediction of the long-term evolution of debris orbits and their collision probabilities with other space objects. In this paper we will report on the charging of space debris under a variety of orbital conditions in the LEO and GEO regions using both analytic and particle-in-cell (PIC) modeling. The analytic estimates are obtained using refined Orbit Motion Limited (OML) modeling while the simulation studies are carried out using the SPIS code [1]. In the GEO region account is taken of charging due to photoemission processes as well as energetic beam charging. The PIC approach enables us to study charging of irregularly shaped debris objects as well as differential charging on objects that are composed of patches of conducting and insulated regions. The dynamical consequences of the debris charging on their orbital trajectories and rotational characteristics will be discussed. [1] J

  16. Emittance growth for the thermalization of space-charged nonuniformities

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Lee, Edward P.

    2001-03-01

    Beams injected into a linear focusing channel typically have some degree of space-charge nonuniformity. In general, injected particle distributions with systematic charge nonuniformities are not equilibria of the focusing channel and launch a broad spectrum of collective modes. These modes can phase-mix and have nonlinear wave-wave interactions which, at high space-charge intensities, results in a relaxation to a more thermal-like distribution characterized by a uniform density profile. This thermalization can transfer self-field energy from the initial space-charge nonuniformity to the local particle temperature, thereby increasing beam phase space area (emittance growth). In this paper, we employ a simple kinetic model of a continuous focusing channel and build on previous work that applied system energy and charge conservation to quantify emittance growth associated with the collective thermalization of an initial azimuthally symmetric, rms matched beam with a radial density profile that is hollowed or peaked. This emittance growth is shown to be surprisingly modest even for high beam intensities with significant radial structure in the initial density profile.

  17. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    Modern accelerator applications, such as heavy ion fusion drivers, pulsed neutron sources, electron injectors for high-energy linear colliders, and X-ray Free Electron Lasers, demand beams with high intensity, low emittance and small energy spread. At low (non-relativistic) energies, the "electrostatic", collective interactions from space-charge forces existing in such intense beams play the dominant role; we characterize these beams as space-charge dominated beams. This dissertation presents numerous new findings on the longitudinal dynamics of a space-charge dominated beam, particularly on the propagation of density perturbations. In order to fully understand the complex physics of longitudinal space-charge waves, we combine the results of theory, computer simulation, and experiment. In the Long Solenoid Experimental system (LSE), with numerous diagnostic tools and techniques, we have, for the first time, experimentally measured the detailed energy profiles of longitudinal space-charge waves at different locations, both near the beam source and at the end of the transport system. Along with the current profiles, we have a complete set of experimental data for the propagation of space-charge waves. We compare these measured results to a 1-D theory and find better agreement for beams with perturbations in the linear regime, where the perturbation strength is less than 10%, than those with nonlinear perturbations. Using fast imaging techniques that we newly developed, we have, for the first time, obtained the progressive time-resolved images of longitudinal slices of a space-charge dominated beam. These images not only provide us time-resolved transverse density distribution of the beam, but also enable us to take time-resolved transverse phase space measurement using computerized tomography. By combining this information with the longitudinal energy measurement, we have, for the first time, experimentally constructed the full 6-D phase space. Part of the results

  18. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  19. Improved Space Charge Modeling for Simulation and Design of Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert H. Jackson, Thuc Bui, John Verboncoeur

    2010-04-19

    Photoinjectors in advanced high-energy accelerators reduce beam energy spreads and enhance undulator photon fluxes. Photoinjector design is difficult because of the substantial differences in time and spatial scales. This Phase I program explored an innovative technique, the local Taylor polynomial (LTP) formulation, for improving finite difference analysis of photoinjectors. This included improved weighting techniques, systematic formula for high order interpolation and electric field computation, and improved handling of space charge. The Phase I program demonstrated that the approach was powerful, accurate, and efficient. It handles space charge gradients better than currently available technology.

  20. Physics-based Simulation of Human Posture Using 3D Whole Body Scanning Technology for Astronaut Space Suit Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Jung

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years high precision three-dimensional (3D) full body laser scanners have been developed to be used as a powerful anthropometry tool for quantification of the morphology of the human body. The full body scanner can quickly extract body characteristics in non-contact fashion. It is required for the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) to have capabilities for kinematics simulation of a digital human at various postures whereas the laser scanner only allows capturing a single static posture at each time. During this summer fellowship period a theoretical study has been conducted to estimate an arbitrary posture with a series of example postures through finite element (FE) approximation and found that four-point isoparametric FE approximation would result in reasonable maximum position errors less than 5%. Subsequent pilot scan experiments demonstrated that a bead marker with a nominal size of 6 mm could be used as a marker for digitizing 3-D coordinates of anatomical landmarks for further kinematic analysis. Two sessions of human subject testing were conducted for reconstruction of an arbitrary postures from a set of example postures for each joint motion for the forearm/hand complex and the whole upper extremity.

  1. Evaluation of Time and Space Scales in a Spatially Developing 3D Turbulent Incompressible Mixing Layer by Using LES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP013651 TITLE: Evaluation of Time and Space Scales in a Spatially...the following component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP013620 thru ADP013707 UNCLASSIFIED EVALUATION OF TIME AND SPACE SCALES IN A...Simulation (LES). The time and space fluctuations of velocity components lead to the energy spectra. We can then to highlight the characteristic scales in

  2. Usefulness of the SPACE pulse sequence at 1.5T MR cholangiography: comparison of image quality and image acquisition time with conventional 3D-TSE sequence.

    PubMed

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Kidoh, Masafumi; Maruyama, Natsuki; Kawahara, Tetsuya; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Sakai, Yoshinari; Harada, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2013-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate the image quality and image acquisition time at 3D magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) using sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts (SPACE) and conventional turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequences. We acquired navigator-triggered SPACE and conventional 3D-TSE MRCP images using the same parameters where possible for 30 patients and compared the image acquisition time, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the common bile duct (CBD). Two radiologists performed qualitative analyses using a 4-point scale. Image acquisition time was 31% shorter with the SPACE than the conventional TSE sequence (248.9 ± 73.0 sec vs. 360.5 ± 99.9 sec, P < 0.01). The contrast and CNR was significantly higher with the SPACE technique than conventional TSE (39.4 ± 14.7 vs. 33.5 ± 14.2, P < 0.01 and 18.6 ± 7.8 vs. 15.5 ± 9.3, P = 0.03). All visual scores were higher for the SPACE than the conventional TSE sequence; there was a significant difference in motion artifacts and the depiction of the CBD and the left hepatic and main pancreatic duct (P < 0.05). On the 1.5T MR scanner, 3D-MRCP with the SPACE sequence significantly improved the contrast and CNR of CBD. In addition, it yielded images of better quality at 30% shorter acquisition time than constant refocusing pulse flip angle TSE. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Magnetic charge lattices, moduli spaces and fusion rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmeijer, L.; Slingerland, J. K.; Schroers, B. J.; Bais, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the labelling and fusion properties of magnetic charge sectors consisting of smooth BPS monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with arbitrary gauge group G spontaneously broken to a subgroup H. The magnetic charges are restricted by a generalized Dirac quantization condition and by an inequality due to Murray. Geometrically, the set of allowed charges is a solid cone in the coroot lattice of G, which we call the Murray cone. We argue that magnetic charge sectors correspond to points in this cone divided by the Weyl group of H so that magnetic charge sectors are labelled by dominant integral weights of the dual group H. We define generators of the Murray cone modulo Weyl group, and interpret the monopoles in the associated magnetic charge sectors as basic; monopoles in sectors with decomposable charges are interpreted as composite configurations. This interpretation is supported by the dimensionality of the moduli spaces associated to the magnetic charges and by classical fusion properties for smooth monopoles in particular cases. Throughout the paper we compare our findings with corresponding results for singular monopoles recently obtained by Kapustin and Witten.

  4. Comparison of NSTX FIDA, Charge Exchange, and Neutron Fluxes with Calculated Signals Based on CQL3D-FOW Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.; Kinsey, J. E.; Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Taylor, G.; Bonoli, P. T.

    2014-10-01

    Ion distribution function calculations with CQL3D have been substantially advanced through implementation of guiding-center-orbit-based Fokker-Planck Coefficients. The resulting finite-orbit-width (FOW) calculations are carried out with a fast CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW option, and in a slower but neoclassically complete (except no Er yet) CQL3D-FOW option. Good comparison between time-dependent Fast Ion Diagnostic FIDA, NPA, and neutron signals resulting from neutral beaminjection(NBI) and high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power injected into the NSTX spherical tokamak have been simulated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, using only the FOW effects on QL diffusion, and particle losses, direct and CX. Comparisons are also made with recent CQL3D-FOW results, as well as between the original FIDA calculation code and a recent fortran version. Supported by USDOE Grants SC0006614, ER54744, and ER44649.

  5. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A radial sampling strategy for uniform k-space coverage with retrospective respiratory gating in 3D ultrashort-echo-time lung imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinil; Shin, Taehoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jang-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 3D radial-sampling strategy which maintains uniform k-space sample density after retrospective respiratory gating, and demonstrate its feasibility in free-breathing ultrashort-echo-time lung MRI. A multi-shot, interleaved 3D radial sampling function was designed by segmenting a single-shot trajectory of projection views such that each interleaf samples k-space in an incoherent fashion. An optimal segmentation factor for the interleaved acquisition was derived based on an approximate model of respiratory patterns such that radial interleaves are evenly accepted during the retrospective gating. The optimality of the proposed sampling scheme was tested by numerical simulations and phantom experiments using human respiratory waveforms. Retrospectively, respiratory-gated, free-breathing lung MRI with the proposed sampling strategy was performed in healthy subjects. The simulation yielded the most uniform k-space sample density with the optimal segmentation factor, as evidenced by the smallest standard deviation of the number of neighboring samples as well as minimal side-lobe energy in the point spread function. The optimality of the proposed scheme was also confirmed by minimal image artifacts in phantom images. Human lung images showed that the proposed sampling scheme significantly reduced streak and ring artifacts compared with the conventional retrospective respiratory gating while suppressing motion-related blurring compared with full sampling without respiratory gating. In conclusion, the proposed 3D radial-sampling scheme can effectively suppress the image artifacts due to non-uniform k-space sample density in retrospectively respiratory-gated lung MRI by uniformly distributing gated radial views across the k-space. PMID:26891126

  7. Space-Charge Modulation in Vacuum Microdiodes at THz Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Andreas; Manolescu, Andrei; Valfells, Agust

    2010-04-30

    We investigate the dynamics of a space-charge limited, photoinjected, electron beam in a microscopic vacuum diode. Because of the small nature of the system it is possible to conduct high-resolution simulations where the number of simulated particles is equal to the number of electrons within the system. In a series of simulations of molecular dynamics type, where electrons are treated as point charges, we address and analyze space-charge effects in a micrometer-scale vacuum diode. We have been able to reproduce breakup of a single pulse injected with a current density beyond the Child-Langmuir limit, and we find that continuous injection of current into the diode gap results in a well-defined train of electron bunches corresponding to THz frequency. A simple analytical explanation of this behavior is given.

  8. Space charge effect simulation at electrons channeling in laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, E. N.; Dik, A. V.; Dabagov, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    In this work we present simulation results for electron beam channeling in ponderomotive potential of laser fields, calculated with a newly created code for electron beam dynamics taking into account space charge effect. It is shown that the use of laser field allows the electron beam to be shaped including focusing and collimation.

  9. Space Charge Dominated Beams in the Iucf Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    1995-01-01

    Many present and future accelerator projects require significantly increased brightness of the accelerated and stored beams to make modern nuclear and high energy experiments feasible. In the case of IUCF Cooler it has been stated that there is strong motivation for increased beam intensity to provide the designed luminosity for the future Light Ion Spin Synchrotron. To achieve the desired brightness of the beam one must consider a complex problem involving both effective injection and circumventing various intensity limits. This dissertation is essentially a collection of theoretical models and experimental observations which, taken together, make an attempt to analyze numerous intensity and space charge related effects in the IUCF Cooler. We found that the proton beams in the IUCF Cooler are nearly completely space charge dominated longitudinally. This leads to a number of beam properties, such as coherent synchrotron frequency shift and an absence of decoherence in the synchrotron phase oscillations, which have not been observed before. We observed experimentally that the intensity limit in the IUCF Cooler is a peak current limit due to space charge effects. Beam losses occur due to incoherent transverse effects, such as large space charge tune shift and the formation of tails. In addition to that, a very precise bunched beam current monitor was invented and tested. This device could be used in the future precise nuclear experiments.

  10. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS) in the frame of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station (ISS) is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European Columbus module the experiment “Dose Distribution Inside the ISS” (DOSIS), under the project and science lead of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The DOSIS experiment consists of a combination of “Passive Detector Packages” (PDP) distributed at eleven locations inside Columbus for the measurement of the spatial variation of the radiation field and two active Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTELs) with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) in a dedicated nomex pouch mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) for the measurement of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. The DOSIS experiment suite measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 2009 to June 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the follow up DOSIS 3D experiment. The hardware for DOSIS 3D was launched with Soyuz 30S to the ISS on May 15th 2012. The PDPs are replaced with each even number Soyuz flight starting with Soyuz 30S. Data from the active detectors is transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated once a month for this action. The presentation will give an overview of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D experiment and focus on the results from the passive radiation detectors from the DOSIS 3D experiment

  11. Space charges can significantly affect the dynamics of accelerator maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountis, Tassos; Skokos, Charalampos

    2006-10-01

    Space charge effects can be very important for the dynamics of intense particle beams, as they repeatedly pass through nonlinear focusing elements, aiming to maximize the beam's luminosity properties in the storage rings of a high energy accelerator. In the case of hadron beams, whose charge distribution can be considered as “frozen” within a cylindrical core of small radius compared to the beam's dynamical aperture, analytical formulas have been recently derived [C. Benedetti, G. Turchetti, Phys. Lett. A 340 (2005) 461] for the contribution of space charges within first order Hamiltonian perturbation theory. These formulas involve distribution functions which, in general, do not lead to expressions that can be evaluated in closed form. In this Letter, we apply this theory to an example of a charge distribution, whose effect on the dynamics can be derived explicitly and in closed form, both in the case of 2-dimensional as well as 4-dimensional mapping models of hadron beams. We find that, even for very small values of the “perveance” (strength of the space charge effect) the long term stability of the dynamics changes considerably. In the flat beam case, the outer invariant “tori” surrounding the origin disappear, decreasing the size of the beam's dynamical aperture, while beyond a certain threshold the beam is almost entirely lost. Analogous results in mapping models of beams with 2-dimensional cross section demonstrate that in that case also, even for weak tune depressions, orbital diffusion is enhanced and many particles whose motion was bounded now escape to infinity, indicating that space charges can impose significant limitations on the beam's luminosity.

  12. Space-charge physics and the breakdown process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, G.

    1995-04-01

    The trapping of charges in hard dielectric materials has been recently described [G. Blaise, IEEE Trans. Electr. Insul. EI-28, 437 (1993)] on the basis of the polaron concept. A local increase of the internal energy of the medium Up˜5-10 eV results from the polarization around a trapped charge. The relaxation of the lattice after a rapid detrapping of charges from their site releases the local excess of internal energy to the medium, producing breakdown when critical conditions are reached. This scenario is applied to the electric breakdown of a parallel-plate capacitor in which the space charge results from the injection of electrons at the cathode. Breakdown at the cathode is produced by the destabilization of a static space charge when the field in dielectric gap exceeds the detrapping field of charges. This determines the minimum value ‖EM1‖ of the field strength. At the anode breakdown is due to the trapping-detrapping of flowing charges. This corresponds to the maximum value of the field strength ‖EM2‖. The model allows the interpretation of scaling laws observed experimentally: an inverse relationship of the field strength with the dielectric constant ɛ; a dependence of the field strength on the length l of the gap (size effect). It is demonstrated that, provided the total amount of charges is bounded when l→∞, the field strength ‖EM2‖ is necessarily a decreasing function of l, tending toward a finite value. This interpretation of breakdown applies to bulk breakdown observed in small-gap capacitors and surface flashover observed in large-gap capacitors as well.

  13. Classification and segmentation of orbital space based objects against terrestrial distractors for the purpose of finding holes in shape from motion 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Flores, Arturo; Hoffman, Heiko

    2013-12-01

    3D reconstruction of objects via Shape from Motion (SFM) has made great strides recently. Utilizing images from a variety of poses, objects can be reconstructed in 3D without knowing a priori the camera pose. These feature points can then be bundled together to create large scale scene reconstructions automatically. A shortcoming of current methods of SFM reconstruction is in dealing with specular or flat low feature surfaces. The inability of SFM to handle these places creates holes in a 3D reconstruction. This can cause problems when the 3D reconstruction is used for proximity detection and collision avoidance by a space vehicle working around another space vehicle. As such, we would like the automatic ability to recognize when a hole in a 3D reconstruction is in fact not a hole, but is a place where reconstruction has failed. Once we know about such a location, methods can be used to try to either more vigorously fill in that region or to instruct a space vehicle to proceed with more caution around that area. Detecting such areas in earth orbiting objects is non-trivial since we need to parse out complex vehicle features from complex earth features, particularly when the observing vehicle is overhead the target vehicle. To do this, we have created a Space Object Classifier and Segmenter (SOCS) hole finder. The general principle we use is to classify image features into three categories (earth, man-made, space). Classified regions are then clustered into probabilistic regions which can then be segmented out. Our categorization method uses an augmentation of a state of the art bag of visual words method for object categorization. This method works by first extracting PHOW (dense SIFT like) features which are computed over an image and then quantized via KD Tree. The quantization results are then binned into histograms and results classified by the PEGASOS support vector machine solver. This gives a probability that a patch in the image corresponds to one of three

  14. Joint Design of Excitation k-Space Trajectory and RF Pulse for Small-Tip 3D Tailored Excitation in MRI.

    PubMed

    Hao, Sun; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Noll, Douglas C; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new method for the joint design of k-space trajectory and RF pulse in 3D small-tip tailored excitation. Designing time-varying RF and gradient waveforms for a desired 3D target excitation pattern in MRI poses a non-linear, non-convex, constrained optimization problem with relatively large problem size that is difficult to solve directly. Existing joint pulse design approaches are therefore typically restricted to predefined trajectory types such as EPI or stack-of-spirals that intrinsically satisfy the gradient maximum and slew rate constraints and reduce the problem size (dimensionality) dramatically, but lead to suboptimal excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. Here we use a 2nd-order B-spline basis that can be fitted to an arbitrary k-space trajectory, and allows the gradient constraints to be implemented efficiently. We show that this allows the joint optimization problem to be solved with quite general k-space trajectories. Starting from an arbitrary initial trajectory, we first approximate the trajectory using B-spline basis, and then optimize the corresponding coefficients. We evaluate our method in simulation using four different k-space initializations: stack-of-spirals, SPINS, KT-points, and a new method based on KT-points. In all cases, our approach leads to substantial improvement in excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. We also validated our method for inner-volume excitation using phantom experiments. The computation is fast enough for online applications.

  15. Extracting a high-quality data space for stereo-tomography based on a 3D structure tensor algorithm and kinematic de-migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Kai; Yang, Kai; Wang, Yu-Xiang

    2017-08-01

    To extract a high-quality data space (the so-called kinematic invariants) is a key factor to a successful implementation of stereo-tomography. The structure tensor algorithm demonstrated itself a robust tool to pick the kinematic invariants for stereo-tomography. However, if there are lots of diffractions and other noises in the data, it could be risky to extract the data space from the data domain. Meanwhile, for any reflector, we try to pick all the relevant primary reflections as much as possible within a wide offset range. To achieve this, in this paper, we design a scheme to extract a high-quality data space for stereo-tomography based on 3D structure tensor and kinematic de-migration. Firstly, we apply an automatic, dense volumetric picking for residual move-out (RMO) and the structural dip in the depth-migrated domain with an advanced 3D structure tensor algorithm. Then, a set of key horizons are picked manually in a few selected depth-migrated common offset gathers. Finally, all the picked horizons are extrapolated along the offset axis based on the RMO information picked in advance. Thus, the initial high-density points picked in the depth-migrated volume are greatly refined. After this processing, a final and refined data space for stereo-tomography is extracted through a kinematic de-migration. We demonstrate the correctness and the robustness of the presented scheme with synthetic and real data examples.

  16. An experiment to study the effects of space flight cells of mesenchymal origin in the new model 3D-graft in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volova, Larissa

    One of the major health problems of the astronauts are disorders of the musculoskeletal system, which determines the relevance of studies of the effect of space flight factors on osteoblastic and hondroblastic cells in vitro. An experiment to study the viability and proliferative activity of cells of mesenchymal origin on culture: chondroblasts and dermal fibroblasts was performed on SC "BION -M" № 1 with scientific equipment " BIOKONT -B ." To study the effect of space flight conditions in vitro at the cellular level has developed a new model with 3D- graft as allogeneic demineralized spongiosa obtained on technology Lioplast ®. For space and simultaneous experiments in the laboratory of the Institute of Experimental Medicine and Biotechnology Samara State Medical University were obtained from the cell culture of hyaline cartilage and human skin, which have previously been grown, and then identified by morphological and immunohistochemical methods. In the experiment, they were seeded on the porous 3D- graft (controlled by means of scanning electron and confocal microscopy) and cultured in full growth medium. After completion of the flight of spacecraft "BION -M" № 1 conducted studies of biological objects using a scanning electron microscope (JEOL JSM-6390A Analysis Station, Japan), confocal microscopy and LDH - test. According to the results of the experiment revealed that after a 30- day flight of the cells not only retained vitality, but also during the flight actively proliferate, and their number has increased by almost 8 times. In synchronous experiment, all the cells died by this date. The experimentally confirmed the adequacy of the proposed model 3D- graft in studying the effect of space flight on the morphological and functional characteristics of cells in vitro.

  17. High spatial resolution 3D MR cholangiography with high sampling efficiency technique (SPACE): comparison of 3T vs. 1.5T.

    PubMed

    Arizono, Shigeki; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Maetani, Yoji S; Hirokawa, Yuusuke; Shimada, Kotaro; Nakamoto, Yuji; Shibata, Toshiya; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate image quality of 3D MR cholangiography (MRC) using high sampling efficiency technique (SPACE) at 3T compared with 1.5T. An IRB approved prospective study was performed with 17 healthy volunteers using both 3 and 1.5T MR scanners. MRC images were obtained with free-breathing navigator-triggered 3D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence with SPACE (TR, >2700ms; TE, 780ms at 3T and 801ms at 1.5T; echo-train length, 121; voxel size, 1.1mmx1.0mmx0.84mm). The common bile duct (CBD) to liver contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were compared between 3 and 1.5T. A five-point scale was used to compare overall image quality and visualization of the third branches of bile duct (B2, B6, and B8). The depiction of cystic duct insertion and the highest order of bile duct visible were also compared. The results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. CNR between the CBD and liver was significantly higher at 3T than 1.5T (p=0.0006). MRC at 3T showed a significantly higher overall image quality (p=0.0215) and clearer visualization of B2 (p=0.0183) and B6 (p=0.0106) than at 1.5T. In all analyses of duct visibility, 3T showed higher scores than 1.5T. 3T MRC using SPACE offered better image quality than 1.5T. SPACE technique facilitated high-resolution 3D MRC with excellent image quality at 3T. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Development at NASA Langley Research Center for NASA Space-Based 3-D Winds Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Yu, Jirong; Koch, Grady J.

    2012-01-01

    We review the 20-plus years of pulsed transmit laser development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to enable a coherent Doppler wind lidar to measure global winds from earth orbit. We briefly also discuss the many other ingredients needed to prepare for this space mission.

  19. Coming down to Earth: Helping Teachers Use 3D Virtual Worlds in Across-Spaces Learning Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muñoz-Cristóbal, Juan A.; Prieto, Luis P.; Asensio-Pérez, Juan I.; Martínez-Monés, Alejandra; Jorrín-Abellán, Iván M.; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Different approaches have explored how to provide seamless learning across multiple ICT-enabled physical and virtual spaces, including three-dimensional virtual worlds (3DVW). However, these approaches present limitations that may reduce their acceptance in authentic educational practice: The difficulties of authoring and sharing teacher-created…

  20. Improving stall design: use of 3-D kinematics to measure space use by dairy cows when lying down.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, A; Sanderson, D; Rushen, J; Weary, D M

    2004-07-01

    Uncomfortable stalls reduce the time cows spend resting and are a risk factor for lameness. Although recommendations for stall dimensions are available, little research supports these recommendations. In this study, kinematic techniques were used to provide the first accurate measures of space used by Holstein dairy cows during lying-down movements in an open space and in a free stall. Cows (n=5, mean parity 3.2 +/- 1.0, body weight=607 +/- 21 kg) used up to 300 cm of longitudinal space when lying down, more than is typically provided by current industry recommendations for stall length. Cows used up to 109 cm of lateral space (180% of hip width), an estimate that is within current recommendations for stall width. During the lying-down movement, maximal lateral displacements at the hip occurred in two vertical zones: one between 95 and 135 cm, and the second less than 50 cm above the lying surface. Maximal longitudinal displacements of the nose were clustered 10 to 30 cm above the surface. These heights should be taken into account when designing and positioning stall partitions. Maximum instantaneous velocity of body markers approached 220 cm/s, indicating that cows can contact inappropriately placed stall partitions and the lying surface with considerable force. Kinematic techniques are promising ways of assessing spatial requirements of cattle to improve stall design. Further work is required to assess a wider range of cow sizes and stall configurations.

  1. Coming down to Earth: Helping Teachers Use 3D Virtual Worlds in Across-Spaces Learning Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muñoz-Cristóbal, Juan A.; Prieto, Luis P.; Asensio-Pérez, Juan I.; Martínez-Monés, Alejandra; Jorrín-Abellán, Iván M.; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Different approaches have explored how to provide seamless learning across multiple ICT-enabled physical and virtual spaces, including three-dimensional virtual worlds (3DVW). However, these approaches present limitations that may reduce their acceptance in authentic educational practice: The difficulties of authoring and sharing teacher-created…

  2. Dynamics of extended space charge in concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2010-06-01

    This paper is concerned with ionic currents from an electrolyte solution into a charge selective solid, such as an electrode, an ion exchange membrane or an array of nanochannels in a microfluidic system. All systems of this kind have characteristic voltage-current curves with segments in which current nearly saturates at some plateau values due to concentration polarization—formation of solute concentration gradients under the passage of a dc current. A number of seemingly different phenomena occurring in that range, such as anomalous rectification in cathodic copper deposition from a copper sulfate solution, superfast vortexes near an ion-exchange granule, overlimiting conductance in electrodialysis and the recently observed nonequilibrium electro-osmotic instability, result from formation of an additional extended space charge layer next to that of a classical electrical double layer at the solid/liquid interface or, rather, from the peculiar features of the extended space charge distinguishing it from that of a common diffuse electrical double layer. In this paper we discuss the nature and origin of the extended space charge and analyze its peculiar steady state and time-dependent properties important for understanding nonequilibrium electrokinetic phenomena in ionic systems.

  3. Space-charge compensation in high-intensity proton rings

    SciTech Connect

    A. Burov, G.W. Foster and V.D. Shiltsev

    2000-09-21

    Recently, it was proposed to use negatively charged electron beams for compensation of beam-beam effects due to protons in the Tevatron collider. The authors show that a similar compensation is possible in space-charge dominated low energy proton beams. The idea has a potential of several-fold increase of the FNAL Booster beam brightness. Best results will be obtained using three electron lenses around the machine circumference, using co-moving electron beam with time structure and profile approximately matched to the proton beam. This technique, if feasible, will be more cost effective than the straightforward alternative of increasing the energy of the injection linac.

  4. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  5. Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing in NASA: An Overview of Current Projects and Future Initiatives for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA, including each Mission Directorate, is investing in, experimenting with, and/or utilizing AM across a broad spectrum of applications and projects; Centers have created and are continuing to create partnerships with industry, other Government Agencies, other Centers, and Universities; In-house additive manufacturing capability enables rapid iteration of the entire design, development and testing process, increasing innovation and reducing risk and cost to projects; For deep space exploration, AM offers significant reduction to logistics costs and risk by providing ability to create on demand; There are challenges: Overwhelming message from recent JANNAF AM for Propulsion Applications TIM was "certification."; NASA will continue to work with our partners to address this and other challenges to advance the state of the art in AM and incorporate these capabilities into an array of applications from aerospace to science missions to deep space exploration.

  6. A two-level space-time color-coding method for 3D measurements using structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qi; Wang, Zhao; Huang, Junhui; Gao, Jianmin; Qi, Zhaoshuai

    2015-11-01

    Color-coding methods have significantly improved the measurement efficiency of structured light systems. However, some problems, such as color crosstalk and chromatic aberration, decrease the measurement accuracy of the system. A two-level space-time color-coding method is thus proposed in this paper. The method, which includes a space-code level and a time-code level, is shown to be reliable and efficient. The influence of chromatic aberration is completely mitigated when using this method. Additionally, a self-adaptive windowed Fourier transform is used to eliminate all color crosstalk components. Theoretical analyses and experiments have shown that the proposed coding method solves the problems of color crosstalk and chromatic aberration effectively. Additionally, the method guarantees high measurement accuracy which is very close to the measurement accuracy using monochromatic coded patterns.

  7. Constraining the Properties of the Eta Carinae System via 3-D SPH Models of Space-Based Observations: The Absolute Orientation of the Binary Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Russell, Christopher M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The extremely massive (> 90 Stellar Mass) and luminous (= 5 x 10(exp 6) Stellar Luminosity) star Eta Carinae, with its spectacular bipolar "Homunculus" nebula, comprises one of the most remarkable and intensely observed stellar systems in the Galaxy. However, many of its underlying physical parameters remain unknown. Multiwavelength variations observed to occur every 5.54 years are interpreted as being due to the collision of a massive wind from the primary star with the fast, less dense wind of a hot companion star in a highly elliptical (e approx. 0.9) orbit. Using three-dimensional (3-D) Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary wind-wind collision, together with radiative transfer codes, we compute synthetic spectral images of [Fe III] emission line structures and compare them to existing Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) observations. We are thus able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute orientation of the binary orbit on the sky. An orbit with an inclination of approx. 40deg, an argument of periapsis omega approx. 255deg, and a projected orbital axis with a position angle of approx. 312deg east of north provides the best fit to the observations, implying that the orbital axis is closely aligned in 3-D space with the Homunculus symmetry axis, and that the companion star orbits clockwise on the sky relative to the primary.

  8. FIBRASCAN: a novel method for 3D white matter tract reconstruction in MR space from cadaveric dissection.

    PubMed

    Zemmoura, Ilyess; Serres, Barthélémy; Andersson, Frédéric; Barantin, Laurent; Tauber, Clovis; Filipiak, Isabelle; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Venturini, Gilles; Destrieux, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion tractography relies on complex mathematical models that provide anatomical information indirectly, and it needs to be validated. In humans, up to now, tractography has mainly been validated by qualitative comparison with data obtained from dissection. No quantitative comparison was possible because Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and dissection data are obtained in different reference spaces, and because fiber tracts are progressively destroyed by dissection. Here, we propose a novel method and software (FIBRASCAN) that allow accurate reconstruction of fiber tracts from dissection in MRI reference space. Five human hemispheres, obtained from four formalin-fixed brains were prepared for Klingler's dissection, placed on a holder with fiducial markers, MR scanned, and then dissected to expose the main association tracts. During dissection, we performed iterative acquisitions of the surface and texture of the specimens using a laser scanner and two digital cameras. Each texture was projected onto the corresponding surface and the resulting set of textured surfaces was coregistered thanks to the fiducial holders. The identified association tracts were then interactively segmented on each textured surface and reconstructed from the pile of surface segments. Finally, the reconstructed tracts were coregistered onto ex vivo MRI space thanks to the fiducials. Each critical step of the process was assessed to measure the precision of the method. We reconstructed six fiber tracts (long, anterior and posterior segments of the superior longitudinal fasciculus; Inferior fronto-occipital, Inferior longitudinal and uncinate fasciculi) from cadaveric dissection and ported them into ex vivo MRI reference space. The overall accuracy of the method was of the order of 1mm: surface-to-surface registration=0.138mm (standard deviation (SD)=0.058mm), deformation of the specimen during dissection=0.356mm (SD=0.231mm), and coregistration surface-MRI=0.6mm (SD=0.274mm). The spatial

  9. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  10. What is the "best" atomic charge model to describe through-space charge-transfer excitations?

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, Denis; Le Bahers, Tangui; Adamo, Carlo; Ciofini, Ilaria

    2012-04-28

    We investigate the efficiency of several partial atomic charge models (Mulliken, Hirshfeld, Bader, Natural, Merz-Kollman and ChelpG) for investigating the through-space charge-transfer in push-pull organic compounds with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory approaches. The results of these models are compared to benchmark values obtained by determining the difference of total densities between the ground and excited states. Both model push-pull oligomers and two classes of "real-life" organic dyes (indoline and diketopyrrolopyrrole) used as sensitisers in solar cell applications have been considered. Though the difference of dipole moments between the ground and excited states is reproduced by most approaches, no atomic charge model is fully satisfactory for reproducing the distance and amount of charge transferred that are provided by the density picture. Overall, the partitioning schemes fitting the electrostatic potential (e.g. Merz-Kollman) stand as the most consistent compromises in the framework of simulating through-space charge-transfer, whereas the other models tend to yield qualitatively inconsistent values.

  11. Space charge effects in bunches for different rf wave forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Shukla, Tripti

    2005-03-01

    The interplay of nonlinear rf fields and space charge is studied using a particle simulation code together with analytic derivations. In the framework of the elliptic (“Hofmann-Pedersen”) distribution function the matched beam parameters are obtained. Using the simulation “Schottky” noise from matched bunches the coherent mode spectrum is analyzed and compared with analytic expression. The bunch response to a small rf phase modulation is studied over a large range of initial simulation parameters (modulation frequency, bunch intensity). These bunch response scans clearly show the location of the dipole mode frequency as well as the threshold for the loss of Landau damping due to space charge. In addition, bunch stability scans are performed in order to determine the stability boundaries for flattopped bunches in single and double rf wave forms. The results are related to previous work on beam transfer functions in single and double rf buckets and to experimental observations in the GSI synchrotron SIS.

  12. Space charge effects on the dielectric response of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhong-Hui; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Xin; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing; Shen, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Adding high-κ ceramic nanoparticles into polymers is a general strategy to improve the performances in energy storage. Classic effective medium theories may fail to predict the effective permittivity in polymer nanocomposites wherein the space charge effects are important. In this work, a computational model is developed to understand the space charge effects on the frequency-dependent dielectric properties including the real permittivity and the loss for polymer nanocomposites with both randomly distributed and aggregated nanoparticle fillers. It is found that the real permittivity of the SrTiO3/polyethylene (12% SrTiO3 in volume fraction) nanocomposite can be increased to as high as 60 when there is nanoparticle aggregation and the ion concentration in the bulk polymer is around 1016 cm-3. This model can be employed to quantitatively predict the frequency-dependent dielectric properties for polymer nanocomposites with arbitrary microstructures.

  13. The stationary Navier-Stokes equations in 3D exterior domains. An approach in anisotropically weighted L spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafison, Ulrich

    We consider the three-dimensional exterior problem for stationary Navier-Stokes equations. We prove, under assumptions of smallness of the data, existence and uniqueness of solutions. By setting the problem in weighted spaces where the weights reflect the anisotropic decay properties of the fundamental solution of Oseen, we show the better decay of the solutions outside the wake region. Moreover, the solutions we obtained have a finite Dirichlet integral and under additional assumptions on the weights they are also PR-solutions in the sense of Finn [R. Finn, On the exterior stationary problem for the Navier-Stokes equations, and associated perturbation problems, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 19 (1965) 363-406]. The study relies on an L-theory for 1

  14. Space charge induced velocity spread in a gyrotron MIG

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Lui, C.; Levush, B.

    1996-12-31

    Generally speaking, there are a variety of sources of velocity spread, including the initial thermal velocity spread, spread due to roughness of the surface on the cathode and spread due to the effect of beam space charge. The velocity spread caused by the first two items is difficult to eliminate in principle, and related problems have been studied. The authors focus on the third item, the velocity spread due to the beam space charge field, and regard the effects of temperature and surface roughness as initial conditions in the simulation. It has been shown that a change in velocity spread begins during the beam`s transition from an initially laminar state to a highly nonlaminar mixed state. The model aimed at investigating this effect. A simple model is introduced to describe the mixing process. A periodically varying potential caused by the nonuniform space charge is found to be associated with spiraling electrons, and breaks the adiabatic constancy of the magnetic moment. This space charge potential does not vanish until electrons are completely mixed. Consequently, a spread in perpendicular velocity is introduced in the mixing from the originally in phase state to the randomly mixed state. The study suggests that the velocity spread due to temperature or cathode roughness is taken into account, and could be less if a larger spread in guiding center radii can be tolerated. This new model provides a more accurate and efficient approach for analyzing the velocity spread due to mixing in MIG`s. Simulations are performed by using the design parameters of the MIT 170 GHz MIG. The velocity spread obtained from this model is a little larger than that predicted by the EGUN finite-element calculation, and the possible cases are analyzed.

  15. Space charge induced velocity spread in a gyrotron MIG

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Lui, C.; Levush, B.

    1996-12-31

    Generally speaking, there are a variety of sources of velocity spread, including the initial thermal velocity spread, spread due to roughness of the surface on the cathode and spread due to the effect of beam space charge. The velocity spread caused by the first two items is difficult to eliminate in principle, and related problems have been studied. The authors focus on the third item, the velocity spread due to the beam space charge field, and regard the effects of temperature and surface roughness as initial conditions in their simulation. It has been shown that a change in velocity spread begins during the beam`s transition from an initially laminar state to a highly nonlaminar mixed state. Their model is aimed at investigating this effect. A simple model is introduced to describe the mixing process. A periodically varying potential caused by the nonuniform space charge is found to be associated with spiraling electrons, and breaks the adiabatic constancy of the magnetic moment. This space charge potential does not vanish until electrons are completely mixed. Consequently, a spread in perpendicular velocity is introduced in the mixing from the originally in phase state to the randomly mixed state. The study suggests that the velocity spread due to temperature or cathode roughness is taken into account, and could be less if a larger spread in guiding center radii can be tolerated. This new model provides a more accurate and efficient approach for analyzing the velocity spread due to mixing in MIG`s. Simulations are performed by using the design parameters of the MIT 170 GHz MIG. The velocity spread obtained from this model is a little larger than that predicted by the EGUN finite-element calculation, and the possible cases are analyzed.

  16. Modeling space charge in beams for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.

    1995-05-02

    A new analytic model is presented which accurately estimates the radially averaged axial component of the space-charge field of an axisymmetric heavy-ion beam in a cylindrical beam pipe. The model recovers details of the field near the beam ends that are overlooked by simpler models, and the results compare well to exact solutions of Poisson`s equation. Field values are shown for several simple beam profiles and are compared with values obtained from simpler models.

  17. Halo and space charge issues in the SNS Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Abell, D.T.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Malitsky, N.; Wei, J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    2000-06-30

    The latest designs for high-intensity proton rings require minimizing beam-induced radioactivation of the vacuum chamber. Although the tune depression in the ring is much smaller than in high-intensity linacs, space-charge contributions to halo formation and, hence, beam loss may be significant. This paper reviews our current understanding of halo formation issues for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring.

  18. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0–20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary. PMID:27973530

  19. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    PubMed

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  20. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1992-08-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  1. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 machine. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel efficiency of particle-tracking implementation on any parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  2. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  3. A parallel implementation of particle tracking with space charge effects on an Intel iPSC/860

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Machida, S.

    1993-04-01

    Particle-tracking simulation is one of the scientific applications that is well-suited to parallel computations. At the Superconducting Super Collider, it has been theoretically and empirically demonstrated that particle tracking on a designed lattice can achieve very high parallel efficiency on a MIMD Intel iPSC/860 macene. The key to such success is the realization that the particles can be tracked independently without considering their interaction. The perfectly parallel nature of particle tracking is broken if the interaction effects between particles are included. The space charge introduces an electromagnetic force that will affect the motion of tracked particles in 3-D space. For accurate modeling of the beam dynamics with space charge effects, one needs to solve three-dimensional Maxwell field equations, usually by a particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm. This will require each particle to communicate with its neighbor grids to compute the momentum changes at each time step. It is expected that the 3-D PIC method will degrade parallel computer. In this paper, we describe an efficient scheme for implementing particle tracking with space charge effects on an INTEL iPSC/860 machine. Experimental results show that a parallel efficiency of 75% can be obtained.

  4. Diagnostic Quality of 3D T2-SPACE Compared with T2-FSE in the Evaluation of Cervical Spine MRI Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, F H; Sadigh, G; Carpenter, W; Allen, J W

    2017-04-01

    Spinal anatomy has been variably investigated using 3D MRI. We aimed to compare the diagnostic quality of T2 sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using flip angle evolution (SPACE) with T2-FSE sequences for visualization of cervical spine anatomy. We predicted that T2-SPACE will be equivalent or superior to T2-FSE for visibility of anatomic structures. Adult patients undergoing cervical spine MR imaging with both T2-SPACE and T2-FSE sequences for radiculopathy or myelopathy between September 2014 and February 2015 were included. Two blinded subspecialty-trained radiologists independently assessed the visibility of 12 anatomic structures by using a 5-point scale and assessed CSF pulsation artifact by using a 4-point scale. Sagittal images and 6 axial levels from C2-T1 on T2-FSE were reviewed; 2 weeks later and after randomization, T2-SPACE was evaluated. Diagnostic quality for each structure and CSF pulsation artifact visibility on both sequences were compared by using a paired t test. Interobserver agreement was calculated (κ). Forty-five patients were included (mean age, 57 years; 40% male). The average visibility scores for intervertebral disc signal, neural foramina, ligamentum flavum, ventral rootlets, and dorsal rootlets were higher for T2-SPACE compared with T2-FSE for both reviewers (P < .001). Average scores for remaining structures were either not statistically different or the superiority of one sequence was discordant between reviewers. T2-SPACE showed less degree of CSF flow artifact (P < .001). Interobserver variability ranged between -0.02-0.20 for T2-SPACE and -0.02-0.30 for T2-FSE (slight to fair agreement). T2-SPACE may be equivalent or superior to T2-FSE for the evaluation of cervical spine anatomic structures, and T2-SPACE shows a lower degree of CSF pulsation artifact. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Phase Space Tomography: A Simple, Portable and Accurate Technique to Map Phase Spaces of Beams with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Walter, M.; Haber, I.; Fiorito, R.; Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P. G.; Li, H.

    2006-11-27

    In order to understand the charged particle dynamics, e.g. the halo formation, emittance growth, x-y energy transfer and coupling, knowledge of the actual phase space is needed. Other the past decade there is an increasing number of articles who use tomography to map the beam phase space and measure the beam emittance. These studies where performed at high energy facilities where the effect of space charge was neglible and therefore not considered in the analysis. This work extends the tomography technique to beams with space charge. In order to simplify the analysis linear forces where assumed. By carefully modeling the tomography process using the particle-in-cell code WARP we test the validity of our assumptions and the accuracy of the reconstructed phase space. Finally, we report experimental results of phase space mapping at the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) using tomography.

  6. 3-D Reconstruction of Macular Type II Cell Innervation Patterns in Space-Flight and Control Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel Dorothy; Montgomery, K.; Linton, S.; Cheng, R.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A semiautomated method for reconstructing objects from serial thin sections has been developed in the Biocomputation Center. The method is being used to completely, for the first time, type II hair cells and their innervations. The purposes are to learn more about the fundamental circuitry of the macula on Earth and to determine whether changes in connectivities occur under space flight conditions. Data captured directly from a transmission electron microscope via a video camera are sent to a graphics workstation. There, the digitized micrographs are mosaicked into sections and contours are traced, registered and displayed by semiautomated methods. Current reconstructions are of type II cells from the medial part of rat maculas collected in-flight on the Space Life Sciences-2 mission, 4.5 hrs post-flight, and from a ground control. Results show that typical type II cells receive processes from tip to six nearby calyces or afferents. Nearly all processes are elongated and have bouton-like enlargements; some have numerous vesicles. Multiple (2 to 4) processes from a single calyx to a type II cell are common, and approximately 1/3 of the processes innervale 2 or 3 type II cells or a neighboring cluster. From 2% to 6% of the cells resemble type I cells morphologically but have demi-calyces. Thus far, increments in synaptic number in type II cells of flight rats are prominent along processes that supply two hair cells. It is clear that reconstruction methods provide insights into details of macular circuitry not obtainable by other techniques. The results demonstrate a morphological basis for interactions between adjacent receptive fields through feed back-feed forward connections, and for dynamic alterations in receptive field range and activity during preprocessing of linear acceleratory information by the maculas. The reconstruction method we have developed will find further applications in the study of the details of neuronal architecture of more complex systems, to

  7. 3-D Reconstruction of Macular Type II Cell Innervation Patterns in Space-Flight and Control Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel Dorothy; Montgomery, K.; Linton, S.; Cheng, R.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A semiautomated method for reconstructing objects from serial thin sections has been developed in the Biocomputation Center. The method is being used to completely, for the first time, type II hair cells and their innervations. The purposes are to learn more about the fundamental circuitry of the macula on Earth and to determine whether changes in connectivities occur under space flight conditions. Data captured directly from a transmission electron microscope via a video camera are sent to a graphics workstation. There, the digitized micrographs are mosaicked into sections and contours are traced, registered and displayed by semiautomated methods. Current reconstructions are of type II cells from the medial part of rat maculas collected in-flight on the Space Life Sciences-2 mission, 4.5 hrs post-flight, and from a ground control. Results show that typical type II cells receive processes from tip to six nearby calyces or afferents. Nearly all processes are elongated and have bouton-like enlargements; some have numerous vesicles. Multiple (2 to 4) processes from a single calyx to a type II cell are common, and approximately 1/3 of the processes innervale 2 or 3 type II cells or a neighboring cluster. From 2% to 6% of the cells resemble type I cells morphologically but have demi-calyces. Thus far, increments in synaptic number in type II cells of flight rats are prominent along processes that supply two hair cells. It is clear that reconstruction methods provide insights into details of macular circuitry not obtainable by other techniques. The results demonstrate a morphological basis for interactions between adjacent receptive fields through feed back-feed forward connections, and for dynamic alterations in receptive field range and activity during preprocessing of linear acceleratory information by the maculas. The reconstruction method we have developed will find further applications in the study of the details of neuronal architecture of more complex systems, to

  8. Joint design of excitation k-space trajectory and RF pulse for small-tip 3D tailored excitation in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Noll, Douglas C.; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for the joint design of k-space trajectory and RF pulse in 3D small-tip tailored excitation. Designing time-varying RF and gradient waveforms for a desired 3D target excitation pattern in MRI poses a non-linear, non-convex, constrained optimization problem with relatively large problem size that is difficult to solve directly. Existing joint pulse design approaches are therefore typically restricted to predefined trajectory types such as EPI or stack-of-spirals that intrinsically satisfy the gradient maximum and slew rate constraints and reduce the problem size (dimensionality) dramatically, but lead to suboptimal excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. Here we use a 2nd-order B-spline basis that can be fitted to an arbitrary k-space trajectory, and allows the gradient constraints to be implemented efficiently. We show that this allows the joint optimization problem to be solved with quite general k-space trajectories. Starting from an arbitrary initial trajectory, we first approximate the trajectory using B-spline basis, and then optimize the corresponding coefficients. We evaluate our method in simulation using four different k-space initializations: stack-of-spirals, SPINS, KT-points, and a new method based on KT-points. In all cases, our approach leads to substantial improvement in excitation accuracy for a given pulse duration. We also validated our method for inner-volume excitation using phantom experiments. The computation is fast enough for online applications. PMID:26390450

  9. 3D plasma camera for planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthomier, Matthieu; Morel, Xavier; Techer, Jean-Denis

    2014-05-01

    A new 3D field-of-view toroidal space plasma analyzer based on an innovative optical concept allows the coverage of 4π str solid angle with only two sensor heads. It fits the need of all-sky thermal plasma measurements on three-axis stabilized spacecraft which are the most commonly used platforms for planetary missions. The 3D plasma analyzer also takes advantage of the new possibilities offered by the development of an ultra low-power multi-channel charge sensitive amplifier used for the imaging detector of the instrument. We present the design and measured performances of a prototype model that will fly on a test rocket in 2014.

  10. A model-based 3D template matching technique for pose acquisition of an uncooperative space object.

    PubMed

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2015-03-16

    This paper presents a customized three-dimensional template matching technique for autonomous pose determination of uncooperative targets. This topic is relevant to advanced space applications, like active debris removal and on-orbit servicing. The proposed technique is model-based and produces estimates of the target pose without any prior pose information, by processing three-dimensional point clouds provided by a LIDAR. These estimates are then used to initialize a pose tracking algorithm. Peculiar features of the proposed approach are the use of a reduced number of templates and the idea of building the database of templates on-line, thus significantly reducing the amount of on-board stored data with respect to traditional techniques. An algorithm variant is also introduced aimed at further accelerating the pose acquisition time and reducing the computational cost. Technique performance is investigated within a realistic numerical simulation environment comprising a target model, LIDAR operation and various target-chaser relative dynamics scenarios, relevant to close-proximity flight operations. Specifically, the capability of the proposed techniques to provide a pose solution suitable to initialize the tracking algorithm is demonstrated, as well as their robustness against highly variable pose conditions determined by the relative dynamics. Finally, a criterion for autonomous failure detection of the presented techniques is presented.

  11. A Model-Based 3D Template Matching Technique for Pose Acquisition of an Uncooperative Space Object

    PubMed Central

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a customized three-dimensional template matching technique for autonomous pose determination of uncooperative targets. This topic is relevant to advanced space applications, like active debris removal and on-orbit servicing. The proposed technique is model-based and produces estimates of the target pose without any prior pose information, by processing three-dimensional point clouds provided by a LIDAR. These estimates are then used to initialize a pose tracking algorithm. Peculiar features of the proposed approach are the use of a reduced number of templates and the idea of building the database of templates on-line, thus significantly reducing the amount of on-board stored data with respect to traditional techniques. An algorithm variant is also introduced aimed at further accelerating the pose acquisition time and reducing the computational cost. Technique performance is investigated within a realistic numerical simulation environment comprising a target model, LIDAR operation and various target-chaser relative dynamics scenarios, relevant to close-proximity flight operations. Specifically, the capability of the proposed techniques to provide a pose solution suitable to initialize the tracking algorithm is demonstrated, as well as their robustness against highly variable pose conditions determined by the relative dynamics. Finally, a criterion for autonomous failure detection of the presented techniques is presented. PMID:25785309

  12. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  13. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  14. A Method to Overcome Space Charge at Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ya.

    2005-06-01

    The transverse space charge forces in a high current, low energy beam can be reduced by mean of a large increase of the beam's transverse sizes while maintaining the beam area in the 4D phase space. This can be achieved by transforming the beam area in phase space of each of two normal 2D transverse (either plane or circular) modes from a spot shape into a narrow ring of a large amplitude, but homogeneous in phase. Such a transformation results from the beam evolution in the island of a dipole resonance when the amplitude width of the island shrinks adiabatically. After stacking (by using stripping foils or cooling) the beam in such a state and accelerating to energies sufficiently high that the space charge becomes insignificant, the beam then can be returned back to a normal spot shape by applying the reverse transformation. An arrangement that can provide such beam gymnastics along a transport line after a linac and before a booster and/or in a ring with circulating beam will be described and numerical estimates will be presented. Other potential applications of the method will be briefly discussed.

  15. A Method to Overcome Space Charge at Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ya. Derbenev

    2005-09-29

    The transverse space charge forces in a high current, low energy beam can be reduced by mean of a large increase of the beam's transverse sizes while maintaining the beam area in the 4D phase space. This can be achieved by transforming the beam area in phase space of each of two normal 2D transverse (either plane or circular) modes from a spot shape into a narrow ring of a large amplitude, but homogeneous in phase. Such a transformation results from the beam evolution in the island of a dipole resonance when the amplitude width of the island shrinks adiabatically. After stacking (by using stripping foils or cooling) the beam in such a state and accelerating to energies sufficiently high that the space charge becomes insignificant, the beam then can be returned back to a normal spot shape by applying the reverse transformation. An arrangement that can provide such beam gymnastics along a transport line after a linac and before a booster and/or in a ring with circulating beam will be described and numerical estimates will be presented. Other potential applications of the method will be briefly discussed.

  16. A Method to Overcome Space Charge at Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Ya.

    2005-06-08

    The transverse space charge forces in a high current, low energy beam can be reduced by mean of a large increase of the beam's transverse sizes while maintaining the beam area in the 4D phase space. This can be achieved by transforming the beam area in phase space of each of two normal 2D transverse (either plane or circular) modes from a spot shape into a narrow ring of a large amplitude, but homogeneous in phase. Such a transformation results from the beam evolution in the island of a dipole resonance when the amplitude width of the island shrinks adiabatically. After stacking (by using stripping foils or cooling) the beam in such a state and accelerating to energies sufficiently high that the space charge becomes insignificant, the beam then can be returned back to a normal spot shape by applying the reverse transformation. An arrangement that can provide such beam gymnastics along a transport line after a linac and before a booster and/or in a ring with circulating beam will be described and numerical estimates will be presented. Other potential applications of the method will be briefly discussed.

  17. Charge carrier photogeneration, trapping, and space-charge field formation in PVK-based photorefractive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Däubler, T. K.; Bittner, R.; Meerholz, K.; Cimrová, V.; Neher, D.

    2000-05-01

    We studied the dark conductivity (jdark), the photoconductivity (jphoto), and the charge carrier photogeneration efficiency η of poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-based photorefractive (PR) materials with different glass-transition temperatures (Tg) and chromophore content (ρCHR). Measurements were carried out at wavelengths similar to those used in degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) and two-beam coupling (2BC) experiments. Both thick (37 μm) and thin samples (~1 μm) were analyzed. Photoconductivity experiments at different temperatures show that both jdark and jphoto are thermally activated. For jdark the activation is not related to the glass-transition temperature of the blends, whereas photocurrents exhibit a universal behavior with respect to Tr=Tg-T. The charge carrier photogeneration efficiency η was measured by xerographic discharge experiments. η was found to be independent of both Tg and of ρCHR. The photoconductivity gain factor G defined as the number of charge carriers measured in photoconductivity in relation to the number of carriers initially photogenerated as determined by the xerographic experiments is used to compare the results of photoconductivity and xerographic discharge experiments. G is found to be much smaller than unity even for thin samples, which indicates that the mean free path of the photogenerated charge carriers is less than 1 μm at photoelectrical equilibrium. Using Schildkraut's model for the space-charge field formation in organic PR materials, trap densities Ti of approximately 1017 cm-3 could be derived from G. The field and temperature dependence of Ti is independent of ρCHR and might account for the universal Tr dependence of jphoto. The estimated trap densities are used to calculate the first-order Fourier component of the space-charge field in the PR materials illuminated with a sinusoidal intensity pattern. Modifying Schildkraut's model so that the tilt between the applied electric field and the index of refraction grating

  18. Evaluating a 3-D transport model of atmospheric CO2 using ground-based, aircraft, and space-borne data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, L.; Palmer, P. I.; Yang, Y.; Yantosca, R. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Paris, J.-D.; Matsueda, H.; Machida, T.

    2011-03-01

    We evaluate the GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport model (v8-02-01) of CO2 over 2003-2006, driven by GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorology from the NASA Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, using surface, aircraft and space-borne concentration measurements of CO2. We use an established ensemble Kalman Filter to estimate a posteriori biospheric+biomass burning (BS + BB) and oceanic (OC) CO2 fluxes from 22 geographical regions, following the TransCom-3 protocol, using boundary layer CO2 data from a subset of GLOBALVIEW surface sites. Global annual net BS + BB + OC CO2 fluxes over 2004-2006 for GEOS-4 (GEOS-5) meteorology are -4.4 ± 0.9 (-4.2 ± 0.9), -3.9 ± 0.9 (-4.5 ± 0.9), and -5.2 ± 0.9 (-4.9 ± 0.9) PgC yr-1, respectively. After taking into account anthropogenic fossil fuel and bio-fuel emissions, the global annual net CO2 emissions for 2004-2006 are estimated to be 4.0 ± 0.9 (4.2 ± 0.9), 4.8 ± 0.9 (4.2 ± 0.9), and 3.8 ± 0.9 (4.1 ± 0.9) PgC yr-1, respectively. The estimated 3-yr total net emission for GEOS-4 (GEOS-5) meteorology is equal to 12.5 (12.4) PgC, agreeing with other recent top-down estimates (12-13 PgC). The regional a posteriori fluxes are broadly consistent in the sign and magnitude of the TransCom-3 study for 1992-1996, but we find larger net sinks over northern and southern continents. We find large departures from our a priori over Europe during summer 2003, over temperate Eurasia during 2004, and over North America during 2005, reflecting an incomplete description of terrestrial carbon dynamics. We find GEOS-4 (GEOS-5) a posteriori CO2 concentrations reproduce the observed surface trend of 1.91-2.43 ppm yr-1 (parts per million per year), depending on latitude, within 0.15 ppm yr-1 (0.2 ppm yr-1) and the seasonal cycle within 0.2 ppm (0.2 ppm) at all latitudes. We find the a posteriori model reproduces the aircraft vertical profile measurements of CO2 over North America and Siberia generally within 1.5 ppm in the free and upper

  19. Head-tail instability and Landau damping in bunches with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2010-11-01

    Head-tail modes in bunches with space charge are studied using particle tracking simulations. The eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of transverse coherent oscillations in a Gaussian bunch are determined and compared with theories. A model for an airbag distribution in a barrier potential gives good predictions for the head-tail spectrum and for eigenfunctions in bunches with space charge. Using numerical simulations, space-charge induced Landau damping in a bunch is demonstrated. The damping rates are quantified for different modes and space-charge tune shifts. Finally, the head-tail instability with space charge is studied for the resistive-wall impedance below the mode coupling threshold. Results demonstrate that space-charge induced damping can suppress the instability for moderately strong space charge; instability growth rates saturate at strong space charge, in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  20. A comparison study between 3D T2-weighted SPACE and conventional 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo in assessment of carotid plaque.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng; Dai, Yuanyuan; Lin, Jiang; Zhang, Weisheng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hui; Tang, Xiao

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 3D T2-weighted sampling perfection with application optimized contrast using different flip angle evolutions (T2w SPACE) with conventional 2D T2w turbo-spin echo (TSE) in plaque imaging of carotid artery. 45 patients underwent 3.0-T MRI for carotid arteries imaging. MR sequences included T2w SPACE, T2w TSE, Time of flight (TOF) and T1-weighted (T1w) TSE. The signal intensity of intra-plaque hemorrhage (IPH), lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC), and loose matrix (LM) were measured and their contrast ratios (CRs) against adjacent muscle were calculated. CRs from T2w SPACE and T2w TSE were compared to each other. CRs of LM, LRNC, and IPH measured on T2w SPACE were 1.74-3.04 (2.44), 0.98-1.66 (1.39), and 1.91-2.93 (2.51), respectively. CRs of LM, LRNC, and IPH on T2w TSE were 1.97-3.41 (2.44), 1.18-1.73 (1.43), and 2.26-3.75 (2.26), respectively. There was no significant difference of CR of the carotid plaques between T2w SPACE and T2w TSE (p = 0.455). Markedly significant differences of CRs were found between LM and LRNC (p < 0.001), and between LRNC and IPH (p < 0.001) on T2w SPACE and T2w TSE. T2w SPACE was comparable with conventional T2w TSE in characterization of carotid plaque.

  1. Emittance growth in heavy ion rings due to effects of space charge and dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    We review the derivation of moment equations which include the effects of space charge and dispersion in bends first presented in ref [1]. These equations generalize the familiar envelope equations to include the dispersive effects of bends. We review the application of these equations to the calculation of the change in emittance resulting from a sharp transition from a straight section to a bend section, using an energy conservation constraint. Comparisons of detailed 2D and 3D simulations of intense beams in rings using the WARP code (refs [2,3]) are made with results obtained from the moment equations. We also compare the analysis carried out in ref [1], to more recent analyses, refs [4,5]. We further examine self-consistent distributions of beams in bends and discuss the relevance of these distributions to the moment equation formulation.

  2. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  3. String formulation of space charge forces in a deflecting bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The force between two moving point charges, because of its inverse square law singularity, cannot be applied directly in the numerical simulation of bunch dynamics; radiative effects make this especially true for short bunches being deflected by magnets. This paper describes a formalism circumventing this restriction in which the basic ingredient is the total force on a point charge comoving with a longitudinally aligned, uniformly charged string. Bunch evolution can then be treated using direct particle-to-particle, intrabeam scattering, with no need for an intermediate, particle-in-cell, step. Electric and magnetic fields do not appear individually in the theory. Since the basic formulas are both exact (in paraxial approximation) and fully relativistic, they are applicable to beams of all particle types and all energies. But the theory is expected to be especially useful for calculating the emittance growth of the ultrashort electron bunches of current interest for energy recovery linacs and free-electron lasers. The theory subsumes coherent synchrotron radiation and centrifugal space charge force. Renormalized, on-axis, longitudinal field components are in excellent agreement with values from Saldin et al. [DESY Report No. DESY-TESLA-FEL-96-14, 1995;

    Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. ANIMAER0168-9002 417, 158 (1998).10.1016/S0168-9002(98)00623-8

  4. Active Space Debris Charging for Contactless Electrostatic Disposal Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, H.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2013-08-01

    We assess the feasibility of removing large space debris from geosynchronous orbit (GEO) by means of a tug spacecraft that uses electrostatic forces to pull the debris without touching. The advantage of this method is that it can operate with a separation distance of multiple craft radii, thus reducing the risk of collision. Further, the debris does not have to be detumbled first to engage the re-orbit maneuver. The charging of the tug-debris system to high potentials is achieved by active charge transfer using a directed electron beam and an auxiliary ion bleeder. Our simple charging model takes into account the primary electron beam current, UV induced photoelectron emission, collection of plasma particles, secondary electron emission and the recapture of emitted particles. The results show that by active charging high potentials can be both achieved and maintained. The resulting mN level electrostatic force is sufficient for the safe re-orbiting of debris objects over an acceptable period of a few months. The capability of debris removal is becoming a pressing need as the increasing population of dysfunctional satellites poses a threat to the future of satellite operations at GEO.

  5. Extended space charge near nonideally selective membranes and nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Leibowitz, Neta; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the role of selectivity variation in the structure of the nonequilibrium extended space charge using one-dimensional analytic and two-dimensional numerical Poisson-Nernst-Planck models for the electro-diffusive transport of a symmetric electrolyte. This provides a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanism behind a previously observed maximum in the resistance-voltage curve for a shallow micro-nanochannel interface device [Schiffbauer, Liel, Leibowitz, Park, and Yossifon, arXiv:1409.4548, Phys. Rev. E (to be published)]. The current study helps to establish a connection between parameters such as the geometry and nanochannel surface charge and the control of selectivity and resistance in the overlimiting current regime.

  6. Formation and Distribution of Space-Charge in Cross-Linked Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye-Wen; Li, Ji-Xiao; Zheng, Fei-Hu; Peng, Zong-Ren; Wu, Chang-Shun; Xia, Zhong-Fu

    2002-08-01

    The formation and distribution of space-charge in a cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) sample are investigated by means of pressure wave propagation, infrared spectroscopy and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The related mechanism of space-charge distribution and the structure of XLPE are discussed. The EFM images show that quite large quantitative space-charges locate at the surface of spherulites.

  7. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  8. Space-Charge Transport Limits in Periodic Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Chawla, S R

    2005-05-16

    It has been empirically observed in both experiments and particle-in-cell simulations that space-charge-dominated beams suffer strong emittance growth and particle losses in alternating gradient quadrupole transport channels when the undepressed phase advance {sigma}{sub 0} increases beyond about 85{sup o} per lattice period. Although this criteria has been used extensively in practical designs of intense beam transport lattices, no theory exists that explains the limit. We propose a mechanism for the transport limit resulting from classes of halo particle resonances near the core of the beam that allow near-edge particles to rapidly increase in oscillation amplitude when the space-charge intensity and the flutter of the matched beam envelope are both sufficiently large. Due to a finite beam edge and/or perturbations, this mechanism can result in dramatic halo-driven increases in statistical beam phase space area, lost particles, and degraded transport. A core-particle model for a uniform density elliptical beam in a periodic focusing lattice is applied to parametrically analyze this process.

  9. Computation of the Longitudinal Space Charge Effect in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Welch, J.J.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    The LCLS Photoinjector produces a 100A, 10 ps long electron bunch which is later compressed down to 230 fs to produce the peak current required for generating SASE radiation. SASE saturation will be reached in the LCLS only if the emittance and uncorrelated energy spread remain respectively below 1.2 mm.mrad and 5.10{sup -4}. This high beam quality will not be met if the Longitudinal Space Charge (LSC) instability develops in the injector and gets amplified in the compressors. The LSC instability originates in the injector beamline, from an initial modulation on top of the photoelectron pulse leaving the cathode. Numerical computations, performed with Multiparticle Space Charge tracking codes, showing the evolution of the longitudinal phase space along the LCLS injector beamline, are discussed. Their results are compared with those deduced from theoretical models in different regimes of energy and acceleration and for different modulation wavelengths. This study justifies the necessity to insert a ''laser heater'' in the LCLS Photoinjector beamline.

  10. The Charging of Composites in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czepiela, Steven A.

    1997-01-01

    Deep dielectric charging and subsequent electrostatic discharge in composite materials used on spacecraft have become greater concerns since composite materials are being used more extensively as main structural components. Deep dielectric charging occurs when high energy particles penetrate and deposit themselves in the insulating material of spacecraft components. These deposited particles induce an electric field in the material, which causes the particles to move and thus changes the electric field. The electric field continues to change until a steady state is reached between the incoming particles from the space environment and the particles moving away due to the electric field. An electrostatic discharge occurs when the electric field is greater than the dielectric strength of the composite material. The goal of the current investigation is to investigate deep dielectric charging in composite materials and ascertain what modifications have to be made to the composite properties to alleviate any breakdown issues. A 1-D model was created. The space environment, which is calculated using the Environmental Workbench software, the composite material properties, and the electric field and voltage boundary conditions are input into the model. The output from the model is the charge density, electric field, and voltage distributions as functions of the depth into the material and time. Analysis using the model show that there should be no deep dielectric charging problem with conductive composites such as carbon fiber/epoxy. With insulating materials such as glass fiber/epoxy, Kevlar, and polymers, there is also no concern of deep dielectric charging problems with average day-to-day particle fluxes. However, problems can arise during geomagnetic substorms and solar particle events where particle flux levels increase by several orders of magnitude, and thus increase the electric field in the material by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, the second part of this

  11. A Dynamical Systems Approach to Analysis of Earthquakes on a 2D Discrete Fault Zone Embedded in a 3D Elastic Half-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2001-05-01

    Numerical simulations of slip along a 2D cellular fault zone in a 3D elastic half-space are performed for several models [Ben-Zion and Rice, 1993; Ben-Zion, 1996] that belong to a generalized phase space of models. Each model consists of a planar computational grid with uniform cells where slip is governed by brittle and creep processes, surrounded by regions with constant slip rate representing the tectonic loading. Brittle failures are governed by a static/kinetic friction law with spatially varying coefficients chosen to represent different cases of quenched heterogeneities. The creep process is given by a power law dependency of creep velocity on stress with spatially varying coefficients chosen to produce, when activated, gradual (brittle-ductile type) stress transitions at the edges of the computational grid. Quasi-static stress transfer due to slip anywhere on the fault is calculated with 3D elastic dislocation theory. Inertial effects during brittle failures are accounted for approximately by a dynamic overshoot coefficient. The phase space of models is described by generalized coordinates that measure: a) the form of slip transitions at the edges of the computational grid (we employ two different limits, one in which the creep process in the computational grid is deactivated leading to abrupt transitions, and one with gradual transitions), b) the dynamic weakening, c) the distribution of brittle fault properties, d) the fault aspect ratio, e) the depth dependence of the static friction (we simulate two different limits, one in which the static friction does not have a trend with depth and one in which it grows linearly with depth). We analyze the interplay between temporal chaos and spatial scales in the simulated patterns by measuring various quantifiers of the chaotic dynamics (such as Lyapunov exponents, entropies and dimensions of the attractor describing the motion) as we explore the phase space of models. A key tool in the analysis of the results is

  12. Axonemal Positioning and Orientation in 3-D Space for Primary Cilia: What is Known, What is Assumed, and What Needs Clarification

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, Cornelia E.; Wilsman, Norman J.

    2012-01-01

    Two positional characteristics of the ciliary axoneme – its location on the plasma membrane as it emerges from the cell, and its orientation in three-dimensional space – are known to be critical for optimal function of actively motile cilia (including nodal cilia), as well as for modified cilia associated with special senses. However, these positional characteristics have not been analyzed to any significant extent for primary cilia. This review briefly summarizes the history of knowledge of these two positional characteristics across a wide spectrum of cilia, emphasizing their importance for proper function. Then the review focuses what is known about these same positional characteristics for primary cilia in all major tissue types where they have been reported. The review emphasizes major areas that would be productive for future research for understanding how positioning and 3-D orientation of primary cilia may be related to their hypothesized signaling roles within different cellular populations. PMID:22012592

  13. Assessment of 3D T2-weighted high-sampling-efficiency technique (SPACE) for detection of cerebellar tonsillar motion: new useful sign for Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Murat; Tokgoz, Nil; Koc, Ali Murat; Kilic, Koray; Borcek, Alp Ozgun; Oner, Ali Yusuf; Kalkan, Gokalp; Akkan, Koray

    2015-01-01

    To describe tonsillar blackout sign (TBS) on three-dimensional (3D)-SPACE, evaluate its performance in identifying Chiari malformation (CM1) as diagnostic marker, and investigate its role in differentiation of symptomatic and asymptomatic CM1. One-hundred fifty-six patients were divided into two groups based on caudal displacement of cerebellar tonsils: CM1 (Group I) and non-CM1 (Group II). Group I was subclassified as symptomatic and asymptomatic by a neurosurgeon. Two radiologists evaluated TBS and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormality. All subjects presenting TBS had CM1. Difference in presence of TBS between Group I and Group II was highly significant (P<.001).Grading of TBS in symptomatic patients was significantly higher than that in asymptomatic patients (P<.001). TBS is highly suggestive of CM1 and potentially useful in differentiation of symptomatic and asymptomatic CM1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  15. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. Emittance Measurements of Space Charge Dominated Electron Beam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-AI8 693 EMITTANE KASUREMNIS OF SPACE CHARG DOMINATED I/S ELECIRON BEAI) NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS CENTER SILVER SPRING N, NASUNG El AL. 01 JUN 65 NSW...UNIT NUMBERS 10901 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, Maryland 20903-5000 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE 1 June 1985 13. NUMBER...by a plate with a pinhole of radius rp which travels on the -axis, This system is commonly 8 NSWC TR 85-244 designed as L > a (beam radius) >> d > rp

  18. Accelerating space-charge gratings in wide-bandgap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Bryushinin, Mikhail

    2017-06-01

    The excitation of the non-steady-state photoelectromotive force and two-wave mixing signals is theoretically investigated for the case of uniformly accelerated motion of the recording light pattern. Such illumination is usually created by the linear frequency modulation of the interfering light beams. For the both effects we predict the pulsed response arising at the moments, when the velocities of the interference pattern and space-charge wave coincide. The application of the effects in laser Doppler velocimeters and accelerometers is discussed.

  19. Space charge effects for multipactor in coaxial lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sorolla, E.

    2015-03-15

    Multipactor is a hazardous vacuum discharge produced by secondary electron emission within microwave devices of particle accelerators and telecommunication satellites. This work analyzes the dynamics of the multipactor discharge within a coaxial line for the mono-energetic electron emission model taking into account the space charge effects. The steady-state is predicted by the proposed model and an analytical expression for the maximum number of electrons released by the discharge presented. This could help to link simulations to experiments and define a multipactor onset criterion.

  20. Nonlinear longitudinal space charge oscillations in relativistic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Li, R K; Marinelli, A

    2011-05-06

    In this Letter we study the evolution of an initial periodic modulation in the temporal profile of a relativistic electron beam under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces. Linear theory predicts a periodic exchange of the modulation between the density and the energy profiles at the beam plasma frequency. For large enough initial modulations, wave breaking occurs after 1/2 period of plasma oscillation leading to the formation of short current spikes. We confirm this effect by direct measurements on a ps-modulated electron beam from an rf photoinjector. These results are useful for the generation of intense electron pulse trains for advanced accelerator applications.

  1. Nonlinear Longitudinal Space Charge Oscillations in Relativistic Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.; Marinelli, A.

    2011-05-06

    In this Letter we study the evolution of an initial periodic modulation in the temporal profile of a relativistic electron beam under the effect of longitudinal space-charge forces. Linear theory predicts a periodic exchange of the modulation between the density and the energy profiles at the beam plasma frequency. For large enough initial modulations, wave breaking occurs after 1/2 period of plasma oscillation leading to the formation of short current spikes. We confirm this effect by direct measurements on a ps-modulated electron beam from an rf photoinjector. These results are useful for the generation of intense electron pulse trains for advanced accelerator applications.

  2. Suppression of parasitic space-charge oscillations in a gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louksha, O. I.; Piosczyk, B.; Sominski, G. G.; Thumm, M.; Samsonov, D. B.

    2006-10-01

    We study the influence of nonuniform electric and magnetic fields in the helical-beam compression region on the low-frequency parasitic space-charge oscillations for a moderate-power (˜ 100 kW) 4-mm gyrotron. Suppression of the oscillations is achieved by optimization of both the cathode-unit geometry in the magnetron-injector gun and the magnetic-field distribution in the region near the cavity input. The obtained data are evidence of possible effective operation of the gyrotron at elevated pitch-factor values α > 1.5 even for emitters with no highest emission uniformity (δje ≈ 30%).

  3. Constraining the Properties of the Eta Carinae System via 3-D SPH Models of Space-Based Observations: The Absolute Orientation of the Binary Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Russell, Christopher M. P.

    2010-01-01

    The extremely massive (> 90 Solar Mass) and luminous (= 5 x 10(exp 6) Solar Luminosity) star Eta Carinae, with its spectacular bipolar "Homunculus" nebula, comprises one of the most remarkable and intensely observed stellar systems in the galaxy. However, many of its underlying physical parameters remain a mystery. Multiwavelength variations observed to occur every 5.54 years are interpreted as being due to the collision of a massive wind from the primary star with the fast, less dense wind of a hot companion star in a highly elliptical (e approx. 0.9) orbit. Using three-dimensional (3-D) Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary wind-wind collision in Eta Car, together with radiative transfer codes, we compute synthetic spectral images of [Fe III] emission line structures and compare them to existing Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) observations. We are thus able, for the first time, to constrain the absolute orientation of the binary orbit on the sky. An orbit with an inclination of i approx. 40deg, an argument of periapsis omega approx. 255deg, and a projected orbital axis with a position angle of approx. 312deg east of north provides the best fit to the observations, implying that the orbital axis is closely aligned in 3-1) space with the Homunculus symmetry axis, and that the companion star orbits clockwise on the sky relative to the primary.

  4. Effect of induced charge at boundaries on transverse dynamics of a space-charge-dominated beam

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.; Haber, I.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.; Tiefenback, M.G.

    1985-05-01

    A particle simulation code has been used to study the effect of transverse beam dynamics of charge induced on focusing electrodes. A linear transport system was assumed. The initial particle distribution was taken to be that of a uniform elliptical beam with a Gaussian velocity distribution. For misaligned, highly space-charge-dominated beams (betatron phase advance per lattice period less than or equal to 10/sup 0/), a large oscillation of the rms emittance occurred in a beat pattern. Linearized Vlasov analysis shows the oscillation to be a sextupole oscillation, driven by the beam coherent betatron motion. Emittance growth accompanied the oscillation. Preliminary experimental results from the Single Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE) are consistent with the code results. Addition of a dodecapole nonlinearity to the computational focusing field greatly reduces the oscillation amplitude.

  5. Camera memory study for large space telescope. [charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. P.; Brewer, J. E.; Brager, E. A.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Specifications were developed for a memory system to be used as the storage media for camera detectors on the large space telescope (LST) satellite. Detectors with limited internal storage time such as intensities charge coupled devices and silicon intensified targets are implied. The general characteristics are reported of different approaches to the memory system with comparisons made within the guidelines set forth for the LST application. Priority ordering of comparisons is on the basis of cost, reliability, power, and physical characteristics. Specific rationales are provided for the rejection of unsuitable memory technologies. A recommended technology was selected and used to establish specifications for a breadboard memory. Procurement scheduling is provided for delivery of system breadboards in 1976, prototypes in 1978, and space qualified units in 1980.

  6. Significantly improved charge collection and interface injection in 3D BiVO4 based multilayered core-shell nanowire photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zemin; Li, Yunxia; Jiang, Xiao; Han, Weihua; Xie, Mingzheng; Wang, Fangcong; Xie, Erqing

    2017-09-11

    It is challenging to design a photocatalyst with high-efficiency light absorption, charge separation and even high-efficiency charge transfer. Here, we report a demonstration by utilizing a three-dimensional multilayered core-shell nanowire array (rGO-ITO@BiVO4) as the composite photocatalyst. The core-shell structure can shorten the length of charge transfer and enhance light absorption through multireflection. RGO with defects can work as the charge transfer medium to improve the hole injection from semiconductor to electrolyte. Associated with the above effects, the Co-pi electrocatalyst modified rGO-ITO@BiVO4 photocatalyst yields a photocurrent of about 6.0 mA cm(-2) at 0.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Transient-state surface photovoltage measurement shows that the rGO layer can prolong the lifetime of the photogenerated holes through π-π interactions, so that more holes can participate in the water oxidation reaction.

  7. An FPGA computing demo core for space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Huang, Yifei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    In accelerator physics, space charge simulation requires large amount of computing power. In a particle system, each calculation requires time/resource consuming operations such as multiplications, divisions, and square roots. Because of the flexibility of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), we implemented this task with efficient use of the available computing resources and completely eliminated non-calculating operations that are indispensable in regular micro-processors (e.g. instruction fetch, instruction decoding, etc.). We designed and tested a 16-bit demo core for computing Coulomb's force in an Altera Cyclone II FPGA device. To save resources, the inverse square-root cube operation in our design is computed using a memory look-up table addressed with nine to ten most significant non-zero bits. At 200 MHz internal clock, our demo core reaches a throughput of 200 M pairs/s/core, faster than a typical 2 GHz micro-processor by about a factor of 10. Temperature and power consumption of FPGAs were also lower than those of micro-processors. Fast and convenient, FPGAs can serve as alternatives to time-consuming micro-processors for space charge simulation.

  8. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  9. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  10. Optimum Electron Distributions for Space Charge Dominated Beams in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Bolton, P.R.; /SLAC

    2006-06-15

    The optimum photo-electron distribution from the cathode of an RF photoinjector producing a space charge dominated beam is a uniform distribution contained in an ellipsoid. For such a bunch distribution, the space charge forces are linear and the emittance growth induced by those forces is totally reversible and consequently can be compensated. With the appropriate tuning of the emittance compensation optics, the emittance, at the end of photoinjector beamline, for an ellipsoidal laser pulse, would only have two contributions, the cathode emittance and the RF emittance. For the peak currents of 50A and 100 A required from the SBand and L-Band RF gun photoinjectors discussed here, the RF emittance contribution is negligible. If such an ellipsoidal photo-electron distribution were available, the emittance at the end of the beamline could be reduced to the cathode emittance. Its value would be reduced by more than 40% from that obtained using cylindrical shape laser pulses. This potentially dramatic improvement warrants review of the challenges associated with the production of ellipsoidal photo-electrons. We assume the photo-electrons emission time to be short enough that the ellipsoidal electron pulse shape will come directly from the laser pulse. We shift the challenge to ellipsoidal laser pulse shaping. To expose limiting technical issues, we consider the generation of ellipsoidal laser pulse shape in terms of three different concepts.

  11. 3D Printer Coupon removal and stowage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-09

    iss042e031282 (12/09/2014) ---US Astronaut Barry (Butch) Wilmore holding a 3D coupon works with the new 3D printer aboard the International Space Station. The 3D Printing experiment in zero gravity demonstrates that a 3D printer works normally in space. In general, a 3D printer extrudes streams of heated plastic, metal or other material, building layer on top of layer to create 3 dimensional objects. Testing a 3D printer using relatively low-temperature plastic feedstock on the International Space Station is the first step towards establishing an on-demand machine shop in space, a critical enabling component for deep-space crewed missions and in-space manufacturing.

  12. Effect of surface topography and morphology on space charge packets in polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanxiang, Zhou; Yunshan, Wang; Ninghua, Wang; Qinghua, Sun

    2009-08-01

    Polyethylene (PE) is a major kind of internal insulating material. With great progresses of space charge measurement technologies in the last three decades, lots of researches are focused on space charge in PE. The heat pressing and annealing condition of polyethylene affect its morphology obviously. During the heat pressing, the surface of PE forms different surface topographies because of different substrate materials. Surface topography has great relation to the epitaxial crystallization layer and influences the space charge characteristic of PE dramatically. This paper studied the formation process of different surface topographies and their micrographic characters in low density polyethylene (LDPE). pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method was used to measure the space charge distribution of samples with different surface topographies and morphologies in LDPE. The effect of surface topography and morphology to space charge packet were studied. The surface topography has great influence on space charge packet polarity and morphology has influence on both movement speed rate and polarity of space charge packet.

  13. CID of singly charged antioxidants applied in lubricants by means of a 3D ion trap and a linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kassler, Alexander; Pittenauer, Ernst; Doerr, Nicole; Allmaier, Guenter

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fragmentation behavior induced by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (LE-CID) of four selected antioxidants applied in lubricants, by two different types of ion trap mass spectrometers: a three-dimensional ion trap (3D-IT) and a linear IT (LIT) Orbitrap MS. Two sterically hindered phenols and two aromatic amines were selected as model compounds representing different antioxidant classes and were characterized by positive-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and LE-CID. Various types of molecular ions (e.g. [M](+•) , [M + H](+) , [M + NH(4) ](+) or [M + Na](+) ) were used as precursor ions generating a significant number of structurally relevant product ions. Furthermore, the phenolic compounds were analyzed by negative-ion ESI. For both IT types applied for fragmentation, the antioxidants exhibited the same unusual LE-CID behavior: (1) they formed stable radical product ions and (2) CC bond cleavages of aliphatic substituents were observed and their respective cleavage sites depended on the precursor ion selected. This fragmentation provided information on the type of structural isomer usually not obtainable for branched aliphatic substituents utilizing LE-CID. Comparing the two instruments, the main benefit of applying the LIT-Orbitrap was direct access to elemental composition of product ions enabling unambiguous interpretation of fragmentation trees not obtainable by the 3D-IT device (e.g. loss of isobaric neutrals). It should be emphasized that the types of product ions formed do not depend on the type of IT analyzer applied. For characterizing degradation products of antioxidants, the LIT-Orbitrap hybrid system, allowing the determination of accurate m/z values for product ions, is the method of choice.

  14. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  15. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  16. Body size and ability to pass through a restricted space: Observations from 3D scanning of 210 male UK offshore workers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Arthur; Ledingham, Robert; Furnace, Graham; Nevill, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Offshore workers are subjected to a unique physical and cultural environment which has the ability to affect their size and shape. Because they are heavier than the UK adult population we hypothesized they would have larger torso dimensions which would adversely affect their ability to pass one another in a restricted space. A sample of 210 male offshore workers was selected across the full weight range, and measured using 3D body scanning for shape. Bideltoid breadth and maximum chest depth were extracted from the scans and compared with reference population data. In addition a size algorithm previously calculated on 44 individuals was applied to adjust for wearing a survival suit and re-breather device. Mean bideltoid breadth and chest depth was 51.4 cm and 27.9 cm in the offshore workers, compared with 49.7 cm and 25.4 cm respectively in the UK population as a whole. Considering the probability of two randomly selected people passing within a restricted space of 100 cm and 80 cm, offshore workers are 28% and 34% less likely to pass face to face and face to side respectively, as compared with UK adults, an effect which is exacerbated when wearing personal protective equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Astronomers Discover First Negatively-charged Molecule in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Cambridge, MA - Astronomers have discovered the first negatively charged molecule in space, identifying it from radio signals that were a mystery until now. While about 130 neutral and 14 positively charged molecules are known to exist in interstellar space, this is the first negative molecule, or anion, to be found. "We've spotted a rare and exotic species, like the white tiger of space," said astronomer Michael McCarthy of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA). By learning more about the rich broth of chemicals found in interstellar space, astronomers hope to explain how the young Earth converted these basic ingredients into the essential chemicals for life. This new finding helps to advance scientists' understanding of the chemistry of the interstellar medium, and hence the birthplaces of planets. McCarthy worked with CfA colleagues Carl Gottlieb, Harshal Gupta (also from the Univ. of Texas), and Patrick Thaddeus to identify the molecular anion known as C6H-: a linear chain of six carbon atoms with one hydrogen atom at the end and an "extra" electron. Such molecules were thought to be extremely rare because ultraviolet light that suffuses space easily knocks electrons off molecules. The large size of C6H-, larger than most neutral and all positive molecules known in space, may increase its stability in the harsh cosmic environment. "The discovery of C6H- resolves a long-standing enigma in astrochemistry: the apparent lack of negatively charged molecules in space," stated Thaddeus. The team first conducted laboratory experiments to determine exactly what radio frequencies to use in their search. Then, they used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to hunt for C6H- in celestial objects. In particular, they targeted locations in which previous searches had spotted unidentified radio signals at the appropriate frequencies. They found C6H- in two very different locations-a shell of gas surrounding the evolved red giant

  18. Space Weather at Mars: 3-D studies using one-way coupling between the Multi-fluid MHD, M-GITM and M-AMPS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei

    This dissertation presents numerical simulation results of the solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere by using three comprehensive 3-D models: the Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), the Mars exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS), and the BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD (MF-MHD) model. The coupled framework has the potential to provide improved predictions for ion escape rates for comparison with future data to be returned by the MAVEN mission (2014-2016) and thereby improve our understanding of present day escape processes. Estimates of ion escape rates over Mars history must start from properly validated models that can be extrapolated into the past. This thesis aims to build a model library for the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission, which will thus enhance the science return from the MAVEN mission. In this thesis, we aim to address the following four main scientific questions by adopting the one-way coupled framework developed here: (1) What are the Martian ion escape rates at the current epoch and ancient times? (2) What controls the ion escape processes at the current epoch? How are the ion escape variations connected to the solar cycle, crustal field orientation and seasonal variations? (3) How do the variable 3-D cold neutral thermosphere and hot oxygen corona affect the solar wind-Mars interaction? (4) How does the Martian atmosphere respond to extreme variations (e.g., ICMEs) in the solar wind and its interplanetary environment? These questions are closely related to the primary scientific goals of NASA's MAVEN mission and European Space Agency's Mars Express (MEX) mission. We reasonably answer all these four questions at the end of this thesis by employing the one-way coupled framework and comparing the simulation results with both MEX and MAVEN observational data.

  19. Four-chamber heart modeling and automatic segmentation for 3-D cardiac CT volumes using marginal space learning and steerable features.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yefeng; Barbu, Adrian; Georgescu, Bogdan; Scheuering, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2008-11-01

    We propose an automatic four-chamber heart segmentation system for the quantitative functional analysis of the heart from cardiac computed tomography (CT) volumes. Two topics are discussed: heart modeling and automatic model fitting to an unseen volume. Heart modeling is a nontrivial task since the heart is a complex nonrigid organ. The model must be anatomically accurate, allow manual editing, and provide sufficient information to guide automatic detection and segmentation. Unlike previous work, we explicitly represent important landmarks (such as the valves and the ventricular septum cusps) among the control points of the model. The control points can be detected reliably to guide the automatic model fitting process. Using this model, we develop an efficient and robust approach for automatic heart chamber segmentation in 3-D CT volumes. We formulate the segmentation as a two-step learning problem: anatomical structure localization and boundary delineation. In both steps, we exploit the recent advances in learning discriminative models. A novel algorithm, marginal space learning (MSL), is introduced to solve the 9-D similarity transformation search problem for localizing the heart chambers. After determining the pose of the heart chambers, we estimate the 3-D shape through learning-based boundary delineation. The proposed method has been extensively tested on the largest dataset (with 323 volumes from 137 patients) ever reported in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, our system is the fastest with a speed of 4.0 s per volume (on a dual-core 3.2-GHz processor) for the automatic segmentation of all four chambers.

  20. Charged iron particles, components of space radiation, destroy ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Birendra; Ortiz, Laura; Luderer, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Do charged iron particles, components of space radiation, cause premature ovarian failure? Exposure to charged iron particles causes ovarian DNA damage, oxidative damage and apoptosis, resulting in premature ovarian failure. The ovary is very sensitive to follicle destruction by low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, such as X-rays and γ-rays. However, it is completely unknown whether high-LET radiation, such as charged iron particles, also destroys ovarian follicles. Twelve week old C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to single doses of 0, 5, 30 or 50 cGy (n = 8/group) charged iron particles (LET = 179 keV/µm) at energy of 600 MeV/u. Two groups were irradiated at the highest dose, one fed AIN-93M chow and the other fed AIN-93M chow supplemented with 150 mg/kg diet alpha lipoic acid (ALA). We quantified the numbers of ovarian follicles, measured serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, and analyzed histone H2AX phosphorylation, oxidative damage and apoptosis markers in the ovarian follicles. H2AX phosphorylation, lipid peroxidation, protein nitration and apoptosis were highly induced in ovarian follicles at 6 h and remained increased 1 week after irradiation. As a result, numbers of healthy ovarian follicles were significantly and dose-dependently depleted at 1 and 8 weeks post-irradiation, with 57, 84 and 99% decreases in primordial follicles at 8 weeks at the 5, 30 and 50 cGy doses, respectively (P < 0.05 versus 0 cGy). Consistent with near-total depletion of ovarian follicles in the 50 cGy group, serum concentrations of FSH and LH were significantly elevated at 8 weeks. Dietary supplementation with ALA partially prevented the adverse ovarian effects of 50 cGy iron particles. About 21% of the estimated radiation dose from exposure to galactic cosmic rays during a multi-year Mars mission will be due to high-LET particles, of which iron is only one. The effects of galactic cosmic rays, which contain a mixture of

  1. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  2. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  3. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  4. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  5. On 3d bulk geometry of Virasoro coadjoint orbits: orbit invariant charges and Virasoro hair on locally AdS_3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Yavartanoo, H.

    2016-09-01

    Expanding upon [arXiv:1404.4472, arXiv:1511.06079], we provide a further detailed analysis of Bañados geometries, the most general solutions to the AdS_3 Einstein gravity with Brown-Henneaux boundary conditions. We analyze in some detail the causal, horizon, and boundary structure, and the geodesic motion on these geometries, as well as the two classes of symplectic charges one can associate with these geometries: charges associated with the exact symmetries and the Virasoro charges. We elaborate on the one-to-one relation between the coadjoint orbits of two copies of the Virasoro group and Bañados geometries. We discuss that the information as regards the Bañados goemetries falls into two categories: "orbit invariant" information and "Virasoro hairs". The former concerns geometric quantities, while the latter are specified by the non-local surface integrals. We elaborate on multi-BTZ geometries which have a number of disconnected pieces at the horizon bifurcation curve. We study multi-BTZ black hole thermodynamics and discuss that the thermodynamic quantities are orbit invariants. We also comment on the implications of our analysis for a 2d CFT dual which could possibly be dual to AdS_3 Einstein gravity.

  6. New implementation of the trajectory surface hopping method with use of the Zhu-Nakamura theory. II. Application to the charge transfer processes in the 3D DH2+ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chaoyuan; Kamisaka, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2002-02-01

    The newly implemented trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method for the collinear system with use of the Zhu-Nakamura semiclassical theory of nonadiabatic transition [C. Zhu, K. Nobusada, and H. Nakamura, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 3031 (2001)] is extended to treat 3D nonadiabatic reactions. Since the avoided crossing seam becomes a two-dimensional surface in the 3D system, the nonadiabatic transition region and the possibility of classically forbidden hops are enlarged very much in comparison with those in the collinear case. As a result, the contribution of the classically forbidden hops is quite a bit enhanced in the 3D system. Conservation of total angular momentum J is taken into account by slightly rotating the direction of momentum during the hop in the classically forbidden case. The method is tested by applying to the charge transfer processes in the 3D DH2+ system for J=0. Numerical results clearly demonstrate that the new TSH method works very well at all energies and for all initial vibrational states considered compared to the old TSH method based on the Landau-Zener formula. The significant discrepancy between the two TSH methods survives even at high collision energy and high vibrational states in contrast to the collinear case, indicating the importance of the classically forbidden hops in 3D systems. The new TSH method is considered to be a very promising method to deal with high dimensional nonadiabatic dynamics. It should also be noted that the new TSH method does not require any knowledge of nonadiabatic coupling and is based only on adiabatic potentials.

  7. Space-charge trapping and conduction in LDPE, HDPE and XLPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, G. C.; Mazzanti, G.; Palmieri, F.; Motori, A.; Perego, G.; Serra, S.

    2001-09-01

    The mechanisms of charge injection, transport and trapping in low-density, high-density and cross-linked polyethylene (LDPE, HDPE and XLPE) are investigated in this paper through charging-discharging current measurements and space-charge observations. The conductivity of LDPE is much larger than that of XLPE and HDPE. The threshold for space-charge accumulation and that for a space-charge-limited current mechanism, coinciding for the same material, are almost identical for LDPE and HDPE, while the threshold of XLPE is higher. However, HDPE accumulates more charge than the other two materials. The depolarization space-charge curves and the conduction current versus field characteristics indicate that the mobility of LDPE is larger than that of XLPE and HDPE, which supports the significant difference in conductivity. The lower mobility, as well as the nature, depth and density of trap sites, can explain the difference in space-charge accumulation and thresholds.

  8. Space charge behavior of silicone rubber nanocomposites with thermal step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji Wei; Li, Qing Quan; Liu, Hong Shun; Ren, Ang; Li, Jie; Xiao, Meng; Li, Bin; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, effects of the space charge behavior of silicone rubber (SiR) nanocomposites with SiO2, Al2O3, and MgO nanoparticles on charge transfer were clarified. To investigate the effects of SiO2, Al2O3, and MgO nanoparticles on space charge profiles, the space charge behavior was measured using a thermal step method system under a dc electric field of 2 to 4 kV/mm. In the case of SiR nanocomposites, a negative packet like charge injection with a peak charge density of more than several hundred C/m3 was measured. The effects of space charge behavior were discussed with the response current associated with the conductivity and permittivity affected by a thermal process. The obtained results showed that the relaxation processes had discrete energy differences with distinct peaks in the response currents of space charge affected by nanoparticles.

  9. The effect of space charges on conduction current in polymer by modified PEA method

    SciTech Connect

    Hwangbo, S.; Yun, D.H.; Yi, D.Y.; Han, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Direct measurement of space charge and conduction current was carried out on low-density polyethylene degraded by ultra-violet using a pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. Dominant hetero-charges were formed near both electrodes by high voltage application and was found to be deeply trapped. In this paper, the effect of temperature and electric field reversal on the detrapping and trapping of space charges was investigated and the role of space charge in electrical conduction was discussed quantitatively. The main mechanism for detrapping and trapping of space charges was Poole-Frenkel model.

  10. R3D-B2 - Measurement of ionizing and solar radiation in open space in the BIOPAN 5 facility outside the FOTON M2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häder, D.-P.; Richter, P.; Schuster, M.; Dachev, Ts.; Tomov, B.; Georgiev, Pl.; Matviichuk, Yu.

    2009-04-01

    Solar and space radiation have been monitored using the R3D-B2 radiation risks radiometer-dosimeter on board a recent space flight on the Russian satellite Foton M2 within the ESA Biopan 5 facility mounted on the outside of the satellite exposed to space conditions. The solar radiation has been assayed in four wavelength bands (UV-C, 170-280 nm, UV-B, 280-315 nm), UV-A (315-400 nm) and PAR (photosynthetic active radiation, 400-700 nm). The data show an increasing tumbling rotation of the satellite during the mission. The photodiodes do not show a cosine response to the incident light which has been corrected. After calibration of the signals using the extraterrestrial spectrum, doses have been calculated for each orbit, for each day and for the total mission as basic data for the biological material which has been exposed in parallel in the Biopan facility. Cosmic ionizing radiation has been monitored and separated in 256 deposited energy spectra, which were further used for determination of the absorbed dose rate and flux. Basic data tables were prepared to be used by other Biopan 5 experiments. The paper summarizes the results for the Earth radiation environment at the altitude (262-304 km) of the Foton M2 spacecraft. Comparisons with the predictions of NASA Earth radiation environment experimental models AE-8 and AP-8, and the PSB97 model are also presented, which calculate the fluxes of ionizing radiation from a simulation. AP-8 is a model for trapped radiation.

  11. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, W; Hong, S-M

    2016-03-07

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient's breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN(+) , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN(+) prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN(+) implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN(+) . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN(+) algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating

  12. Real-time prediction and gating of respiratory motion in 3D space using extended Kalman filters and Gaussian process regression network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhari, W.; Hong, S.-M.

    2016-03-01

    The prediction as well as the gating of respiratory motion have received much attention over the last two decades for reducing the targeting error of the radiation treatment beam due to respiratory motion. In this article, we present a real-time algorithm for predicting respiratory motion in 3D space and realizing a gating function without pre-specifying a particular phase of the patient’s breathing cycle. The algorithm, named EKF-GPRN+ , first employs an extended Kalman filter (EKF) independently along each coordinate to predict the respiratory motion and then uses a Gaussian process regression network (GPRN) to correct the prediction error of the EKF in 3D space. The GPRN is a nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for modeling input-dependent correlations between the output variables in multi-output regression. Inference in GPRN is intractable and we employ variational inference with mean field approximation to compute an approximate predictive mean and predictive covariance matrix. The approximate predictive mean is used to correct the prediction error of the EKF. The trace of the approximate predictive covariance matrix is utilized to capture the uncertainty in EKF-GPRN+ prediction error and systematically identify breathing points with a higher probability of large prediction error in advance. This identification enables us to pause the treatment beam over such instances. EKF-GPRN+ implements a gating function by using simple calculations based on the trace of the predictive covariance matrix. Extensive numerical experiments are performed based on a large database of 304 respiratory motion traces to evaluate EKF-GPRN+ . The experimental results show that the EKF-GPRN+ algorithm reduces the patient-wise prediction error to 38%, 40% and 40% in root-mean-square, compared to no prediction, at lookahead lengths of 192 ms, 384 ms and 576 ms, respectively. The EKF-GPRN+ algorithm can further reduce the prediction error by employing the gating function, albeit

  13. 3D Bi2S3/TiO2 cross-linked heterostructure: An efficient strategy to improve charge transport and separation for high photoelectrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minmin; Jia, Junhong

    2016-10-01

    A novel 3D cross-linked heterostructure of TiO2 nanorods connecting with each other via ultrathin Bi2S3 nanosheets is constructed by a facile and effective strategy. The growth mechanism has been investigated and proposed based on the evolution of microstructure by changing the reaction parameters. Benefiting from the unique cross-linked heterostructure, the as-prepared Bi2S3 nanosheets modified TiO2 nanorods arrays could achieve a high energy conversion efficiency of 3.29% which is the highest value to date for Bi2S3-only sensitized solar cells as the reported highest value is 2.23% and other reported values are less than 1%. Furthermore, the photoelectrochemical studies clearly reveal that the novel cross-linked heterostructure exhibits much better activity than 0D nanoparticles decorated TiO2 nanorods under visible light irradiation, which may be primarily ascribed to the efficient electron transfer from 2D ultrathin Bi2S3 nanosheets to 1D TiO2 nanorod arrays. The promising results in this work confirm the advantages of cross-linked heterostructure and also undoubtedly offer an attractive synthesis strategy to fabricate other nanorod-based hierarchical architecture as well as nano-devices for solar energy conversion.

  14. Space-charge at the lithium-lithium chloride interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamnik, J.; Gaberscek, M.; Meden, A.; Pejovnik, S.

    1991-06-01

    The electrical properties of the passive layer formed on lithium as the product of the corrosion reaction in thionyl chloride are discussed. The passive layer is regarded as a thin layer of an ionic crystal placed between two party blocking electrodes (i.e., lithium and liquid electrolyte). After a short review of thermodynamic properties of the system, a model for description of the electric properties of the static space-charge regions is presented. On this basis, a comment on and partial reinterpretation of impedance measurements of the passive layer is given. The suggested approach leads to the conclusion that the quality of Li/SOCl2 batteries decisively depends on the properties of the lithium passive layer interface. Finally, experiments to confirm the model are suggested.

  15. Space charge oscillations in semiinsulating CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Franc, J.; Musiienko, A.; Grill, R.

    2017-09-01

    Our work focuses on a detailed analysis of non-trivial temporal evolution of the electric field measured by the Pockels effect in a CdZnTe planar sample after biasing. The electric field varies, and in a couple of seconds, it reaches a steady state. We have observed an undershoot of the electric field evolution close to the cathode which is a sign of a local oscillation of the space charge density. An advanced deep level analysis based on thermal emission results in a single hole trap with energy Ev + 0.87 eV responsible for complex electric field behavior. Moreover, we simulated an influence of a deep level concentration Nt on the local electric field oscillations: with a higher Nt the undershoots turn to the oscillations, while with a lower Nt, the undershoots turn to the monotonous temporal evolution of the electric field.

  16. Space charge limited current emission for a sharp tip

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. B. Ang, L. K.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we formulate a self-consistent model to study the space charge limited current emission from a sharp tip in a dc gap. The tip is assumed to have a radius in the order of 10s nanometer. The electrons are emitted from the tip due to field emission process. It is found that the localized current density J at the apex of the tip can be much higher than the classical Child Langmuir law (flat surface). A scaling of J ∝ V{sub g}{sup 3/2}/D{sup m}, where V{sub g} is the gap bias, D is the gap size, and m = 1.1–1.2 (depending on the emission area or radius) is proposed. The effects of non-uniform emission and the spatial dependence of work function are presented.

  17. TMCI threshold with space charge and different wake fields

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2016-08-22

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered within the frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as a basis for the solution of the equations with the wake field included. A dispersion equation for constant wake is presented in the form of an infinite continued fraction and also as the recursive relation with an arbitrary number of the basis functions. Realistic wake fields are considered as well including resistive wall, square, and oscillating wakes. It is shown that the TMCI threshold of the negative wake grows up in absolute value when the SC tune shift increases. Threshold of positive wake goes down at the increasing SC tune shift. The explanation is developed by an analysis of the bunch spectrum.

  18. Space charge limited current emission for a sharp tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Ang, L. K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we formulate a self-consistent model to study the space charge limited current emission from a sharp tip in a dc gap. The tip is assumed to have a radius in the order of 10s nanometer. The electrons are emitted from the tip due to field emission process. It is found that the localized current density J at the apex of the tip can be much higher than the classical Child Langmuir law (flat surface). A scaling of J ∝ Vg3/2/Dm, where Vg is the gap bias, D is the gap size, and m = 1.1-1.2 (depending on the emission area or radius) is proposed. The effects of non-uniform emission and the spatial dependence of work function are presented.

  19. Simulations of space charge neutralization in a magnetized electron cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, David; Gerity, James; Hall, Christopher; McIntyre, Peter; Park, Chong Shik; Moens, Vince; Stancari, Giulio

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized electron cooling at relativistic energies and Ampere scale current is essential to achieve the proposed ion luminosities in a future electron-ion collider (EIC). Neutralization of the space charge in such a cooler can significantly increase the magnetized dynamic friction and, hence, the cooling rate. The Warp framework is being used to simulate magnetized electron beam dynamics during and after the build up of neutralizing ions, via ionization of residual gas in the cooler. The design follows previous experiments at Fermilab as a verification case. We also discuss the relevance to EIC designs. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-SC0015212.

  20. Doping level dependent space charge limited conduction in polyaniline nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Chandrani; Kumar, A.

    2012-11-01

    Spherical shaped polyaniline nanoparticles of average diameter ˜4 nm were doped with different concentration of hydrochloric acid. The x-ray diffraction studies reveal an increase in crystallinity with doping. Temperature dependent current-voltage measurements on the different nanoparticle samples indicate the prevalence of bulk-controlled space charge limited conduction (SCLC) mechanism in the high voltage (>1 V) region while the ohmic conduction dominates at the lower voltage (<1 V) region. With increasing doping the nature of SCLC changes from trap-free SCLC to Child-Langmuir type SCLC via exponential trap-limited SCLC. Moreover, the field and temperature dependence of mobility exhibits the universal Poole-Frenkel behavior. The energetic disorder parameter, spatial disorder parameter, inter-site distance, and localization length have been extracted employing the uncorrelated and the correlated Gaussian disorder model.

  1. A Space-Charge-Neutralizing Plasma for Beam Drift Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.E.; Gilson, E.P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D.P.; Jung, J.Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.

    2008-08-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a {approx} 10 cm long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter {approx} 5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8T field. Measured plasma density of {ge} 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} meets the challenge of n{sub p}/Zn{sub b} > 1, where n{sub p} and n{sub b} are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the plasma ions.

  2. A space-charge-neutralizing plasma for beam drift compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Coleman, J. E.; Gilson, E. P.; Greenway, W.; Grote, D. P.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; Sefkow, A. B.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.

    2009-07-01

    Simultaneous radial focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams are being studied to heat matter to the warm dense matter, or strongly coupled plasma regime. Higher compression ratios can be achieved if the beam compression takes place in a plasma-filled drift region in which the space-charge forces of the ion beam are neutralized. Recently, a system of four cathodic arc plasma sources has been fabricated and the axial plasma density has been measured. A movable plasma probe array has been developed to measure the radial and axial plasma distribution inside and outside of a ˜10-cm-long final focus solenoid (FFS). Measured data show that the plasma forms a thin column of diameter ˜5 mm along the solenoid axis when the FFS is powered with an 8 T field. Measured plasma density of ⩾1×10 13 cm -3 meets the challenge of np/ Znb>1, where np and nb are the plasma and ion beam density, respectively, and Z is the mean ion charge state of the beam ions.

  3. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  4. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert ma