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Sample records for 3d space-charge effects

  1. Transport of 3D space charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Jian-Qin

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present the theoretical analysis and the computer code design for the intense pulsed beam transport. Intense beam dynamics is a very important issue in low-energy high-current accelerators and beam transport systems. This problem affects beam transmission and beam qualities. Therefore, it attracts the attention of the accelerator physicists worldwide. The analysis and calculation for the intense beam dynamics are very complicated, because the state of particle motion is dominated not only by the applied electromagnetic fields, but also by the beam-induced electromagnetic fields (self-fields). Moreover, the self fields are related to the beam dimensions and particle distributions. So, it is very difficult to get the self-consistent solutions of particle motion analytically. For this reason, we combine the Lie algebraic method and the particle in cell (PIC) scheme together to simulate intense 3D beam transport. With the Lie algebraic method we analyze the particle nonlinear trajectories in the applied electromagnetic fields up to third order approximation, and with the PIC algorithm we calculate the space charge effects to the particle motion. Based on the theoretical analysis, we have developed a computer code, which calculates beam transport systems consisting of electrostatic lenses, electrostatic accelerating columns, solenoid lenses, magnetic and electric quadruples, magnetic sextupoles, octopuses and different kinds of electromagnetic analyzers. The optimization calculations and the graphic display for the calculated results are provided by the code.

  2. Space charge effects: tune shifts and resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1986-08-01

    The effects of space charge and beam-beam interactions on single particle motion in the transverse degree of freedom are considered. The space charge force and the resulting incoherent tune shift are described, and examples are given from the AGS and CERN's PSB. Equations of motion are given for resonances in the presence of the space charge force, and particle behavior is examined under resonance and space charge conditions. Resonance phase space structure is described with and without space charge. Uniform and bunched beams are compared. Beam-beam forces and resonances and beam-beam detuning are described. 18 refs., 15 figs. (LEW)

  3. Space charge induced nonlinear effects in quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Wang, Yuzhuo; Xiong, Xingchuang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Tao; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical method was proposed in this work to study space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps, including ion trapping, ion motion frequency shift, and nonlinear effects on ion trajectories. The spatial distributions of ion clouds within quadrupole ion traps were first modeled for both 3D and linear ion traps. It is found that the electric field generated by space charge can be expressed as a summation of even-order fields, such as quadrupole field, octopole field, etc. Ion trajectories were then solved using the harmonic balance method. Similar to high-order field effects, space charge will result in an "ocean wave" shape nonlinear resonance curve for an ion under a dipolar excitation. However, the nonlinear resonance curve will be totally shifted to lower frequencies and bend towards ion secular frequency as ion motion amplitude increases, which is just the opposite effect of any even-order field. Based on theoretical derivations, methods to reduce space charge effects were proposed.

  4. Space charge effect in isochronous rings

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F.; York, R.

    2008-08-25

    Cyclotrons, rings for precise nuclear mass spectrometry, and some light sources with extremely short bunches are operated or planned to be operated in the isochronous or almost isochronous regime. Also, many hadron synchrotrons run in the isochronous regime for a short period of time during transition crossing. The longitudinal motion is frozen in the isochronous regime that leads to accumulation of the integral of the longitudinal space charge force. In low-gamma hadron machines, this can cause a fast growth of the beam energy spread even at modest beam intensities. Additionally, the transverse component of the space charge effectively modifies the dispersion function and the slip factor shifting the isochronous (transition) point. In this paper, we discuss space charge effects in the isochronous regime and present experimental results obtained in the Small Isochronous Ring, developed at Michigan State University specifically for studies of space charge in the isochronous regime.

  5. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics.more » In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.« less

  6. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  7. Space-charge driven emittance growth in a 3D mismatched anisotropic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Hofmann, I.

    2002-12-03

    In this paper we present a 3D simulation study of the emittance growth in a mismatched anisotropic beam. The equipartitioning driven by a 4th order space-charge resonance can be significantly modified by the presence of mismatch oscillation and halo formation. This causes emittance growth in both the longitudinal and transverse directions which could drive the beam even further away from equipartition. The averaged emittance growth per degree freedom follows the upper bound of the 2D free energy limit plus the contributions from equipartitioning.

  8. PARALLEL 3-D SPACE CHARGE CALCULATIONS IN THE UNIFIED ACCELERATOR LIBRARY.

    SciTech Connect

    D'IMPERIO, N.L.; LUCCIO, A.U.; MALITSKY, N.

    2006-06-26

    The paper presents the integration of the SIMBAD space charge module in the UAL framework. SIMBAD is a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code. Its 3-D Parallel approach features an optimized load balancing scheme based on a genetic algorithm. The UAL framework enhances the SIMBAD standalone version with the interactive ROOT-based analysis environment and an open catalog of accelerator algorithms. The composite package addresses complex high intensity beam dynamics and has been developed as part of the FAIR SIS 100 project.

  9. Benchmarking of 3D space charge codes using direct phase space measurements from photoemission high voltage dc gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarov, Ivan V.; Dunham, Bruce M.; Gulliford, Colwyn; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Sinclair, Charles K.; Soong, Ken; Hannon, Fay

    2008-10-01

    We present a comparison between space charge calculations and direct measurements of the transverse phase space of space charge dominated electron bunches from a high voltage dc photoemission gun followed by an emittance compensation solenoid magnet. The measurements were performed using a double-slit emittance measurement system over a range of bunch charge and solenoid current values. The data are compared with detailed simulations using the 3D space charge codes GPT and Parmela3D. The initial particle distributions were generated from measured transverse and temporal laser beam profiles at the photocathode. The beam brightness as a function of beam fraction is calculated for the measured phase space maps and found to approach within a factor of 2 the theoretical maximum set by the thermal energy and the accelerating field at the photocathode.

  10. Understanding the effect of space charge on instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Chao, A.; Chin, Y. H.

    2015-05-03

    The combined effect of space charge and wall impedance on transverse instabilities is an important consideration in the design and operation of high intensity hadron machines as well as an intrinsic academic interest. This study explores the combined effects of space charge and wall impedance using various simplified models in an attempt to produce a better understanding of their interplay.

  11. Space-Charge Effects in a Gas Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2010-12-03

    Discussion of space-charge effects in a photoluminescence cell that will be used as a nondisruptive total energy monitor at the LCLS facility is presented. Regimes where primary photoelectrons will be confined within the X-ray beam aperture are identified. Effects of the space-charge on the further evolution of the electron and ion populations are discussed. Parameters of the afterglow plasma are evaluated. Conditions under which the detector output will be proportional to the pulse energy are defined.

  12. Ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of solutions: space-charge effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Obaidi, R.; Wilke, M.; Borgwardt, M.; Metje, J.; Moguilevski, A.; Engel, N.; Tolksdorf, D.; Raheem, A.; Kampen, T.; Mähl, S.; Kiyan, I. Yu; Aziz, E. F.

    2015-09-01

    The method of time-resolved XUV photoelectron spectroscopy is applied in a pump-probe experiment on a liquid micro-jet. We investigate how the XUV energy spectra of photoelectrons are influenced by the space charge created due to ionization of the liquid medium by the pump laser pulse. XUV light from high-order harmonic generation is used to probe the electron population of the valence shell of iron hexacyanide in water. By exposing the sample to a short UV pump pulse of 266 nm wavelength and ˜55 fs duration, we observe an energy shift of the spectral component associated with XUV ionization from the Fe 3d(t2g) orbital as well as a shift of the water spectrum. Depending on the sequence of the pump and probe pulses, the arising energy shift of photoelectrons acquires a positive or negative value. It exhibits a sharp positive peak at small time delays, which facilitates to determine the temporal overlap between pump and probe pulses. The negative spectral shift is due to positive charge accumulated in the liquid medium during ionization. Its dissipation is found to occur on a (sub)nanosecond time scale and has a biexponential character. A simple mean-field model is provided to interpret the observations. A comparison between the intensity dependencies of the spectral shift and the UV ionization yield shows that the space-charge effect can be significantly reduced when the pump intensity is attenuated below the saturation level of water ionization. For the given experimental conditions, the saturation intensity lies at 6× {10}10 W cm-2.

  13. Design of low energy bunch compressors with space charge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, A.; Willeke, F.; Yu, L. H.; Yang, L.; Shaftan, T.; Wang, G.; Li, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore a method to manipulate low energy electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime, and we use this method to design low energy linac bunch compressors to compress electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime. In the method, we use the space charge effects instead of avoiding them; i.e., we use the space charge forces to generate the required energy chirp instead of the ordinary method which uses the rf accelerating system to generate the chirp. We redefine the concepts of the dispersion function and beta functions in a space charge dominated regime to guide the optimization. Using this method, we study the low energy (5-22 MeV) linac bunch compressor design to produce short (˜150 fs ) and small size (˜30 μ m ) bunches for the electron beam slicing project. The low energy linac bunch compressors work in a space charge dominated regime, and the bunches at the downstream of the gun have a negative energy chirp due to the space charge effects. To provide compression for the negative energy chirped bunch, we design a positive R56 dispersive section using a four-dipole chicane with several quadrupole magnets. We have designed low energy linac bunch compressors with different photocathode rf guns. For example, one linac bunch compressor with the BNL photocathode electron rf gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 166 fs rms bunch length, 28 and 31 μ m rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 5 MeV with 50 pC charge. Another example with LBNL's very-high frequency gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 128 fs rms bunch length, 42 and 25 μ m rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 22 MeV with 200 pC charge.

  14. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE PAGES

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; et al

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge-induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  15. Effect of water on the space charge formation in XLPE

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Ayako; Takahashi, Tohru; Yamamaoto, Syuji

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the authors describe the effect of water on the space charge in crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE). In order to study the effects of water and by-products of crosslinking, they prepared two types of samples. The water in the first one (Type A) is controlled by immersing in water after removing the by-products, and the water in the other type (Type B) of samples is controlled by the water from the decomposition of cumyl-alcohol by heating. The authors measured the space charge formation by pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. A large difference was observed between Type A and Type B. In Type A samples (containing only water) the space charge distribution changes from homogeneous to heterogeneous as the water content increases, whereas in Type B (containing water and by-product) all samples exhibit heterogeneous space charge distribution. However, merely the effect of water for both types was almost the same, including peculiar space charge behavior near the water solubility limit.

  16. Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Zhensheng; Zhang He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu

    2012-02-15

    Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

  17. Accelerated simulation study of space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps using GPU techniques.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingchuang; Xu, Wei; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Yulin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in the performance of various types of mass analyzers. Simulation of space charge effects is often limited by the computation capability. In this study, we evaluate the method of using graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate ion trajectory simulation. Simulation using GPU has been compared with multi-core central processing unit (CPU), and an acceleration of about 390 times have been obtained using a single computer for simulation of up to 10(5) ions in quadrupole ion traps. Characteristics of trapped ions can be investigated at detailed levels within a reasonable simulation time. Space charge effects on the trapping capacities of linear and 3D ion traps, ion cloud shapes, ion motion frequency shift, mass spectrum peak coalescence effects between two ion clouds of close m/z are studied with the ion trajectory simulation using GPU.

  18. Space-Charge Effects in the Gas Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Hau-Riege, S; Bionta, R

    2007-09-24

    Discussion of space-charge effects in a photoluminescence cell that will be used as a non-disruptive total energy monitor at the LCLS facility is presented. Regimes where primary photoelectrons will be confined within the X-ray beam aperture are identified. Effects of the space-charge on the further evolution of the electron and ion populations are discussed. Parameters of the afterglow plasma are evaluated. Conditions under which the detector output will be proportional to the pulse energy are defined.

  19. Space charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Mahale, N.K.; Mehta, N.; Pilat, F.; Talman, R.; York, R.C.

    1991-05-01

    By means of multi-particle tracking, we explore space charge effects in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) which has a strong requirement for small transverse emittance. Macro-particles are tracked in a self-consistent manner in six dimensional phase space with transverse space charge kicks so that the emittance evolution as well as the particle distribution are simulated as a function of time. Among recent improvements of the code, the longitudinal motion, i.e. synchrotron oscillations as well as acceleration, makes it possible to simulate the capture process of linac microbunches. The code was calibrated by comparing with the experimental results at the Fermilab Booster. Preliminary results of the LEB show slow emittance growth due to the space charge. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Electron cloud and space charge effects in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space charge making Landau damping appear impossible. Simulations reveal a substantial buildup of electron cloud in the whole Booster ramping cycle, both inside the unshielded combined-function magnets and the beam pipes joining the magnets, whenever the secondary-emission yield (SEY) is larger than {approx}1.6. The implication of the electron-cloud effects on the space charge and collective instabilities of the beam is investigated.

  1. The fast multipole method in the differential algebra framework for the calculation of 3D space charge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He

    2013-01-01

    The space charge effect is one of the most important collective effects in beam dynamic studies. In many cases, numerical simulations are inevitable in order to get a clear understanding of this effect. The particle-particle interaction algorithms and the article-in-cell algorithms are widely used in space charge effect simulations. But they both have difficulties in dealing with highly correlated beams with abnormal distributions or complicated geometries. We developed a new algorithm to calculate the three dimensional self-field between charged particles by combining the differential algebra (DA) techniques with the fast multi-pole method (FMM). The FMM hierarchically decomposes the whole charged domain into many small regions. For each region it uses multipole expansions to represent the potential/field contributions from the particles far away from the region and then converts the multipole expansions into a local expansion inside the region. The potential/field due to the far away particles is calculated from the expansions and the potential/field due to the nearby particles is calculated from the Coulomb force law. The DA techniques are used in the calculation, translation and converting of the expansions. The new algorithm scales linearly with the total number of particles and it is suitable for any arbitrary charge distribution. Using the DA techniques, we can calculate both the potential/field and its high order derivatives, which will be useful for the purpose of including the space charge effect into transfer maps in the future. We first present the single level FMM, which decomposes the whole domain into boxes of the same size. It works best for charge distributions that are not overly non-uniform. Then we present the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA), which decomposes the whole domain into different sized boxes according to the charge density. Finer boxes are generated where the higher charge density exists; thus the algorithm works for any

  2. Space charge effects for multipactor in coaxial lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sorolla, E.

    2015-03-15

    Multipactor is a hazardous vacuum discharge produced by secondary electron emission within microwave devices of particle accelerators and telecommunication satellites. This work analyzes the dynamics of the multipactor discharge within a coaxial line for the mono-energetic electron emission model taking into account the space charge effects. The steady-state is predicted by the proposed model and an analytical expression for the maximum number of electrons released by the discharge presented. This could help to link simulations to experiments and define a multipactor onset criterion.

  3. Numerical Study of Three Dimensional Effects in Longitudinal Space-Charge Impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    Longitudinal space-charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as detrimental in free-electron lasers as they can seed instabilities. Such “microbunching instabilities” were recently shown to be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation pulses [1, 2]. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beamlines capable of sustaining this LSC instability as a mechanism to produce a coherent light source. To date most of these studies have been carried out with a one-dimensional impedance model for the LSC. In this paper we use a N-body “Barnes-Hut” algorithm [3] to simulate the 3D space charge force in the beam combined with elegant [4] and explore the limitation of the 1D model often used

  4. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer.

    PubMed

    Dell'Angela, M; Anniyev, T; Beye, M; Coffee, R; Föhlisch, A; Gladh, J; Kaya, S; Katayama, T; Krupin, O; Nilsson, A; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Sellberg, J A; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Öström, H; Ogasawara, H; Wolf, M; Wurth, W

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  5. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer.

    PubMed

    Dell'Angela, M; Anniyev, T; Beye, M; Coffee, R; Föhlisch, A; Gladh, J; Kaya, S; Katayama, T; Krupin, O; Nilsson, A; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Sellberg, J A; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Öström, H; Ogasawara, H; Wolf, M; Wurth, W

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse. PMID:26798795

  6. Effect of the Injected Space Charge on Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabkin, M. M.; Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bazelyan, E. M.; Carpenter, R. B.; Raizer, Y. P.

    2001-12-01

    . This work investigates the development of the lightning discharge between tall grounded objects and a thunderstorm cloud in the presence of local space charges. Corona currents from the objects initiated under the influence of the electric field of a thundercloud cell produce these space charges. Starting from the object, the local space charge expands toward the opposite charge in the thundercloud cell. Within seconds, the radius of the space charge (tens of meters) exceeds many times the radius of the electrode (usually one-two meters), where the space charge began. The presence of the local space charge near the object changes qualitatively the process of lightning discharge between a thundercloud cell and an object on the earth. The air gap between them consists now of two characteristic regions: the region free of space charge and the region filled with space charge. The analytical results of the electric field and potential distribution along the air gap in the presence of a space charge indicate the significant difference from the well-known distribution of these properties in the laboratory air gaps without a space charge. The injected space charge smoothes the radial potential distribution along the charged region of the air gap. Most of the applied voltage drops along the charge-free portion of the air gap. One of the phases of the process of lightning discharge is developing a counter leader, which will complete the discharge path between a thundercloud cell and the object on the earth. It was found theoretically and experimentally that the initiation of the leader in the long air gap (including an upward connecting leader in the downward lightning and an upward leader in the upward lightning) requires that the voltage drop near the stressed electrode must be not less than 400 kV along one meter of length. Redistribution of the voltage along the air gap influenced by the presence of the local charge can lead to a situation where that requirement will

  7. The effect of space charges on conduction current in polymer by modified PEA method

    SciTech Connect

    Hwangbo, S.; Yun, D.H.; Yi, D.Y.; Han, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Direct measurement of space charge and conduction current was carried out on low-density polyethylene degraded by ultra-violet using a pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) method. Dominant hetero-charges were formed near both electrodes by high voltage application and was found to be deeply trapped. In this paper, the effect of temperature and electric field reversal on the detrapping and trapping of space charges was investigated and the role of space charge in electrical conduction was discussed quantitatively. The main mechanism for detrapping and trapping of space charges was Poole-Frenkel model.

  8. KOBRA3-three dimensional raytracing including space-charge effects

    SciTech Connect

    Spadtke, P.

    1985-10-01

    Using the three-dimensional computer code KOBRA3, we have simulated the behaviour of the space charge compensating electrons within the potential of ion beams and magnetic fields. Measured field maps of a solenoid and a quadrupole have been used for these simulations. The predictions of the code are compared with measurements.

  9. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  10. Incoherent effect of space charge and electron cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchetti, G.; Hofmann, I.; Fischer, W.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-12-01

    Trapping by resonances or scattering off resonances induced by space charge (SC) or electron cloud (EC) in conjunction with synchrotron motion can explain observations of slow beam loss and emittance growth, which are often accompanied by changes in the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper we review the recent progress in understanding and modeling of the underlying mechanisms, highlight the differences and similarities between space charge and electron cloud, and discuss simulation results in the light of experimental observations, e.g., at GSI, CERN, and BNL. In particular, we address the role of the pinched electrons and describe in detail the complexity of the electron pinch formation. We present simulation results within a dipole or in a field-free region of the beam pipe, which reveal the morphology and main features of this phenomenon, explain the physical origin of the complex electron structures like stripe in either field configuration, and discuss the dependence on some key parameters.

  11. Emittance growth in heavy ion rings due to effects of space charge and dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    We review the derivation of moment equations which include the effects of space charge and dispersion in bends first presented in ref [1]. These equations generalize the familiar envelope equations to include the dispersive effects of bends. We review the application of these equations to the calculation of the change in emittance resulting from a sharp transition from a straight section to a bend section, using an energy conservation constraint. Comparisons of detailed 2D and 3D simulations of intense beams in rings using the WARP code (refs [2,3]) are made with results obtained from the moment equations. We also compare the analysis carried out in ref [1], to more recent analyses, refs [4,5]. We further examine self-consistent distributions of beams in bends and discuss the relevance of these distributions to the moment equation formulation.

  12. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  13. High-order space charge effects using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reusch, M.F.; Bruhwiler, D.L. |

    1997-02-01

    The Northrop Grumman Topkark code has been upgraded to Fortran 90, making use of operator overloading, so the same code can be used to either track an array of particles or construct a Taylor map representation of the accelerator lattice. We review beam optics and beam dynamics simulations conducted with TOPKARK in the past and we present a new method for modeling space charge forces to high-order with automatic differentiation. This method generates an accurate, high-order, 6-D Taylor map of the phase space variable trajectories for a bunched, high-current beam. The spatial distribution is modeled as the product of a Taylor Series times a Gaussian. The variables in the argument of the Gaussian are normalized to the respective second moments of the distribution. This form allows for accurate representation of a wide range of realistic distributions, including any asymmetries, and allows for rapid calculation of the space charge fields with free space boundary conditions. An example problem is presented to illustrate our approach. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. High-order space charge effects using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reusch, Michael F.; Bruhwiler, David L.

    1997-02-01

    The Northrop Grumman Topkark code has been upgraded to Fortran 90, making use of operator overloading, so the same code can be used to either track an array of particles or construct a Taylor map representation of the accelerator lattice. We review beam optics and beam dynamics simulations conducted with TOPKARK in the past and we present a new method for modeling space charge forces to high-order with automatic differentiation. This method generates an accurate, high-order, 6-D Taylor map of the phase space variable trajectories for a bunched, high-current beam. The spatial distribution is modeled as the product of a Taylor Series times a Gaussian. The variables in the argument of the Gaussian are normalized to the respective second moments of the distribution. This form allows for accurate representation of a wide range of realistic distributions, including any asymmetries, and allows for rapid calculation of the space charge fields with free space boundary conditions. An example problem is presented to illustrate our approach.

  15. Transverse space charge effect calculation in the Synergia accelerator modeling toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes a transverse space charge effect calculation algorithm, developed in the context of accelerator modeling toolkit Synergia. The introduction to the space charge problem and the Synergia modeling toolkit short description are given. The developed algorithm is explained and the implementation is described in detail. As a result of this work a new space charge solver was developed and integrated into the Synergia toolkit. The solver showed correct results in comparison to existing Synergia solvers and delivered better performance in the regime where it is applicable.

  16. Effect of positron space charge on operation of an antihydrogen trap.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, C A

    2007-07-01

    Experimental conditions have recently been reported [G. Andresen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023402 (2007)] that are relevant to the prospect of trapping antihydrogen atoms. An analysis of the experimental conditions indicates that positron space charge can have an important effect. The fraction of antiprotons that have an energy suitable for antihydrogen trapping can be reduced by drifts caused by the presence of positron space charge.

  17. Effect of positron space charge on operation of an antihydrogen trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C. A.

    2007-07-15

    Experimental conditions have recently been reported [G. Andresen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 023402 (2007)] that are relevant to the prospect of trapping antihydrogen atoms. An analysis of the experimental conditions indicates that positron space charge can have an important effect. The fraction of antiprotons that have an energy suitable for antihydrogen trapping can be reduced by drifts caused by the presence of positron space charge.

  18. ACTIVE CATHODES FOR SUPER-HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS THROUGH SPACE CHARGE EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2003-12-12

    This report summarizes the work done during the fourth quarter of the project. Effort was directed in two areas, namely, continued further development of the model on the role of connectivity on ionic conductivity of porous bodies, including the role of grain boundaries and space charge, and its relationship to cathode polarization; and fabrication of samaria-doped ceria porous (SDC). The work on the model development involves calculation of the effect of space charge on transport through porous bodies. Three specific cases have been examined: (1) Space charge resistivity greater than the grain resistivity, (2) Space charge resistivity equal to the grain resistivity, and (3) Space charge resistivity lower than the grain resistivity. The model accounts for transport through three regions: the bulk of the grain, the space charge region, and the structural part of the grain boundary. The effect of neck size has been explicitly incorporated. In future work, the effective resistivity will be incorporated into the effective cathode polarization resistance. The results will then be compared with experiments.

  19. The effect of dc poling duration on space charge relaxation in virgin XLPE cable peelings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzimas, Antonios; Rowland, Simon M.; Dissado, Leonard A.; Fu, Mingli; Nilsson, Ulf H.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of dc poling time upon the time-dependent decay of space charge in insulation peelings of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable that had not previously experienced either electrical or thermal stressing is investigated. Two dc poling durations were used, 2 h and 26 h at an electric field of 50 kV mm-1 and at ambient temperature. Space charge was measured in the two samples investigated both during space charge accumulation and throughout its subsequent decay. The results show that the length of dc poling plays an important role in the subsequent decay. Despite the fact that both samples have had the same amount of space charge by the end of both short and long poling durations the time dependence of the space charge decay is different. Most of the charge stored in the sample that had experienced the short time poling decays rapidly after voltage removal. On the other hand, the charge that is stored in the sample with the long dc poling duration decays slowly and its decay occurs in two stages. The data, which are analysed by means of the de-trapping theory of space charge decay, imply that the charge stored in the material has occupied energy states with different trap depth ranges. The two poling durations lead to different relative amounts of charge in each of the two trap depth ranges. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  20. Space charge effect of the high intensity proton beam during the resonance extraction for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Johnstone, John; Michelotti, Leo; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The proposed Mu2e experiment to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab plans slow, resonant extraction of a beam with 3 x 10{sup 12} protons from the Debuncher ring. Space charge of this high intensity beam is a critical factor, since it induces significant betatron tune spread and consequently affects resonance extraction processes, such as spill uniformity and beam losses. This study shows the multi-particle simulation results in the early stages of resonance extraction and spill uniformity in the presence of 2D and 3D space charge effects. We have presented the results of the third-integer resonance extraction in early stage for the Mu2e experiment in the presence of space charge effects. In order to track particles and to calculate self-consistent space charge effects, Synergia2 was used, which is capable of parallel computing. The space charge tune shift was computed and was reasonable value compared with the analytical calculation. Locations of the septum and Lambertson were chosen so that particles are kicked and extracted efficiently. The spill rates for with and without space charge effects were uniform, but should be improved for the early stage after the sextupole field ramping.

  1. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  2. Studies of Space Charge Effects in the Proposed CERN PS2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert; De Maria, Riccardo; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Wienands, Ulrich; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    A new proton synchrotron, the PS2, is under design study to replace the current proton synchrotron at CERN for the LHC upgrade. Nonlinear space charge effects could cause significant beam emittance growth and particle losses and limit the performance of the PS2. In this paper, we report on studies of the potential space-charge effects at the PS2 using three-dimensional self-consistent macroparticle tracking codes, IMPACT, MaryLie/IMPACT, and Synergia. We will present initial benchmark results among these codes. Effects of space-charge on the emittance growth, especially due to synchrotron coupling, aperture sizes, initial painted distribution, and RF ramping scheme will also be discussed.

  3. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  4. Study of the Charge Density Control Method Including the Space Charge Effect in the Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinichi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Hotchi, Hideaki; Okabe, Kota; Yamamoto, Kazami; Kinsho, Michikazu

    For high intensity proton accelerators, one of the beam loss sources is the incoherent tune spread caused by the space charge force. In the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, beams are injected sequentially and shifted slightly from the central orbit in order to increase the beam size intentionally and suppress the charge density and incoherent tune spread. This injection method has been adopted and suppressed the beam loss. However, simulations clarified that beams did not spread as much as expected because of the space charge effect in the high current case. As simulation results of the optimized beam shift pattern when the space charge effect is considered, it was obtained that the incoherent tune spread could be suppressed to an extent that has not been achieved previously.

  5. Mixing and space-charge effects in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, E.; Endler, A.; Rizzato, F. B.; Serbeto, A.

    2013-12-15

    The present work revisits the subjects of mixing, saturation, and space-charge effects in free-electron lasers. Use is made of the compressibility factor, which proves to be a helpful tool in the related systems of charged beams confined by static magnetic fields. The compressibility allows to perform analytical estimates of the elapsed time until the onset of mixing, which in turn allows to estimate the saturated amplitude of the radiation field. In addition, the compressibility helps to pinpoint space-charge effects and the corresponding transition from Compton to Raman regimes.

  6. ACTIVE CATHODES FOR SUPER-HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS THROUGH SPACE CHARGE EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2004-05-17

    This report summarizes the work done during the sixth quarter of the project. Effort was directed in three areas: (1) Further development of the model on the role of connectivity on ionic conductivity of porous bodies, including the role of grain boundaries and space charge region. (2) Calculation of the effect of space charge and morphology of porous bodies on the effective charge transfer resistance of porous composite cathodes. (3) The investigation of the three electrode system for the measurement of cathodic polarization using amperometric sensors.

  7. Space charge enhanced plasma gradient effects on satellite electric field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diebold, Dan; Hershkowitz, Noah; Dekock, J.; Intrator, T.; Hsieh, M-K.

    1991-01-01

    It has been recognized that plasma gradients can cause error in magnetospheric electric field measurements made by double probes. Space charge enhanced Plasma Gradient Induced Error (PGIE) is discussed in general terms, presenting the results of a laboratory experiment designed to demonstrate this error, and deriving a simple expression that quantifies this error. Experimental conditions were not identical to magnetospheric conditions, although efforts were made to insure the relevant physics applied to both cases. The experimental data demonstrate some of the possible errors in electric field measurements made by strongly emitting probes due to space charge effects in the presence of plasma gradients. Probe errors in space and laboratory conditions are discussed, as well as experimental error. In the final section, theoretical aspects are examined and an expression is derived for the maximum steady state space charge enhanced PGIE taken by two identical current biased probes.

  8. Space charge stopband correction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2005-09-01

    It is speculated that the space charge effect cause beam emittance growth through the resonant envelope oscillation. Based on this theory, we propose an approach, called space charge stopband correction, to reduce such emittance growth by compensation of the half-integer stopband width of the resonant oscillation. It is illustrated with the Fermilab Booster model.

  9. Simulation of space charge effects and transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P.; MacLachlan, J.

    1987-03-01

    The longitudinal phase space program ESME, modified for space charge and wall impedance effects, has been used to simulate transition crossing in the Fermilab Booster. The simulations yield results in reasonable quantitative agreement with measured parameters. They further indicate that a transition jump scheme currently under construction will significantly reduce emittance growth, while attempts to alter machine impedance are less obviously beneficial. In addition to presenting results, this paper points out a serious difficulty, related to statistical fluctuations, in the space charge calculation. False indications of emittance growth can appear if care is not taken to minimize this problem.

  10. Space-charge perturbation effects in photonic tubes under high irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalibjian, R.; Peterson, G.G.

    1982-06-01

    Potential perturbation effects at the cathode region of a photonic tube can occur at high intensity due to space-charge. Using appropriate photoelectron energy distribution functions, the electric field at the cathode is calculated and its effect upon the spatial/temporal resolution is examined.

  11. ACTIVE CATHODES FOR SUPER-HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS THROUGH SPACE CHARGE EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2004-03-08

    This report summarizes the work done during the fifth quarter of the project. Effort was directed in two areas: (1) Further development of the model on the role of connectivity on ionic conductivity of porous bodies, including the role of grain boundaries and space charge region. (2) Fabrication of porous samaria-doped ceria (SDC) and investigation of the effect of thermal treatment on its conductivity. The model developed accounts for transport through three regions: (a) Transport through the bulk of the grain, RI, which includes parallel transport through space charge region. (b) Transport through the space charge region adjacent to the neck (grain boundary), RII. (c) Transport through the structural part of the neck (grain boundary), RIII. The work on the model development involves calculation RI, RII, RIII, and the sum of these three terms, which is the total resistance, as a function of the grain radius ranging between 0.5 and 5 microns and as a function of the relative neck size, described in terms of the angle theta, ranging between 5 and 45{sup o}. Three values of resistivity of the space charge region were chosen; space charge resistivity greater than grain resistivity, equal to grain resistivity, and lower than grain resistivity. Experimental work was conducted on samaria (Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3})-doped ceria (SDC) samples of differing porosity levels, before and after thermal treatment at 1200 C. The conductivity in the annealed samples was lower, consistent with enhanced Debye length. This shows the important role of space charge on ionic transport, and its implications concerning cathode polarization.

  12. Space-charge Effect on Electroresistance in Metal-Ferroelectric-Metal capacitors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bo Bo; Liu, Yang; Chen, Liu Fang; Wang, Jian Lu; Sun, Shuo; Shen, Hong; Sun, Jing Lan; Yuan, Guo Liang; Fusil, Stéphane; Garcia, Vincent; Dkhil, Brahim; Meng, Xiang Jian; Chu, Jun Hao

    2015-12-16

    Resistive switching through electroresistance (ER) effect in metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors has attracted increasing interest due to its potential applications as memories and logic devices. However, the detailed electronic mechanisms resulting in large ER when polarisation switching occurs in the ferroelectric barrier are still not well understood. Here, ER effect up to 1000% at room temperature is demonstrated in C-MOS compatible MFM nanocapacitors with a 8.8 nm-thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) homopolymer ferroelectric, which is very promising for silicon industry integration. Most remarkably, using theory developed for metal-semiconductor rectifying contacts, we derive an analytical expression for the variation of interfacial barrier heights due to space-charge effect that can interpret the observed ER response. We extend this space-charge model, related to the release of trapped charges by defects, to MFM structures made of ferroelectric oxides. This space-charge model provides a simple and straightforward tool to understand recent unusual reports. Finally, this work suggests that defect-engineering could be an original and efficient route for tuning the space-charge effect and thus the ER performances in future electronic devices.

  13. Space-charge Effect on Electroresistance in Metal-Ferroelectric-Metal capacitors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bo Bo; Liu, Yang; Chen, Liu Fang; Wang, Jian Lu; Sun, Shuo; Shen, Hong; Sun, Jing Lan; Yuan, Guo Liang; Fusil, Stéphane; Garcia, Vincent; Dkhil, Brahim; Meng, Xiang Jian; Chu, Jun Hao

    2015-01-01

    Resistive switching through electroresistance (ER) effect in metal-ferroelectric-metal (MFM) capacitors has attracted increasing interest due to its potential applications as memories and logic devices. However, the detailed electronic mechanisms resulting in large ER when polarisation switching occurs in the ferroelectric barrier are still not well understood. Here, ER effect up to 1000% at room temperature is demonstrated in C-MOS compatible MFM nanocapacitors with a 8.8 nm-thick poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) homopolymer ferroelectric, which is very promising for silicon industry integration. Most remarkably, using theory developed for metal-semiconductor rectifying contacts, we derive an analytical expression for the variation of interfacial barrier heights due to space-charge effect that can interpret the observed ER response. We extend this space-charge model, related to the release of trapped charges by defects, to MFM structures made of ferroelectric oxides. This space-charge model provides a simple and straightforward tool to understand recent unusual reports. Finally, this work suggests that defect-engineering could be an original and efficient route for tuning the space-charge effect and thus the ER performances in future electronic devices. PMID:26670138

  14. Dynamic aperture and space charge effect studies for the Recycler ring for Project-X

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; Vorobiev, L.G.; Johnson, D.E.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    A simplified Recycler lattice was created to fine tune injection straight, ring tune, and phase trombone. In this paper, we will present detailed modifications for further optimization of Recycler lattice which requires the investigation of tune footprint and dynamic aperture based on higher order momentum components of the magnetic fields, together with the space charge effects.

  15. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  16. Reducing Space Charge Effects in a Linear Ion Trap by Rhombic Ion Excitation and Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Yuzhuo; Hu, Lili; Guo, Dan; Fang, Xiang; Zhou, Mingfei; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in ion trap operations, which typically limit the ion trapping capacity, dynamic range, mass accuracy, and resolving power of a quadrupole ion trap. In this study, a rhombic ion excitation and ejection method was proposed to minimize space charge effects in a linear ion trap. Instead of applying a single dipolar AC excitation signal, two dipolar AC excitation signals with the same frequency and amplitude but 90° phase difference were applied in the x- and y-directions of the linear ion trap, respectively. As a result, mass selective excited ions would circle around the ion cloud located at the center of the ion trap, rather than go through the ion cloud. In this work, excited ions were then axially ejected and detected, but this rhombic ion excitation method could also be applied to linear ion traps with ion radial ejection capabilities. Experiments show that space charge induced mass resolution degradation and mass shift could be alleviated with this method. For the experimental conditions in this work, space charge induced mass shift could be decreased by ~50%, and the mass resolving power could be improved by ~2 times at the same time.

  17. Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.

    2012-05-20

    During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

  18. The effect of trap density on the space charge formation in polymeric photorefractive composites.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jin-Woo; Lee, Choongkeun; Kim, Nakjoong

    2009-04-01

    The effect of trap density on the space charge formation of polymeric photorefractive (PR) composites was studied using the modified Schildkraut differential equation. The densities of electrons, holes, and traps, as well as the rates of generation, recombination, trapping, and detrapping are examined. The steady-state and temporal behaviors of photocurrent and space charge field (E(sc)) formation dependence on the trap density are also discussed. The charge transport dynamics influenced by the presence of the trap molecules controls the formation of E(sc) via charge trapping, charge detrapping, and charge recombination. Experimental studies of photocurrent and E(sc) in poly[methyl-3-(9-carbazolyl) propylsiloxane]-based polymeric PR composites were carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the model.

  19. Direct space-charge effects on the ILC damping rings: Task ForceReport

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Oide, Katsunobu

    2006-02-28

    In 2005 a global effort was initiated to conduct studies for a baseline recommendation for the various components of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Work for the damping rings was subdivided in a number of tasks. This Report contains the contribution to this effort by the Authors as Coordinators of the Task Force on space charge. (A slightly reduced version of this document can also be found as part of the ''Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC Damping Rings'', Edts. A. Wolski, et al., LBNL-59449.) The studies documented in this Report were carried out for several of the reference lattices considered for the baseline recommendation. Space charge effects were found to be quite noticeable in the lattices with the longest circumference. Although it does not appear that they could prevent operation of any machine having such lattices they do favor a choice of a ring design with shorter ({approx}6km) circumference at 5 GeV.

  20. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-09-01

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  1. Measurement and Simulation of Space Charge Effects in a Multi-Beam Electron Bunch from an RF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.M.; Piot, P.; Power, J.G.; Yusof, Z.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We report on a new experimental study of the space charge effect in a space-charge-dominated multi-beam electron bunch. A 5 MeV electron bunch, consisting of a variable number of beamlets separated transversely, was generated in a photoinjector and propagated in a drift space. The collective interaction of these beamlets was studied for different experimental conditions. The experiment allowed the exploration of space charge effects and its comparison with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Our observations also suggest the possible use of a multibeam configuration to tailor the transverse distribution of an electron beam.

  2. ACTIVE CATHODES FOR SUPER-HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS THROUGH SPACE CHARGE EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2003-11-03

    This report summarizes the work done during the third quarter of the project. Effort was directed in two areas: (1) Further development of the model on the role of connectivity on ionic conductivity of porous bodies, including the role of grain boundaries, and its relationship to cathode polarization. Included indirectly through the grain boundary effect is the effect of space charge. (2) Synthesis of LSC + SDC composite cathode powders by combustion synthesis. (3) Fabrication and testing of anode-supported single cells made using synthesized LSC + ScDC composite cathodes.

  3. Wiggler taper optimization for free-electron-laser amplifiers with moderate space-charge effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.; Scharlemann, E.T.; Fawley, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    The standard synchronous tapering method used to design the wiggler magnetic field for free-electron-laser (FEL) amplifiers operating in the Compton regime will not work for amplifier systems where space-charge effects are important. The space-charge effects lower the overall gain in the amplifier system and, even more importantly, shift the peak in the gain curve to magnetic field values that are significantly less than the synchronous magnetic field value. As a result, the overall predicted gain using the synchronous tapering method is too low. Moreover, the synchronous magnetic field corresponds to the peak in the gain curve for a frequency below the fundamental frequency. Consequently, shot noise at frequencies below the fundamental frequency can grow to levels that may prevent amplification of the fundamental. We have developed a new tapering strategy that improves the predicted amplifier gain and circumvents the shot-noise growth for systems with moderate space-charge effects. For this new strategy, we hold the wiggler magnetic field constant at a value below the synchronous value but near the peak of the gain curve for the fundamental frequency, for some optimized length at the front end of the wiggler. Beyond this constant wiggler section, the field is tapered using the standrd synchronous tapering algorithm. This new tapering scheme results in significant improvement in predicted amplifier gains and limits the growth of shot noise to insignificant levels. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new tapering algorithm using the tapered wiggler design for the proposed microwave heating experiment (MTX) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). 4 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Aberration of a negative ion beam caused by space charge effect.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Wada, S; Hatayama, A

    2010-02-01

    Aberrations are inevitable when the charged particle beams are extracted, accelerated, transmitted, and focused with electrostatic and magnetic fields. In this study, we investigate the aberration of a negative ion accelerator for a neutral beam injector theoretically, especially the spherical aberration caused by the negative ion beam expansion due to the space charge effect. The negative ion current density profiles with the spherical aberration are compared with those without the spherical aberration. It is found that the negative ion current density profiles in a log scale are tailed due to the spherical aberration.

  5. Vacuum space charge effect in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; Hellmann, Stefan; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Christopher; Hussain, Zahid; Kaindl, Robert; Kipp, Lutz; Rossnagel, Kai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2009-08-05

    We report a systematic measurement of the space charge effect observed in the few-ps laser pulse regime in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The broadening and the shift of a gold Fermi edge as a function of spot size, laser power, and emission angle are characterized for pulse lengths of 6 ps and 6 eV photon energy. The results are used as a benchmark for an N-body numerical simulation and are compared to different regimes used in photoemission spectroscopy. These results provide an important reference for the design of time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setups and next-generation light sources.

  6. Space charge effects on relative peak heights in fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Uechi, G T; Dunbar, R C

    1992-10-01

    Ion trajectory calculations have confirmed that space charge interactions can be a source for mass discrimination seen in Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectra. As compared with the previously recognized mechanism of z-axis excitation, ion-ion repulsion is a mechanism which specifically affects relative peak heights of ions close in mass, and is most severe for low excitation radiofrequency (rf) amplitudes. In this mechanism, Coulomb repulsion significantly perturbs the motion of the ion clouds during excitation and alters the final cyclotron orbital radii. Under these conditions peak heights do not accurately reflect the true ion abundances in the FT-ICR spectrometer. Mass discrimination can be minimized by using low numbers of ions, low ion densities, and a short, high amplitude rf excitation waveform. Experimental observation of the relative peak heights of the m/z 91, 92, and 134 ions in n-butylbenzene gives quantitative confirmation of the results of the trajectory calculations. Chirp, SWIFT, and impulse excitation were modeled: impulse excitation was found to be most effective in minimizing the effects of space charge interactions.

  7. Space charge memory effect in a-Si:H at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, S.; Stradins, P.; Fritzsche, H.

    1997-07-01

    Space charges build up near one or both electrodes of a photoconductor unless the thermoionic current balances the photocurrent. Space charges built up also when a voltage U is applied at low T to a semiconductor containing a nonequilibrium distribution of carriers. The presence of a space charge is observed as a relaxation-current transient when the sample is illuminated at zero bias. If one type of carrier is immobile the steady state photocurrent becomes zero.

  8. Calibration function for the Orbitrap FTMS accounting for the space charge effect.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Good, David M; Lyutvinskiy, Yaroslav; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A

    2010-11-01

    Ion storage in an electrostatic trap has been implemented with the introduction of the Orbitrap Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS), which demonstrates performance similar to high-field ion cyclotron resonance MS. High mass spectral characteristics resulted in rapid acceptance of the Orbitrap FTMS for Life Sciences applications. The basics of Orbitrap operation are well documented; however, like in any ion trap MS technology, its performance is limited by interactions between the ion clouds. These interactions result in ion cloud couplings, systematic errors in measured masses, interference between ion clouds of different size yet with close m/z ratios, etc. In this work, we have characterized the space-charge effect on the measured frequency for the Orbitrap FTMS, looking for the possibility to achieve sub-ppm levels of mass measurement accuracy (MMA) for peptides in a wide range of total ion population. As a result of this characterization, we proposed an m/z calibration law for the Orbitrap FTMS that accounts for the total ion population present in the trap during a data acquisition event. Using this law, we were able to achieve a zero-space charge MMA limit of 80 ppb for the commercial Orbitrap FTMS system and sub-ppm level of MMA over a wide range of total ion populations with the automatic gain control values varying from 10 to 10(7).

  9. Space Charge Layer Effect in Solid State Ion Conductors and Lithium Batteries: Principle and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Guo, Xiangxin

    2016-01-01

    The space charge layer (SCL) effects were initially developed to explain the anomalous conductivity enhancement in composite ionic conductors. They were further extended to qualitatively as well as quantitatively understand the interfacial phenomena in many other ionic-conducting systems. Especially in nanometre-scale systems, the SCL effects could be used to manipulate the conductivity and construct artificial conductors. Recently, existence of such effects either at the electrolyte/cathode interface or at the interfaces inside the composite electrode in all solid state lithium batteries (ASSLB) has attracted attention. Therefore, in this article, the principle of SCL on basis of defect chemistry is first presented. The SCL effects on the carrier transport and storage in typical conducting systems are reviewed. For ASSLB, the relevant effects reported so far are also reviewed. Finally, the perspective of interface engineer related to SCL in ASSLB is addressed.

  10. Space Charge Layer Effect in Solid State Ion Conductors and Lithium Batteries: Principle and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Guo, Xiangxin

    2016-01-01

    The space charge layer (SCL) effects were initially developed to explain the anomalous conductivity enhancement in composite ionic conductors. They were further extended to qualitatively as well as quantitatively understand the interfacial phenomena in many other ionic-conducting systems. Especially in nanometre-scale systems, the SCL effects could be used to manipulate the conductivity and construct artificial conductors. Recently, existence of such effects either at the electrolyte/cathode interface or at the interfaces inside the composite electrode in all solid state lithium batteries (ASSLB) has attracted attention. Therefore, in this article, the principle of SCL on basis of defect chemistry is first presented. The SCL effects on the carrier transport and storage in typical conducting systems are reviewed. For ASSLB, the relevant effects reported so far are also reviewed. Finally, the perspective of interface engineer related to SCL in ASSLB is addressed. PMID:27640376

  11. Observation of space-charge effects in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Fitzgerald, D.; Hardek, T.; Hutson, R.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Thiessen, H.; Wang, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    In recent operation of the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR), the vertical and horizontal tunes have been moved closer to the integers (v{sub y} = 2.12, v{sub x} = 3.17) due to enlarge the low-los working region. In this region, the beam can be significantly affected by space charge. The first observed effects are a nondestructive distortion of the beam profile and vertical growth of beam size sufficient to keep the shifted tunes from crossing the integer, but without large beam loss. At higher intensities, or with tunes closer to the integer, beam blow-up, accompanied by beam losses, can occur. In this paper, we report recent observations of this intensity-dependent effect and discuss implications for future PSR operation. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The compensation of quadrupole errors and space charge effects by using trim quadrupoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, YuWen; Wang, Sheng

    2011-12-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) accelerators consist of an H-linac and a proton Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS). RCS is designed to accumulate and accelerate proton beam from 80 MeV to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The main dipole and quadruple magnet will operate in AC mode. Due to the adoption of the resonant power supplies, saturation errors of magnetic field cannot be compensated by power supplies. These saturation errors will disturb the linear optics parameters, such as tunes, beta function and dispersion function. The strong space charge effects will cause emittance growth. The compensation of these effects by using trim quadruples is studied, and the corresponding results are presented.

  13. Longitudinal Space Charge Effects in Bunched Electron Beams Travelling through a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rome, M.; Cavaliere, F.; De Luca, F.; Pozzoli, R.; Cavenago, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.

    2010-06-16

    Nanosecond pulsed electron beams in the 1-10 keV energy range have been characterized by means of an electrostatic diagnostic in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. The beam length has been inferred through the numerical analysis of the signals measured across the overall load impedance of a planar charge collector. The presence of space charge effects leading to a longitudinal spread of the beam during its transport are evidenced at low injection energies. This feature has also been tested with the use of a one-dimensional fluid model and with two-dimensional, cylindrically-symmetric Particle-In-Cell simulations, whose results are compared to the experimental observations.

  14. Neutralization of Space Charge Effects for Low Energy Ion Beams Using Field Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaescu, D.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2008-11-03

    The paper presents models and computations for neutralization of space charge effects using electrons provided by field emitter arrays. Different ion species ({sup 11}B{sup +},{sup 31}P{sup +},{sup 75}As{sup +}) with energy in the range E{sub ion} = 200 eV-1 keV have been considered. The ion beam divergence is studied as a function of electron beam geometry and physical parameters (electron and ion energy, electron/ion current ratio I{sub el}/I{sub ion}). The electron beam geometry takes into account electron source positions and initial launching angles. It is shown that optimal ion beam neutralization occurs for low energy electrons emitted parallel to the ion beam.

  15. Time-resolved measurements with single droplet introduction to investigate space-charge effects in plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, I I; Olesik, J W

    1999-02-01

    An investigation of the space-charge induced effects of high concentrations of Pb+ matrix ions on Li+ analyte ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented using a vertically oriented mass spectrometer with single droplet introduction. Greater reproducibility and stability in droplet-to-droplet sample introduction using the monodisperse microparticulate injector (MDMI) was achieved with the vertical orientation. Typical variation (%RSD) in the droplet-to-droplet arrival times, and mass spectrometry peak analytical areas are better than 5%. With this precision, a more quantitative description of the space-charge effect on a single cloud of ions is obtained. Both radial and axial space-charge effects were found to occur in the ion beam. Radial effects result in a loss in intensity because of poor transmission or collisions at surfaces within the mass spectrometer. Axial effects modify the kinetic energy distribution of background ion beam components (e.g., 16O+ and 40Ar+) and sampled ion cloud constituents (e.g., 7Li+). However, axial effects do not appear to generate significant broadening of sampled ion clouds within the mass spectrometer. At the point of charge separation and high ion-beam charge density, the ion cloud maxima for Li and Pb are not coincident. This is because of mass dependent diffusion in the ICP as the ion clouds approach the sampling orifice. Space-charge induced ion loss occurs predominantly at a localized region after the Li+ sampled cloud peak maximum. When the Pb concentration in the sample is sufficiently high the 7Li+ sampled signal has a bimodal peak shape. The existence of the dip and its relative location in the bimodal 7Li+ sampled signal suggests that space-charge effects are localized to the region of high charge density occurring just after charge separation.

  16. A novel technique for compensation of space charge effects in the LUPIN-II detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassell, C.; Ferrarini, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Caresana, M.

    2015-12-01

    A new method for improving REM counter performance in Pulsed Neutron Fields (PNFs) has been developed. This method uses an analysis of the build-up of space charge in the counter to compensate for an underestimation of Ambient Dose Equivalent (H*(10)) in intense pulsed fields. It was applied to three sets of experimental data acquired using the LUPIN-II REM counter device, which is designed for use in PNFs. The data was acquired using the cyclotron at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), at the HiRadMat facility at CERN and at the 'Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste' (ELETTRA), Italy. A comparison of the data with and without this compensation method is used to highlight its effectiveness. The LUPIN-II performance, which has already been shown to be able to cope with fields of up to hundreds of nSv/burst, is improved by at least one order of magnitude, with further potential for improvement.

  17. The effect of space charge produced by corona at ground level on lightning attachment to high objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Raizer, Yu. P.; Aleksandrov, N. L.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of the corona space charge layer created at ground level on lightning attachment to high (20-100 m) slender objects is numerically studied. The shielding effect of corona space charge produced near the object tip on the electric field at ground level is considered. The behavior of a non-stationary streamer-free corona developed from ground irregularities in a time-varying thundercloud electric field is discussed. The initiation of an upward leader from the tip of a high grounded object is simulated in the electric field created by a storm-cloud, approaching downward leader and space charge produced by corona at ground level and near the object tip. The corona space charge produced on the ground surface is shown to affect only slightly the inception of an upward connecting leader from the object when the local electric field near the object tip rises rapidly due to an approaching downward leader. The effect of neutral aerosol particles on lightning attachment to high grounded slender objects is also small.

  18. Effective medium theory of the space-charge region electrostatics of arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2016-01-01

    We develop an Effective Medium Theory for the electrostatics of the Space-Charge Region (SCR) of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires (NWs), and nanotubes (NTs) in a dielectric ambient. The theory captures the effects of electric fields in both the semiconductor, i.e., NF/NW/NT, and the dielectric media of the array. It shows that the depletion width and the screening length characterizing the SCR tail in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. Further, the reverse bias 1 /C2 -V behavior of junctions in NF/NW/NT arrays is linear, as in bulk junctions, and is useful to extract from measurements the built-in potential, effective doping including the semiconductor-dielectric interface charge, and NF/NW/NT length. The theory is validated with numerical simulations, is useful for the experimentalist, and yields simple formulas for nano-device design which predict the following. In the limiting case of a single sheet-like NF, the junction depletion width variation with potential drop is linear rather than square-root (as in a bulk junction). In arrays of symmetric silicon p-n junctions in oxide dielectric where NF/NW thickness and separation are 5% and 100% of the bulk depletion width, respectively, the junction depletion width and the screening length are scaled up from their bulk values by the same factor of ˜2 for NF and ˜10 for NW array.

  19. Time-resolved measurements of individual ion cloud signals to investigate space-charge effects in plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olesik, J W; Dziewatkoski, M P

    1996-04-01

    A new approach to directly monitor space charge induced effects due to high concentrations of efficiently ionized elements in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is described. The broadening of ion clouds produced from individual, monodisperse drops of sample is measured by using time-resolved ICP-MS. The extent of broadening due to high concentrations of Pb in the sample is related inversely to the analyte mass. For the lightest analyte investigated, Li(+), the relative width of the time-resolved analyte peak increases and then shows a dip in the center as the Pb concentration is increased to 500 and then 1500 µg/mL. The initial results of experiments that investigated chemical matrix effects as a function of concomitant species concentration, analyte mass, and sampling location in ICP-MS are consistent with space-charge effects.

  20. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oloff, L.-P.; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K.

    2016-06-01

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  1. Space-charge effects in ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Grinner, F. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Maier, A. R.; Becker, S.; Mikhailova, J. M.

    2009-02-11

    Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron-laser (FEL). Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultra-high peak beam currents (10-100 kA) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultra-compact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution), which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  2. Space charge studies in FFAG using the tracking code Zgoubi

    SciTech Connect

    Tahar, M. Haj; Meot, F.; Tsoupas, N.

    2015-05-03

    A method is implemented in Zgoubi that allows the computation of space charge effects in 2D distributions and with some restrictions in 3D distributions. It relies on decomposing field maps or analytical elements into slices and applying a space charge kick to the particles. The aim of this study is to investigate the accuracy of this technique, its limitations/advantages by comparisons with other linear/nonlinear computation methods and codes, and to apply it to high power fixed field ring design studies.

  3. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  4. An effective longitudinal space-charge impedance model for beamswith non-uniform and non-axissymmetric transverse density

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-06-29

    Use of a one-dimensional model of longitudinal space-charge(SC) impedance has been proposed for studying the microbunchinginstability in single-pass delivery systems relevant for the nextgeneration of FELs. For beams with uniform transverse density andcircular cross-section of radius r_b the SC impedance can be expressed ina handy analytical form, making this model particularly convenient. Inthis report we show how with an appropriate choice of r_b one can usethis as an effective-beam model to approximate beams with non-axissymmetric and non-uniform transverse densities.

  5. Quantum interference and control of the dynamic Franz-Keldysh effect: Generation and detection of terahertz space-charge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Jacobs, Paul; Smirl, Arthur L.; Zhao, Hui

    2013-06-24

    The Dynamic Franz Keldysh Effect (DFKE) is produced and controlled in bulk gallium arsenide by quantum interference without the aid of externally applied fields and is spatially and temporally resolved using ellipsometric pump-probe techniques. The {approx}3 THz internal driving field for the DFKE is a transient space-charge field that is associated with a critically damped coherent plasma oscillation produced by oppositely traveling ballistic electron and hole currents that are injected by two-color quantum interference techniques. The relative phase and polarization of the two pump pulses can be used to control the DFKE.

  6. Quantum interference and control of the dynamic Franz-Keldysh effect: Generation and detection of terahertz space-charge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Jacobs, Paul; Zhao, Hui; Smirl, Arthur L.

    2013-06-01

    The Dynamic Franz Keldysh Effect (DFKE) is produced and controlled in bulk gallium arsenide by quantum interference without the aid of externally applied fields and is spatially and temporally resolved using ellipsometric pump-probe techniques. The ˜3 THz internal driving field for the DFKE is a transient space-charge field that is associated with a critically damped coherent plasma oscillation produced by oppositely traveling ballistic electron and hole currents that are injected by two-color quantum interference techniques. The relative phase and polarization of the two pump pulses can be used to control the DFKE.

  7. An effect of the electrode material on space charge relaxation in ferroelectric copolymers of vinylidene fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kochervinskii, Valentin Pavlov, Alexey; Pakuro, Natalia; Bessonova, Natalia; Shmakova, Nina; Malyshkina, Inna; Bedin, Sergey

    2015-12-28

    Processes of relaxation of space charges formed by impurities carriers in isotropic films of vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene copolymers of the composition 71/29 and 94/6 were studied. Al and Au symmetric electrodes deposited by evaporation in vacuum have been used. In the case of Al electrodes at temperatures above 100 °C, giant low frequency dielectric dispersion was observed, while it is absent in films with Au electrodes. Causes of this phenomenon were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was shown that at Al deposition, new functional groups, such as Al-C, Al-F, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which are not characteristic of the copolymer film surface, formed. They were supposed to be traps for impurity carriers and because of this the electrode became partially blocked. This led to appearance of the giant electrode polarization on the metal-polymer boundary, which did not take place in the case of Au electrodes. Parameters of the Au4f line for the copolymer with different contents of fluorine atoms in the chain were analyzed. An increase in the number of these atoms was shown to result in the line shift to higher energies. This phenomenon was associated with an increase in the shift of the electron density from Au atoms to the F ones which has a high affinity to electrons.

  8. Effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on space charge distribution in propylene carbonate under impulse voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Sima, Wenxia Song, He; Yang, Qing; Guo, Hongda; Chen, Qiulin

    2015-12-15

    Addition of nanoparticles of the ferromagnetic material Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} can increase the positive impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate by 11.65%. To further investigate the effect of ferromagnetic nanoparticles on the space charge distribution in the discharge process, the present work set up a Kerr electro-optic field mapping measurement system using an array photodetector to carry out time-continuous measurement of the electric field and space charge distribution in propylene carbonate before and after modification. Test results show that fast electrons can be captured by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and converted into relatively slow, negatively charged particles, inhibiting the generation and transportation of the space charge, especially the negative space charge.

  9. Absolute determination of radiation bursts and of proportional counters space charge effect through the influence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    When proportional counters are employed in charge integration mode to determine the magnitude of a radiation pulse, so intense that individual detection events take place in a time too short to produce individual output pulses, mostly in pulsed neutron sources, the strong build-up of positive space charge reduces the electric multiplication factor of the proportional detector. Under such conditions the ensuing measurement underestimates the amount of radiation that interacted with the detector. If the geometric characteristics, the filling gas pressure and the voltage applied to that detector are known, it becomes possible to apply an analytical correction method to the measurement. In this article we present a method that allows to determine the absolute value of the detected radiation burst without the need to know the characteristics of the employed detectors. It is necessary to employ more than one detector, taking advantage of the Influence Method. The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1,2]). Its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016 [3]) and the extension for multiple detectors in (Rios and Mayer 2016 [4]).

  10. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  11. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  12. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  13. Observation of transverse space charge effects in a mutli-beamlet electron bunch produced in a photo-emission electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Yusof, Z.; Piot, P.

    2009-01-22

    A 'multiple beamlet' experiment aimed at investigating the transverse space charge effect was recently conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment generated a symmetric pattern of 5 beamlets on the photocathode of the RF gun with the drive laser. We explored the evolution of the thereby produced 5 MeV, space-charge dominated electron beamlets in the 2 m drift following the RF photocathode gun for various external focusing. Two important effects were observed and benchmarked using the particle-in-cell beam dynamics code Impact-T. In this paper, we present our experimental observation and their benchmarking with Impact-T.

  14. Observation of transverse space charge effects in a multi-beamlet electron bunch produced in a photo-emission electron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Yusof, Z.; Rihaoui, M.; Piot, P.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.; FNAL

    2009-01-01

    A 'multiple beamlet' experiment aimed at investigating the transverse space charge effect was recently conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment generated a symmetric pattern of 5 beamlets on the photocathode of the RF gun with the drive laser. We explored the evolution of the thereby produced 5 MeV, space-charge dominated electron beamlets in the 2 m drift following the RF photocathode gun for various external focusing. Two important effects were observed and benchmarked using the particle-in-cell beam dynamics code Impact-T. In this paper, we present our experimental observation and their benchmarking with Impact-T.

  15. Observation of transverse space charge effects in a multi-beamlet electron bunch produced in a photo-emission electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rihaoui, M.; Gai, W.; Piot, P.; Power, J.G.; Ysof, Z.; /Argonne

    2008-09-01

    A 'multiple beamlet' experiment aimed at investigating the transverse space charge effect was recently conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. The experiment generated a symmetric pattern of 5 beamlets on the photocathode of the RF gun with the drive laser. We explored the evolution of the thereby produced 5 MeV, space-charge dominated electron beamlets in the 2m drift following the RF photocathode gun for various external focusing. Two important effects were observed and benchmarked using the particle-in-cell beam dynamics code IMPACT-T. In this paper, we present our experimental observation and their benchmarking with Impact-T.

  16. Simulations of space charge in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-03-01

    The Fermilab Project X plan for future high intensity operation relies on the Main Injector as the engine for delivering protons in the 60-120 GeV energy range. Project X plans call for increasing the number of protons per Main Injector bunch from the current value of 1.0 x 10{sup 11} to 3.0 x 10{sup 11}. Space charge effects at the injection energy of 8 GeV have the potential to seriously disrupt operations. We report on ongoing simulation efforts with Synergia, MARYLIE/Impact, and IMPACT, which provide comprehensive capabilities for parallel, multi-physics modeling of beam dynamics in the Main Injector including 3D space-charge effects.

  17. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  18. Restoring Fort Frontenac in 3D: Effective Usage of 3D Technology for Heritage Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, M.; Goins, E.; Jackson, C.; Halbstein, D.; Foster, S.; Bazely, S.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is composed of three elements: 3D modeling, web design, and heritage visualization. The aim is to use computer graphics design to inform and create an interest in historical visualization by rebuilding Fort Frontenac using 3D modeling and interactive design. The final model will be integr ated into an interactive website to learn more about the fort's historic imp ortance. It is apparent that using computer graphics can save time and money when it comes to historical visualization. Visitors do not have to travel to the actual archaeological buildings. They can simply use the Web in their own home to learn about this information virtually. Meticulously following historical records to create a sophisticated restoration of archaeological buildings will draw viewers into visualizations, such as the historical world of Fort Frontenac. As a result, it allows the viewers to effectively understand the fort's social sy stem, habits, and historical events.

  19. ACTIVE CATHODES FOR SUPER-HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS THROUGH SPACE CHARGE EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anil V. Virkar

    2003-10-11

    This report summarizes the work done during the second quarter of the project. Effort is directed in two areas: (1) The use of a novel method to achieve a given porosity level with high contiguity and thus conductivity. (2) Relate the measured conductivity to porosity and contiguity. The rationale for these experiments was to develop cathodes with high ionic conductivity, so that the effective polarization resistance will be concomitantly lowered.

  20. Fully three dimensional calculations of c-AFM current flow patterns, including space charge effects, traps and fibrous morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimcharoen, Kanokkorn; Duxbury, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    Organic semiconductors are promising materials for many optoelectronic devices due to their versatile applications and low-cost fabrication, including organic photovoltaics (OPV), light-emitting diodes (OLED), and thin-film transistors (OTFT). The performance of these devices are controlled by charge transport which primarily depends on the nanoscale morphology. Unlike other microscopies, conductive Atomic Force Microscope (c-AFM) is capable of characterizing both nanoscale morphology and local electronic properties simultaneously. With this unique ability, c-AFM has been used extensively to characterized these organic semiconductor devices in the past decade, however the spreading of current from the tip geometry in the presence of traps, which are ubiquitous in these materials, is not well understood. We have developed a fully three dimensional device simulation tool enabling treatment of inhomogeneous systems including c-AFM tip geometry, spatially varying trap distributions, and fibrous morphologies. Results characterizing charge transport in the fibrous morphologies and in the presence of traps will be discussed, including the effect of traps and space charge effects on current spreading from the c-AFM tip.

  1. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  2. Stereoscopic 3D video games and their effects on engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, Andrew; Kapralos, Bill; Zerebecki, Chris; Tawadrous, Mina; Stanfield, Brodie; Hogue, Urszula

    2012-03-01

    With television manufacturers developing low-cost stereoscopic 3D displays, a large number of consumers will undoubtedly have access to 3D-capable televisions at home. The availability of 3D technology places the onus on content creators to develop interesting and engaging content. While the technology of stereoscopic displays and content generation are well understood, there are many questions yet to be answered surrounding its effects on the viewer. Effects of stereoscopic display on passive viewers for film are known, however video games are fundamentally different since the viewer/player is actively (rather than passively) engaged in the content. Questions of how stereoscopic viewing affects interaction mechanics have previously been studied in the context of player performance but very few have attempted to quantify the player experience to determine whether stereoscopic 3D has a positive or negative influence on their overall engagement. In this paper we present a preliminary study of the effects stereoscopic 3D have on player engagement in video games. Participants played a video game in two conditions, traditional 2D and stereoscopic 3D and their engagement was quantified using a previously validated self-reporting tool. The results suggest that S3D has a positive effect on immersion, presence, flow, and absorption.

  3. Emittance growth and instability induced by space charge effect during final beam bunching in HIF accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beam dynamics and emittance growth are investigated by using particle-in-cell simulations during a final beam bunching for a driver system of inertial fusion driven by intense heavy ion beams. Space-charge-dominated beams are transported by a transverse confinement lattice with longitudinal compression, and the emittance increases along the longitudinal beam bunching. Dipole oscillations are excited due to the initial displacement of the beam center. The displacement causes the additional emittance growth during the final beam bunching.

  4. Time-resolved HAXPES using a microfocused XFEL beam: From vacuum space-charge effects to intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oloff, Lars-Philip; Chainani, Ashish; Matsunami, Masaharu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Togashi, Tadashi; Osawa, Hitoshi; Hanff, Kerstin; Quer, Arndt; Matsushita, Ryuki; Shiraishi, Ryutaro; Nagashima, Maki; Kimura, Ayato; Matsuishi, Kotaro; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Rossi, Giorgio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Rossnagel, Kai; Oura, Masaki

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (trHAXPES) using microfocused X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL, hν = 8 keV) pulses as a probe and infrared laser pulses (hν = 1.55 eV) as a pump is employed to determine intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics in La:SrTiO3. By means of a combination of experiments and numerical N-body simulations, we first develop a simple approach to characterize and decrease XFEL-induced vacuum space-charge effects, which otherwise pose a serious limitation to spectroscopy experiments. We then show that, using an analytical mean-field model, vacuum space-charge effects can be counteracted by pump laser-induced photoholes at high excitation densities. This provides us a method to separate vacuum space-charge effects from the intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics in the time domain. Our trHAXPES results thus open a route to studies of intrinsic charge-carrier dynamics on picosecond time scales with lateral spatial resolution on the micrometer scale.

  5. Time-resolved HAXPES using a microfocused XFEL beam: From vacuum space-charge effects to intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Oloff, Lars-Philip; Chainani, Ashish; Matsunami, Masaharu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Togashi, Tadashi; Osawa, Hitoshi; Hanff, Kerstin; Quer, Arndt; Matsushita, Ryuki; Shiraishi, Ryutaro; Nagashima, Maki; Kimura, Ayato; Matsuishi, Kotaro; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Rossi, Giorgio; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Rossnagel, Kai; Oura, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (trHAXPES) using microfocused X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL, hν = 8 keV) pulses as a probe and infrared laser pulses (hν = 1.55 eV) as a pump is employed to determine intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics in La:SrTiO3. By means of a combination of experiments and numerical N-body simulations, we first develop a simple approach to characterize and decrease XFEL-induced vacuum space-charge effects, which otherwise pose a serious limitation to spectroscopy experiments. We then show that, using an analytical mean-field model, vacuum space-charge effects can be counteracted by pump laser-induced photoholes at high excitation densities. This provides us a method to separate vacuum space-charge effects from the intrinsic charge-carrier recombination dynamics in the time domain. Our trHAXPES results thus open a route to studies of intrinsic charge-carrier dynamics on picosecond time scales with lateral spatial resolution on the micrometer scale. PMID:27731408

  6. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE - WANG,J.; LUCCIO,A.U.; D IMPERIO,N.; MACHIDA,S.

    2002-06-03

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  7. Space-charge calculations in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.

    1993-05-01

    One obvious bottleneck of achieving high luminosity in hadron colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), is the beam emittance growth, due to space-charge effects in low energy injector synchrotrons. Although space-charge effects have been recognized since the alternating-gradient synchrotron was invented, and the Laslett tune shift usually calculated to quantify these effects, our understanding of the effects is limited, especially when the Laslett tune shift becomes a large fraction of the integer. Using the Simpsons tracking code, which we developed to study emittance preservation issues in proton synchrotrons, we investigated space-charge effects in the SSC Low Energy Booster (LEB). We observed detailed dependence on parameters such as beam intensity, initial emittance, injection energy, lattice function, and longitudinal motion. A summary of those findings, as well as the tracking technique we developed for the study, are presented.

  8. The effect of space charge fields due to finite length electron beams in the free-electron laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C.-M.; Sprangle, P.; Freund, H.; Colson, W.

    1982-01-01

    The space charge electric field of a finite length electron beam in the free electron laser amplifier with a tapered wiggler is analyzed. In the free drift region between the accelerator and laser, expressions for the increase of energy spread due to the self field are presented. In the FEL interaction region, the general conditions on the importance of the self electric field in the equations of motion is obtained. A numerical example of the FEL experiment at 10.6 microns is given.

  9. Programming standards for effective S-3D game development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neil; Matveev, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    When a video game is in development, more often than not it is being rendered in three dimensions - complete with volumetric depth. It's the PC monitor that is taking this three-dimensional information, and artificially displaying it in a flat, two-dimensional format. Stereoscopic drivers take the three-dimensional information captured from DirectX and OpenGL calls and properly display it with a unique left and right sided view for each eye so a proper stereoscopic 3D image can be seen by the gamer. The two-dimensional limitation of how information is displayed on screen has encouraged programming short-cuts and work-arounds that stifle this stereoscopic 3D effect, and the purpose of this guide is to outline techniques to get the best of both worlds. While the programming requirements do not significantly add to the game development time, following these guidelines will greatly enhance your customer's stereoscopic 3D experience, increase your likelihood of earning Meant to be Seen certification, and give you instant cost-free access to the industry's most valued consumer base. While this outline is mostly based on NVIDIA's programming guide and iZ3D resources, it is designed to work with all stereoscopic 3D hardware solutions and is not proprietary in any way.

  10. 3D quantum gravity and effective noncommutative quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Freidel, Laurent; Livine, Etera R

    2006-06-01

    We show that the effective dynamics of matter fields coupled to 3D quantum gravity is described after integration over the gravitational degrees of freedom by a braided noncommutative quantum field theory symmetric under a kappa deformation of the Poincaré group.

  11. Single/Few Bunch Space Charge Effects at 8 GeV in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yang, M.-J.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    For Project X, it is planned to inject a beam of 3 10{sup 11} particles per bunch into the Main Injector. Therefore, at 8 GeV, there will be increased space charge tune shifts and an increased incoherent tune spread. In preparation for these higher intensity bunches exploratory studies have commenced looking at the transmission of different intensity bunches at different tunes. An experiment is described with results for bunch intensities between 20 and 300 10{sup 9} particles. To achieve the highest intensity bunches coalescing at 8 GeV is required, resulting in a longer bunch length. Comparisons show that similar transmission curves are obtained when the intensity and bunch length have increased by similar factors. This indicates the incoherent tune shifts are similar, as expected from theory. The results of these experiments will be used in conjugation with simulations to further study high intensity bunches in the Main Injector.

  12. Misalignment effects in 3-D versions of Poggendorff displays.

    PubMed

    Liu, C H; Kennedy, J M

    1995-04-01

    Strong misalignment effects are found in three-dimensional (3-D) versions of Poggendorff displays viewed binocularly. The components of the standard 2-D Poggendorff figure--the parallels and the oblique segments--were presented in 3-D depth as a flat rectangular object with occluding edges and an oblique line situated behind the object. Three experiments investigated the misalignment effects under three different observation instructions: Subjects were told to look at the oblique (Experiment 1), at the rectangle (Experiment 2), or at the background (Experiment 3). Experiments 1 and 2 examined the effects on judgments of alignment of varying the distance in depth that separates the oblique from the rectangle. Experiment 3 examined the effects of varying the distance between the fixated background and the 3-D Poggendorff figure. Both standard and reversed misalignment effects were obtained. When the viewing condition produces crossed disparity for the oblique, perceived misalignment occurs in the usual Poggendorff direction, but it is reversed with uncrossed disparity. Moreover, the amount of misalignment is related to the amount of disparity, and it can be much stronger than is usual in the 2-D versions of the Poggendorff. The misalignment effects can be explained by binocular integration to produce a single cyclopean image.

  13. 3d model for site effect assessment at Nice (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, E.; Courrioux, G.; Bourgine, B.; Bour, M.; Guillen, A.; Mouroux, P.; Devaux, E.; Duval, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    Assessment of lithologic site effects is based on an accurate knowledge of properties and geometry of superficial geological formations, i.e. ideally a 3D-4G subsurface model (Geology, Geomorphology, Geophysics, Geotechnics). Such a model has been achieved using a 3D geomodeler ("Geological Editor" developed at BRGM) that allows building 3D volumes of geological formations starting from drill-holes data, sections, and geological maps. This software uses a pseudo-stratigraphic pile in order to reproduce geological history and structural relationships (erosion, deposit). The interpolation is achieved through a 3D potential field. A geostatistical formulation allows to consider data points of a geological limit as equipotential, and sructural dips as gradient inputs for the 3D field interpolation. Then isosurfaces corresponding to each limit are combined using formation relationships to provide volumic models of geological formations. The first task was to identify the relevant geological formations underlying in Nice area. In a first approach Mesozoic bedrock, Pliocene bedrock, and Quaternary alluvial deposits have been distinguished considering their seismic properties. Then alluvions have been subdivided into 9 groups according to their lithology and granulometry. Modelling has been performed considering 2 major erosion surfaces, post-Mesozoic and post-Pliocene. The succession of Quaternary alluviums have been considered as "onlap deposits". Given adjacent lithologies contained in maps and drill holes, these relations lead to logical identification of the roof of formations to be interpolated. The distribution of modeled geological formations can be visualised in 3 dimensions or in 2D sections. Besides the visual interest of 3D representations, the model is first used to build a series of earth columns over a 50m/50m 2D grid. A statistical analysis allowed to identify 73 existing configurations in the Nice district area. Among these, only 15 configurations

  14. Use of Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy to Measure Built-in Voltage, Space Charge Layer Width, and Effective Band Gap in CdSe Quantum Dot Films.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Nail, Benjamin A; Holmes, Michael A; Osterloh, Frank E

    2016-09-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) was used to study the photochemistry of mercaptoethanol-ligated CdSe quantum dot (2.0-4.2 nm diameter) films on indium doped tin oxide (ITO) in the absence of an external bias or electrolyte. The n-type films generate negative voltages under super band gap illumination (0.1-0.5 mW cm(-2)) by majority carrier injection into the ITO substrate. The photovoltage onset energies track the optical band gaps of the samples and are assigned as effective band gaps of the films. The photovoltage values (-125 to -750 mV) vary with quantum dot sizes and are modulated by the built-in potential of the CdSe-ITO Schottky type contacts. Deviations from the ideal Schottky model are attributed to Fermi level pinning in states approximately 1.1 V negative of the ITO conduction band edge. Positive photovoltage signals of +80 to +125 mV in films of >4.0 nm nanocrystals and in thin (70 nm) nanocrystal films are attributed to electron-hole (polaron) pairs that are polarized by a space charge layer at the CdSe-ITO boundary. The space charge layer is 70-150 nm wide, based on thickness-dependent photovoltage measurements. The ability of SPS to directly measure built-in voltages, space charge layer thickness, sub-band gap states, and effective band gaps in drop-cast quantum dot films aids the understanding of photochemical charge transport in quantum dot solar cells. PMID:27505130

  15. Use of Surface Photovoltage Spectroscopy to Measure Built-in Voltage, Space Charge Layer Width, and Effective Band Gap in CdSe Quantum Dot Films.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Nail, Benjamin A; Holmes, Michael A; Osterloh, Frank E

    2016-09-01

    Surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) was used to study the photochemistry of mercaptoethanol-ligated CdSe quantum dot (2.0-4.2 nm diameter) films on indium doped tin oxide (ITO) in the absence of an external bias or electrolyte. The n-type films generate negative voltages under super band gap illumination (0.1-0.5 mW cm(-2)) by majority carrier injection into the ITO substrate. The photovoltage onset energies track the optical band gaps of the samples and are assigned as effective band gaps of the films. The photovoltage values (-125 to -750 mV) vary with quantum dot sizes and are modulated by the built-in potential of the CdSe-ITO Schottky type contacts. Deviations from the ideal Schottky model are attributed to Fermi level pinning in states approximately 1.1 V negative of the ITO conduction band edge. Positive photovoltage signals of +80 to +125 mV in films of >4.0 nm nanocrystals and in thin (70 nm) nanocrystal films are attributed to electron-hole (polaron) pairs that are polarized by a space charge layer at the CdSe-ITO boundary. The space charge layer is 70-150 nm wide, based on thickness-dependent photovoltage measurements. The ability of SPS to directly measure built-in voltages, space charge layer thickness, sub-band gap states, and effective band gaps in drop-cast quantum dot films aids the understanding of photochemical charge transport in quantum dot solar cells.

  16. Reduction of attenuation effects in 3D transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, Hans; Acosta, Oscar; Fenster, Aaron; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most used imaging modalities today as it is cheap, reliable, safe and widely available. There are a number of issues with US images in general. Besides reflections which is the basis of ultrasonic imaging, other phenomena such as diffraction, refraction, attenuation, dispersion and scattering appear when ultrasound propagates through different tissues. The generated images are therefore corrupted by false boundaries, lack of signal for surface tangential to ultrasound propagation, large amount of noise giving rise to local properties, and anisotropic sampling space complicating image processing tasks. Although 3D Transrectal US (TRUS) probes are not yet widely available, within a few years they will likely be introduced in hospitals. Therefore, the improvement of automatic segmentation from 3D TRUS images, making the process independent of human factor is desirable. We introduce an algorithm for attenuation correction, reducing enhancement/shadowing effects and average attenuation effects in 3D US images, taking into account the physical properties of US. The parameters of acquisition such as logarithmic correction are unknown, therefore no additional information is available to restore the image. As the physical properties are related to the direction of each US ray, the 3D US data set is resampled into cylindrical coordinates using a fully automatic algorithm. Enhancement and shadowing effects, as well as average attenuation effects, are then removed with a rescaling process optimizing simultaneously in and perpendicular to the US ray direction. A set of tests using anisotropic diffusion are performed to illustrate the improvement in image quality, where well defined structures are visible. The evolution of both the entropy and the contrast show that our algorithm is a suitable pre-processing step for segmentation tasks.

  17. C3d adjuvant effects are mediated through the activation of C3d-specific autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Ross, Ted M; Levitz, Lauren; Messitt, Timothy J; Tassone, Ryan; Boyle, Christine M; Vincelli, Amber J; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; Knopf, Paul M

    2015-02-01

    Complement fragment C3d covalently attached to antigens enhances immune responses, particularly for antigens lacking T-cell epitopes. Enhancement has been attributed to receptor cross-linking between complement receptor CR2 (CD21) and polysaccharide antigen to surface IgM on naïve B cells. Paradoxically, C3d has still been shown to increase immune responses in CD21 knockout mice, suggesting that an auxiliary activation pathway exists. In prior studies, we demonstrated the CD21-independent C3d adjuvant effect might be due to T-cell recognition of C3d T-helper epitopes processed and presented by major histocompatibility complex class II on the B-cell surface. C3d peptide sequences containing concentrated clusters of putative human C3 T-cell epitopes were identified using the epitope-mapping algorithm, EpiMatrix. These peptide sequences were synthesized and shown in vitro to bind multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles with high affinity, and induce interferon-γ responses in healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the present studies, we establish further correlations between HLA binding and HLA-specific lymphocyte reactions with select epitope clusters. In addition, we show that the T-cell phenotype of C3d-specific reactive T cells is CD4(+)CD45RO(+) memory T cells. Finally, mutation of a single T-cell epitope residing within the P28 peptide segment of C3d resulted in significantly diminished adjuvant activity in BALB/c mice. Collectively, these studies support the hypothesis that the paradoxical enhancement of immune responses by C3d in the absence of CD21 is due to internalization and processing of C3d into peptides that activate autoreactive CD4(+) T-helper cells in the context of HLA class II.

  18. C3d adjuvant effects are mediated through the activation of C3d-specific autoreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    De Groot, Anne S; Ross, Ted M; Levitz, Lauren; Messitt, Timothy J; Tassone, Ryan; Boyle, Christine M; Vincelli, Amber J; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William; Knopf, Paul M

    2015-02-01

    Complement fragment C3d covalently attached to antigens enhances immune responses, particularly for antigens lacking T-cell epitopes. Enhancement has been attributed to receptor cross-linking between complement receptor CR2 (CD21) and polysaccharide antigen to surface IgM on naïve B cells. Paradoxically, C3d has still been shown to increase immune responses in CD21 knockout mice, suggesting that an auxiliary activation pathway exists. In prior studies, we demonstrated the CD21-independent C3d adjuvant effect might be due to T-cell recognition of C3d T-helper epitopes processed and presented by major histocompatibility complex class II on the B-cell surface. C3d peptide sequences containing concentrated clusters of putative human C3 T-cell epitopes were identified using the epitope-mapping algorithm, EpiMatrix. These peptide sequences were synthesized and shown in vitro to bind multiple human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR alleles with high affinity, and induce interferon-γ responses in healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the present studies, we establish further correlations between HLA binding and HLA-specific lymphocyte reactions with select epitope clusters. In addition, we show that the T-cell phenotype of C3d-specific reactive T cells is CD4(+)CD45RO(+) memory T cells. Finally, mutation of a single T-cell epitope residing within the P28 peptide segment of C3d resulted in significantly diminished adjuvant activity in BALB/c mice. Collectively, these studies support the hypothesis that the paradoxical enhancement of immune responses by C3d in the absence of CD21 is due to internalization and processing of C3d into peptides that activate autoreactive CD4(+) T-helper cells in the context of HLA class II. PMID:25385064

  19. Effective 3-D surface modeling for geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksek, K.; Alparslan, M.; Mendi, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose a dynamic, flexible and interactive urban digital terrain platform with spatial data and query processing capabilities of geographic information systems, multimedia database functionality and graphical modeling infrastructure. A new data element, called Geo-Node, which stores image, spatial data and 3-D CAD objects is developed using an efficient data structure. The system effectively handles data transfer of Geo-Nodes between main memory and secondary storage with an optimized directional replacement policy (DRP) based buffer management scheme. Polyhedron structures are used in digital surface modeling and smoothing process is performed by interpolation. The experimental results show that our framework achieves high performance and works effectively with urban scenes independent from the amount of spatial data and image size. The proposed platform may contribute to the development of various applications such as Web GIS systems based on 3-D graphics standards (e.g., X3-D and VRML) and services which integrate multi-dimensional spatial information and satellite/aerial imagery.

  20. Kinetic isotope effects of 12CH3D + OH and 13CH3D + OH from 278 to 313 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joelsson, L. M. T.; Schmidt, J. A.; Nilsson, E. J. K.; Blunier, T.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Ono, S.; Johnson, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Methane is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas and plays a central role in the chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere. Nonetheless there are significant uncertainties in its source budget. Analysis of the isotopic composition of atmospheric methane, including the doubly substituted species 13CH3D, offers new insight into the methane budget as the sources and sinks have distinct isotopic signatures. The most important sink of atmospheric methane is oxidation by OH in the troposphere, which accounts for around 84 % of all methane removal. Here we present experimentally derived methane + OH kinetic isotope effects and their temperature dependence over the range of 278 to 313 K for CH3D and 13CH3D; the latter is reported here for the first time. We find kCH4/kCH3D = 1.31 ± 0.01 and kCH4/k13CH3D = 1.34 ± 0.03 at room temperature, implying that the methane + OH kinetic isotope effect is multiplicative such that (kCH4/k13CH4)(kCH4/kCH3D) = kCH4/k13CH3D, within the experimental uncertainty, given the literature value of kCH4/k13CH4 = 1.0039 ± 0.0002. In addition, the kinetic isotope effects were characterized using transition state theory with tunneling corrections. Good agreement between the experimental, quantum chemical, and available literature values was obtained. Based on the results we conclude that the OH reaction (the main sink of methane) at steady state can produce an atmospheric clumped isotope signal (Δ(13CH3D) = ln([CH4][13CH3D]/[13CH4][CH3D])) of 0.02 ± 0.02. This implies that the bulk tropospheric Δ(13CH3D) reflects the source signal with relatively small adjustment due to the sink signal (i.e., mainly OH oxidation).

  1. Developmental neurotoxic effects of Malathion on 3D neurosphere system

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Mohamed; Lotfy, Ahmed; Fathy, Khaled; Makar, Maria; El-emam, Mona; El-gamal, Aya; El-gamal, Mohamed; Badawy, Ahmad; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.; Sobh, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) refers to the toxic effects induced by various chemicals on brain during the early childhood period. As human brains are vulnerable during this period, various chemicals would have significant effects on brains during early childhood. Some toxicants have been confirmed to induce developmental toxic effects on CNS; however, most of agents cannot be identified with certainty. This is because available animal models do not cover the whole spectrum of CNS developmental periods. A novel alternative method that can overcome most of the limitations of the conventional techniques is the use of 3D neurosphere system. This in-vitro system can recapitulate many of the changes during the period of brain development making it an ideal model for predicting developmental neurotoxic effects. In the present study we verified the possible DNT of Malathion, which is one of organophosphate pesticides with suggested possible neurotoxic effects on nursing children. Three doses of Malathion (0.25 μM, 1 μM and 10 μM) were used in cultured neurospheres for a period of 14 days. Malathion was found to affect proliferation, differentiation and viability of neurospheres, these effects were positively correlated to doses and time progress. This study confirms the DNT effects of Malathion on 3D neurosphere model. Further epidemiological studies will be needed to link these results to human exposure and effects data. PMID:27054080

  2. Experimental evidences for emittance degradation by space charge effect when using a focusing solenoid below an electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Machicoane, G; Doleans, M; Stetson, J; Wu, X; Závodszky, P A

    2008-02-01

    Solenoids are widely used to provide initial focusing of beams extracted from an ion source. However, in the case of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, the extracted beam will usually include different ion species and for each of them a wide distribution of charge states. When such a multicomponent beam is focused by a solenoid, the ions with a Q/A larger than the beam of interest are overfocused and usually go through a waist before reaching the analyzing magnet. If the beam currents obtained for these ions are sufficient, the resulting space charge forces can significantly degrade the emittance of the beam components with a lower Q/A and result for those in a hollow beam. Using a beam viewer and an emittance-measuring device, this paper reports on experimental findings that confirm the existence of such an effect for low charge states of argon. Moreover, by changing the experimental conditions of the ECR plasma in order to modify the charge state distribution of the extracted ion beam, it is shown that the threshold where this space charge effect starts to be significant can be changed.

  3. Space Charge Compensation (SSC) in hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal space-charge fields can generate substantial distortion of the rf-generated potential wells, fill the extraction kicker gap in the beam, affect the incoherent synchrotron tune spread, and have the potential for causing instability and longitudinal emittance growth. The net effective voltage per turn resulting from the space-charge self voltage and the ring inductive wall impedance ?0L is proportional to the slope of the beam current distribution e{beta}c {lambda}(s) and can be expressed as: V{sub s} = {partial_derivative}{lambda}(s)/{partial_derivative}s [g{sub 0}Z{sub 0}/2{beta}{gamma}{sup 2} - {omega}{sub 0}L]e{beta}cR where R = c/{omega}{sub 0} is the average machine radius, Z{sub 0} = 377 Ohm and g{sub 0} = 1 + 2ln(b/a) is the geometric space-charge constant, a and b are the beam radii and vacuum-chamber aperture. By introduction a tunable inductance L, e.g. of ferrite rings, the term in brackets and, consequently, the space-charge effect may be substantially reduced or canceled at some chosen energy [1]. This concept has been experimentally proven at the LANL Proton Storage Ring at LANL where three inductive inserts, each consisting of 30 'cores' of a cylindrically shaped ferrite with thickness of 1 inch, inner diameter of 5 inches, and an outer diameter of 8 inches, were installed. The magnetic permeability of the ferrite could be adjusted by introducing current into solenoids wound around the ferrite so that in the MHz range of frequencies the longitudinal space charge impedance of the machine was compensated. A strong longitudinal instability was noticed at much higher frequencies of about 75 MHz, but it was later suppressed by heating the ferrite to a temperature of 130 C to make it more lossy.

  4. PARMELA_B: a new version of PARMELA with coherent synchrotron radiation effects and a finite difference space charge routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltenbah, Benjamin E. C.; Parazzoli, Claudio G.; Greegor, Robert B.; Dowell, David H.

    2002-07-01

    Recent interest in advanced laser light sources has stimulated development of accelerator systems of intermediate beam energy, 100-200 MeV, and high charge, 1-10 nC, for high power FEL applications and high energy, 1-2 GeV, high charge, SASE-FEL applications. The current generation of beam transport codes which were developed for high-energy, low-charge beams with low self-fields are inadequate to address this energy and charge regime, and better computational tools are required to accurately calculate self-fields. To that end, we have developed a new version of PARMELA, named PARMELA_B and written in Fortran 95, which includes a coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) routine and an improved, generalized space charge (SC) routine. An electron bunch is simulated by a collection of macro-particles, which traverses a series of beam line elements. At each time step through the calculation, the momentum of each particle is updated due to the presence of external and self-fields. The self-fields are due to CSR and SC. For the CSR calculations, the macro-particles are further combined into macro-particle-bins that follow the central trajectory of the bend. The energy change through the time step is calculated from expressions derived from the Liénard-Wiechart formulae, and from this energy change the particle's momentum is updated. For the SC calculations, we maintain the same rest-frame-electrostatic approach of the original PARMELA; however, we employ a finite difference Poisson equation solver instead of the symmetrical ring algorithm of the original code. In this way, we relax the symmetry assumptions in the original code. This method is based upon standard numerical procedures and conserves momentum to first order. The SC computational grid is adaptive and conforms to the size of the pulse as it evolves through the calculation. We provide descriptions of these two algorithms, validation comparisons with other CSR and SC methods, and a limited comparison with

  5. Research progress on space charge characteristics in polymeric insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibo; Christen, Thomas; Meng, Xing; Chen, Jiansheng; Rocks, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Due to their excellent electrical insulation properties and processability, polymer materials are used in many electrical products. It is widely believed that space charge plays an important role for the electric field distribution, conduction, ageing, and electric breakdown of polymeric insulation. This paper reviews measurements and characteristics of space charge behavior which mainly determined by the pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurement technique. Particular interests are the effects of the applied voltage, the electrodes, temperature, humidity, microstructure, additives, and filler materials on accumulation, distribution, transport, and the decay of space charge in polymeric materials. This review paper is to provide an overview on various space charge effects under different conditions, and also to summarize the information for polymeric materials with suppressed space charge and improved electrical behavior.

  6. Self-correction of field-effect transistor characteristics in the mode of spontaneous space-charge ion polarization of gate oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdan, A. G.; Naryshkina, V. G.; Chucheva, G. V.

    2009-05-15

    Spontaneous space-charge ion polarization of gate oxide in the inversion n-channel silicon field-effect transistor was accomplished in the mode of its Joule heating by the drain current I{sub d}. The transistor characteristics measured at room temperature (T{sub r}) before and after thermal-field treatment show that positive ion (Na{sup +}) localization near the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface is accompanied by an increase in the effective electron mobility (by a factor of {approx} 2.3), steepness, I{sub d}, and by a small decrease in the threshold voltage ({delta}V{sub th} = 0.58 V). At T = T{sub r}, the modified transistor characteristics are retained for months; they can be easily and predictably varied by changing I{sub d} and heating duration.

  7. Subduction zone guided waves: 3D modelling and attenuation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garth, T.; Rietbrock, A.

    2013-12-01

    Waveform modelling is an important tool for understanding complex seismic structures such as subduction zone waveguides. These structures are often simplified to 2D structures for modelling purposes to reduce computational costs. In the case of subduction zone waveguide affects, 2D models have shown that dispersed arrivals are caused by a low velocity waveguide, inferred to be subducted oceanic crust and/or hydrated outer rise normal faults. However, due to the 2D modelling limitations the inferred seismic properties such as velocity contrast and waveguide thickness are still debated. Here we test these limitations with full 3D waveform modelling. For waveguide effects to be observable the waveform must be accurately modelled to relatively high frequencies (> 2 Hz). This requires a small grid spacing due to the high seismic velocities present in subduction zones. A large area must be modelled as well due to the long propagation distances (400 - 600 km) of waves interacting with subduction zone waveguides. The combination of the large model area and small grid spacing required means that these simulations require a large amount of computational resources, only available at high performance computational centres like the UK National super computer HECTOR (used in this study). To minimize the cost of modelling for such a large area, the width of the model area perpendicular to the subduction trench (the y-direction) is made as small as possible. This reduces the overall volume of the 3D model domain. Therefore the wave field is simulated in a model ';corridor' of the subduction zone velocity structure. This introduces new potential sources of error particularly from grazing wave side reflections in the y-direction. Various dampening methods are explored to reduce these grazing side reflections, including perfectly matched layers (PML) and more traditional exponential dampening layers. Defining a corridor model allows waveguide affects to be modelled up to at least 2

  8. Space Charge Waves in Mismatched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Chen, Y; Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2009-04-17

    Mismatch oscillations resulting from the propagation of space charge waves in intense beams may lead to halo generation, beam loss, and modification of longitudinal beam properties. These oscillations have amplitudes and frequencies different from that of the main beam and are particularly important in machines such as the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), in which the beam dynamics scales to parameters associated with heavy ion fusion drivers. To study these effects, we use the particle in cell code LSP [1] to simulate space charge wave dynamics in an intense electron beam propagating in a smooth focusing channel with 2-D cylindrical symmetry. We examine the evolution of linear and nonlinear density perturbations for both matched and mismatched beams. Comparisons between LSP simulations and numerical models are presented.

  9. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  10. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-09-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes.

  11. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20(th) century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  12. Modeling 3-D Effects in the DIII-D Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Moyer, R. A.; Reiter, D.; Kasilov, S. V.; Runov, A. M.

    2002-11-01

    Resonant magnetic perturbations δ br from the DIII-D locked and resistive wall mode control coils (C-coil and I-coil, respectively) affect ne and Te profiles in both the pedestal and core. To understand why these δ br perturbations change the plasma profiles we first model the edge magnetic topology with a field line integration code, TRIP3D code. In general, the TRIP3D results indicate that the control coils create stochastic layers with as much as 25% edge magnetic flux connected to the divertors and walls. While heat and particle transport modeling in open stochastic layers is inherently very difficult, Monte Carlo methods appear to provide the most reasonable approach with which to address these issues. As such, we have assessed the possibility of coupling a recently developed Monte Carlo heat transport code, the E3D code, [A.M. Runov et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 916 (2001)] to TRIP3D. We will discuss how this coupling can best be accomplished and what must be done to benchmark the TRIP3D/E3D ensemble using DIII-D experimental data. We will also discuss the analysis of proposed designs for a dedicated DIII-D stochastic boundary layer coil which produce minimal δ br core perturbations.

  13. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  14. The effects of 3-D shaping on ITG stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorvig, Mordechai; Hegna, Chris

    2012-03-01

    In this work we seek to understand how 3-D shaping can be used to improve ion temperature gradient stability. Part of the difficulty in deducing the role of 3-D shaping is the generation of 3-D MHD equilibria necessary for the calculations. In this work, MHD equilibrium surfaces are generated using local 3-D magnetostatic equilibrium theory [1]. We distinguish three different types of toroidal magnetic surface shaping: axisymmetric shaping, toroidal rotation of the cross section, and toroidal translation of the magnetic axis. We study these types of shaping independently and in combination to look for improvements. Linear growth rates for ITG modes are calculated using the gyrokinetics code GENE [2]. The geometric interface package GIST [3] accepts the equilibrium input data from the local equilibrium calculation. Growth rates for both axisymmetric and 3-D equilibrium calculations are presented. [4pt] [1] C. C. Hegna, Physics of Plasmas 7, 3921 (2000).[0pt] [2] F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Physical Review Letters 7, 1904 (2000).[0pt] [3] P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Physics of Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009).

  15. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  16. Effect of quantum parameter – H on space-charge wave spectra in n-type semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S. Muley, Apurva

    2015-07-31

    The present paper deals with the propagation characteristics of very fundamental wave i.e. space – charge wave while propagating through quantum semiconductor plasma. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model to derive the most general dispersion relation in terms of quantum parameter – H. We have found that in presence of an external electrostatic field, the wave spectra (dispersion as well as gain characteristics) not only modified due to presence of quantum effect but also two novel modes of propagation are introduced due to this effect. Hence it may be concluded that to miniaturize the opto-electronic devices, one should use highly doped semiconductor medium at comparatively lower temperature so that the quantum effects predominate.

  17. Effect of an electrostatic space charge system on airborne dust and subsequent potential transmission of microorganisms to broiler breeder pullets by airborne dust.

    PubMed

    Richardson, L J; Mitchell, B W; Wilson, J L; Hofacre, C L

    2003-01-01

    High levels of dust and microorganisms are known to be associated with animal confinement rearing facilities. Many of the microorganisms are carried by dust particles, thus providing an excellent vector for horizontal disease transmission between birds. Two environmentally controlled rooms containing female broiler breeder pullets (n = 300) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of an electrostatic space charge system (ESCS) in reducing airborne dust and gram-negative bacteria levels over an 8-wk period (starting when the birds were 10 wk old). The ESCS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of reducing airborne microorganism levels by charging airborne dust particles and causing the particles to be attracted to grounded surfaces (i.e., walls, floor, equipment). The use of the ESCS resulted in a 64% mean reduction in gram-negative bacteria. Airborne dust levels were reduced an average of 37% over a 1-wk period in the experimental room compared with the control room on the basis of samples taken every 10 min. The reductions of airborne dust and bacteria in this study are comparable with earlier results obtained with the ESCS in commercial hatching cabinets and experimental caged layer rooms, suggesting the system could also be applied to other types of enclosed animal housing. PMID:12713167

  18. Spatial location of the space charge effect in individual ion clouds using monodisperse dried microparticulate injection with a twin quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Allen, L A; Leach, J J; Houk, R S

    1997-07-01

    Pulses of analyte and matrix ions from individual drops are measured simultaneously using a twin quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The sample solution is introduced by monodisperse dried microparticulate injection (MDMI). At modest Pb concentrations (500 ppm), a shoulder on the leading edge of the Li(+) signal appears. At higher matrix concentrations (1000 to at least 1500 ppm), a dip in the leading edge of the Li(+) signal develops. These changes in the shapes of the Li(+) pulses are attributed to space charge effects in the extraction system and ion optics of the mass spectrometer. A qualitative depiction for this behavior is proposed, in which the Li(+) ions are deflected out of the preferred ion path and then refocused by the ion optics. Part of the Li(+) ion cloud is driven ahead of the Pb(+) cloud, and part is trapped behind the Pb(+) cloud. The result is a shoulder on the leading edge of the Li(+) signal. With the Pb matrix present, the shapes of the analyte ion pulses are sensitive to the voltages applied to the first two ion lenses, especially the extractor lens. This observation shows that the part of the matrix effect that occurs in the ion optics takes place mainly in the first two lenses.

  19. Effects of Presence, Copresence, and Flow on Learning Outcomes in 3D Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassell, Martin D.; Goyal, Sandeep; Limayem, Moez; Boughzala, Imed

    2012-01-01

    The level of satisfaction and effectiveness of 3D virtual learning environments were examined. Additionally, 3D virtual learning environments were compared with face-to-face learning environments. Students that experienced higher levels of flow and presence also experienced more satisfaction but not necessarily more effectiveness with 3D virtual…

  20. TEMPO Monolayers on Si(100) Electrodes: Electrostatic Effects by the Electrolyte and Semiconductor Space-Charge on the Electroactivity of a Persistent Radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Vogel, Yan Boris; Noble, Benjamin B; Gonçales, Vinicius R; Darwish, Nadim; Brun, Anton Le; Gooding, J Justin; Wallace, Gordon G; Coote, Michelle L; Ciampi, Simone

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the effect of electrostatic interactions on the electroactivity of a persistent organic free radical. This was achieved by chemisorption of molecules of 4-azido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperdinyloxy (4-azido-TEMPO) onto monolayer-modified Si(100) electrodes using a two-step chemical procedure to preserve the open-shell state and hence the electroactivity of the nitroxide radical. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the surface electrochemical reaction are investigated experimentally and analyzed with the aid of electrochemical digital simulations and quantum-chemical calculations of a theoretical model of the tethered TEMPO system. Interactions between the electrolyte anions and the TEMPO grafted on highly doped, i.e., metallic, electrodes can be tuned to predictably manipulate the oxidizing power of surface nitroxide/oxoammonium redox couple, hence showing the practical importance of the electrostatics on the electrolyte side of the radical monolayer. Conversely, for monolayers prepared on the poorly doped electrodes, the electrostatic interactions between the tethered TEMPO units and the semiconductor-side, i.e., space-charge, become dominant and result in drastic kinetic changes to the electroactivity of the radical monolayer as well as electrochemical nonidealities that can be explained as an increase in the self-interaction "a" parameter that leads to the Frumkin isotherm. PMID:27373457

  1. TEMPO Monolayers on Si(100) Electrodes: Electrostatic Effects by the Electrolyte and Semiconductor Space-Charge on the Electroactivity of a Persistent Radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Vogel, Yan Boris; Noble, Benjamin B; Gonçales, Vinicius R; Darwish, Nadim; Brun, Anton Le; Gooding, J Justin; Wallace, Gordon G; Coote, Michelle L; Ciampi, Simone

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the effect of electrostatic interactions on the electroactivity of a persistent organic free radical. This was achieved by chemisorption of molecules of 4-azido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperdinyloxy (4-azido-TEMPO) onto monolayer-modified Si(100) electrodes using a two-step chemical procedure to preserve the open-shell state and hence the electroactivity of the nitroxide radical. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the surface electrochemical reaction are investigated experimentally and analyzed with the aid of electrochemical digital simulations and quantum-chemical calculations of a theoretical model of the tethered TEMPO system. Interactions between the electrolyte anions and the TEMPO grafted on highly doped, i.e., metallic, electrodes can be tuned to predictably manipulate the oxidizing power of surface nitroxide/oxoammonium redox couple, hence showing the practical importance of the electrostatics on the electrolyte side of the radical monolayer. Conversely, for monolayers prepared on the poorly doped electrodes, the electrostatic interactions between the tethered TEMPO units and the semiconductor-side, i.e., space-charge, become dominant and result in drastic kinetic changes to the electroactivity of the radical monolayer as well as electrochemical nonidealities that can be explained as an increase in the self-interaction "a" parameter that leads to the Frumkin isotherm.

  2. Space charge inhibition effect of nano-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} on improvement of impulse breakdown voltage of transformer oil based on improved Kerr optic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing Yu, Fei; Sima, Wenxia; Zahn, Markus

    2015-09-15

    Transformer oil-based nanofluids (NFs) with 0.03 g/L Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle content exhibit 11.2% higher positive impulse breakdown voltage levels than pure transformer oils. To study the effects of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on the space charge in transformer oil and to explain why the nano-modified transformer oil exhibits improved impulse breakdown voltage characteristics, the traditional Kerr electro-optic field mapping technique is improved by increasing the length of the parallel-plate electrodes and by using a photodetector array as a high light sensitivity device. The space charge distributions of pure transformer oil and of NFs containing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles can be measured using the improved Kerr electro-optic field mapping technique. Test results indicate a significant reduction in space charge density in the transformer oil-based NFs with the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The fast electrons are captured by the nanoparticles and are converted into slow-charged particles in the NFs, which then reduce the space charge density and result in a more uniform electric field distribution. Streamer propagation in the NFs is also obstructed, and the breakdown strengths of the NFs under impulse voltage conditions are also improved.

  3. Extended space charge in concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2010-09-15

    This paper is concerned with ionic currents from an electrolyte solution into a charge-selective solid, such as, an electrode, an ion-exchange membrane or an array of nano-channels in a micro-fluidic system, and the related viscous fluid flows on the length scales varying from nanometers to millimeters. All systems of this kind have characteristic voltage-current curves with segments in which current nearly saturates at some plateau values due to concentration polarization--formation of solute concentration gradients under the passage of a DC current. A number of seemingly different phenomena occurring in that range, such as anomalous rectification in cathodic copper deposition from a copper sulfate solution, super-fast vortexes near an ion-exchange granule, overlimiting conductance in electrodialysis and the recently observed non-equilibrium electroosmotic instability, result from the formation of an additional extended space charge layer next to that of a classical electrical double layer at the solid/liquid interface. In this paper we review the peculiar features of the non-equilibrium electric double layer and extended space charge and the possibility of their direct probing by harmonic voltage/current perturbations through a linear and non-linear system's response, by the methods of electrical impedance spectroscopy and via the anomalous rectification effect. On the relevant microscopic scales the ionic transport in the direction normal to the interface is dominated by drift-diffusion; hence, the extended space charge related viscous flows remain beyond the scope of this paper. PMID:20619824

  4. Models of Longitudinal Space-Charge Impedance for the Study of theMicrobunching Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco

    2008-03-10

    A 1D model of space-charge impedance, assuming atransversely uniform beam with circular cross-section, has been proposedand is being extensively used in the modelling of the microbunchinginstability of relevance for the beam delivery systems of x-ray FELs. Inthis paper we investigate the limitation of the model when applied tostudying the effect of shot noise--one of the sources of themicrobunching instability. We make comparison witha fully 3D calculationand identify the upper end of the frequency spectrum for applicability ofthe 1D model. Relaxation of the assumptions regarding axis-symmetry anduniformity of the transverse density is also reviewed.

  5. Effect of electrostatic space charge on reduction of airborne transmission of Salmonella and other bacteria in broiler breeders in production and their progeny.

    PubMed

    Richardson, L J; Hofacre, C L; Mitchell, B W; Wilson, J L

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella in birds is a concern because of the human foodborne illness associated with the consumption of poultry meat and eggs. One of the methods of transmission of Salmonella within a flock can be by the air. Therefore, we used reduction of transmission of Salmonella to monitor the effectiveness of the electrostatic space charge system (ESCS). During the average broiler breeder laying cycle of 40 wk, a large amount of dust becomes airborne and accumulates on walls, ceiling, and equipment. Many microorganisms adhere to these dust particles, making dust an excellent vector for horizontal disease transmission between birds. We used two environmentally controlled rooms containing commercial broiler breeders to evaluate the effectiveness of an ESCS that produced a strong negative electrostatic charge to reduce airborne dust and, subsequently, microorganism levels. The ESCS caused the dust to become negatively charged, therefore moving to the grounded floor in the treatment room. The use of the ESCS resulted in a significant reduction (P < 0.0001, 61% reduction) in airborne dust concentration levels, which resulted in a significant reduction (P < 0.0001, 76% reduction) in total airborne bacteria and gram-negative bacteria (48% reduction) in the treatment room. Significant reductions (P < 0.05) of gram-negative bacteria (63% reduction) on the egg collection belts were also recorded in the treatment room, which resulted in a significant reduction (P < 0.0001) of gram-negative bacteria (28% reduction) on the eggshell surface. The ESCS treatment resulted in fewer Salmonella enteritidis-positive hens and their progeny from the treatment room due to reductions of dust and airborne bacteria. In addition, this significant reduction in bacteria on the eggshell surface should result in less bacteria in the day-old chicks, therefore better early chick livability. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in egg production, male or female body weights, mortality, or

  6. The agreement between 3D, standard 2D and triplane 2D speckle tracking: effects of image quality and 3D volume rate

    PubMed Central

    Stöbe, Stephan; Tarr, Adrienn; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Hagendorff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of 3D and 2D speckle tracking performed on standard 2D and triplane 2D datasets of normal and pathological left ventricular (LV) wall-motion patterns with a focus on the effect that 3D volume rate (3DVR), image quality and tracking artifacts have on the agreement between 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 37 patients with normal LV function and 18 patients with ischaemic wall-motion abnormalities underwent 2D and 3D echocardiography, followed by offline speckle tracking measurements. The values of 3D global, regional and segmental strain were compared with the standard 2D and triplane 2D strain values. Correlation analysis with the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was also performed. The 3D and 2D global strain values correlated good in both normally and abnormally contracting hearts, though systematic differences between the two methods were observed. Of the 3D strain parameters, the area strain showed the best correlation with the LVEF. The numerical agreement of 3D and 2D analyses varied significantly with the volume rate and image quality of the 3D datasets. The highest correlation between 2D and 3D peak systolic strain values was found between 3D area and standard 2D longitudinal strain. Regional wall-motion abnormalities were similarly detected by 2D and 3D speckle tracking. 2DST of triplane datasets showed similar results to those of conventional 2D datasets. 2D and 3D speckle tracking similarly detect normal and pathological wall-motion patterns. Limited image quality has a significant impact on the agreement between 3D and 2D numerical strain values. PMID:26693303

  7. Viewing 3D TV over two months produces no discernible effects on balance, coordination or eyesight.

    PubMed

    Read, Jenny C A; Godfrey, Alan; Bohr, Iwo; Simonotto, Jennifer; Galna, Brook; Smulders, Tom V

    2016-08-01

    With the rise in stereoscopic 3D media, there has been concern that viewing stereoscopic 3D (S3D) content could have long-term adverse effects, but little data are available. In the first study to address this, 28 households who did not currently own a 3D TV were given a new TV set, either S3D or 2D. The 116 members of these households all underwent tests of balance, coordination and eyesight, both before they received their new TV set, and after they had owned it for 2 months. We did not detect any changes which appeared to be associated with viewing 3D TV. We conclude that viewing 3D TV does not produce detectable effects on balance, coordination or eyesight over the timescale studied. Practitioner Summary: Concern has been expressed over possible long-term effects of stereoscopic 3D (S3D). We looked for any changes in vision, balance and coordination associated with normal home S3D TV viewing in the 2 months after first acquiring a 3D TV. We find no evidence of any changes over this timescale.

  8. Viewing 3D TV over two months produces no discernible effects on balance, coordination or eyesight

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C.A.; Godfrey, Alan; Bohr, Iwo; Simonotto, Jennifer; Galna, Brook; Smulders, Tom V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the rise in stereoscopic 3D media, there has been concern that viewing stereoscopic 3D (S3D) content could have long-term adverse effects, but little data are available. In the first study to address this, 28 households who did not currently own a 3D TV were given a new TV set, either S3D or 2D. The 116 members of these households all underwent tests of balance, coordination and eyesight, both before they received their new TV set, and after they had owned it for 2 months. We did not detect any changes which appeared to be associated with viewing 3D TV. We conclude that viewing 3D TV does not produce detectable effects on balance, coordination or eyesight over the timescale studied. Practitioner Summary: Concern has been expressed over possible long-term effects of stereoscopic 3D (S3D). We looked for any changes in vision, balance and coordination associated with normal home S3D TV viewing in the 2 months after first acquiring a 3D TV. We find no evidence of any changes over this timescale. PMID:26758965

  9. Slat Cove Unsteadiness Effect of 3D Flow Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 2D, time accurate computations based on a pseudo-laminar zonal model of the slat cove region (within the framework of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations) are inadequate for predicting the full unsteady dynamics of the slat cove flow field. Even though such computations could capture the large-scale, unsteady vorticity structures in the slat cove region without requiring any external forcing, the simulated vortices were excessively strong and the recirculation zone was unduly energetic in comparison with the PIV measurements for a generic high-lift configuration. To resolve this discrepancy and to help enable physics based predictions of slat aeroacoustics, the present paper is focused on 3D simulations of the slat cove flow over a computational domain of limited spanwise extent. Maintaining the pseudo-laminar approach, current results indicate that accounting for the three-dimensionality of flow fluctuations leads to considerable improvement in the accuracy of the unsteady, nearfield solution. Analysis of simulation data points to the likely significance of turbulent fluctuations near the reattachment region toward the generation of broadband slat noise. The computed acoustic characteristics (in terms of the frequency spectrum and spatial distribution) within short distances from the slat resemble the previously reported, subscale measurements of slat noise.

  10. Independent effects of 2-D and 3-D locations of stimuli in a 3-D display on response speed in a Simon task

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Simon Effect is a phenomenon in which reaction times are usually faster when the stimulus location and the response correspond, even if the stimulus location is irrelevant to the task. Recent studies have demonstrated the Simon effect in a three-dimensional (3-D) display. The present study examined whether two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D locations simultaneously affected the Simon effect for stimuli in which a target and fixation were located on the same plane (ground or ceiling) at different 3-D depths, and the perspective effect produced a difference in the 2-D vertical location of the target stimulus relative to the fixation. The presence of the ground and ceiling plane was controlled to examine the contextual effects of background. The results showed that the 2-D vertical location and 3-D depth simultaneously affected the speed of responses, and they did not interact. The presence of the background did not affect the magnitude of either the 2-D or the 3-D Simon effect. These results suggest that 2-D vertical location and 3-D depth are coded simultaneously and independently, and both affect response selection in which 2-D and 3-D representations overlap. PMID:26388807

  11. Generation and transport of space charge waves in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C. T.; Beaudoin, Brian; Feldman, Donald; Kishek, Rami; Bernal, Santiago; Sutter, David; Reiser, Martin; O'Shea, Patrick

    2009-01-22

    An experimental study of longitudinal dynamics of space charge dominated beams is presented. We use drive-laser driven perturbations to study the evolution of space charge waves on an intese electron beam. Collective effects like propagation of space charge waves, superposition of waves and crossing of waves are presented and verified with 1-D cold fluid model theory. Multi-turn transport and other collective effects in UMER are discussed.

  12. Correlation effects in 3D triple-Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Xin; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    We study interaction effects, including short-range interactions and long-range Coulomb interactions, in three-dimensional topological triple-Weyl semimetals whose triple-Weyl points are protected by crystalline symmetries. In the low-energy effective field theory of triple-Weyl semimetals, by considering symmetries and utilizing Fierz identity, we find that there are only four independent short-range interaction terms. We then perform Wilsonian renormalization group analysis to determine the effect of short-range interactions at low energy and long distance by finding fixed points as well as stable strong-coupling limits. For those strong-coupling limits due to short-range interactions, spontaneous symmetry-breaking ordering is expected and is analyzed by self-consistent mean-field calculations combined with RG flow. For long-range Coulomb interactions, we find anisotropic screening effect, similar with the one in double-Weyl semimetals, and hence a qualitatively different fixed point from the Gaussian one.

  13. 3-D numerical evaluation of density effects on tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Beinhorn, M; Dietrich, P; Kolditz, O

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations carried out to assess the importance of density-dependent flow on tracer plume development. The scenario considered in the study is characterized by a short-term tracer injection phase into a fully penetrating well and a natural hydraulic gradient. The scenario is thought to be typical for tracer tests conducted in the field. Using a reference case as a starting point, different model parameters were changed in order to determine their importance to density effects. The study is based on a three-dimensional model domain. Results were interpreted using concentration contours and a first moment analysis. Tracer injections of 0.036 kg per meter of saturated aquifer thickness do not cause significant density effects assuming hydraulic gradients of at least 0.1%. Higher tracer input masses, as used for geoelectrical investigations, may lead to buoyancy-induced flow in the early phase of a tracer test which in turn impacts further plume development. This also holds true for shallow aquifers. Results of simulations with different tracer injection rates and durations imply that the tracer input scenario has a negligible effect on density flow. Employing model cases with different realizations of a log conductivity random field, it could be shown that small variations of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of the tracer injection well have a major control on the local tracer distribution but do not mask effects of buoyancy-induced flow. PMID:16183165

  14. Spatial distribution of space charge in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, F.; Geschke, D.; Monkman, A. P.

    2001-08-06

    We demonstrate the pyroelectric effect in a conjugated polymer, poly(2,5-pyridinediyl) (PPY), and we use the laser intensity modulation method (LIMM) to resolve the spatial distribution of electric field and space charges inside a 5 {mu}m Au/PPY/Au sandwich device. The pyroelectric signal shows hysteresis behavior with respect to the applied bias indicating permanent storage of injected charges. From the analysis of the LIMM spectra we conclude that application of a bias leads to the accumulation of space charges near the electrodes, while a zone of opposite space charge may establish in a distance of about 1 {mu}m from it. The charged state retains after removing the bias and can lead to an internal electric field that is opposite to the external poling field in the bulk of the polymer film. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Wang, G.

    2015-05-03

    The effects of space charge play a significant role in modern-day accelerators, frequently constraining the beam parameters attainable in an accelerator or in an accelerator chain. They also can limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with sub-TeV high-brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Using an appropriate electron beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam in a coasting beam. But these methods cannot compensate space charge tune spread in a bunched hadron beam. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with mismatched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread.

  16. A Measure of the Effectiveness of Incorporating 3D Human Anatomy into an Online Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbelink, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Results of a study designed to determine the effectiveness of implementing three-dimensional (3D) stereo images of a human skull in an undergraduate human anatomy online laboratory were gathered and analysed. Mental model theory and its applications to 3D relationships are discussed along with the research results. Quantitative results on 62 pairs…

  17. Genre Matters: A Comparative Study on the Entertainment Effects of 3D in Cinematic Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qihao; Lee, Young Sun

    2014-09-01

    Built upon prior comparative studies of 3D and 2D films, the current project investigates the effects of 2D and 3D on viewers' perception of enjoyment, narrative engagement, presence, involvement, and flow across three movie genres (Action/fantasy vs. Drama vs. Documentary). Through a 2 by 3 mixed factorial design, participants (n = 102) were separated into two viewing conditions (2D and 3D) and watched three 15-min film segments. Result suggested both visual production methods are equally efficient in terms of eliciting people's enjoyment, narrative engagement, involvement, flow and presence, no effects of visual production method was found. In addition, through examining the genre effects in both 3D and 2D conditions, we found that 3D works better for action movies than documentaries in terms of eliciting viewers' perception of enjoyment and presence, similarly, it improves views' narrative engagement for documentaries than dramas substantially. Implications and limitations are discussed in detail.

  18. 3D magnetic geometric effects during 3D field application and comparison to measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wingen, A.; Shafer, M. W.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hillis, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Bird, T. M.; Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-01

    Density pumpout during the application of 3D fields in tokamaks may be caused by changes to the plasma equilibrium shaping that destabilize microinstabilities, thereby increasing transport. Local geometric quantities of the magnetic field that are relevant for microinstabilities (curvature and local shear) are calculated using VMEC equilibria in typical RMP discharges on DIII-D. Measurements of phase-differenced soft X-ray emission in the pedestal region show a clear helical structure that is compared with a model of localized impurity transport based on the 3D geometry. Broadband density fluctuations measured by beam emission spectroscopy also show changes in magnitude with I-coil phase, in support of the theory that microstability changes with the magnetic geometry. A scan of 3D equilibria over a large range of DIII-D geometric parameter space has been preformed in order to map out the operating space of the microstability mechanism. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. PMMA interlayer-modulated memory effects by space charge polarization in resistive switching based on CuSCN-nanopyramids/ZnO-nanorods p-n heterojunction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Baochang; Zhao, Jie; Xiao, Li; Cai, Qiangsheng; Guo, Rui; Xiao, Yanhe; Lei, Shuijin

    2015-01-01

    Resistive switching (RS) devices are commonly believed as a promising candidate for next generation nonvolatile resistance random access memory. Here, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) interlayer was introduced at the heterointerface of p-CuSCN hollow nanopyramid arrays and n-ZnO nanorod arrays, resulting in a typical bipolar RS behavior. We propose the mechanism of nanostructure trap-induced space charge polarization modulated by PMMA interlayer. At low reverse bias, PMMA insulator can block charges through the heterointerface, and and trapped states are respectively created on both sides of PMMA, resulting in a high resistance state (HRS) due to wider depletion region. At high reverse bias, however, electrons and holes can cross PMMA interlayer by Fowler-Nordeim tunneling due to a massive tilt of energy band, and then inject into the traps of ZnO and CuSCN, respectively. and trapped states are created, resulting in the formation of degenerate semiconductors on both sides of PMMA. Therefore, quantum tunneling and space charge polarization lead to a low resistance state (LRS). At relatively high forward bias, subsequently, the trapped states of and are recreated due to the opposite injection of charges, resulting in a recovery of HRS. The introduction of insulating interlayer at heterointerface, point a way to develop next-generation nonvolatile memories. PMID:26648249

  20. ACCELERATORS: Matching by solenoids in space charge dominated LEBTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Hai; Tang, Jing-Yu; Ouyang, Hua-Fu

    2009-10-01

    The betatron matching of a rotationally asymmetric beam in space charge dominated low-energy beam transports (LEBTs) where solenoids are used for the transverse matching has been studied. For better understanding, the coupling elements of a beam matrix are interpreted in special forms that are products of a term defined by the Larmor rotation angle and another by the difference between the beam matrix elements in the two transverse planes. The coupling form originally derived from the rotationally symmetric field in solenoids still holds when taking into account the rotationally asymmetric space charge forces that are due to the unequal emittance in the two transverse planes. It is shown in this paper that when an LEBT mainly comprising solenoids transports a beam having unequal emittance in the two transverse planes and the linear space charge force is taken into account, the initial Twiss parameters can be modified to obtain the minimum and equal emittance at the LEBT exit. The TRACE3D calculations also prove the principle. However, when quadrupoles that are also rotationally asymmetric are involved in between solenoids, the coupling between the two transverse planes becomes more complicated and the emittance increase is usually unavoidable. A matching example using the CSNS (China Spallation Neutron Source) LEBT conditions is also presented.

  1. 3D FEM Simulations of Drop Test Reliability on 3D-WLP: Effects of Solder Reflow Residual Stress and Molding Resin Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhenini, Soufyane; Tougui, Abdellah; Bouchou, Abdelhake; Mohan, Ranganathan; Dosseul, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Numerous three-dimensional (3D) packaging technologies are currently used for 3D integration. 3D-wafer level package (3D-WLP) appears to be a way to keep increasing the density of the microelectronic components. The reliability of 3D components has to be evaluated on mechanical demonstrators with daisy chains before real production. Numerical modeling is acknowledged as a very efficient tool for design optimization. In this paper, 3D finite-elements calculations are carried out to analyze the effects of molding resin's mechanical properties and thickness on the 3D component's dynamic response under drop loading conditions. Residual stress generated by solder reflow is also discussed. The influences of residual stresses on the numerical estimation of the component behavior during drop loading are studied. Solder reflow residual stresses have an impact on solder plastic strain and die equivalent stress calculations. We have compared the result of two numerical drop test models. Stress-free initial conduction is introduced for the first model. Solder reflow residual stresses are considered as the initial condition for the second drop test model. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons are carried out to show the effect of residual stress in drop test calculations. For the effect of molding resin thickness on the component behavior under drop loading, the stress-free initial condition is considered. The effect of the molding resin's thickness on critical area location is discussed. The solder bump maximum plastic shear strain and the silicon die maximum equivalent stress are used as reliability criteria. Numerical submodeling techniques are used to increase calculation accuracy. Numerical results have contributed to the design optimization of the 3D-WLP component.

  2. Space Charge Dominated Beams in the Iucf Cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    1995-01-01

    Many present and future accelerator projects require significantly increased brightness of the accelerated and stored beams to make modern nuclear and high energy experiments feasible. In the case of IUCF Cooler it has been stated that there is strong motivation for increased beam intensity to provide the designed luminosity for the future Light Ion Spin Synchrotron. To achieve the desired brightness of the beam one must consider a complex problem involving both effective injection and circumventing various intensity limits. This dissertation is essentially a collection of theoretical models and experimental observations which, taken together, make an attempt to analyze numerous intensity and space charge related effects in the IUCF Cooler. We found that the proton beams in the IUCF Cooler are nearly completely space charge dominated longitudinally. This leads to a number of beam properties, such as coherent synchrotron frequency shift and an absence of decoherence in the synchrotron phase oscillations, which have not been observed before. We observed experimentally that the intensity limit in the IUCF Cooler is a peak current limit due to space charge effects. Beam losses occur due to incoherent transverse effects, such as large space charge tune shift and the formation of tails. In addition to that, a very precise bunched beam current monitor was invented and tested. This device could be used in the future precise nuclear experiments.

  3. Do Fractal Models of Clouds Produces the Right 3D Radiative Effects?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stochastic fractal models of clouds are often used to study 3D radiative effects and their influence on the remote sensing of cloud properties. Since it is important that the cloud models produce a correct radiative response, some researchers require the model parameters to match observed cloud properties such as scale-independent optical thickness variability. Unfortunately, matching these properties does not necessarily imply that the cloud models will cause the right 3D radiative effects. First, the matched properties alone only influence the 3D effects but do not completely determine them. Second, in many cases the retrieved cloud properties have been already biased by 3D radiative effects, and so the models may not match the true real clouds. Finally, the matched cloud properties cannot be considered independent from the scales at which they have been retrieved. This paper proposes an approach that helps ensure that fractal cloud models are realistic and produce the right 3D effects. The technique compares the results of radiative transfer simulations for the model clouds to new direct observations of 3D radiative effects in satellite images.

  4. Strategies for Effectively Visualizing a 3D Flow Using Volume Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering insights into the greater potential of 3D LIC as a method for effectively representing flow in a volume, a principal contribution of this work is the suggestion of a technique for generating and rendering 3D visibility-impeding 'halos' that can help to intuitively indicate the presence of depth discontinuities between contiguous elements in a projection and thereby clarify the 3D spatial organization of elements in the flow. The proposed techniques are applied to the visualization of a hot, supersonic, laminar jet exiting into a colder, subsonic coflow.

  5. Longitudinal phase space tomography with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, S.; Lindroos, M.; Koscielniak, S.

    2000-12-01

    Tomography is now a very broad topic with a wealth of algorithms for the reconstruction of both qualitative and quantitative images. In an extension in the domain of particle accelerators, one of the simplest algorithms has been modified to take into account the nonlinearity of large-amplitude synchrotron motion. This permits the accurate reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density from one-dimensional bunch profile data. The method is a hybrid one which incorporates particle tracking. Hitherto, a very simple tracking algorithm has been employed because only a brief span of measured profile data is required to build a snapshot of phase space. This is one of the strengths of the method, as tracking for relatively few turns relaxes the precision to which input machine parameters need to be known. The recent addition of longitudinal space charge considerations as an optional refinement of the code is described. Simplicity suggested an approach based on the derivative of bunch shape with the properties of the vacuum chamber parametrized by a single value of distributed reactive impedance and by a geometrical coupling coefficient. This is sufficient to model the dominant collective effects in machines of low to moderate energy. In contrast to simulation codes, binning is not an issue since the profiles to be differentiated are measured ones. The program is written in Fortran 90 with high-performance Fortran extensions for parallel processing. A major effort has been made to identify and remove execution bottlenecks, for example, by reducing floating-point calculations and recoding slow intrinsic functions. A pointerlike mechanism which avoids the problems associated with pointers and parallel processing has been implemented. This is required to handle the large, sparse matrices that the algorithm employs. Results obtained with and without the inclusion of space charge are presented and compared for proton beams in the CERN protron synchrotron booster. Comparisons

  6. Emittance growth from space-charge forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1991-01-01

    Space-charge-induced emittance growth has become a topic of much recent interest for designing the low-velocity sections of high- intensity, high-brightness accelerators and beam-transport channels. In this paper we review the properties of the space-charge force, and discuss the concepts of matching, space-charge and emittance-dominated beams, and equilibrium beams and their characteristics. This is followed by a survey of some of the work over the past 25 years to identify the mechanisms of this emittance growth in both ion and electron accelerators. We summarize the overall results in terms of four distinct mechanisms whose characteristics we describe. Finally, we show numerical simulation results for the evolution of initial rms-mismatched laminar beams. The examples show that for space-charge dominated beams, the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a highly choatic filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. In the examples we have studied the halo contains only a few percent of the particles, but contributes about half of the emittance growth. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Optimization for enhancement of signal effectiveness in three-dimensional (3D) cell based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Se Hoon; Ku, Bosung; Yi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dong Woo; Lee, Hye Seon; Kim, Jhingook

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the optimization for enhancement of signal effectiveness in 3D cell based electrochemical biosensor. While 2D culture has a structural limitation to mimic an in vivo, 3D culture can provide more similar cell responses. In addition, although 3D cultured cells have been applied to measure electrically, the intensity of electrical signal from cells on the electrode was extremely low. Thus, we have optimized and evaluated the condition of gelation between several types of sol-gel and cancer cells using the electrical measurement to make fine 3D cell structure on the electrode. These results show that our work can be an useful method for monitoring cell activity by compensating a limitation of 2D culture in real time. PMID:22256300

  8. Characteristics of visual fatigue under the effect of 3D animation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Shuo; Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Jhou, Fong-Yi; Lin, David Pei-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Visual fatigue is commonly encountered in modern life. Clinical visual fatigue characteristics caused by 2-D and 3-D animations may be different, but have not been characterized in detail. This study tried to distinguish the differential effects on visual fatigue caused by 2-D and 3-D animations. A total of 23 volunteers were subjected to accommodation and vergence assessments, followed by a 40-min video game program designed to aggravate their asthenopic symptoms. The volunteers were then assessed for accommodation and vergence parameters again and directed to watch a 5-min 3-D video program, and then assessed again for the parameters. The results support that the 3-D animations caused similar characteristics in vision fatigue parameters in some specific aspects as compared to that caused by 2-D animations. Furthermore, 3-D animations may lead to more exhaustion in both ciliary and extra-ocular muscles, and such differential effects were more evident in the high demand of near vision work. The current results indicated that an arbitrary set of indexes may be promoted in the design of 3-D display or equipments.

  9. The effectiveness of 3-D marine systems as an exploration tool in the offshore Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Idowu, A.O. )

    1993-09-01

    From inception in 1984, three-dimensional (3-D) marine surveys have been used widely for field development where commercial hydrocarbons were known to exist in Nigeria. The high-trace density and full 3-D migration provide a data set that allows detailed interpretation of complex geologic structures and, in many cases, provides good stratigraphic information as well. The result has been better placement of development wells, making field development more efficient and cost effective. Previous application of the 3-d method (i.e., reconaissance 3-D) as an exploration tool in 1987 has demonstrated its effectiveness for predrilling detailing of prospects in offshore Niger Delta in a situation where a large volume of seismic data were acquired at relatively reduced unit costs. The technique involves acquiring data along a line every 200 m spacing, while interpretation in 3-D data processing is applied for subsequent 3-D migration. Based on pattern recognition of events on the input traces, the links are established to allow traces to be formed between input locations by comparing several attributes of events on neighboring traces. A case history example from the offshore Niger delta shows that the collection costs for the reconnaissance 3-D method are comparable to two-dimensional detailing based on similar line kilometer and time duration for the survey. A trade-off between cost and technical specifications can be programmed by focusing on the geologic objective. The technique brings the advantage of 3-D methods, but not their costs, to the exploration phase of the search for petroleum, and it is highly recommended for exploration in frontier areas, particularly the deep offshore of the Niger Delta.

  10. Space charge behavior of silicone rubber nanocomposites with thermal step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji Wei; Li, Qing Quan; Liu, Hong Shun; Ren, Ang; Li, Jie; Xiao, Meng; Li, Bin; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, effects of the space charge behavior of silicone rubber (SiR) nanocomposites with SiO2, Al2O3, and MgO nanoparticles on charge transfer were clarified. To investigate the effects of SiO2, Al2O3, and MgO nanoparticles on space charge profiles, the space charge behavior was measured using a thermal step method system under a dc electric field of 2 to 4 kV/mm. In the case of SiR nanocomposites, a negative packet like charge injection with a peak charge density of more than several hundred C/m3 was measured. The effects of space charge behavior were discussed with the response current associated with the conductivity and permittivity affected by a thermal process. The obtained results showed that the relaxation processes had discrete energy differences with distinct peaks in the response currents of space charge affected by nanoparticles.

  11. Faraday effect due to Pauli exclusion principle in 3D topological insulator nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Hari P.; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2014-05-01

    3D topological insulator (3D TI) materials have interesting surface states that are protected against scattering due to non-magnetic impurities. They turn out to be useful in quantum information processing. Here, using the 3D Dirac equation, we show that the transitions between positive and negative energy solutions in a 3D TI heterostructure junction and in a 3D TI quantum dot (QD) obey strict optical selection rules. We calculate the optical conductivity tensor of a 3D TI double interface made of a PbTe/Pb0:31Sn0:69Te/PbTe heterostructure using Maxwell's equations, which reveals a giant Faraday rotation effect due to Pauli exclusion principle. A transfer matrix method is employed to calculate the transmittance in a multilayer stacking of PbTe/Pb0:31Sn0:69Te/PbTe heterostructure. We show that while the Faraday rotation is giant for a single double interface, it takes about 60 double interfaces to absorb incoming radiation completely. We also present the model of a QD consisting of a spherical core-bulk heterostructure made of 3D TI materials, such as PbTe/Pb0:31Sn0:69Te/PbTe , with bound massless and helical Weyl states existing at the interface and being confined in all three dimensions. We calculate the Faraday rotation effect coming from the polarization of single electron-hole pairs. We show that the semi-classical Faraday effect can be used to read out spin quantum memory.

  12. Depth enhancement of S3D content and the psychological effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirahara, Masahiro; Shiraishi, Saki; Kawai, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) imaging technologies are widely used recently to create content for movies, TV programs, games, etc. Although S3D content differs from 2D content by the use of binocular parallax to induce depth sensation, the relationship between depth control and the user experience remains unclear. In this study, the user experience was subjectively and objectively evaluated in order to determine the effectiveness of depth control, such as an expansion or reduction or a forward or backward shift in the range of maximum parallactic angles in the cross and uncross directions (depth bracket). Four types of S3D content were used in the subjective and objective evaluations. The depth brackets of comparison stimuli were modified in order to enhance the depth sensation corresponding to the content. Interpretation Based Quality (IBQ) methodology was used for the subjective evaluation and the heart rate was measured to evaluate the physiological effect. The results of the evaluations suggest the following two points. (1) Expansion/reduction of the depth bracket affects preference and enhances positive emotions to the S3D content. (2) Expansion/reduction of the depth bracket produces above-mentioned effects more notable than shifting the cross/uncross directions.

  13. 3d {N}=1 effective supergravity and F-theory from M-theory on fourfolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, Daniël; Tsimpis, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    We consider 3d N=1 M-theory compactifications on Calabi-Yau fourfolds, and the effective 3d theory of light modes obtained by reduction from eleven dimensions. We study in detail the mass spectrum at the vacuum and, by decoupling the massive multiplets, we derive the effective 3d N=1 theory in the large-volume limit up to quartic fermion terms. We show that in general it is an ungauged N=1 supergravity of the form expected from 3d supersymmetry. In particular the massless bosonic fields consist of the volume modulus and the axions originating from the eleven-dimensional three-form, while the moduli-space metric is locally isometric to hyperbolic space. We consider the F-theory interpretation of the 3d N=1 M-theory vacua in the light of the F-theory effective action approach. We show that these vacua generally have F-theory duals with circle fluxes, thus breaking 4d Poincaré invariance.

  14. Effects of 3D Virtual Reality of Plate Tectonics on Fifth Grade Students' Achievement and Attitude toward Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Paul

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effects of a teaching method using 3D virtual reality simulations on achievement and attitude toward science. An experiment was conducted with fifth-grade students (N = 41) to examine the effects of 3D simulations, designed to support inquiry-based science curriculum. An ANOVA analysis revealed that the 3D group scored…

  15. Visual storytelling in 2D and stereoscopic 3D video: effect of blur on visual attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh-Thu, Quan; Vienne, Cyril; Blondé, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    Visual attention is an inherent mechanism that plays an important role in the human visual perception. As our visual system has limited capacity and cannot efficiently process the information from the entire visual field, we focus our attention on specific areas of interest in the image for detailed analysis of these areas. In the context of media entertainment, the viewers' visual attention deployment is also influenced by the art of visual storytelling. To this date, visual editing and composition of scenes in stereoscopic 3D content creation still mostly follows those used in 2D. In particular, out-of-focus blur is often used in 2D motion pictures and photography to drive the viewer's attention towards a sharp area of the image. In this paper, we study specifically the impact of defocused foreground objects on visual attention deployment in stereoscopic 3D content. For that purpose, we conducted a subjective experiment using an eyetracker. Our results bring more insights on the deployment of visual attention in stereoscopic 3D content viewing, and provide further understanding on visual attention behavior differences between 2D and 3D. Our results show that a traditional 2D scene compositing approach such as the use of foreground blur does not necessarily produce the same effect on visual attention deployment in 2D and 3D. Implications for stereoscopic content creation and visual fatigue are discussed.

  16. Effects of antenna orientation on 3-D ground penetrating radar surveys: an archaeological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lualdi, Maurizio; Lombardi, Federico

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigates the impact that the GPR antenna orientation, or survey direction, has on migrated image resulting from 3-D georadar acquisitions carried out on heterogeneous and anisotropic subsurface. This feature is related to the directional dependency of wave propagation effects, such as dispersion, absorption, depolarization, and scattering phenomena. We provide a proof of this with two field examples, demonstrating that a 3-D survey performed along a single direction could bring weak results in terms of target detection and reconstruction. To overcome this risk, we show the improvements that the combination of GPR 3-D data acquired along different directions on the same area can obtain: an enhancement of target detection probability and the practical advantage for the end-user of looking through a single image. Further on, we develop a stacking scheme that employs a threshold associated with amplitude comparison to adaptively handle the combination of georadar data volumes.

  17. 3D calculation of Tucson-Melbourne 3NF effect in triton binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hadizadeh, M. R.; Tomio, L.; Bayegan, S.

    2010-08-04

    As an application of the new realistic three-dimensional (3D) formalism reported recently for three-nucleon (3N) bound states, an attempt is made to study the effect of three-nucleon forces (3NFs) in triton binding energy in a non partial wave (PW) approach. The spin-isospin dependent 3N Faddeev integral equations with the inclusion of 3NFs, which are formulated as function of vector Jacobi momenta, specifically the magnitudes of the momenta and the angle between them, are solved with Bonn-B and Tucson-Melbourne NN and 3N forces in operator forms which can be incorporated in our 3D formalism. The comparison with numerical results in both, novel 3D and standard PW schemes, shows that non PW calculations avoid the very involved angular momentum algebra occurring for the permutations and transformations and it is more efficient and less cumbersome for considering the 3NF.

  18. The effect of volumetric (3D) tactile symbols within inclusive tactile maps.

    PubMed

    Gual, Jaume; Puyuelo, Marina; Lloveras, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Point, linear and areal elements, which are two-dimensional and of a graphic nature, are the morphological elements employed when designing tactile maps and symbols for visually impaired users. However, beyond the two-dimensional domain, there is a fourth group of elements - volumetric elements - which mapmakers do not take sufficiently into account when it comes to designing tactile maps and symbols. This study analyses the effect of including volumetric, or 3D, symbols within a tactile map. In order to do so, the researchers compared two tactile maps. One of them uses only two-dimensional elements and is produced using thermoforming, one of the most popular systems in this field, while the other includes volumetric symbols, thus highlighting the possibilities opened up by 3D printing, a new area of production. The results of the study show that including 3D symbols improves the efficiency and autonomous use of these products. PMID:25683526

  19. The Effects of 3D Computer Simulation on Biology Students' Achievement and Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elangovan, Tavasuria; Ismail, Zurida

    2014-01-01

    A quasi experimental study was conducted for six weeks to determine the effectiveness of two different 3D computer simulation based teaching methods, that is, realistic simulation and non-realistic simulation on Form Four Biology students' achievement and memory retention in Perak, Malaysia. A sample of 136 Form Four Biology students in Perak,…

  20. Space charge neutralization by electron-transparent suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Srisonphan, Siwapon; Kim, Myungji; Kim, Hong Koo

    2014-01-01

    Graphene possesses many fascinating properties originating from the manifold potential for interactions at electronic, atomic, or molecular levels. Here we report measurement of electron transparency and hole charge induction response of a suspended graphene anode on top of a void channel formed in a SiO2/Si substrate. A two-dimensional (2D) electron gas induced at the oxide interface emits into air and makes a ballistic transport toward the suspended graphene. A small fraction (>~0.1%) of impinging electrons are captured at the edge of 2D hole system in graphene, demonstrating good transparency to very low energy (<3 eV) electrons. The hole charges induced in the suspended graphene anode have the effect of neutralizing the electron space charge in the void channel. This charge compensation dramatically enhances 2D electron gas emission at cathode to the level far surpassing the Child-Langmuir's space-charge-limited emission. PMID:24441774

  1. Space-Charge Modulation in Vacuum Microdiodes at THz Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Andreas; Manolescu, Andrei; Valfells, Agust

    2010-04-30

    We investigate the dynamics of a space-charge limited, photoinjected, electron beam in a microscopic vacuum diode. Because of the small nature of the system it is possible to conduct high-resolution simulations where the number of simulated particles is equal to the number of electrons within the system. In a series of simulations of molecular dynamics type, where electrons are treated as point charges, we address and analyze space-charge effects in a micrometer-scale vacuum diode. We have been able to reproduce breakup of a single pulse injected with a current density beyond the Child-Langmuir limit, and we find that continuous injection of current into the diode gap results in a well-defined train of electron bunches corresponding to THz frequency. A simple analytical explanation of this behavior is given.

  2. Effect of density gradients in confined supersonic shear layers. Part 2: 3-D modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peroomian, Oshin; Kelly, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of basic flow density gradients on the supersonic wall modes were investigated in Part 1 of this analysis. In that investigation only the 2-D modes were studied. Tam and Hu investigated the 3-D modes in a confined vortex sheet and reported that the first 2-D Class A mode (A01) had the highest growth rate compared to all other 2-D and 3-D modes present in the vortex sheet for that particular set of flow patterns. They also showed that this result also held true for finite thickness shear layers with delta(sub w) less than 0.125. For free shear layers, Sandham and Reynolds showed that the 3-D K-H mode became the dominant mode for M(sub c) greater than 0.6. Jackson and Grosch investigated the effect of crossflow and obliqueness on the slow and fast odes present in a M(sub c) greater than 1 environment and showed that for certain combination of crossflow and wave angles the growth rates could be increased by up to a factor of 2 with respect to the 2-D case. The case studied here is a confined shear layer shown in Part 1. All solution procedures and basic low profiles are the same as in Part 1. The effect of density gradients on the 3-D modes present in the density ratios considered in Part 1 are investigated.

  3. Effect of mental fatigue caused by mobile 3D viewing on selective attention: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Mun, Sungchul; Kim, Eun-Soo; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated behavioral responses to and auditory event-related potential (ERP) correlates of mental fatigue caused by mobile three-dimensional (3D) viewing. Twenty-six participants (14 women) performed a selective attention task in which they were asked to respond to the sounds presented at the attended side while ignoring sounds at the ignored side before and after mobile 3D viewing. Considering different individual susceptibilities to 3D, participants' subjective fatigue data were used to categorize them into two groups: fatigued and unfatigued. The amplitudes of d-ERP components were defined as differences in amplitudes between time-locked brain oscillations of the attended and ignored sounds, and these values were used to calculate the degree to which spatial selective attention was impaired by 3D mental fatigue. The fatigued group showed significantly longer response times after mobile 3D viewing compared to before the viewing. However, response accuracy did not significantly change between the two conditions, implying that the participants used a behavioral strategy to cope with their performance accuracy decrement by increasing their response times. No significant differences were observed for the unfatigued group. Analysis of covariance revealed group differences with significant and trends toward significant decreases in the d-P200 and d-late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes at the occipital electrodes of the fatigued and unfatigued groups. Our findings indicate that mentally fatigued participants did not effectively block out distractors in their information processing mechanism, providing support for the hypothesis that 3D mental fatigue impairs spatial selective attention and is characterized by changes in d-P200 and d-LPP amplitudes. PMID:25194505

  4. Particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles.

  5. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  6. Giant Faraday effect due to Pauli exclusion principle in 3D topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Hari P; Leuenberger, Michael N

    2014-02-26

    Experiments using ARPES, which is based on the photoelectric effect, show that the surface states in 3D topological insulators (TI) are helical. Here we consider Weyl interface fermions due to band inversion in narrow-bandgap semiconductors, such as Pb1-xSnxTe. The positive and negative energy solutions can be identified by means of opposite helicity in terms of the spin helicity operator in 3D TI as ĥ(TI) = (1/ |p|_ |) β (σ|_ x p|_ ) · z^, where β is a Dirac matrix and z^ points perpendicular to the interface. Using the 3D Dirac equation and bandstructure calculations we show that the transitions between positive and negative energy solutions, giving rise to electron-hole pairs, obey strict optical selection rules. In order to demonstrate the consequences of these selection rules, we consider the Faraday effect due to the Pauli exclusion principle in a pump-probe setup using a 3D TI double interface of a PbTe/Pb₀.₃₁Sn₀.₆₉Te/PbTe heterostructure. For that we calculate the optical conductivity tensor of this heterostructure, which we use to solve Maxwell's equations. The Faraday rotation angle exhibits oscillations as a function of probe wavelength and thickness of the heterostructure. The maxima in the Faraday rotation angle are of the order of mrds.

  7. Special effects used in creating 3D animated scenes-part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramescu, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    In present, with the help of computer, we can create special effects that look so real that we almost don't perceive them as being different. These special effects are somehow hard to differentiate from the real elements like those on the screen. With the increasingly accesible 3D field that has more and more areas of application, the 3D technology goes easily from architecture to product designing. Real like 3D animations are used as means of learning, for multimedia presentations of big global corporations, for special effects and even for virtual actors in movies. Technology, as part of the movie art, is considered a prerequisite but the cinematography is the first art that had to wait for the correct intersection of technological development, innovation and human vision in order to attain full achievement. Increasingly more often, the majority of industries is using 3D sequences (three dimensional). 3D represented graphics, commercials and special effects from movies are all designed in 3D. The key for attaining real visual effects is to successfully combine various distinct elements: characters, objects, images and video scenes; like all these elements represent a whole that works in perfect harmony. This article aims to exhibit a game design from these days. Considering the advanced technology and futuristic vision of designers, nowadays we have different and multifarious game models. Special effects are decisively contributing in the creation of a realistic three-dimensional scene. These effects are essential for transmitting the emotional state of the scene. Creating the special effects is a work of finesse in order to achieve high quality scenes. Special effects can be used to get the attention of the onlooker on an object from a scene. Out of the conducted study, the best-selling game of the year 2010 was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. This way, the article aims for the presented scene to be similar with many locations from this type of games, more

  8. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-07-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  9. Contact Effects in thin 3D-Topological Insulators: How does the current flow?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Gaurav; Jalil, Mansoor Bin Abdul; Liang, Gengchiau

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different contact configurations (semi-infinite extended-channel, normal metal and ferromagnetic metal) on quantum transport through thin Bi2Se3 three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) slab (channel) has been investigated through Non-Equilibrium Green Function. The issue of contact dependent current flow and distribution across quintuple layers of 3D-TI has been addressed in this work and applied to expound the explanation for recent experimental work on electrical detection of spin-momentum locking on topological surface for long channel device. A theoretical model is propounded to develop a microscopic understanding of transport in 3D-TI in which contact type and magnetization concur with helical surface states of the TI channel to manifest seemingly counter-intuitive current distribution across layers. The quantum transport calculations for short channel devices with magnetic source and drain contacts postulate negative surface current for anti-phase magnetization whose axis is transverse to both current and quintuple layers. For in-phase magnetization at the two terminals, it is shown that observations can change fundamentally to result in anomalous current distribution. Such results are explained to stem from the confinement of 3D-TI between ferromagnetic contacts along the transport direction. A simple mechanism to validate topological insulators via quantum transport experiments has also been suggested. PMID:25820460

  10. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of 3D-printed PLA-based porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Senatov, F S; Niaza, K V; Zadorozhnyy, M Yu; Maksimkin, A V; Kaloshkin, S D; Estrin, Y Z

    2016-04-01

    In the present work polylactide (PLA)/15wt% hydroxyapatite (HA) porous scaffolds with pre-modeled structure were obtained by 3D-printing by fused filament fabrication. Composite filament was obtained by extrusion. Mechanical properties, structural characteristics and shape memory effect (SME) were studied. Direct heating was used for activation of SME. The average pore size and porosity of the scaffolds were 700μm and 30vol%, respectively. Dispersed particles of HA acted as nucleation centers during the ordering of PLA molecular chains and formed an additional rigid fixed phase that reduced molecular mobility, which led to a shift of the onset of recovery stress growth from 53 to 57°C. A more rapid development of stresses was observed for PLA/HA composites with the maximum recovery stress of 3.0MPa at 70°C. Ceramic particles inhibited the growth of cracks during compression-heating-compression cycles when porous PLA/HA 3D-scaffolds recovered their initial shape. Shape recovery at the last cycle was about 96%. SME during heating may have resulted in "self-healing" of scaffold by narrowing the cracks. PLA/HA 3D-scaffolds were found to withstand up to three compression-heating-compression cycles without delamination. It was shown that PLA/15%HA porous scaffolds obtained by 3D-printing with shape recovery of 98% may be used as self-fitting implant for small bone defect replacement owing to SME.

  11. 3D-printing and the effect on medical costs: a new era?

    PubMed

    Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Kondiah, Pierre P D; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    3D-printing (3DP) is the art and science of printing in a new dimension using 3D printers to transform 3D computer aided designs (CAD) into life-changing products. This includes the design of more effective and patient-friendly pharmaceutical products as well as bio-inspired medical devices. It is poised as the next technology revolution for the pharmaceutical and medical-device industries. After decorous implementation scientists in collaboration with CAD designers have produced innovative medical devices ranging from pharmaceutical tablets to surgical transplants of the human face and skull, spinal implants, prosthetics, human organs and other biomaterials. While 3DP may be cost-efficient, a limitation exists in the availability of 3D printable biomaterials for most applications. In addition, the loss of skilled labor in producing medical devices such as prosthetics and other devices may affect developing economies. This review objectively explores the potential growth and impact of 3DP costs in the medical industry.

  12. The effectiveness of 3D animations to enhance understanding of cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Broadhurst, Henry; Clarke, Stephen P; Farrell, Michael; Bennett, David; Mosley, John R; Mellanby, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most important orthopedic diseases taught to veterinary undergraduates. The complexity of the anatomy of the canine stifle joint combined with the plethora of different surgical interventions available for the treatment of the disease means that undergraduate veterinary students often have a poor understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of CCL rupture. We designed, developed, and tested a three dimensional (3D) animation to illustrate the pertinent clinical anatomy of the stifle joint, the effects of CCL rupture, and the mechanisms by which different surgical techniques can stabilize the joint with CCL rupture. When compared with a non-animated 3D presentation, students' short-term retention of functional anatomy improved although they could not impart a better explanation of how different surgical techniques worked. More students found the animation useful than those who viewed a comparable non-animated 3D presentation. Multiple peer-review testing is required to maximize the usefulness of 3D animations during development. Free and open access to such tools should improve student learning and client understanding through wide-spread uptake and use. PMID:23475409

  13. Testing the Effectiveness of 3D Film for Laboratory-Based Studies of Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Bride, Daniel L.; Crowell, Sheila E.; Baucom, Brian R.; Kaufman, Erin A.; O'Connor, Caitlin G.; Skidmore, Chloe R.; Yaptangco, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Research in psychology and affective neuroscience often relies on film as a standardized and reliable method for evoking emotion. However, clip validation is not undertaken regularly. This presents a challenge for research with adolescent and young adult samples who are exposed routinely to high-definition (HD) three-dimensional (3D) stimuli and may not respond to older, validated film clips. Studies with young people inform understanding of emotional development, dysregulated affect, and psychopathology, making it critical to assess whether technological advances improve the study of emotion. In the present study, we examine whether 3D film is more evocative than 2D using a tightly controlled within-subjects design. Participants (n  =  408) viewed clips during a concurrent psychophysiological assessment. Results indicate that both 2D and 3D technology are highly effective tools for emotion elicitation. However, 3D does not add incremental benefit over 2D, even when individual differences in anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and novelty seeking are considered. PMID:25170878

  14. 3D-printing and the effect on medical costs: a new era?

    PubMed

    Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Kondiah, Pierre P D; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    3D-printing (3DP) is the art and science of printing in a new dimension using 3D printers to transform 3D computer aided designs (CAD) into life-changing products. This includes the design of more effective and patient-friendly pharmaceutical products as well as bio-inspired medical devices. It is poised as the next technology revolution for the pharmaceutical and medical-device industries. After decorous implementation scientists in collaboration with CAD designers have produced innovative medical devices ranging from pharmaceutical tablets to surgical transplants of the human face and skull, spinal implants, prosthetics, human organs and other biomaterials. While 3DP may be cost-efficient, a limitation exists in the availability of 3D printable biomaterials for most applications. In addition, the loss of skilled labor in producing medical devices such as prosthetics and other devices may affect developing economies. This review objectively explores the potential growth and impact of 3DP costs in the medical industry. PMID:26817398

  15. Testing the effectiveness of 3D film for laboratory-based studies of emotion.

    PubMed

    Bride, Daniel L; Crowell, Sheila E; Baucom, Brian R; Kaufman, Erin A; O'Connor, Caitlin G; Skidmore, Chloe R; Yaptangco, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Research in psychology and affective neuroscience often relies on film as a standardized and reliable method for evoking emotion. However, clip validation is not undertaken regularly. This presents a challenge for research with adolescent and young adult samples who are exposed routinely to high-definition (HD) three-dimensional (3D) stimuli and may not respond to older, validated film clips. Studies with young people inform understanding of emotional development, dysregulated affect, and psychopathology, making it critical to assess whether technological advances improve the study of emotion. In the present study, we examine whether 3D film is more evocative than 2D using a tightly controlled within-subjects design. Participants (n  =  408) viewed clips during a concurrent psychophysiological assessment. Results indicate that both 2D and 3D technology are highly effective tools for emotion elicitation. However, 3D does not add incremental benefit over 2D, even when individual differences in anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and novelty seeking are considered. PMID:25170878

  16. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-10-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  17. Testing the effectiveness of 3D film for laboratory-based studies of emotion.

    PubMed

    Bride, Daniel L; Crowell, Sheila E; Baucom, Brian R; Kaufman, Erin A; O'Connor, Caitlin G; Skidmore, Chloe R; Yaptangco, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Research in psychology and affective neuroscience often relies on film as a standardized and reliable method for evoking emotion. However, clip validation is not undertaken regularly. This presents a challenge for research with adolescent and young adult samples who are exposed routinely to high-definition (HD) three-dimensional (3D) stimuli and may not respond to older, validated film clips. Studies with young people inform understanding of emotional development, dysregulated affect, and psychopathology, making it critical to assess whether technological advances improve the study of emotion. In the present study, we examine whether 3D film is more evocative than 2D using a tightly controlled within-subjects design. Participants (n  =  408) viewed clips during a concurrent psychophysiological assessment. Results indicate that both 2D and 3D technology are highly effective tools for emotion elicitation. However, 3D does not add incremental benefit over 2D, even when individual differences in anxiety, emotion dysregulation, and novelty seeking are considered.

  18. Effects of camera location on the reconstruction of 3D flare trajectory with two cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özsaraç, Seçkin; Yeşilkaya, Muhammed

    2015-05-01

    Flares are used as valuable electronic warfare assets for the battle against infrared guided missiles. The trajectory of the flare is one of the most important factors that determine the effectiveness of the counter measure. Reconstruction of the three dimensional (3D) position of a point, which is seen by multiple cameras, is a common problem. Camera placement, camera calibration, corresponding pixel determination in between the images of different cameras and also the triangulation algorithm affect the performance of 3D position estimation. In this paper, we specifically investigate the effects of camera placement on the flare trajectory estimation performance by simulations. Firstly, 3D trajectory of a flare and also the aircraft, which dispenses the flare, are generated with simple motion models. Then, we place two virtual ideal pinhole camera models on different locations. Assuming the cameras are tracking the aircraft perfectly, the view vectors of the cameras are computed. Afterwards, using the view vector of each camera and also the 3D position of the flare, image plane coordinates of the flare on both cameras are computed using the field of view (FOV) values. To increase the fidelity of the simulation, we have used two sources of error. One is used to model the uncertainties in the determination of the camera view vectors, i.e. the orientations of the cameras are measured noisy. Second noise source is used to model the imperfections of the corresponding pixel determination of the flare in between the two cameras. Finally, 3D position of the flare is estimated using the corresponding pixel indices, view vector and also the FOV of the cameras by triangulation. All the processes mentioned so far are repeated for different relative camera placements so that the optimum estimation error performance is found for the given aircraft and are trajectories.

  19. Theoretical analysis and simulation of the influence of self-bunching effects and longitudinal space charge effects on the propagation of keV electron bunch produced by a novel S-band Micro-Pulse electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jifei; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhou, Kui; Yang, Ziqin; Yang, Deyu; Luo, Xing; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Yujia

    2016-06-01

    As an important electron source, Micro-Pulse electron Gun (MPG) which is qualified for producing high average current, short pulse, low emittance electron bunches steadily holds promise to use as an electron source of Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation (CSPR), Free Electron Laser (FEL). The stable output of S-band MPG has been achieved in many labs. To establish reliable foundation for the future application of it, the propagation of picosecond electron bunch produced by MPG should be studied in detail. In this article, the MPG which was working on the rising stage of total effective Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) curve was introduced. The self-bunching mechanism was discussed in depth both in the multipacting amplifying state and the steady working state. The bunch length broadening induced by the longitudinal space-charge (SC) effects was investigated by different theoretical models in different regions. The 2D PIC codes MAGIC and beam dynamic codes TraceWin simulations were also performed in the propagation. The result shows an excellent agreement between the simulation and the theoretical analysis for bunch length evolution.

  20. GIA models with composite rheology and 3D viscosity: effect on GRACE mass balance in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Whitehouse, Pippa; Schrama, Ernst

    2014-05-01

    Most Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) models that have been used to correct GRACE data for the influence of GIA assume a radial stratification of viscosity in the Earth's mantle (1D viscosity). Seismic data in Antarctica indicate that there are large viscosity variations in the horizontal direction (3D viscosity). The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of 3D viscosity on GIA model output, and hence mass balance estimates in Antarctica. We use a GIA model with 3D viscosity and composite rheology in combination with ice loading histories ICE-5G and W12a. From comparisons with uplift and sea-level data in Fennoscandia and North America three preferred viscosity models are selected. For two of the 3D viscosity models the maximum gravity rate due to ICE-5G forcing is located over the Ronne-Filchner ice shelf. This is in contrast with the results obtained using a 1D model, in which the maximum gravity rate due to ICE-5G forcing is always located over the Ross ice shelf. This demonstrates that not all 3D viscosity models can be approximated with a 1D viscosity model. Using CSR release 5 GRACE data from February 2003 to June 2013 mass balance estimates for the three preferred viscosity models are -131 to -171 Gt/year for the ICE-5G model, and -48 to -57 Gt/year for the W12a model. The range due to Earth model uncertainty is larger than the error bar for GRACE (10 Gt/year), but smaller than the range resulting from the difference in ice loading histories.

  1. Stress-induced Effects Caused by 3D IC TSV Packaging in Advanced Semiconductor Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, V.; Kteyan, A.; Choy, J.-H.; Hovsepyan, H.; Markosian, A.; Zschech, E.; Huebner, R.

    2011-11-10

    Potential challenges with managing mechanical stress and the consequent effects on device performance for advanced 3D through-silicon-via (TSV) based technologies are outlined. The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze a design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-die out-of-spec variations in device electrical characteristics caused by the layout and through-silicon-via (TSV)/package-induced mechanical stress. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities for 3D IC stacks and a strict ''good die'' requirement make this type of analysis critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation to assess the mechanical stress across the device layers in silicon chips stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology is proposed. A calibration technique based on fitting to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is presented. A strategy for generation of a simulation feeding data and respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. For model validation, high-resolution strain measurements in Si channels of the test-chip devices are needed. At the nanoscale, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is the only technique available for sub-10 nm strain measurements so far.

  2. Effects of stellar flybys on planetary systems: 3D modeling of the circumstellar disk's damping effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picogna, G.; Marzari, F.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Stellar flybys in star clusters are suspected of affecting the orbital architecture of planetary systems causing eccentricity excitation and orbital misalignment between the planet orbit and the equatorial plane of the star. Aims: We explore whether the impulsive changes in the orbital elements of planets, caused by a hyperbolic stellar flyby, can be fully damped by the circumstellar disk surrounding the star. The time required to disperse stellar clusters is comparable to the circumstellar disk's lifetime. Since we perform 3D simulations, we can also test the inclination, excitation, and damping. Methods: We have modeled in 3D with the SPH code VINE, a system made of a solar-type star surrounded by a low density disk with a giant planet embedded in it approached on a hyperbolic encounter trajectory by a second star of similar mass and with its own disk. Different inclinations between the disks, planet orbit, and star trajectory have been considered to explore various encounter geometries. We focus on an extreme configuration where a very deep stellar flyby perturbs a Jovian planet on an external orbit. This allows us to test in full the ability of the disk to erase the effects of the stellar encounter. Results: We find that the amount of mass lost by the disk during the stellar flyby is less than in 2D models where a single disk was considered. This is mostly related to the mass exchange between the two disks at the encounter. The damping in eccentricity is slightly faster than in 2D models and it occurs on timescales on the order of a few kyr. During the flyby both the disks are warped owing to the mutual interaction and to the stellar gravitational perturbations, but they quickly relax to a new orbital plane. The planet is quickly dragged back within the disk by the tidal interaction with the gas. The only trace of the flyby left in the planet system, after about 104 yr, is a small misalignment, lower than 9°, between the star equatorial plane and the

  3. Modeling the Impact of Drizzle and 3D Cloud Structure on Remote Sensing of Effective Radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Zinner, Tobias; Ackerman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of cloud particle size with passive sensors like MODIS is an important tool for cloud microphysical studies. As a measure of the radiatively relevant droplet size, effective radius can be retrieved with different combinations of visible through shortwave infrared channels. MODIS observations sometimes show significantly larger effective radii in marine boundary layer cloud fields derived from the 1.6 and 2.1 pm channel observations than for 3.7 pm retrievals. Possible explanations range from 3D radiative transport effects and sub-pixel cloud inhomogeneity to the impact of drizzle formation on the droplet distribution. To investigate the potential influence of these factors, we use LES boundary layer cloud simulations in combination with 3D Monte Carlo simulations of MODIS observations. LES simulations of warm cloud spectral microphysics for cases of marine stratus and broken stratocumulus, each for two different values of cloud condensation nuclei density, produce cloud structures comprising droplet size distributions with and without drizzle size drops. In this study, synthetic MODIS observations generated from 3D radiative transport simulations that consider the full droplet size distribution will be generated for each scene. The operational MODIS effective radius retrievals will then be applied to the simulated reflectances and the results compared with the LES microphysics.

  4. Effect of Random Geometric Uncertainty on the Computational Design of a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, C. R.; Newman, P. A.; Hou, G. J.-W.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of geometric uncertainty due to statistically independent, random, normally distributed shape parameters is demonstrated in the computational design of a 3-D flexible wing. A first-order second-moment statistical approximation method is used to propagate the assumed input uncertainty through coupled Euler CFD aerodynamic / finite element structural codes for both analysis and sensitivity analysis. First-order sensitivity derivatives obtained by automatic differentiation are used in the input uncertainty propagation. These propagated uncertainties are then used to perform a robust design of a simple 3-D flexible wing at supercritical flow conditions. The effect of the random input uncertainties is shown by comparison with conventional deterministic design results. Sample results are shown for wing planform, airfoil section, and structural sizing variables.

  5. 3D Cloud Effects in OCO-2 Observations - Evidence and Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Massie, Steven; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Okamura, Rintaro; Crisp, David

    2016-04-01

    In July 2014, the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite was inserted into the 705-km Afternoon Constellation (A-Train). OCO-2 provides estimates of column-averaged CO2 dry air mixing ratios (XCO2), based on high spectral resolution radiance observations of reflected sunlight in the O2 A-band and in the weak and strong absorption CO2 bands at 1.6 and 2.1 μm. The accuracy requirement for OCO-2 XCO2 retrievals is 1 ppmv on regional scales (> 1000 km). At the single sounding level, inhomogeneous clouds, surface albedo, and aerosols introduce wavelength-dependent perturbations into the sensed radiance fields, affecting the retrieval products. Scattering and shadowing by clouds outside of the field of view (FOV) may be a leading source of error for clear-sky XCO2 retrievals in partially cloudy regions. To understand these effects, we developed a 3D OCO-2 simulator, which uses observations by MODIS (also in the A-Train) and other scene information as input to simulate OCO-2 radiance spectra at the full wavelength resolution of the three bands. It is based on MCARaTS (Monte Carlo Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator) as the 3D radiative transfer solver. The OCO-2 3D simulator was applied to an observed scene near a Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) station. The 3D calculations reproduced the OCO-2 radiances, including the perturbations due to clouds, at the single sounding level. The analysis further suggests that clouds near an OCO-2 footprint leave systematic spectral imprints on the radiances, which could be parameterized to be included in the retrieval state vector. If successful, this new state vector element could account for 3D effects without the need for operational 3D radiative transfer calculations. This may be the starting point not only for the improved screening of low-level broken boundary layer clouds, but also for mitigating the effects of nearby clouds at the radiance level, thus improving the accuracy of retrievals in

  6. Dephasing effect on backscattering of helical surface states in 3D topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiwen; Jiang, Hua; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X C

    2014-07-25

    We analyze the dephasing effect on the backscattering behavior of the helical surface states in 3D topological insulators. We show that the combination of dephasing and impurity scattering can cause backscattering in the helical states. Especially for the charge impurity case, the backscattering cross section becomes extremely large around the Dirac point. This large backscattering behavior can lead to the anomalous "gaplike" features found in recent experiments [T. Sato et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 840 (2011)].

  7. A study of the 3D radiative transfer effect in cloudy atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okata, M.; Teruyuki, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of the effect of clouds in the atmosphere is a significant problem in the Earth's radiation budget study with their large uncertainties of microphysics and the optical properties. In this situation, we still need more investigations of 3D cloud radiative transer problems using not only models but also satellite observational data.For this purpose, we have developed a 3D-Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is implemented with various functions compatible with the OpenCLASTR R-Star radiation code for radiance and flux computation, i.e. forward and backward tracing routines, non-linear k-distribution parameterization (Sekiguchi and Nakajima, 2008) for broad band solar flux calculation, and DM-method for flux and TMS-method for upward radiance (Nakajima and Tnaka 1998). We also developed a Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as a method for a construction of 3D cloud field with MODIS/AQUA and CPR/CloudSat data. We then selected a best-matched radar reflectivity factor profile from the library for each of off-nadir pixels of MODIS where CPR profile is not available, by minimizing the deviation between library MODIS parameters and those at the pixel. In this study, we have used three cloud microphysical parameters as key parameters for the MIDPM, i.e. effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and top of cloud temperature, and estimated 3D cloud radiation budget. We examined the discrepancies between satellite observed and mode-simulated radiances and three cloud microphysical parameter's pattern for studying the effects of cloud optical and microphysical properties on the radiation budget of the cloud-laden atmospheres.

  8. Toward the establishment of design guidelines for effective 3D perspective interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzhugh, Elisabeth; Dixon, Sharon; Aleva, Denise; Smith, Eric; Ghrayeb, Joseph; Douglas, Lisa

    2009-05-01

    The propagation of information operation technologies, with correspondingly vast amounts of complex network information to be conveyed, significantly impacts operator workload. Information management research is rife with efforts to develop schemes to aid operators to identify, review, organize, and retrieve the wealth of available data. Data may take on such distinct forms as intelligence libraries, logistics databases, operational environment models, or network topologies. Increased use of taxonomies and semantic technologies opens opportunities to employ network visualization as a display mechanism for diverse information aggregations. The broad applicability of network visualizations is still being tested, but in current usage, the complexity of densely populated abstract networks suggests the potential utility of 3D. Employment of 2.5D in network visualization, using classic perceptual cues, creates a 3D experience within a 2D medium. It is anticipated that use of 3D perspective (2.5D) will enhance user ability to visually inspect large, complex, multidimensional networks. Current research for 2.5D visualizations demonstrates that display attributes, including color, shape, size, lighting, atmospheric effects, and shadows, significantly impact operator experience. However, guidelines for utilization of attributes in display design are limited. This paper discusses pilot experimentation intended to identify potential problem areas arising from these cues and determine how best to optimize perceptual cue settings. Development of optimized design guidelines will ensure that future experiments, comparing network displays with other visualizations, are not confounded or impeded by suboptimal attribute characterization. Current experimentation is anticipated to support development of cost-effective, visually effective methods to implement 3D in military applications.

  9. Effect of tow alignment on the mechanical performance of 3D woven textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Timothy L.; Allison, Patti; Baldwin, Jack W.; Gracias, Brian K.; Seesdorf, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) woven preforms are currently being considered for use as primary structural components. Lack of technology to properly manufacture, characterize and predict mechanical properties, and predict damage mechanisms leading to failure are problems facing designers of textile composite materials. Two material systems with identical specifications but different manufacturing approaches are investigated. One manufacturing approach resulted in an irregular (nonuniform) preform geometry. The other approach yielded the expected preform geometry (uniform). The objectives are to compare the mechanical properties of the uniform and nonuniform angle interlock 3D weave constructions. The effect of adding layers of laminated tape to the outer surfaces of the textile preform is also examined. Damage mechanisms are investigated and test methods are evaluated.

  10. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  11. Effects of plasma rotation in reconstructed 3-D equilibria for DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingen, A.; Shafer, M. W.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Hillis, D. L.; Lao, L.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2015-11-01

    A technique for tokamak equilibrium reconstructions when weakly 3-D fields (δB/B ~ 10-3) are applied is used for inner-wall-limited DIII-D discharges. The technique couples diagnostics to the non-linear, ideal MHD equilibrium solver VMEC, using the V3FIT code, to find the most likely 3-D equilibrium based on a suite of measurements. Observations at DIII-D show that plasma rotation larger than 20 krad/s changes the relative phase between the applied 3-D fields and the measured plasma response. Numerical simulations of linear, resistive, 2-fluid MHD show, that large plasma rotation increases flux surface corrugations1. Discharges with low averaged (~10 krad/s) and peaked rotation profiles (~40 krad/s) are reconstructed. Similarities and differences to forward modeled VMEC equilibria, which do not include rotational effects, are shown. The resulting significance of including rotational effects in VMEC is discussed. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  12. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  13. Effect of HDAC Inhibitors on Corneal Keratocyte Mechanical Phenotypes in 3-D Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Lakshman, Neema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC) have been shown to inhibit the TGFβ-induced myofibroblast transformation of corneal fibroblasts in 2-D culture. However, the effect of HDAC inhibitors on keratocyte spreading, contraction, and matrix remodeling in 3-D culture has not been directly assessed. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the HDAC inhibitors Trichostatin A (TSA) and Vorinostat (SAHA) on corneal keratocyte mechanical phenotypes in 3-D culture using defined serum-free culture conditions. Methods: Rabbit corneal keratocytes were plated within standard rat tail type I collagen matrices (2.5 mg/ml) or compressed collagen matrices (~100 mg/ml) and cultured for up to 4 days in serum-free media, PDGF BB, TGFβ1, and either 50 nM TSA, 10 μM SAHA, or vehicle (DMSO). F-actin, α-SM-actin, and collagen fibrils were imaged using confocal microscopy. Cell morphology and global matrix contraction were quantified digitally. The expression of α-SM-actin was assessed using western blotting. Results: Corneal keratocytes in 3-D matrices had a quiescent mechanical phenotype, as indicated by a dendritic morphology, a lack of stress fibers, and minimal cell-induced matrix remodeling. This phenotype was generally maintained following the addition of TSA or SAHA. TGFβ1 induced a contractile phenotype, as indicated by a loss of dendritic cell processes, the development of stress fibers, and significant matrix compaction. In contrast, cells cultured in TGFβ1 plus TSA or SAHA remained dendritic and did not form stress fibers or induce ECM compaction. Western blotting showed that the expression of α-SM actin after treatment with TGFβ1 was inhibited by TSA and SAHA. PDGF BB stimulated the elongation of keratocytes and the extension of dendritic processes within 3-D matrices without inducing stress fiber formation or collagen reorganization. This spreading response was maintained in the presence of TSA or SAHA. Conclusions: Overall, HDAC inhibitors

  14. Effect of the cathode on the 3D plume distribution of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Liqiu; Liang Wei; Fan Jinrui; Zhang Chaohai; Zhao Yequan; Yu Daren

    2012-09-15

    A Hall thruster usually has a symmetric cylindrical structure with the cathode placed on the outlet along a particular radial direction. In order to evaluate the effect of the nonaxisymmetric location of the cathode on the plume distribution, the 3D ion current density distribution was measured and the plume deflection angles were defined. Experimental results show that high electron density near the cathode would cause plume deflection angles along a radial direction toward the cathode. The effect of the cathode's nonaxisymmetric location upon the discharge's axisymmetric characteristics is an important physical problem, which deserves emphasizing.

  15. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for coherent radiation generation

    DOE PAGES

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2016-03-03

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. It was pointed out, however, that such \\micro-bunching instabilities" could be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we augment these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program elegant. This high-fidelity model of the space charge ismore » used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We then employ the developed model to optimize the performance of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab.« less

  16. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods.

    PubMed

    van Velden, Floris H P; Kloet, Reina W; van Berckel, Bart N M; Wolfensberger, Saskia P A; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-06-21

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  17. Comparison of 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction algorithms for High-Resolution Research Tomograph studies: effects of randoms estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velden, Floris H. P.; Kloet, Reina W.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Wolfensberger, Saskia P. A.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Boellaard, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    The High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) is a dedicated human brain positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Recently, a 3D filtered backprojection (3D-FBP) reconstruction method has been implemented to reduce bias in short duration frames, currently observed in 3D ordinary Poisson OSEM (3D-OP-OSEM) reconstructions. Further improvements might be expected using a new method of variance reduction on randoms (VRR) based on coincidence histograms instead of using the delayed window technique (DW) to estimate randoms. The goal of this study was to evaluate VRR in combination with 3D-OP-OSEM and 3D-FBP reconstruction techniques. To this end, several phantom studies and a human brain study were performed. For most phantom studies, 3D-OP-OSEM showed higher accuracy of observed activity concentrations with VRR than with DW. However, both positive and negative deviations in reconstructed activity concentrations and large biases of grey to white matter contrast ratio (up to 88%) were still observed as a function of scan statistics. Moreover 3D-OP-OSEM+VRR also showed bias up to 64% in clinical data, i.e. in some pharmacokinetic parameters as compared with those obtained with 3D-FBP+VRR. In the case of 3D-FBP, VRR showed similar results as DW for both phantom and clinical data, except that VRR showed a better standard deviation of 6-10%. Therefore, VRR should be used to correct for randoms in HRRT PET studies.

  18. Effect of orthodontic debonding and residual adhesive removal on 3D enamel microroughness

    PubMed Central

    Tomkowski, Robert; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Stepien, Piotr; Szatkiewicz, Tomasz; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    scale-limited surface). Discussion Confocal laser microscopy allowed 3D surface analysis of enamel surface, avoiding the limitations of contact profilometry. Tungsten carbide burs are the most popular adhesive removing tools, however, the results of the present study indicate, that a one step polisher and finisher as well as Adhesive Residue Remover are less detrimental to the enamel. This is in agreement with a recent study based on direct 3D scanning enamel surface. It proved, that a one-step finisher and polisher as well as Adhesive Residue Remover are characterized by a similar effectiveness in removing residual remnants as tungsten carbide bur, but they remove significantly less enamel. Conclusion Orthodontic debonding and removal of adhesive remnants increases enamel roughness. The smoothest surfaces were achieved using Adhesive Residue Remover, and the roughest using tungsten carbide bur. PMID:27761343

  19. Suppression of parasitic space-charge oscillations in a gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louksha, O. I.; Piosczyk, B.; Sominski, G. G.; Thumm, M.; Samsonov, D. B.

    2006-10-01

    We study the influence of nonuniform electric and magnetic fields in the helical-beam compression region on the low-frequency parasitic space-charge oscillations for a moderate-power (˜ 100 kW) 4-mm gyrotron. Suppression of the oscillations is achieved by optimization of both the cathode-unit geometry in the magnetron-injector gun and the magnetic-field distribution in the region near the cavity input. The obtained data are evidence of possible effective operation of the gyrotron at elevated pitch-factor values α > 1.5 even for emitters with no highest emission uniformity (δje ≈ 30%).

  20. 3D Effects in the Formation of Zonal Jets Through Inverse Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Showman, A. P.

    2006-09-01

    The atmospheric zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn are characterized by the broad, prograde, equatorial jet and the narrower, higher-latitude jets that alternate between prograde and retrograde. The question of what controls the widths and directions of those jets remains a major unsolved problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. Past studies have shown that, in shallow flows on a rotating sphere, small random vortices can undergo inverse cascade to form zonal jets with a characteristic width called the Rhines scale. Most of the studies to date use 2D non-divergent or shallow-water models in studying this zonal jet formation mechanism. However, in the parameter ranges representative of the Jovian conditions, the flows produced by 2D non-divergent models are typically dominated by strong circumpolar jets, and the shallow-water models produce a robust retrograde equatorial jet. These models' apparent inabilities in reproducing some key Jovian jet features may suggest the importance of 3D effects in controlling the jets' large-scale horizontal structures. To date, Kitamura and Matsuda (Fluid Dynamics Research, 34, 33-57, 2004) is the only published study that analyzes the 3D effects in the zonalization of fine-scale random turbulence through the inverse cascade. Their two-layer primitive equation simulations of free-evolving flows resulted in circumpolar jet dominated flows, although slower mid-latitude jets are also present. Our study is a significant extension over that by Kitamura and Matsuda and includes substantially more layers to study the zonalization process to more fully resolve relevant 3D effects in the inverse cascade. We test the flow behavior's dependence on the deformation radius and the resulting vertical structures in both spherical and beta-plane geometries. Our study uses the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling et al, Icarus, 32, 221-238., 1998). The research is supported by a NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant to APS.

  1. 3D Effects in the Formation of Zonal Jets Through Inverse Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    The atmospheric zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn are characterized by the broad, prograde, equatorial jet and the narrower, higher-latitude jets that alternate between prograde and retrograde. The question of what controls the widths and directions of those jets remains a major unsolved problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. Past studies have shown that, in shallow flows on a rotating sphere, small random vortices can undergo inverse cascade to form zonal jets with a characteristic width called the Rhines scale. Most of the studies to date use 2D non-divergent or shallow-water models in studying this zonal jet formation mechanism. However, in the parameter ranges representative of the Jovian conditions, the flows produced by 2D non- divergent models are typically dominated by strong circumpolar jets, and the shallow-water models produce a robust retrograde equatorial jet. These models' apparent inabilities in reproducing some key Jovian jet features may suggest the importance of 3D effects in controlling the jets' large-scale horizontal structures. To date, Kitamura and Matsuda (Fluid Dynamics Research, 34, 33-57, 2004) is the only published study that analyzes the 3D effects in the zonalization of fine-scale random turbulence through the inverse cascade. Their two-layer primitive equation simulations of free-evolving flows resulted in circumpolar jet dominated flows, although slower mid-latitude jets are also present. Our study is a significant extension over that by Kitamura and Matsuda and includes substantially more layers to study the zonalization process to more fully resolve relevant 3D effects in the inverse cascade. We test the flow behavior's dependence on the deformation radius and the resulting vertical structures in both spherical and beta-plane geometries. Our study uses the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling et al, Icarus, 32, 221-238., 1998). The research is supported by a NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant to APS.

  2. Reconstructing the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint; Munshi, Dipak

    2014-07-01

    The thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect measures the line-of-sight projection of the thermal pressure of free electrons and lacks any redshift information. By cross-correlating the tSZ effect with an external cosmological tracer, we can recover a good fraction of this lost information. Weak lensing (WL) is thought to provide an unbiased probe of the dark Universe, with many WL surveys having sky coverage that overlaps with tSZ surveys. Generalizing the tomographic approach, we advocate the use of the spherical Fourier-Bessel expansion to perform an analysis of the cross-correlation between the projected (2D) tSZ Compton y-parameter maps and 3D WL convergence maps. We use redshift-dependent linear biasing and the halo model as a tool to investigate the tSZ-WL cross-correlations in 3D. We use the Press-Schechter and the Sheth-Tormen mass functions in our calculations, finding that the results are quite sensitive to detailed modelling. We provide detailed analysis of surveys with photometric and spectroscopic redshifts. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the cross-spectra {C}_{ℓ} (k) for individual 3D modes, defined by the radial and tangential wave numbers (k; ℓ), remains comparable to, but below, unity though optimal binning is expected to improve this. The results presented can be generalized to analyse other cosmic microwave background secondaries, such as the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.

  3. Evaluation of space charge effects in the second vacuum stage of a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer by planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmund, Alisa J.; Bergeson, Scott D.; Lyon, Mary; Taylor, Nicholas; Kalinitchenko, Iouri; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of matrix on the formation and focusing of a Ca ion beam in the second vacuum stage of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer has been evaluated with the use of planar laser induced fluorescence. A cross section of the beam was imaged near the entrance to the mass analyzer of a commercial instrument. Characteristics of the beam from a solution containing only the Ca analyte closely matched those predicted by simulation software. The individual addition of three matrix species, Mg, Cs, and Pb, had minor effect on beam shape. Cs and Pb both affected the beam trajectory. The most pronounced effect was with the Pb matrix, which caused an order-of-magnitude drop in the Ca signal intensity at the electron multiplier of the mass spectrometer. The loss in signal was due primarily to a shift in the direction and location of the Ca ion beam that caused it to miss the entrance into the mass analyzer.

  4. Effects of a weakly 3-D equilibrium on ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C. C.

    2014-07-15

    The effect of a small three-dimensional equilibrium distortion on an otherwise axisymmetric configuration is shown to be destabilizing to ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes. The calculations assume that the 3-D fields are weak and that shielding physics is present so that no islands appear in the resulting equilibrium. An eigenfunction that has coupled harmonics of different toroidal mode number is constructed using a perturbation approach. The theory is applied to the case of tokamak H-modes with shielded resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) present indicating RMPs can be destabilizing to intermediate-n peeling-ballooning modes.

  5. Femtosecond pulsed light polarization induced effects in direct laser writing 3D nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Jonavičius, Tomas; Gailevičius, Darius; Mizeikis, Vygantas; Gamaly, Eugene; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how the coupling between (i) polarization of the writing laser beam, (ii) tight focusing and (iii) heat conduction affects the size, shape and absorption in the laser-affected area and therefore the polymerization process. It is possible to control the sizes of 3D laser-produced structure at the scale of several nanometers. Specifically we were able to tune the aspect ratio of 3D suspended line up to 20% in hybrid SZ2080 resist. The focal spot of tightly focused linearly polarized beam has an elliptical form with the long axis in the field direction. It is shown here that this effect is enhanced by increase in the electronic heat conduction when polarization coincide with temperature gradient along with the absorption. Overlapping of three effects (i- iii) results in the difference of several tens of nanometers between two axes of the focal ellipse. Narrow line appears when polarization and scan direction coincide, while the wide line is produced when these directions are perpendicular to each other. The effect scales with the laser intensity giving a possibility to control the width of the structure on nanometer scale as demonstrated experimentally in this work. These effects are of general nature and can be observed in any laser-matter interaction experiments where plasma produced by using tight focusing of linear-polarized light.

  6. Effect of Frictions on the Ballistic Performance of a 3D Warp Interlock Fabric: Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha-Minh, Cuong; Boussu, François; Kanit, Toufik; Crépin, David; Imad, Abdellatif

    2012-06-01

    3D interlock woven fabrics are promising materials to replace the 2D structures in the field of ballistic protection. The structural complexity of this material caused many difficulties in numerical modeling. This paper presents a new tool that permits to generate a geometry model of any woven fabric, then, mesh this model in shell or solid elements, and apply the mechanical properties of yarns to them. The tool shows many advantages over existing software. It is very handy in use with an organization of the functions in menu and using a graphic interface. It can describe correctly the geometry of all textile woven fabrics. With this tool, the orientation of the local axes of finite elements following the yarn direction facilitates defining the yarn mechanical properties in a numerical model. This tool can be largely applied because it is compatible with popular finite element codes such as Abaqus, Ansys, Radioss etc. Thanks to this tool, a finite element model was carried out to describe a ballistic impact on a 3D warp interlock Kevlar KM2® fabric. This work focuses on studying the effect of friction onto the ballistic impact behavior of this textile interlock structure. Results showed that the friction among yarns affects considerably on the impact behavior of this fabric. The effect of the friction between projectile and yarn is less important. The friction plays an important role in keeping the fabric structural stability during the impact event. This phenomenon explained why the projectile is easier to penetrate this 3D warp interlock fabric in the no-friction case. This result also indicates that the ballistic performance of the interlock woven fabrics can be improved by using fibers with great friction coefficients.

  7. Space charge and screening in bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B; Straley, Joseph P; Abrams, Daniel L

    2016-11-30

    Undoped bilayer graphene is a two-dimensional semimetal with a low-energy excitation spectrum that is parabolic in the momentum. As a result, the screening of an arbitrary external charge Ze is accompanied by a reconstruction of the ground state: valence band electrons (for Z  >  0) are promoted to form a space charge around the charge while the holes leave the physical picture. The outcome is a flat neutral object resembling the regular atom except that for [Formula: see text] it is described by a strictly linear Thomas-Fermi theory. This theory also predicts that the bilayer's static dielectric constant is the same as that of a two-dimensional electron gas in the long-wavelength limit. PMID:27636158

  8. Space charge and screening in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.; Abrams, Daniel L.

    2016-11-01

    Undoped bilayer graphene is a two-dimensional semimetal with a low-energy excitation spectrum that is parabolic in the momentum. As a result, the screening of an arbitrary external charge Ze is accompanied by a reconstruction of the ground state: valence band electrons (for Z  >  0) are promoted to form a space charge around the charge while the holes leave the physical picture. The outcome is a flat neutral object resembling the regular atom except that for Z\\gg 1 it is described by a strictly linear Thomas-Fermi theory. This theory also predicts that the bilayer’s static dielectric constant is the same as that of a two-dimensional electron gas in the long-wavelength limit.

  9. Loading mode dependent effective properties of octet-truss lattice structures using 3D-printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challapalli, Adithya

    Cellular materials, often called lattice materials, are increasingly receiving attention for their ultralight structures with high specific strength, excellent impact absorption, acoustic insulation, heat dissipation media and compact heat exchangers. In alignment with emerging additive manufacturing (AM) technology, realization of the structural applications of the lattice materials appears to be becoming faster. Considering the direction dependent material properties of the products with AM, by directionally dependent printing resolution, effective moduli of lattice structures appear to be directionally dependent. In this paper, a constitutive model of a lattice structure, which is an octet-truss with a base material having an orthotropic material property considering AM is developed. In a case study, polyjet based 3D printing material having an orthotropic property with a 9% difference in the principal direction provides difference in the axial and shear moduli in the octet-truss by 2.3 and 4.6%. Experimental validation for the effective properties of a 3D printed octet-truss is done for uniaxial tension and compression test. The theoretical value based on the micro-buckling of truss member are used to estimate the failure strength. Modulus value appears a little overestimate compared with the experiment. Finite element (FE) simulations for uniaxial compression and tension of octettruss lattice materials are conducted. New effective properties for the octet-truss lattice structure are developed considering the observed behavior of the octet-truss structure under macroscopic compression and tension trough simulations.

  10. Effects of scanning orientation on outlier formation in 3D laser scanning of reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutao; Feng, Hsi-Yung

    2016-06-01

    Inspecting objects with reflective surfaces using 3D laser scanning is a demanded but challenging part inspection task due to undesirable specular reflections, which produce extensive outliers in the scanned point cloud. These outliers need to be removed in order to alleviate subsequent data processing issues. Many existing automatic outlier removal methods do not detect outliers according to the outlier formation properties. As a result, these methods only offer limited capabilities in removing extensive and complex outliers from scanning objects with reflective surfaces. This paper reports an empirical study which experimentally investigates the outlier formation characteristics in relation to the scanning orientation of the laser probe. The objective is to characterize the scanning orientation effects on outlier formation in order to facilitate the development of an effective outlier detection and removal method. Such an experimental investigation was hardly done before. It has been found in this work that scanning orientation can directly affect outlier extensity and occurrence in 3D laser scanning. A general guidance on proper scan path planning can then be provided with an aim to reduce the occurrence of outliers. Further, the observed dependency of outlier formation on scanning orientation can be exploited to facilitate effective and automatic outlier detection and removal.

  11. Effect of sterilization on structural and material properties of 3-D silk fibroin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Stok, Kathryn S; Kohler, Thomas; Meinel, Anne J; Müller, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The development of porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications requires the careful choice of properties, as these influence cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Sterilization of scaffolds is a prerequisite for in vitro culture as well as for subsequent in vivo implantation. The variety of methods used to provide sterility is as diverse as the possible effects they can have on the structural and material properties of the three-dimensional (3-D) porous structure, especially in polymeric or proteinous scaffold materials. Silk fibroin (SF) has previously been demonstrated to offer exceptional benefits over conventional synthetic and natural biomaterials in generating scaffolds for tissue replacements. This study sought to determine the effect of sterilization methods, such as autoclaving, heat-, ethylene oxide-, ethanol- or antibiotic-antimycotic treatment, on porous 3-D SF scaffolds. In terms of scaffold morphology, topography, crystallinity and short-term cell viability, the different sterilization methods showed only few effects. Nevertheless, mechanical properties were significantly decreased by a factor of two by all methods except for dry autoclaving, which seemed not to affect mechanical properties compared to the native control group. These data suggest that SF scaffolds are in general highly resistant to various sterilization treatments. Nevertheless, care should be taken if initial mechanical properties are of interest.

  12. Effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of 3D steel buildings with PMRF.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

    2014-01-01

    The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions.

  13. Effect of Damping and Yielding on the Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings with PMRF

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

    2014-01-01

    The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions. PMID:25097892

  14. Effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of 3D steel buildings with PMRF.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Haldar, Achintya; Rodelo-López, Ramon Eduardo; Bojórquez, Eden

    2014-01-01

    The effect of viscous damping and yielding, on the reduction of the seismic responses of steel buildings modeled as three-dimensional (3D) complex multidegree of freedom (MDOF) systems, is studied. The reduction produced by damping may be larger or smaller than that of yielding. This reduction can significantly vary from one structural idealization to another and is smaller for global than for local response parameters, which in turn depends on the particular local response parameter. The uncertainty in the estimation is significantly larger for local response parameter and decreases as damping increases. The results show the limitations of the commonly used static equivalent lateral force procedure where local and global response parameters are reduced in the same proportion. It is concluded that estimating the effect of damping and yielding on the seismic response of steel buildings by using simplified models may be a very crude approximation. Moreover, the effect of yielding should be explicitly calculated by using complex 3D MDOF models instead of estimating it in terms of equivalent viscous damping. The findings of this paper are for the particular models used in the study. Much more research is needed to reach more general conclusions. PMID:25097892

  15. Space-charge-dominated mass spectrometry ion sources: Modeling and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Busman, M; Sunner, J; Vogel, C R

    1991-01-01

    The factors determining the sensitivity of space-charge-dominated (SCD) unipolar ion sources, such as electrospray (ESP) and corona atmospheric pressure ionization (API) have been studied theoretically. The most important parameters are the ion density and ion drift time in the vicinity of the sampling orifice. These are obtained by solving a system of differential equations, "the space-charge problem." For some simple geometries, analytical solutions are known. For a more realistic "needle-in-can" geometry, a solution to the space-charge problem was obtained using a finite-element method. The results illustrate some general characteristics of SCD ion sources. It is shown that for typical operating conditions the minimum voltage required to overcome the space-charge effect in corona API or ESP ion sources constitutes a dominant or significant fraction of total applied voltage. Further, the electric field and the ion density in the region of the ion-sampling orifice as well as the ion residence time in the source are determined mainly by the space charge. Finally, absolute sensitivities of corona API ion sources were calculated by using a geometry-independent treatment of space charge.

  16. Flexible membranes of Ag-nanosheet-grafted polyamide-nanofibers as effective 3D SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yiwu; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhu, Chuhong; Huang, Zhulin; Sun, Kexi; Chen, Bin

    2014-04-01

    We report on a synthetic approach to produce self-supported flexible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active membranes consisting of polyamide (PA) nanofibers grafted with vertical Ag-nanosheets, via a combinatorial process of electrospinning PA-nanofiber membranes, assembling Au-nanoparticles on the PA-nanofibers as seeds for subsequent growth of Ag-nanosheets, and electrodepositing Ag-nanosheets on the electrospun PA-nanofibers. As a high density of Ag-nanosheets are vertically grown around each PA-nanofiber in the three-dimensional (3D) networked PA-nanofiber membranes, homogeneous nano-scaled gaps between the neighboring Ag-nanosheets are formed, leading to a high density of 3D SERS ``hot spots'' within the Ag-nanosheet-grafted PA-nanofiber membranes. The Ag-nanosheet-grafted PA-nanofiber membranes demonstrate high SERS activity with excellent Raman signal reproducibility for rhodamine 6G over the whole membrane. For a SERS-based trial analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a kind of global environmental hazard), the 3D SERS substrate membranes are modified with mono-6-β-cychlodextrin to effectively capture PCB molecules. As a result, not only a low concentration down to 10-6 M is reached, but also two congeners of PCBs in their mixed solution are identified, showing promising potential in SERS-based rapid detection of trace organic pollutants such as PCBs in the environment.We report on a synthetic approach to produce self-supported flexible surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active membranes consisting of polyamide (PA) nanofibers grafted with vertical Ag-nanosheets, via a combinatorial process of electrospinning PA-nanofiber membranes, assembling Au-nanoparticles on the PA-nanofibers as seeds for subsequent growth of Ag-nanosheets, and electrodepositing Ag-nanosheets on the electrospun PA-nanofibers. As a high density of Ag-nanosheets are vertically grown around each PA-nanofiber in the three-dimensional (3D) networked PA

  17. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and tunable topological states in 3d transition metals doped silicene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Lan-Feng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Silicene is an intriguing 2D topological material which is closely analogous to graphene but with stronger spin orbit coupling effect and natural compatibility with current silicon-based electronics industry. Here we demonstrate that silicene decorated with certain 3d transition metals (Vanadium) can sustain a stable quantum anomalous Hall effect using both analytical model and first-principles Wannier interpolation. We also predict the quantum valley Hall effect and electrically tunable topological states could be realized in certain transition metal doped silicene where the energy band inversion occurs. Our findings provide new scheme for the realization of quantum anomalous Hall effect and platform for electrically controllable topological states which are highly desirable for future nanoelectronics and spintronics application. PMID:24105063

  18. Spectral Element Modeling of 3D Site Effects in the Alpine Valley of Grenoble, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, E.; Cornou, C.; Gueguen, P.; Causse, M.; Komatitsch, D.

    2004-12-01

    Sitting on top of a 3D Y-shaped basin filled mostly with late quaternary deposits, the city of Grenoble (French Alps) is subject to strong amplification of seismic motion (see the SISMOVALP web site). In order to assess the magnitude and 3D complexity of these site effects, we propose a spectral element modeling approach previously applied to the prediction of strong ground motion in the Los Angeles sedimentary basin (Komatitstch et al., 2004). The spectral element method naturally accounts for depth variations of the free surface and of internal interfaces, such as the contact between the sediments and the bedrock. It is also well suited to model the propagation of surface waves generated at the basin edges. The 3D spectral element mesh honors the stiff surface topography of the mountains surrounding the city, as well as the bedrock depth obtained from extensive gravimetric measurements. In the basin, we use a generic 1D velocity model derived from geophysical measurements performed in a deep borehole that reached the substratum at 550 m depth in 1999. Results and comparison to data are shown in the time and frequency domain for small-size (Mw=2.5 and Mw=3.5) local events recorded in the past years. Then, a Mw=5.5 strike-slip event is simulated on the eastern border of the basin along the Belledonne fault, and the results are compared to those obtained by the method of Empirical Green Functions. References: http://www-lgit.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr/sismovalp/ Simulations of ground motion in the Los Angeles basin based upon the spectral- element method, Dimitri Komatitsch, Qinya Liu, Jeroen Tromp, Peter Süss, Christiane Stidham and John H. Shaw, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, vol. 94, p 187-206 (2004).

  19. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  20. Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings considering the Effect of PR Connections and Gravity Frames

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J. Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  1. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization.

    PubMed

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-01-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction-diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction-diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models. PMID:27345945

  2. Seismic response of 3D steel buildings considering the effect of PR connections and gravity frames.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Edén; Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system.

  3. Seismic response of 3D steel buildings considering the effect of PR connections and gravity frames.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Edén; Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  4. Effects of 3D geometries on cellular gradient sensing and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spill, Fabian; Andasari, Vivi; Mak, Michael; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-06-01

    During cell migration, cells become polarized, change their shape, and move in response to various internal and external cues. Cell polarization is defined through the spatio-temporal organization of molecules such as PI3K or small GTPases, and is determined by intracellular signaling networks. It results in directional forces through actin polymerization and myosin contractions. Many existing mathematical models of cell polarization are formulated in terms of reaction–diffusion systems of interacting molecules, and are often defined in one or two spatial dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a 3D reaction–diffusion model of interacting molecules in a single cell, and find that cell geometry has an important role affecting the capability of a cell to polarize, or change polarization when an external signal changes direction. Our results suggest a geometrical argument why more roundish cells can repolarize more effectively than cells which are elongated along the direction of the original stimulus, and thus enable roundish cells to turn faster, as has been observed in experiments. On the other hand, elongated cells preferentially polarize along their main axis even when a gradient stimulus appears from another direction. Furthermore, our 3D model can accurately capture the effect of binding and unbinding of important regulators of cell polarization to and from the cell membrane. This spatial separation of membrane and cytosol, not possible to capture in 1D or 2D models, leads to marked differences of our model from comparable lower-dimensional models.

  5. Effects of Verbal Components in 3D Talking-Head on Pronunciation Learning among Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Ahmad Zamzuri Mohamad; Segaran, Kogilathah; Hoe, Tan Wee

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the benefit of inclusion of various verbal elements in 3D talking-head on pronunciation learning among non-native speakers. In particular, the study examines the effects of three different multimedia presentation strategies in 3D talking-head Mobile-Assisted-Language-Learning (MALL) on the learning…

  6. The Effects of 3D Computer Modelling on Conceptual Change about Seasons and Phases of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucukozer, Huseyin

    2008-01-01

    In this study, prospective science teachers' misconceptions about the seasons and the phases of the Moon were determined, and then the effects of 3D computer modelling on their conceptual changes were investigated. The topics were covered in two classes with a total of 76 students using a predict-observe-explain strategy supported by 3D computer…

  7. Are There Side Effects to Watching 3D Movies? A Prospective Crossover Observational Study on Visually Induced Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Solimini, Angelo G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity of commercial movies showing three dimensional (3D) images has raised concern about possible adverse side effects on viewers. Methods and Findings A prospective carryover observational study was designed to assess the effect of exposure (3D vs. 2D movie views) on self reported symptoms of visually induced motion sickness. The standardized Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was self administered on a convenience sample of 497 healthy adult volunteers before and after the vision of 2D and 3D movies. Viewers reporting some sickness (SSQ total score>15) were 54.8% of the total sample after the 3D movie compared to 14.1% of total sample after the 2D movie. Symptom intensity was 8.8 times higher than baseline after exposure to 3D movie (compared to the increase of 2 times the baseline after the 2D movie). Multivariate modeling of visually induced motion sickness as response variables pointed out the significant effects of exposure to 3D movie, history of car sickness and headache, after adjusting for gender, age, self reported anxiety level, attention to the movie and show time. Conclusions Seeing 3D movies can increase rating of symptoms of nausea, oculomotor and disorientation, especially in women with susceptible visual-vestibular system. Confirmatory studies which include examination of clinical signs on viewers are needed to pursue a conclusive evidence on the 3D vision effects on spectators. PMID:23418530

  8. Eliminating the dose-rate effect in a radiochromic silicone-based 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, E. M.; Balling, P.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Skyt, P. S.

    2015-07-01

    Comprehensive dose verification, such as 3D dosimetry, may be required for safe introduction and use of advanced treatment modalities in radiotherapy. A radiochromic silicone-based 3D dosimetry system has recently been suggested, though its clinical use has so far been limited by a considerable dose-rate dependency of the dose response. In this study we have investigated the dose-rate dependency with respect to the chemical composition of the dosimeter. We found that this dependency was reduced with increasing dye concentration, and the dose response was observed to be identical for dosimeters irradiated with 2 and 6 Gy min-1 at concentrations of 0.26% (w/w) dye and 1% (w/w) dye solvent. Furthermore, for the optimized dosimeter formulation, no dose-rate effect was observed due to the attenuation of the beam fluence with depth. However, the temporal stability of the dose response decreased with dye concentration; the response was reduced by (62  ±  1)% within approximately 20 h upon irradiation, at the optimal chemical composition and storage at room temperature. In conclusion, this study presents a chemical composition for a dose-rate independent silicone dosimeter which has considerably improved the clinical applicability of such dosimeters, but at the cost of a decreased stability.

  9. Effects of Matrix Alignment and Mechanical Constraints on Cellular Behavior in 3D Engineered Microtissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Prasenjit; Eyckmans, Jeroen; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    The adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular functions. The main building blocks of the ECM are 3D networks of fibrous proteins whose structure and alignments varies with tissue type. However, the impact of ECM alignment on cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, spreading, extension and mechanics remains poorly understood. We present results on the development of a microtissue-based system that enables control of the structure, orientation, and degree of fibrillar alignment in 3D fibroblast-populated collagen gels. The tissues self-assemble from cell-laden collagen gels placed in micro-fabricated wells containing sets of elastic pillars. The contractile action of the cells leads to controlled alignment of the fibrous collagen, depending on the number and location of the pillars in each well. The pillars are elastic, and are utilized to measure the contractile forces of the microtissues, and by incorporating magnetic material in selected pillars, time-varying forces can be applied to the tissues for dynamic stimulation and measurement of mechanical properties. Results on the effects of varying pillar shape, spacing, location, and stiffness on microtissue organization and contractility will be presented. This work is supported by NSF CMMI-1463011.

  10. More effective antimicrobial mastoparan derivatives, generated by 3D-QSAR-Almond and computational mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Buiu, Catalin; Borcan, Florin; Milac, Adina-Luminita

    2012-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are drugs used against a wide range of pathogens which present a great advantage: in contrast with antibiotics they do not develop resistance. The wide spectrum of antimicrobial peptides advertises them in the research and pharmaceutical industry as attractive starting points for obtaining new, more effective analogs. Here we predict the antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis (expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration values) for 33 mastoparan analogs and their new derivatives by a non-aligned 3D-QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationship) method. We establish the contribution to antimicrobial activity of molecular descriptors (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond donor and steric), correlated with contributions from the membrane environment (sodium, potassium, chloride). Our best QSAR models show significant cross-validated correlation q(2) (0.55-0.75), fitted correlation r(2) (greater than 0.90) coefficients and standard error of prediction SDEP (less than 0.250). Moreover, based on our most accurate 3D-QSAR models, we propose nine new mastoparan analogs, obtained by computational mutagenesis, some of them predicted to have significantly improved antimicrobial activity compared to the parent compound.

  11. Characterizing the effects of droplines on target acquisition performance on a 3-D perspective display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Min-Ju; Johnson, Walter W.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of droplines on target acquisition performance on a 3-D perspective display in which participants were required to move a cursor into a target cube as quickly as possible. Participants' performance and coordination strategies were characterized using both Fitts' law and acquisition patterns of the 3 viewer-centered target display dimensions (azimuth, elevation, and range). Participants' movement trajectories were recorded and used to determine movement times for acquisitions of the entire target and of each of its display dimensions. The goodness of fit of the data to a modified Fitts function varied widely among participants, and the presence of droplines did not have observable impacts on the goodness of fit. However, droplines helped participants navigate via straighter paths and particularly benefited range dimension acquisition. A general preference for visually overlapping the target with the cursor prior to capturing the target was found. Potential applications of this research include the design of interactive 3-D perspective displays in which fast and accurate selection and manipulation of content residing at multiple ranges may be a challenge.

  12. The cross-correlation between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieser, Britta; Merkel, Philipp M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first calculation of the cross-correlation between 3D cosmic shear and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (iSW) effect. Both signals are combined in a single formalism, which permits the computation of the full covariance matrix. In order to avoid the uncertainties presented by the non-linear evolution of the matter power spectrum and intrinsic alignments of galaxies, our analysis is restricted to large scales, i.e. multipoles below ℓ = 1000. We demonstrate in a Fisher analysis that this reduction compared to other studies of 3D weak lensing extending to smaller scales is compensated by the information that is gained if the additional iSW signal and in particular its cross-correlation with lensing data are considered. Given the observational standards of upcoming weak-lensing surveys like Euclid, marginal errors on cosmological parameters decrease by 10 per cent compared to a cosmic shear experiment if both types of information are combined without a cosmic wave background (CMB) prior. Once the constraining power of CMB data is added, the improvement becomes marginal.

  13. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  14. 3D viscosity maps for Greenland and effect on GRACE mass balance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Xu, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The GRACE satellite mission measures mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. To correct for glacial isostatic adjustment numerical models are used. Although generally found to be a small signal, the full range of possible GIA models has not been explored yet. In particular, low viscosities due to a wet mantle and high temperatures due to the nearby Iceland hotspot could have a significant effect on GIA gravity rates. The goal of this study is to present a range of possible viscosity maps, and investigate the effect on GRACE mass balance estimates. Viscosity is derived using flow laws for olivine. Mantle temperature is computed from global seismology models, based on temperature derivatives for different mantle compositions. An indication for grain sizes is obtained by xenolith findings at a few locations. We also investigate the weakening effect of the presence of melt. To calculate gravity rates, we use a finite-element GIA model with the 3D viscosity maps and the ICE-5G loading history. GRACE mass balances for mascons in Greenland are derived with a least-squares inversion, using separate constraints for the inland and coastal areas in Greenland. Biases in the least-squares inversion are corrected using scale factors estimated from a simulation based on a surface mass balance model (Xu et al., submitted to The Cryosphere). Model results show enhanced gravity rates in the west and south of Greenland with 3D viscosity maps, compared to GIA models with 1D viscosity. The effect on regional mass balance is up to 5 Gt/year. Regional low viscosity can make present-day gravity rates sensitivity to ice thickness changes in the last decades. Therefore, an improved ice loading history for these time scales is needed.

  15. Role of space charge in scanned probe oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagata, J. A.; Inoue, T.; Itoh, J.; Matsumoto, K.; Yokoyama, H.

    1998-12-01

    The growth rate and electrical character of nanostructures produced by scanned probe oxidation are investigated by integrating an in situ electrical force characterization technique, scanning Maxwell-stress microscopy, into the fabrication process. Simultaneous topographical, capacitance, and surface potential data are obtained for oxide features patterned on n- and p-type silicon and titanium thin-film substrates. The electric field established by an applied voltage pulse between the probe tip and substrate depends upon reactant and product ion concentrations associated with the water meniscus at the tip-substrate junction and within the growing oxide film. Space-charge effects are consistent with the rapid decline of high initial growth rates, account for observed doping and voltage-pulse dependencies, and provide a basis for understanding local density variations within oxide features. An obvious method for avoiding the buildup of space charge is to employ voltage modulation and other dynamic pulse-shaping techniques during the oxidation pulse. Voltage modulation leads to a significant enhancement of the growth rate and to improvements in the aspect ratio compared with static voltage pulses.

  16. Is the effect of 3-D viscosity distributions on postseismic gravity variations detectable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-01

    Satellite gravity measurements by GRACE and GOCE have successfully revealed postseismic mass transports caused by megathrust earthquakes. So far, several physical models to interpret the variations in the gravity field have been constructed. Some models consider the effects of self-gravitation and compressibility and others heterogeneous viscoelastic structures. Previous studies have already shown that the effects of compressibility are not negligible compared with the observation accuracy of gravity data. In this presentation, we estimate the effect of lateral heterogeneities in viscosity due to the presence of a subducting slab, using a spectral finite-element approach. This time-domain approach allows us to account for 3-D viscosity distributions without the necessity of artificial surface boundary conditions as used in an ordinary finite-element model. It is also possible to consider compressibility without technical difficulties which conventional normal mode methods encounter. As an example, we compare our model with recent gravity solutions in the case of the 2011 M-9 Tohoku earthquake. When the spatial resolution is increased up to d/o 80, the difference caused by considering the slab can reach 10 cm in equivalent water height at the center of the negative coseismic signal after the first 4 years from the main shock. This difference amounts to 20 per cent of the coseismic signal. The result indicates that satellite gravity data are potentially useful for investigating 3-D viscosity distributions in relatively shallow portions in the subduction zones, which will help predict the stress behaviors there in the context of earthquake cycles.

  17. Investigation of Three-Dimensional (3-D) Solar Radiative Transfer Effects Using A-Train Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, S.; Kato, S.; Barker, H.; Rose, F. G.

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) radiative effects are examined for cloudy atmosphere obtained from A-train satellite measurements. Since CloudSat and Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) only provide two-dimensional (2-D) nadir profiles along the satellite track, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spectral radiances are used to extend the 2-D cloud profiles to the cross track direction (Barker et al., 2011). Then one-dimensional (1-D) and 3-D simulations are performed to get (SW) broad band (BB) flux and heating rate profile for constructed 3-D cloud field. In the simulation, correlated k-distribution model is employed to obtain rapid estimation of gaseous optical depths for 70 solar spectral bands. The difference between 1-D and 3-D results are interpreted as 3-D solar effects, and analyzed for different cloud types and solar zenith angle. In addition, modeled top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances by the 1-D and 3-D models are compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)-derived TOA irradiances. The preliminary results show that 3-D cloud absorption is larger than 1-D calculation, and thus 3-D heating rate is larger than 1-D heating rate for cloud layer. On the other hand, 3-D downward flux at surface is smaller than 1-D flux. Reference Barker, H. W., M. P. Jerg, T. Wehr, S. Kato, D. P. Donovan, and R. J. Hogan, 2011, A 3D cloud-construction algorithm for the EarthCARE mission, Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc., 137, 1042-1058.

  18. Methodology for the Assessment of 3D Conduction Effects in an Aerothermal Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Anthony Brandon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for the assessment of three-dimensional conduction effects during test in a Aerothermal Wind Tunnel. The test objectives were to duplicate and extend tests that were performed during the 1960's on thermal conduction on proturberance on a flat plate. Slides review the 1D versus 3D conduction data reduction error, the analysis process, CFD-based analysis, loose coupling method that simulates a wind tunnel test run, verification of the CFD solution, Grid convergence, Mach number trend, size trends, and a Sumary of the CFD conduction analysis. Other slides show comparisons to pretest CFD at Mach 1.5 and 2.16 and the geometries of the models and grids.

  19. Small-scale effects of underwater bubble clouds on ocean reflectance: 3-D modeling results.

    PubMed

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2009-07-01

    We examined the effect of individual bubble clouds on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean with a 3-D Monte Carlo model of radiative transfer. The concentrations and size distribution of bubbles were defined based on acoustical measurements of bubbles in the surface ocean. The light scattering properties of bubbles for various void fractions were calculated using Mie scattering theory. We show how the spatial pattern, magnitude, and spectral behavior of remote-sensing reflectance produced by modeled bubble clouds change due to variations in their geometric and optical properties as well as the background optical properties of the ambient water. We also determined that for realistic sizes of bubble clouds, a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous geometry (1-D radiative transfer model) is inadequate for modeling water-leaving radiance above the cloud.

  20. Assessment of 3D aerodynamic effects on the behaviour of floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolas, D.; Riziotis, V.; Voutsinas, S.

    2014-12-01

    Current state-of-art models for floating wind turbines are built by merging separate modules addressing the four basic aspects leading to a compound hydro-servo-aero-elastic time domain solver. While current state-of-the-art models differ in many aspects, they all use the blade element momentum (BEM) aerodynamic modelling. Due to its low cost, BEM is the standard choice for design purposes. However the use of BEM entails several semi-empirical corrections and add-ons that need reconsideration and recalibration when new features appear. For floating wind turbines, the effect of the floater motions is such a new feature. In the present paper, this aspect is investigated by comparing BEM based results against 3D free-wake simulations. Deterministic as well as stochastic simulations are presented in pure aerodynamic and full aeroelastic context. It is confirmed that asymmetric inflow originating from yaw misalignment and shear give significant differences reflected on mean values and amplitudes.

  1. Sensor Spatial Distortion, Visual Latency, and Update Rate Effects on 3D Tracking in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Baumeler, S.; Jense, G. J.; Jacoby, R. H.; Trejo, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several common defects that we have sought to minimize in immersing virtual environments are: static sensor spatial distortion, visual latency, and low update rates. Human performance within our environments during large amplitude 3D tracking was assessed by objective and subjective methods in the presence and absence of these defects. Results show that 1) removal of our relatively small spatial sensor distortion had minor effects on the tracking activity, 2) an Adapted Cooper-Harper controllability scale proved the most sensitive subjective indicator of the degradation of dynamic fidelity caused by increasing latency and decreasing frame rates, and 3) performance, as measured by normalized RMS tracking error or subjective impressions, was more markedly influenced by changing visual latency than by update rate.

  2. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  3. 3d Transition Metal Adsorption Induced the valley-polarized Anomalous Hall Effect in Germanene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P.; Sun, L. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Based on DFT + U and Berry curvature calculations, we study the electronic structures and topological properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atom (from Ti to Co) adsorbed germanene (TM-germanene). We find that valley-polarized anomalous Hall effect (VAHE) can be realized in germanene by adsorbing Cr, Mn, or Co atoms on its surface. A finite valley Hall voltage can be easily detected in their nanoribbon, which is important for valleytronics devices. Moreover, different valley-polarized current and even reversible valley Hall voltage can be archived by shifting the Fermi energy of the systems. Such versatile features of the systems show potential in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27312176

  4. Space charge generated by wind tunnel fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, Don J.

    Plume clouds resulting from wildland fires (pyrocumulus) sometimes produce lightning discharges to ground. These discharges were found to carry positive charge to ground exclusively in several cases. Emission of space charge was observed from woody materials burned in the presence of an external electric field. Measurements done in a large wind tunnel for this study confirm and extend measurements made in open air. The net charge given up by the fire in the wind tunnel has sign appropriate to reduce an applied electric field (negative for the earth's fair weather field), and magnitude directly proportional to the magnitude of the applied electric field and the fuel consumption: Q=0.034+0.0015 E, where Q is the net charge liberated in nC g -1, and E is the applied electric field in V m -1 (positive upward). There is a weak dependence of the net charge on wind speed, probably due to wind tunnel airflow characteristics. The net charge in the smoke is a small difference between large amounts of charged ions of both signs liberated by the fire. For fires burning under fair-weather electric fields, the amount and sign of charge released by the mechanism studied cannot be the direct cause of anomalous lightning from pyrocumulus.

  5. Flow effects of blood constitutive equations in 3D models of vascular anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neofytou, Panagiotis; Tsangaris, Sokrates

    2006-06-01

    The effects of different blood rheological models are investigated numerically utilizing two three- dimensional (3D) models of vascular anomalies, namely a stenosis and an abdominal aortic aneurysm model. The employed CFD code incorporates the SIMPLE scheme in conjunction with the finite-volume method with collocated arrangement of variables. The approximation of the convection terms is carried out using the QUICK differencing scheme, whereas the code enables also multi-block computations, which are useful in order to cope with the two-block grid structure of the current computational domain. Three non-Newtonian models are employed, namely the Casson, Power-Law and Quemada models, which have been introduced in the past for modelling the rheological behaviour of blood and cover both the viscous as well as the two-phase character of blood. In view of the haemodynamical mechanisms related to abnormalities in the vascular network and the role of the wall shear stress in initiating and further developing of arterial diseases, the present study focuses on the 3D flow field and in particular on the distribution as well as on both low and high values of the wall shear stress in the vicinity of the anomaly. Finally, a comparison is made between the effects of each rheological model on the aforementioned parameters. Results show marked differences between simulating blood as Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid and furthermore the Power-Law model exhibits different behaviour in all cases compared to the other models whereas Quemada and Casson models exhibit similar behaviour in the case of the stenosis but different behaviour in the case of the aneurysm.

  6. Quantified effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope attachments on 3D organization of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Nicholas Allen; Onufriev, Alexey V; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    We use a combined experimental and computational approach to study the effects of chromosome-nuclear envelope (Chr-NE) attachments on the 3D genome organization of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) salivary gland nuclei. We consider 3 distinct models: a Null model - without specific Chr-NE attachments, a 15-attachment model - with 15 previously known Chr-NE attachments, and a 48-attachment model - with 15 original and 33 recently identified Chr-NE attachments. The radial densities of chromosomes in the models are compared to the densities observed in 100 experimental images of optically sectioned salivary gland nuclei forming "z-stacks." Most of the experimental z-stacks support the Chr-NE 48-attachment model suggesting that as many as 48 chromosome loci with appreciable affinity for the NE are necessary to reproduce the experimentally observed distribution of chromosome density in fruit fly nuclei. Next, we investigate if and how the presence and the number of Chr-NE attachments affect several key characteristics of 3D genome organization: chromosome territories and gene-gene contacts. This analysis leads to novel insight about the possible role of Chr-NE attachments in regulating the genome architecture. Specifically, we find that model nuclei with more numerous Chr-NE attachments form more distinct chromosome territories and their chromosomes intertwine less frequently. Intra-chromosome and intra-arm contacts are more common in model nuclei with Chr-NE attachments compared to the Null model (no specific attachments), while inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts are less common in nuclei with Chr-NE attachments. We demonstrate that Chr-NE attachments increase the specificity of long-range inter-chromosome and inter-arm contacts. The predicted effects of Chr-NE attachments are rationalized by intuitive volume vs. surface accessibility arguments.

  7. 3D-CAD Effects on Creative Design Performance of Different Spatial Abilities Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Students' creativity is an important focus globally and is interrelated with students' spatial abilities. Additionally, three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing (3D-CAD) overcomes barriers to spatial expression during the creative design process. Does 3D-CAD affect students' creative abilities? The purpose of this study was to…

  8. The effect of motion on IMRT – looking at interplay with 3D measurements

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, A; Yan, H; Oldham, M; Juang, T; Adamovics, J; Yin, FF

    2013-01-01

    Six base of skull IMRT treatment plans were delivered to 3D dosimeters within the RPC Head and Neck Phantom for QA verification. Isotropic 2mm 3D data was obtained using the DLOS-PRESAGE system and compared to an Eclipse (Varian) treatment plan. Normalized Dose Distribution pass rates were obtained for a number of criteria. High quality 3D dosimetry data was observed from the DLOS system, illustrated here through colormaps, isodose lines, profiles, and NDD 3D maps. Excellent agreement with the planned dose distributions was also observed with NDD analysis revealing > 90% NDD pass rates [3%, 2mm], noise < 0.5%. This paper focuses on a detailed exploration of the quality and use of 3D dosimetry data obtained with the DLOS-PRESAGE system. PMID:26877756

  9. Effect of 3d doping on the electronic structure of BaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, John A.; Buling, A.; Green, R.J.; Boyko, T.D.; Skorikov, N.A.; Kurmaev, E.Z.; Neumann, M.; Finkelstein, L.D.; Ni, Ni; Thaler, Alexander; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul; Moewes, A.

    2012-04-25

    The electronic structure of BaFe2As2 doped with Co, Ni and Cu has been studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods, but a clear picture of the dopant 3d states has not yet emerged. Herein we provide experimental evidence of the distribution of Co, Ni and Cu 3d states in the valence band. We conclude that the Co and Ni 3d states provide additional free carriers to the Fermi level, while the Cu 3d states are found at the bottom of the valence band in a localized 3d10 shell. These findings help shed light on why superconductivity can occur in BaFe2As2 doped with Co and Ni but not Cu.

  10. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  11. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  12. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  13. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  14. Head-Tail Modes for Strong Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey

    2008-12-01

    Head-tail modes are described here for the space charge tune shift significantly exceeding the synchrotron tune. General equation for the modes is derived. Spatial shapes of the modes, their frequencies, and coherent growth rates are explored. The Landau damping rates are also found. Suppression of the transverse mode coupling instability by the space charge is explained.

  15. Emitter space charge layer transit time in bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustagi, S. C.; Chattopadhyaya, S. K.

    1981-04-01

    The charge defined emitter space charge layer transit times of double diffused transistors have been calculated using a regional approach, and compared with the corresponding base transit times. The results obtained for emitter space-charge layer transit times have been discussed with reference to the capacitance analysis of Morgan and Smit (1960) for graded p-n junctions.

  16. Beam transport and space charge compensation strategies (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meusel, O.; Droba, M.; Noll, D.; Schulte, K.; Schneider, P. P.; Wiesner, C.

    2016-02-01

    The transport of intense ion beams is affected by the collective behavior of this kind of multi-particle and multi-species system. The space charge expressed by the generalized perveance dominates the dynamical process of thermalisation, which leads to emittance growth. To prevent changes of intrinsic beam properties and to reduce the intensity dependent focusing forces, space charge compensation seems to be an adequate solution. In the case of positively charged ion beams, electrons produced by residual gas ionization and secondary electrons provide the space charge compensation. The influence of the compensation particles on the beam transport and the local degree of space charge compensation is given by different beam properties as well as the ion beam optics. Especially for highly charged ion beams, space charge compensation in combination with poor vacuum conditions leads to recombination processes and therefore increased beam losses. Strategies for providing a compensation-electron reservoir at very low residual gas pressures will be discussed.

  17. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  18. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  19. The effects of task difficulty on visual search strategy in virtual 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Marc; Garaas, Tyler W; Carrasco, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing the factors that determine our choice of visual search strategy may shed light on visual behavior in everyday situations. Previous results suggest that increasing task difficulty leads to more systematic search paths. Here we analyze observers' eye movements in an "easy" conjunction search task and a "difficult" shape search task to study visual search strategies in stereoscopic search displays with virtual depth induced by binocular disparity. Standard eye-movement variables, such as fixation duration and initial saccade latency, as well as new measures proposed here, such as saccadic step size, relative saccadic selectivity, and x-y target distance, revealed systematic effects on search dynamics in the horizontal-vertical plane throughout the search process. We found that in the "easy" task, observers start with the processing of display items in the display center immediately after stimulus onset and subsequently move their gaze outwards, guided by extrafoveally perceived stimulus color. In contrast, the "difficult" task induced an initial gaze shift to the upper-left display corner, followed by a systematic left-right and top-down search process. The only consistent depth effect was a trend of initial saccades in the easy task with smallest displays to the items closest to the observer. The results demonstrate the utility of eye-movement analysis for understanding search strategies and provide a first step toward studying search strategies in actual 3D scenarios. PMID:23986539

  20. Convection and chemistry effects in CVD: A 3-D analysis for silicon deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.; Tsui, P.; Chait, A.

    1989-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT has been adopted to simulate the entire rectangular-channel-like (3-D) geometry of an experimental CVD reactor designed for Si deposition. The code incorporated the effects of both homogeneous (gas phase) and heterogeneous (surface) chemistry with finite reaction rates of important species existing in silane dissociation. The experiments were designed to elucidate the effects of gravitationally-induced buoyancy-driven convection flows on the quality of the grown Si films. This goal is accomplished by contrasting the results obtained from a carrier gas mixture of H2/Ar with the ones obtained from the same molar mixture ratio of H2/He, without any accompanying change in the chemistry. Computationally, these cases are simulated in the terrestrial gravitational field and in the absence of gravity. The numerical results compare favorably with experiments. Powerful computational tools provide invaluable insights into the complex physicochemical phenomena taking place in CVD reactors. Such information is essential for the improved design and optimization of future CVD reactors.

  1. The effects of task difficulty on visual search strategy in virtual 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Marc; Garaas, Tyler W; Carrasco, Marisa

    2013-08-28

    Analyzing the factors that determine our choice of visual search strategy may shed light on visual behavior in everyday situations. Previous results suggest that increasing task difficulty leads to more systematic search paths. Here we analyze observers' eye movements in an "easy" conjunction search task and a "difficult" shape search task to study visual search strategies in stereoscopic search displays with virtual depth induced by binocular disparity. Standard eye-movement variables, such as fixation duration and initial saccade latency, as well as new measures proposed here, such as saccadic step size, relative saccadic selectivity, and x-y target distance, revealed systematic effects on search dynamics in the horizontal-vertical plane throughout the search process. We found that in the "easy" task, observers start with the processing of display items in the display center immediately after stimulus onset and subsequently move their gaze outwards, guided by extrafoveally perceived stimulus color. In contrast, the "difficult" task induced an initial gaze shift to the upper-left display corner, followed by a systematic left-right and top-down search process. The only consistent depth effect was a trend of initial saccades in the easy task with smallest displays to the items closest to the observer. The results demonstrate the utility of eye-movement analysis for understanding search strategies and provide a first step toward studying search strategies in actual 3D scenarios.

  2. Space charge formation and Bohm's criterion in the edge of thermal electronegative plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasserian, Kiomars; Aslaninejad, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    The collisional electronegative plasma space charge is investigated in the presence of the thermal positive ions. The Boltzmann distribution is assumed for electrons and negative ions and fluid equations are used to treat the accelerated positive ion through the sheath region. The influence of the positive ion temperature on the profile of the space charge is obtained for different negative ion concentration and negative ion temperature for collisionless and collisional cases. It is shown that the position of the space charge peak is independent of positive ion temperature while its amplitude depends on the positive ion temperature. The presence of the negative ion leads to damping of the space charge amplitude. In addition the thermal effect of the positive ion on the kinetic energy of the ion extracted from an ion source is studied in difference of collisionality and electronegativity. It is shown that, in the presence of thermal positive ion, the influence of the negative ion temperature on the sheath characteristics disappears. It is observed that in the presence of the hot positive ion, the twofold feature of the space charge starts at higher values of negative ion temperature which is more pronounced in collisional case. Finally, the influences of the positive and negative ion temperature, as well as the electronegativity and collisionality on the net electric current are studied.

  3. Effect of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on 3D equilibria in the MST RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Stefano; Chapman, B. E.; Almagri, A. F.; Boguski, J.; Cianciosa, M.; den Hartog, D. J.; Dubois, A. M.; Goetz, J. A.; Hanson, J. D.; Holly, D. J.; McCollam, K. J.; Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.; Norval, R. J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    The orientation of 3D equilibria in the MST RFP can now be controlled with application of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). This control has led to improved diagnosis revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. Coupled to a recent advance in the V3FIT code, reconstructions of the 3D equilibria have also been improved. The RMP also inhibits generation of high-energy (>20keV) electrons, which are otherwise produced with the 3D state. This state occurs when the normally broad spectrum of core-resonant m = 1 tearing modes condenses, with the innermost resonant mode growing to large amplitude ~ 8% of the axisymmetric field. As the dominant mode grows, eddy current in MST's conducting shell slows the mode's rotation, eventually leading to locking of the 3D structure. An m = 1 RMP with an amplitude br/B ~ 10% can force the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. Reduced stochasticity and improved confinement of high-energy electrons during the formations of the 3D structure are observed. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  4. Impact of 3-D printed PLA- and chitosan-based scaffolds on human monocyte/macrophage responses: unraveling the effect of 3-D structures on inflammation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina R; Serra, Tiziano; Oliveira, Marta I; Planell, Josep A; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have pointed towards a decisive role of inflammation in triggering tissue repair and regeneration, while at the same time it is accepted that an exacerbated inflammatory response may lead to rejection of an implant. Within this context, understanding and having the capacity to regulate the inflammatory response elicited by 3-D scaffolds aimed for tissue regeneration is crucial. This work reports on the analysis of the cytokine profile of human monocytes/macrophages in contact with biodegradable 3-D scaffolds with different surface properties, architecture and controlled pore geometry, fabricated by 3-D printing technology. Fabrication processes were optimized to create four different 3-D platforms based on polylactic acid (PLA), PLA/calcium phosphate glass or chitosan. Cytokine secretion and cell morphology of human peripheral blood monocytes allowed to differentiate on the different matrices were analyzed. While all scaffolds supported monocyte/macrophage adhesion and stimulated cytokine production, striking differences between PLA-based and chitosan scaffolds were found, with chitosan eliciting increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, while PLA-based scaffolds induced higher production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12/23 and IL-10. Even though the material itself induced the biggest differences, the scaffold geometry also impacted on TNF-α and IL-12/23 production, with chitosan scaffolds having larger pores and wider angles leading to a higher secretion of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings strengthen the appropriateness of these 3-D platforms to study modulation of macrophage responses by specific parameters (chemistry, topography, scaffold architecture). PMID:24211731

  5. Space charge limited current emission for a sharp tip

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. B. Ang, L. K.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we formulate a self-consistent model to study the space charge limited current emission from a sharp tip in a dc gap. The tip is assumed to have a radius in the order of 10s nanometer. The electrons are emitted from the tip due to field emission process. It is found that the localized current density J at the apex of the tip can be much higher than the classical Child Langmuir law (flat surface). A scaling of J ∝ V{sub g}{sup 3/2}/D{sup m}, where V{sub g} is the gap bias, D is the gap size, and m = 1.1–1.2 (depending on the emission area or radius) is proposed. The effects of non-uniform emission and the spatial dependence of work function are presented.

  6. Transverse-longitudinal coupling by space charge in cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, C.

    2011-11-01

    A method is presented that enables one to compute the parameters of matched beams with space charge in cyclotrons with emphasis on the effect of the transverse-longitudinal coupling. Equations describing the transverse-longitudinal coupling and corresponding tune shifts in first order are derived for the model of an azimuthally symmetric cyclotron. The eigenellipsoid of the beam is calculated and the transfer matrix is transformed into block-diagonal form. The influence of the slope of the phase curve on the transverse-longitudinal coupling is accounted for. The results are generalized and numerical procedures for the case of an azimuthally varying field cyclotron are presented. The algorithm is applied to the PSI injector II and ring cyclotron and the results are compared to TRANSPORT.

  7. Numerical study of the 3-D effect on FEL performance and its application to the APS LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.C.

    1998-09-01

    A Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In LEUTL periodic focusing is provided by external quadrupoles. This results in an elliptical beam with its betatron oscillation envelope varying along the undulators. The free-electron laser (FEL) interaction with such a beam will exhibit truly 3-D effects. Thus the investigation of 3-D effects is important in optimizing the FEL performance. The programs GINGER and TDA3D, coupled with theoretically known facts, have been used for this purpose. Both programs are fully 3-D in moving the particle, but model the interaction between particles and axially symmetric electromagnetic waves. Even though TDA3D can include a few azimuthal modes in the interaction, it is still not a fully 3-D FEL code. However, they show that these 2-D programs can still be used for an elliptical beam whose aspect ratio is within certain limits. The author presents numerical results of FEL performance for the circular beam, the elliptical beam, and finally for the beam in the realistic LEUTL lattice.

  8. Anisotropic intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in ordered 3dPt alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2011-07-01

    By performing first-principles calculations, we investigate the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) and its anisotropy in ordered L10 FePt, CoPt, and NiPt ferromagnets and their intermediate alloys. We demonstrate that the AHC in this family of compounds depends strongly on the direction of the magnetization M in the crystal. We predict that such pronounced orientational dependence in combination with the general decreasing trend of the AHC when going from FePt to NiPt leads to a sign change of the AHC upon rotating the magnetization direction in the crystal of CoPt alloy. We also suggest that, for a range of concentration x in CoxNi1-xPt and FexCo1-xPt alloys, it is possible to achieve a complete quenching of the anomalous Hall current for a certain direction of the magnetization in the crystal. By analyzing the spin-resolved AHC in 3dPt alloys, we endeavor to relate the overall trend of the AHC in these compounds to the changes in their densities of d states around the Fermi energy upon varying the atomic number. Moreover, we show the generality of the phenomenon of anisotropic anomalous Hall effect by demonstrating its occurrence within the three-band tight-binding model.

  9. Osteogenic effect of controlled released rhBMP-2 in 3D printed porous hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai; Wu, Gui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Kui; Yin, Bo; Su, Xinlin; Qiu, Guixing; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Xianglin; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, 3D printing as effective technology has been highlighted in the biomedical field. Previously, a porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold with the biocompatibility and osteoconductivity has been developed by this method. However, its osteoinductivity is limited. The main purpose of this study was to improve it by the introduction of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). This scaffold was developed by coating rhBMP-2-delivery microspheres with collagen. These synthesized scaffolds were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), a delivery test in vitro, cell culture, and the experiments in vivo by a Micro-computed tomography (μCT) scan and histological evaluation of VanGieson staining. SEM results indicated the surface of scaffolds were more fit for the adhesion of hMSCs to coat collagen/rhBMP-2 microspheres. Biphasic release of rhBMP-2 could continue for more than 21 days, and keep its osteoinductivity to induce osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro. In addition, the experiments in vivo showed that the scaffold had a good bone regeneration capacity. These findings demonstrate that the HA/Collagen/Chitosan Microspheres system can simultaneously achieve localized long-term controlled release of rhBMP-2 and bone regeneration, which provides a promising route for improving the treatment of bone defects.

  10. On Integral Invariants for Effective 3-D Motion Trajectory Matching and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhanpeng; Li, Youfu

    2016-02-01

    Motion trajectories tracked from the motions of human, robots, and moving objects can provide an important clue for motion analysis, classification, and recognition. This paper defines some new integral invariants for a 3-D motion trajectory. Based on two typical kernel functions, we design two integral invariants, the distance and area integral invariants. The area integral invariants are estimated based on the blurred segment of noisy discrete curve to avoid the computation of high-order derivatives. Such integral invariants for a motion trajectory enjoy some desirable properties, such as computational locality, uniqueness of representation, and noise insensitivity. Moreover, our formulation allows the analysis of motion trajectories at a range of scales by varying the scale of kernel function. The features of motion trajectories can thus be perceived at multiscale levels in a coarse-to-fine manner. Finally, we define a distance function to measure the trajectory similarity to find similar trajectories. Through the experiments, we examine the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed integral invariants and find that they can capture the motion cues in trajectory matching and sign recognition satisfactorily.

  11. On the effect of muscular cocontraction on the 3-D human arm impedance.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harshil; O'Neill, Gerald; Artemiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-10-01

    Humans have the inherent ability to perform highly dexterous tasks with their arms, involving maintenance of posture, movement, and interaction with the environment. The latter requires the human to control the dynamic characteristics of the upper limb musculoskeletal system. These characteristics are quantitatively represented by inertia, damping, and stiffness, which are measures of mechanical impedance. Many previous studies have shown that arm posture is a dominant factor in determining the end point impedance on a horizontal plane. This paper presents the characterization of the end point impedance of the human arm in 3-D space. Moreover, it models the regulation of the arm impedance with muscle cocontraction. The characterization is made by route of experimental trials where human subjects maintained arm posture while their arms were perturbed by a robot arm. Furthermore, the subjects were asked to control the level of their arm muscles' cocontraction, using visual feedback, in order to investigate the effect of muscle cocontraction on the arm impedance. The results of this study show an anisotropic increase of arm stiffness due to muscle cocontraction. These results could improve our understanding of the human arm biomechanics, as well as provide implications for human motor control-specifically the control of arm impedance through muscle cocontraction.

  12. CAST: Effective and Efficient User Interaction for Context-Aware Selection in 3D Particle Clouds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We present a family of three interactive Context-Aware Selection Techniques (CAST) for the analysis of large 3D particle datasets. For these datasets, spatial selection is an essential prerequisite to many other analysis tasks. Traditionally, such interactive target selection has been particularly challenging when the data subsets of interest were implicitly defined in the form of complicated structures of thousands of particles. Our new techniques SpaceCast, TraceCast, and PointCast improve usability and speed of spatial selection in point clouds through novel context-aware algorithms. They are able to infer a user's subtle selection intention from gestural input, can deal with complex situations such as partially occluded point clusters or multiple cluster layers, and can all be fine-tuned after the selection interaction has been completed. Together, they provide an effective and efficient tool set for the fast exploratory analysis of large datasets. In addition to presenting Cast, we report on a formal user study that compares our new techniques not only to each other but also to existing state-of-the-art selection methods. Our results show that Cast family members are virtually always faster than existing methods without tradeoffs in accuracy. In addition, qualitative feedback shows that PointCast and TraceCast were strongly favored by our participants for intuitiveness and efficiency.

  13. Effects of flow control over a 3D turret -- Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan; Andino, Marlyn; Schmit, Ryan; Camphouse, Chris; Myatt, James; Glauser, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Building upon the 3D turret work done at Syracuse University an extended study was conducted in the Air Force Research Laboratory's Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL) wind tunnel at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The SARL experiments were performed at higher Reynolds and Mach numbers and therefore present a more complex, more challenging flow. Synthetic jets mounted upstream of the aperture were used to generate multiple actuation cases in order to provide a rich ensemble for plant model development based on the split POD method of Camphouse (2007). PIV velocity data was acquired along with simultaneous surface pressure data at various planes across the turret with and without open-loop control. In addition, a simple proportional closed-loop control was performed using the bandpass filtered first POD mode coefficient of the surface pressure as the feedback signal. The amplitude of the feedback signal was calibrated using the open-loop results which were the most effective in reducing the separation zone of the turret.

  14. Effects of microalloying with 3d transition metals on glass formation in AlYFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bondi, K.S.; Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Marine, Z.; Kim, T.H.; Mukhopadhyay, Anindita; Goldman, A.I.; Buhro, William E.; Kelton, K.F.

    2008-05-20

    The effects of microalloying on glass formation and stability were systematically investigated by substituting 0.5 at.% of all 3d transition metals for Al in Al{sub 88}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5} alloys. X-ray diffraction and isothermal differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate that samples containing microadditions of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co were amorphous, while those alloyed with Ni and Cu were not. The onset temperatures for crystallization (devitrification) of the amorphous alloys were increased with microalloying and some showed a supercooled liquid region ({Delta}T{sub x} = T{sub x} - T{sub g}) of up to 40 C. In addition, microalloying changes the glass structure and the devitrification sequence, as determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and high energy X-ray diffraction. The results presented here suggest that the order induced in the alloy by the transition metal microaddition decreases the atomic mobility in the glass and raises the barrier for the nucleation of {alpha}-Al, the primary devitrifying phase in most cases. New intermetallic phases also appear with microalloying and vary for different transition metal additions.

  15. 3-D Waveguide Effects of Topographical Structural Variation on Full Waveform Propagation: 3-D Finite Difference Modeling Comparisons with Field Data From Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. S.; Miller, R.; Greenfield, R.; Fisk, D.

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through regions of complex topography is not thoroughly understood. Surface waves, are of particular interest, as they are large in amplitude and can characterize the source depth, magnitude, and frequency content. The amplitude and frequency content of seismic waves that propagate in regions with large topographical variations are affected by both the scattering and blockage of the wave energy. The ability to predict the 3-d scattering due to topography will improve the understanding of both regional scale surface wave magnitudes, and refine surface wave discriminants as well as at the local scale (<2 km ) where it will aid in the development of rule of thumb guide lines for array sensor placement for real time sensing technologies. Ideally, when validating the numerical accuracy of a propagation model against field data, the input geologic parameters would be known and thus eliminates geology as a source of error in the calculation. In March of 2001, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) performed a detailed seismic site characterization at the Smart Weapons Test Range, Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The result of the KGS characterization study is a high-resolution 3-d model that is used in our seismic simulations. The velocities Vs, Vp are calculated by tomography and refraction, attenuation coefficients estimated from the surface wave and from p-waves and are provided in a model with attributes resolved in 3-d to 0.5 meters. In the present work, we present comparisons of synthetic data with seismic data collected at the Smart Weapons Test Range to benchmark the accuracy achieved in simulating 3-d wave propagation in the vicinity of a topographical anomaly (trench). Synthetic seismograms are generated using a 3-d 8th order staggered grid visco-elastic finite difference code that accounts for topography. The geologic model is based on the Yuma site characterization. The size of these calculations required use of the DoD High Performance

  16. Numerical Simulation of the Effect of 3D Needle Movement on Cavitation and Spray Formation in a Diesel Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandumpala Devassy, B.; Edelbauer, W.; Greif, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation and its effect on spray formation and its dispersion play a crucial role in proper engine combustion and controlled emission. This study focuses on these effects in a typical common rail 6-hole diesel injector accounting for 3D needle movement and flow compressibility effects. Coupled numerical simulations using 1D and 3D CFD codes are used for this investigation. Previous studies in this direction have already presented a detailed structure of the adopted methodology. Compared to the previous analysis, the present study investigates the effect of 3D needle movement and cavitation on the spray formation for pilot and main injection events for a typical diesel engine operating point. The present setup performs a 3D compressible multiphase simulation coupled with a standalone 1D high pressure flow simulation. The simulation proceeds by the mutual communication between 1D and 3D solvers. In this work a typical common rail injector with a mini-sac nozzle is studied. The lateral and radial movement of the needle and its effect on the cavitation generation and the subsequent spray penetration are analyzed. The result indicates the effect of compressibility of the liquid on damping the needle forces, and also the difference in the spray penetration levels due to the asymmetrical flow field. Therefore, this work intends to provide an efficient and user-friendly engineering tool for simulating a complete fuel injector including spray propagation.

  17. Effect of rosiglitazone on progression of atherosclerosis: insights using 3D carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Anitha; Yee, Michael S; Chan, Cheuk F; Crowe, Lindsey A; Keenan, Niall G; Johnston, Desmond G; Pennell, Dudley J

    2009-01-01

    Background There is recent evidence suggesting that rosiglitazone increases death from cardiovascular causes. We investigated the direct effect of this drug on atheroma using 3D carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Results A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was performed to evaluate the effect of rosiglitazone treatment on carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with type 2 diabetes and coexisting vascular disease or hypertension. The primary endpoint of the study was the change from baseline to 52 weeks of carotid arterial wall volume, reflecting plaque burden, as measured by carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Rosiglitazone or placebo was allocated to 28 and 29 patients respectively. Patients were managed to have equivalent glycemic control over the study period, but in fact the rosiglitazone group lowered their HbA1c by 0.88% relative to placebo (P < 0.001). Most patients received a statin or fibrate as lipid control medication (rosiglitazone 78%, controls 83%). Data are presented as mean ± SD. At baseline, the carotid arterial wall volume in the placebo group was 1146 ± 550 mm3 and in the rosiglitazone group was 1354 ± 532 mm3. After 52 weeks, the respective volumes were 1134 ± 523 mm3 and 1348 ± 531 mm3. These changes (-12.1 mm3 and -5.7 mm3 in the placebo and rosiglitazone groups, respectively) were not statistically significant between groups (P = 0.57). Conclusion Treatment with rosiglitazone over 1 year had no effect on progression of carotid atheroma in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to placebo. PMID:19635160

  18. Effects of CT image segmentation methods on the accuracy of long bone 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Rathnayaka, Kanchana; Sahama, Tony; Schuetz, Michael A; Schmutz, Beat

    2011-03-01

    An accurate and accessible image segmentation method is in high demand for generating 3D bone models from CT scan data, as such models are required in many areas of medical research. Even though numerous sophisticated segmentation methods have been published over the years, most of them are not readily available to the general research community. Therefore, this study aimed to quantify the accuracy of three popular image segmentation methods, two implementations of intensity thresholding and Canny edge detection, for generating 3D models of long bones. In order to reduce user dependent errors associated with visually selecting a threshold value, we present a new approach of selecting an appropriate threshold value based on the Canny filter. A mechanical contact scanner in conjunction with a microCT scanner was utilised to generate the reference models for validating the 3D bone models generated from CT data of five intact ovine hind limbs. When the overall accuracy of the bone model is considered, the three investigated segmentation methods generated comparable results with mean errors in the range of 0.18-0.24 mm. However, for the bone diaphysis, Canny edge detection and Canny filter based thresholding generated 3D models with a significantly higher accuracy compared to those generated through visually selected thresholds. This study demonstrates that 3D models with sub-voxel accuracy can be generated utilising relatively simple segmentation methods that are available to the general research community.

  19. Zebrafish response to 3D printed shoals of conspecifics: the effect of body size.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Tiziana; Mwaffo, Violet; Showler, Ashleigh; Macrì, Simone; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Recent progress in three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has enabled rapid prototyping of complex models at a limited cost. Virtually every research laboratory has access to a 3D printer, which can assist in the design and implementation of hypothesis-driven studies on animal behavior. In this study, we explore the possibility of using 3D printing technology to understand the role of body size in the social behavior of the zebrafish model organism. In a dichotomous preference test, we study the behavioral response of zebrafish to shoals of 3D printed replicas of varying size. We systematically vary the size of each replica without altering the coloration, aspect ratio, and stripe patterns, which are all selected to closely mimic zebrafish morphophysiology. The replicas are actuated through a robotic manipulator, mimicking the natural motion of live subjects. Zebrafish preference is assessed by scoring the time spent in the vicinity of the shoal of replicas, and the information theoretic construct of transfer entropy is used to further elucidate the influence of the replicas on zebrafish motion. Our results demonstrate that zebrafish adjust their behavior in response to variations in the size of the replicas. Subjects exhibit an avoidance reaction for larger replicas, and they are attracted toward and influenced by smaller replicas. The approach presented in this study, integrating 3D printing technology, robotics, and information theory, is expected to significantly aid preclinical research on zebrafish behavior. PMID:26891476

  20. Effects of 3D PIV post-processing on impulse and force analysis in vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    Vortical flows measured using 3D PIV techniques are fundamentally filtered versions of physical phenomena, with velocity information lost below the length and time scales of the measurement system. In the context of propulsive vortices, such as those generated during biological locomotion, these factors, combined with experimental noise and error, can lead to inaccuracies in analysis of the vortex momentum and net thrust. As a result, while 3D velocity measurements remove many of the assumptions required to analyze planar PIV data, they should not be considered absolute physical quantities. Our work focuses on post-processing for 3D PIV data sets to enable the extraction of accurate, quantitative 3D force measurements for unsteady vortical propulsion. In this study, we compare utilizing measurement signal processing techniques, orthogonal decomposition, and identification of coherent structures to measure the impulse of a canonical vortex ring generated by a mechanical piston. In particular, we consider the ability of these methods to confront the influences of limited spatial resolution and arbitrary geometries, and make recommendations for a general procedure for propulsion analysis from 3D PIV data, regardless of which PIV technique is used to obtain the velocity fields.

  1. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, Øystein

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  2. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for coherent radiation generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. This "micro-bunching instabilities" is naturally broadband and could possibly support the generation of coherent radiation over a broad region of the spectrum. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we refine these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program ELEGANT. This high-fidelity model of the space charge is used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We finally employ the developed model to investigate the performance of a cascaded LSC amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab.

  3. Space charge neutralization in inertial electrostatic confinement plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Evstatiev, E. G.; Nebel, R. A.; Chacon, L.; Park, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2007-04-15

    A major issue for electron injected inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices is space charge neutralization. A new formalism is developed that will allow this neutralization to occur for both oscillating and steady-state IEC plasmas. Results indicate that there are limits on the amount of compression that can be achieved by oscillating plasmas while simultaneously maintaining space charge neutralization and parabolic background potential. For steady-state plasmas, there are no such limits and space charge neutralization can be achieved even when the plasma becomes quasineutral.

  4. Effects of Processing and Medical Sterilization Techniques on 3D-Printed and Molded Polylactic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geritano, Mariah Nicole

    Manufacturing industries have evolved tremendously in the past decade with the introduction of Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing. The medical device industry has been a leader in adapting this new technology into research and development. 3D printing enables medical devices and implants to become more customizable, patient specific, and allows for low production numbers. This study compares the mechanical and thermal properties of traditionally manufactured parts versus parts manufactured through 3D printing before and after sterilization, and the ability of an FDM printer to produce reliable, identical samples. It was found that molded samples and 100% infill high-resolution samples have almost identical changes in properties when exposed to different sterilization methods, and similar cooling rates. The data shown throughout this investigation confirms that manipulation of printing parameters can result in an object with comparable material properties to that created through traditional manufacturing methods.

  5. Transverse modes and instabilities of a bunched beam with space charge and resistive wall impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Transverse instability of a bunch in a ring accelerator is considered with space charge and wakefield taken into account. It is assumed that space charge tune shift significantly exceeds the synchrotron tune. Bunch spectrum, instability growth rate, and effects of chromaticity are studied with different bunch and wake forms. Fast instability caused by coupling of transverse modes is studied in detail. It is shown that, for monotonic wakes, the transverse mode coupling instability is possible only with a certain sign of the wake. Its threshold and growth rate are calculated precisely over a wide range of parameters.

  6. Space charge limited electron emission from a Cu surface under ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelen, W.; Autrique, D.; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-10-08

    In this theoretical study, the electron emission from a copper surface under ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation is investigated using a one dimensional particle in cell model. Thermionic emission as well as multi-photon photoelectron emission were taken into account. The emitted electrons create a negative space charge above the target, consequently the generated electric field reduces the electron emission by several orders of magnitude. The simulations indicate that the space charge effect should be considered when investigating electron emission related phenomena in materials under ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation of metals.the word ''abstract,'' but do replace the rest of this text.

  7. Estimation of 3-D Cloud Effects on TOMS Satellite Retrieval of Surface UV Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Geogdzhayev, I.; Herman, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    To improve surface UV irradiance retrieval from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) we simulate errors of the TOMS cloud correction algorithm for summertime broken cloud conditions. Cloud scenes (50 km by 50 km) are modeled by a normal random (Gaussian) field with a fixed lower boundary and conservative scattering. The model relates stochastic field characteristics with the cloud amount, mean cloud diameter and aspect ratio. Clouds are embedded into Rayleigh atmosphere with standard ozone profile. Radiative transfer calculations of the radiance at the top of the atmosphere and irradiance at the surface were performed using 3-D Monte Carlo (MC) code. The results are averaged over the satellite field of view on the surface (50 km by 50 km) and compared with TOMS predicted surface irradiance for the same scene reflectance. The TOMS algorithm assumes horizontally homogeneous Cl-type cloud between 3 km and 5.5 km. The effective optical depth is determined by fitting observed (MC) radiance at 380 nm. Having the same radiance at the satellite the homogeneous and broken cloud models predict different average irradiances at the surface. This is due to the differences in Bidirectional Reflection Distribution Function (BRDF) for homogeneous and broken cloud scenes with the same hemispherical albedo. For typical TOMS observational geometry at mid-latitudes the simulated single pixels errors may be as large as +/- 20%. Qualitatively these errors are due to the dominance of the non-horizontal cloud surfaces, which are not accounted for in the homogeneous cloud model. However, due to high variability of the real cloud shapes and types it is unclear how these single pixel errors would affect TOMS time-integrated UV exposure over extended periods (weeks to months) for different regions.

  8. Effect of Kayak Ergometer Elastic Tension on Upper Limb EMG Activity and 3D Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Neil; Donne, Bernard; Fletcher, David

    2012-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of shoulder injury in kayakers, limited published research examining associated upper limb kinematics and recruitment patterns exists. Altered muscle recruitment patterns on-ergometer vs. on-water kayaking were recently reported, however, mechanisms underlying changes remain to be elucidated. The current study assessed the effect of ergometer recoil tension on upper limb recruitment and kinematics during the kayak stroke. Male kayakers (n = 10) performed 4 by 1 min on-ergometer exercise bouts at 85%VO2max at varying elastic recoil tension; EMG, stroke force and three-dimensional 3D kinematic data were recorded. While stationary recoil forces significantly increased across investigated tensions (125% increase, p < 0.001), no significant differences were detected in assessed force variables during the stroke cycle. In contrast, increasing tension induced significantly higher Anterior Deltoid (AD) activity in the latter stages (70 to 90%) of the cycle (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed across tension levels for Triceps Brachii or Latissimus Dorsi. Kinematic analysis revealed that overhead arm movements accounted for 39 ± 16% of the cycle. Elbow angle at stroke cycle onset was 144 ± 10°; maximal elbow angle (151 ± 7°) occurred at 78 ± 10% into the cycle. All kinematic markers moved to a more anterior position as tension increased. No significant change in wrist marker elevation was observed, while elbow and shoulder marker elevations significantly increased across tension levels (p < 0.05). In conclusion, data suggested that kayakers maintained normal upper limb kinematics via additional AD recruitment despite ergometer induced recoil forces. Key pointsKayak ergometer elastic tension significantly alters Anterior Deltoid recruitment patterns.Kayakers maintain optimal arm kinematics despite changing external forces via altered shoulder muscle recruitment.Overhead arm movements account for a high proportion of the kayak

  9. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS OF SPRAY RETENTION BY A 3D BARLEY PLANT: EFFECT OF FORMULATION SURFACE TENSION.

    PubMed

    Massinon, M; De Cock, N; Salah, S Ouled Taleb; Lebeau, F

    2015-01-01

    A spray retention model was used in this study to explore theoretically the effect of a range of mixture surface tension on the spray retention and the variability of deposits. The spray retention model was based on an algorithm that tested whether droplets from a virtual nozzle intercepted a 3D plant model. If so, the algorithm determined the contribution of the droplet to the overall retention depending on the droplet impact behaviour on the leaf; adhesion, rebound or splashing. The impact outcome probabilities, function of droplet impact energy, were measured using high-speed imaging on an excised indoor grown barley leaf (BBCH12) both for pure water (surface tension of 0.072 N/m) and a non-ionic super spreader (static surface tension of 0.021 N/m) depending on the surface orientation. The modification of spray mixture properties in the simulations was performed by gradually changing the spray the droplet impact probabilities between pure water and a solution with non-ionic surfactant exhibiting super spreading properties. The plant architecture was measured using a structured light scanner. The final retention was expressed as the volume of liquid retained by the whole plant relative to the projected leaf surface area in the main spray direction. One hundred simulations were performed at different volumes per hectare and flat-fan nozzles for each formulation surface tension. The coefficient of variation was used as indicator of variability of deposits. The model was able to discriminate between mixture surface tension. The spray retention increased as the mixture surface tension decreased. The variability of deposits also decreased as the surface tension decreased. The proposed modelling approach provides a suited tool for sensitivity analysis: nozzle kind, pressure, volume per hectare applied, spray mixture physicochemical properties, plant species, growth stage could be screened to determine the best spraying characteristics maximizing the retention. The

  10. The Effectiveness of a 3D Computerized Tutorial to Enhance Learning of the Canine Larynx and Hyoid Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Nemanic, Sarah; Mills, Serena; Viehdorfer, Matt; Clark, Terri; Bailey, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the canine larynx and hyoid apparatus is challenging because dissection disassembles and/or damages these structures, making it difficult to understand their three-dimensional (3D) anatomy and spatial interrelationships. This study assessed the effectiveness of an interactive, computerized 3D tutorial for teaching the anatomy of the canine larynx and hyoid apparatus using a randomized control design with students enrolled in the first-year professional program at Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine. All first-year students from 2 consecutive years were eligible. All students received the traditional methods of didactic teaching and dissection to learn the anatomy of the canine larynx and hyoid apparatus, after which they were divided into two statistically equal groups based on their cumulative anatomy test scores from the prior term. The tutorial group received an interactive, computerized tutorial developed by the investigators containing 3D images of the canine larynx and hyoid apparatus, while the control group received the same 3D images without the computerized tutorial. Both groups received the same post-learning assessment and survey. Sixty-three first-year students participated in the study, 28 in the tutorial group, and 35 in the control group. Post-learning assessment and survey scores were both significantly higher among students in the computerized tutorial group than those in the control group. This study demonstrates that a 3D computerized tutorial is more effective in teaching the anatomy of the canine hyoid apparatus and larynx than 3D images without a tutorial. Students likewise rated their learning experience higher when using the 3D computerized tutorial.

  11. 3D-2D registration for surgical guidance: effect of projection view angles on registration accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Otake, Y.; Wang, A. S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and x-ray projections is evaluated, specifically using single- or dual-projection views to provide 3D localization. The registration framework employs the gradient information similarity metric and covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy to solve for the patient pose in six degrees of freedom. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver, using C-arm projection views acquired at angular separation, Δθ, ranging from ˜0°-180° at variable C-arm magnification. Registration accuracy was assessed in terms of 2D projection distance error and 3D target registration error (TRE) and compared to that of an electromagnetic (EM) tracker. The results indicate that angular separation as small as Δθ ˜10°-20° achieved TRE <2 mm with 95% confidence, comparable or superior to that of the EM tracker. The method allows direct registration of preoperative CT and planning data to intraoperative fluoroscopy, providing 3D localization free from conventional limitations associated with external fiducial markers, stereotactic frames, trackers and manual registration.

  12. Landau damping of space-charge dominated Fermilab Booster beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The stable region of the Fermilab Booster beam in the complex coherent-tune-shift plane appears to have been shifted far away from the origin by its intense space-charge making Landau damping impossible. However, it is shown that the bunching structure of the beam reduces the mean space-charge tune shift. As a result, the beam can be stabilized by suitable octupole-driven tune spread.

  13. A 3D polarized Monte Carlo LIDAR system simulator for studying effects of cirrus inhomogeneities on CALIOP/CALIPSO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczap, F.; Cornet, C.; Alqassem, A.; Gour, Y.; C.-Labonnote, L.; Jourdan, O.

    2013-05-01

    To estimate cirrus inhomogeneity effects on the apparent backscatter and on the apparent depolarization ratio measured by CALIOP/CALIPSO, a 3D polarized Monte Carlo LIDAR simulator was developed. Comparisons were done with the fast Hogan's LIDAR simulator. Early results show that clouds inhomogeneous effects seem to be negligible on the apparent backscatter but not on the apparent depolarization ratio.

  14. Biomimicry 3D gastrointestinal spheroid platform for the assessment of toxicity and inflammatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Sing Ling; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel I; Leong, David T

    2015-02-11

    Our current mechanistic understanding on the effects of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cellular physiology is derived mainly from 2D cell culture studies. However, conventional monolayer cell culture may not accurately model the mass transfer gradient that is expected in 3D tissue physiology and thus may lead to artifactual experimental conclusions. Herein, using a micropatterned agarose hydrogel platform, the effects of ZnO NPs (25 nm) on 3D colon cell spheroids of well-defined sizes are examined. The findings show that cell dimensionality plays a critical role in governing the spatiotemporal cellular outcomes like inflammatory response and cytotoxicity in response to ZnO NPs treatment. More importantly, ZnO NPs can induce different modes of cell death in 2D and 3D cell culture systems. Interestingly, the outer few layers of cells in 3D model could only protect the inner core of cells for a limited time and periodically slough off from the spheroids surface. These findings suggest that toxicological conclusions made from 2D cell models might overestimate the toxicity of ZnO NPs. This 3D cell spheroid model can serve as a reproducible platform to better reflect the actual cell response to NPs and to study a more realistic mechanism of nanoparticle-induced toxicity.

  15. Biomimicry 3D gastrointestinal spheroid platform for the assessment of toxicity and inflammatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Sing Ling; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel I; Leong, David T

    2015-02-11

    Our current mechanistic understanding on the effects of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cellular physiology is derived mainly from 2D cell culture studies. However, conventional monolayer cell culture may not accurately model the mass transfer gradient that is expected in 3D tissue physiology and thus may lead to artifactual experimental conclusions. Herein, using a micropatterned agarose hydrogel platform, the effects of ZnO NPs (25 nm) on 3D colon cell spheroids of well-defined sizes are examined. The findings show that cell dimensionality plays a critical role in governing the spatiotemporal cellular outcomes like inflammatory response and cytotoxicity in response to ZnO NPs treatment. More importantly, ZnO NPs can induce different modes of cell death in 2D and 3D cell culture systems. Interestingly, the outer few layers of cells in 3D model could only protect the inner core of cells for a limited time and periodically slough off from the spheroids surface. These findings suggest that toxicological conclusions made from 2D cell models might overestimate the toxicity of ZnO NPs. This 3D cell spheroid model can serve as a reproducible platform to better reflect the actual cell response to NPs and to study a more realistic mechanism of nanoparticle-induced toxicity. PMID:25331163

  16. Analytical theory of the space-charge region of lateral p-n junctions in nanofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2015-07-21

    There is growing interest in fabricating conventional semiconductor devices in a nanofilm which could be a 3D material with one reduced dimension (e.g., silicon-on-insulator (SOI) film), or single/multiple layers of a 2D material (e.g., MoS{sub 2}), or a two dimensional electron gas/two dimensional hole gas (2DEG/2DHG) layer. Lateral p-n junctions are essential parts of these devices. The space-charge region electrostatics in these nanofilm junctions is strongly affected by the surrounding field, unlike in bulk junctions. Current device physics of nanofilms lacks a simple analytical theory of this 2D electrostatics of lateral p-n junctions. We present such a theory taking into account the film's thickness, permittivity, doping, interface charge, and possibly different ambient permittivities on film's either side. In analogy to the textbook theory of the 1D electrostatics of bulk p-n junctions, our theory yields simple formulas for the depletion width, the extent of space-charge tails beyond this width, and the screening length associated with the space-charge layer in nanofilm junctions; these formulas agree with numerical simulations and measurements. Our theory introduces an electrostatic thickness index to classify nanofilms into sheets, bulk and intermediate sized.

  17. Effects of Na+ and He+ pickup ions on the lunar plasma environment: 3D hybrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. There is a set of MHD,kinetic, hybrid, drift kinetic, electrostatic and full kinetic modeling of the lunar plasma environment [1]. However, observations show the existence of several species of the neutrals and pickup ions like Na, He, K, O etc., (see e.g., [2,3,4]). The solar wind parameters are chosen from the ARTEMIS observations [5]. The Na+, He+ lunar exosphere's parameters are chosen from [6,7]. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field, and on the lunar surface. Modeling shows the formation of the asymmetric Mach cone, the structuring of the pickup ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. We will compare the results of our modeling with observed distributions. References [1] Lipatov, A.S., and Cooper, J.F., Hybrid kinetic modeling of the Lunar plasma environment: Past, present and future. In: Lunar Dust, Plasma and Atmosphere: The Next Steps, January 27-29, 2010, Boulder, Colorado, Abstracts/lpa2010.colorado.edu/. [2] Potter, A.E., and Morgan, T.H., Discovery of sodium and potassium vapor in the atmosphere of the Moon, Science, 241, 675-680, doi:10.1126/science.241.4866.675, 1988. [3] Tyler, A.L., et al., Observations of sodium in the tenuous lunar atmosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 15(10), 1141-1144, doi:10.1029/GL015i010p01141, 1988. [4] Tanaka, T., et al., First in situ observation of the Moon-originating ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere by MAP-PACE on SELENE (KAGUYA), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L22106, doi:10.1029/2009GL040682, 2009. [5] Wiehle, S., et al., First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations, Planet

  18. Light-Driven Overall Water Splitting Enabled by a Photo-Dember Effect Realized on 3D Plasmonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Gu, Jiajun; Sun, Cheng; Zhao, Yixin; Zhang, Ruoxi; You, Xinyuan; Liu, Qinglei; Zhang, Wang; Su, Yishi; Su, Huilan; Zhang, Di

    2016-07-26

    Photoelectric conversion driven by sunlight has a broad range of energy/environmental applications (e.g., in solar cells and water splitting). However, difficulties are encountered in the separation of photoexcited charges. Here, we realize a long-range (∼1.5 μm period) electric polarization via asymmetric localization of surface plasmons on a three-dimensional silver structure (3D-Ag). This visible-light-responsive effect-the photo-Dember effect, can be analogous to the thermoelectric effect, in which hot carriers are thermally generated instead of being photogenerated. The induced electric field can efficiently separate photogenerated charges, enabling sunlight-driven overall water splitting on a series of dopant-free commercial semiconductor particles (i.e., ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, and WO3) once they are combined with the 3D-Ag substrate. These photocatalytic processes can last over 30 h on 3D-Ag+ZnO, 3D-Ag+CeO2, and 3D-Ag+TiO2, thus demonstrating good catalytic stability for these systems. Using commercial WO3 powder as a reference, the amount of O2 generated with 3D-Ag+CeO2 surpasses even its recently reported counterpart in which sacrificial reagents had to be involved to run half-reactions. This plasmon-mediated charge separation strategy provides an effective way to improve the efficiency of photoelectric energy conversion, which can be useful in photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

  19. Light-Driven Overall Water Splitting Enabled by a Photo-Dember Effect Realized on 3D Plasmonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Gu, Jiajun; Sun, Cheng; Zhao, Yixin; Zhang, Ruoxi; You, Xinyuan; Liu, Qinglei; Zhang, Wang; Su, Yishi; Su, Huilan; Zhang, Di

    2016-07-26

    Photoelectric conversion driven by sunlight has a broad range of energy/environmental applications (e.g., in solar cells and water splitting). However, difficulties are encountered in the separation of photoexcited charges. Here, we realize a long-range (∼1.5 μm period) electric polarization via asymmetric localization of surface plasmons on a three-dimensional silver structure (3D-Ag). This visible-light-responsive effect-the photo-Dember effect, can be analogous to the thermoelectric effect, in which hot carriers are thermally generated instead of being photogenerated. The induced electric field can efficiently separate photogenerated charges, enabling sunlight-driven overall water splitting on a series of dopant-free commercial semiconductor particles (i.e., ZnO, CeO2, TiO2, and WO3) once they are combined with the 3D-Ag substrate. These photocatalytic processes can last over 30 h on 3D-Ag+ZnO, 3D-Ag+CeO2, and 3D-Ag+TiO2, thus demonstrating good catalytic stability for these systems. Using commercial WO3 powder as a reference, the amount of O2 generated with 3D-Ag+CeO2 surpasses even its recently reported counterpart in which sacrificial reagents had to be involved to run half-reactions. This plasmon-mediated charge separation strategy provides an effective way to improve the efficiency of photoelectric energy conversion, which can be useful in photovoltaics and photocatalysis. PMID:27351779

  20. Effect of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on 3D equilibria in the MST RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The orientation of 3D, stellarator-like equilibria in the MST RFP can now be controlled with application of an m = 1 RMP. This has led to greatly improved diagnosis, revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. Coupled to a recent advance in the V3FIT code, reconstructions of the 3D equilibria have also been dramatically improved. The RMP also inhibits the generation of high-energy >20 keV electrons that is otherwise common with the 3D state. This state occurs when the normally broad spectrum of core-resonant m = 1 tearing modes condenses, with the innermost resonant mode growing to large amplitude, reaching ~ 8% of the axisymmetric field strength. This occurs in plasmas of sufficiently large Lundquist number ~ IpTe3/2, and the duration of the state is maximized with zero applied Bt (infinite toroidal beta). As the dominant mode grows, eddy current in MST's conducting shell slows the mode's rotation. This leads to locking of the 3D structure, but with an orientation that varies randomly shot to shot, making diagnosis difficult. An m = 1 RMP can now be applied with an array of saddle coils at the vertical insulated cut in the shell. With an amplitude br/B ~ 10% and a tailored temporal waveform, the RMP can force the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. A recent advance in V3FIT allows calculation of the substantial helical image current flowing in MST's shell, which has in turn allowed self-consistent utilization of both external and internal (Faraday rotation) measurements of the magnetic field. The ORBIT code predicts reduced stochasticity and improved confinement of high-energy electrons within the 3D structure. The suppression of these electrons by the m = 1 RMP may reflect a change to the central magnetic topology. The generation of these electrons is unaffected by non-resonant perturbations, such as m = 3. Supported by the US DOE.

  1. A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Song, A.; Li, X. D.; Lu, Y.; Yan, R.; Xu, B.; Li, X.

    2014-10-01

    A 3D reconstruction solution to ultrasound Joule heat density tomography based on acousto-electric effect by deconvolution is proposed for noninvasive imaging of biological tissue. Compared with ultrasound current source density imaging, ultrasound Joule heat density tomography doesn't require any priori knowledge of conductivity distribution and lead fields, so it can gain better imaging result, more adaptive to environment and with wider application scope. For a general 3D volume conductor with broadly distributed current density field, in the AE equation the ultrasound pressure can't simply be separated from the 3D integration, so it is not a common modulation and basebanding (heterodyning) method is no longer suitable to separate Joule heat density from the AE signals. In the proposed method the measurement signal is viewed as the output of Joule heat density convolving with ultrasound wave. As a result, the internal 3D Joule heat density can be reconstructed by means of Wiener deconvolution. A series of computer simulations set for breast cancer imaging applications, with consideration of ultrasound beam diameter, noise level, conductivity contrast, position dependency and size of simulated tumors, have been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and performance of the proposed reconstruction method. The computer simulation results demonstrate that high spatial resolution 3D ultrasound Joule heat density imaging is feasible using the proposed method, and it has potential applications to breast cancer detection and imaging of other organs.

  2. An interactive 3D visualization and manipulation tool for effective assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis using computed tomographic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Zhuang, Zhenwu; DeMuinck, Ebo; Huang, Heng; Makedon, Fillia; Pearlman, Justin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents IVM, an Interactive Vessel Manipulation tool that can help make effective and efficient assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in computed tomographic angiography (CTA) studies. IVM consists of three fundamental components: (1) a visualization component, (2) a tracing component, and (3) a measurement component. Given a user-specified threshold, IVM can create a 3D surface visualization based on it. Since vessels are thin and tubular structures, using standard isosurface extraction techniques usually cannot yield satisfactory reconstructions. Instead, IVM directly renders the surface of a derived binary 3D image. The image volumes collected in CTA studies often have a relatively high resolution. Thus, compared with more complicated vessel extraction and visualization techniques, rendering the binary image surface has the advantages of being effective, simple and fast. IVM employs a semi-automatic approach to determine the threshold: a user can adjust the threshold by checking the corresponding 3D surface reconstruction and make the choice. Typical tracing software often defines ROIs on 3D image volumes using three orthogonal views. The tracing component in IVM takes one step further: it can perform tracing not only on image slices but also in a 3D view. We observe that directly operating on a 3D view can help a tracer identify ROIs more easily. After setting a threshold and tracing an ROI, a user can use IVM's measurement component to estimate the volume and other parameters of vessels in the ROI. The effectiveness of the IVM tool is demonstrated on rat vessel/bone images collected in a previous CTA study.

  3. The effect of motion on IMRT - looking at interplay with 3D measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A.; Yan, H.; Oldham, M.; Juang, T.; Adamovics, J.; Yin, F. F.

    2013-06-01

    Clinical recommendations to address tumor motion management have been derived from studies dealing with simulations and 2D measurements. 3D measurements may provide more insight and possibly alter the current motion management guidelines. This study provides an initial look at true 3D measurements involving leaf motion deliveries by use of a motion phantom and the PRESAGE/DLOS dosimetry system. An IMRT and VMAT plan were delivered to the phantom and analyzed by means of DVHs to determine whether the expansion of treatment volumes based on known imaging motion adequately cover the target. DVHs confirmed that for these deliveries the expansion volumes were adequate to treat the intended target although further studies should be conducted to allow for differences in parameters that could alter the results, such as delivery dose and breathe rate.

  4. Effects of changes in rock microstructures on permeability: 3-D printing investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, D.; Vanorio, T.

    2016-07-01

    Rocks are naturally heterogeneous; two rock samples with identical bulk properties can vary widely in microstructure. Understanding how the microstructure and bulk properties of rocks then evolve during experiments and computations simulating diagenesis is inherently a multiscale problem. The advent of modern 3-D printing has provided an unprecedented opportunity to link those scales by combining the strengths of digital and experimental rock physics. In this study, we take a computerized tomography-scanned model of a natural carbonate pore space then iteratively digitally manipulate, 3-D print, and measure the flow properties in the laboratory. This approach allows us to access multiple scales digitally and experimentally and test hypotheses about how changes in rock microstructure due to compaction and dissolution affect bulk transport properties in a repeatable manner.

  5. Effect of geometry on drug release from 3D printed tablets.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Robles Martinez, Pamela; Buanz, Asma; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of combining hot melt extrusion (HME) with 3D printing (3DP) technology, with a view to producing different shaped tablets which would be otherwise difficult to produce using traditional methods. A filament extruder was used to obtain approx. 4% paracetamol loaded filaments of polyvinyl alcohol with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modelling 3DP. Five different tablet geometries were successfully 3D-printed-cube, pyramid, cylinder, sphere and torus. The printing process did not affect the stability of the drug. Drug release from the tablets was not dependent on the surface area but instead on surface area to volume ratio, indicating the influence that geometrical shape has on drug release. An erosion-mediated process controlled drug release. This work has demonstrated the potential of 3DP to manufacture tablet shapes of different geometries, many of which would be challenging to manufacture by powder compaction. PMID:25934428

  6. Effect of machining on the performance of carbon/epoxy 3-D woven composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M.; Carlson, C.; Gu, P.; Sadler, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper evaluates 3-D orthogonal woven Carbon/Epoxy composites with holes for joint locations. The preforms were manufactured on a newly patented automatic 3-D weaving machine developed at North Carolina State University. The machine uses an electronic jacquard head and is capable of weaving the holes in the preforms without cutting the fibers. Composites were made at NC A&T State University by a resin transfer molding technique using an epoxy resin and a special mold which allows the holes to be formed. Holes were also made in other samples by regular drilling. Specimens were subjected to tensile tests. Comparison is made between samples without holes and samples with holes created by the two methods.

  7. Kinetic depth effect and optic flow--I. 3D shape from Fourier motion.

    PubMed

    Dosher, B A; Landy, M S; Sperling, G

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-three different 3D shapes were defined by sequences of 2D views (frames) of dots on a rotating 3D surface. (1) Subjects' accuracy of shape identifications dropped from over 90% to less than 10% when either the polarity of the stimulus dots was alternated from light-on-gray to dark-on-gray on successive frames or when neutral gray interframe intervals were interposed. Both manipulations interfere with motion extraction by spatio-temporal (Fourier) and gradient first-order detectors. Second-order (non-Fourier) detectors that use full-wave rectification are unaffected by alternating-polarity but disrupted by interposed gray frames. (2) To equate the accuracy of two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) planar direction-of-motion discrimination in standard and polarity-alternated stimuli, standard contrast was reduced. 3D shape discrimination survived contrast reduction in standard stimuli whereas it failed completely with polarity-alternation even at full contrast. (3) When individual dots were permitted to remain in the image sequence for only two frames, performance showed little loss compared to standard displays where individual dots had an expected lifetime of 20 frames, showing that 3D shape identification does not require continuity of stimulus tokens. (4) Performance in all discrimination tasks is predicted (up to a monotone transformation) by considering the quality of first-order information (as given by a simple computation on Fourier power) and the number of locations at which motion information is required. Perceptual first-order analysis of optic flow is the primary substrate for structure-from-motion computations in random dot displays because only it offers sufficient quality of perceptual motion at a sufficient number of locations.

  8. The Effect of Ultrasound Stimulation on the Cytoskeletal Organization of Chondrocytes Seeded In 3D Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra; Hasanova, Gulnara; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    The impact of low intensity diffuse ultrasound (LIDUS) stimulation on the cytoskeletal organization of chondrocytes seeded in 3D scaffolds was evaluated. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D chitosan matrices were exposed to LIDUS at 5.0 MHz (~15kPa, 51-secs, 4-applications/day) in order to study the organization of actin, tubulin and vimentin. The results showed that actin presented a cytosolic punctuated distribution, tubulin presented a quasi parallel organization of microtubules whereas vimentin distribution was unaffected. Chondrocytes seeded on 3D scaffolds responded to US stimulation by the disruption of actin stress fibers and were sensitive to the presence of ROCK inhibitor (Y27632). The gene expression of ROCK-I, a key element in the formation of stress fibers and mDia1, was significantly up-regulated under the application of US. We conclude that the results of both the cytoskeletal analyses and gene expression support the argument that the presence of punctuated actin upon US stimulation was accompanied by the up-regulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. PMID:22987069

  9. 3D hydro-mechanically coupled groundwater flow modelling of Pleistocene glaciation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Bense, Victor F.; Sass, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    Pleistocene glaciation led to temporal and spatial variations of sub-surface pore fluid pressure. In basins covered by ice sheets, fluid flow and recharge rates are strongly elevated during glaciations as compared to inter-glacial periods. Present-day hydrogeological conditions across formerly glaciated areas are likely to still reflect the impact of glaciations that ended locally more than 10 thousand years before present. 3D hydro-mechanical coupled modelling of glaciation can help to improve the management of groundwater resources in formerly glaciated basins. An open source numerical code for solving linear elasticity, which is based on the finite element method (FEM) in 3D, has been developed. By coupling this code with existing 3D flow codes it is possible to enable hydro-mechanical coupled modelling. Results of two benchmark simulations are compared to existing analytical solutions to demonstrate the performance of the newly developed code. While the result for a fluid-structure coupled case is in reasonable agreement with the analytical model, the result for a classical structure-fluid coupled benchmark showed that the analytical solution only matches the numerical result when the relevant coupling parameter (loading efficiency) is known in advance. This indicates that the applicability of widely applied approaches using an extra term in the groundwater flow equation for vertical stress to simulate hydro-mechanical coupling might have to be re-evaluated. A case study with the commercial groundwater simulator FEFLOW demonstrates the newly developed solution.

  10. Reproducibly creating hierarchical 3D carbon to study the effect of Si surface functionalization on the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yuze; Flores, Jose F.; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Jinghua; Chuang, Yi-De; Lu, Jennifer Q.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new method to reproducibly fabricate functional 3D carbon structures directly on a current collector, e.g. stainless steel. The 3D carbon platform is formed by direct growth of upright arrays of carbon nanofiber bundles on a roughened surface of stainless steel via the seed-assisted approach. Each bundle consists of about 30 individual carbon nanofibers with a diameter of 18 nm on average. We have found that this new platform offers adequate structural integrity. As a result, no reduction of the surface area during downstream chemical functionalization was observed. With a fixed and reproducible 3D structure, the effect of the chemistry of the grafted species on the oxygen reduction reaction has been systematically investigated. This investigation reveals for the first time that non-conductive Si with an appropriate electronic structure distorts the carbon electronic structure and consequently enhances ORR electrocatalysis. The strong interface provides excellent electron connectivity according to electrochemical analysis. This highly reproducible and stable 3D platform can serve as a stepping-stone for the investigation of the effect of carbon surface functionalization on electrochemical reactions in general.We report a new method to reproducibly fabricate functional 3D carbon structures directly on a current collector, e.g. stainless steel. The 3D carbon platform is formed by direct growth of upright arrays of carbon nanofiber bundles on a roughened surface of stainless steel via the seed-assisted approach. Each bundle consists of about 30 individual carbon nanofibers with a diameter of 18 nm on average. We have found that this new platform offers adequate structural integrity. As a result, no reduction of the surface area during downstream chemical functionalization was observed. With a fixed and reproducible 3D structure, the effect of the chemistry of the grafted species on the oxygen reduction reaction has been systematically investigated. This

  11. A Platform for High-Throughput Testing of the Effect of Soluble Compounds on 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, Frédérique; Mazzeo, Aaron; Hong, Estrella; Ingber, Donald E.; Derda, Ratmir; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture could provide an important model of tissues in vivo, but assessing the effects of chemical compounds on cells in specific regions of 3D culture requires physical isolation of cells, and thus currently relies mostly on delicate and low-throughput methods. This paper describes a technique (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” CiGiP) that permits rapid assembly of arrays of 3D cell cultures, and convenient isolation of cells from specific regions of these cultures. The 3D cultures were generated by stacking sheets of 200-μm-thick paper, each sheet supporting 96 individual “spots” (thin circular slabs) of hydrogels containing cells, separated by hydrophobic material (wax, PDMS) impermeable to aqueous solutions, and hydrophilic and most hydrophobic solutes. A custom-made 96-well holder isolated the cell-containing zones from each other. Each well contained media to which a different compound could be added. After culture, and disassembly of the holder, peeling the layers apart ‘sectioned’ the individual 3D cultures into 200-μm-thick sections which were easy to analyze using 2D imaging (e.g., with a commercial gel scanner). This 96-well holder brings new utilities to high-throughput, cell-based screening, by combining the simplicity of CiGiP with the convenience of a microtiter plate. This work demonstrated the potential of this type of assays by examining the cytotoxic effects of phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and cyclophosphamide (CPA) on human breast cancer cells positioned at different separations from culture media in 3D cultures. PMID:23952342

  12. The Effect of 3D Virtual Learning Environment on Secondary School Third Grade Students' Attitudes toward Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    With this research, in Second Life environment which is a three dimensional online virtual world, it is aimed to reveal the effects of student attitudes toward mathematics courses and design activities which will enable the third grade students of secondary school (primary education seventh grade) to see the 3D objects in mathematics courses in a…

  13. 3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyeon; Kim, Dong-Eun; Sohn, MyungHee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness of 3D simulation technology for enhancing spatial visualization skills in apparel design education and further to suggest an innovative teaching approach using the technology. Apparel design majors in an introductory patternmaking course, at a large Midwestern University in the United…

  14. Simulating 3-D radiative transfer effects over the Sierra Nevada Mountains using WRF

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Lee, W. -L.; Leung, L. R.

    2012-01-01

    A surface solar radiation parameterization based on deviations between 3-D and conventional plane-parallel radiative transfer models has been incorporated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to understand the solar insolation over mountain/snow areas and to investigate the impact of the spatial and temporal distribution and variation of surface solar fluxes on land-surface processes. Using the Sierra-Nevada in the western United States as a testbed, we show that mountain effect could produce up to -50 to + 50 W m-2 deviations in the surface solar fluxes over the mountain areas, resulting in a temperature increase of up to 1 °C on the sunny side. Upward surface sensible and latent heat fluxes are modulated accordingly to compensate for the change in surface solar fluxes. Snow water equivalent and surface albedo both show decreases on the sunny side of the mountains, indicating more snowmelt and hence reduced snow albedo associated with more solar insolation due to mountain effect. Soil moisture increases on the sunny side of the mountains due to enhanced snowmelt, while decreases on the shaded side. Substantial differences are found in the morning hours from 8–10 a.m. and in the afternoon around 3–5 p.m., while differences around noon and in the early morning and late afternoon are comparatively smaller. Variation in the surface energy balance can also affect atmospheric processes, such as cloud fields, through the modulation of vertical thermal structure. Negative changes of up to -40 g m-2 are found in the cloud water path, associated with reductions in the surface insolation over the cloud region. The day-averaged deviations in the surface solar flux are positive over the mountain areas and negative in the valleys, with a range between -12~12 W m-2. Changes in sensible and latent heat fluxes and surface skin temperature follow the solar insolation pattern. Differences in the domain-averaged diurnal variation

  15. Theory of Space Charge Limited Current in Fractional Dimensional Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ang, L. K.

    The concept of fractional dimensional space has been effectively applied in many areas of physics to describe the fractional effects on the physical systems. We will present some recent developments of space charge limited (SCL) current in free space and solid in the framework of fractional dimensional space which may account for the effect of imperfectness or roughness of the electrode surface. For SCL current in free space, the governing law is known as the Child-Langmuir (CL) law. Its analogy in a trap-free solid (or dielectric) is known as Mott-Gurney (MG) law. This work extends the one-dimensional CL Law and MG Law for the case of a D-dimensional fractional space with 0 < D <= 1 where parameter D defines the degree of roughness of the electrode surface. Such a fractional dimensional space generalization of SCL current theory can be used to characterize the charge injection by the imperfectness or roughness of the surface in applications related to high current cathode (CL law), and organic electronics (MG law). In terms of operating regime, the model has included the quantum effects when the spacing between the electrodes is small.

  16. A coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs: Predicting 3D structure, stability and salt effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Feng-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2014-09-14

    To bridge the gap between the sequences and 3-dimensional (3D) structures of RNAs, some computational models have been proposed for predicting RNA 3D structures. However, the existed models seldom consider the conditions departing from the room/body temperature and high salt (1M NaCl), and thus generally hardly predict the thermodynamics and salt effect. In this study, we propose a coarse-grained model with implicit salt for RNAs to predict 3D structures, stability, and salt effect. Combined with Monte Carlo simulated annealing algorithm and a coarse-grained force field, the model folds 46 tested RNAs (≤45 nt) including pseudoknots into their native-like structures from their sequences, with an overall mean RMSD of 3.5 Å and an overall minimum RMSD of 1.9 Å from the experimental structures. For 30 RNA hairpins, the present model also gives the reliable predictions for the stability and salt effect with the mean deviation ∼ 1.0 °C of melting temperatures, as compared with the extensive experimental data. In addition, the model could provide the ensemble of possible 3D structures for a short RNA at a given temperature/salt condition.

  17. Integration Of 3D Geographic Information System (GIS) For Effective Waste Management Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, G.J.; Hecox, G.R.

    2006-07-01

    Soil remediation in response to the presence of residual radioactivity resulting from past MED/AEC activities is currently in progress under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program near the St. Louis, MO airport. During GY05, approximately 92,000 cubic meters (120,000 cubic yards) of radioactive soil was excavated, packaged and transported via rail for disposal at U.S. Ecology or Envirocare of Utah, LLC. To facilitate the management of excavation/transportation/disposal activities, a 3D GIS was developed for the site that was used to estimate the in-situ radionuclide activities, activities in excavation block areas, and shipping activities using a sum-of ratio (SOR) method for combining various radionuclide compounds into applicable transportation and disposal SOR values. The 3D GIS was developed starting with the SOR values for the approximately 900 samples from 90 borings. These values were processed into a three-dimensional (3D) point grid using kriging with nominal grid spacing of 1.5 by 1.5 meter horizontal by 0.3 meter vertical. The final grid, clipped to the area and soil interval above the planned base of excavation, consisted of 210,000 individual points. Standard GIS volumetric and spatial join procedures were used to calculate the volume of soil represented by each grid point, the base of excavation, depth below ground surface, elevation, surface elevation and SOR values for each point in the final grid. To create the maps needed for management, the point grid results were spatially joined to each excavation area in 0.9 meter (3 foot) depth intervals and the average SOR and total volumes were calculations. The final maps were color-coded for easy identification of areas above the specific transportation or disposal criteria. (authors)

  18. Sedimentary basin effects in Seattle, Washington: Ground-motion observations and 3D simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur; Stephenson, William; Carver, David

    2009-01-01

    Seismograms of local earthquakes recorded in Seattle exhibit surface waves in the Seattle basin and basin-edge focusing of S waves. Spectral ratios of Swaves and later arrivals at 1 Hz for stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin show a dependence on the direction to the earthquake, with earthquakes to the south and southwest producing higher average amplification. Earthquakes to the southwest typically produce larger basin surface waves relative to S waves than earthquakes to the north and northwest, probably because of the velocity contrast across the Seattle fault along the southern margin of the Seattle basin. S to P conversions are observed for some events and are likely converted at the bottom of the Seattle basin. We model five earthquakes, including the M 6.8 Nisqually earthquake, using 3D finite-difference simulations accurate up to 1 Hz. The simulations reproduce the observed dependence of amplification on the direction to the earthquake. The simulations generally match the timing and character of basin surface waves observed for many events. The 3D simulation for the Nisqually earth-quake produces focusing of S waves along the southern margin of the Seattle basin near the area in west Seattle that experienced increased chimney damage from the earthquake, similar to the results of the higher-frequency 2D simulation reported by Stephenson et al. (2006). Waveforms from the 3D simulations show reasonable agreement with the data at low frequencies (0.2-0.4 Hz) for the Nisqually earthquake and an M 4.8 deep earthquake west of Seattle.

  19. Effect of 3D animation videos over 2D video projections in periodontal health education among dental students

    PubMed Central

    Dhulipalla, Ravindranath; Marella, Yamuna; Katuri, Kishore Kumar; Nagamani, Penupothu; Talada, Kishore; Kakarlapudi, Anusha

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited evidence about the distinguished effect of 3D oral health education videos over conventional 2 dimensional projections in improving oral health knowledge. This randomized controlled trial was done to test the effect of 3 dimensional oral health educational videos among first year dental students. Materials and Methods: 80 first year dental students were enrolled and divided into two groups (test and control). In the test group, 3D animation and in the control group, regular 2D video projections pertaining to periodontal anatomy, etiology, presenting conditions, preventive measures and treatment of periodontal problems were shown. Effect of 3D animation was evaluated by using a questionnaire consisting of 10 multiple choice questions given to all participants at baseline, immediately after and 1month after the intervention. Clinical parameters like Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), and Oral Hygiene Index Simplified (OHI-S) were measured at baseline and 1 month follow up. Results: A significant difference in the post intervention knowledge scores was found between the groups as assessed by unpaired t-test (p<0.001) at baseline, immediate and after 1 month. At baseline, all the clinical parameters in the both the groups were similar and showed a significant reduction (p<0.001)p after 1 month, whereas no significant difference was noticed post intervention between the groups. Conclusion: 3D animation videos are more effective over 2D videos in periodontal disease education and knowledge recall. The application of 3D animation results also demonstrate a better visual comprehension for students and greater health care outcomes. PMID:26759805

  20. Reproducibly creating hierarchical 3D carbon to study the effect of Si surface functionalization on the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuze; Flores, Jose F; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Jinghua; Chuang, Yi-De; Lu, Jennifer Q

    2016-06-01

    We report a new method to reproducibly fabricate functional 3D carbon structures directly on a current collector, e.g. stainless steel. The 3D carbon platform is formed by direct growth of upright arrays of carbon nanofiber bundles on a roughened surface of stainless steel via the seed-assisted approach. Each bundle consists of about 30 individual carbon nanofibers with a diameter of 18 nm on average. We have found that this new platform offers adequate structural integrity. As a result, no reduction of the surface area during downstream chemical functionalization was observed. With a fixed and reproducible 3D structure, the effect of the chemistry of the grafted species on the oxygen reduction reaction has been systematically investigated. This investigation reveals for the first time that non-conductive Si with an appropriate electronic structure distorts the carbon electronic structure and consequently enhances ORR electrocatalysis. The strong interface provides excellent electron connectivity according to electrochemical analysis. This highly reproducible and stable 3D platform can serve as a stepping-stone for the investigation of the effect of carbon surface functionalization on electrochemical reactions in general. PMID:27217228

  1. 3-D Storybook: Effects on Surgical Knowledge and Anxiety Among Four- to Six-Year-Old Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Macindo, John Rey B; Macabuag, Katherine R; Macadangdang, Carlo Miguel P; Macaranas, Margaux Valerie S; Macarilay, Marianne Jezelle Jem T; Madriñan, Natasha Nikki M; Villarama, Rouena S

    2015-07-01

    Inadequate surgical knowledge potentiates anxiety; however, no methodology simultaneously addresses anxiety and surgical knowledge. Our quasi-experimental study determined the effectiveness of a three-dimensional (3-D) storybook in increasing surgical knowledge and decreasing anxiety among young children scheduled for planned or required major surgeries. We studied 20 randomly assigned participants who received either the 3-D storybook or traditional health teaching. A presurgical knowledge questionnaire and modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale assessed surgical knowledge and anxiety. Data were analyzed with one-way and repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance. Results showed that both groups had higher knowledge scores (F = 8.94; P = .008) and lower anxiety scores (F = 5.13; P = .036) after the intervention. The children who received information from the 3-D storybook exhibited a significantly higher posttest knowledge score (F = 11.71; P = .003) and lower anxiety score (F = 10.05; P = .005) than the traditionally educated group of children. The 3-D storybook effectively increased surgical knowledge and decreased anxiety and could be used as an alternative method to prepare pediatric surgical patients.

  2. Numeric description of space charge in polyethylene under ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, Z.; Chen, G.; Lewin, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Space charge in polyethylene-based insulation materials and its effect on the local electric field under a dc environment have been extensively examined over the last few decades while the behavior of space charge under ac stress has received less attention. Space charge phenomenon under ac electric fields becomes an important issue with increased operating field strength in many applications, such as next generation high voltage cables. In this paper, a bipolar charge transport model has been developed to simulate space charge in polymers under ac electric fields. Obtained simulation results show that there is a small quantity of phase-dependent bipolar charge accumulation in the vicinity of the electrodes that does not move into the bulk under ac stress. This causes a slight distortion of the local field in the bulk. However, at lower frequencies less than 1 Hz, there is increased charge accumulation and penetration. Comparison with available experimental data suggests that the model is capable of describing the underlying physics of charge behavior when a dielectric material is subjected to ac electric fields. Due to the weak charge movement in the bulk, the conduction current density is small and hence the displacement component dominates the total current density and this increases linearly with ac frequency.

  3. Correction of the deterministic part of space-charge interaction in momentum microscopy of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Schönhense, G; Medjanik, K; Tusche, C; de Loos, M; van der Geer, B; Scholz, M; Hieke, F; Gerken, N; Kirschner, J; Wurth, W

    2015-12-01

    Ultrahigh spectral brightness femtosecond XUV and X-ray sources like free electron lasers (FEL) and table-top high harmonics sources (HHG) offer fascinating experimental possibilities for analysis of transient states and ultrafast electron dynamics. For electron spectroscopy experiments using illumination from such sources, the ultrashort high-charge electron bunches experience strong space-charge interactions. The Coulomb interactions between emitted electrons results in large energy shifts and severe broadening of photoemission signals. We propose a method for a substantial reduction of the effect by exploiting the deterministic nature of space-charge interaction. The interaction of a given electron with the average charge density of all surrounding electrons leads to a rotation of the electron distribution in 6D phase space. Momentum microscopy gives direct access to the three momentum coordinates, opening a path for a correction of an essential part of space-charge interaction. In a first experiment with a time-of-flight momentum microscope using synchrotron radiation at BESSY, the rotation in phase space became directly visible. In a separate experiment conducted at FLASH (DESY), the energy shift and broadening of the photoemission signals were quantified. Finally, simulations of a realistic photoemission experiment including space-charge interaction reveals that a gain of an order of magnitude in resolution is possible using the correction technique presented here. PMID:26051657

  4. Correction of the deterministic part of space-charge interaction in momentum microscopy of charged particles.

    PubMed

    Schönhense, G; Medjanik, K; Tusche, C; de Loos, M; van der Geer, B; Scholz, M; Hieke, F; Gerken, N; Kirschner, J; Wurth, W

    2015-12-01

    Ultrahigh spectral brightness femtosecond XUV and X-ray sources like free electron lasers (FEL) and table-top high harmonics sources (HHG) offer fascinating experimental possibilities for analysis of transient states and ultrafast electron dynamics. For electron spectroscopy experiments using illumination from such sources, the ultrashort high-charge electron bunches experience strong space-charge interactions. The Coulomb interactions between emitted electrons results in large energy shifts and severe broadening of photoemission signals. We propose a method for a substantial reduction of the effect by exploiting the deterministic nature of space-charge interaction. The interaction of a given electron with the average charge density of all surrounding electrons leads to a rotation of the electron distribution in 6D phase space. Momentum microscopy gives direct access to the three momentum coordinates, opening a path for a correction of an essential part of space-charge interaction. In a first experiment with a time-of-flight momentum microscope using synchrotron radiation at BESSY, the rotation in phase space became directly visible. In a separate experiment conducted at FLASH (DESY), the energy shift and broadening of the photoemission signals were quantified. Finally, simulations of a realistic photoemission experiment including space-charge interaction reveals that a gain of an order of magnitude in resolution is possible using the correction technique presented here.

  5. Simulation of Space Charge Dynamic in Polyethylene Under DC Continuous Electrical Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhari, Hamed; Rogti, Fatiha

    2016-10-01

    The space charge dynamic plays a very important role in the aging and breakdown of polymeric insulation materials under high voltage. This is due to the intensification of the local electric field and the attendant chemical-mechanical effects in the vicinity around the trapped charge. In this paper, we have investigated the space charge dynamic in low-density polyethylene under high direct-current voltage, which is evaluated by experimental conditions. The evaluation is on the basis of simulation using a bipolar charge transport model consisting of charge injection, transports, trapping, detrapping, and recombination phenomena. The theoretical formulation of the physical problem is based on the Poisson, the continuity, and the transport equations. Numerical results provide temporal and local distributions of the electric field, the space charge density for the different kinds of charges (net charge density, mobile and trapped of electron density, mobile hole density), conduction and displacement current densities, and the external current. The result shows the appearance of the negative packet-like space charge with a large amount of the bulk under the dc electric field of 100 kV/mm, and the induced distortion of the electric field is largely near to the anode, about 39% higher than the initial electric field applied.

  6. Effect of fiber diameter on the assembly of functional 3D cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Miller, Jacob; Hurowitz, Haley; Shapira, Assaf; Dvir, Tal

    2015-07-01

    The cardiac ECM has a unique 3D structure responsible for tissue morphogenesis and strong contractions. It is divided into three fiber groups with specific roles and distinct dimensions; nanoscale endomysial fibers, perimysial fibers with a diameter of 1 μm, and epimysial fibers, which have a diameter of several micrometers. We report here on our work, where distinct 3D fibrous scaffolds, each of them recapitulating the dimension scales of a single fiber population in the heart matrix, were fabricated. We have assessed the mechanical properties of these scaffolds and the contribution of each fiber population to cardiomyocyte morphogenesis, tissue assembly and function. Our results show that the nanoscale fiber scaffolds were more elastic than the microscale scaffolds, however, cardiomyocytes cultured on microscale fiber scaffolds exhibited enhanced spreading and elongation, both on the single cell and on the engineered tissue levels. In addition, lower fibroblast proliferation rates were observed on these microscale topographies. Based on the collected data we have fabricated composite scaffolds containing micro and nanoscale fibers, promoting superior tissue morphogenesis without compromising tissue contraction. Cardiac tissues, engineered within these composite scaffolds exhibited superior function, including lower excitation threshold and stronger contraction forces than tissue engineered within the single-population fiber scaffolds.

  7. How effective can optical-CT 3D dosimetry be without refractive fluid matching?

    PubMed Central

    Rankine, L; Oldham

    2013-01-01

    Achieving accurate optical CT 3D dosimetry without the use of viscous refractive index (RI) matching fluids would greatly increase convenience. Software has been developed to simulate optical CT 3D dosimetry for a range of scanning configurations including parallel-beam, point and converging light sources. For each configuration the efficacy of 3 refractive media were investigated: air, water, and a fluid closely matched to Presage (RI = 1.00, 1.33 and 1.49 respectively). The results revealed that the useable radius of the dosimeter (i.e. where data was within 2% of truth) reduced to 68% for water-matching, and 31% for dry-scanning in air. Point source incident ray geometry produced slightly more favourable results, although variation between the three geometries was relatively small. The required detector size however, increased by a factor six for dry-scanning, introducing cost penalties. For applications where dose information is not required in the periphery, some dry and low-viscous matching configurations may be feasible. PMID:24454520

  8. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  9. Monte Carlo - Metropolis Investigations of Shape and Matrix Effects in 2D and 3D Spin-Crossover Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerroudj, Salim; Caballero, Rafael; De Zela, Francisco; Jureschi, Catalin; Linares, Jorge; Boukheddaden, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    The Ising like model, taking into account short-, long-range interaction as well as surface effects is used to investigate size and shape effects on the thermal behaviour of 2D and 3D spin crossover (SCO) nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. We analyze the role of the parametert, representing the ratio between the number of surface and volume molecules, on the unusual thermal hysteresis behaviour (appearance of the hysteresis and a re-entrance phase transition) at small scales.

  10. 3D Mapping of plasma effective areas via detection of cancer cell damage induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Yueing; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, a nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used for irradiation of oral cancer cells. Since cancer cells are very susceptible to plasma treatment, they can be used as a tool for detection of APPJ-effective areas, which extended much further than the visible part of the APPJ. An immunofluorescence assay was used for DNA damage identification, visualization and quantification. Thus, the effective damage area and damage level were determined and plotted as 3D images.

  11. 2D fluid model analysis for the effect of 3D gas flow on a capacitively coupled plasma deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The wide applicability of capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) deposition has increased the interest in developing comprehensive numerical models, but CCP imposes a tremendous computational cost when conducting a transient analysis in a three-dimensional (3D) model which reflects the real geometry of reactors. In particular, the detailed flow features of reactive gases induced by 3D geometric effects need to be considered for the precise calculation of radical distribution of reactive species. Thus, an alternative inclusive method for the numerical simulation of CCP deposition is proposed to simulate a two-dimensional (2D) CCP model based on the 3D gas flow results by simulating flow, temperature, and species fields in a 3D space at first without calculating the plasma chemistry. A numerical study of a cylindrical showerhead-electrode CCP reactor was conducted for particular cases of SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film. The proposed methodology produces numerical results for a 300 mm wafer deposition reactor which agree very well with the deposition rate profile measured experimentally along the wafer radius.

  12. The effect of 3D hydrogel scaffold modulus on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization revealed by combinatorial screening.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Wallace, William E; Parekh, Sapun H; Lee, Young Jong; Cicerone, Marcus T; Young, Marian F; Simon, Carl G

    2010-07-01

    Cells are known to sense and respond to the physical properties of their environment and those of tissue scaffolds. Optimizing these cell-material interactions is critical in tissue engineering. In this work, a simple and inexpensive combinatorial platform was developed to rapidly screen three-dimensional (3D) tissue scaffolds and was applied to screen the effect of scaffold properties for tissue engineering of bone. Differentiation of osteoblasts was examined in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel gradients spanning a 30-fold range in compressive modulus ( approximately 10 kPa to approximately 300 kPa). Results demonstrate that material properties (gel stiffness) of scaffolds can be leveraged to induce cell differentiation in 3D culture as an alternative to biochemical cues such as soluble supplements, immobilized biomolecules and vectors, which are often expensive, labile and potentially carcinogenic. Gel moduli of approximately 225 kPa and higher enhanced osteogenesis. Furthermore, it is proposed that material-induced cell differentiation can be modulated to engineer seamless tissue interfaces between mineralized bone tissue and softer tissues such as ligaments and tendons. This work presents a combinatorial method to screen biological response to 3D hydrogel scaffolds that more closely mimics the 3D environment experienced by cells in vivo.

  13. Space Charge Neutralization in the ITER Negative Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth

    2007-08-10

    A model of the space charge neutralization of negative ion beams, developed from the model due to Holmes, is applied to the ITER heating and diagnostic beams. The Holmes model assumed that the plasma electron temperature was derived from the stripped electrons. This is shown to be incorrect for the ITER beams and the plasma electron temperature is obtained from the average creation energy upon ionization. The model shows that both ITER beams will be fully space charge compensated in the drift distance between the accelerator and the neutralizer. Inside the neutralizer, the plasma over compensates the space charge to the extent that a significant focusing force is predicted. At a certain position in the neutraliser this force balances the defocusing force due to the ions' transverse energy. Under these conditions the beam distribution function can change from Gaussian to Bennett and evidence of such a distribution observed in a multi-aperture, neutralized negative ion beam is presented.

  14. Space-charge impedance calculations in long-wavelength approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1999-12-01

    Space-charge impedance calculations for smooth vacuum chambers with an arbitrary cross-section and perfectly conducting walls are considered in the long-wavelength approximation, when ωb/(βγc)≪1, where b is a typical transverse size. For the SNS beam energies βγ⩽1.8, and the wavelengths are long when λ≫b. Within the long-wavelength approximation, the fields can be found by solving a 2-D electrostatic problem. Two examples are presented: the space-charge impedance of screening wires (RF-cage) and of a ceramic chamber with inner metal stripes. In addition, we explore the transverse space-charge impedance of a circular pipe with account of betatron oscillations in a wide frequency range.

  15. Effect of high magnetic field on a quasi-3D silver dendrite growing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fengzhi; Katsuki, Akio; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    The Ag+/Cu liquid-solid redox reaction was investigated in a vertical and inhomogeneous high magnetic field (up to 15 T). According to a comparison between the morphologies of quasi-3D silver dendrites generated under different magnetic flux densities, the imposition of a high magnetic field strongly affected the aggregation process of the silver dendrites. The present experiment used four kinds of liquid-solid boundaries, which are affected by the reaction direction and solution condition, as bases for the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)-like dendritic growth of silver deposition. Results are interpreted in terms of convections of the aqueous solution and a tentative quantitative analysis of forces acting on particles arising from the magnetic field. A new force is predicted theoretically and is discussed in detail.

  16. Space charges and defect concentration profiles at complex oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, Felix; Waser, Rainer; Ramadan, Amr H. H.; De Souza, Roger A.; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Dittmann, Regina

    2016-06-01

    We discuss electronic and ionic defect concentration profiles at the conducting interface between the two wide-band-gap insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 (STO). The profiles are deduced from a thermodynamic model considering a local space charge layer (SCL) originating from charge transfer to the interface region, thus combining electronic and ionic reconstruction mechanisms. We show that the electrical potential confining the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface modifies the equilibrium defect concentrations in the SCL. For the n -conducting interface, positively charged oxygen vacancies are depleted within the SCL, while negatively charged strontium vacancies accumulate. Charge compensation within the SCL is achieved by a mixed ionic-electronic interface reconstruction, while the competition between 2DEG and localized ionic defects is controlled by ambient p O2 . The concentration of strontium vacancies increases drastically in oxidizing conditions and exhibits a steep depth profile towards the interface. Accounting for the low cation diffusivity in STO, we also discuss kinetic limitations of cation defect formation and the effect of a partial equilibration of the cation sublattice. We discuss the resulting implications for low temperature transport.

  17. String formulation of space charge forces in a deflecting bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The force between two moving point charges, because of its inverse square law singularity, cannot be applied directly in the numerical simulation of bunch dynamics; radiative effects make this especially true for short bunches being deflected by magnets. This paper describes a formalism circumventing this restriction in which the basic ingredient is the total force on a point charge comoving with a longitudinally aligned, uniformly charged string. Bunch evolution can then be treated using direct particle-to-particle, intrabeam scattering, with no need for an intermediate, particle-in-cell, step. Electric and magnetic fields do not appear individually in the theory. Since the basic formulas are both exact (in paraxial approximation) and fully relativistic, they are applicable to beams of all particle types and all energies. But the theory is expected to be especially useful for calculating the emittance growth of the ultrashort electron bunches of current interest for energy recovery linacs and free-electron lasers. The theory subsumes coherent synchrotron radiation and centrifugal space charge force. Renormalized, on-axis, longitudinal field components are in excellent agreement with values from Saldin et al. [DESY Report No. DESY-TESLA-FEL-96-14, 1995;

    Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. ANIMAER0168-9002 417, 158 (1998).10.1016/S0168-9002(98)00623-8

  18. North Cascadia heat flux and fluid flow from gas hydrates: Modeling 3-D topographic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-lin; He, Tao; Spence, George D.

    2014-01-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) of gas hydrate is well imaged from two perpendicular seismic grids in the region of a large carbonate mound, informally called Cucumber Ridge off Vancouver Island. We use a new method to calculate 3-D heat flow map from the BSR depths, in which we incorporate 3-D topographic corrections after calibrated by the drilling results from nearby (Integrated) Ocean Drilling Program Site 889 and Site U1327. We then estimate the associated fluid flow by relating it to the topographically corrected heat flux anomalies. In the midslope region, a heat flux anomaly of 1 mW/m2 can be associated with an approximate focused fluid flow rate of 0.09 mm/yr. Around Cucumber Ridge, high rates of focused fluid flow were observed at steep slopes with values more than double the average regional diffusive fluid discharge rate of 0.56 mm/yr. As well, in some areas of relatively flat seafloor, the focused fluid flow rates still exceeded 0.5 mm/yr. On the seismic lines the regions of focused fluid flow were commonly associated with seismic blanking zones above the BSR and sometimes with strong reflectors below the BSR, indicating that the faults/fractures provide high-permeability pathways for fluids to carry methane from BSR depths to the seafloor. These high fluid flow regions cover mostly the western portion of our area with gas hydrate concentration estimations of ~6% based on empirical correlations from Hydrate Ridge in south off Oregon, significantly higher than previously recognized values of ~2.5% in the eastern portion determined from Site U1327.

  19. Effect of 3d-metal doping on magnetic properties of Fe3 Se4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabirianov, Renat; Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Sengupta, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    Fe3Se4 exhibits large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MAE) and coercivity up 40kOe. The large anisotropy of Fe3Se4 should be accompanied by large magnetization for permanent magnet applications. The magnetization of Fe3Se4 suffers from antiferromagnetic (AFM) superexchange coupling of Fe across the Se planes. We present density functional theory study of the magnetic properties of Fe3Se4 doped with TM (Co, Cr, Ni and Mn), TM ions doped in Fe sites, Fe3-x(TM)xSe4 (x = 0.5), to examine a potential increase of the magnetization and Curie temperature of Fe3Se4. We performed screening of the exchange interactions and magnetization modifications upon the substitution of Fe by 3d-transition metals at various Fe sites in the Fe3Se4 We find that the doping of Fe3Se4 with 3d-elements does not remove AFM coupling across layers. The increase in the strength of exchange interactions on doping with Cr should increase the Curie temperature of the system. We compare the results of doped alloy with the ones for Cr3Te4. This compound is analogous to Fe3Se4 because Te has same electron configuration as Se, but Cr has only four d-electrons. We find that Cr3Te4 has ferromagnetic coupling and magnetization larger than one possible in Fe3Se4. Magnetization per unit cell is 18.24μB. MAE of this material is large (MAE =1.67 MJ/m3)

  20. Improved Space Charge Modeling for Simulation and Design of Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Robert H. Jackson, Thuc Bui, John Verboncoeur

    2010-04-19

    Photoinjectors in advanced high-energy accelerators reduce beam energy spreads and enhance undulator photon fluxes. Photoinjector design is difficult because of the substantial differences in time and spatial scales. This Phase I program explored an innovative technique, the local Taylor polynomial (LTP) formulation, for improving finite difference analysis of photoinjectors. This included improved weighting techniques, systematic formula for high order interpolation and electric field computation, and improved handling of space charge. The Phase I program demonstrated that the approach was powerful, accurate, and efficient. It handles space charge gradients better than currently available technology.

  1. Time-Dependent Effects of Pre-Aging 3D Polymer Scaffolds in Cell Culture Medium on Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Hung, Stevephen; Kumar, Girish; Simon, Carl G

    2012-01-01

    Protein adsorption is known to direct biological response to biomaterials and is important in determining cellular response in tissue scaffolds. In this study we investigated the effect of the duration of protein adsorption to 3D polymer scaffolds on cell attachment and proliferation. 3D macro-porous polymer scaffolds were pre-aged in serum-containing culture medium for 5 min, 1 d or 7 d prior to seeding osteoblasts. The total amount of protein adsorbed was found to increase with pre-ageing time. Cell attachment and proliferation were measured 1 d and 14 d, respectively, after cell seeding. Osteoblast proliferation, but not attachment, increased with scaffold pre-ageing time and amount of adsorbed serum protein. These results demonstrate that the amount of time that scaffolds are exposed to serum-containing medium can affect cell proliferation and suggest that these effects are mediated by differences in the amount of protein adsorption.

  2. First Principles Study of Effect of 3d Transition Metal-Doped Zinc Oxide on Gas Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Murakami, Ri-Ichi

    Two series models were developed in order to investigate the gas sensitivity of 3d transition metal-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) materials. Software based on a discrete variation method (DVM) within the framework of density functional theory was used to calculate the electronic structures of the models. It was possible to determine gas sensitivity using the calculated results, from which a relationship between electronic properties and gas sensitivity was formed. The results showed that doping the transition metals greatly affected the gas sensitivity of ZnO-based materials. The main effect was attributed to the change in carrier concentration. On the contrary, the doping of transition metals had a negligible effect on the mobility of ZnO-based materials. Titanium or iron doped-ZnO is thus expected to have the best gas sensitivity of all of the 3d transition metal-doped ZnO materials.

  3. Fast 3D Net Expeditions: Tools for Effective Scientific Collaboration on the World Wide Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two new technologies, the FASTexpedition and Remote FAST, have been developed that provide remote, 3D (three dimensional), high resolution, dynamic, interactive viewing of scientific data. The FASTexpedition permits one to access scientific data from the World Wide Web, take guided expeditions through the data, and continue with self controlled expeditions through the data. Remote FAST permits collaborators at remote sites to simultaneously view an analysis of scientific data being controlled by one of the collaborators. Control can be transferred between sites. These technologies are now being used for remote collaboration in joint university, industry, and NASA projects. Also, NASA Ames Research Center has initiated a project to make scientific data and guided expeditions through the data available as FASTexpeditions on the World Wide Web for educational purposes. Previously, remote visualization of dynamic data was done using video format (transmitting pixel information) such as video conferencing or MPEG (Motion Picture Expert Group) movies on the Internet. The concept for this new technology is to send the raw data (e.g., grids, vectors, and scalars) along with viewing scripts over the Internet and have the pixels generated by a visualization tool running on the viewers local workstation. The visualization tool that is currently used is FAST (Flow Analysis Software Toolkit). The advantages of this new technology over using video format are: (1) The visual is much higher in resolution (1280x1024 pixels with 24 bits of color) than typical video format transmitted over the network. (2) The form of the visualization can be controlled interactively (because the viewer is interactively controlling the visualization tool running on his workstation). (3) A rich variety of guided expeditions through the data can be included easily. (4) A capability is provided for other sites to see a visual analysis of one site as the analysis is interactively performed. Control of

  4. An Orientation Measurement Method Based on Hall-effect Sensors for Permanent Magnet Spherical Actuators with 3D Magnet Array

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators. PMID:25342000

  5. An Orientation Measurement Method Based on Hall-effect Sensors for Permanent Magnet Spherical Actuators with 3D Magnet Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I.-Ming

    2014-10-01

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  6. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  7. Effects of changes in size, speed and distance on the perception of curved 3D trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjun; Braunstein, Myron L.; Andersen, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the perception of 3D object motion has considered time to collision, time to passage, collision detection and judgments of speed and direction of motion, but has not directly studied the perception of the overall shape of the motion path. We examined the perception of the magnitude of curvature and sign of curvature of the motion path for objects moving at eye level in a horizontal plane parallel to the line of sight. We considered two sources of information for the perception of motion trajectories: changes in angular size and changes in angular speed. Three experiments examined judgments of relative curvature for objects moving at different distances. At the closest distance studied, accuracy was high with size information alone but near chance with speed information alone. At the greatest distance, accuracy with size information alone decreased sharply but accuracy for displays with both size and speed information remained high. We found similar results in two experiments with judgments of sign of curvature. Accuracy was higher for displays with both size and speed information than with size information alone, even when the speed information was based on parallel projections and was not informative about sign of curvature. For both magnitude of curvature and sign of curvature judgments, information indicating that the trajectory was curved increased accuracy, even when this information was not directly relevant to the required judgment. PMID:23007204

  8. Orbital and anisotropy effects on the itinerant exchange interaction in 3D Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa, Sergio; Mastrogiuseppe, Diego; Sandler, Nancy

    Dirac semimetals are new materials that can be considered analogues of graphene in three dimensions. Their band structure exhibits robust Dirac points that are protected by crystalline symmetry, and strong spin-orbit interaction. These unusual properties suggest that magnetic impurities may reveal exotic behavior with potential technological importance. In metallic hosts, magnetic impurities interact through the electron gas via the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction that depends strongly on the band structure of the material. We report on the RKKY interaction in 3D Dirac semimetals, such as Na3Bi and Cd3As2. We discuss asymptotic expressions for the interaction corresponding to settings with magnetic impurities at different distances and relative angle with respect to high symmetry directions on the lattice. We show that the Fermi velocity anisotropy produces a strong renormalization of the magnitude of the interaction, and a correction to the frequency of oscillation in real space. Hybridization of the impurities to different conduction electron orbitals results in interesting anisotropic interactions which can generate spiral spin structures in doped samples

  9. 3-D FEM Modeling of fiber/matrix interface debonding in UD composites including surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupurs, A.; Varna, J.

    2012-02-01

    Fiber/matrix interface debond growth is one of the main mechanisms of damage evolution in unidirectional (UD) polymer composites. Because for polymer composites the fiber strain to failure is smaller than for the matrix multiple fiber breaks occur at random positions when high mechanical stress is applied to the composite. The energy released due to each fiber break is usually larger than necessary for the creation of a fiber break therefore a partial debonding of fiber/matrix interface is typically observed. Thus the stiffness reduction of UD composite is contributed both from the fiber breaks and from the interface debonds. The aim of this paper is to analyze the debond growth in carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy UD composites using fracture mechanics principles by calculation of energy release rate GII. A 3-D FEM model is developed for calculation of energy release rate for fiber/matrix interface debonds at different locations in the composite including the composite surface region where the stress state differs from the one in the bulk composite. In the model individual partially debonded fiber is surrounded by matrix region and embedded in a homogenized composite.

  10. Acute effects of delayed reperfusion following myocardial infarction: a 3D x-ray imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simari, Robert D.; Bell, M. R.; Pao, Y. C.; Gersh, B. J.; Ritman, Erik L.

    1996-04-01

    Clinical and experimental data suggest that delayed reperfusion of the infarct related artery may limit infarct expansion without increasing myocardial salvage. In order to assess the potential mechanisms involved, an acute closed chest canine model of myocardial infarction and delayed reperfusion was studied. Nineteen dogs underwent 3D computed tomography in the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (a fast, volume imaging, CT scanner) at baseline and three and four hours later to estimate left ventricular chamber volumes, global distensibility and regional myocardial stiffness. A control group was scanned without intervention. An occlusion group underwent four hours of coronary artery occlusion. A reperfusion group underwent three hours of coronary artery occlusion followed by one hour of reperfusion. Similar infarct sizes were seen in the occlusion and reperfusion groups. Globally reperfusion was associated with increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and prolongation of global relaxation. Regionally reperfusion was associated with increased myocardial stiffness, intramyocardial blood volume and wall thickness within the infarct zone relative to the not reperfused myocardium.

  11. CFD Code Calibration and Inlet-Fairing Effects On a 3D Hypersonic Powered-Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) computational study has been performed addressing issues related to the wind tunnel testing of a hypersonic powered-simulation model. The study consisted of three objectives. The first objective was to calibrate a state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code in its ability to predict hypersonic powered-simulation flows by comparing CFD solutions with experimental surface pressure data. Aftbody lower surface pressures were well predicted, but lower surface wing pressures were less accurately predicted. The second objective was to determine the 3D effects on the aftbody created by fairing over the inlet; this was accomplished by comparing the CFD solutions of two closed-inlet powered configurations with a flowing- inlet powered configuration. Although results at four freestream Mach numbers indicate that the exhaust plume tends to isolate the aftbody surface from most forebody flow- field differences, a smooth inlet fairing provides the least aftbody force and moment variation compared to a flowing inlet. The final objective was to predict and understand the 3D characteristics of exhaust plume development at selected points on a representative flight path. Results showed a dramatic effect of plume expansion onto the wings as the freestream Mach number and corresponding nozzle pressure ratio are increased.

  12. Effect of space balance 3D training using visual feedback on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ko, YoungJun; Ha, HyunGeun; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, WanHee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of balance training with Space Balance 3D, which is a computerized measurement and visual feedback balance assessment system, on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This was a randomized controlled trial in which 52 subjects were assigned randomly into either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group, which contained 26 subjects, received balance training with a Space Balance 3D exercise program and conventional physical therapy interventions 5 times per week during 3 weeks. Outcome measures were examined before and after the 3-week interventions using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS). The data were analyzed by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 19.0. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant interaction effect between group and time period for both groups before and after the interventions in the BBS score, TUG score, and PASS score. In addition, the experimental group showed more improvement than the control group in the BBS, TUG and PASS scores, but the differences were not significant. In the comparisons within the groups by time, both groups showed significant improvement in BBS, TUG, and PASS scores. [Conclusion] The Space Balance 3D training with conventional physical therapy intervention is recommended for improvement of balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. PMID:26157270

  13. Effect of space balance 3D training using visual feedback on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Ko, YoungJun; Ha, HyunGeun; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, WanHee

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of balance training with Space Balance 3D, which is a computerized measurement and visual feedback balance assessment system, on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This was a randomized controlled trial in which 52 subjects were assigned randomly into either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group, which contained 26 subjects, received balance training with a Space Balance 3D exercise program and conventional physical therapy interventions 5 times per week during 3 weeks. Outcome measures were examined before and after the 3-week interventions using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS). The data were analyzed by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 19.0. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant interaction effect between group and time period for both groups before and after the interventions in the BBS score, TUG score, and PASS score. In addition, the experimental group showed more improvement than the control group in the BBS, TUG and PASS scores, but the differences were not significant. In the comparisons within the groups by time, both groups showed significant improvement in BBS, TUG, and PASS scores. [Conclusion] The Space Balance 3D training with conventional physical therapy intervention is recommended for improvement of balance and mobility in acute stroke patients.

  14. Effect of GIA models with 3D composite mantle viscosity on GRACE mass balance estimates for Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wal, Wouter; Whitehouse, Pippa L.; Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    2015-03-01

    Seismic data indicate that there are large viscosity variations in the mantle beneath Antarctica. Consideration of such variations would affect predictions of models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), which are used to correct satellite measurements of ice mass change. However, most GIA models used for that purpose have assumed the mantle to be uniformly stratified in terms of viscosity. The goal of this study is to estimate the effect of lateral variations in viscosity on Antarctic mass balance estimates derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data. To this end, recently-developed global GIA models based on lateral variations in mantle temperature are tuned to fit constraints in the northern hemisphere and then compared to GPS-derived uplift rates in Antarctica. We find that these models can provide a better fit to GPS uplift rates in Antarctica than existing GIA models with a radially-varying (1D) rheology. When 3D viscosity models in combination with specific ice loading histories are used to correct GRACE measurements, mass loss in Antarctica is smaller than previously found for the same ice loading histories and their preferred 1D viscosity profiles. The variation in mass balance estimates arising from using different plausible realizations of 3D viscosity amounts to 20 Gt/yr for the ICE-5G ice model and 16 Gt/yr for the W12a ice model; these values are larger than the GRACE measurement error, but smaller than the variation arising from unknown ice history. While there exist 1D Earth models that can reproduce the total mass balance estimates derived using 3D Earth models, the spatial pattern of gravity rates can be significantly affected by 3D viscosity in a way that cannot be reproduced by GIA models with 1D viscosity. As an example, models with 1D viscosity always predict maximum gravity rates in the Ross Sea for the ICE-5G ice model, however, for one of the three preferred 3D models the maximum (for the same ice model) is found

  15. Study of longitudinal dynamics in space-charge dominated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Kai

    Modern accelerator applications, such as heavy ion fusion drivers, pulsed neutron sources, electron injectors for high-energy linear colliders, and X-ray Free Electron Lasers, demand beams with high intensity, low emittance and small energy spread. At low (non-relativistic) energies, the "electrostatic", collective interactions from space-charge forces existing in such intense beams play the dominant role; we characterize these beams as space-charge dominated beams. This dissertation presents numerous new findings on the longitudinal dynamics of a space-charge dominated beam, particularly on the propagation of density perturbations. In order to fully understand the complex physics of longitudinal space-charge waves, we combine the results of theory, computer simulation, and experiment. In the Long Solenoid Experimental system (LSE), with numerous diagnostic tools and techniques, we have, for the first time, experimentally measured the detailed energy profiles of longitudinal space-charge waves at different locations, both near the beam source and at the end of the transport system. Along with the current profiles, we have a complete set of experimental data for the propagation of space-charge waves. We compare these measured results to a 1-D theory and find better agreement for beams with perturbations in the linear regime, where the perturbation strength is less than 10%, than those with nonlinear perturbations. Using fast imaging techniques that we newly developed, we have, for the first time, obtained the progressive time-resolved images of longitudinal slices of a space-charge dominated beam. These images not only provide us time-resolved transverse density distribution of the beam, but also enable us to take time-resolved transverse phase space measurement using computerized tomography. By combining this information with the longitudinal energy measurement, we have, for the first time, experimentally constructed the full 6-D phase space. Part of the results

  16. Effect of 3-D viscoelastic structure on post-seismic relaxation from the 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.; Banerjee, P.; Grijalva, K.; Nagarajan, B.; Burgmann, R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake profoundly altered the state of stress in a large volume surrounding the ???1400 km long rupture. Induced mantle flow fields and coupled surface deformation are sensitive to the 3-D rheology structure. To predict the post-seismic motions from this earthquake, relaxation of a 3-D spherical viscoelastic earth model is simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The quasi-static deformation basis set and solution on the 3-D model is constructed using: a spherically stratified viscoelastic earth model with a linear stress-strain relation; an aspherical perturbation in viscoelastic structure; a 'static'mode basis set consisting of Earth's spheroidal and toroidal free oscillations; a "viscoelastic" mode basis set; and interaction kernels that describe the coupling among viscoelastic and static modes. Application to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake illustrates the profound modification of the post-seismic flow field at depth by a slab structure and similarly large effects on the near-field post-seismic deformation field at Earth's surface. Comparison with post-seismic GPS observations illustrates the extent to which viscoelastic relaxation contributes to the regional post-seismic deformation. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  17. 3-D viscous flow CFD analysis of the propeller effect on an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1993-01-01

    The time-marching Navier-Stokes code PARC3D was used to study the 3D viscous flow associated with an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet at take-off operating conditions. At a free stream Mach number of 0.2, experimental data for the inlet-with-propeller test model indicated that the airflow was attached on the cowl windward lip at an angle of attack of 25 deg became unstable at 29 deg, and separated at 30 deg. An experimental study with a similar inlet and without propeller (through-flow) indicated that flow separation occurred at an angle of attack a few degrees below the value observed when the inlet was tested with the propeller, indicating the propeller's favorable effect on inlet performance. In the present numerical study, flow blockage analogous to the propeller was modeled via a PARC3D computational boundary condition (BC), the 'screen BC', based on 1-1/2 dimension actuator disk theory. The application of the screen BC in this numerical study provided results similar to those of past experimental efforts in which either the blockage device or the propeller was used.

  18. Transition to Turbulence and Effect of Initial Conditions on 3D Compressible Mixing in Planar Blast-wave-driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, A R; Edwards, M J; Greenough, J A

    2004-11-08

    Perturbations on an interface driven by a strong blast wave grow in time due to a combination of Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and decompression effects. In this paper, results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of such a system under drive conditions to be attainable on the National Ignition Facility [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams, 9(2), 209 (1991)] are presented. Using the multi-physics, adaptive mesh refinement, higher order Godunov Eulerian hydrocode, Raptor [L. H. Howell and J.A. Greenough, J. Comp. Phys. 184, 53 (2003)], the late nonlinear instability evolution, including transition to turbulence, is considered for various multimode perturbation spectra. The 3D post-transition state differs from the 2D result, but the process of transition proceeds similarly in both 2D and 3D. The turbulent mixing transition results in a reduction in the growth rate of the mixing layer relative to its pre-transition value and, in the case of the bubble front, relative to the 2D result. The post-transition spike front velocity is approximately the same in 2D and 3D. Implications for hydrodynamic mixing in core-collapse supernova are discussed.

  19. Seismic Hazard Maps for Seattle, Washington, Incorporating 3D Sedimentary Basin Effects, Nonlinear Site Response, and Rupture Directivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Stephenson, William J.; Carver, David L.; Williams, Robert A.; Odum, Jack K.; Rhea, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This report presents probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Seattle, Washington, based on over 500 3D simulations of ground motions from scenario earthquakes. These maps include 3D sedimentary basin effects and rupture directivity. Nonlinear site response for soft-soil sites of fill and alluvium was also applied in the maps. The report describes the methodology for incorporating source and site dependent amplification factors into a probabilistic seismic hazard calculation. 3D simulations were conducted for the various earthquake sources that can affect Seattle: Seattle fault zone, Cascadia subduction zone, South Whidbey Island fault, and background shallow and deep earthquakes. The maps presented in this document used essentially the same set of faults and distributed-earthquake sources as in the 2002 national seismic hazard maps. The 3D velocity model utilized in the simulations was validated by modeling the amplitudes and waveforms of observed seismograms from five earthquakes in the region, including the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake. The probabilistic seismic hazard maps presented here depict 1 Hz response spectral accelerations with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years. The maps are based on determinations of seismic hazard for 7236 sites with a spacing of 280 m. The maps show that the most hazardous locations for this frequency band (around 1 Hz) are soft-soil sites (fill and alluvium) within the Seattle basin and along the inferred trace of the frontal fault of the Seattle fault zone. The next highest hazard is typically found for soft-soil sites in the Duwamish Valley south of the Seattle basin. In general, stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin exhibit higher hazard than stiff-soil sites outside the basin. Sites with shallow bedrock outside the Seattle basin have the lowest estimated hazard for this frequency band.

  20. Differential algebraic methods for space charge modeling and applications to the University of Maryland Electron Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, Edward W.

    2011-12-01

    The future of particle accelerators is moving towards the intensity frontier; the need to place more particles into a smaller space is a common requirement of nearly all applications of particle accelerators. Putting large numbers of particles in a small space means that the mutual repulsion of these charged particles becomes a significant factor, this effect is called space charge. In this work we develop a series of differential algebra based methods to simulate the effects of space charge in particle accelerators. These methods were used to model the University of Maryland Electron Ring, a small 3.8 meter diameter 10 KeV electron storage ring designed to observe the effects of space charge in a safe, cost effective manner. The methods developed here are designed to not only simulate the effects of space charge on the motions of the test particles in the system but to add their effects to the transfer map of the system. Once they have been added useful information about the beam, such as tune shifts and chromaticities, can be extracted directly from the map. In order to make the simulation self consistent, the statistical moments of the distribution are used to create a self consistent Taylor series representing the distribution function, which is combined with pre-stored integrals solved using a Duffy transformation to find the potential. This method can not only find the map of the system, but also advance the particles under most conditions. For conditions where it cannot be used to accurately advance the particles a differential algebra based fast multipole method is implemented. By using differential algebras to create local expansions, noticeable time savings are found.

  1. Probing space charge and resolving overlimiting current mechanisms at the microchannel-nanochannel interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Liel, Uri; Leibowitz, Neta; Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-07-01

    We present results demonstrating the space charge-mediated transition between classical, diffusion-limited current and surface-conduction dominant over-limiting current in a shallow microchannel-nanochannel device. The extended space charge layer develops at the depleted microchannel-nanochannel entrance at high current and is correlated with a distinctive maximum in the dc resistance. Experimental results for a shallow surface-conduction dominated system are compared with theoretical models, allowing estimates of the effective surface charge at high voltage to be obtained. In comparison to an equilibrium estimate of the surface charge obtained from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, it is further observed that the effective surface charge appears to change under applied voltage.

  2. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  3. Space charge corrected electron emission from an aluminum surface under non-equilibrium conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelen, W.; Bogaerts, A.; Mueller, B. Y.; Rethfeld, B.; Autrique, D.

    2012-06-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted of ultrashort pulsed laser induced electron emission from an aluminum surface. Electron emission fluxes retrieved from the commonly employed Fowler-DuBridge theory were compared to fluxes based on a laser-induced non-equilibrium electron distribution. As a result, the two- and three-photon photoelectron emission parameters for the Fowler-DuBridge theory have been approximated. We observe that at regimes where photoemission is important, laser-induced electron emission evolves in a more smooth manner than predicted by the Fowler-DuBridge theory. The importance of the actual electron distribution decreases at higher laser fluences, whereas the contribution of thermionic emission increases. Furthermore, the influence of a space charge effect on electron emission was evaluated by a one dimensional particle-in-cell model. Depending on the fluences, the space charge reduces the electron emission by several orders of magnitude. The influence of the electron emission flux profiles on the effective electron emission was found to be negligible. However, a non-equilibrium electron velocity distribution increases the effective electron emission significantly. Our results show that it is essential to consider the non-equilibrium electron distribution as well as the space charge effect for the description of laser-induced photoemission.

  4. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  5. Multi-scale simulation flow and multi-scale materials characterization for stress management in 3D through-silicon-via integration technologies - Effect of stress on 3D IC interconnect reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Valeriy; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2014-06-01

    The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze any design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-layers implications in 3D IC reliability caused by through-silicon-via (TSV) and chip-package interaction (CPI) induced mechanical stresses. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities of 3D IC stacks and a strict "good die" requirement make this type of analysis really critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, to assess the mechanical stress across the dies stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology, is proposed. As an example the effect of CPI/TSV induced stresses on stress migration (SM) and electromigration (EM) in the back-end-of-line (BEoL) and backside-redistribution-layer (BRDL) interconnect lines is considered. A strategy for a simulation feeding data generation and a respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. A calibration technique based on fitting the simulation results to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is discussed.

  6. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Marty-Dessus, D. Ziani, A. C.; Berquez, L.; Petre, A.

    2015-04-15

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  7. Space charge distributions in insulating polymers: A new non-contacting way of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty-Dessus, D.; Ziani, A. C.; Petre, A.; Berquez, L.

    2015-04-01

    A new technique for the determination of space charge profiles in insulating polymers is proposed. Based on the evolution of an existing thermal wave technique called Focused Laser Intensity Modulation Method ((F)LIMM), it allows non-contact measurements on thin films exhibiting an internal charge to be studied. An electrostatic model taking into account the new sample-cell geometry proposed was first developed. It has been shown, in particular, that it was theoretically possible to calculate the internal charge from experimental measurements while allowing an evaluation of the air layer appearing between the sample and the electrode when non-contact measurements are performed. These predictions were confirmed by an experimental implementation for two thin polymer samples (25 μm-polyvinylidenefluoride and 50 μm-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) used as tests. In these cases, minimum air-layer thickness was determined with an accuracy of 3% and 20%, respectively, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio during the experimental procedure. In order to illustrate the reachable possibilities of this technique, 2D and 3D cartographies of a negative space charge implanted by electron beam within the PTFE test sample were depicted: like in conventional (F)LIMM, a multidimensional representation of a selectively implanted charge remains possible at a few microns depth, but using a non-contacting way of measurement.

  8. [Effect of Temperatures and Lead Ions on 3D-EEMs of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) Derived from Straw Humification].

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-hui; Zhang, Ying-chao; Wang, Jia-hong

    2015-11-01

    Straw incorporation is significant for straw reduction and reutilization, and is clearly required in the twelfth five-year-plan for national economic and social development of the People's Republic of China. The incorporated straw will naturally decompose and release the component of dissolved organic matter (DOM). At present, it lacks the research on straw humification behavior controlled by environmental factors and complexation effect between humification component and metal ions with fluorescence spectrometry in the representative region of loess. The fluorescence spectrometry was used to reveal the 3D-EEMs characteristics of DOM affected by temperatures and lead ions in the straw humification process, and the modified Stern-Volmer equation and Van't Hoff equation were applied to indicate the complexation parameters and thermodynamic constants between lead ions and DOM. The results showed: the humification temperatures affected little on fluorescence peaks of DOM and no peaks were obviously found to appear or disappear from the 3D-EEMs results. The fluorescence intensity decreased gradually at higher temperatures and in the presence of lead ions, the quenching effect might work in the process. The binding ability was more significant between lead ions and visible fulvic-like component shown from modified Stern-Volmer equation, and the values of ƒ revealed the complexation effect of lead ions and functional groups in DOM. Static quenching was the primary mechanism during the reaction process. The constants in Van't Hoff equation suggested the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic, and the disordered degree and the complexity were relatively low in the reaction system. The 3D-EEMs were acceptable to illustrate the variation of DOM characteristics under different temperatures and in the presence of lead ions in the straw humification process. PMID:26978920

  9. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  10. Evaluation of breathing interplay effects during VMAT by using 3D gel measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceberg, S.; Ceberg, C.; Falk, M.; Rosenschöld, P. Munk af; Bäck, S. ÅJ

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory motion during dynamic radiotherapy may affect the absorbed dose distribution both by dose-reducing smoothing and by more complicated interplay effects. In this study we present a novel method to determine the relative importance of these two effects. For the two dynamic deliveries studied in this work, the expected target dose reduction due to the smoothing effect was estimated by measurements convolved by the motion function. Remaining absorbed dose differences were attributed to interplay effects between the motion of the gel phantom and the movement of the modulating MLC leaves during modulated arc radiotherapy. The total dosimetric effect due to breathing motion and dynamic MLC motion during VMAT delivery resulted in an average of about 4% target dose reduction. Comparing with only the smoothing effect, the average difference was decreased to around 1%, and the remaining distribution was attributed to interplay effects. Although the interplay effects were small compared to the smoothing effect, the standard deviations of 1.4-2.3% (1SD) were larger than the narrow distribution for repeated stationary measurement with a standard deviation between 0.5-0.9% (1SD).

  11. Application of Gauss's law space-charge limited emission model in iterative particle tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeyev, V. V.; Ponomarev, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    The particle tracking method with a so-called gun iteration for modeling the space charge is discussed in the following paper. We suggest to apply the emission model based on the Gauss's law for the calculation of the space charge limited current density distribution using considered method. Based on the presented emission model we have developed a numerical algorithm for this calculations. This approach allows us to perform accurate and low time consumpting numerical simulations for different vacuum sources with the curved emitting surfaces and also in the presence of additional physical effects such as bipolar flows and backscattered electrons. The results of the simulations of the cylindrical diode and diode with elliptical emitter with the use of axysimmetric coordinates are presented. The high efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach are confirmed by the obtained results and comparisons with the analytical solutions.

  12. Space-charge impedance of rf-shielding wires with external ceramic and conducting pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Gluckstern, Robert L.

    2001-10-01

    We studied the electrostatic field due to a charged-particle beam with uniform particle density propagating inside an rf-shielding cage (rf cage) constructed from evenly spaced conducting wires. The beam and the rf cage are surrounded by a ceramic beam pipe positioned inside a conducting pipe concentric with the beam and the rf cage. The space-charge impedances in the long wavelength regime are investigated by considering the electrostatic fields due to the longitudinal and transverse perturbations on the density of the charged-particle beam. Shielding effects due to the rf cage are discussed and simple formulas are derived for estimating the space-charge impedances. Numerical examples are given for illustration. Comparisons between analytical estimates and the results produced by the field-solver computer program MAFIA show good agreement.

  13. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  14. Reversible supra-channel effects: 3D kagome structure and catalysis via a molecular array of 1D coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haeri; Noh, Tae Hwan; Jung, Ok-Sang

    2013-10-14

    Self-assembly of CuX2 (X(-) = ClO4(-) and BF4(-)) with 2,3-bis(nicotinoyloxy)naphthalene yields a 1D loop-chain skeleton. The loop-chains form an ensemble constituting a unique 3D kagome-type structure with both hexagonal and trigonal supra-channels. The unprecedented supra-channel effects on the catalytic oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol to 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzoquinone were investigated.

  15. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  16. Effective Wall Friction in Wall-Bounded 3D Dense Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, Riccardo; Richard, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    We report numerical simulations on granular shear flows confined between two flat but frictional sidewalls. Novel regimes differing by their strain localization features are observed. They originate from the competition between dissipation at the sidewalls and dissipation in the bulk of the flow. The effective friction at sidewalls is characterized (effective friction coefficient and orientation of the friction force) for each regime, and its interdependence with slip and force fluctuations is pointed out. We propose a simple scaling law linking the slip velocity to the granular temperature in the main flow direction which leads naturally to another scaling law for the effective friction.

  17. Computational studies of hard-body and 3-D effects in plume flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Feiereisen, William J.; Obayashi, Shigeru

    1989-01-01

    Axisymmetric and three-dimensional, multi-nozzle plume flows around generic rocket geometries are investigated with a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver to study the interactive effects between hard body and the plume. Time-asymptotic, laminar, ideal-gas solutions obtained with a two-factor, flux-split scheme and a diagonal, upwind scheme are presented. Computed solutions to three-dimensional, multi-nozzle problems and single-nozzle, axisymmetric problems demonstrate flow field features including three-dimensionality and hard-body effects. Geometry and three-dimensional effects are shown to be significant in multi-nozzle flows.

  18. The 3-D effects in the long-term solar wind speed rise observed by Voyager 2 in early 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, V. J.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Belcher, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    In early 1994, Voyager 2 at 42-43 AU near heliolatitude 10 deg S observed over a period of approximately 100 days a remarkable sequence of quasi-recurrent stream fronts, wherein the background (ambient) speed rose steadily from approximately 450 to approximately 550 km/s while the mean period of the streams decreased from the usual 25 days down to approximately 20 days. A qualitative explanation for this effect can be derived from IMP observations, which show that the amplitude of the stream structure at 1 AU increased monotonically in late 1993, concurrent with major secular evolution in the corona. The reduction in period, then, amounts to a doppler shift due to the progressive overtaking of successively faster streams in the sequence. Attempts to model this process quantitatively with 1-D dynamic simulations falter on three accounts: (1) the reduction in period is overestimated, (2) the simulation predicts many more fronts surviving to 43 AU than are observed by Voyager; (3) the density variations are much too large. It is argued that inclusion of the 3-D geometry in the simulation would resolve most all these shortcomings. Using a series of calculations executed with 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D MHD models of hypothetical tilted-dipole flows, we show that: (1) the radial propagation velocities of 3-D fronts are less than those of 1-D or 2-D fronts, owing to the tilt of (and increased shearing across) the interaction surfaces hence the overtaking rate of successive streams is reduced; (2) in a tilted-dipole geometry, the reverse fronts should largely disappear from the equatorial plane by 43 AU, effectively halving the number of fronts to be observed (see companion paper on predominance of forward fronts at Voyager); and (3) the density enhancements would be much smaller than predicted by a 1-D model.

  19. The 3-D viscous flow CFD analysis of the propeller effect on an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1993-01-01

    A time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC3D was used to study the 3-D viscous flow associated with an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet at take-off operating conditions. At a free stream Mach number of 0.2, experimental data for the inlet-with-propeller test model indicated that the airflow was attached on the cowl windward lip at an angle of attack of 25 degrees became unstable at 29 degrees, and separated at 30 degrees. An experimental study with a similar inlet and with no propeller (through-flow) indicated that flow separation occurred at an angle of attack a few degrees below the value observed when the inlet was tested with the propeller. This tends to indicate that the propeller exerts a favorable effect on the inlet performance. During the through-flow experiment a stationary blockage device was used to successfully simulate the propeller effect on the inlet flow field at angles of attack. In the present numerical study, this flow blockage was modeled via a PARC3D computational boundary condition (BC) called the screen BC. The principle formulation of this BC was based on the one-and-half dimension actuator disk theory. This screen BC was applied at the inlet propeller face station of the computational grid. Numerical results were obtained with and without the screen BC. The application of the screen BC in this numerical study provided results which are similar to the results of past experimental efforts in which either the blockage device or the propeller was used.

  20. A novel 3D embedded gate field effect transistor - Screen-grid FET - Device concept and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fobelets, K.; Ding, P. W.; Velazquez-Perez, J. E.

    2007-05-01

    A novel 3D field effect transistor on SOI - screen-grid FET (SGrFET) - is proposed and an analysis of its DC behaviour is presented by means of 2D TCAD analysis. The novel feature of the SGrFET is the design of 3D insulated gate cylinders embedded in the SOI body. This novel gate topology improves efficiency and allows great flexibility in device and gate geometry to optimize DC performance. The floating body effect is avoided and the double gating row configuration controls short channel effects. The traditional intimate relationship between gate length and source-drain distance is removed, resulting in easy control of drain induced barrier lowering, improved output conductance and ideal sub-threshold slope. The separation between the gate fingers in each row is the key factor to optimize the performance, whilst downscaling of the source-drain distance and oxide thickness is not essential from an operational point of view. The device exhibits a huge potential in low power electronics as given by an efficiency of transconductance " gm/ Id" of 39 S/A at VDS = 100 mV over a large gate voltage range and at a source-drain distance of 825 nm. We present the modelling results of the influence of gate cylinder distribution in the channel, channel doping, gate oxide thickness, gate finger distance and source-drain distance on the characteristics of the device.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of the 3D effect on connecting arm of vertical axis tidal current turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Kang, Hai-gui; Chen, Bing; Xie, Yu; Wang, Yin

    2016-03-01

    Vertical axis tidal current turbine is a promising device to extract energy from ocean current. One of the important components of the turbine is the connecting arm, which can bring about a significant effect on the pressure distribution along the span of the turbine blade, herein we call it 3D effect. However, so far the effect is rarely reported in the research, moreover, in numerical simulation. In the present study, a 3D numerical model of the turbine with the connecting arm was developed by using FLUENT software compiling the UDF (User Defined Function) command. The simulation results show that the pressure distribution along the span of blade with the connecting arm model is significantly different from those without the connecting arm. To facilitate the validation of numerical model, the laboratory experiment has been carried out by using three different types of NACA aerofoil connecting arm and circle section connecting arm. And results show that the turbine with NACA0012 connecting arm has the best start-up performance which is 0.346 m/s and the peak point of power conversion coefficient is around 0.33. A further study has been performed and a conclusion is drawn that the aerofoil and thickness of connecting arm are the most important factors on the power conversion coefficient of the vertical axis tidal current turbine.

  2. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers for compounds of the 3d transition elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Boydaş, Elif; Cömert, Esra

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine mass attenuation coefficient (μm) and effective atomic number (Zeff) for some compounds of the 3d transition elements such as CoO, CoF2, CoF3, Cr2O3, CrF2, CrF3, FeO, Fe2O3, MnO2, TiO2, V2O3, VF3, V2O5, VF4 and ZnO at 19.63 and 22.10 keV photon energies by using an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The experimental results of μm are compared with the theoretical results. Also, effective atomic numbers of compounds of the 3d transition elements have been determined by using experimental and theoretical mass attenuation coefficients. The agreement of measured values of effective atomic numbers with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory.

  3. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  4. The effect of anisotropic heat transport on magnetic islands in 3-D configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlutt, M. G.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-08-15

    An analytic theory of nonlinear pressure-induced magnetic island formation using a boundary layer analysis is presented. This theory extends previous work by including the effects of finite parallel heat transport and is applicable to general three dimensional magnetic configurations. In this work, particular attention is paid to the role of finite parallel heat conduction in the context of pressure-induced island physics. It is found that localized currents that require self-consistent deformation of the pressure profile, such as resistive interchange and bootstrap currents, are attenuated by finite parallel heat conduction when the magnetic islands are sufficiently small. However, these anisotropic effects do not change saturated island widths caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter current effects. Implications for finite pressure-induced island healing are discussed.

  5. Halo and space charge issues in the SNS Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Abell, D.T.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Malitsky, N.; Wei, J.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    2000-06-30

    The latest designs for high-intensity proton rings require minimizing beam-induced radioactivation of the vacuum chamber. Although the tune depression in the ring is much smaller than in high-intensity linacs, space-charge contributions to halo formation and, hence, beam loss may be significant. This paper reviews our current understanding of halo formation issues for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring.

  6. Quantum theory of space charge limited current in solids

    SciTech Connect

    González, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    We present a quantum model of space charge limited current transport inside trap-free solids with planar geometry in the mean field approximation. We use a simple transformation which allows us to find the exact analytical solution for the steady state current case. We use our approach to find a Mott-Gurney like behavior and the mobility for single charge carriers in the quantum regime in solids.

  7. A particle accelerator employing transient space charge potentials

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1988-02-25

    The invention provides an accelerator for ions and charged particles. The plasma is generated and confined in a magnetic mirror field. The electrons of the plasma are heated to high temperatures. A series of local coils are placed along the axis of the magnetic mirror field. As an ion or particle beam is directed along the axis in sequence the coils are rapidly pulsed creating a space charge to accelerate and focus the beam of ions or charged particles. 3 figs.

  8. Measurement of 3-D hydraulic conductivity in aquifer cores at in situ effective stresses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Martin; Dillon, Peter; Pavelic, Paul; Peter, Paul; Nefiodovas, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    An innovative and nondestructive method to measure the hydraulic conductivity of drill core samples in horizontal and vertical directions within a triaxial cell has been developed. This has been applied to characterizing anisotropy and heterogeneity of a confined consolidated limestone aquifer. Most of the cores tested were isotropic, but hydraulic conductivity varied considerably and the core samples with lowest values were also the most anisotropic. Hydraulic conductivity decreased with increasing effective stress due to closure of microfractures caused by sampling for all core samples. This demonstrates the importance of replicating in situ effective stresses when measuring hydraulic conductivity of cores of deep aquifers in the laboratory. PMID:12236264

  9. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas.more » At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.« less

  10. Particle-in-cell/accelerator code for space-charge dominated beam simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-08

    Warp is a multidimensional discrete-particle beam simulation program designed to be applicable where the beam space-charge is non-negligible or dominant. It is being developed in a collaboration among LLNL, LBNL and the University of Maryland. It was originally designed and optimized for heave ion fusion accelerator physics studies, but has received use in a broader range of applications, including for example laser wakefield accelerators, e-cloud studies in high enery accelerators, particle traps and other areas. At present it incorporates 3-D, axisymmetric (r,z) planar (x-z) and transverse slice (x,y) descriptions, with both electrostatic and electro-magnetic fields, and a beam envelope model. The code is guilt atop the Python interpreter language.

  11. Dynamics of extended space charge in concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2010-06-01

    This paper is concerned with ionic currents from an electrolyte solution into a charge selective solid, such as an electrode, an ion exchange membrane or an array of nanochannels in a microfluidic system. All systems of this kind have characteristic voltage-current curves with segments in which current nearly saturates at some plateau values due to concentration polarization--formation of solute concentration gradients under the passage of a dc current. A number of seemingly different phenomena occurring in that range, such as anomalous rectification in cathodic copper deposition from a copper sulfate solution, superfast vortexes near an ion-exchange granule, overlimiting conductance in electrodialysis and the recently observed nonequilibrium electro-osmotic instability, result from formation of an additional extended space charge layer next to that of a classical electrical double layer at the solid/liquid interface or, rather, from the peculiar features of the extended space charge distinguishing it from that of a common diffuse electrical double layer. In this paper we discuss the nature and origin of the extended space charge and analyze its peculiar steady state and time-dependent properties important for understanding nonequilibrium electrokinetic phenomena in ionic systems. PMID:20866420

  12. Studies of Bystander Effects in 3-D Tissue Systems Using a Low-LET Microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-17

    It is now accepted that biological effects may occur in cells that were not themselves traversed by ionizing radiation but are close to those that were. Little is known about the mechanism underlying such a bystander effect, although cell-to-cell communication is thought to be important. Previous work demonstrated a significant bystander effect for clonogenic survival and oncogenic transformation in C3H 10T(1/2) cells. Additional studies were undertaken to assess the importance of the degree of cell-to-cell contact at the time of irradiation on the magnitude of this bystander effect by varying the cell density. When 10% of cells were exposed to a range of 2-12 alpha particles, a significantly greater number of cells were inactivated when cells were irradiated at high density than at low density. In addition, the oncogenic transformation frequency was significantly higher in high-density cultures. These results suggest that when a cell is hit by radiation, the transmission of the bystander signal through cell-to-cell contact is an important mediator of the effect, implicating the involvement of intracellular communication through gap junctions. Additional studies to address the relationship between the bystander effect and the adaptive response were undertaken. A novel apparatus, where targeted and non-targeted cells were grown in close proximity, was used to investigate these. It was further examined whether a bystander effect or an adaptive response could be induced by a factor(s) present in the supernatants of cells exposed to a high or low dose of X-rays, respectively. When non-hit cells were co-cultured for 24 h with cells irradiated with 5 Gy alpha-particles, a significant increase in both cell killing and oncogenic transformation frequency was observed. If these cells were treated with 2 cGy X-rays 5 h before co-culture with irradiated cells, approximately 95% of the bystander effect was cancelled out. A 2.5-fold decrease in the oncogenic transformation

  13. Aerodynamic heating on 3-D bodies including the effects of entropy-layer swallowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Hamilton, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    A relatively simple method was developed previously (authors, 1973) for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent heating rates on three-dimensional bodies in hypersonic flows. This method was shown to yield reasonably accurate results for laminar heating on blunted circular and elliptical cones and an earlier version of the space shuttle vehicle. As the boundary layer along the surface grows, more and more of the inviscid-flow mass is entrained into the boundary layer, and the streamlines which passed through the nearly normal portion of the bow shock wave are 'swallowed' by the boundary layer. This phenomenon is often referred to as entropy-layer or streamline swallowing, and it can have a significant effect on the calculated heating rates. An approximate, yet simple, method for including the effects of entropy-layer swallowing in the heating-rate calculations is given.

  14. Weights and topology: a study of the effects of graph construction on 3D image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Grady, Leo; Jolly, Marie-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Graph-based algorithms have become increasingly popular for medical image segmentation. The fundamental process for each of these algorithms is to use the image content to generate a set of weights for the graph and then set conditions for an optimal partition of the graph with respect to these weights. To date, the heuristics used for generating the weighted graphs from image intensities have largely been ignored, while the primary focus of attention has been on the details of providing the partitioning conditions. In this paper we empirically study the effects of graph connectivity and weighting function on the quality of the segmentation results. To control for algorithm-specific effects, we employ both the Graph Cuts and Random Walker algorithms in our experiments.

  15. Space Charge Neutralization of DEMO Relevant Negative Ion Beams at Low Gas Density

    SciTech Connect

    Surrey, Elizabeth; Porton, Michael

    2011-09-26

    The application of neutral beams to future power plant devices (DEMO) is dependent on achieving significantly improved electrical efficiency and the most promising route to achieving this is by implementing a photoneutralizer in place of the traditional gas neutralizer. A corollary of this innovation would be a significant reduction in the background gas density through which the beam is transported between the accelerator and the neutralizer. This background gas is responsible for the space charge neutralization of the beam, enabling distances of several metres to be traversed without significant beam expansion. This work investigates the sensitivity of a D{sup -} beam to reduced levels of space charge compensation for energies from 100 keV to 1.5 MeV, representative of a scaled prototype experiment, commissioning and full energy operation. A beam transport code, following the evolution of the phase space ellipse, is employed to investigate the effect of space charge on the beam optics. This shows that the higher energy beams are insensitive to large degrees of under compensation, unlike the lower energies. The probable degree of compensation at low gas density is then investigated through a simple, two component beam-plasma model that allows the potential to be negative. The degree of under-compensation is dependent on the positive plasma ion energy, one source of which is dissociation of the gas by the beam. The subsequent space charge state of the beam is shown to depend upon the relative times for equilibration of the dissociation energy and ionization by the beam ions.

  16. Effective declutter of complex flight displays using stereoptic 3-D cueing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.; Nold, Dean E.

    1994-01-01

    The application of stereo technology to new, integrated pictorial display formats has been effective in situational awareness enhancements, and stereo has been postulated to be effective for the declutter of complex informational displays. This paper reports a full-factorial workstation experiment performed to verify the potential benefits of stereo cueing for the declutter function in a simulated tracking task. The experimental symbology was designed similar to that of a conventional flight director, although the format was an intentionally confused presentation that resulted in a very cluttered dynamic display. The subject's task was to use a hand controller to keep a tracking symbol, an 'X', on top of a target symbol, another X, which was being randomly driven. In the basic tracking task, both the target symbol and the tracking symbol were presented as red X's. The presence of color coding was used to provide some declutter, thus making the task more reasonable to perform. For this condition, the target symbol was coded red, and the tracking symbol was coded blue. Noise conditions, or additional clutter, were provided by the inclusion of randomly moving, differently colored X symbols. Stereo depth, which was hypothesized to declutter the display, was utilized by placing any noise in a plane in front of the display monitor, the tracking symbol at screen depth, and the target symbol behind the screen. The results from analyzing the performances of eight subjects revealed that the stereo presentation effectively offsets the cluttering effects of both the noise and the absence of color coding. The potential of stereo cueing to declutter complex informational displays has therefore been verified; this ability to declutter is an additional benefit from the application of stereoptic cueing to pictorial flight displays.

  17. Capturing atmospheric effects on 3D millimeter wave radar propagation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Richard D.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Keefer, Kevin J.; Stringer, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Traditional radar propagation modeling is done using a path transmittance with little to no input for weather and atmospheric conditions. As radar advances into the millimeter wave (MMW) regime, atmospheric effects such as attenuation and refraction become more pronounced than at traditional radar wavelengths. The DoD High Energy Laser Joint Technology Offices High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) in combination with the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) code have shown great promise simulating atmospheric effects on laser propagation. Indeed, the LEEDR radiative transfer code has been validated in the UV through RF. Our research attempts to apply these models to characterize the far field radar pattern in three dimensions as a signal propagates from an antenna towards a point in space. Furthermore, we do so using realistic three dimensional atmospheric profiles. The results from these simulations are compared to those from traditional radar propagation software packages. In summary, a fast running method has been investigated which can be incorporated into computational models to enhance understanding and prediction of MMW propagation through various atmospheric and weather conditions.

  18. Surface-effect corrections for solar-like oscillations using 3D hydrodynamical simulations. I. Adiabatic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoi, T.; Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Mosser, B.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The CoRoT and Kepler space-borne missions have provided us with a wealth of high-quality observational data that allows for seismic inferences of stellar interiors. This requires the computation of precise and accurate theoretical frequencies, but imperfect modeling of the uppermost stellar layers introduces systematic errors. To overcome this problem, an empirical correction has been introduced by Kjeldsen et al. (2008, ApJ, 683, L175) and is now commonly used for seismic inferences. Nevertheless, we still lack a physical justification allowing for the quantification of the surface-effect corrections. Aims: Our aim is to constrain the surface-effect corrections across the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram using a set of 3D hydrodynamical simulations. Methods: We used a grid of these simulations computed with the CO5BOLD code to model the outer layers of solar-like stars. Upper layers of the corresponding 1D standard models were then replaced by the layers obtained from the horizontally averaged 3D models. The frequency differences between these patched models and the 1D standard models were then calculated using the adiabatic approximation and allowed us to constrain the Kjeldsen et al. power law, as well as a Lorentzian formulation. Results: We find that the surface effects on modal frequencies depend significantly on both the effective temperature and the surface gravity. We further provide the variation in the parameters related to the surface-effect corrections using their power law as well as a Lorentzian formulation. Scaling relations between these parameters and the elevation (related to the Mach number) is also provided. The Lorentzian formulation is shown to be more robust for the whole frequency spectrum, while the power law is not suitable for the frequency shifts in the frequency range above νmax. Finally, we show that, owing to turbulent pressure, the elevation of the uppermost layers modifies the location of the hydrogen ionization zone and

  19. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam.

    PubMed

    Sartori, E; Maceina, T J; Veltri, P; Cavenago, M; Serianni, G

    2016-02-01

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H(-) ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H(-) beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H2 (+) ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H(+)). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions. PMID:26932089

  20. A Self Consistent Multiprocessor Space Charge Algorithm that is Almost Embarrassingly Parallel

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Nissen, B. Erdelyi, S.L. Manikonda

    2012-07-01

    We present a space charge code that is self consistent, massively parallelizeable, and requires very little communication between computer nodes; making the calculation almost embarrassingly parallel. This method is implemented in the code COSY Infinity where the differential algebras used in this code are important to the algorithm's proper functioning. The method works by calculating the self consistent space charge distribution using the statistical moments of the test particles, and converting them into polynomial series coefficients. These coefficients are combined with differential algebraic integrals to form the potential, and electric fields. The result is a map which contains the effects of space charge. This method allows for massive parallelization since its statistics based solver doesn't require any binning of particles, and only requires a vector containing the partial sums of the statistical moments for the different nodes to be passed. All other calculations are done independently. The resulting maps can be used to analyze the system using normal form analysis, as well as advance particles in numbers and at speeds that were previously impossible.

  1. Effect of Bending Anisotropy on the 3D Conformation of Short DNA Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, Davood; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid; Golestanian, Ramin

    2008-10-01

    The equilibrium three dimensional shape of relatively short loops of DNA is studied using an elastic model that takes into account anisotropy in bending rigidities. Using a reasonable estimate for the anisotropy, it is found that cyclized DNA with lengths that are not integer multiples of the pitch take on nontrivial shapes that involve bending out of planes and formation of kinks. The effect of sequence inhomogeneity on the shape of DNA is addressed, and shown to enhance the geometrical features. These findings could shed some light on the role of DNA conformation in protein DNA interactions.

  2. Effects of photophoresis on the dust distribution in a 3D protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuello, N.; Gonzalez, J.-F.; Pignatale, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    Photophoresis is a physical process based on momentum exchange between an illuminated dust particle and its gaseous environment. Its net effect in protoplanetary discs (PPD) is the outward transport of solid bodies from hot to cold regions. This process naturally leads to the formation of ring-shaped features where dust piles up. In this work, we study the dynamical effects of photophoresis in PPD by including the photophoretic force in the two-fluid (gas+dust) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code developed by Barrière-Fouchet et al. (2005). We find that the conditions of pressure and temperature encountered in the inner regions of PPD result in important photophoretic forces, which dramatically affect the radial motion of solid bodies. Moreover, dust particles have different equilibrium locations in the disc depending on their size and their intrinsic density. The radial transport towards the outer parts of the disc is more efficient for silicates than for iron particles, which has important implications for meteoritic composition. Our results indicate that photophoresis must be taken into account in the inner regions of PPD to fully understand the dynamics and the evolution of the dust composition.

  3. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  4. Effects of inflow distortion profiles on fan tone noise calculated using a 3-D theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of the fan tone acoustic power and modal structure generated by complex distortions in axial inflow velocity are presented. The model used treats the motor as a rotating three-dimensional cascade and calculates the acoustic field from the distortion-produced dipole distribution on the blades including noncompact source effects. Radial and circumferential distortion shapes are synthesized from Fourier-Bessel components representing individual distortion modes. The relation between individual distortion modes and the generated acoustic modes is examined for particular distortion cases. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results for distortions produced by wakes from upstream radial rods show that the analysis is a good predictor of acoustic power dependence on disturbance strength.

  5. Creating effective focus cues in multi-plane 3D displays

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Sowmya; Akeley, Kurt; Banks, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    Focus cues are incorrect in conventional stereoscopic displays. This causes a dissociation of vergence and accommodation, which leads to visual fatigue and perceptual distortions. Multi-plane displays can minimize these problems by creating nearly correct focus cues. But to create the appearance of continuous depth in a multi-plane display, one needs to use depth-weighted blending: i.e., distribute light intensity between adjacent planes. Akeley et al. [ACM Trans. Graph. 23, 804 (2004)] and Liu and Hua [Opt. Express 18, 11562 (2009)] described rather different rules for depth-weighted blending. We examined the effectiveness of those and other rules using a model of a typical human eye and biologically plausible metrics for image quality. We find that the linear blending rule proposed by Akeley and colleagues [ACM Trans. Graph. 23, 804 (2004)] is the best solution for natural stimuli. PMID:21997103

  6. 3D Global Climate Modelling of the environmental effect of meteoritic impacts on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbet, Martin; Forget, Francois; Gillmann, Cedric; Karatekin, Ozgur; Svetsov, Vladimir; Popova, Olga; Wallemacq, Quentin

    2016-10-01

    There are now robust evidences that liquid water flowed on ancient Mars: dry river beds and lakes, hydrated sedimentary minerals and high erosion rates. Climate models that consider only CO2/H2O as greenhouse gases have been unable yet to produce warm climates suitable for liquid water on Early Mars, given the lower solar luminosity at that time. It has been suggested that the warm conditions required to explain the formation of the 3.8 Gyrs old valley networks could have been transient and produced in response to the meteoritic impacts that occured during the contemporaneous Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB). This scenario is appealing because, in a predominately cold climate, the ice tends to accumulate preferentially in the regions where the rivers were sculpted ('Icy Highlands' scenario). This would be a very efficient mechanism of recharge of the valley network water sources between two impact-induced melting events.Using the LMD Global Climate Model (LMD-GCM) designed for flexible (from cold & dry to warm & wet) conditions, we explored the environmental effect of LHB impact events of various sizes on Early Mars. Our main result is that, whatever the initial impact-induced temperatures and water vapor content injected, warm climates cannot be stable and are in fact short-lived (lifetime of ~ 5 martian years/bar of H2O injected). Moreover, we will give preliminar estimates of the amount of rainfall/snowmelt that can be produced after impact events depending on their size, following three different approaches:1) For large impact events (Dimpactor < 50km, N ~ 40) we initialize the LMD-GCM with warm/moist conditions prescribed with simple scaling laws and assuming energy conservation.2) For moderate-size events (5km < Dimpactor < 50km, N ~ 3x103) we use the SOVA hydrocode for short-term modelling of impact cratering. It provides us with post-impact temperature fields, injection of volatiles, ejecta and dust distribution that serve as input for the LMD-GCM.3

  7. Effect of Weaving Direction of Conductive Yarns on Electromagnetic Performance of 3D Integrated Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fujun; Yao, Lan; Zhao, Da; Jiang, Muwen; Qiu, Yipping

    2013-10-01

    A three-dimensionally integrated microstrip antenna (3DIMA) is a microstrip antenna woven into the three-dimensional woven composite for load bearing while functioning as an antenna. In this study, the effect of weaving direction of conductive yarns on electromagnetic performance of 3DIMAs are investigated by designing, simulating and experimental testing of two microstrip antennas with different weaving directions of conductive yarns: one has the conductive yarns along the antenna feeding direction (3DIMA-Exp1) and the other has the conductive yarns perpendicular the antenna feeding direction (3DIMA-Exp2). The measured voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) of 3DIMA-Exp1 was 1.4 at the resonant frequencies of 1.39 GHz; while that of 3DIMA-Exp2 was 1.2 at the resonant frequencies of 1.35 GHz. In addition, the measured radiation pattern of the 3DIMA-Exp1 has smaller back lobe and higher gain value than those of the 3DIMA-Exp2. This result indicates that the waving direction of conductive yarns may have a significant impact on electromagnetic performance of textile structural antennas.

  8. Rheological effects in the 3D creeping flow past a sedimenting sphere subject to orthogonal shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas D.; Tanner, Roger I.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the rheological parameters of nonlinear differential constitutive models in the isothermal, steady, creeping, flow past a sedimenting sphere, in an incompressible viscoelastic matrix fluid, subject to simple shear in a plane perpendicular to the direction of sedimentation are studied analytically. The viscoelasticity of the ambient fluid is modeled using the Upper Convected Maxwell, Oldroyd-B, exponential Phan-Thien-Tanner, Giesekus, and FENE-P constitutive equations. The solution of the governing equations is expanded as a regular perturbation series for small values of the Deborah number, and the resulting sequence of three-dimensional partial differential equations is solved analytically up to fourth order. Approximate analytical expressions for the angular velocity of the rigid sphere, as well as for the drag force on the sphere, are derived and discussed. The solutions reveal both the increase of the drag in case of Boger-type fluids (modeled with the FENE-P model) and the decrease of the drag in case of elastic fluids (modeled with the Giesekus model).

  9. Doppler effects on 3-D non-LTE radiation transport and emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Jones, B.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Thornhill, J. W.; Scott, H. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Coverdale, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Dasgupta, A.; Clark, R. W.; Davis, J.

    2011-12-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved X-ray emission lines contain information about temperatures, densities, velocities, and the gradients in a plasma. Extracting this information from optically thick lines emitted from complex ions in dynamic, three-dimensional, non-LTE plasmas requires self-consistent accounting for both non-LTE atomic physics and non-local radiative transfer. We present a brief description of a hybrid-structure spectroscopic atomic model coupled to an iterative tabular on-the-spot treatment of radiative transfer that can be applied to plasmas of arbitrary material composition, conditions, and geometries. The effects of Doppler line shifts on the self-consistent radiative transfer within the plasma and the emergent emission and absorption spectra are included in the model. Sample calculations for a two-level atom in a uniform cylindrical plasma are given, showing reasonable agreement with more sophisticated transport models and illustrating the potential complexity - or richness - of radially resolved emission lines from an imploding cylindrical plasma. Also presented is a comparison of modeled L- and K-shell spectra to temporally and radially resolved emission data from a Cu:Ni plasma. Finally, some shortcomings of the model and possible paths for improvement are discussed.

  10. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  11. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Christopher C.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-08-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere is associated with large-scale currents in the ionosphere at polar latitudes that flow along magnetic field lines (Birkeland currents) and horizontally. These current systems are tightly linked, but their global behaviors are rarely analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting Swarm and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal and toroidal parts of the magnetic disturbance field, represented in magnetic apex coordinates. The use of apex coordinates reduces effects of longitudinal and hemispheric variations in the Earth's main field. We present global currents from both hemispheres during different sunlight conditions. The results show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV emissions on the dayside and on particle precipitation at pre-midnight magnetic local times. In sunlight, the horizontal equivalent current flows in two cells, resembling an opposite ionospheric convection pattern, which implies that it is dominated by Hall currents. By combining the Birkeland current maps and the equivalent current, we are able to calculate the total horizontal current, without any assumptions about the conductivity. We show that the total horizontal current is close to zero in the polar cap when it is dark. That implies that the equivalent current, which is sensed by ground magnetometers, is largely canceled by the horizontal closure of the Birkeland currents.

  12. The effect of porosity on cell ingrowth into accurately defined, laser-made, polylactide-based 3D scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Georgiadi, Leoni; Pateman, Christopher J.; Claeyssens, Frederik; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy required for the investigation of the role of solid scaffolds' porosity in cell proliferation. We therefore present a qualitative investigation into the effect of porosity on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cell ingrowth of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds fabricated by direct femtosecond laser writing. The material we used is a purpose made photosensitive pre-polymer based on polylactide. We designed and fabricated complex, geometry-controlled 3D scaffolds with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 110 μm, representing porosities 70%, 82%, 86%, and 90%. The 70% porosity scaffolds did not support cell growth initially and in the long term. For the other porosities, we found a strong adhesion of the pre-osteoblastic cells from the first hours after seeding and a remarkable proliferation increase after 3 weeks and up to 8 weeks. The 86% porosity scaffolds exhibited a higher efficiency compared to 82% and 90%. In addition, bulk material degradation studies showed that the employed, highly-acrylated polylactide is degradable. These findings support the potential use of the proposed material and the scaffold fabrication technique in bone tissue engineering.

  13. Effect of 3D stall-cells on the pressure distribution of a laminar NACA64-418 wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragni, Daniele; Ferreira, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    A 3D stall-cell flow-field has been studied in a 4.8 aspect-ratio wing obtained by linear extrusion of a laminar NACA64-418 airfoil profile. The span-wise change in the velocity and pressure distribution along the wing has been quantified with respect to the development of cellular structures from 8° to 20° angle of attack. Oil-flow visualizations help localizing the regular cellular pattern in function of the angle of attack. Multi-plane stereoscopic PIV measurements obtained by traversing the entire setup along the wing span show that the flow separation is not span-wise uniform. The combination of different stereoscopic fields into a 3D volume of velocity data allows studying the global effect of the stall-cell pattern on the wing flow. Integration of the experimentally computed pressure gradient from the Navier-Stokes equation is employed to compute the span-wise distribution of the mean surface pressure. Comparison of the results with the ones obtained from pressure taps installed in the wing evidences a span-wise periodic loading on the wing. The periodic loading has maxima confined in the stream-wise direction between the location of the highest airfoil curvature and the one of the airfoil flow separation. Estimation of the periodic loading is found within 2-6 % of the sectional wing lift.

  14. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  15. A fully 3D atomistic quantum mechanical study on random dopant induced effects in 25nm MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Jiang, Xiang-Wei; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Luo, Jun-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen; Wang, Lin-Wang; Xia, Jian-Bai

    2008-07-11

    We present a fully 3D atomistic quantum mechanical simulation for nanometered MOSFET using a coupled Schroedinger equation and Poisson equation approach. Empirical pseudopotential is used to represent the single particle Hamiltonian and linear combination of bulk band (LCBB) method is used to solve the million atom Schroedinger's equation. We studied gate threshold fluctuations and threshold lowering due to the discrete dopant configurations. We compared our results with semiclassical simulation results. We found quantum mechanical effects increase the threshold fluctuation while decreases the threshold lowering. The increase of threshold fluctuation is in agreement with previous study based on approximated density gradient approach to represent the quantum mechanical effect. However, the decrease in threshold lowering is in contrast with the previous density gradient calculations.

  16. Self-imaging effect in photonic quasicrystal waveguides: Application to 3 dB power splitter for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feixiang; Zou, Qiushun; Zhou, Quancheng; Wang, Tongbiao; Yu, Tianbao; Liu, Nianhua

    2016-05-01

    We report that self-imaging effect still can be achieved in photonic quasicrystal waveguides (PtQCWs) just as it does in photonic crystal waveguides. As a possible application of the results, a new kind of compact 3 dB PtQCWs-based power splitters based on this effect for terahertz waves with symmetric interference is presented and analyzed. The finite element method is used to calculate the distributions of stable-state electric field and evaluate transmission efficiency of these structures. The calculated results show that the proposed device provides a new compact model for exporting efficiently THz wave with a broad bandwidth to two channels averagely and can be extended to new designs of PtQCW devices.

  17. DFT-based studies on the Jahn-Teller effect in 3d hexacyanometalates with orbitally degenerate ground states.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Mihial; Comba, Peter; Daul, Claude A; Hauser, Andreas

    2007-09-20

    The topology of the ground-state potential energy surface of M(CN)(6) with orbitally degenerate (2)T(2g) (M = Ti(III) (t(2g)(1)), Fe(III) and Mn(II) (both low-spin t(2g)(5))) and (3)T(1g) ground states (M = V(III) (t(2g)(2)), Mn(III) and Cr(II) (both low-spin t(2g)(4))) has been studied with linear and quadratic Jahn-Teller coupling models in the five-dimensional space of the epsilon(g) and tau(2g) octahedral vibrations (Tg[symbol: see text](epsilon(g)+tau(2g)) Jahn-Teller coupling problem (T(g) = (2)T(2g), (3)T(1g))). A procedure is proposed to give access to all vibronic coupling parameters from geometry optimization with density functional theory (DFT) and the energies of a restricted number of Slater determinants, derived from electron replacements within the t(2g)(1,5) or t(2g)(2,4) ground-state electronic configurations. The results show that coupling to the tau(2g) bending mode is dominant and leads to a stabilization of D(3d) structures (absolute minima on the ground-state potential energy surface) for all complexes considered, except for [Ti(CN)(6)](3-), where the minimum is of D(4h) symmetry. The Jahn-Teller stabilization energies for the D3d minima are found to increase in the order of increasing CN-M pi back-donation (Ti(III) < V(III) < Mn(III) < Fe(III) < Mn(II) < Cr(II)). With the angular overlap model and bonding parameters derived from angular distortions, which correspond to the stable D(3d) minima, the effect of configuration interaction and spin-orbit coupling on the ground-state potential energy surface is explored. This approach is used to correlate Jahn-Teller distortion parameters with structures from X-ray diffraction data. Jahn-Teller coupling to trigonal modes is also used to reinterpret the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibilities and g tensors of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-), and the (3)T(1g) ground-state splitting of [Mn(CN)(6)](3-), deduced from near-IR spectra. The implications of the pseudo Jahn-Teller coupling due to t(2g)-e(g) orbital mixing via

  18. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modeling and analysis of the effect of 3-D distortion of the human aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2002-06-01

    An idealized CFD model and a realistic one were used to investigate the effect of the 3-D distortion of the aortic arch on the blood flow and its pathophysiological significance with respect to the pathogenesis of the aortic aneurysm. From the results of the flow simulations, the distortion of the centerline of the pipe was shown to affect significantly the flow structure. A right-handed vortex at the descending arch, and a left-handed one at the end of the arch tended to develop in the realistic model. But the secondary flow did not become a single helix. The top of the arch was the region where complex spatial and temporal WSS distributed. It was also observed that the direction of WSS had a significant circumferential component at the top of the arch.

  20. Measuring the effects of fractionated radiation therapy in a 3D prostate cancer model system using SERS nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Camus, Victoria L; Stewart, Grant; Nailon, William H; McLaren, Duncan B; Campbell, Colin J

    2016-08-15

    Multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) are three-dimensional cell cultures that possess their own microenvironments and provide a more meaningful model of tumour biology than monolayer cultures. As a result, MTS are becoming increasingly used as tumor models when measuring the efficiency of therapies. Monitoring the viability of live MTS is complicated by their 3D nature and conventional approaches such as fluorescence often require fixation and sectioning. In this paper we detail the use of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to measure the viability of MTS grown from prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Our results show that we can monitor loss of viability by measuring pH and redox potential in MTS and furthermore we demonstrate that SERS can be used to measure the effects of fractionation of a dose of radiotherapy in a way that has potential to inform treatment planning.

  1. Magnetic fields end-face effect investigation of HTS bulk over PMG with 3D-modeling numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujie; Lu, Yiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the magnetic fields end-face effect of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) is researched with 3D-modeling numerical method. The electromagnetic behavior of the bulk is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The framework is formulated by the magnetic field vector method (H-method). A superconducting levitation system composed of one rectangular HTS bulk and one infinite long PMG is successfully investigated using the proposed method. The simulation results show that for finite geometrical HTS bulk, even the applied magnetic field is only distributed in x-y plane, the magnetic field component Hz which is along the z-axis can be observed interior the HTS bulk.

  2. Measuring the effects of fractionated radiation therapy in a 3D prostate cancer model system using SERS nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Camus, Victoria L; Stewart, Grant; Nailon, William H; McLaren, Duncan B; Campbell, Colin J

    2016-08-15

    Multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) are three-dimensional cell cultures that possess their own microenvironments and provide a more meaningful model of tumour biology than monolayer cultures. As a result, MTS are becoming increasingly used as tumor models when measuring the efficiency of therapies. Monitoring the viability of live MTS is complicated by their 3D nature and conventional approaches such as fluorescence often require fixation and sectioning. In this paper we detail the use of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to measure the viability of MTS grown from prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Our results show that we can monitor loss of viability by measuring pH and redox potential in MTS and furthermore we demonstrate that SERS can be used to measure the effects of fractionation of a dose of radiotherapy in a way that has potential to inform treatment planning. PMID:27310732

  3. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on Growth of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D and Monolayer Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Forouharmehr, Ali; Harkinezhad, Taher; Qasemi-Panahi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many studies have been showed transfer of aflatoxins, toxins produced by Aspergillus flvaus and Aspergillus parasiticus fungi, into milk. These toxins are transferred into the milk through digestive system by eating contaminated food. Due to the toxicity of these materials, it seems that it has side effects on the growth of mammary cells. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigate possible toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on bovine mammary epithelial cells in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Methods: Specimens of the mammary tissue of bovine were sized out in size 2×2 cm in slaughterhouse. After disinfection and washing in sterile PBS, primary cell culture was performed by enzymatic digestion of tissue with collagenase. When proper numbers of cells were achieved in monolayer culture, cells were seeded in a 24-well culture plate for three-dimensional (3D) culture in Matrigel matrix. After 21 days of 3D culture and reaching the required number of cells, the concentrations of 15, 25 and 35 µL of AFB1 were added to the culture in quadruplicate and incubated for 8 hours. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay and finally, any change in the morphology of the cells was studied by microscopic technique. Results: Microscopic investigations showed necrosis of the AFB1-exposed cells compared to the control cells. Also, bovine mammary epithelial cells were significantly affected by AFB1 in dose and time dependent manner in cell viability assays. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that AFB1 can induce cytotoxicity and necrosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:24312827

  4. Effect of ion release from Cu-doped 45S5 Bioglass® on 3D endothelial cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stähli, Christoph; James-Bhasin, Mark; Hoppe, Alexander; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Nazhat, Showan N

    2015-06-01

    Both silicate-based bioactive glasses and copper ions have demonstrated angiogenic activity and therefore represent promising bioinorganic agents for the promotion of vascularization in tissue-engineered scaffolds. This study examined the effect of ionic release products from 45S5 Bioglass® doped with 0 and 2.5 wt.% CuO (BG and Cu-BG respectively) on the formation of capillary-like networks by SVEC4-10 endothelial cells (ECs) seeded in a three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen matrix. Copper and silicon release following 24h dissolution increased non-proportionally with Cu-BG concentration in cell culture medium, while calcium levels were decreased below the initial medium concentration. EC network length, connectivity, branching, quantified by means of a 3D morphometric image analysis method, as well as proliferation and metabolic activity were reduced in a dose-dependent fashion by BG and Cu-BG ionic release products. This reduction was less prominent for BG compared to an equivalent concentration of Cu-BG, which was attributed to a lower extent of silicon release and calcium consumption. Moreover, a CuCl2 dose equivalent to the highest concentration of Cu-BG exhibited no effect on ECs. In conclusion, while the previously reported pro-angiogenic activity of both Bioglass® and copper may not be reflected in a direct response of ECs, this study provides a maximum glass concentration for non-harmful angiogenic stimulation to be examined in future work.

  5. The effect of thread design on stress distribution in a solid screw implant: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Oğuz; Inan, Ozgür

    2010-08-01

    The biomechanical behavior of implant thread plays an important role on stresses at implant-bone interface. Information about the effect of different thread profiles upon the bone stresses is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different implant thread designs on stress distribution characteristics at supporting structures. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) stress-analysis method was used. Four types of 3D mathematical models simulating four different thread-form configurations for a solid screw implant was prepared with supporting bone structure. V-thread (1), buttress (2), reverse buttress (3), and square thread designs were simulated. A 100-N static axial occlusal load was applied to occlusal surface of abutment to calculate the stress distributions. Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FE modeling/analysis. The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at loading areas of implant abutments and cervical cortical bone regions for all models. Stress concentration at cortical bone (18.3 MPa) was higher than spongious bone (13.3 MPa), and concentration of first thread (18 MPa) was higher than other threads (13.3 MPa). It was seen that, while the von Mises stress distribution patterns at different implant thread models were similar, the concentration of compressive stresses were different. The present study showed that the use of different thread form designs did not affect the von Mises concentration at supporting bone structure. However, the compressive stress concentrations differ by various thread profiles.

  6. Finite Gyroradius Effects in the Plasma Environment Near Titan: 3D Hybrid Modeling of the T5 Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this report we discuss the results of a 3D hybrid modeling of the interaction between Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's atmosphere/ionosphere for the T5 encounter. The T5 flyby is the only encounter when the two main ionizing sources of Titan's atmosphere, solar radiation and corotating plasma, align quasi-anti-parallel. The model is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements during the T5 flyby through Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere [1,2]. Magnetic field data was used from the MAG instrument [3]. In our model the background ions (O+, H+), all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid (see e.g. [4]). Inhomogeneous photoionization (in the dayside ionosphere), electron-impact ionization, and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperature of the background electrons and pickup electrons was also incorporated into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account collisions between ions and neutrals. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. The first results of our hybrid modeling show a strong asymmetry in the background (H+, O+) and pickup (H2+, N2+, CH4+) ion density profiles. Such strong asymmetry cannot be explained by a single-fluid multi-species 3D MHD model [5], which includes complex chemistry but does not produce finite gyroradius and kinetic effects. References [1] Sittler, et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton, J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds., Springer, (Dordrecht, Heidelberg, London, New York), pp. 393-455, 2010. [2] Agren, K., et al., On magnetosphere electron impact ionization and dynamics in Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere -- a Cassini case study, Ann. Geophys., 25, 2359

  7. Comparing the effects of rheology on the dynamics and topography of 3D subduction-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. It is well known that they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. The differences among the structures and evolutions of mountain belts arise for several reasons, such as different strengths of materials, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergence plates. All these possible controlling factors can change with space and time. Of all the mountain belts and orogenic plateaus, the most striking example is the India-Asia collision zone, which gave rise to the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau, the largest region of elevated topography and anomalously thick crust on Earth. Understanding the formation and evolution of such a highly elevated region has been the focus of many tectonic and numerical models. While some of these models (i.e. thin sheet model) have successfully illustrated some of the basic physics of continental collision, none can simultaneously represent active processes such as subduction, underthrusting, channel flow or extrusion, for which fully 3D models are required. Here, we employed the 3D code LaMEM to investigate the role that subduction, continental collision and indentation play on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins, and the implications they have for the Asian tectonics. Our model setup resembles a simplified tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone and we performed long-term 3D simulations to analyse the dynamics and the conditions under which large topographic plateaus, such as the Tibetan Plateau can form in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. Results of models with linear viscous rheologies show different modes between the oceanic subduction side (continuous subduction, trench retreat and slab roll-back) and the

  8. An effective evolutionary algorithm for protein folding on 3D FCC HP model by lattice rotation and generalized move sets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    effective for finding optimal conformations on the 3D FCC HP model. Furthermore, the local searches developed in this paper can be integrated with other approaches such as the Monte Carlo and Tabu searches to improve their performance. PMID:24565217

  9. Investigations of the Dynamics of Space Charged Dominated Beams

    SciTech Connect

    York, Richard C.

    2002-08-01

    We propose to perform investigations of the dynamics of space charge dominated beams. These investigations will support present activities such as the electron ring project at the University of Maryland as well as provide an improved basis for future accelerator designs. Computer simulations will provide the primary research element with improved code development being an integral part of the activities during the first period. We believe that one of the code development projects provides a unique strategy for the inclusion of longitudinal dynamics, and that this concept should provide a computationally rapid research tool.

  10. The Effect of 3D-Modeling Training on Students' Spatial Reasoning Relative to Gender and Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šafhalter, Andrej; Vukman, Karin Bakracevic; Glodež, Srecko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to establish whether gender and age have an impact on spatial reasoning and its development through the use of 3D modeling. The study was conducted on a sample of 196 children from sixth to ninth grade, of whom 95 represented the experimental group and 101 the control group. The experimental group received 3D modeling…

  11. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that the local seismic site effects may have a significant contribution to the intensity of damage and destruction (e.g., Hough et al., 1990; Regnier et al., 2000; Bonnefoy-Claudet et al., 2006; Haase et al., 2010). The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, usually are derived from seismic velocities. At the same time, thickness of sediments may be determined (or defined) on the basis of 3D combined gravity-magnetic modeling joined with available geological materials, seismic data and borehole section examination. Final result of such investigation is a 3D physical-geological model (PGM) reflecting main geological peculiarities of the area under study. Such a combined study needs in application of a reliable 3D mathematical algorithm of computation together with advanced methodology of 3D modeling. For this analysis the developed GSFC software was selected. The GSFC (Geological Space Field Calculation) program was developed for solving a direct 3-D gravity and magnetic prospecting problem under complex geological conditions (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2004). This program has been designed for computing the field of Δg (Bouguer, free-air or observed value anomalies), ΔZ, ΔX, ΔY , ΔT , as well as second derivatives of the gravitational potential under conditions of rugged relief and inclined magnetization. The geological space can be approximated by (1) three-dimensional, (2) semi-infinite bodies and (3) those infinite along the strike closed, L.H. non-closed, R.H. on-closed and open). Geological bodies are approximated by horizontal polygonal prisms. The program has the following main advantages (besides abovementioned ones): (1) Simultaneous computing of gravity and magnetic fields; (2) Description of the terrain relief by irregularly placed characteristic points; (3) Computation of the effect of the earth-air boundary by the method of selection directly in the process of interpretation; (4

  12. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  13. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or ‑80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  14. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  15. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  16. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that O(2)(-)* and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  17. EDITORIAL: 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, Richard

    2011-08-01

    This annual workshop on MHD Stability Control has been held since 1996 with a focus on understanding and developing control of MHD instabilities for future fusion reactors. The workshop generally covers a wide range of stability topics: from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, ELMs, resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD. It spans many device types, particularly tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches, to pull out commonalities in the physics and improve understanding. In 2010 the workshop was held on 15-17 November at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and was combined with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop. The theme was `3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control', with a focus on multidisciplinary sessions exploring issues of plasma response to 3D fields, the manifestation of such fields in the plasma, and how they influence stability. This has been a topic of renewed interest, with utilisation of 3D fields for ELM control now planned in ITER, and a focus on the application of such fields for error field correction, disruption avoidance, and RWM control. Key issues included the physics of the interaction, types of coils and harmonic spectra needed to control instabilities, and subsidiary effects such as braking (or rotating) the plasma. More generally, a wider range of issues were discussed including RWM physics, tearing mode physics, disruption mitigation, ballooning stability, the snowflake divertor concept, and the line tied pinch! A novel innovation to the meeting was a panel discussion session, this year on Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity, which ran well; more will be tried next year. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2010 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http

  18. Negative Differential Conductance from Space Charge Limited Currents in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    Applying the theory of space charge limited currents (SCLC), we show that negative differential conductance can arise from doubly occupied traps that are nearly degenerate with the bottom of the conduction band. Using degenerate state perturbation theory, the Coulomb energy of the doubly occupied traps is shown to depend on the hybridization with the conduction band states. Initially, when carriers are injected into the solid, traps begin to fill while the conduction band states stay relatively empty and thus accessible to trapped electrons via hopping. Trap and conduction states continue to be filled as current is increased, and the energy of trapped electrons begins to rise. A critical current is reached whereupon a further increase in current leads to a reduction of filled traps (i.e. a reduction of space charge in the solid), and thus a corresponding decrease in voltage. This trend in the current-voltage characteristic curves persists until the bottom of the conduction band has been filled, then voltage rises with current.

  19. A Method to Overcome Space Charge at Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ya. Derbenev

    2005-09-29

    The transverse space charge forces in a high current, low energy beam can be reduced by mean of a large increase of the beam's transverse sizes while maintaining the beam area in the 4D phase space. This can be achieved by transforming the beam area in phase space of each of two normal 2D transverse (either plane or circular) modes from a spot shape into a narrow ring of a large amplitude, but homogeneous in phase. Such a transformation results from the beam evolution in the island of a dipole resonance when the amplitude width of the island shrinks adiabatically. After stacking (by using stripping foils or cooling) the beam in such a state and accelerating to energies sufficiently high that the space charge becomes insignificant, the beam then can be returned back to a normal spot shape by applying the reverse transformation. An arrangement that can provide such beam gymnastics along a transport line after a linac and before a booster and/or in a ring with circulating beam will be described and numerical estimates will be presented. Other potential applications of the method will be briefly discussed.

  20. An FPGA computing demo core for space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Huang, Yifei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    In accelerator physics, space charge simulation requires large amount of computing power. In a particle system, each calculation requires time/resource consuming operations such as multiplications, divisions, and square roots. Because of the flexibility of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), we implemented this task with efficient use of the available computing resources and completely eliminated non-calculating operations that are indispensable in regular micro-processors (e.g. instruction fetch, instruction decoding, etc.). We designed and tested a 16-bit demo core for computing Coulomb's force in an Altera Cyclone II FPGA device. To save resources, the inverse square-root cube operation in our design is computed using a memory look-up table addressed with nine to ten most significant non-zero bits. At 200 MHz internal clock, our demo core reaches a throughput of 200 M pairs/s/core, faster than a typical 2 GHz micro-processor by about a factor of 10. Temperature and power consumption of FPGAs were also lower than those of micro-processors. Fast and convenient, FPGAs can serve as alternatives to time-consuming micro-processors for space charge simulation.

  1. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results. PMID:26932087

  2. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A L; Peng, S X; Ren, H T; Zhang, T; Zhang, J F; Xu, Y; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2016-02-01

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H(+) beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H(-) beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H(-) ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  3. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  4. Examination of Buoyancy-Reduction Effect in Induction-Heating Cookers by Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetsu, Daigo; Tanaka, Kazufumi; Hara, Takehisa

    In recent years, induction-heating (IH) cookers that can be used to heat nonmagnetic metals such as aluminum have been produced. Occasionally, a light pan moves on a glass plate due to buoyancy when heated by an IH cooker. In some IH cookers, an aluminum plate is mounted between the glass plate and the coil in order to reduce the buoyancy effect. The objective of this research is to evaluate the buoyancy-reduction effect and the heating effect of buoyancy-reduction plates. Eddy current analysis is carried out by 3D finite element method, and the electromagnetic force and the heat distribution on the heating plate are calculated. After this calculation is performed, the temperature distribution of the heating plate is calculated by heat transfer analysis. It is found that the shape, area, and the position of the buoyancy reduction plate strongly affect the buoyancy and the heat distribution. The impact of the shape, area, and position of the buoyancy reduction plate was quantified. The phenomena in the heating were elucidated qualitatively.

  5. Sensitivity of the OLGA and VCM models to erroneous marker placement: effects on 3D-gait kinematics.

    PubMed

    Groen, B E; Geurts, M; Nienhuis, B; Duysens, J

    2012-03-01

    Gait data need to be reliable to be valuable for clinical decision-making. To reduce the impact of marker placement errors, the Optimized Lower Limb Gait Analysis (OLGA) model was developed. The purpose of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the kinematic gait data to a standard marker displacement of the OLGA model compared with the standard Vicon Clinical Manager (VCM) model and to determine whether OLGA reduces the errors due to the most critical marker displacements. Healthy adults performed six gait sessions. The first session was a standard gait session. For the following sessions, 10mm marker displacements were applied. Kinematic data were collected for both models. The root mean squares of the differences (RMS) were calculated for the kinematics of the displacement sessions with respect to the first session. The results showed that the RMS values were generally larger than the stride-to-stride variation except for the pelvic kinematics. For the ankle, knee and hip kinematics, OLGA significantly reduced the averaged RMS values for most planes. The shank, knee and thigh anterior-posterior marker displacements resulted in RMS values exceeding 10°. OLGA reduced the errors due to the knee and thigh marker displacements, but not the errors due to the ankle marker displacements. In conclusion, OLGA reduces the effect of erroneous marker placement, but does not fully compensate all effects, indicating that accurate marker placement remains of crucial importance for adequate 3D-gait analysis and subsequent clinical decision-making.

  6. Effect of He-Ar ratio of side assisting gas on plasma 3D formation during CO2 laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dawei; Cai, Yan; Wang, Yonggui; Wu, Yue; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-05-01

    Side assisting gas plays a very important role in the laser-induced plasma suppression and the gas mixture ratio directly influences the formation and behavior of the laser-induced plasma during the laser welding process. In this paper, a photography system was set up with three synchronous CCD cameras to record the plasma plume during CO2 laser welding under different He-Ar ratios for helium-argon mixed side assisting gas. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the laser-induced plasma based on the computed tomography (CT) technology was achieved from the images shot by the cameras. Four characteristics, including the volume, uniformity, parameter PA associated with plasma absorption and parameter PR associated with laser refraction, were extracted from the 3D plasma and analyzed to investigate the effect on the plasma plume morphology as well as the laser energy attenuation. The results indicated that the He-Ar ratio of the side assisting gas has a considerable influence on some characteristics while some other characteristics are not sensitive to the mixture ratio. In addition, the effect of He-Ar ratio on the laser-induced plasma varies a lot with the flow rate of the side assisting gas.

  7. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  8. Viewing effects of 3-D images synthesized from a series of 2-D tomograms by VAP and HAP approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, H. C.; Wang, M. W.; Liu, F. M.; Hsu, Ken Y.

    We report, for the first time, the experimental result and its analysis of synthesizing a series of simulating 2-D tomograms into a 3-D monochromatic image. Our result shows clearly the advantage in monochromaticity of a vertical area-partition (VAP) approach over a horizontal area-partition (HAP) approach during the final white-light reconstruction. This monochromaticity will ensure a 3-D image synthesis without any distortion in gray level or positional recovery.

  9. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that the local seismic site effects may have a significant contribution to the intensity of damage and destruction (e.g., Hough et al., 1990; Regnier et al., 2000; Bonnefoy-Claudet et al., 2006; Haase et al., 2010). The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, usually are derived from seismic velocities. At the same time, thickness of sediments may be determined (or defined) on the basis of 3D combined gravity-magnetic modeling joined with available geological materials, seismic data and borehole section examination. Final result of such investigation is a 3D physical-geological model (PGM) reflecting main geological peculiarities of the area under study. Such a combined study needs in application of a reliable 3D mathematical algorithm of computation together with advanced methodology of 3D modeling. For this analysis the developed GSFC software was selected. The GSFC (Geological Space Field Calculation) program was developed for solving a direct 3-D gravity and magnetic prospecting problem under complex geological conditions (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2004). This program has been designed for computing the field of Δg (Bouguer, free-air or observed value anomalies), ΔZ, ΔX, ΔY , ΔT , as well as second derivatives of the gravitational potential under conditions of rugged relief and inclined magnetization. The geological space can be approximated by (1) three-dimensional, (2) semi-infinite bodies and (3) those infinite along the strike closed, L.H. non-closed, R.H. on-closed and open). Geological bodies are approximated by horizontal polygonal prisms. The program has the following main advantages (besides abovementioned ones): (1) Simultaneous computing of gravity and magnetic fields; (2) Description of the terrain relief by irregularly placed characteristic points; (3) Computation of the effect of the earth-air boundary by the method of selection directly in the process of interpretation; (4

  10. Relativistic solutions for one- and two-dimensional space-charge limited current in coaxial diode

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhanfeng; Liu, Guozhi; Shao, Hao; Yan, Teng; Zhang, Yuchuan

    2013-05-15

    This paper reports the two-dimensional physics and space-charge limited current (SLC) of coaxial diodes with a finite-length emitter. A full-voltage and one-dimensional approximate solution is first obtained by matching the non-relativistic solution to the super-relativistic solution. Including the effects of fields induced by the anode current and the beam itself yields the pinch-limited current in the coaxial diode. The SLC of a practically applied coaxial diode with a finite length emitter is obtained by a semi-analytical method. The solutions well agree with numerical solutions and particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. A quantitative comparison of the effects of stabilizing functionals in 3D regularized inversion of marine CSEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. A.; Cuma, M.; Zhdanov, M. S.; Gribenko, A.; Black, N.

    2010-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) inversion is required for defining 3D geoelectric structures associated with hydrocarbon (HC) deposits from marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. In 3D inversion, regularization is introduced to ensure uniqueness and stability in the inverse model. However, a common misconception is that regularization implies smoothing of the inverse model when in fact regularization and the stabilizing functionals are used to select the class of model from which an inverse solution is sought. Smooth stabilizers represent just one inverse model class from which the minimum norm or first or second derivatives of the 3D resistivity distribution are minimized. Smooth stabilizers have limited physical basis in geological interpretation aimed at exploration for HC reservoirs. Focusing stabilizers on the other hand make it possible to recover subsurface models with sharp resistivity contrasts which are typical for HC reservoirs. Using a synthetic example of the stacked anticlinal structures and reservoir units of the Shtokman gas field in the Barents Sea, we demonstrate that focusing stabilizers not only recover more geologically meaningful models than smooth stabilizers, but they provide better convergence for iterative inversion. This makes it practical to run multiple inversion scenarios based on the suite of a priori models, different data combinations, and various other parameters so as to build confidence in the recovered 3D resistivity model and to discriminate any artifacts that may arise from the interpretation of a single 3D inversion result.

  12. Tomographic measurement of the phase space distribution of a space-charge-dominated beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    Many applications of accelerators, such as free electron lasers, pulsed neutron sources, and heavy ion fusion, require a good quality beam with high intensity. In practice, the achievable intensity is often limited by the dynamics at the low-energy, space-charge dominated end of the machine. Because low-energy beams can have complex distribution functions, a good understanding of their detailed evolution is needed. To address this issue, we have developed a simple and accurate tomographic method to map the beam phase using quadrupole magnets, which includes the effects from space charge. We extend this technique to use also solenoidal magnets which are commonly used at low energies, especially in photoinjectors, thus making the diagnostic applicable to most machines. We simulate our technique using a particle in cell code (PIC), to ascertain accuracy of the reconstruction. Using this diagnostic we report a number of experiments to study and optimize injection, transport and acceleration of intense space charge dominated beams. We examine phase mixing, by studying the phase-space evolution of an intense beam with a transversely nonuniform initial density distribution. Experimental measurements, theoretical predictions and PIC simulations are in good agreement each other. Finally, we generate a parabolic beam pulse to model those beams from photoinjectors, and combine tomography with fast imaging techniques to investigate the time-sliced parameters of beam current, size, energy spread and transverse emittance. We found significant differences between the slice emittance profiles and slice orientation as the beam propagates downstream. The combined effect of longitudinal nonuniform profiles and fast imaging of the transverse phase space provided us with information about correlations between longitudinal and transverse dynamics that we report within this dissertation.

  13. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  14. The effect of rheological approximations on the dynamics and topography in 3D subduction-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. Moreover, they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. These differences arise for several reasons, such as different rheological properties, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergent plates. Previous 3D geodynamic models of subduction/collision processes have used various rheological approximations, making numerical results difficult to compare, since there is no clear image on the extent of these approximations on the dynamics. Here, we employ the code LaMEM to perform high-resolution long-term 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. We test the effect of rheological approximations on mantle and lithosphere dynamics in a geometrically simplified model setup that resembles a tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone. We use the "sticky-air" approach to allow for the development of topography and the dynamics of subduction and collision is entirely driven by slab-pull (i.e. "free subduction"). The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow following a viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, inducing strong mantle flow in the slab window. We also examine the stress states in the subducting and overriding plates and topography evolution in the upper plate, and we discuss the implications on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins

  15. Gaussian-2 (G2) theory for third-row elements: A systematic study of the effect of the 3d orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Brian J.; Radom, Leo

    1998-09-01

    The importance of the inclusion of the 3d orbitals on third-row atoms in the correlation space in G2 theory has been systematically examined through calculations on the third-row G2 test set. Compared with standard G2, this G2(d) approach gives better agreement with experiment for the evaluation of ionization energies, a slightly poorer agreement for atomization energies, and much the same agreement for the very small sub-set of electron affinities and proton affinities. Overall, there is only slightly better agreement with experiment. However, when mixing of the 3d orbitals of the third-row atom with valence orbitals on the adjacent atoms is strong, inclusion of the 3d orbitals in the correlation space becomes a prerequisite to obtaining reliable results. Standard G2 theory is unsuitable in these circumstances. Similar conclusions pertain for the more economical G2(MP2)(d) method and for the full G2(QCI)(d) method. Inclusion of the 3d orbitals in the correlation space greatly increases the computer time required for a G2 calculation so some simple additive corrections to the G2 energy to approximate the effect of this inclusion have been investigated. These additivity methods generally underestimate the effect of the 3d orbitals but give reasonable agreement with the full G2(d) calculations in most cases. They cannot be used, however, in situations where the 3d orbital mixing is strong.

  16. Metabonomic study on the antitumor effect of flavonoid derivative 3d in HepG2 cells and its action mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dan; Jin, Feng; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Yini; Jiang, Yuyang

    2014-01-01

    A novel flavonid derivate, 1-(3-chloro-4-(6-ethyl-4-oxo-4H-chromen-2-yl)phenyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)urea (3d) synthesized in our lab possesses potent antitumor activity against HepG2 cells. Our previous studies on pharmacological mechanism of 3d mostly focused on cell and gene levels, little is about its metabolomics study. Herein, an ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS) based metabolomics approach was established to investigate the antitumor effect of 3d on HepG2 cells and its action mechanism. Q-TOF MS was used to identify metabolites, and tandem mass spectrometry was used to confirm their identity. Comparing 3d-treated HepG2 cells with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide), 32 distinct metabolites involved in glutathione metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and phenylalanine metabolism. The reduced level of glutathione (GSH) and decreased ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in 3d-treated cells indicated the increased oxidative stress after 3d treatment. The significant decrease of phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels and increase of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels suggested alterations in lipid composition which were causally related to decline in mitochondrial function. Depletion of carnitine and increase of long chain carnitines and fatty acids reflected decline in fatty acid metabolism. The further biological experiments including ROS and MMP measurements confirmed the above probabilities presumed from metabolomic results. Our findings suggested that 3d caused the perturbation of multiple cellular pathways. The increased oxidative stress and the resulting mitochondrial dysfunction resulted in the antiproliferative effect of 3d. The UPLC/Q-TOF MS based metabolomics approach provides new insights into the mechanistic studies of new compounds that distinct from traditional biological studies.

  17. Effect of 3d-transition metal doping on the shielding behavior of barium borate glasses: a spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    ElBatal, H A; Abdelghany, A M; Ghoneim, N A; ElBatal, F H

    2014-12-10

    UV-visible and FT infrared spectra were measured for prepared samples before and after gamma irradiation. Base undoped barium borate glass of the basic composition (BaO 40%-B2O3 60mol.%) reveals strong charge transfer UV absorption bands which are related to unavoidable trace iron impurities (Fe(3+)) within the chemical raw materials. 3d transition metal (TM)-doped glasses exhibit extra characteristic absorption bands due to each TM in its specific valence or coordinate state. The optical spectra show that TM ions favor generally the presence in the high valence or tetrahedral coordination state in barium borate host glass. Infrared absorption bands of all prepared glasses reveal the appearance of both triangular BO3 units and tetrahedral BO4 units within their characteristic vibrational modes and the TM-ions cause minor effects because of the low doping level introduced (0.2%). Gamma irradiation of the undoped barium borate glass increases the intensity of the UV absorption together with the generation of an induced broad visible band at about 580nm. These changes are correlated with suggested photochemical reactions of trace iron impurities together with the generation of positive hole center (BHC or OHC) within the visible region through generated electrons and positive holes during the irradiation process.

  18. A pilot study of the photoprotective effect of almond phytochemicals in a 3D human skin equivalent.

    PubMed

    Evans-Johnson, Julie A; Garlick, Jonathan A; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Wang, Xiang-Dong; Oliver Chen, C-Y

    2013-09-01

    UV exposure causes oxidative stress, inflammation, erythema, and skin cancer. α-Tocopherol (AT) and polyphenols (AP) present in almonds may serve as photoprotectants. Our objectives were to assess the feasibility of using a 3D human skin equivalent (HSE) in photoprotectant research and to determine photoprotection of AT and AP against UVA radiation. AT or AP was applied to medium (25 and 5μmol/L, respectively) or topically (1mg/cm(2) and 14μg/cm(2)), followed by UVA. Photodamage assessed 96h post UVA included HSE morphology, keratinocyte proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. UVA induced disorganization of basal layer, alteration of epidermal development, and fibroblast loss which were alleviated by all nutrient pretreatments. UVA significantly decreased keratinocyte proliferation compared to controls, and all pretreatments tended to negate the reduction though only the medium AT effect was statistically significant (p⩽0.05). UVA led to a significant 16-fold increase in apoptosis of fibroblasts compared to the control which was alleviated by topical AP pretreatment and completely negated by topical AT (p⩽0.05). In conclusion, we validated the feasibility of using HSE in evaluation of photoprotectants and found that AT and AP, applied to medium or topically, provided some degree of photoprotection against UVA.

  19. First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  20. Effects of sintering temperature on morphology and mechanical characteristics of 3D printed porous titanium used as dental implant.

    PubMed

    Gagg, Graham; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2013-10-01

    Porous titanium samples were manufactured using the 3D printing and sintering method in order to determine the effects of final sintering temperature on morphology and mechanical properties. Cylindrical samples were printed and split into groups according to a final sintering temperature (FST). Irregular geometry samples were also printed and split into groups according to their FST. The cylindrical samples were used to determine part shrinkage, in compressive tests to provide stress-strain data, in microCT scans to provide internal morphology data and for optical microscopy to determine surface morphology. All of the samples were used in microhardness testing to establish the hardness. Below 1100 °C FST, shrinkage was in the region of 20% but increased to approximately 30% by a FST of 1300 °C. Porosity varied from a maximum of approximately 65% at the surface to the region of 30% internally. Between 97 and 99% of the internal porosity is interconnected. Average pore size varied between 24 μm at the surface and 19 μm internally. Sample hardness increased to in excess of 300 HV0.05 with increasing FST while samples with an FST of below 1250 °C produced an elastic-brittle stress/strain curve and samples above this displayed elastic-plastic behaviour. Yield strength increased significantly through the range of sintering temperatures while the Young's modulus remained fairly consistent. PMID:23910288

  1. Investigation the effect of lattice angle on the band structure in 3D phononic crystals with rhombohedral(II) lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryadoust, M.; Salehi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystals (PC) of 3D with rhombohedral(II) lattice is studied theoretically. The PC are constituted of nickel spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and density of states are performed with the plane wave expansion method in the irreducible part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). In this study, we analyze the dependence of the band structures inside (the complete band gap width) and outside the complete band gap (negative refraction of acoustic wave) on the lattice angle in the irreducible part of the first BZ. Also the effect of lattice angle has been analyzed on the band structure of the () and (122) planes. Then, the equifrequency surface is calculated for the high symmetry point in the [111] and [100] directions. The results show that the maximum width of AEBG (0.022) in the irreducible part of the BZ of RHL2 is formed for (105∘) and no AEBG is found for γ > 150∘. Also, the maximum of the first and second AEBG width are 0.1076 and 0.0523 for γ = 133∘ in the () plane and the maximum of the first and second AEBG width are 0.1446 and 0.0998 for γ = 113∘ in the (122) plane. In addition, we have found that frequencies in which negative refraction occurs is constant for all lattice angles.

  2. Effect of thin gate dielectrics and gate materials on simulated device characteristics of 3D double gate JNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya, A.; Krishnan, V.; Baishya, S.; Lenka, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a novel Silicon based three dimensional (3D) double-gate Junctionless Nanowire Transistor (JNT) of 20 nm gate length is proposed. The device characteristics such as gate characteristics and drain characteristics are studied with the help of Sentaurus TCAD by using different gate materials such as Al, Ti, n+ Polysilicon, Au and using different ultra thin gate dielectrics such as SiO2, Si3N4 and HfO2. The effect of various work functions and dielectrics on the threshold voltage of the JNT is also analysed. From the TCAD simulation results it is observed that high-K material (HfO2) as gate dielectric shows better drain characteristics with respect to others. The JNT with Al as gate material gives better current characteristics with respect to others. It is also analysed that under flat-band condition the driving of drain current does not directly depend on the gate-oxide capacitance but depends upon the channel doping concentrations. Thus by choosing the proper gate material and gate dielectric combinations, the desired device characteristics could be obtained for JNT.

  3. 3D-Printing of inverted pyramid suspending architecture for pyroelectric infrared detectors with inhibited microphonic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qing; Zhao, Xiangyong; Li, Xiaobing; Deng, Hao; Yan, Hong; Yang, Linrong; Di, Wenning; Luo, Haosu; Neumann, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    A sensitive chip with ultralow dielectric loss based on Mn doped PMNT (71/29) has been proposed for high-end pyroelectric devices. The dielectric loss at 1 kHz is 0.005%, one order lower than the minimum value reported so far. The detective figure of merit (Fd) is up to 92.6 × 10-5 Pa-1/2 at 1 kHz and 53.5 × 10-5 Pa-1/2 at 10 Hz, respectively. In addition, an inverted pyramid suspending architecture for supporting the sensitive chip has been designed and manufactured by 3D printing technology. The combination of this sensitive chip and the proposed suspending architecture largely enhances the performance of the pyroelectric detectors. The responsivity and specific detectivity are 669,811 V/W and 3.32 × 109 cm Hz1/2/W at 10 Hz, respectively, 1.9 times and 1.5 times higher than those of the highest values in literature. Furthermore, the microphonic effect can be largely inhibited according to the theoretical and experimental analysis. This architecture will have promising applications in high-end and stable pyroelectric infrared detectors.

  4. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalone, Emily A.; Fox, Anne-Marie V.; Kedgley, Angela E.; Jenkyn, Thomas R.; King, Graham J. W.; Athwal, George S.; Johnson, James A.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-10-01

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  5. Use of 3D simulations to investigate the effect of grooves on the surface of a plate impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, P. D.; Townsley, R.; Fishpool, D.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the surface finish for a plate impact specimen has little influence on the Hugoniot stress attained in it, as obtained from a uniaxial strain loading scenario [1]. However, the surface finish did clearly affect the rise time of the gauge trace due to local inhomogenieties in the wave structure. The Eulerian hydrocode GRIM3D has been used to investigate the detailed wave profiles obtained in copper to explain and quantify these effects. The simulations have been used to compare the Hugoniot stress, rise times and general wave structure in the specimen and compared with idealised an equivalent 1D loading case. An attempt is also made to identify the critical groove depth and width before the wave profile is significantly affected compared to the 1D case. This is important since some specimens are difficult to prepare to very high tolerances. The results are discussed in terms of material response, numerics and with a recommendation for further work.

  6. Extended space charge near nonideally selective membranes and nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Leibowitz, Neta; Yossifon, Gilad

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the role of selectivity variation in the structure of the nonequilibrium extended space charge using one-dimensional analytic and two-dimensional numerical Poisson-Nernst-Planck models for the electro-diffusive transport of a symmetric electrolyte. This provides a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanism behind a previously observed maximum in the resistance-voltage curve for a shallow micro-nanochannel interface device [Schiffbauer, Liel, Leibowitz, Park, and Yossifon, arXiv:1409.4548, Phys. Rev. E (to be published)]. The current study helps to establish a connection between parameters such as the geometry and nanochannel surface charge and the control of selectivity and resistance in the overlimiting current regime.

  7. 3D Finite Element Modelling for the investigation of the cavity effect in extensometric rock-deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kis, M.; Detzky, G.; Koppán, A.

    2012-04-01

    phenomenon in general. Authors calculated the deformations of a simple-geometry 3D cavity, which is caused by variable gravity loads. Dependence of the cavity effect on changing of distinct elastic properties in categorized models has been investigated. Authors introduced qualifying parameter fields calculated using the results of the FE modelling (nodal displacements as a model answer for the gravity load), in order to characterize the effect. Modelling results can be used as an estimation not only for the absolute cavity effect rate of the intended arrangement, furthermore the sensitivity of the given system against a particular geometric property. As an application example finite element modelling were carried out in order to estimate the influence of the complicated cavity system surrounding the "Budapest-Matyashegy" Gravity and Geodynamical Observatory of the Eotvos Lorand Geophysical Institute of Hungary.

  8. The Effects of Matrix Stiffness and RhoA on the Phenotypic Plasticity of Smooth Muscle Cells in a 3-D Biosynthetic Hydrogel System

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kim, Peter D.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seliktar, Dror; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies using 2-D cultures have shown that the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell migration, spreading, proliferation, and differentiation; however, cellular mechanosensing in 3-D remains under-explored. To investigate this topic, a unique biomaterial system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated fibrinogen was adapted to study phenotypic plasticity in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as a function of ECM mechanics in 3-D. Tuning compressive modulus between 448–5804 Pa modestly regulated SMC cytoskeletal assembly in 3-D, with spread cells in stiff matrices having a slightly higher degree of F-actin bundling after prolonged culture. However, vinculin expression in all 3-D conditions was qualitatively low and was not assembled into the classic focal adhesions typically seen in 2-D cultures. Given the evidence that RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal contractility represents a critical node in mechanosensing, we molecularly upregulated contractility by inducing SMCs to express constitutively active RhoA. In these cells, F-actin bundling and total vinculin expression increased, and focal adhesion-like structures began to emerge, consistent with RhoA’s mechanism of action cells cultured on 2-D substrates. Furthermore, SMC proliferation in 3-D did not depend significantly on matrix stiffness, and was reduced by constitutive activation of RhoA irrespective of ECM mechanical properties. Conversely, the expression of contractile markers globally increased with constitutive RhoA activation and depended on 3-D matrix stiffness only in cells with heightened RhoA activity. Combined, these data suggest the synergistic effects of ECM mechanics and RhoA activity on SMC phenotype in 3-D are distinct from those in 2-D, and highlight the importance of studying the mechanical role of cell-matrix interactions in tunable 3-D environments. PMID:18342366

  9. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  10. Full 3-D TLM simulations of the Earth-ionosphere cavity: Effect of conductivity on the Schumann resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Redondo, S.; Salinas, A.; Fornieles, J.; Portí, J.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.

    2016-06-01

    Schumann resonances can be found in planetary atmospheres, inside the cavity formed by the conducting surface of the planet and the lower ionosphere. They are a powerful tool to investigate both the electric processes that occur in the atmosphere and the characteristics of the surface and the lower ionosphere. Results from a full 3-D model of the Earth-ionosphere electromagnetic cavity based on the Transmission-Line Modeling (TLM) method are presented. A Cartesian scheme with homogeneous cell size of 10 km is used to minimize numerical dispersion present in spherical schemes. Time and frequency domain results have been obtained to study the resonance phenomenon. The effect of conductivity on the Schumann resonances in the cavity is investigated by means of numerical simulations, studying the transition from resonant to nonresonant response and setting the conductivity limit for the resonances to develop inside the cavity. It is found that the transition from resonant to nonresonant behavior occurs for conductivity values above roughly 10-9 S/m. For large losses in the cavity, the resonances are damped, but, in addition, the peak frequencies change according to the local distance to the source and with the particular electromagnetic field component. These spatial variations present steep variations around each mode's nodal position, covering distances around 1/4 of the mode wavelength, the higher modes being more sensitive to this effect than the lower ones. The dependence of the measured frequency on the distance to the source and particular component of the electric field offers information on the source generating these resonances.

  11. A study of the effects of degraded imagery on tactical 3D model generation using structure-from-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolick, Leslie; Harguess, Josh

    2016-05-01

    An emerging technology in the realm of airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems is structure-from-motion (SfM), which enables the creation of three-dimensional (3D) point clouds and 3D models from two-dimensional (2D) imagery. There are several existing tools, such as VisualSFM and open source project OpenSfM, to assist in this process, however, it is well-known that pristine imagery is usually required to create meaningful 3D data from the imagery. In military applications, such as the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for surveillance operations, imagery is rarely pristine. Therefore, we present an analysis of structure-from-motion packages on imagery that has been degraded in a controlled manner.

  12. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  13. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  14. Single bunch transverse instability in a circular accelerator with chromaticity and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-10-21

    The transverse instability of a bunch in a circular accelerator is elaborated in this paper. A new tree-modes model is proposed and developed to describe the most unstable modes of the bunch. This simple and flexible model includes chromaticity and space charge, and can be used with any bunch and wake forms. The dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in form of a third-order algebraic equation. The known head-tail and TMCI modes appear as the limiting cases which are distinctly bounded at zero chromaticity only. It is shown that the instability parameters depend only slightly on the bunch model but they are rather sensitive to the wake shape. In particular, space charge effects are investigated in the paper and it is shown that their influence depends on sign of wake field enhancing the bunch stability if the wake is negative. In addition, the resistive wall wake is considered in detail including a comparison of single and collective effects. A comparison of the results with earlier publications is carried out.

  15. Single bunch transverse instability in a circular accelerator with chromaticity and space charge

    DOE PAGES

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-10-21

    The transverse instability of a bunch in a circular accelerator is elaborated in this paper. A new tree-modes model is proposed and developed to describe the most unstable modes of the bunch. This simple and flexible model includes chromaticity and space charge, and can be used with any bunch and wake forms. The dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in form of a third-order algebraic equation. The known head-tail and TMCI modes appear as the limiting cases which are distinctly bounded at zero chromaticity only. It is shown that the instability parameters depend only slightly on the bunchmore » model but they are rather sensitive to the wake shape. In particular, space charge effects are investigated in the paper and it is shown that their influence depends on sign of wake field enhancing the bunch stability if the wake is negative. In addition, the resistive wall wake is considered in detail including a comparison of single and collective effects. A comparison of the results with earlier publications is carried out.« less

  16. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  17. Numerical modelling of seawater intrusion in Shenzhen (China) using a 3D density-dependent model including tidal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Qingchun; Martín, Jordi D.; Juncosa, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    During the 1990s, groundwater overexploitation has resulted in seawater intrusion in the coastal aquifer of the Shenzhen city, China. Although water supply facilities have been improved and alleviated seawater intrusion in recent years, groundwater overexploitation is still of great concern in some local areas. In this work we present a three-dimensional density-dependent numerical model developed with the FEFLOW code, which is aimed at simulating the extent of seawater intrusion while including tidal effects and different groundwater pumping scenarios. Model calibration, using waterheads and reported chloride concentration, has been performed based on the data from 14 boreholes, which were monitored from May 2008 to December 2009. A fairly good fitness between the observed and computed values was obtained by a manual trial-and-error method. Model prediction has been carried out forward 3 years with the calibrated model taking into account high, medium and low tide levels and different groundwater exploitation schemes. The model results show that tide-induced seawater intrusion significantly affects the groundwater levels and concentrations near the estuarine of the Dasha river, which implies that an important hydraulic connection exists between this river and groundwater, even considering that some anti-seepage measures were taken in the river bed. Two pumping scenarios were considered in the calibrated model in order to predict the future changes in the water levels and chloride concentration. The numerical results reveal a decreased tendency of seawater intrusion if groundwater exploitation does not reach an upper bound of about 1.32 × 104 m3/d. The model results provide also insights for controlling seawater intrusion in such coastal aquifer systems.

  18. Biochemical and cellular effects of c-Src kinase-selective pyrido[2, 3-d]pyrimidine tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kraker, A J; Hartl, B G; Amar, A M; Barvian, M R; Showalter, H D; Moore, C W

    2000-10-01

    Increased expression or activity of c-Src tyrosine kinase has been associated with the transformed phenotype in tumor cells and with progression of neoplastic disease. A number of pyrido[2, 3-d]pyrimidines have been characterized biochemically and in cells as part of an assessment of their potential as anti-tumor agents. The compounds were ATP-competitive inhibitors of c-Src kinase with IC(50) values < 10 nM and from 6 to >100-fold selectivity for c-Src tyrosine kinase relative to basic fibroblast growth factor receptor (bFGFr) tyrosine kinase, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFr) tyrosine kinase, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) tyrosine kinase. The compounds yielded IC(50) values < 5 nM against Lck. Human colon tumor cell growth in culture was inhibited, as was colony formation in soft agar at concentrations < 1 microM. Phosphorylation of the c-Src cellular substrates paxillin, p130(cas), and Stat3 was also inhibited at concentrations < 1 microM. Autophosphorylation of EGFr tyrosine kinase or PDGFr tyrosine kinase was not inhibited by c-Src inhibitors, thus showing the selective nature of the compounds in cells. In a mitogenesis assay measuring thymidine incorporation stimulated by specific mitogens, the c-Src tyrosine kinase inhibitors reduced incorporated thymidine in a manner consistent with previously reported roles of c-Src in mitogenic signaling. Progression through the cell cycle was inhibited at G(2)/M in human colon tumor cells treated with two of the c-Src-selective compounds, which is also consistent with earlier reports describing a requirement for active c-Src tyrosine kinase for G(2) to M phase progression. The compounds described here are selective inhibitors of c-Src tyrosine kinase and have antiproliferative effects in tumor cells consistent with inhibition of c-Src.

  19. Increase in the Random Dopant Induced Threshold Fluctuations and Lowering in Sub 100 nm MOSFETs Due to Quantum Effects: A 3-D Density-Gradient Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Slavcheva, G.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.; Saini, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed simulation study of the influence of quantum mechanical effects in the inversion layer on random dopant induced threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering in sub 100 nm MOSFETs. The simulations have been performed using a 3-D implementation of the density gradient (DG) formalism incorporated in our established 3-D atomistic simulation approach. This results in a self-consistent 3-D quantum mechanical picture, which implies not only the vertical inversion layer quantisation but also the lateral confinement effects related to current filamentation in the 'valleys' of the random potential fluctuations. We have shown that the net result of including quantum mechanical effects, while considering statistical dopant fluctuations, is an increase in both threshold voltage fluctuations and lowering. At the same time, the random dopant induced threshold voltage lowering partially compensates for the quantum mechanical threshold voltage shift in aggressively scaled MOSFETs with ultrathin gate oxides.

  20. Different effects of bladder distention on point A-based and 3D-conformal intracavitary brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sang Gyu; Huh, Seung Jae; Shin, Jung Suk; Park, Won; Nam, Heerim; Bae, Sunhyun; Oh, Dongryul; Hong, Chae-Seon; Kim, Jin Sung; Han, Youngyih; Choi, Doo Ho

    2013-03-01

    This study sought to evaluate the differential effects of bladder distention on point A-based (AICBT) and three-dimensional conformal intracavitary brachytherapy (3D-ICBT) planning for cervical cancer. Two sets of CT scans were obtained for ten patients to evaluate the effect of bladder distention. After the first CT scan, with an empty bladder, a second set of CT scans was obtained with the bladder filled. The clinical target volume (CTV), bladder, rectum, and small bowel were delineated on each image set. The AICBT and 3D-ICBT plans were generated, and we compared the different planning techniques with respect to the dose characteristics of CTV and organs at risk. As a result of bladder distention, the mean dose (D50) was decreased significantly and geometrical variations were observed in the bladder and small bowel, with acceptable minor changes in the CTV and rectum. The average D2 cm(3)and D1 cm(3)showed a significant change in the bladder and small bowel with AICBT; however, no change was detected with the 3D-ICBT planning. No significant dose change in the CTV or rectum was observed with either the AICBT or the 3D-ICBT plan. The effect of bladder distention on dosimetrical change in 3D-ICBT planning appears to be minimal, in comparison with AICBT planning.