Science.gov

Sample records for 3d spatial control

  1. 3-D Separation Control using Spatially-Compact, Pulsed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, George T. K.; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of controlled 3-D transitory attachment of stalled flow over a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil are investigated in wind tunnel experiments. Pulsed actuation is effected over a spanwise fraction of the separated domain on a time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's characteristic convective time scale using surface-integrated pulsed, combustion-driven actuator jets. The formation, evolution, and advection of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in its near wake are computed from high-resolution, phase-locked PIV measurements of the flow field in multiple cross-stream planes. It is shown that transitory attachment spreads toward the outboard, unactuated flow domains and exceeds the spanwise width of the actuation. The attachment is preceded by the formation of 3-D vortical structures that are advected and shed into the near wake. The effect of the actuation on the variation of the lift and pitching moment during the pitching cycle is altered significantly with its phase delay relative to the airfoil's pitching motion and can significantly mitigate the adverse aerodynamic effects of the dynamic stall. Supported by AFOSR.

  2. High throughput assembly of spatially controlled 3D cell clusters on a micro/nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Sharma, Sadhana; Reen, Rashmeet K; Palmer, Andre F; Gooch, Keith J; Lee, L James; Lannutti, John J; Hansford, Derek J

    2010-03-21

    Guided assembly of microscale tissue subunits (i.e. 3D cell clusters/aggregates) has found applications in cell therapy/tissue engineering, cell and developmental biology, and drug discovery. As cluster size and geometry are known to influence cellular responses, the ability to spatially control cluster formation in a high throughput manner could be advantageous for many biomedical applications. In this work, a micro- and nanofabricated platform was developed for this purpose, consisting of a soft-lithographically fabricated array of through-thickness microwells structurally bonded to a sheet of electrospun fibers. The microwells and fibers were manufactured from several polymers of biomedical interest. Human hepatocytes were used as model cells to demonstrate the ability of the platform to allow controlled cluster formation. In addition, the ability of the device to support studies on semi-controlled heterotypic interactions was demonstrated by co-culturing hepatocytes and fibroblasts. Preliminary experiments with other cells of interest (pancreatic cells, embryonic stem cells, and cardiomyocytes) were also conducted. Our platform possesses several advantages over previously developed microwell arrays: a more in vivo-like topographical stimulation of cells; better nutrient/waste exchange through the underlying nanofiber mat; and easy integration into standard two-chamber cell culture well systems. PMID:20221567

  3. Spatial Visualization by Realistic 3D Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the popular Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization by Rotations (PSVT-R) in isometric drawings was recreated with CAD software that allows 3D solid modeling and rendering to provide more realistic pictorial views. Both the original and the modified PSVT-R tests were given to students and their scores on the two tests were…

  4. Developing 3D Spatial Skills for K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorby, Sheryl A.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional spatial skills have been shown to be critical to success in engineering and other technological fields. Well-developed 3D spatial skills are particularly important for success in engineering graphics courses. Further, 3D spatial skills of women lag significantly behind those of their male counterparts, which could hinder their…

  5. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  6. Using 3D Geometric Models to Teach Spatial Geometry Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoline, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    An explanation of 3-D Computer Aided Design (CAD) usage to teach spatial geometry concepts using nontraditional techniques is presented. The software packages CADKEY and AutoCAD are described as well as their usefulness in solving space geometry problems. (KR)

  7. 3D spatial information infrastructure: The case of Port Rotterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatanova, S.; Beetz, J.

    2012-10-01

    The development and maintenance of the infrastructure, facilities, logistics and other assets of the Port of Rotterdam requires a broad spectrum of heterogeneous information. This information concerns features, which are spatially distributed above ground, underground, in the air and in the water. The data are managed in a variety of data models with varying levels of dimensionality, granularity, accuracy and up-to-dateness. Additionally increasing number of 3D design models is becoming available. This complexity of tasks and diversity of information challenges the Port authority to look for more advanced 3D solutions. This paper presents research in progress related to developing a 3D SII in support of information and process management within the Port of Rotterdam.

  8. Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies

  9. 3D GIS spatial operation based on extended Euler operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongbo; Lu, Guonian; Sheng, Yehua; Zhou, Liangchen; Guo, Fei; Shang, Zuoyan; Wang, Jing

    2008-10-01

    The implementation of 3 dimensions spatial operations, based on certain data structure, has a lack of universality and is not able to treat with non-manifold cases, at present. ISO/DIS 19107 standard just presents the definition of Boolean operators and set operators for topological relationship query, and OGC GeoXACML gives formal definitions for several set functions without implementation detail. Aiming at these problems, based mathematical foundation on cell complex theory, supported by non-manifold data structure and using relevant research in the field of non-manifold geometry modeling for reference, firstly, this paper according to non-manifold Euler-Poincaré formula constructs 6 extended Euler operators and inverse operators to carry out creating, updating and deleting 3D spatial elements, as well as several pairs of supplementary Euler operators to convenient for implementing advanced functions. Secondly, we change topological element operation sequence of Boolean operation and set operation as well as set functions defined in GeoXACML into combination of extended Euler operators, which separates the upper functions and lower data structure. Lastly, we develop underground 3D GIS prototype system, in which practicability and credibility of extended Euler operators faced to 3D GIS presented by this paper are validated.

  10. Developing Spatial Reasoning Through 3D Representations of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, F.; Eisenhamer, B.; McCallister, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mental models of astronomical objects are often greatly hampered by the flat two-dimensional representation of pictures from telescopes. Lacking experience with the true structures in much of the imagery, there is no basis for anything but the default interpretation of a picture postcard. Using astronomical data and scientific visualizations, our professional development session allows teachers and their students to develop their spatial reasoning while forming more accurate and richer mental models. Examples employed in this session include star positions and constellations, morphologies of both normal and interacting galaxies, shapes of planetary nebulae, and three dimensional structures in star forming regions. Participants examine, imagine, predict, and confront the 3D interpretation of well-known 2D imagery using authentic data from NASA, the Hubble Space Telescope, and other scientific sources. The session's cross-disciplinary nature includes science, math, and artistic reasoning while addressing common cosmic misconceptions. Stars of the Orion Constellation seen in 3D explodes the popular misconception that stars in a constellation are all at the same distance. A scientific visualization of two galaxies colliding provides a 3D comparison for Hubble images of interacting galaxies.

  11. Gravity and spatial orientation in virtual 3D-mazes.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manuel; Lipshits, Mark; McIntyre, Joseph; Berthoz, Alain

    2003-01-01

    In order to bring new insights into the processing of 3D spatial information, we conducted experiments on the capacity of human subjects to memorize 3D-structured environments, such as buildings with several floors or the potentially complex 3D structure of an orbital space station. We had subjects move passively in one of two different exploration modes, through a visual virtual environment that consisted of a series of connected tunnels. In upright displacement, self-rotation when going around corners in the tunnels was limited to yaw rotations. For horizontal translations, subjects faced forward in the direction of motion. When moving up or down through vertical segments of the 3D tunnels, however, subjects facing the tunnel wall, remaining upright as if moving up and down in a glass elevator. In the unconstrained displacement mode, subjects would appear to climb or dive face-forward when moving vertically; thus, in this mode subjects could experience visual flow consistent with rotations about any of the 3 canonical axes. In a previous experiment, subjects were asked to determine whether a static, outside view of a test tunnel corresponded or not to the tunnel through which they had just passed. Results showed that performance was better on this task for the upright than for the unconstrained displacement mode; i.e. when subjects remained "upright" with respect to the virtual environment as defined by subject's posture in the first segment. This effect suggests that gravity may provide a key reference frame used in the shift between egocentric and allocentric representations of the 3D virtual world. To check whether it is the polarizing effects of gravity that leads to the favoring of the upright displacement mode, the experimental paradigm was adapted for orbital flight and performed by cosmonauts onboard the International Space Station. For these flight experiments the previous recognition task was replaced by a computerized reconstruction task, which proved

  12. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  13. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  14. Quantification of Spatial Parameters in 3D Cellular Constructs Using Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A. W.; Bilgin, C. C.; Hasan, M. A.; McKeen, L. M.; Stegemann, J. P.; Yener, B.; Zaki, M. J.; Plopper, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Multispectral three-dimensional (3D) imaging provides spatial information for biological structures that cannot be measured by traditional methods. This work presents a method of tracking 3D biological structures to quantify changes over time using graph theory. Cell-graphs were generated based on the pairwise distances, in 3D-Euclidean space, between nuclei during collagen I gel compaction. From these graphs quantitative features are extracted that measure both the global topography and the frequently occurring local structures of the “tissue constructs.” The feature trends can be controlled by manipulating compaction through cell density and are significant when compared to random graphs. This work presents a novel methodology to track a simple 3D biological event and quantitatively analyze the underlying structural change. Further application of this method will allow for the study of complex biological problems that require the quantification of temporal-spatial information in 3D and establish a new paradigm in understanding structure-function relationships. PMID:19920859

  15. The Effect of 3D-Modeling Training on Students' Spatial Reasoning Relative to Gender and Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šafhalter, Andrej; Vukman, Karin Bakracevic; Glodež, Srecko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to establish whether gender and age have an impact on spatial reasoning and its development through the use of 3D modeling. The study was conducted on a sample of 196 children from sixth to ninth grade, of whom 95 represented the experimental group and 101 the control group. The experimental group received 3D modeling…

  16. Object-oriented urban 3D spatial data model organization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Li, Wen-qing; Lv, Nan; Su, Tao

    2015-12-01

    This paper combined the 3d data model with object-oriented organization method, put forward the model of 3d data based on object-oriented method, implemented the city 3d model to quickly build logical semantic expression and model, solved the city 3d spatial information representation problem of the same location with multiple property and the same property with multiple locations, designed the space object structure of point, line, polygon, body for city of 3d spatial database, and provided a new thought and method for the city 3d GIS model and organization management.

  17. An optimal performance control scheme for a 3D crane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mohammad Javad; Mohamed, Z.; Husain, A. R.; Tokhi, M. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal performance control scheme for control of a three dimensional (3D) crane system including a Zero Vibration shaper which considers two control objectives concurrently. The control objectives are fast and accurate positioning of a trolley and minimum sway of a payload. A complete mathematical model of a lab-scaled 3D crane is simulated in Simulink. With a specific cost function the proposed controller is designed to cater both control objectives similar to a skilled operator. Simulation and experimental studies on a 3D crane show that the proposed controller has better performance as compared to a sequentially tuned PID-PID anti swing controller. The controller provides better position response with satisfactory payload sway in both rail and trolley responses. Experiments with different payloads and cable lengths show that the proposed controller is robust to changes in payload with satisfactory responses.

  18. Think3d!: Training Spatial Thinking Fundamental to STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Holly A.; Hutton, Allyson

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the initial implementation of an innovative program for elementary-age children involving origami and pop-up paper engineering to promote visuospatial thinking. While spatial ability measures correlate with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) success, a focus on spatial thinking is all but missing in elementary…

  19. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  20. 3D-CAD Effects on Creative Design Performance of Different Spatial Abilities Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Students' creativity is an important focus globally and is interrelated with students' spatial abilities. Additionally, three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing (3D-CAD) overcomes barriers to spatial expression during the creative design process. Does 3D-CAD affect students' creative abilities? The purpose of this study was to…

  1. Experiment for Integrating Dutch 3d Spatial Planning and Bim for Checking Building Permits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, L.; Dijkmans, T.; Stoter, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a research project in The Netherlands in which several SMEs collaborated to create a 3D model of the National spatial planning information. This 2D information system described in the IMRO data standard holds implicit 3D information that can be used to generate an explicit 3D model. The project realized a proof of concept to generate a 3D spatial planning model. The team used the model to integrate it with several 3D Building Information Models (BIMs) described in the open data standard Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Goal of the project was (1) to generate a 3D BIM model from spatial planning information to be used by the architect during the early design phase, and (2) allow 3D checking of building permits. The team used several technologies like CityGML, BIM clash detection and GeoBIM to explore the potential of this innovation. Within the project a showcase was created with a part of the spatial plan from the city of The Hague. Several BIM models were integrated in the 3D spatial plan of this area. A workflow has been described that demonstrates the benefits of collaboration between the spatial domain and the AEC industry in 3D. The research results in a showcase with conclusions and considerations for both national and international practice.

  2. Effect of spatial behavior of scatter on 3D PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Pei, Cheng-Chih

    1997-05-01

    In 3D positron emission tomography (PET), all the coincidence events can be collected to increase the sensitivity of signal detection. However, the sensitivity increase results in the enlargement of scatter fraction which degrades image quality. For improving the accuracy of PET images, an effective scatter correction technique is necessary. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations were done according to the system configuration of the animal PET design at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. From the simulation data we could understand what the scatter effect of our planned system will be. The convolution-subtraction method was chosen to correct for the scatter. A new approach to determine the scatter kernel function which could do better job on scatter correction will be presented.

  3. Jacob's Interpretation Method Revisited: Accounting for 3-D Spatial Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Carrera, J.

    2005-12-01

    Traditional approaches to hydraulic test interpretation provide typically individual aquifer parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity (K) and storativity (S) values. The values obtained somehow incorporate some averaging values of aquifer heterogeneity, while the averaging functions are a direct consequence of the method of analysis employed. In recent years most work, casted in a stochastic framework, focused on the relationship between pumping rate and ensemble mean or variance of drawdown, thus having to pre-specify the parameters characterizing the underlying random spatial function. On the contrary, we contend that additional highly relevant information about heterogeneity can be obtained by looking to the spatial distribution of drawdown in individual realizations of the heterogeneous K field, without the need for invoking ergodic arguments. We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of time-dependent drawdown in a tridimensional aquifer produced by constant rate pumping in a fully penetrating well. The aquifer is considered of infinite extension in the x, y directions, and we assume no-flow boundaries in the aquifer top and bottom. The observation point is a fully penetrating piezometer. We consider an unknown spatial distribution of K(x,y,z), and using a perturbation expansion up to second order, we look at the late-time behavior of drawdown at any given observation vertical line. We conclude that: (1) at any given observation line the late-time behavior of drawdown would display a straight line in a drawdown versus log time plot, thus allowing the use of Jacob's method for test interpretation; (2) the slope of the straight line is the same for each observation line, thus providing a global average of K(x,y,z) through the aquifer; (3) the intercept point of the line in the same plot depends on location and is related to connectivity issues between the pumping and observation locations; (4) the intercept value is a weighted function of the local

  4. 3D hybrid wound devices for spatiotemporally controlled release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Koc, Bahattin

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents localized and temporal control of release kinetics over 3-dimensional (3D) hybrid wound devices to improve wound-healing process. Imaging study is performed to extract wound bed geometry in 3D. Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) based surface lofting is applied to generate functionally graded regions. Diffusion-based release kinetics model is developed to predict time-based release of loaded modifiers for functionally graded regions. Multi-chamber single nozzle solid freeform dispensing system is used to fabricate wound devices with controlled dispensing concentration. Spatiotemporal control of biological modifiers thus enables a way to achieve target delivery to improve wound healing. PMID:22672934

  5. Indoor 3D Route Modeling Based On Estate Spatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wen, Y.; Jiang, J.; Huang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Indoor three-dimensional route model is essential for space intelligence navigation and emergency evacuation. This paper is motivated by the need of constructing indoor route model automatically and as far as possible. By comparing existing building data sources, this paper firstly explained the reason why the estate spatial management data is chosen as the data source. Then, an applicable method of construction three-dimensional route model in a building is introduced by establishing the mapping relationship between geographic entities and their topological expression. This data model is a weighted graph consist of "node" and "path" to express the spatial relationship and topological structure of a building components. The whole process of modelling internal space of a building is addressed by two key steps: (1) each single floor route model is constructed, including path extraction of corridor using Delaunay triangulation algorithm with constrained edge, fusion of room nodes into the path; (2) the single floor route model is connected with stairs and elevators and the multi-floor route model is eventually generated. In order to validate the method in this paper, a shopping mall called "Longjiang New City Plaza" in Nanjing is chosen as a case of study. And the whole building space is constructed according to the modelling method above. By integrating of existing path finding algorithm, the usability of this modelling method is verified, which shows the indoor three-dimensional route modelling method based on estate spatial data in this paper can support indoor route planning and evacuation route design very well.

  6. The 3D model control of image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, An H.; Stark, Lawrence

    1989-01-01

    Telerobotics studies remote control of distant robots by a human operator using supervisory or direct control. Even if the robot manipulators has vision or other senses, problems arise involving control, communications, and delay. The communication delays that may be expected with telerobots working in space stations while being controlled from an Earth lab have led to a number of experiments attempting to circumvent the problem. This delay in communication is a main motivating factor in moving from well understood instantaneous hands-on manual control to less well understood supervisory control; the ultimate step would be the realization of a fully autonomous robot. The 3-D model control plays a crucial role in resolving many conflicting image processing problems that are inherent in resolving in the bottom-up approach of most current machine vision processes. The 3-D model control approach is also capable of providing the necessary visual feedback information for both the control algorithms and for the human operator.

  7. Measuring the impact of 3D data geometric modeling on spatial analysis: Illustration with Skyview factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasebin, M.; Perret, J.; Mustière, S.; Weber, C.

    2012-10-01

    The increased availability of 3D urban data reflects a growing interest in 3D spatial analysis. As 3D spatial analysis often uses complex 3D data, studies of the potential gains of using more detailed 3D urban databases for specific uses is an important issue. First, more complex data implies an increase in time and memory usage for the analysis (and calls for more research on the efficiency of the algorithms used). Second, detailed 3D urban data are complex to produce, expensive and it is important to be well informed in order to decide whether of not to invest in such data. Currently, many studies have been led about the fitness for use of 2D data but they are very scarce concerning 3D data. This article presents a method to determine the influence of 3D modeling on the results of 3D analysis by isolating the potential sources of errors (such as roof modeling and geometric accuracy). This method is applied on two 3D datasets (LOD1 and LOD2) and a 3D indicator (the sky view factor or SVF). The results show that the significant influence of roof modeling is globally compensated by the difference in geometric modeling but that important local variations are noticed. Nevertheless, for 75% of the SVF processed the difference between the results using these two databases is lower than 2%.

  8. Types of Reasoning in 3D Geometry Thinking and Their Relation with Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittalis, Marios; Christou, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyse the structure of 3D geometry thinking by identifying different types of reasoning and to examine their relation with spatial ability. To achieve this goal, two tests were administered to students in grades 5 to 9. The results of the study showed that 3D geometry thinking could be described by four…

  9. Review and comparison of temporal- and spatial-phase shift speckle pattern interferometry for 3D deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Yang, Lianxiang; Chen, Xu; Xu, Nan; Wang, Yonghong

    2013-10-01

    High accuracy full field three dimensional (3D) deformation measurements have always been an essential problem for the manufacturing, instrument, and aerospace industry. 3D deformations, which can be translated further into 3D strain and stress, are the key parameter for design, manufacturing and quality control. Due to the fast development of the manufacturing industry, especially in the automobile and airspace industry, rapid design and optimization concepts have already widely accepted. These concepts all require the support of rapid, high sensitive and accuracy 3D deformation measurement. Advanced optical methods are gaining widely acceptance for deformation and stain measurement by industry due to the advantages of non-contact, full-field and high measurement sensitivity. Of these methods, Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is the most sensitive and accurate method for 3D deformation measurement in micro and sub micro-level. ESPI measures deformation by evaluating the phase difference of two recorded speckle interferograms under different loading conditions. Combined with a phase shift technique, ESPI systems can measure the 3D deformation with dozens of nanometer level sensitivity. Cataloged by phase calculation methods, ESPI systems can be divided into temporal phase shift ESPI systems and spatial phase shift ESPI system. This article provides a review and a comparison of temporal and spatial phase shift speckle pattern interferometry for 3D deformation measurement. After an overview of the fundamentals of ESPI theory, temporal phase-shift and spatial phase-shift techniques, 3D deformation measurements by the temporal phase-shift ESPI which is suited well for static measurement and by the spatial phase-shift ESPI which is particularly useful for dynamic measurement will be discussed in detail. Basic theory, brief derivation and different optical layouts for the two systems will be presented. The potentials and limitations of the both ESPI

  10. Shape control in wafer-based aperiodic 3D nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Ho; Mark, Andrew G.; Gibbs, John G.; Reindl, Thomas; Waizmann, Ulrike; Weis, Jürgen; Fischer, Peer

    2014-06-01

    Controlled local fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures is important to explore and enhance the function of single nanodevices, but is experimentally challenging. We present a scheme based on e-beam lithography (EBL) written seeds, and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) grown structures to create nanoscale objects with defined shapes but in aperiodic arrangements. By using a continuous sacrificial corral surrounding the features of interest we grow isolated 3D nanostructures that have complex cross-sections and sidewall morphology that are surrounded by zones of clean substrate.

  11. 3D synthetic aperture for controlled-source electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaak, Allison

    Locating hydrocarbon reservoirs has become more challenging with smaller, deeper or shallower targets in complicated environments. Controlled-source electromagnetics (CSEM), is a geophysical electromagnetic method used to detect and derisk hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine settings, but it is limited by the size of the target, low-spatial resolution, and depth of the reservoir. To reduce the impact of complicated settings and improve the detecting capabilities of CSEM, I apply synthetic aperture to CSEM responses, which virtually increases the length and width of the CSEM source by combining the responses from multiple individual sources. Applying a weight to each source steers or focuses the synthetic aperture source array in the inline and crossline directions. To evaluate the benefits of a 2D source distribution, I test steered synthetic aperture on 3D diffusive fields and view the changes with a new visualization technique. Then I apply 2D steered synthetic aperture to 3D noisy synthetic CSEM fields, which increases the detectability of the reservoir significantly. With more general weighting, I develop an optimization method to find the optimal weights for synthetic aperture arrays that adapts to the information in the CSEM data. The application of optimally weighted synthetic aperture to noisy, simulated electromagnetic fields reduces the presence of noise, increases detectability, and better defines the lateral extent of the target. I then modify the optimization method to include a term that minimizes the variance of random, independent noise. With the application of the modified optimization method, the weighted synthetic aperture responses amplifies the anomaly from the reservoir, lowers the noise floor, and reduces noise streaks in noisy CSEM responses from sources offset kilometers from the receivers. Even with changes to the location of the reservoir and perturbations to the physical properties, synthetic aperture is still able to highlight targets

  12. Sensor Spatial Distortion, Visual Latency, and Update Rate Effects on 3D Tracking in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Baumeler, S.; Jense, G. J.; Jacoby, R. H.; Trejo, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several common defects that we have sought to minimize in immersing virtual environments are: static sensor spatial distortion, visual latency, and low update rates. Human performance within our environments during large amplitude 3D tracking was assessed by objective and subjective methods in the presence and absence of these defects. Results show that 1) removal of our relatively small spatial sensor distortion had minor effects on the tracking activity, 2) an Adapted Cooper-Harper controllability scale proved the most sensitive subjective indicator of the degradation of dynamic fidelity caused by increasing latency and decreasing frame rates, and 3) performance, as measured by normalized RMS tracking error or subjective impressions, was more markedly influenced by changing visual latency than by update rate.

  13. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  14. How spatial abilities and dynamic visualizations interplay when learning functional anatomy with 3D anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material presentation formats, spatial abilities, and anatomical tasks. First, to understand the cognitive challenges a novice learner would be faced with when first exposed to 3D anatomical content, a six-step cognitive task analysis was developed. Following this, an experimental study was conducted to explore how presentation formats (dynamic vs. static visualizations) support learning of functional anatomy, and affect subsequent anatomical tasks derived from the cognitive task analysis. A second aim was to investigate the interplay between spatial abilities (spatial visualization and spatial relation) and presentation formats when the functional anatomy of a 3D scapula and the associated shoulder flexion movement are learned. Findings showed no main effect of the presentation formats on performances, but revealed the predictive influence of spatial visualization and spatial relation abilities on performance. However, an interesting interaction between presentation formats and spatial relation ability for a specific anatomical task was found. This result highlighted the influence of presentation formats when spatial abilities are involved as well as the differentiated influence of spatial abilities on anatomical tasks. PMID:25689057

  15. Precision Control Module For UV Laser 3D Micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Hong; Hung, Min-Wei; Chang, Chun-Li

    2011-01-01

    UV laser has been widely used in various micromachining such as micro-scribing or patterning processing. At present, most of the semiconductors, LEDs, photovoltaic solar panels and touch panels industries need the UV laser processing system. However, most of the UV laser processing applications in the industries utilize two dimensional (2D) plane processing. And there are tremendous business opportunities that can be developed, such as three dimensional (3D) structures of micro-electromechanical (MEMS) sensor or the precision depth control of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films edge insulation in touch panels. This research aims to develop a UV laser 3D micromachining module that can create the novel applications for industries. By special designed beam expender in optical system, the focal point of UV laser can be adjusted quickly and accurately through the optical path control lens of laser beam expender optical system. Furthermore, the integrated software for galvanometric scanner and focal point adjustment mechanism is developed as well, so as to carry out the precise 3D microstructure machining.

  16. Temporal-spatial modeling of fast-moving and deforming 3D objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoliang; Wei, Youzhi

    1998-09-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the method and techniques developed for the modeling and reconstruction of fast moving and deforming 3D objects. A new approach using close-range digital terrestrial photogrammetry in conjunction with high speed photography and videography is proposed. A sequential image matching method (SIM) has been developed to automatically process pairs of images taken continuously of any fast moving and deforming 3D objects. Using the SIM technique a temporal-spatial model (TSM) of any fast moving and deforming 3D objects can be developed. The TSM would include a series of reconstructed surface models of the fast moving and deforming 3D object in the form of 3D images. The TSM allows the 3D objects to be visualized and analyzed in sequence. The SIM method, specifically the left-right matching and forward-back matching techniques are presented in the paper. An example is given which deals with the monitoring of a typical blast rock bench in a major open pit mine in Australia. With the SIM approach and the TSM model it is possible to automatically and efficiently reconstruct the 3D images of the blasting process. This reconstruction would otherwise be impossible to achieve using a labor intensive manual processing approach based on 2D images taken from conventional high speed cameras. The case study demonstrates the potential of the SIM approach and the TSM for the automatic identification, tracking and reconstruction of any fast moving and deforming 3D targets.

  17. Robust and Blind 3D Mesh Watermarking in Spatial Domain Based on Faces Categorization and Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Amir Masoud; Ebrahimnezhad, Hossein; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a 3D watermarking algorithm in spatial domain is presented with blind detection. In the proposed method, a negligible visual distortion is observed in host model. Initially, a preprocessing is applied on the 3D model to make it robust against geometric transformation attacks. Then, a number of triangle faces are determined as mark triangles using a novel systematic approach in which faces are categorized and sorted robustly. In order to enhance the capability of information retrieval by attacks, block watermarks are encoded using Reed-Solomon block error-correcting code before embedding into the mark triangles. Next, the encoded watermarks are embedded in spherical coordinates. The proposed method is robust against additive noise, mesh smoothing and quantization attacks. Also, it is stout next to geometric transformation, vertices and faces reordering attacks. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is designed so that it is robust against the cropping attack. Simulation results confirm that the watermarked models confront very low distortion if the control parameters are selected properly. Comparison with other methods demonstrates that the proposed method has good performance against the mesh smoothing attacks.

  18. Voltage controlled magnetism in 3d transitional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weigang

    2015-03-01

    Despite having attracted much attention in multiferroic materials and diluted magnetic semiconductors, the impact of an electric field on the magnetic properties remains largely unknown in 3d transitional ferromagnets (FMs) until recent years. A great deal of effort has been focused on the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect where the modulation of anisotropy field is understood by the change of electron density among different d orbitals of FMs in the presence of an electric field. Here we demonstrate another approach to alter the magnetism by electrically controlling the oxidation state of the 3d FM at the FM/oxide interface. The thin FM film sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and a gate oxide can be reversibly changed from an optimally-oxidized state with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to a metallic state with an in-plane magnetic anisotropy, or to a fully-oxidized state with nearly zero magnetization, depending on the polarity and time duration of the applied electric fields. This is a voltage controlled magnetism (VCM) effect, where both the saturation magnetization and anisotropy field of the 3d FM layer can be simultaneously controlled by voltage in a non-volatile fashion. We will also discuss the impact of this VCM effect on magnetic tunnel junctions and spin Hall switching experiments. This work, in collaboration with C. Bi, Y.H. Liu, T. Newhouse-Illige, M. Xu, M. Rosales, J.W. Freeland, O. Mryasov, S. Zhang, and S.G.E. te Velthuis, was supported in part by NSF (ECCS-1310338) and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  19. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering. PMID:25058941

  20. Representing 3D virtual objects: interaction between visuo-spatial ability and type of exploration.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Frank; van den Broek, Egon L

    2010-03-17

    We investigated individual differences in interactively exploring 3D virtual objects. 36 participants explored 24 simple and 24 difficult objects (composed of respectively three and five Biederman geons) actively, passively, or not at all. Both their 3D mental representation of the objects and visuo-spatial ability was assessed. Results show that, regardless of the object's complexity, people with a low VSA benefit from active exploration of objects, where people with a middle or high VSA do not. These findings extend and refine earlier research on interactively learning visuo-spatial information and underline the importance to take individual differences into account. PMID:20116394

  1. 3D hierarchical spatial representation and memory of multimodal sensory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Dow, Paul A.; Huber, David J.

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes an efficient method and system for representing, processing and understanding multi-modal sensory data. More specifically, it describes a computational method and system for how to process and remember multiple locations in multimodal sensory space (e.g., visual, auditory, somatosensory, etc.). The multimodal representation and memory is based on a biologically-inspired hierarchy of spatial representations implemented with novel analogues of real representations used in the human brain. The novelty of the work is in the computationally efficient and robust spatial representation of 3D locations in multimodal sensory space as well as an associated working memory for storage and recall of these representations at the desired level for goal-oriented action. We describe (1) A simple and efficient method for human-like hierarchical spatial representations of sensory data and how to associate, integrate and convert between these representations (head-centered coordinate system, body-centered coordinate, etc.); (2) a robust method for training and learning a mapping of points in multimodal sensory space (e.g., camera-visible object positions, location of auditory sources, etc.) to the above hierarchical spatial representations; and (3) a specification and implementation of a hierarchical spatial working memory based on the above for storage and recall at the desired level for goal-oriented action(s). This work is most useful for any machine or human-machine application that requires processing of multimodal sensory inputs, making sense of it from a spatial perspective (e.g., where is the sensory information coming from with respect to the machine and its parts) and then taking some goal-oriented action based on this spatial understanding. A multi-level spatial representation hierarchy means that heterogeneous sensory inputs (e.g., visual, auditory, somatosensory, etc.) can map onto the hierarchy at different levels. When controlling various machine

  2. Controlled double emulsification utilizing 3D PDMS microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fu-Che; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a PDMS emulsification device that is capable of generating water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions in a controlled manner. Specially designed 3D microchannels are utilized to steer the independently driven water- and oil-phase flows (especially to restrict the attachment of the middle oil-phase flow on the channel surfaces), and to break the continuous flows into monodisperse double emulsions. In addition to channel geometries and fluid flow rates, surfactants and osmotic agents are employed to facilitate the breakup process and stabilize the resulting emulsion structures. In the prototype demonstration, two-level SU-8 molds were fabricated to duplicate PDMS microstructures, which were surface treated and bonded irreversibly to form 3D microchannels. Throughout the emulsification trials, dripping was intentionally induced to generate monodisperse double emulsions with single or multiple aqueous droplets inside each oil drop. It is found that the overall and core sizes of the resulting double emulsions could be adjusted independently, mainly by varying the outer and inner fluid flow rates, respectively. As such, the presented double emulsification device could potentially realize the controllability on emulsion structure and size distribution, which is desired for a variety of biological and pharmaceutical applications.

  3. How Spatial Abilities and Dynamic Visualizations Interplay When Learning Functional Anatomy with 3D Anatomical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material…

  4. Who Benefits from Learning with 3D Models?: The Case of Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huk, T.

    2006-01-01

    Empirical studies that focus on the impact of three-dimensional (3D) visualizations on learning are to date rare and inconsistent. According to the ability-as-enhancer hypothesis, high spatial ability learners should benefit particularly as they have enough cognitive capacity left for mental model construction. In contrast, the…

  5. 3D resolution enhancement of deep-tissue imaging based on virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, I-Cheng; Hsu, Kuo-Jen; Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-07-25

    During the last decades, several resolution enhancement methods for optical microscopy beyond diffraction limit have been developed. Nevertheless, those hardware-based techniques typically require strong illumination, and fail to improve resolution in deep tissue. Here we develop a high-speed computational approach, three-dimensional virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy (3D-vSPOM), which immediately solves the strong-illumination issue. By amplifying only the spatial frequency component corresponding to the un-scattered point-spread-function at focus, plus 3D nonlinear value selection, 3D-vSPOM shows significant resolution enhancement in deep tissue. Since no iteration is required, 3D-vSPOM is much faster than iterative deconvolution. Compared to non-iterative deconvolution, 3D-vSPOM does not need a priori information of point-spread-function at deep tissue, and provides much better resolution enhancement plus greatly improved noise-immune response. This method is ready to be amalgamated with two-photon microscopy or other laser scanning microscopy to enhance deep-tissue resolution. PMID:27464077

  6. 3D Data Mapping and Real-Time Experiment Control and Visualization in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marco A; Hibbard, Jaime V K; Miller, Michael E; Nivin, Tyler W; Milescu, Lorin S

    2015-10-20

    Here, we propose two basic concepts that can streamline electrophysiology and imaging experiments in brain slices and enhance data collection and analysis. The first idea is to interface the experiment with a software environment that provides a 3D scene viewer in which the experimental rig, the brain slice, and the recorded data are represented to scale. Within the 3D scene viewer, the user can visualize a live image of the sample and 3D renderings of the recording electrodes with real-time position feedback. Furthermore, the user can control the instruments and visualize their status in real time. The second idea is to integrate multiple types of experimental data into a spatial and temporal map of the brain slice. These data may include low-magnification maps of the entire brain slice, for spatial context, or any other type of high-resolution structural and functional image, together with time-resolved electrical and optical signals. The entire data collection can be visualized within the 3D scene viewer. These concepts can be applied to any other type of experiment in which high-resolution data are recorded within a larger sample at different spatial and temporal coordinates. PMID:26488641

  7. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm3 uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm)3 to (2 mm)3 in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm)3 to (9 mm)3. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm)3 even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm)3 cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial resolution with 0.5×0.5×1.0 mm3 crystals

  8. Quality control loop for 3D laser beam cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitznagel, Juergen

    1996-08-01

    Existing systems for computer integrated manufacturing are based on the principle of the process chain: The product runs through different production sections as design, work planning and manufacturing in a sequential order. The data generated by a production sequence are transferred via interface to the following production sequence. These tightly-packed production sequences leave little scope for responding to quality deviations. This deficit is highlighted particularly in 3D laser cutting processes. In order to achieve an optimum machining result, a series of preliminary tests is required. Quality control loops play an important role in restricting the scope of necessary testing to a minimum. The represented control loop contains a CAD- system to design the workpiece, an offline-programming system to develop working strategies and NC/RC-programs as well as a shop-floor oriented tool to record quality data of the workpiece. The systems are coupled by an integrated product model. The control loop feeds quality data back to Operations Planning in the form of rules for processing strategies and technological data, so that the quality of the production process is enhanced. It is intended to supply optimum process parameters, so that the number of preliminary tests can be reduced. On the other hand the control loop contributes quality enhancement measures which serve as rules for the designers.

  9. Octree-based indexing for 3D pointclouds within an Oracle Spatial DBMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Bianca; Mosa, Abu Saleh Mohammad; Laefer, Debra F.; Bertolotto, Michela

    2013-02-01

    A large proportion of today's digital datasets have a spatial component. The effective storage and management of which poses particular challenges, especially with light detection and ranging (LiDAR), where datasets of even small geographic areas may contain several hundred million points. While in the last decade 2.5-dimensional data were prevalent, true 3-dimensional data are increasingly commonplace via LiDAR. They have gained particular popularity for urban applications including generation of city-scale maps, baseline data disaster management, and utility planning. Additionally, LiDAR is commonly used for flood plane identification, coastal-erosion tracking, and forest biomass mapping. Despite growing data availability, current spatial information systems do not provide suitable full support for the data's true 3D nature. Consequently, one system is needed to store the data and another for its processing, thereby necessitating format transformations. The work presented herein aims at a more cost-effective way for managing 3D LiDAR data that allows for storage and manipulation within a single system by enabling a new index within existing spatial database management technology. Implementation of an octree index for 3D LiDAR data atop Oracle Spatial 11g is presented, along with an evaluation showing up to an eight-fold improvement compared to the native Oracle R-tree index.

  10. Magnetically controllable 3D microtissues based on magnetic microcryogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yaqian; Feng, Siyu; Ning, Jia; Wang, Jingyu; Gou, Maling; Chen, Huijun; Xu, Feng; Du, Yanan

    2014-08-01

    Microtissues on the scale of several hundred microns are a promising cell culture configuration resembling the functional tissue units in vivo. In contrast to conventional cell culture, handling of microtissues poses new challenges such as medium exchange, purification and maintenance of the microtissue integrity. Here, we developed magnetic microcryogels to assist microtissue formation with enhanced controllability and robustness. The magnetic microcryogels were fabricated on-chip by cryogelation and micro-molding which could endure extensive external forces such as fluidic shear stress during pipetting and syringe injection. The magnetically controllable microtissues were applied to constitute a novel separable 3D co-culture system realizing functional enhancement of the hepatic microtissues co-cultured with the stromal microtissues and easy purification of the hepatic microtissues for downstream drug testing. The magnetically controllable microtissues with pre-defined shapes were also applied as building blocks to accelerate the tissue assembly process under magnetic force for bottom-up tissue engineering. Finally, the magnetic microcryogels could be injected in vivo as cell delivery vehicles and tracked by MRI. The injectable magnetic microtissues maintained viability at the injection site indicating good retention and potential applications for cell therapy. The magnetic microcryogels are expected to significantly promote the microtissues as a promising cellular configuration for cell-based applications such as in drug testing, tissue engineering and regenerative therapy. PMID:24736804

  11. Multi-scale modelling of strongly heterogeneous 3D composite structures using spatial Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Said, Bassam; Ivanov, Dmitry; Long, Andrew C.; Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    3D composite materials are characterized by complex internal yarn architectures, leading to complex deformation and failure development mechanisms. Net-shaped preforms, which are originally periodic in nature, lose their periodicity when the fabric is draped, deformed on a tool, and consolidated to create geometrically complex composite components. As a result, the internal yarn architecture, which dominates the mechanical behaviour, becomes dependent on the structural geometry. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of 3D composites requires an accurate representation of the yarn architecture within structural scale models. When applied to 3D composites, conventional finite element modelling techniques are limited to either homogenised properties at the structural scale, or the unit cell scale for a more detailed material property definition. Consequently, these models fail to capture the complex phenomena occurring across multiple length scales and their effects on a 3D composite's mechanical response. Here a multi-scale modelling approach based on a 3D spatial Voronoi tessellation is proposed. The model creates an intermediate length scale suitable for homogenisation to deal with the non-periodic nature of the final material. Information is passed between the different length scales to allow for the effect of the structural geometry to be taken into account on the smaller scales. The stiffness and surface strain predictions from the proposed model have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The proposed modelling framework has been used to gain important insight into the behaviour of this category of materials. It has been observed that the strain and stress distributions are strongly dependent on the internal yarn architecture and consequently on the final component geometry. Even for simple coupon tests, the internal architecture and geometric effects dominate the mechanical response. Consequently, the behaviour of 3D woven

  12. Exploring 3-D Virtual Reality Technology for Spatial Ability and Chemistry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Z.; Goetz, E. T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, W.; Cifuentes, L.; Kwok, O.; Davis, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the potential of Second Life® (SL), a three-dimensional (3-D) virtual world, to enhance undergraduate students' learning of a vital chemistry concept. A quasi-experimental pre-posttest control group design was used to conduct the study. A total of 387 participants completed three assignment activities either in SL or using…

  13. Two Eyes, 3D Early Results: Stereoscopic vs 2D Representations of Highly Spatial Scientific Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    "Two Eyes, 3D" is a 3-year NSF funded research project to study the educational impacts of using stereoscopic representations in informal settings. The first study conducted as part of the project tested children 5-12 on their ability to perceive spatial elements of slides of scientific objects shown to them in either stereoscopic or 2D format. Children were also tested for prior spatial ability. Early results suggest that stereoscopy does not have a major impact on perceiving spatial elements of an image, but it does have a more significant impact on how the children apply that knowledge when presented with a common sense situation. The project is run by the AAVSO and this study was conducted at the Boston Museum of Science.

  14. Generation of 3D Collagen Gels with Controlled Diverse Architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Rat tail collagen solutions have been used as polymerizable in vitro three dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) gels for single and collective cell migration assays as well as spheroid formation. Factors such as ECM concentration, pH, ionic concentration, and temperature can alter collagen polymerization and ECM architecture. This unit describes how to generate 3D collagen gels that have distinct architectures ranging from a highly reticular meshwork of short thin fibrils with small pores to a loose matrix consisting of stiff, parallel-bundled long fibrils by changing collagen polymerization temperature. This permits analysis of 3D cell migration in different ECM architectures found in vivo while maintaining a similar ECM concentration. Also included are collagen labeling techniques helpful for ECM visualization during live fluorescence imaging. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27580704

  15. Engineering controllable architecture in matrigel for 3D cell alignment.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Myung; Tran, Si-Hoai-Trung; Na, Sang Cheol; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-02-01

    We report a microfluidic approach to impart alignment in ECM components in 3D hydrogels by continuously applying fluid flow across the bulk gel during the gelation process. The microfluidic device where each channel can be independently filled was tilted at 90° to generate continuous flow across the Matrigel as it gelled. The presence of flow helped that more than 70% of ECM components were oriented along the direction of flow, compared with randomly cross-linked Matrigel. Following the oriented ECM components, primary rat cortical neurons and mouse neural stem cells showed oriented outgrowth of neuronal processes within the 3D Matrigel matrix. PMID:25585718

  16. An Optically Controlled 3D Cell Culturing System

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kelly S.; Hu, Wenqi; Namekar, Swapnil A.; Ohta, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A novel 3D cell culture system was developed and tested. The cell culture device consists of a microfluidic chamber on an optically absorbing substrate. Cells are suspended in a thermoresponsive hydrogel solution, and optical patterns are utilized to heat the solution, producing localized hydrogel formation around cells of interest. The hydrogel traps only the desired cells in place while also serving as a biocompatible scaffold for supporting the cultivation of cells in 3D. This is demonstrated with the trapping of MDCK II and HeLa cells. The light intensity from the optically induced hydrogel formation does not significantly affect cell viability. PMID:22701475

  17. Cell mediated contraction in 3D cell-matrix constructs leads to spatially regulated osteogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Darinka D.; Zhao, Xuanhe; Mooney, David J.; Smit, Theo H.

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, morphogenetic processes give rise to a variety of shapes and patterns that lead to functional tissues and organs. While the impact of chemical signals in these processes is widely studied, the role of physical cues is less understood. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the interplay of cell mediated contraction and mechanical boundary conditions alone can result in spatially regulated differentiation in simple 3D constructs. An experimental model consisting of a 3D cell-gel construct and a finite element (FE) model were used to study the effect of cellular traction exerted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on an initially homogeneous matrix under inhomogeneous boundary conditions. A robust shape change is observed due to contraction under time-varying mechanical boundary conditions, which is explained by the finite element model. Furthermore, distinct local differences of osteogenic differentiation are observed, with a spatial pattern independent of osteogenic factors in the culture medium. Regions that are predicted to have experienced relatively high shear stress at any time during contraction, correlate with the regions of distinct osteogenesis. Taken together, these results support the underlying hypothesis that cellular contractility and mechanical boundary conditions alone can result in spatially regulated differentiation. These results will have important implications for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:23925497

  18. Fast similarity search for protein 3D structures using topological pattern matching based on spatial relations.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hee; Ryu, Keun Ho; Gilbert, David

    2005-08-01

    Similarity search for protein 3D structures become complex and computationally expensive due to the fact that the size of protein structure databases continues to grow tremendously. Recently, fast structural similarity search systems have been required to put them into practical use in protein structure classification whilst existing comparison systems do not provide comparison results on time. Our approach uses multi-step processing that composes of a preprocessing step to represent geometry of protein structures with spatial objects, a filter step to generate a small candidate set using approximate topological string matching, and a refinement step to compute a structural alignment. This paper describes the preprocessing and filtering for fast similarity search using the discovery of topological patterns of secondary structure elements based on spatial relations. Our system is fully implemented by using Oracle 8i spatial. We have previously shown that our approach has the advantage of speed of performance compared with other approach such as DALI. This work shows that the discovery of topological relations of secondary structure elements in protein structures by using spatial relations of spatial databases is practical for fast structural similarity search for proteins. PMID:16187404

  19. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  20. GRID3D-v2: An updated version of the GRID2D/3D computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped three-dimensional spatial domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Shih, T. I-P.; Roelke, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    In order to generate good quality systems for complicated three-dimensional spatial domains, the grid-generation method used must be able to exert rather precise controls over grid-point distributions. Several techniques are presented that enhance control of grid-point distribution for a class of algebraic grid-generation methods known as the two-, four-, and six-boundary methods. These techniques include variable stretching functions from bilinear interpolation, interpolating functions based on tension splines, and normalized K-factors. The techniques developed in this study were incorporated into a new version of GRID3D called GRID3D-v2. The usefulness of GRID3D-v2 was demonstrated by using it to generate a three-dimensional grid system in the coolent passage of a radial turbine blade with serpentine channels and pin fins.

  1. GIS-based 3D spatial-temporal assessment of landslide hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, M.; Qiu, C.; Liu, X.

    2009-04-01

    A desirable landslide hazard assessment should give answers to three key questions: the magnitude, the location, and the occurrence time of failure(s). It is thus necessary to evaluate the effects of both the static variables (such as geological and geotechnical properties that contribute to landslide susceptibility) and the dynamic variables (such as rainfall and earthquake that tend to trigger landslides in an area of given susceptibility) on slope stability at the same time. With the fast development in earth observation science and geotechnology, there are more and more techniques available for acquiring data of both static and dynamic variables, and for carrying out a more reliable analysis to explain the triggering mechanism of landslide. Taking advantage of these techniques can result in an efficient and advanced spatial-temporal assessment of landslide hazard. It means that all the necessary data, including geological and geomorphological data and real-time monitoring data on rainfall or earthquake, should be acquired and integrated into a database, and being quickly analyzed at any time by an advanced method which developed by, for example, coupling geotechnical and hydrological models, to evaluate what will happen in certain situations. To achieve this task, a uniform platform is also needed to integrate various types of data and models into a standardized form for efficient treatment and easy implementation. Based on the above consideration, a GIS-based three-dimensional spatial-temporal assessment methodology is proposed. In this methodology, a GIS raster-based framework is delivered to achieve 3D slope stability analysis; a Monte Carlo technique is used to locate the potential slip surfaces by means of minimizing the 3D safety factor through an iterative procedure, based on a simulation of ellipsoid for the 3D shape of slip surfaces; a GIS-based model is developed by coupling a dynamic rainfall-infiltration model with a GIS-based 3D model to quantify

  2. 3D constrained inversion of geophysical and geological information applying Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Ploug, C.; Mendoza, J. A.; Martínez, K.

    2009-05-01

    The need for increaseding accuracy and reduced ambiguities in the inversion results has resulted in focus on the development of more advanced inversion methods of geophysical data. Over the past few years more advanced inversion techniques have been developed to improve the results. Real 3D-inversion is time consuming and therefore often not the best solution in a cost-efficient perspective. This has motivated the development of 3D constrained inversions, where 1D-models are constrained in 3D, also known as a Spatial Constrained Inversion (SCI). Moreover, inversion of several different data types in one inversion has been developed, known as Mutually Constrained Inversion (MCI). In this paper a presentation of a Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion method (SMCI) is given. This method allows 1D-inversion applied to different geophysical datasets and geological information constrained in 3D. Application of two or more types of geophysical methods in the inversion has proved to reduce the equivalence problem and to increase the resolution in the inversion results. The use of geological information from borehole data or digital geological models can be integrated in the inversion. In the SMCI, a 1D inversion code is used to model soundings that are constrained in three dimensions according to their relative position in space. This solution enhances the accuracy of the inversion and produces distinct layers thicknesses and resistivities. It is very efficient in the mapping of a layered geology but still also capable of mapping layer discontinuities that are, in many cases, related to fracturing and faulting or due to valley fills. Geological information may be included in the inversion directly or used only to form a starting model for the individual soundings in the inversion. In order to show the effectiveness of the method, examples are presented from both synthetic data and real data. The examples include DC-soundings as well as land-based and airborne TEM

  3. Desktop 3D printing of controlled release pharmaceutical bilayer tablets.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Shaban A; Burley, Jonathan C; Alexander, Morgan R; Roberts, Clive J

    2014-01-30

    Three dimensional (3D) printing was used as a novel medicine formulation technique for production of viable tablets capable of satisfying regulatory tests and matching the release of standard commercial tablets. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC 2208) (Methocel™ K100M Premium) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (Carbopol(®) 974P NF) were used as a hydrophilic matrix for a sustained release (SR) layer. Hypromellose(®) (HPMC 2910) was used as a binder while microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) (Pharmacel(®) 102) and sodium starch glycolate (SSG) (Primojel(®)) were used as disintegrants for an immediate release (IR) layer. Commercial guaifenesin bi-layer tablets (GBT) were used as a model drug (Mucinex(®)) for this study. There was a favourable comparison of release of the active guaifenesin from the printed hydrophilic matrix compared with the commercially available GBT. The printed formulations were also evaluated for physical and mechanical properties such as weight variation, friability, hardness and thickness as a comparison to the commercial tablet and were within acceptable range as defined by the international standards stated in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). All formulations (standard tablets and 3D printed tablets) showed Korsmeyer-Peppas n values between 0.27 and 0.44 which indicates Fickian diffusion drug release through a hydrated HPMC gel layer. PMID:24280018

  4. Depth-controlled 3D TV image coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Armando; Ciciani, Bruno; Romero, Milton; Rossi, Ricardo

    1998-04-01

    Conventional 3D-TV codecs processing one down-compatible (either left, or right) channel may optionally include the extraction of the disparity field associated with the stereo-pairs to support the coding of the complementary channel. A two-fold improvement over such approaches is proposed in this paper by exploiting 3D features retained in the stereo-pairs to reduce the redundancies in both channels, and according to their visual sensitiveness. Through an a-priori disparity field analysis, our coding scheme separates a region of interest from the foreground/background in the volume space reproduced in order to code them selectively based on their visual relevance. Such a region of interest is here identified as the one which is focused by the shooting device. By suitably scaling the DCT coefficient n such a way that precision is reduced for the image blocks lying on less relevant areas, our approach aims at reducing the signal energy in the background/foreground patterns, while retaining finer details on the more relevant image portions. From an implementation point of view, it is worth noticing that the system proposed keeps its surplus processing power on the encoder side only. Simulation results show such improvements as a better image quality for a given transmission bit rate, or a graceful quality degradation of the reconstructed images with decreasing data-rates.

  5. Research on the key technologies of 3D spatial data organization and management for virtual building environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Zhu, Qing

    2006-10-01

    As the special case of VGE in the fields of AEC (architecture, engineering and construction), Virtual Building Environment (VBE) has been broadly concerned. Highly complex, large-scale 3d spatial data is main bottleneck of VBE applications, so 3d spatial data organization and management certainly becomes the core technology for VBE. This paper puts forward 3d spatial data model for VBE, and the performance to implement it is very high. Inherent storage method of CAD data makes data redundant, and doesn't concern efficient visualization, which is a practical bottleneck to integrate CAD model, so An Efficient Method to Integrate CAD Model Data is put forward. Moreover, Since the 3d spatial indices based on R-tree are usually limited by their weakness of low efficiency due to the severe overlap of sibling nodes and the uneven size of nodes, a new node-choosing algorithm of R-tree are proposed.

  6. Spatial parallelism of a 3D finite difference, velocity-stress elastic wave propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately, finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. The authors model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MPI library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speedup. Because I/O is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) the authors have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle I/O. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ghost cells. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, they observe excellent scaled speedup. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, they achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  7. Spatial Parallelism of a 3D Finite Difference, Velocity-Stress Elastic Wave Propagation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MINKOFF,SUSAN E.

    1999-12-09

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately. finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. We model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MP1 library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speed up. Because i/o is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) we have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle i/o. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ''ghost cells''. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, we observe excellent scaled speed up. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, we achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  8. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  9. The spatial accuracy of cellular dose estimates obtained from 3D reconstructed serial tissue autoradiographs.

    PubMed

    Humm, J L; Macklis, R M; Lu, X Q; Yang, Y; Bump, K; Beresford, B; Chin, L M

    1995-01-01

    In order to better predict and understand the effects of radiopharmaceuticals used for therapy, it is necessary to determine more accurately the radiation absorbed dose to cells in tissue. Using thin-section autoradiography, the spatial distribution of sources relative to the cells can be obtained from a single section with micrometre resolution. By collecting and analysing serial sections, the 3D microscopic distribution of radionuclide relative to the cellular histology, and therefore the dose rate distribution, can be established. In this paper, a method of 3D reconstruction of serial sections is proposed, and measurements are reported of (i) the accuracy and reproducibility of quantitative autoradiography and (ii) the spatial precision with which tissue features from one section can be related to adjacent sections. Uncertainties in the activity determination for the specimen result from activity losses during tissue processing (4-11%), and the variation of grain count per unit activity between batches of serial sections (6-25%). Correlation of the section activity to grain count densities showed deviations ranging from 6-34%. The spatial alignment uncertainties were assessed using nylon fibre fiduciary markers incorporated into the tissue block, and compared to those for alignment based on internal tissue landmarks. The standard deviation for the variation in nylon fibre fiduciary alignment was measured to be 41 microns cm-1, compared to 69 microns cm-1 when internal tissue histology landmarks were used. In addition, tissue shrinkage during histological processing of up to 10% was observed. The implications of these measured activity and spatial distribution uncertainties upon the estimate of cellular dose rate distribution depends upon the range of the radiation emissions. For long-range beta particles, uncertainties in both the activity and spatial distribution translate linearly to the uncertainty in dose rate of < 15%. For short-range emitters (< 100

  10. 3D printed guides for controlled alignment in biomechanics tests.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Matthias A; Willemot, Laurent; Van Onsem, Stefaan; Stevens, Cyriëlle; Arnout, Nele; Victor, Jan

    2016-02-01

    The bone-machine interface is a vital first step for biomechanical testing. It remains challenging to restore the original alignment of the specimen with respect to the test setup. To overcome this issue, we developed a methodology based on virtual planning and 3D printing. In this paper, the methodology is outlined and a proof of concept is presented based on a series of cadaveric tests performed on our knee simulator. The tests described in this paper reached an accuracy within 3-4° and 3-4mm with respect to the virtual planning. It is however the authors' belief that the method has the potential to achieve an accuracy within one degree and one millimeter. Therefore, this approach can aid in reducing the imprecisions in biomechanical tests (e.g. knee simulator tests for evaluating knee kinematics) and improve the consistency of the bone-machine interface. PMID:26810696

  11. M3D: a kernel-based test for spatially correlated changes in methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Tom R.; Schweikert, Gabriele; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA methylation is an intensely studied epigenetic mark implicated in many biological processes of direct clinical relevance. Although sequencing-based technologies are increasingly allowing high-resolution measurements of DNA methylation, statistical modelling of such data is still challenging. In particular, statistical identification of differentially methylated regions across different conditions poses unresolved challenges in accounting for spatial correlations within the statistical testing procedure. Results: We propose a non-parametric, kernel-based method, M3D, to detect higher order changes in methylation profiles, such as shape, across pre-defined regions. The test statistic explicitly accounts for differences in coverage levels between samples, thus handling in a principled way a major confounder in the analysis of methylation data. Empirical tests on real and simulated datasets show an increased power compared to established methods, as well as considerable robustness with respect to coverage and replication levels. Availability and implementation: R/Bioconductor package M3D. Contact: G.Sanguinetti@ed.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25398611

  12. Spatial Sense and Perspective: A 3-D Model of the Orion Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, I.; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2012-08-01

    Building a scale model of the Orion constellation provides spatial perspective for students studying astronomy. For this activity, students read a passage from literature that refers to stars being strange when seen from a different point of view. From a data set of the seven major stars of Orion they construct a 3-D distance scale model. This involves the subject areas of astronomy, mathematics, literature and art, as well as the skill areas of perspective, relative distances, line-of-sight, and basic algebra. This model will appear from one side exactly the way we see it from Earth. But when looking at it from any other angle the familiar constellation will look very alien. Students are encouraged to come up with their own names and stories to go with these new constellations. This activity has been used for K-12 teacher professional development classes, and would be most suitable for grades 6-12.

  13. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 1: Theory and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Bailey, R. T.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  14. Quantifying the Spatial Distribution of Hill Slope Erosion Using a 3-D Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, B. N.; Bogonko, M.; He, Y.; Beighley, R. E.; Milberg, C. T.

    2007-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complicated process involving many interdependent variables including rainfall intensity and duration, drop size, soil characteristics, ground cover, and surface slope. The interplay of these variables produces differing spatial patterns of rill versus inter-rill erosion by changing the effective energy from rain drop impacts and the quantities and timing of sheet and shallow, concentrated flow. The objective of this research is to characterize the spatial patterns of rill and inter-rill erosion produced from simulated rainfall on different soil densities and surface slopes using a 3-D laser scanner. The soil used in this study is a sandy loam with bulk density due to compaction ranging from 1.25-1.65 g/cm3. The surface slopes selected for this study are 25, 33, and 50 percent and represent common slopes used for grading on construction sites. The spatial patterns of soil erosion are measured using a Trimble GX DR 200+ 3D Laser Scanner which employs a time of flight calculation averaged over 4 points using a class 2, pulsed, 532 nm, green laser at a distance of 2 to 11 m from the surface. The scanner measures point locations on an approximately 5 mm grid. The pre- and post-erosion scan surfaces are compared to calculate the change in volume and the dimensions of rills and inter-rill areas. The erosion experiments were performed in the Soil Erosion Research Laboratory (SERL), part of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at San Diego State University. SERL experiments utilize a 3-m by 10-m tilting soil bed with a soil depth of 0.5 meters. Rainfall is applied to the soil surface using two overhead Norton ladder rainfall simulators, which produce realistic rain drop diameters (median = 2.25 mm) and impact velocities. Simulated storm events used in this study consist of rainfall intensities ranging from 5, 10 to 15 cm/hr for durations of 20 to 30 minutes. Preliminary results are presented that illustrate a change in runoff processes and

  15. Controlled 3D rotation of biological cells using optical multiple-force clamps

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Wakida, Shin-ich

    2014-01-01

    Controlled three-dimensional (3D) rotation of arbitrarily shaped objects in the observation space of optical microscopes is essential for realizing tomographic microscope imaging and offers great flexibility as a noncontact micromanipulation tool for biomedical applications. Herein, we present 3D rotational control of inhomogeneous biological samples using 3D optical multiple-force clamps based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus-tunable lens. For inhomogeneous samples with shape and optical anisotropy, we choose diatoms and their fragments, and demonstrate interactive and controlled 3D rotation about arbitrary axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates. We also outline the hardware setup and 3D rotation method for our demonstrations. PMID:25071968

  16. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  17. Modelling 3D control of upright stance using an optimal control strategy.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xingda; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2012-01-01

    A 3D balance control model of quiet upright stance is presented, based on an optimal control strategy, and evaluated in terms of its ability to simulate postural sway in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. The human body was represented as a two-segment inverted pendulum. Several assumptions were made to linearise body dynamics, for example, that there was no transverse rotation during upright stance. The neural controller was presumed to be an optimal controller that generates ankle control torque and hip control torque according to certain performance criteria. An optimisation procedure was used to determine the values of unspecified model parameters including random disturbance gains and sensory delay times. This model was used to simulate postural sway behaviours characterised by centre-of-pressure (COP)-based measures. Confidence intervals for all normalised COP-based measures contained unity, indicating no significant differences between any of the simulated COP-based measures and corresponding experimental references. In addition, mean normalised errors for the traditional measures were < 8%, and those for most statistical mechanics measures were ∼3-66%. On the basis these results, the proposed 3D balance control model appears to have the ability to accurately simulate 3D postural sway behaviours. PMID:21598131

  18. Motion-Capture-Enabled Software for Gestural Control of 3D Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Luo, Victor; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Valderrama, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art systems use general-purpose input devices such as a keyboard, mouse, or joystick that map to tasks in unintuitive ways. This software enables a person to control intuitively the position, size, and orientation of synthetic objects in a 3D virtual environment. It makes possible the simultaneous control of the 3D position, scale, and orientation of 3D objects using natural gestures. Enabling the control of 3D objects using a commercial motion-capture system allows for natural mapping of the many degrees of freedom of the human body to the manipulation of the 3D objects. It reduces training time for this kind of task, and eliminates the need to create an expensive, special-purpose controller.

  19. The impact of stereo 3D sports TV broadcasts on user's depth perception and spatial presence experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, K.; Wiemeyer, J.

    2014-03-01

    This work examines the impact of content and presentation parameters in 2D versus 3D on depth perception and spatial presence, and provides guidelines for stereoscopic content development for 3D sports TV broadcasts and cognate subjects. Under consideration of depth perception and spatial presence experience, a preliminary study with 8 participants (sports: soccer and boxing) and a main study with 31 participants (sports: soccer and BMX-Miniramp) were performed. The dimension (2D vs. 3D) and camera position (near vs. far) were manipulated for soccer and boxing. In addition for soccer, the field of view (small vs. large) was examined. Moreover, the direction of motion (horizontal vs. depth) was considered for BMX-Miniramp. Subjective assessments, behavioural tests and qualitative interviews were implemented. The results confirm a strong effect of 3D on both depth perception and spatial presence experience as well as selective influences of camera distance and field of view. The results can improve understanding of the perception and experience of 3D TV as a medium. Finally, recommendations are derived on how to use various 3D sports ideally as content for TV broadcasts.

  20. “Taller and Shorter”: Human 3-D Spatial Memory Distorts Familiar Multilevel Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Thomas; Huber, Markus; Schramm, Hannah; Kugler, Günter; Dieterich, Marianne; Glasauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments report contradictory findings on the presence of a behavioural and neuronal anisotropy exhibited in vertical and horizontal capabilities of spatial orientation and navigation. We performed a pointing experiment in humans on the imagined 3-D direction of the location of various invisible goals that were distributed horizontally and vertically in a familiar multilevel hospital building. The 21 participants were employees who had worked for years in this building. The hypothesis was that comparison of the experimentally determined directions and the true directions would reveal systematic inaccuracy or dimensional anisotropy of the localizations. The study provides first evidence that the internal representation of a familiar multilevel building was distorted compared to the dimensions of the true building: vertically 215% taller and horizontally 51% shorter. This was not only demonstrated in the mathematical reconstruction of the mental model based on the analysis of the pointing experiments but also by the participants’ drawings of the front view and the ground plan of the building. Thus, in the mental model both planes were altered in different directions: compressed for the horizontal floor plane and stretched for the vertical column plane. This could be related to human anisotropic behavioural performance of horizontal and vertical navigation in such buildings. PMID:26509927

  1. 3D imaging of radiation damage in silicon sensor and spatial mapping of charge collection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, M.; Jakubek, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Platkevic, M.; Havranek, V.; Semian, V.

    2013-03-01

    Radiation damage in semiconductor sensors alters the response and degrades the performance of many devices ultimately limiting their stability and lifetime. In semiconductor radiation detectors the homogeneity of charge collection becomes distorted while decreasing the overall detection efficiency. Moreover the damage can significantly increase the detector noise and degrade other electrical properties such as leakage current. In this work we present a novel method for 3D mapping of the semiconductor radiation sensor volume allowing displaying the three dimensional distribution of detector properties such as charge collection efficiency and charge diffusion rate. This technique can visualize the spatially localized changes of local detector performance after radiation damage. Sensors used were 300 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip which serves as an imaging multichannel microprobe (256 × 256 square pixels with pitch of 55 μm, i.e. all together 65 thousand channels). Per pixel energy sensitivity of the Timepix chip allows to evaluate the local charge collection efficiency and also the charge diffusion rate. In this work we implement an X-ray line scanning technique for systematic evaluation of changes in the performance of a silicon sensor intentionally damaged by energetic protons.

  2. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  3. "Taller and Shorter": Human 3-D Spatial Memory Distorts Familiar Multilevel Buildings.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Thomas; Huber, Markus; Schramm, Hannah; Kugler, Günter; Dieterich, Marianne; Glasauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments report contradictory findings on the presence of a behavioural and neuronal anisotropy exhibited in vertical and horizontal capabilities of spatial orientation and navigation. We performed a pointing experiment in humans on the imagined 3-D direction of the location of various invisible goals that were distributed horizontally and vertically in a familiar multilevel hospital building. The 21 participants were employees who had worked for years in this building. The hypothesis was that comparison of the experimentally determined directions and the true directions would reveal systematic inaccuracy or dimensional anisotropy of the localizations. The study provides first evidence that the internal representation of a familiar multilevel building was distorted compared to the dimensions of the true building: vertically 215% taller and horizontally 51% shorter. This was not only demonstrated in the mathematical reconstruction of the mental model based on the analysis of the pointing experiments but also by the participants' drawings of the front view and the ground plan of the building. Thus, in the mental model both planes were altered in different directions: compressed for the horizontal floor plane and stretched for the vertical column plane. This could be related to human anisotropic behavioural performance of horizontal and vertical navigation in such buildings. PMID:26509927

  4. Spatial 3D infrastructure: display-independent software framework, high-speed rendering electronics, and several new displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Won-Suk; Napoli, Joshua; Cossairt, Oliver S.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Purtell, Thomas J., II; Schooler, James F.; Banker, Yigal; Favalora, Gregg E.

    2005-03-01

    We present a software and hardware foundation to enable the rapid adoption of 3-D displays. Different 3-D displays - such as multiplanar, multiview, and electroholographic displays - naturally require different rendering methods. The adoption of these displays in the marketplace will be accelerated by a common software framework. The authors designed the SpatialGL API, a new rendering framework that unifies these display methods under one interface. SpatialGL enables complementary visualization assets to coexist through a uniform infrastructure. Also, SpatialGL supports legacy interfaces such as the OpenGL API. The authors" first implementation of SpatialGL uses multiview and multislice rendering algorithms to exploit the performance of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable real-time visualization of 3-D graphics from medical imaging, oil & gas exploration, and homeland security. At the time of writing, SpatialGL runs on COTS workstations (both Windows and Linux) and on Actuality"s high-performance embedded computational engine that couples an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 Ultra GPU, an AMD Athlon 64 processor, and a proprietary, high-speed, programmable volumetric frame buffer that interfaces to a 1024 x 768 x 3 digital projector. Progress is illustrated using an off-the-shelf multiview display, Actuality"s multiplanar Perspecta Spatial 3D System, and an experimental multiview display. The experimental display is a quasi-holographic view-sequential system that generates aerial imagery measuring 30 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, providing 198 horizontal views.

  5. Superhydrophobic PDMS surfaces with three-dimensional (3D) pattern-dependent controllable adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Jiale; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Dongshi; Du, Guangqing; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Yun, Feng; Hou, Xun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an effective approach for the three-dimensional (3D) pattern-structured superhydrophobic PDMS surfaces with controllable adhesion by using femtosecond laser etching method. By combining different laser power with a multi-layered etching way, various 3D patterns can be fabricated (for example, convex triangle array, round pit array, cylindrical array, convex rhombus array and concave triangle-cone array). The as-prepared surfaces with 3D patterns show superhydrophobic character and water controllable adhesion that range from ultralow to ultrahigh by designing different 3D patterns, on which the sliding angle can be controlled from 1° to 90° (the water droplet is firmly pinned on the superhydrophobic surface without any movement at any tilted angles). The 3D pattern-dependent adhesive property is attributed to the different contact modes. This work will provide a facile and promising strategy for the adhesion adjustment on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Tracking 3-D body motion for docking and robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donath, M.; Sorensen, B.; Yang, G. B.; Starr, R.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced method of tracking three-dimensional motion of bodies has been developed. This system has the potential to dynamically characterize machine and other structural motion, even in the presence of structural flexibility, thus facilitating closed loop structural motion control. The system's operation is based on the concept that the intersection of three planes defines a point. Three rotating planes of laser light, fixed and moving photovoltaic diode targets, and a pipe-lined architecture of analog and digital electronics are used to locate multiple targets whose number is only limited by available computer memory. Data collection rates are a function of the laser scan rotation speed and are currently selectable up to 480 Hz. The tested performance on a preliminary prototype designed for 0.1 in accuracy (for tracking human motion) at a 480 Hz data rate includes a worst case resolution of 0.8 mm (0.03 inches), a repeatability of plus or minus 0.635 mm (plus or minus 0.025 inches), and an absolute accuracy of plus or minus 2.0 mm (plus or minus 0.08 inches) within an eight cubic meter volume with all results applicable at the 95 percent level of confidence along each coordinate region. The full six degrees of freedom of a body can be computed by attaching three or more target detectors to the body of interest.

  7. Educational Research in Developing 3-D Spatial Skills for Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorby, Sheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to visualize in three dimensions is a cognitive skill that has been shown to be important for success in engineering and other technological fields. For engineering, the ability to mentally rotate 3-D objects is especially important. Unfortunately, of all the cognitive skills, 3-D rotation abilities exhibit robust gender differences,…

  8. Enabling accurate gate profile control with inline 3D-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Tianming; Lopez, Andrew; Dawson, Dean

    2009-05-01

    The logic and memory semiconductor device technology strives to follow the aggressive ITRS roadmap. The ITRS calls for increased 3D metrology to meet the demand for tighter process control at 45nm and 32nm nodes. In particular, gate engineering has advanced to a level where conventional metrology by CD-SEM and optical scatterometry (OCD) faces fundamental limitations without involvement of 3D atomic force microscope (3D-AFM or CD-AFM). This paper reports recent progress in 3D-AFM to address the metrology need to control gate dimension in MOSFET transistor formation. 3D-AFM metrology measures the gate electrode at post-etch with the lowest measurement uncertainty for critical gate geometry, including linewidth, sidewall profile, sidewall angle (SWA), line width roughness (LWR), and line edge roughness (LER). 3D-AFM enables accurate gate profile control in three types of metrology applications: reference metrology to validate CD-SEM and OCD, inline depth or 3D monitoring, or replacing TEM for 3D characterization for engineering analysis.

  9. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  10. 3D ESPI and 3D shearography measurements applied to NDT and FEM analysis validation for industrial quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Erwin K.; Riner, Marc

    2001-10-01

    Laser interferometric methods opened the way to measure displacements and deformations of an object in a while- field, non-contact and 3D manner. Therefore, they are used in non-destructive testing and validation of 3D finite element (FE) simulation results. This paper emphasizes the fact that the process of validating an FE result comprises in turn the validation and assessment of the optical measurement method and the experimental bou8ndary condition. Application examples for FE analysis validation and NDT from machine engineering, space technology, and biomedical engineering are presented.

  11. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Russell S.; Andersen, George J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers’ reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  12. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Russell S; Andersen, George J

    2014-06-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers' reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  13. A 3D-Printed Oxygen Control Insert for a 24-Well Plate

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Martin D.; Rexius-Hall, Megan L.; Eddington, David T.

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has emerged as a method for directly printing complete microfluidic devices, although printing materials have been limited to oxygen-impermeable materials. We demonstrate the addition of gas permeable PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) membranes to 3D-printed microfluidic devices as a means to enable oxygen control cell culture studies. The incorporation of a 3D-printed device and gas-permeable membranes was demonstrated on a 24-well oxygen control device for standard multiwell plates. The direct printing allows integrated distribution channels and device geometries not possible with traditional planar lithography. With this device, four different oxygen conditions were able to be controlled, and six wells were maintained under each oxygen condition. We demonstrate enhanced transcription of the gene VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A) with decreasing oxygen levels in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. This is the first 3D-printed device incorporating gas permeable membranes to facilitate oxygen control in cell culture. PMID:26360882

  14. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  15. 3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyeon; Kim, Dong-Eun; Sohn, MyungHee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness of 3D simulation technology for enhancing spatial visualization skills in apparel design education and further to suggest an innovative teaching approach using the technology. Apparel design majors in an introductory patternmaking course, at a large Midwestern University in the United…

  16. Integration of GIS, Geostatistics, and 3-D Technology to Assess the Spatial Distribution of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, M.; Tsegaye, T.; Tadesse, W.; Coleman, T. L.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of near surface soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many physical, biological, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. However, knowledge of these space-time dynamics and the processes which control them remains unclear. The integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics together promise a simple mechanism to evaluate and display the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital hydrologic and physical variable. Therefore, this research demonstrates the use of geostatistics and GIS to predict and display soil moisture distribution under vegetated and non-vegetated plots. The research was conducted at the Winfred Thomas Agricultural Experiment Station (WTAES), Hazel Green, Alabama. Soil moisture measurement were done on a 10 by 10 m grid from tall fescue grass (GR), alfalfa (AA), bare rough (BR), and bare smooth (BS) plots. Results indicated that variance associated with soil moisture was higher for vegetated plots than non-vegetated plots. The presence of vegetation in general contributed to the spatial variability of soil moisture. Integration of geostatistics and GIS can improve the productivity of farm lands and the precision of farming.

  17. A hybrid 3D spatial access method based on quadtrees and R-trees for globe data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Ke, Shengnan; Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Shuhua

    2009-10-01

    3D spatial access method for globe data is very crucial technique for virtual earth. This paper presents a brand-new maintenance method to index 3d objects distributed on the whole surface of the earth, which integrates the 1:1,000,000- scale topographic map tiles, Quad-tree and R-tree. Furthermore, when traditional methods are extended into 3d space, the performance of spatial index deteriorates badly, for example 3D R-tree. In order to effectively solve this difficult problem, a new algorithm of dynamic R-tree is put forward, which includes two sub-procedures, namely node-choosing and node-split. In the node-choosing algorithm, a new strategy is adopted, not like the traditional mode which is from top to bottom, but firstly from bottom to top then from top to bottom. This strategy can effectively solve the negative influence of node overlap. In the node-split algorithm, 2-to-3 split mode substitutes the traditional 1-to-2 mode, which can better concern the shape and size of nodes. Because of the rational tree shape, this R-tree method can easily integrate the concept of LOD. Therefore, it will be later implemented in commercial DBMS and adopted in time-crucial 3d GIS system.

  18. Identifying Key Structural Features and Spatial Relationships in Archean Microbialites Using 2D and 3D Visualization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, E. W.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Microbialites in the 2521 ± 3 Ma Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, have several different end-member morphologies which show distinct growth structures and spatial relationships. We characterized several growth structures and spatial relationships in two samples (DK20 and 2_06) using a combination of 2D and 3D analytical techniques. There are two main goals in studying complicated microbialites with a combination of 2D and 3D methods. First, one can better understand microbialite growth by identifying important structures and structural relationships. Once structures are identified, the order in which the structures formed and how they are related can be inferred from observations of crosscutting relationships. Second, it is important to use both 2D and 3D methods to correlate 3D observations with those in 2D that are more common in the field. Combining analysis provides significantly more insight into the 3D morphology of microbial structures. In our studies, 2D analysis consisted of describing polished slabs and serial sections created by grinding down the rock 100 microns at a time. 3D analysis was performed on serial sections visualized in 3D using Vrui and 3DVisualizer software developed at KeckCAVES, UCD (http://keckcaves.org). Data were visualized on a laptop and in an immersive cave system. Both samples contain microbial laminae and more vertically orients microbial "walls" called supports. The relationships between these features created voids now filled with herringbone and blocky calcite crystals. DK20, a classic plumose structure, contains two types of support structures. Both are 1st order structures (1st order structures with organic inclusions and 1st without organic inclusions) interpreted as planar features based on 2D analysis. In the 2D analysis the 1st order structures show v branching relationships as well as single cuspate relationships (two 1st order structures with inclusions merging upward), and single tented relationships (three supports

  19. Testing the hybrid-3D Hillslope Hydrological Model in a Real-World Controlled Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P. D.; Gochis, D. J.; Niu, G. Y.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    Hillslopes play an important role for converting rainfall into runoff, and as such, influence theterrestrial dynamics of the Earth's climate system. Recently, we have developed a hybrid-3D (h3D) hillslope hydrological model that couples a 1D vertical soil column model with a lateral pseudo-2D saturated zone and overland flow model. The h3D model gives similar results as the CATchment HYdrological model (CATHY), which simulates the subsurface movement of water with the 3D Richards equation, though the runtime efficiency of the h3D model is about 2-3 orders of magnitude faster. In the current work, the ability of the h3D model to predict real-world hydrological dynamics is assessed using a number of recharge-drainage experiments within the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at the Biosphere 2 near Tucson, Arizona, USA. LEO offers accurate and high-resolution (both temporally and spatially) observations of the inputs, outputs and storage dynamics of several hillslopes. The level of detail of these observations is generally not possible with real-world hillslope studies. Therefore, LEO offers an optimal environment to test the h3D model. The h3D model captures the observed storage, baseflow, and overland flow dynamics of both a larger and a smaller hillslope. Furthermore, it simulates overland flow better than CATHY. The h3D model has difficulties correctly representing the height of the saturated zone close to the seepage face of the smaller hillslope, though. There is a gravel layer near this seepage face, and the numerical boundary condition of the h3D model is insufficient to capture the hydrological dynamics within this region. In addition, the h3D model is used to test the hypothesis that model parameters change through time due to the migration of soil particles during the recharge-drainage experiments. An in depth calibration of the h3D model parameters reveals that the best results are obtained by applying an event-based optimization procedure as compared

  20. Does spatial variation in environmental conditions affect recruitment? A study using a 3-D model of Peruvian anchovy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Rose, Kenneth A.; Chai, Fei; Chavez, Francisco P.; Ayón, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    We used a 3-dimensional individual-based model (3-D IBM) of Peruvian anchovy to examine how spatial variation in environmental conditions affects larval and juvenile growth and survival, and recruitment. Temperature, velocity, and phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations generated from a coupled hydrodynamic Nutrients-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model, mapped to a three dimensional rectangular grid, were used to simulate anchovy populations. The IBM simulated individuals as they progressed from eggs to recruitment at 10 cm. Eggs and yolk-sac larvae were followed hourly through the processes of development, mortality, and movement (advection), and larvae and juveniles were followed daily through the processes of growth, mortality, and movement (advection plus behavior). A bioenergetics model was used to grow larvae and juveniles. The NPZD model provided prey fields which influence both food consumption rate as well as behavior mediated movement with individuals going to grids cells having optimal growth conditions. We compared predicted recruitment for monthly cohorts for 1990 through 2004 between the full 3-D IBM and a point (0-D) model that used spatially-averaged environmental conditions. The 3-D and 0-D versions generated similar interannual patterns in monthly recruitment for 1991-2004, with the 3-D results yielding consistently higher survivorship. Both versions successfully captured the very poor recruitment during the 1997-1998 El Niño event. Higher recruitment in the 3-D simulations was due to higher survival during the larval stage resulting from individuals searching for more favorable temperatures that lead to faster growth rates. The strong effect of temperature was because both model versions provided saturating food conditions for larval and juvenile anchovies. We conclude with a discussion of how explicit treatment of spatial variation affected simulated recruitment, other examples of fisheries modeling analyses that have used a

  1. Prototype Development Capabilities of 3D Spatial Interactions and Failures During Scenario Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Tony Koonce

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a prototype for using 3D modeling and simulation engine to improve risk analysis and evaluate reactor structures and components for a given scenario. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  2. 3-D Visualisation: Using Internet-based Activities to Enhance Student Understanding of 3-dimensional Spatial Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, A. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, P.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial ability forms its own category separate from verbal ability. Various spatial abilities have been identified over the last three decades and classified into three types: mental rotation, spatial rotation and spatial visualization, which have been linked to high performance in STEM subjects. Geoscience demands spatial thinking from learners and practitioners, and spatial literacy has been seen as a fundamental skill in Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences (GEES disciplines) essential for progression. First year GEES students not only have to cope with new learning and teaching environments (Maguire et al., 2008), but, arriving with different science backgrounds, are faced with the challenge of developing essential skills that may be novel for them. These essential skills are subject-specific, as well as transferable, and require an understanding of 3-dimensional spatial relationships. However, spatial skills can be troublesome for some students to master. Not only do many students find difficulty in acquiring spatial skills, facing a succession of hurdles that need to be overcome in developing their understanding, but also educators, often strong spatial thinkers themselves and unaware of the degree to which some students are spatially-challenged, may find it difficult to help. Recent studies have suggested that performance on abstract and applied spatial tasks may be enhanced through instruction and practice and spatially-intensive geoscience courses may strengthen performance on spatial tasks. At Liverpool, many first year geoscience modules require understanding of 3-D spatial relationships, often from initial 2-D observations (e.g. mineralogy, petrography, vulcanology, sedimentology, palaeontology, geological map work, structural geology and fieldwork). In this paper we outline work, supported by the UK Subject Centre for Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences (GEES), involving first year geosciences students at Liverpool, in which we explored

  3. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions. PMID:26561090

  4. Does spatial arrangement of 3D plants affect light transmission and extinction coefficient within maize crops?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Row spacing effects on light interception and extinction coefficient have been inconsistent for maize (Zea mays L.) when calculated with field measurements. To avoid inconsistencies due to variable light conditions and variable leaf canopies, we used a model to describe three-dimensional (3D) shoot ...

  5. An impedance method for spatial sensing of 3D cell constructs--towards applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Canali, C; Mazzoni, C; Larsen, L B; Heiskanen, A; Martinsen, Ø G; Wolff, A; Dufva, M; Emnéus, J

    2015-09-01

    We present the characterisation and validation of multiplexed 4-terminal (4T) impedance measurements as a method for sensing the spatial location of cell aggregates within large three-dimensional (3D) gelatin scaffolds. The measurements were performed using an array of four rectangular chambers, each having eight platinum needle electrodes for parallel analysis. The electrode positions for current injection and voltage measurements were optimised by means of finite element simulations to maximise the sensitivity field distribution and spatial resolution. Eight different 4T combinations were experimentally tested in terms of the spatial sensitivity. The simulated sensitivity fields were validated using objects (phantoms) with different conductivity and size placed in different positions inside the chamber. This provided the detection limit (volume sensitivity) of 16.5%, i.e. the smallest detectable volume with respect to the size of the measurement chamber. Furthermore, the possibility for quick single frequency analysis was demonstrated by finding a common frequency of 250 kHz for all the presented electrode combinations. As final proof of concept, a high density of human hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells were encapsulated in gelatin to form artificial 3D cell constructs and detected when placed in different positions inside large gelatin scaffolds. Taken together, these results open new perspectives for impedance-based sensing technologies for non-invasive monitoring in tissue engineering applications providing spatial information of constructs within biologically relevant 3D environments. PMID:26198701

  6. Use of 3D printed models in medical education: A randomized control trial comparing 3D prints versus cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kah Heng Alexander; Loo, Zhou Yaw; Goldie, Stephen J; Adams, Justin W; McMenamin, Paul G

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology capable of readily producing accurate anatomical models, however, evidence for the use of 3D prints in medical education remains limited. A study was performed to assess their effectiveness against cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy. A double blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken on undergraduate medical students without prior formal cardiac anatomy teaching. Following a pre-test examining baseline external cardiac anatomy knowledge, participants were randomly assigned to three groups who underwent self-directed learning sessions using either cadaveric materials, 3D prints, or a combination of cadaveric materials/3D prints (combined materials). Participants were then subjected to a post-test written by a third party. Fifty-two participants completed the trial; 18 using cadaveric materials, 16 using 3D models, and 18 using combined materials. Age and time since completion of high school were equally distributed between groups. Pre-test scores were not significantly different (P = 0.231), however, post-test scores were significantly higher for 3D prints group compared to the cadaveric materials or combined materials groups (mean of 60.83% vs. 44.81% and 44.62%, P = 0.010, adjusted P = 0.012). A significant improvement in test scores was detected for the 3D prints group (P = 0.003) but not for the other two groups. The finding of this pilot study suggests that use of 3D prints do not disadvantage students relative to cadaveric materials; maximally, results suggest that 3D may confer certain benefits to anatomy learning and supports their use and ongoing evaluation as supplements to cadaver-based curriculums. Anat Sci Educ 9: 213-221. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26468636

  7. 3D reconstruction and spatial auralization of the "Painted Dolmen" of Antelas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Paulo; Campos, Guilherme; Santos, Vítor; Casaleiro, Ricardo; Seco, Ricardo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the development of a 3D audiovisual model of the Anta Pintada (painted dolmen) of Antelas, a Neolithic chamber tomb located in Oliveira de Frades and listed as Portuguese national monument. The final aim of the project is to create a highly accurate Virtual Reality (VR) model of this unique archaeological site, capable of providing not only visual but also acoustic immersion based on its actual geometry and physical properties. The project started in May 2006 with in situ data acquisition. The 3D geometry of the chamber was captured using a Laser Range Finder. In order to combine the different scans into a complete 3D visual model, reconstruction software based on the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm was developed using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK). This software computes the boundaries of the room on a 3D uniform grid and populates its interior with "free-space nodes", through an iterative algorithm operating like a torchlight illuminating a dark room. The envelope of the resulting set of "free-space nodes" is used to generate a 3D iso-surface approximating the interior shape of the chamber. Each polygon of this surface is then assigned the acoustic absorption coefficient of the corresponding boundary material. A 3D audiovisual model operating in real-time was developed for a VR Environment comprising head-mounted display (HMD) I-glasses SVGAPro, an orientation sensor (tracker) InterTrax 2 with 3 Degrees Of Freedom (3DOF) and stereo headphones. The auralisation software is based on a geometric model. This constitutes a first approach, since geometric acoustics have well-known limitations in rooms with irregular surfaces. The immediate advantage lies in their inherent computational efficiency, which allows real-time operation. The program computes the early reflections forming the initial part of the chamber's impulse response (IR), which carry the most significant cues for source localisation. These early

  8. Drawing on air: input techniques for controlled 3D line illustration.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Daniel; Zeleznik, Robert; Laidlaw, David

    2007-01-01

    We present Drawing on Air, a haptic-aided input technique for drawing controlled 3D curves through space. Drawing on Air addresses a control problem with current 3D modeling approaches based on sweeping movement of the hands through the air. While artists praise the immediacy and intuitiveness of these systems, a lack of control makes it nearly impossible to create 3D form beyond quick design sketches or gesture drawings. Drawing on Air introduces two new strategies for more controlled 3D drawing: one-handed drag drawing and two-handed tape drawing. Both approaches have advantages for drawing certain types of curves. We describe a tangent preserving method for transitioning between the two techniques while drawing. Haptic-aided redrawing and line weight adjustment while drawing are also supported in both approaches. In a quantitative user study evaluation by illustrators, the one and two-handed techniques performed at roughly the same level, and both significantly outperformed freehand drawing and freehand drawing augmented with a haptic friction effect. We present the design and results of this experiment as well as user feedback from artists and 3D models created in a style of line illustration for challenging artistic and scientific subjects. PMID:17622688

  9. Controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning via visible-light induced electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gaole; Wan, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Zixun; Li, Wenjun; Shi, Peng; Shen, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of alginate hydrogel in 3D has recently received increasing attention owing to its distinct efficacy as biocompatible scaffold for 3D cell culture, biomedical and tissue engineering. We report a controllable 3D alginate hydrogel patterning method by developing a visible-light induced electrodeposition chip. The chip mainly consists of a photoconductive titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) anode plate, an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode plate and the mixed solution (1% sodium alginate and 0.25% CaCO3 nano particles) between them. After a designed visible-light pattern is projected onto the TiOPc plate, the produced H(+) by electrolysis will trigger Ca(2+) near the anode (illuminated area), and then the gelation of calcium alginate patterns, as desired, happens controllably. In addition, we further establish an exponential model to elucidate the gel growth v.s. time and current density. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to fabricate various 3D alginate hydrogel patterns in a well controllable manner, and maintain the laden cells at high survival rate (>98% right after gel formation). This research paves an alternative way for 3D alginate hydrogel patterning with high controllability and productivity, which would benefit the research in biomedical and tissue engineering. PMID:27108617

  10. Integration of the virtual 3D model of a control system with the virtual controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbuś, K.; Ociepka, P.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design process includes simulation analysis of different components of a constructed object. It involves the need for integration of different virtual object to simulate the whole investigated technical system. The paper presents the issues related to the integration of a virtual 3D model of a chosen control system of with a virtual controller. The goal of integration is to verify the operation of an adopted object of in accordance with the established control program. The object of the simulation work is the drive system of a tunneling machine for trenchless work. In the first stage of work was created an interactive visualization of functioning of the 3D virtual model of a tunneling machine. For this purpose, the software of the VR (Virtual Reality) class was applied. In the elaborated interactive application were created adequate procedures allowing controlling the drive system of a translatory motion, a rotary motion and the drive system of a manipulator. Additionally was created the procedure of turning on and off the output crushing head, mounted on the last element of the manipulator. In the elaborated interactive application have been established procedures for receiving input data from external software, on the basis of the dynamic data exchange (DDE), which allow controlling actuators of particular control systems of the considered machine. In the next stage of work, the program on a virtual driver, in the ladder diagram (LD) language, was created. The control program was developed on the basis of the adopted work cycle of the tunneling machine. The element integrating the virtual model of the tunneling machine for trenchless work with the virtual controller is the application written in a high level language (Visual Basic). In the developed application was created procedures responsible for collecting data from the running, in a simulation mode, virtual controller and transferring them to the interactive application, in which is verified the

  11. 3D Printed Microtransporters: Compound Micromachines for Spatiotemporally Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian-Yun; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Mao, Angelo; Petruska, Andrew J; Qiu, Famin; Chen, Xue-Bo; Kennedy, Stephen; Mooney, David; Nelson, Bradley J

    2015-11-01

    Functional compound micromachines are fabricated by a design methodology using 3D direct laser writing and selective physical vapor deposition of magnetic materials. Microtransporters with a wirelessly controlled Archimedes screw pumping mechanism are engineered. Spatiotemporally controlled collection, transport, and delivery of micro particles, as well as magnetic nanohelices inside microfluidic channels are demonstrated. PMID:26415002

  12. Fast 3D Spatial EPR Imaging Using Spiral Magnetic Field Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuanmu; Petryakov, Sergy; He, Guanglong; Kesselring, Eric; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Zweier, Jay L.

    2007-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) provides direct detection and mapping of free radicals. The continuous wave (CW) EPRI technique, in particular, has been widely used in a variety of applications in the fields of biology and medicine due to its high sensitivity and applicability to a wide range of free radicals and paramagnetic species. However, the technique requires long image acquisition periods, and this limits its use for many in vivo applications where relatively rapid changes occur in the magnitude and distribution of spins. Therefore, there has been a great need to develop fast EPRI techniques. We report the development of a fast 3D CW EPRI technique using spiral magnetic field gradient. By spiraling the magnetic field gradient and stepping the main magnetic field, this approach acquires a 3D image in one sweep of the main magnetic field, enabling significant reduction of the imaging time. A direct one-stage 3D image reconstruction algorithm, modified for reconstruction of the EPR images from the projections acquired with the spiral magnetic field gradient, was used. We demonstrated using a home-built L-band EPR system that the spiral magnetic field gradient technique enabled a 4 to 7-fold accelerated acquisition of projections. This technique has great potential for in vivo studies of free radicals and their metabolism. PMID:17267252

  13. Multi-static networked 3D ladar for surveillance and access control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ogirala, S. S. R.; Hu, B.; Le, Han Q.

    2007-04-01

    A theoretical design and simulation of a 3D ladar system concept for surveillance, intrusion detection, and access control is described. It is a non-conventional system architecture that consists of: i) multi-static configuration with an arbitrarily scalable number of transmitters (Tx's) and receivers (Rx's) that form an optical wireless code-division-multiple-access (CDMA) network, and ii) flexible system architecture with modular plug-and-play components that can be deployed for any facility with arbitrary topology. Affordability is a driving consideration; and a key feature for low cost is an asymmetric use of many inexpensive Rx's in conjunction with fewer Tx's, which are generally more expensive. The Rx's are spatially distributed close to the surveyed area for large coverage, and capable of receiving signals from multiple Tx's with moderate laser power. The system produces sensing information that scales as NxM, where N, M are the number of Tx's and Rx's, as opposed to linear scaling ~N in non-network system. Also, for target positioning, besides laser pointing direction and time-of-flight, the algorithm includes multiple point-of-view image fusion and triangulation for enhanced accuracy, which is not applicable to non-networked monostatic ladars. Simulation and scaled model experiments on some aspects of this concept are discussed.

  14. The variants of an LOD of a 3D building model and their influence on spatial analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biljecki, Filip; Ledoux, Hugo; Stoter, Jantien; Vosselman, George

    2016-06-01

    The level of detail (LOD) of a 3D city model indicates the model's grade and usability. However, there exist multiple valid variants of each LOD. As a consequence, the LOD concept is inconclusive as an instruction for the acquisition of 3D city models. For instance, the top surface of an LOD1 block model may be modelled at the eaves of a building or at its ridge height. Such variants, which we term geometric references, are often overlooked and are usually not documented in the metadata. Furthermore, the influence of a particular geometric reference on the performance of a spatial analysis is not known. In response to this research gap, we investigate a variety of LOD1 and LOD2 geometric references that are commonly employed, and perform numerical experiments to investigate their relative difference when used as input for different spatial analyses. We consider three use cases (estimation of the area of the building envelope, building volume, and shadows cast by buildings), and compute the deviations in a Monte Carlo simulation. The experiments, carried out with procedurally generated models, indicate that two 3D models representing the same building at the same LOD, but modelled according to different geometric references, may yield substantially different results when used in a spatial analysis. The outcome of our experiments also suggests that the geometric reference may have a bigger influence than the LOD, since an LOD1 with a specific geometric reference may yield a more accurate result than when using LOD2 models.

  15. Using a wireless motion controller for 3D medical image catheter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    State-of-the-art morphological imaging techniques usually provide high resolution 3D images with a huge number of slices. In clinical practice, however, 2D slice-based examinations are still the method of choice even for these large amounts of data. Providing intuitive interaction methods for specific 3D medical visualization applications is therefore a critical feature for clinical imaging applications. For the domain of catheter navigation and surgery planning, it is crucial to assist the physician with appropriate visualization techniques, such as 3D segmentation maps, fly-through cameras or virtual interaction approaches. There has been an ongoing development and improvement for controllers that help to interact with 3D environments in the domain of computer games. These controllers are based on both motion and infrared sensors and are typically used to detect 3D position and orientation. We have investigated how a state-of-the-art wireless motion sensor controller (Wiimote), developed by Nintendo, can be used for catheter navigation and planning purposes. By default the Wiimote controller only measure rough acceleration over a range of +/- 3g with 10% sensitivity and orientation. Therefore, a pose estimation algorithm was developed for computing accurate position and orientation in 3D space regarding 4 Infrared LEDs. Current results show that for the translation it is possible to obtain a mean error of (0.38cm, 0.41cm, 4.94cm) and for the rotation (0.16, 0.28) respectively. Within this paper we introduce a clinical prototype that allows steering of a virtual fly-through camera attached to the catheter tip by the Wii controller on basis of a segmented vessel tree.

  16. Control of 3D equilibria with resonant magnetic perturbations in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, S.; Chapman, B. E.; Holly, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Norval, R. J.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; McCollam, K. J.

    2015-10-01

    To aid in diagnosis of 3D equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus, it has become necessary to control the orientation of the equilibria. In reversed field pinch experiments a transition to a 3D equilibrium is common with sufficiently large plasma current (and Lundquist number). Diagnosis of this state is hampered by the fact that the helical structure is stationary but with an orientation that varies shot-to-shot. A resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) technique has been developed to vary controllably the orientation of the 3D equilibria and optimized to minimize the plasma wall interaction due to its use. Application of an RMP now allows alignment of the structure with key diagnostics, including Thomson scattering and an interferometer-polarimeter.

  17. On human pluripotent stem cell control: The rise of 3D bioengineering and mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Sang, Jianming; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide promising resources for regenerating tissues and organs and modeling development and diseases in vitro. To fulfill their promise, the fate, function, and organization of hPSCs need to be precisely regulated in a three-dimensional (3D) environment to mimic cellular structures and functions of native tissues and organs. In the past decade, innovations in 3D culture systems with functional biomaterials have enabled efficient and versatile control of hPSC fate at the cellular level. However, we are just at the beginning of bringing hPSC-based regeneration and development and disease modeling to the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we summarize existing bioengineered culture platforms for controlling hPSC fate and function by regulating inductive mechanical and biochemical cues coexisting in the synthetic cell microenvironment. We highlight recent excitements in developing 3D hPSC-based in vitro tissue and organ models with in vivo-like cellular structures, interactions, and functions. We further discuss an emerging multifaceted mechanotransductive signaling network – with transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ at the center stage – that regulate fates and behaviors of mammalian cells, including hPSCs. Future development of 3D biomaterial systems should incorporate dynamically modulated mechanical and chemical properties targeting specific intracellular signaling events leading to desirable hPSC fate patterning and functional tissue formation in 3D. PMID:25818411

  18. Electrospinning of small diameter 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with controllable nanofiber orientations for vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huijun; Fan, Jintu; Chu, Chih-Chang; Wu, Jun

    2010-12-01

    The control of nanofiber orientation in nanofibrous tubular scaffolds can benefit the cell responses along specific directions. For small diameter tubular scaffolds, however, it becomes difficult to engineer nanofiber orientation. This paper reports a novel electrospinning technique for the fabrication of 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with controllable nanofiber orientations. Synthetic absorbable poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was used as the model biomaterial to demonstrate this new electrospinning technique. Electrospun 3-D PCL nanofibrous tubular scaffolds of 4.5 mm in diameter with different nanofiber orientations (viz. circumferential, axial, and combinations of circumferential and axial directions) were successfully fabricated. The degree of nanofiber alignment in the electrospun 3-D tubular scaffolds was quantified by using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The results indicated that excellent circumferential nanofiber alignment could be achieved in the 3-D nanofibrous PCL tubular scaffolds. The nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with oriented nanofibers had not only directional mechanical property but also could facilitate the orientation of the endothelial cell attachment on the fibers. Multiple layers of aligned nanofibers in different orientations can produce 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds of different macroscopic properties. PMID:20890639

  19. A new method for determining the 3D spatial orientation of molar microwear.

    PubMed

    Tausch, Jeremy; Kullmer, Ottmar; Bromage, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Many types of behavioral and dietary information can be extracted from studies of tooth microwear. Some studies have even been successful at determining the overall directionality of microwear in order to establish gross masticatory movement (Williams et al., 2009, PNAS, 106, 11194-11199). However, microwear has never been successfully visualized in situ in 3 dimensions (3D), visualized virtually and quantified. The ability to accomplish this yields information on exact masticatory movement which can then be used to address any number of eco-biological and physiological questions in extant and extinct organisms. In order to create 3D virtual reality (VR) representation of microwear, fossil molars from the Javanese Sangiran 7 (S7) Homo erectus tooth collection and from historic hunter/gatherer meta-populations were imaged, the microwear in 3 dimensions was extracted, this information was then placed back on VR representations of the molars and quantified. The methodology contained herein demonstrates the efficacy and importance of such a technique in determining gross masticatory movement in fossil and recent hominin molars. This methodology could, in theory, be applied to any organism which produces microwear on its dentition. Applications in the fields of dentistry, orthodontics, climatology and dietary and habitat reconstructions can also be envisioned. PMID:26114579

  20. Spatial Pattern Dynamics of 3D Stem Cell Loss of Pluripotency via Rules-Based Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas E.; Kinney, Melissa A.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the unique ability to differentiate into cells from all germ lineages, making them a potentially robust cell source for regenerative medicine therapies, but difficulties in predicting and controlling ESC differentiation currently limit the development of therapies and applications from such cells. A common approach to induce the differentiation of ESCs in vitro is via the formation of multicellular aggregates known as embryoid bodies (EBs), yet cell fate specification within EBs is generally considered an ill-defined and poorly controlled process. Thus, the objective of this study was to use rules-based cellular modeling to provide insight into which processes influence initial cell fate transitions in 3-dimensional microenvironments. Mouse embryonic stem cells (D3 cell line) were differentiated to examine the temporal and spatial patterns associated with loss of pluripotency as measured through Oct4 expression. Global properties of the multicellular aggregates were accurately recapitulated by a physics-based aggregation simulation when compared to experimentally measured physical parameters of EBs. Oct4 expression patterns were analyzed by confocal microscopy over time and compared to simulated trajectories of EB patterns. The simulations demonstrated that loss of Oct4 can be modeled as a binary process, and that associated patterns can be explained by a set of simple rules that combine baseline stochasticity with intercellular communication. Competing influences between Oct4+ and Oct4− neighbors result in the observed patterns of pluripotency loss within EBs, establishing the utility of rules-based modeling for hypothesis generation of underlying ESC differentiation processes. Importantly, the results indicate that the rules dominate the emergence of patterns independent of EB structure, size, or cell division. In combination with strategies to engineer cellular microenvironments, this type of modeling approach is a

  1. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  2. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-01

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development. PMID:27327102

  3. Porosity-controlled eggshell membrane as 3D SERS-active substrate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Tsai, Pei-Chuan; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2014-06-01

    We report on the fabrication of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform, comprised of a three-dimensional (3D) porous eggshell membrane (ESM) scaffold decorated with Ag nanoparticles (NPs). Both native and treated ESM were used, where the treated ESM pore size and fiber crossing density was controlled by timed exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Ag NPs were synthesized in situ by reduction of silver nitrate with ascorbic acid. Our results demonstrate that H2O2-treated Ag-ESM provides a more densely packed 3D network of active material, which leads to consistently higher SERS enhancement than untreated Ag-ESM substrates. PMID:24590917

  4. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks' position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations. PMID:26633394

  5. 3-D FEM field analysis in controlled-PM LSM for Maglev vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Lee, J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1997-03-01

    The magnetic fields in the controlled-PM LSM for Maglev vehicle, of which the width is not only finite with lateral edges, but also an effective electric-airgap is very large, are accurately analyzed by using 3-D FEM. The lateral airgap-flux due to lateral edges of the machine is made clear and its effects on thrust and lift forces are evaluated quantitatively from the comparison with 2-D FEA. The accuracy of 3-D FEA is verified by comparing the calculated results with the measured values.

  6. UAV Control on the Basis of 3D Landmark Bearing-Only Observations

    PubMed Central

    Karpenko, Simon; Konovalenko, Ivan; Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris; Nikolaev, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an approach to the control of a UAV on the basis of 3D landmark observations. The novelty of the work is the usage of the 3D RANSAC algorithm developed on the basis of the landmarks’ position prediction with the aid of a modified Kalman-type filter. Modification of the filter based on the pseudo-measurements approach permits obtaining unbiased UAV position estimation with quadratic error characteristics. Modeling of UAV flight on the basis of the suggested algorithm shows good performance, even under significant external perturbations. PMID:26633394

  7. Correlated fluorescence and 3D electron microscopy with high sensitivity and spatial precision

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Wanda; Schorb, Martin; Welsch, Sonja; Picco, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy has the potential to elucidate the ultrastructural details of dynamic and rare cellular events, but has been limited by low precision and sensitivity. Here we present a method for direct mapping of signals originating from ∼20 fluorescent protein molecules to 3D electron tomograms with a precision of less than 100 nm. We demonstrate that this method can be used to identify individual HIV particles bound to mammalian cell surfaces. We also apply the method to image microtubule end structures bound to mal3p in fission yeast, and demonstrate that growing microtubule plus-ends are flared in vivo. We localize Rvs167 to endocytic sites in budding yeast, and show that scission takes place halfway through a 10-s time period during which amphiphysins are bound to the vesicle neck. This new technique opens the door for direct correlation of fluorescence and electron microscopy to visualize cellular processes at the ultrastructural scale. PMID:21200030

  8. A phantom with reduced complexity for spatial 3-D ultrasound calibration.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Sangita; Li, Yinbo; Molloy, Janelle; Hossack, John

    2005-08-01

    The design of a new phantom for 3-D ultrasound calibration is presented. The phantom provides a viable alternative to existing phantoms that are significantly more complex and require high precision fabrication. The phantom, referred to as a "plane-of-wires" phantom, consists of two wires mounted at the same fixed height above the bottom of a water tank. Data collection for calibration involved rotating and translating the phantom so that the wires remained in a single plane parallel to the tank bottom. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the plane-of-wires calibration is 0.66 mm at a mean depth of 12.3 mm, with a precision of 1.23 mm at the same mean depth. The calibration was used to determine the volume of a cube with known volume with an error of 2.51%. The calibration performance achieved is comparable with that of existing approaches. PMID:16085099

  9. Generation of 3D Spatially Variable Anisotropy for Groundwater Flow Simulations.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Andrea; Renard, Philippe; Courrioux, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary units generally present anisotropy in their hydraulic properties, with higher hydraulic conductivity along bedding planes, rather than perpendicular to them. This common property leads to a modeling challenge if the sedimentary structure is folded. In this paper, we show that the gradient of the geological potential used by implicit geological modeling techniques can be used to compute full hydraulic conductivity tensors varying in space according to the geological orientation. For that purpose, the gradient of the potential, a vector normal to the bedding, is used to construct a rotation matrix that allows the estimation of the 3D hydraulic conductivity tensor in a single matrix operation. A synthetic 2D cross section example is used to illustrate the method and show that flow simulations performed in such a folded environment are highly influenced by this rotating anisotropy. When using the proposed method, the streamlines follow very closely the folded formation. This is not the case with an isotropic model. PMID:25648610

  10. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement. PMID:25933063

  11. 3D positional control of magnetic levitation system using adaptive control: improvement of positioning control in horizontal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshimasa; Fujitani, Yasuhiro; Kato, Norihiko; Tsuda, Naoaki; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish a technique that levitates and conveys a hand, a kind of micro-robot, by applying magnetic forces: the hand is assumed to have a function of holding and detaching the objects. The equipment to be used in our experiments consists of four pole-pieces of electromagnets, and is expected to work as a 4DOF drive unit within some restricted range of 3D space: the three DOF are corresponding to 3D positional control and the remaining one DOF, rotational oscillation damping control. Having used the same equipment, Khamesee et al. had manipulated the impressed voltages on the four electric magnetics by a PID controller by the use of the feedback signal of the hand's 3D position, the controlled variable. However, in this system, there were some problems remaining: in the horizontal direction, when translating the hand out of restricted region, positional control performance was suddenly degraded. The authors propose a method to apply an adaptive control to the horizontal directional control. It is expected that the technique to be presented in this paper contributes not only to the improvement of the response characteristic but also to widening the applicable range in the horizontal directional control.

  12. MExLab Planetary Geoportal: 3D-access to planetary images and results of spatial data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, I.; Garov, A.

    2015-10-01

    MExLab Planetary Geoportal was developed as Geodesy and Cartography Node which provide access to results of study of celestial bodies such as DEM and orthoimages, as well as basemaps, crater catalogues and derivative products: slope, roughness, crater density (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal). The main feature of designed Geoportal is the ability of spatial queries and access to the contents selecting from the list of available data set (Phobos, Mercury, Moon, including Lunokhod's archive data). Prior version of Geoportal has been developed using Flash technology. Now we are developing new version which will use 3D-API (OpenGL, WebGL) based on shaders not only for standard 3D-functionality, but for 2D-mapping as well. Users can obtain quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the objects in graphical, tabular and 3D-forms. It will bring the advantages of unification of code and speed of processing and provide a number of functional advantages based on GIS-tools such as: - possibility of dynamic raster transform for needed map projection; - effective implementation of the co-registration of planetary images by combining spatial data geometries; - presentation in 3D-form different types of data, including planetary atmospheric measurements, subsurface radar data, ect. The system will be created with a new software architecture, which has a potential for development and flexibility in reconfiguration based on cross platform solution: - an application for the three types of platforms: desktop (Windows, Linux, OSX), web platform (any HTML5 browser), and mobile application (Android, iOS); - a single codebase shared between platforms (using cross compilation for Web); - a new telecommunication solution to connect between modules and external system like PROVIDE WebGIS (http://www.provide-space.eu/progis/). The research leading to these result was partly supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n

  13. Inertial Sensor-Based Touch and Shake Metaphor for Expressive Control of 3D Virtual Avatars.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashidhar; Chintalapalli, Harinadha Reddy; Kim, Dubeom; Chai, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an inertial sensor-based touch and shake metaphor for expressive control of a 3D virtual avatar in a virtual environment. An intuitive six degrees-of-freedom wireless inertial motion sensor is used as a gesture and motion control input device with a sensor fusion algorithm. The algorithm enables user hand motions to be tracked in 3D space via magnetic, angular rate, and gravity sensors. A quaternion-based complementary filter is implemented to reduce noise and drift. An algorithm based on dynamic time-warping is developed for efficient recognition of dynamic hand gestures with real-time automatic hand gesture segmentation. Our approach enables the recognition of gestures and estimates gesture variations for continuous interaction. We demonstrate the gesture expressivity using an interactive flexible gesture mapping interface for authoring and controlling a 3D virtual avatar and its motion by tracking user dynamic hand gestures. This synthesizes stylistic variations in a 3D virtual avatar, producing motions that are not present in the motion database using hand gesture sequences from a single inertial motion sensor. PMID:26094629

  14. Inertial Sensor-Based Touch and Shake Metaphor for Expressive Control of 3D Virtual Avatars

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shashidhar; Chintalapalli, Harinadha Reddy; Kim, Dubeom; Chai, Youngho

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an inertial sensor-based touch and shake metaphor for expressive control of a 3D virtual avatar in a virtual environment. An intuitive six degrees-of-freedom wireless inertial motion sensor is used as a gesture and motion control input device with a sensor fusion algorithm. The algorithm enables user hand motions to be tracked in 3D space via magnetic, angular rate, and gravity sensors. A quaternion-based complementary filter is implemented to reduce noise and drift. An algorithm based on dynamic time-warping is developed for efficient recognition of dynamic hand gestures with real-time automatic hand gesture segmentation. Our approach enables the recognition of gestures and estimates gesture variations for continuous interaction. We demonstrate the gesture expressivity using an interactive flexible gesture mapping interface for authoring and controlling a 3D virtual avatar and its motion by tracking user dynamic hand gestures. This synthesizes stylistic variations in a 3D virtual avatar, producing motions that are not present in the motion database using hand gesture sequences from a single inertial motion sensor. PMID:26094629

  15. Testing the hybrid-3-D hillslope hydrological model in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, P.; Broxton, P.; Gochis, D.; Niu, G.-Y.; Pangle, L. A.; Pelletier, J. D.; Troch, P. A.; Zeng, X.

    2016-02-01

    Hillslopes are important for converting rainfall into runoff, influencing the terrestrial dynamics of the Earth's climate system. Recently, we developed a hybrid-3-D (h3D) hillslope hydrological model that gives similar results as a full 3-D hydrological model but is up to 2-3 orders of magnitude faster computationally. Here h3D is assessed using a number of recharge-drainage experiments within the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) with accurate and high-resolution (both temporally and spatially) observations of the inputs, outputs, and storage dynamics of several hillslopes. Such detailed measurements are generally not available for real-world hillslopes. Results show that the h3D model captures the observed storage, base flow, and overland flow dynamics of both the larger LEO and the smaller miniLEO hillslopes very well. Sensitivity tests are also performed to understand h3Ds difficulty in representing the height of the saturated zone close to the seepage face of the miniLEO hillslope. Results reveal that a temporally constant parameters set is able to simulate the response of the miniLEO for each individual event. However, when one focuses on the saturated zone dynamics at 0.15 m from the seepage face, a stepwise evolution of the optimal model parameter for the saturated lateral conductivity parameter of the gravel layer occurs. This evolution might be related to the migration of soil particles within the hillslope. However, it is currently unclear whether and where this takes place (in the seepage face or within the parts of the loamy sand soil).

  16. Improving 8th Grades Spatial Thinking Abilities through a 3D Modeling Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toptas, Veli; Celik, Serkan; Karaca, E. Tugce

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of emerging technology in sub disciplines of mathematics education provides a potential for educators to elaborate the capacity of digitized learning for human being. Spatial thinking is considered as a factor of scientific deduction from a multi disciplinary point of view. This paper reports a study aimed at exploring the effect of…

  17. Effect of spatial dispersion on transient acoustic wave propagation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Every, A G

    2006-12-22

    Spatial dispersion is the variation of wave speed with wavelength. It sets in when the acoustic wavelength approaches the natural scale of length of the medium, which could, for example, be the lattice constant of a crystal, the repeat distance in a superlattice, or the grain size in a granular material. In centrosymmetric media, the first onset of dispersion is accommodated by the introduction of fourth order spatial derivatives into the wave equation. These lead to a correction to the phase velocity which is quadratic in the spatial frequency. This paper treats the effect of spatial dispersion on the point force elastodynamic Green's functions of solids. The effects of dispersion are shown to be most pronounced in the vicinity of wave arrivals. These lose their singular form, and are transformed into wave trains known as quasi-arrivals. The step and ramp function wave arrivals are treated, and it is shown that their unfolded quasi-arrival forms can be expressed in terms of integrals involving the Airy function. PMID:16828830

  18. High Spatial Resolution Isotope Ratio Imaging and 3D Reconstruction of Presolar SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Henkel, T.; Clarke, A.

    2015-07-01

    Presolar SiC grains have been analysed with a new NanoSIMS for isotope ratio measurements of C, N and Si. High spatial resolution imaging suggests that nitrogen isotope heterogeneity within the grains may lead to anomalous results in the literature.

  19. Inferring Cross Sections of 3D Objects: A New Spatial Thinking Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Cheryl A.; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A new spatial ability test was administered online to 223 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory science courses. The 30-item multiple choice test measures individual differences in ability to identify the two-dimensional cross section of a three-dimensional geometric solid, a skill that has been identified as important in science,…

  20. 3D electromagnetic simulation of spatial autoresonance acceleration of electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; González, J. D.; Orozco, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The results of full electromagnetic simulations of the electron beam acceleration by a TE 112 linear polarized electromagnetic field through Space Autoresonance Acceleration mechanism are presented. In the simulations, both the self-sustaned electric field and selfsustained magnetic field produced by the beam electrons are included into the elaborated 3D Particle in Cell code. In this system, the space profile of the magnetostatic field maintains the electron beams in the acceleration regime along their trajectories. The beam current density evolution is calculated applying the charge conservation method. The full magnetic field in the superparticle positions is found by employing the trilinear interpolation of the mesh node data. The relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation presented in the centered finite difference form is solved using the Boris algorithm that provides visualization of the beam electrons pathway and energy evolution. A comparison between the data obtained from the full electromagnetic simulations and the results derived from the motion equation depicted in an electrostatic approximation is carried out. It is found that the self-sustained magnetic field is a factor which improves the resonance phase conditions and reduces the beam energy spread.

  1. CCTV Coverage Index Based on Surveillance Resolution and Its Evaluation Using 3D Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoungah; Lee, Impyeong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to evaluating how effectively a closed circuit television (CCTV) system can monitor a targeted area. With 3D models of the target area and the camera parameters of the CCTV system, the approach produces surveillance coverage index, which is newly defined in this study as a quantitative measure for surveillance performance. This index indicates the proportion of the space being monitored with a sufficient resolution to the entire space of the target area. It is determined by computing surveillance resolution at every position and orientation, which indicates how closely a specific object can be monitored with a CCTV system. We present full mathematical derivation for the resolution, which depends on the location and orientation of the object as well as the geometric model of a camera. With the proposed approach, we quantitatively evaluated the surveillance coverage of a CCTV system in an underground parking area. Our evaluation process provided various quantitative-analysis results, compelling us to examine the design of the CCTV system prior to its installation and understand the surveillance capability of an existing CCTV system. PMID:26389909

  2. CCTV Coverage Index Based on Surveillance Resolution and Its Evaluation Using 3D Spatial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoungah; Lee, Impyeong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to evaluating how effectively a closed circuit television (CCTV) system can monitor a targeted area. With 3D models of the target area and the camera parameters of the CCTV system, the approach produces surveillance coverage index, which is newly defined in this study as a quantitative measure for surveillance performance. This index indicates the proportion of the space being monitored with a sufficient resolution to the entire space of the target area. It is determined by computing surveillance resolution at every position and orientation, which indicates how closely a specific object can be monitored with a CCTV system. We present full mathematical derivation for the resolution, which depends on the location and orientation of the object as well as the geometric model of a camera. With the proposed approach, we quantitatively evaluated the surveillance coverage of a CCTV system in an underground parking area. Our evaluation process provided various quantitative-analysis results, compelling us to examine the design of the CCTV system prior to its installation and understand the surveillance capability of an existing CCTV system. PMID:26389909

  3. Influence of spatial disorder on the superconducting state of a 3D superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Carolina; Niestemski, Francis; Giraldo-Gallo, Paula; Contryman, Alex W.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Fisher, Ian R.; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the first measurements of the local tunneling density of states on the three-dimensional superconductor BaPb1 - x BixO3 as a function of Bi doping. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements are performed on a sequence of samples which exhibit a field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator (SIT) transition. Our study shows that gap variations in the superconducting (SC) state (as a sign of SC disorder level) increase when the system moves towards the SIT phase boundary, with spatial inhomogeneity comparable in size to the material's coherence length. We demonstrate that this highly inhomogeneous local gap size is always finite at every location, even for Bi concentration closest to the SIT, where local insulating behavior is expected and globally confirmed in transport experiments. Our results also suggest a method for increasing the critical temperature for this material by reducing its spatial disorder in the appropriate part of the phase diagram.

  4. 3D Conducting Polymer Platforms for Electrical Control of Protein Conformation and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Alwin Ming-Doug; Inal, Sahika; Williams, Tiffany; Wang, Karin; Leleux, Pierre; Estevez, Luis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Fischbach, Claudia; Malliaras, George G.; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) macroporous scaffolds made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) via an ice-templating method. The scaffolds offer tunable pore size and morphology, and are electrochemically active. When a potential is applied to the scaffolds, reversible changes take place in their electrical doping state, which in turn enables precise control over the conformation of adsorbed proteins (e.g., fibronectin). Additionally, the scaffolds support the growth of mouse fibroblasts (3T3-L1) for 7 days, and are able to electrically control cell adhesion and pro-angiogenic capability. These 3D matrix-mimicking platforms offer precise control of protein conformation and major cell functions, over large volumes and long cell culture times. As such, they represent a new tool for biological research with many potential applications in bioelectronics, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26413300

  5. Robust Control of a Two-Qubit Operation in 3D Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Joseph; Kosut, Robert; Joo, Jaewoo; Ginossar, Eran

    Superconducting qubits have shown great improvement in coherence times with the introduction of 3D cavities. In order to control the qubits in 3D a microwave drive is usually coupled to the common mode of the cavity, which makes individual addressability a challenge and causes additional unwanted single and two-qubit dynamics when performing two qubit operations. Quantum information processing requires precise control of the system dynamics in the presence of potential uncertainties in the estimated system parameters. We use optimal control theory to develop pulse shapes that are able to implement an all-microwave two-qubit gate, while mitigating extra unwanted interaction terms, with  = 0 . 9964 . In addition we develop pulses which are robust to errors in the two qubit transition frequencies. This is demonstrated with experimentally relevant parameters and includes realistic constraints in the possible pulse shapes, presenting pulses that can be implemented in experiment.

  6. a Cache Design Method for Spatial Information Visualization in 3d Real-Time Rendering Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.; Xiong, H.; Zheng, X.

    2012-07-01

    A well-designed cache system has positive impacts on the 3D real-time rendering engine. As the amount of visualization data getting larger, the effects become more obvious. They are the base of the 3D real-time rendering engine to smoothly browsing through the data, which is out of the core memory, or from the internet. In this article, a new kind of caches which are based on multi threads and large file are introduced. The memory cache consists of three parts, the rendering cache, the pre-rendering cache and the elimination cache. The rendering cache stores the data that is rendering in the engine; the data that is dispatched according to the position of the view point in the horizontal and vertical directions is stored in the pre-rendering cache; the data that is eliminated from the previous cache is stored in the eliminate cache and is going to write to the disk cache. Multi large files are used in the disk cache. When a disk cache file size reaches the limit length(128M is the top in the experiment), no item will be eliminated from the file, but a new large cache file will be created. If the large file number is greater than the maximum number that is pre-set, the earliest file will be deleted from the disk. In this way, only one file is opened for writing and reading, and the rest are read-only so the disk cache can be used in a high asynchronous way. The size of the large file is limited in order to map to the core memory to save loading time. Multi-thread is used to update the cache data. The threads are used to load data to the rendering cache as soon as possible for rendering, to load data to the pre-rendering cache for rendering next few frames, and to load data to the elimination cache which is not necessary for the moment. In our experiment, two threads are designed. The first thread is to organize the memory cache according to the view point, and created two threads: the adding list and the deleting list, the adding list index the data that should be

  7. Spatial Pinning Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, Mattia; Buscarino, Arturo; Rizzo, Alessandro; Fortuna, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    In this Letter, we introduce the concept of spatial pinning control for a network of mobile chaotic agents. In a planar space, N agents move as random walkers and interact according to a time-varying r-disk proximity graph. A control input is applied only to those agents which enter a given area, called control region. The control is effective in driving all the agents to a reference evolution and has better performance than pinning control on a fixed set of agents. We derive analytical conditions on the relative size of the control region and the agent density for the global convergence of the system to the reference evolution and study the system under different regimes inherited by the velocity.

  8. Mesoscopic hydrogel molding to control the 3D geometry of bioartificial muscle tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Weining; Liau, Brian; Badie, Nima

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a cell/hydrogel molding method for precise and reproducible biomimetic fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) muscle tissue architectures in vitro. Using a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique, we fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds containing arrays of mesoscopic posts with defined size, elongation and spacing. On cell/hydrogel molding, these posts serve to enhance the diffusion of nutrients to cells by introducing elliptical pores in the cell-laden hydrogels and to guide local 3D cell alignment by governing the spatial pattern of mechanical tension. Instead of ultraviolet or chemical cross-linking, this method utilizes natural hydrogel polymerization and topographically constrained cell-mediated gel compaction to create the desired 3D tissue structures. We apply this method to fabricate several square centimeter large, few hundred micron-thick bioartificial muscle tissues composed of viable, dense, uniformly aligned and highly differentiated cardiac or skeletal muscle fibers. The protocol takes 4–5 d to fabricate PDMS molds followed by 2 weeks of cell culture. PMID:19798085

  9. CELSS-3D: a broad computer model simulating a controlled ecological life support system.

    PubMed

    Schneegurt, M A; Sherman, L A

    1997-01-01

    CELSS-3D is a dynamic, deterministic, and discrete computer simulation of a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) focusing on biological issues. A series of linear difference equations within a graphic-based modeling environment, the IThink program, was used to describe a modular CELSS system. The overall model included submodels for crop growth chambers, food storage reservoirs, the human crew, a cyanobacterial growth chamber, a waste processor, fixed nitrogen reservoirs, and the atmospheric gases, CO, O2, and N2. The primary process variable was carbon, although oxygen and nitrogen flows were also modeled. Most of the input data used in CELSS-3D were from published sources. A separate linear optimization program, What'sBest!, was used to compare options for the crew's vegetarian diet. CELSS-3D simulations were run for the equivalent of 3 years with a 1-h time interval. Output from simulations run under nominal conditions was used to illustrate dynamic changes in the concentrations of atmospheric gases. The modular design of CELSS-3D will allow other configurations and various failure scenarios to be tested and compared. PMID:11540449

  10. Zooplankton mortality in 3D ecosystem modelling considering variable spatial-temporal fish consumptions in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Rindorf, Anna; Møller, Eva Friis; Christensen, Asbjørn; Madsen, Kristine S.; van Deurs, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    We tested the feasibility of imposing mesozooplankton mortality into a 3D model based on estimated consumption rates of the dominant planktivorous fish in the North Sea-Kattegat area. The spatial biomass distribution of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), sandeel (Ammodytidae) and European sprat (Sprattus sprattus) was derived from quarterly scientific trawl surveys and Danish commercial catches. Spatio-temporal indices of mortality were created based on the estimated biomasses and ingestion rates from the literature. The fish larvae grazing pressure was obtained from a spatial, size-based larval community model. In this model, larvae, herring and sandeel were the most important fish predators on mesozooplankton, but these groups had different spatial and temporal (seasonal) distributions. Fish larvae were particularly dominant in the eastern and southern areas in early summer. Herring and sandeel had the highest consumption in the central and north-western areas and were more important in late summer. The fish index changed the perceived annual, seasonal and spatial patterns in modelled mesozooplankton biomass, production and mortality. In the present study, the index was kept relatively simple and can be further developed with respect to the description of fish as well carnivorous zooplankton ingestion rates. The data input required to create the fish index is (i) planktivorous fish stock biomasses and (ii) relative fish spawning distribution information and (iii) physics (ocean currents and temperatures) for the region and situation of interest. The fish index seems promising as a realistic mortality term for lower trophic levels in 3D ecosystem models in areas with available data on fish stocks to improve management of marine resources.

  11. High order spatial expansion for the method of characteristics applied to 3-D geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Naymeh, L.; Masiello, E.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-07-01

    The method of characteristics is an efficient and flexible technique to solve the neutron transport equation and has been extensively used in two-dimensional calculations because it permits to deal with complex geometries. However, because of a very fast increase in storage requirements and number of floating operations, its direct application to three-dimensional routine transport calculations it is not still possible. In this work we introduce and analyze several modifications aimed to reduce memory requirements and to diminish the computing burden. We explore high-order spatial approximation, the use of intermediary trajectory-dependent flux expansions and the possibility of dynamic trajectory reconstruction from local tracking for typed subdomains. (authors)

  12. 3D reconstruction and heat map of porcine recurrent laryngeal nerve anatomy: branching and spatial location.

    PubMed

    Mason, Nena Lundgreen; Christiansen, Marc; Wisco, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy is a common post-operative complication of many head and neck surgeries. Theoretically, the best treatment to restore partial function to a damaged recurrent laryngeal nerve would be reinnervation of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle via anastomosis of the recurrent laryngeal and phrenic nerves. The pig is an excellent model of human laryngeal anatomy and physiology but a more thorough knowledge of porcine laryngeal anatomy is necessary before the pig can be used to improve existing surgical strategies, and develop new ones. This study first identifies the three most common recurrent laryngeal nerve branching patterns in the pig. Secondly, this study presents three-dimensional renderings of the porcine larynx onto which the recurrent laryngeal nerve patterns are accurately mapped. Lastly, heat maps are presented to display the spatial variability of recurrent laryngeal nerve trunks and primary branches on each side of 15 subjects (28 specimens). We intend for this study to be useful to groups using a porcine model to study posterior cricoarytenoid muscle reinnervation techniques. PMID:27086418

  13. Recording, Visualization and Documentation of 3D Spatial Data for Monitoring Topography in Areas of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelakis, Emmanouel; Konstantaras, Antonios; Axaridou, Anastasia; Chrysakis, Ioannis; Xinogalos, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    . allowing them to interchange their knowledge, findings and observations at different time frames. Results outline the successful application of the above systems in certain Greek areas of important cultural heritage [3,11] were significant efforts are being made for their preservation through time. Acknowledgement The authors wish to thank the General Secretariat for Research and Technology of Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Culture and Sports in Greece for their financial support via program Cooperation: Partnership of Production and Research Institutions in Small and Medium Scale Projects, Project Title: "3D-SYSTEK - Development of a novel system for 3D Documentation, Promotion and Exploitation of Cultural Heritage Monuments via 3D data acquisition, 3D modeling and metadata recording". Keywords spatial data, land degradation monitoring, 3D modeling and visualization, terrestrial laser scanning, documentation and metadata repository, protection of cultural heritage References [1] Shalaby, A., and Tateishi, R.: Remote sensing and GIS for mapping and monitoring land cover and land-use changes in the northwestern coastal zone of egypt. Applied Geography, 27(1), 28-41, (2007) [2] Poesen, J. W. A., and Hooke, J. M.: Erosion, flooding and channel management in mediterranean environments of southern europe. Progress in Physical Geography, 21(2), 157-199, (1997) [3] Maravelakis, E., Bilalis, N., Mantzorou, I., Konstantaras, A., Antoniadis, A.: 3D modeling of the oldest olive tree of the world. IJCER 2(2), 340-347 (2012) [4] Manferdini, A.M., Remondino, F.: Reality-Based 3D Modeling, Segmentation and Web- Based Visualization. In: Ioannides, M., Fellner, D., Georgopoulos, A., Hadjimitsis, D.G. (eds.) EuroMed 2010. LNCS, vol. 6436, pp. 110-124. Springer, Heidelberg (2010) [5] Tapete, D., Casagli, N., Luzi, G., Fanti, R., Gigli, G., Leva, D.: Integrating radar and laserbased remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

  14. The 3D Human Motion Control Through Refined Video Gesture Annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yohan; Suk, Myunghoon; Prabhakaran, B.

    In the beginning of computer and video game industry, simple game controllers consisting of buttons and joysticks were employed, but recently game consoles are replacing joystick buttons with novel interfaces such as the remote controllers with motion sensing technology on the Nintendo Wii [1] Especially video-based human computer interaction (HCI) technique has been applied to games, and the representative game is 'Eyetoy' on the Sony PlayStation 2. Video-based HCI technique has great benefit to release players from the intractable game controller. Moreover, in order to communicate between humans and computers, video-based HCI is very crucial since it is intuitive, easy to get, and inexpensive. On the one hand, extracting semantic low-level features from video human motion data is still a major challenge. The level of accuracy is really dependent on each subject's characteristic and environmental noises. Of late, people have been using 3D motion-capture data for visualizing real human motions in 3D space (e.g, 'Tiger Woods' in EA Sports, 'Angelina Jolie' in Bear-Wolf movie) and analyzing motions for specific performance (e.g, 'golf swing' and 'walking'). 3D motion-capture system ('VICON') generates a matrix for each motion clip. Here, a column is corresponding to a human's sub-body part and row represents time frames of data capture. Thus, we can extract sub-body part's motion only by selecting specific columns. Different from low-level feature values of video human motion, 3D human motion-capture data matrix are not pixel values, but is closer to human level of semantics.

  15. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability

    PubMed Central

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L.; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities–defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them–have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are “mental rotation” (rotating mental models) and “visualisation” (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel “Bricks” test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  16. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities-defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them-have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are "mental rotation" (rotating mental models) and "visualisation" (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel "Bricks" test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  17. Multimode observations and 3D magnetic control of the boundary of a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, J. P.; Rath, N.; Shiraki, D.; Angelini, S.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; DeBono, B. A.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2013-07-01

    We present high-resolution detection and control of the 3D magnetic boundary in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. Measurements of non-axisymmetric radial and poloidal fields are made using 216 magnetic sensors positioned near the plasma surface. Control of 3D fields is accomplished using 40 independent saddle coils attached to the passive stabilizing wall. The control coils are energized with high-power solid-state amplifiers, and massively parallel, high-throughput feedback control experiments are performed using low-latency connections between PCI Express analogue input and output modules and a graphics processing unit. The time evolution of unstable and saturated wall-stabilized external kink modes are studied with and without applying magnetic perturbations using the control coils. The 3D dynamic structure of the magnetic field surrounding the plasma is determined through biorthogonal decomposition using the full set of magnetic sensors without the need to fit either a Fourier or a model-based basis. Naturally occurring external kinks are composed of multiple independent helical modes. Smooth transitions between dominant poloidal mode numbers are observed for simultaneous n = 1 and n = 2 modes as the edge safety factor changes. Relative amplitudes of coexistent m/n = 3/1 and 6/2 modes depend on the plasma's major radius and edge safety factor. When stationary 3/1 magnetic perturbations are applied, the resonant response can be linear, saturated, or disruptive, depending upon the perturbation amplitude and the edge safety factor; increased plasma-wall interactions from the perturbed plasma are proposed as a saturation mechanism. Initial feedback experiments have used 40 sensors and 40 control coils, producing mode amplification or suppression, and acceleration or deceleration depending on the feedback phase angle.

  18. Quality control of 3D Geological Models using an Attention Model based on Gaze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busschers, Freek S.; van Maanen, Peter-Paul; Brouwer, Anne-Marie

    2014-05-01

    The Geological Survey of the Netherlands (GSN) produces 3D stochastic geological models of the upper 50 meters of the Dutch subsurface. The voxel models are regarded essential in answering subsurface questions on, for example, aggregate resources, groundwater flow, land subsidence studies and the planning of large-scale infrastructural works such as tunnels. GeoTOP is the most recent and detailed generation of 3D voxel models. This model describes 3D lithological variability up to a depth of 50 m using voxels of 100*100*0.5m. Due to the expected increase in data-flow, model output and user demands, the development of (semi-)automated quality control systems is getting more important in the near future. Besides numerical control systems, capturing model errors as seen from the expert geologist viewpoint is of increasing interest. We envision the use of eye gaze to support and speed up detection of errors in the geological voxel models. As a first step in this direction we explore gaze behavior of 12 geological experts from the GSN during quality control of part of the GeoTOP 3D geological model using an eye-tracker. Gaze is used as input of an attention model that results in 'attended areas' for each individual examined image of the GeoTOP model and each individual expert. We compared these attended areas to errors as marked by the experts using a mouse. Results show that: 1) attended areas as determined from experts' gaze data largely match with GeoTOP errors as indicated by the experts using a mouse, and 2) a substantial part of the match can be reached using only gaze data from the first few seconds of the time geologists spend to search for errors. These results open up the possibility of faster GeoTOP model control using gaze if geologists accept a small decrease of error detection accuracy. Attention data may also be used to make independent comparisons between different geologists varying in focus and expertise. This would facilitate a more effective use of

  19. Orienting of visuo-spatial attention in complex 3D space: Search and detection

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The ability to detect changes in the environment is necessary for appropriate interactions with the external world. Changes in the background go more unnoticed than foreground changes, possibly because attention prioritizes processing of foreground/near stimuli. Here, we investigated the detectability of foreground and background changes within natural scenes and the influence of stereoscopic depth cues on this. Using a flicker paradigm, we alternated a pair of images that were exactly same or differed for one single element (i.e., a color change of one object in the scene). The participants were asked to find the change that occurred either in a foreground or background object, while viewing the stimuli either with binocular and monocular cues (bmC) or monocular cues only (mC). The behavioral results showed faster and more accurate detections for foreground changes and overall better performance in bmC than mC conditions. The imaging results highlighted the involvement of fronto-parietal attention controlling networks during active search and target detection. These attention networks did not show any differential effect as function of the presence/absence of the binocular cues, or the detection of foreground/background changes. By contrast, the lateral occipital cortex showed greater activation for detections in foreground compared to background, while area V3A showed a main effect of bmC vs. mC, specifically during search. These findings indicate that visual search with binocular cues does not impose any specific requirement on attention-controlling fronto-parietal networks, while the enhanced detection of front/near objects in the bmC condition reflects bottom-up sensory processes in visual cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 36:2231–2247, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25691253

  20. Modelling static 3-D spatial background error covariances - the effect of vertical and horizontal transform order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlasak, M. A.; Cullen, M. J. P.

    2014-06-01

    A major difference in the formulation of the univariate part of static background error covariance models for use in global operational 4DVAR arises from the order in which the horizontal and vertical transforms are applied. This is because the atmosphere is non-separable with large horizontal scales generally tied to large vertical scales and small horizontal scales tied to small vertical scales. Also horizontal length scales increase dramatically as one enters the stratosphere. A study is presented which evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach with the Met Office Unified Model. It is shown that if the vertical transform is applied as a function of horizontal wavenumber then the horizontal globally-averaged variance and the homogenous, isotropic length scale on each model level for each control variable of the training data is preserved by the covariance model. In addition the wind variance and associated length scales are preserved as the scheme preserves the variances and length scales of horizontal derivatives. If the vertical transform is applied in physical space, it is possible to make it a function of latitude at the cost of not preserving the variances and length scales of the horizontal derivatives. Summer and winter global 4DVAR trials have been run with both background error covariance models. A clear benefit is seen in the fit to observations when the vertical transform is in spectral space and is a function of total horizontal wavenumber.

  1. Building virtual 3D bone fragment models to control diaphyseal fracture reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Thierry; Schuind, Frederic; Lasudry, Nadine; Van Ham, Philippe

    1999-05-01

    Most fractures of the long bones are displaced and need to be surgically reduced. External fixation is often used but the crucial point of this technique is the control of reduction, which is effected with a brilliance amplifier. This system, giving instantly a x-ray image, has many disadvantages. It implies frequent irradiation to the patient and the surgical team, the visual field is limited, the supplied images are distorted and it only gives 2D information. Consequently, the reduction is occasionally imperfect although intraoperatively it appears acceptable. Using the pains inserted in each fragment as markers and an optical tracker, it is possible to build a virtual 3D model for each principal fragment and to follow its movement during the reduction. This system will supply a 3D image of the fracture in real time and without irradiation. The brilliance amplifier could then be replaced by such a virtual reality system to provide the surgeon with an accurate tool facilitating the reduction of the fracture. The purpose of this work is to show how to build the 3D model for each principal bone fragment.

  2. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  3. Exploring direct 3D interaction for full horizontal parallax light field displays using leap motion controller.

    PubMed

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  4. Modeling the crystal distribution of lead-sulfate in lead-acid batteries with 3D spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Moritz; Badeda, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-04-01

    For the reliability of lead-acid batteries it is important to have an accurate prediction of its response to load profiles. A model for the lead-sulfate growth is presented, which is embedded in a physical-chemical model with 3D spatial resolution is presented which is used for analyzing the different mechanism influencing the cell response. One import factor is the chemical dissolution and precipitation of lead-sulfate, since its dissolution speed limits the charging reaction and the accumulation of indissolvable of lead-sulfate leads to capacity degradation. The cell performance/behavior is not only determined by the amount of the sulfate but also by the radii and distribution of the crystals. The presented model can be used to for an improved understanding of the interaction of the different mechanisms.

  5. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution 3D Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography of the Hands and Feet

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Clifton R.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Borisch, Eric A.; Glockner, James F.; Grimm, Roger C.; Hulshizer, Thomas C.; Macedo, Thanila A.; Mostardi, Petrice M.; Rossman, Phillip J.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Young, Phillip M.

    2010-01-01

    Methods are described for generating 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiograms of the hands and feet. Given targeted spatial resolution and frame times, it is shown that acceleration of about one order of magnitude or more is necessary. This is obtained by a combination of 2D Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) and homodyne (HD) acceleration methods. Image update times from 3.4 to 6.8 sec are provided in conjunction with view sharing. Modular receiver coil arrays are described which can be designed to the targeted vascular region. Images representative of the technique are generated in the vasculature of the hands and feet in volunteers and in patient studies. PMID:21698702

  6. Recording, Visualization and Documentation of 3D Spatial Data for Monitoring Topography in Areas of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelakis, Emmanouel; Konstantaras, Antonios; Axaridou, Anastasia; Chrysakis, Ioannis; Xinogalos, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    . allowing them to interchange their knowledge, findings and observations at different time frames. Results outline the successful application of the above systems in certain Greek areas of important cultural heritage [3,11] were significant efforts are being made for their preservation through time. Acknowledgement The authors wish to thank the General Secretariat for Research and Technology of Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Culture and Sports in Greece for their financial support via program Cooperation: Partnership of Production and Research Institutions in Small and Medium Scale Projects, Project Title: "3D-SYSTEK - Development of a novel system for 3D Documentation, Promotion and Exploitation of Cultural Heritage Monuments via 3D data acquisition, 3D modeling and metadata recording". Keywords spatial data, land degradation monitoring, 3D modeling and visualization, terrestrial laser scanning, documentation and metadata repository, protection of cultural heritage References [1] Shalaby, A., and Tateishi, R.: Remote sensing and GIS for mapping and monitoring land cover and land-use changes in the northwestern coastal zone of egypt. Applied Geography, 27(1), 28-41, (2007) [2] Poesen, J. W. A., and Hooke, J. M.: Erosion, flooding and channel management in mediterranean environments of southern europe. Progress in Physical Geography, 21(2), 157-199, (1997) [3] Maravelakis, E., Bilalis, N., Mantzorou, I., Konstantaras, A., Antoniadis, A.: 3D modeling of the oldest olive tree of the world. IJCER 2(2), 340-347 (2012) [4] Manferdini, A.M., Remondino, F.: Reality-Based 3D Modeling, Segmentation and Web- Based Visualization. In: Ioannides, M., Fellner, D., Georgopoulos, A., Hadjimitsis, D.G. (eds.) EuroMed 2010. LNCS, vol. 6436, pp. 110-124. Springer, Heidelberg (2010) [5] Tapete, D., Casagli, N., Luzi, G., Fanti, R., Gigli, G., Leva, D.: Integrating radar and laserbased remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

  7. Large-scale 3D inversion of frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. R.; Routh, P. S.; Donaldson, P.; Oldenburg, D. W.

    2005-05-01

    Controlled Source Audio-Frequency Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) is a frequency domain EM sounding technique. The CSAMT source is a grounded horizontal electric dipole approximately one to two kilometers in length. This dipole source generates both inductive and galvanic currents so that the observed electric field arises due to both the static the vector potentials. At low frequencies, the behavior of the fields is similar to that observed in a geometric sounding such as a direct current experiment. At higher frequencies, the inductive character of the source modifies the behavior of the fields so that the experiment becomes more like a frequency sounding. Higher frequency data are useful for imaging near-surface features and lower frequency data are sensitive to deeper structure. Inversion of controlled source EM data provides a means to image the subsurface electrical conductivity structure. We consider a 3D CSAMT data set acquired over a known geothermal resource area in Western Idaho. The data are amplitudes and phases of the electric and magnetic fields acquired at 25 frequencies. The conductivity contrast between the geothermal fluid conduits and the resistive host material allows us to relate the inverted conductivity image to the distribution of fluid flow pathways in the geothermal system. Our 1D CSAMT inversion of the 3D data set indicates regions of conductive fluid pathways in the subsurface. Our next step is to invert these data using the full Maxwell's equations in 3D. Inversion of a single frequency data set at 2 Hz using the 3D frequency domain inversion algorithm (Haber et. al, 2004) shows regions of fluid circulation indicated by zones of higher conductivity. Comparing the images from different single frequency inversions allows us to identify persistent features in the conductivity image that adequately satisfy the data. With the aid of synthetic modeling we are investigating what frequencies? and what geometries? are appropriate to better resolve

  8. Control of Nematodes and Soil-borne Diseases in Florida Potatoes with Aldicarb and 1,3-D.

    PubMed

    Weingartner, D P; Shumaker, J R

    1990-10-01

    Yields of U.S. Size A potato tubers were increased by 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) (56 liters/ha) and 1,3-D (56 liters/ha) + aldicarb (3.4 kg/ha) in 1982 and 1983 and by aldicarb (3.4 kg/ha) in 1982. Treatments that included aldicarb provided the best control of corky ringspot disease, whereas those including 1,3-D were more effective against bacterial wilt. The most effective nematode control (nematodes included Meloidogyne incognita, Belonolaimus longicaudatus, trichodorids, Criconemella ornata, Tylenchorhynchus claytoni, and Helicotylenchus sp.) was provided by the combination of 1,3-D + aldicarb. PMID:19287795

  9. Micro-Mold Design Controls the 3D Morphological Evolution of Self-Assembling Multicellular Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Svoronos, Alexander A.; Tejavibulya, Nalin; Schell, Jacquelyn Y.; Shenoy, Vivek B.

    2014-01-01

    When seeded into nonadhesive micro-molds, cells self-assemble three-dimensional (3D) multicellular microtissues via the action of cytoskeletal-mediated contraction and cell–cell adhesion. The size and shape of the tissue is a function of the cell type and the size, shape, and obstacles of the micro-mold. In this article, we used human fibroblasts to investigate some of the elements of mold design and how they can be used to guide the morphological changes that occur as a 3D tissue self-organizes. In a loop-ended dogbone mold with two nonadhesive posts, fibroblasts formed a self-constrained tissue whose tension induced morphological changes that ultimately caused the tissue to thin and rupture. Increasing the width of the dogbone's connecting rod increased the stability, whereas increasing its length decreased the stability. Mapping the rupture points showed that the balance of cell volume between the toroid and connecting rod regions of the dogbone tissue controlled the point of rupture. When cells were treated with transforming growth factor-β1, dogbones ruptured sooner due to increased cell contraction. In mold designs to form tissues with more complex shapes such as three interconnected toroids or a honeycomb, obstacle design controlled tension and tissue morphology. When the vertical posts were changed to cones, they became tension modulators that dictated when and where tension was released in a large self-organizing tissue. By understanding how elements of mold design control morphology, we can produce better models to study organogenesis, examine 3D cell mechanics, and fabricate building parts for tissue engineering. PMID:24147855

  10. Micro-mold design controls the 3D morphological evolution of self-assembling multicellular microtissues.

    PubMed

    Svoronos, Alexander A; Tejavibulya, Nalin; Schell, Jacquelyn Y; Shenoy, Vivek B; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    When seeded into nonadhesive micro-molds, cells self-assemble three-dimensional (3D) multicellular microtissues via the action of cytoskeletal-mediated contraction and cell-cell adhesion. The size and shape of the tissue is a function of the cell type and the size, shape, and obstacles of the micro-mold. In this article, we used human fibroblasts to investigate some of the elements of mold design and how they can be used to guide the morphological changes that occur as a 3D tissue self-organizes. In a loop-ended dogbone mold with two nonadhesive posts, fibroblasts formed a self-constrained tissue whose tension induced morphological changes that ultimately caused the tissue to thin and rupture. Increasing the width of the dogbone's connecting rod increased the stability, whereas increasing its length decreased the stability. Mapping the rupture points showed that the balance of cell volume between the toroid and connecting rod regions of the dogbone tissue controlled the point of rupture. When cells were treated with transforming growth factor-β1, dogbones ruptured sooner due to increased cell contraction. In mold designs to form tissues with more complex shapes such as three interconnected toroids or a honeycomb, obstacle design controlled tension and tissue morphology. When the vertical posts were changed to cones, they became tension modulators that dictated when and where tension was released in a large self-organizing tissue. By understanding how elements of mold design control morphology, we can produce better models to study organogenesis, examine 3D cell mechanics, and fabricate building parts for tissue engineering. PMID:24147855

  11. 3D PET image reconstruction including both motion correction and registration directly into an MR or stereotaxic spatial atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravel, Paul; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the feasibility and impact of including both the motion correction and the image registration transformation parameters from positron emission tomography (PET) image space to magnetic resonance (MR), or stereotaxic, image space within the system matrix of PET image reconstruction. This approach is motivated by the fields of neuroscience and psychiatry, where PET is used to investigate differences in activation patterns between different groups of participants, requiring all images to be registered to a common spatial atlas. Currently, image registration is performed after image reconstruction which introduces interpolation effects into the final image. Furthermore, motion correction (also requiring registration) introduces a further level of interpolation, and the overall result of these operations can lead to resolution degradation and possibly artifacts. It is important to note that performing such operations on a post-reconstruction basis means, strictly speaking, that the final images are not ones which maximize the desired objective function (e.g. maximum likelihood (ML), or maximum a posteriori reconstruction (MAP)). To correctly seek parameter estimates in the desired spatial atlas which are in accordance with the chosen reconstruction objective function, it is necessary to include the transformation parameters for both motion correction and registration within the system modeling stage of image reconstruction. Such an approach not only respects the statistically chosen objective function (e.g. ML or MAP), but furthermore should serve to reduce the interpolation effects. To evaluate the proposed method, this work investigates registration (including motion correction) using 2D and 3D simulations based on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner geometry, with and without resolution modeling, using the ML expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The quality of reconstruction was assessed using bias

  12. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 2: User's manual and program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. T.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D, was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  13. 3D nanochannel electroporation for high-throughput cell transfection with high uniformity and dosage control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lingqian; Bertani, Paul; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Chen, Feng; Chiang, Chiling; Malkoc, Veysi; Kuang, Tairong; Gao, Keliang; Lee, L. James; Lu, Wu

    2015-12-01

    Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a ``3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip'' on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40 000 cells per cm2 on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk electroporation (BEP), the NEP chip shows a 20 fold improvement in dosage control and uniformity, while still maintaining high cell viability (>90%) even in cells such as cardiac cells which are characteristically difficult to transfect. This high-throughput 3D NEP system provides an innovative and medically valuable platform with uniform and reliable cellular transfection, allowing for a steady supply of healthy, engineered cells.Of great interest to modern medicine and biomedical research is the ability to inject individual target cells with the desired genes or drug molecules. Some advances in cell electroporation allow for high throughput, high cell viability, or excellent dosage control, yet no platform is available for the combination of all three. In an effort to solve this problem, here we show a ``3D nano-channel electroporation (NEP) chip'' on a silicon platform designed to meet these three criteria. This NEP chip can simultaneously deliver the desired molecules into 40 000 cells per cm2 on the top surface of the device. Each 650 nm pore aligns to a cell and can be used to deliver extremely small biological elements to very large plasmids (>10 kbp). When compared to conventional bulk

  14. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S.; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-09-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π-π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands.

  15. Analytical and numerical aspects in solving the controlled 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, R.; Jovanovic, D.; De Nicola, S.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-11-10

    The results of recently developed investigations, that have been carried out within the framework of the controlling potential method (CPM), are reviewed. This method allows one to decompose a three dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) into the pair of coupled Schroedinger-type equations. Under suitable mathematical conditions, the solutions of the 3D controlled GPE can be constructed from the solutions of a 2D linear Schroedinger equation (the transverse component of the GPE) coupled with a 1D nonlinear Schroedinger equation (the longitudinal component of the GPE). Such decomposition allows one to cast the solutions in the form of the product of the solutions of the transverse and the longitudinal components of the GPE. The coupling between these two equations is the functional of both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles. It is shown that the CPM can be used to obtain a new class of three-dimensional solitary waves solutions of the GPE, which governs the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. By imposing an external controlling potential, the desired time-dependent shape of the localized BECs is obtained. The stability of the exact solutions was checked with direct simulations of the time -dependent, three-dimensional GPE. Our simulations show that the localized condensates are stable with respect to perturbed initial conditions.

  16. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Silke; Müller, Ralph; Hofmann, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing. PMID:24956301

  17. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-01-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π-π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands. PMID:26338090

  18. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S.; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-01-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π–π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands. PMID:26338090

  19. 3D nanopore shape control by current-stimulus dielectric breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Cuifeng; Zhang, Yuechuan; Feng, Yanxiao; Zhou, Daming; Wang, Deqiang; Xiang, Yinxiao; Zhou, Wenyuan; Chen, Yongsheng; Du, Chunlei; Tian, Jianguo

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple and cost-effect method, current-stimulus dielectric breakdown, to manipulate the 3D shapes of the nanochannels in 20-nm-thick SiNx membranes. Besides the precise control of nanopore size, the cone orientation can be determined by the pulse polarity. The cone angle of nanopores can be systematically tuned by simply changing the stimulus pulse waveform, allowing the gradual shape control from conical to obconical. After they are formed, the cone angle of these nanopores can be further tuned in a certain range by adjusting the widening pulse. Such size and 3D shape controllable abiotic nanopores can construct a constriction in the nanochannel and hence produce a sub-nm "sensing zone" to suit any desired bio-sensing or precise DNA sequencing. Using these conical nanopores, 20-nt ssDNA composed of homopolymers (poly(dA)20, poly(dC)20, and poly(dT)20) can be clearly differentiated by their ionic current signals.

  20. Catheter-Based Ultrasound for 3D Control of Thermal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Juang, Titania; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Hsu, I.-Chow; Rieke, Viola; Pauly, Kim Butts; Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been investigated for delivering hyperthermia and thermal ablation for the treatment of cancer and benign diseases. Technology includes an intrauterine applicator integrated with an HDR ring applicator, interstitial applicators for hyperthermia delivery during brachytherapy, interstitial applicators for tumor ablation, and transurethral devices for conformal prostate ablation. Arrays of multiple sectored tubular transducers have been fabricated for interstitial and intrauterine hyperthermia applicators. High-power interstitial versions have been evaluated for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control of thermal ablation. Transurethral applicators include curvilinear transducers with rotational sweeping of narrow heating patterns, and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. Performance was evaluated in phantom, excised tissue, in vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature monitoring, clinical hyperthermia, and 3D-biothermal simulations with patient anatomy. Interstitial and intrauterine devices can tailor hyperthermia to large treatment volumes, with multisectored control useful to limit exposure to rectum and bladder. Curvilinear transurethral devices with sequential rotation produce target conforming coagulation zones that can cover either the whole gland or defined focal regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the prostate without applicator manipulation. High-power interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate defined target regions while avoiding sensitive tissues. MR temperature monitoring can effectively define the extent of thermal damage and provided a means for real-time control of the applicators. In summary, these catheter-based ultrasound devices allow for dynamic control of heating profiles

  1. Engineering hyaluronic acid hydrogel degradation to control cellular interactions and adult stem cell fate in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetan, Sudhir

    The design and implementation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic hydrogels for tissue engineering (TE) applications requires an intensive understanding of cell-material interactions, including matrix remodeling and stem cell differentiation. However, the influence of microenvironmental cues, e.g., matrix biodegradability, on cell behavior in vitro has not been well studied in the case of direct cell encapsulation within 3-dimensional (3D) hydrogels. To address these issues, a facile sequential crosslinking technique was developed that provides spatial and temporal control of 3D hydrogel degradability to investigate the importance of material design on cell behavior. Specifically, hydrogels were synthesized from hyaluronic acid (HA) macromers in a sequential process: (1) a primary Michael-type addition crosslinking using cell adhesive and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-degradable oligopeptides to consume a portion of total reactive groups and resulting in "-UV" hydrogels permissive to cell-mediated degradation, followed by (2) a secondary, light initiated free-radical crosslinking to consume remaining reactive groups and "switch" the network to a non-degradable structure ("+UV") via the addition of non-degradable kinetic chains. Using this approach, we demonstrated control of encapsulated hMSC spreading by varying the crosslink type (i.e., the relative hydrogel biodegradability), including with spatial control. Upon incubation with bipotential soluble differentiation factors, these same degradation-mediated spreading cues resulted in an hMSC differentiation fate switch within -UV versus +UV environments. Follow-up studies demonstrated that degradation-mediated traction generation, rather than matrix mechanics or cell morphology, is the critical biophysical signal determining hMSC fate. Sequentially crosslinked HA hydrogels were also studied for the capacity to support remodeling by in vivo and ex vivo tissues, including with spatial control, toward tissue

  2. Reconstructing 3D coastal cliffs from airborne oblique photographs without ground control points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal cliff collapse hazard assessment requires measuring cliff face topography at regular intervals. Terrestrial laser scanner techniques have proven useful so far but are expensive to use either through purchasing the equipment or through survey subcontracting. In addition, terrestrial laser surveys take time which is sometimes incompatible with the time during with the beach is accessible at low-tide. By comparison, structure from motion techniques (SFM) are much less costly to implement, and if airborne, acquisition of several kilometers of coastline can be done in a matter of minutes. In this paper, the potential of GPS-tagged oblique airborne photographs and SFM techniques is examined to reconstruct chalk cliff dense 3D point clouds without Ground Control Points (GCP). The focus is put on comparing the relative 3D point of views reconstructed by Visual SFM with their synchronous Solmeta Geotagger Pro2 GPS locations using robust estimators. With a set of 568 oblique photos, shot from the open door of an airplane with a triplet of synchronized Nikon D7000, GPS and SFM-determined view point coordinates converge to X: ±31.5 m; Y: ±39.7 m; Z: ±13.0 m (LE66). Uncertainty in GPS position affects the model scale, angular attitude of the reference frame (the shoreline ends up tilted by 2°) and absolute positioning. Ground Control Points cannot be avoided to orient such models.

  3. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  4. Example Applications of A Physically-Based 3D Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Model Over Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudicky, E. A.; Park, Y. J.; Hwang, H. T.; Berg, S.; Frey, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is now generally accepted within the scientific community that the climate is changing, and that future climate change may have significant impact on water resources in both quantity and quality. Alterations of base flow to rivers due to changing subsurface flow patterns, fluctuations in soil moisture and in the depth of the groundwater table, water levels in lakes and wetlands, and altered groundwater recharge/discharge patterns are examples of possible consequences of future climate change. In this presentation, our physically-based model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), is first briefly described. It is a physically-based 3D control-volume finite element model representing 2D surface water flow and transport on the land surface together with 3D variably-saturated flow and transport in the subsurface. A globally implicit scheme used to solve the nonlinear surface and subsurface flow and transport equations simultaneously. The model can explicitly account for the hydrologic, solute and thermal interactions between surface and subsurface flow regimes as well as the atmospheric inputs in terms of air temperature, solar radiation and sensible/latent heat fluxes. A parallel computational framework has been implemented to facilitate model applications in high performance computing environments. The applicability of the model is demonstrated for a variety of problems, covering the hill slope scale to improve the understanding of the physical and chemical processes in the water cycle, to the assessment of the impact of climate change on water resources over the Canadian landmass in three dimensions. The climate-driven 3D basin-scale examples range from that of a highly characterized watershed in Southern Ontario having an area of about 7000 km2 to a large basin in Western Canada that covers an area of about 120,000 km2. The continental scale simulations explore the impacts of global climate change on Canada's surface and groundwater resources.

  5. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2011-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process. PMID:21533072

  6. Neuronal Representation of 3-D Space in the Primary Visual Cortex and Control of Eye Movements.

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, Svetlana V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to consider the correlations between the structure of the primary visual cortical area V1 and control of coordinated movements of the two eyes. Using the anatomical data available, a schematic map of 3-D space representation in the layer IV of area V1 containing only monocular cells has been constructed. The analysis of this map revealed that binocular neurons of V1, which are formed by convergence of monocular cells, should encode the absolute disparity. Participation of monocular and binocular neurons of V1 in the control of convergence, divergence, and version eye movements is discussed. It is proposed that synchronous contraction of corresponding extraocular muscles of both eyes for vergence might be ensured by duplicated transmission of information from the central part of retina to visual cortex of both hemispheres. PMID:26562914

  7. Flow control on a 3D backward facing ramp by pulsed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Pierric; Bortolus, Dorian; Grasso, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of flow separation control over a 3D backward facing ramp by means of pulsed jets. Such geometry has been selected to reproduce flow phenomena of interest for the automotive industry. The base flow has been characterised using PIV and pressure measurements. The results show that the classical notchback topology is correctly reproduced. A control system based on magnetic valves has been used to produce the pulsed jets whose properties have been characterised by hot wire anemometry. In order to shed some light on the role of the different parameters affecting the suppression of the slant recirculation area, a parametric study has been carried out by varying the frequency and the momentum coefficient of the jets for several Reynolds numbers. xml:lang="fr"

  8. Voxelization algorithms for geospatial applications: Computational methods for voxelating spatial datasets of 3D city models containing 3D surface, curve and point data models.

    PubMed

    Nourian, Pirouz; Gonçalves, Romulo; Zlatanova, Sisi; Ohori, Ken Arroyo; Vu Vo, Anh

    2016-01-01

    Voxel representations have been used for years in scientific computation and medical imaging. The main focus of our research is to provide easy access to methods for making large-scale voxel models of built environment for environmental modelling studies while ensuring they are spatially correct, meaning they correctly represent topological and semantic relations among objects. In this article, we present algorithms that generate voxels (volumetric pixels) out of point cloud, curve, or surface objects. The algorithms for voxelization of surfaces and curves are a customization of the topological voxelization approach [1]; we additionally provide an extension of this method for voxelization of point clouds. The developed software has the following advantages:•It provides easy management of connectivity levels in the resulting voxels.•It is not dependant on any external library except for primitive types and constructs; therefore, it is easy to integrate them in any application.•One of the algorithms is implemented in C++ and C for platform independence and efficiency. PMID:27408832

  9. Formation and Optogenetic Control of Engineered 3D Skeletal Muscle Bioactuators†

    PubMed Central

    Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Neal, Devin; Boudou, Thomas; Borochin, Michael A.; Li, Yinqing; Weiss, Ron; Kamm, Roger D.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Densely arrayed skeletal myotubes are activated individually and as a group using precise optical stimulation with high spatiotemporal resolution. Skeletal muscle myoblasts are genetically encoded to express light-activated cation channel, Channelrhodopsin-2, which allows for spatiotemporal coordination of the multitude of skeletal myotubes that contract in response to pulsed blue light. Furthermore, ensembles of mature functional 3D muscle microtissues have been formed from the optogenetically encoded myoblasts using a high-throughput device. The device, called “skeletal muscle on a chip”, not only provides the myoblasts with controlled stress and constraints necessary for muscle alignment, fusion and maturation, but also facilitates to measure forces and characterize the muscle tissue. We measured the specific static and dynamic stresses generated by the microtissues, and characterized the morphology and alignment of the myotubes within the constructs. The device allows for testing the effect of a wide range of parameters (cell source, matrix composition, microtissue geometry, auxotonic load, growth factors, and exercise) on the maturation, structure, and function of the engineered muscle tissues in a combinatorial manner. Our studies integrate tools from optogenetics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology with skeletal muscle tissue engineering to open up opportunities to generate soft robots actuated by multitude of spatiotemporally coordinated 3D skeletal muscle microtissues. PMID:22976544

  10. Motion Controllers for Learners to Manipulate and Interact with 3D Objects for Mental Rotation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Wang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Lin, Po-Han; Chen, Gwo-Dong; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Mental rotation is an important spatial processing ability and an important element in intelligence tests. However, the majority of past attempts at training mental rotation have used paper-and-pencil tests or digital images. This study proposes an innovative mental rotation training approach using magnetic motion controllers to allow learners to…

  11. Computational hologram synthesis and representation on spatial light modulators for real-time 3D holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Leister, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    In dynamic computer-generated holography that utilizes spatial light modulators, both hologram synthesis and hologram representation are essential in terms of fast computation and high reconstruction quality. For hologram synthesis, i.e. the computation step, Fresnel transform based or point-source based raytracing methods can be applied. In the encoding step, the complex wave-field has to be optimally represented by the SLM with its given modulation capability. For proper hologram reconstruction that implies a simultaneous and independent amplitude and phase modulation of the input wave-field by the SLM. In this paper, we discuss full complex hologram representation methods on SLMs by considering inherent SLM parameter such as modulation type and bit depth on their reconstruction performance such as diffraction efficiency and SNR. We review the three implementation schemes of Burckhardt amplitude-only representation, phase-only macro-pixel representation, and two-phase interference representation. Besides the optical performance we address their hardware complexity and required computational load. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate holographic reconstructions of different representation schemes as obtained by functional prototypes utilizing SeeReal's viewing-window holographic display technology. The proposed hardware implementations enable a fast encoding of complex-valued hologram data and thus will pave the way for commercial real-time holographic 3D imaging in the near future.

  12. 3D imaging of soil apparent electrical conductivity from VERIS data using a 1D spatially constrained inversion algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Moral García, Francisco; Rebollo Castillo, Francisco Javier; Monteiro Santos, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Maps of apparent electrical conductivity of the soil are commonly used in precision agriculture to indirectly characterize some important properties like salinity, water, and clay content. Traditionally, these studies are made through an empirical relationship between apparent electrical conductivity and properties measured in soil samples collected at a few locations in the experimental area and at a few selected depths. Recently, some authors have used not the apparent conductivity values but the soil bulk conductivity (in 2D or 3D) calculated from measured apparent electrical conductivity through the application of an inversion method. All the published works used data collected with electromagnetic (EM) instruments. We present a new software to invert the apparent electrical conductivity data collected with VERIS 3100 and 3150 (or the more recent version with three pairs of electrodes) using the 1D spatially constrained inversion method (1D SCI). The software allows the calculation of the distribution of the bulk electrical conductivity in the survey area till a depth of 1 m. The algorithm is applied to experimental data and correlations with clay and water content have been established using soil samples collected at some boreholes. Keywords: Digital soil mapping; inversion modelling; VERIS; soil apparent electrical conductivity.

  13. Size-Controlled Fabrication of Polyaniline Microfibers Based on 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Approach.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Imsung; Song, Simon; Uh, Kyungchan; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the relatively high conductivity and unique redox behavior, polyaniline (PANI) has been one of the most technologically promising conducting polymers. Although various methodologies have been developed, fabrication of PANI microfibers has been a challenging task owing to the poor solubility in most organic solvents. By taking advantage of a microfluidic technology and organic soluble acid labile t-Boc-protected PANI (t-Boc-PANI) as the conducting polymer precursor, fabrication of PANI microfibers in a size-controlled manner is possible. Introduction of a THF solution containing t-Boc-PANI, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) as a core flow, and water as a sheath flow into a microfluidic channel with a 3D hydrodynamic focusing effect results in crystallization of the polymer fiber. By changing the flow rate, linear PANI microfibers that range from 16.2 to 39.4 μm in diameter are readily obtained. PMID:25882095

  14. PAB3D Simulations of a Nozzle with Fluidic Injection for Yaw Thrust-Vector Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted on an exhaust nozzle with fluidic injection for yaw thrust-vector control. The nozzle concept was tested experimentally in the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility (JETF) at nozzle pressure ratios up to 4 and secondary fluidic injection flow rates up to 15 percent of the primary flow rate. Although many injection-port geometries and two nozzle planforms (symmetric and asymmetric) were tested experimentally, this paper focuses on the computational results of the more successful asymmetric planform with a slot injection port. This nozzle concept was simulated with the Navier-Stokes flow solver, PAB3D, invoking the Shih, Zhu, and Lumley algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model (ASM) at nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) of 2,3, and 4 with secondary to primary injection flow rates (w(sub s)/w(sub p)) of 0, 2, 7 and 10 percent.

  15. Unified parametric dependence, control, and reconstruction of 3D equilibria in the RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Brett

    2013-10-01

    A helical, stellarator-like equilibrium emerges in the core of RFP plasmas when the normally broad tearing mode spectrum spontaneously condenses - the innermost resonant mode grows to large amplitude, while the other, secondary mode amplitudes are reduced. This quasi-single-helicity (QSH) transition is not fully understood, but it likely hinges on the nonlinear MHD that governs the tearing mode spectrum. Here we report (1) progress in understanding the transition in terms of the Lundquist number, S, a key dimensionless parameter in nonlinear MHD, (2) improved energy confinement in MST with QSH and inductive current profile control, and (3) progress in developing 3D equilibrium reconstructions for QSH plasmas. In MST, the likelihood and duration of QSH spectra increase strongly with the plasma current, Ip, similar to the trend in RFX-mod, but the Ip at which QSH emerges in MST is 3x smaller. However, given that MST can, for a given Ip, access lower density and higher Te, the two devices share a common range of S, which varies as Ip*Te1.5n- 0 . 5, and the tearing spectra from the two devices exhibit a common dependence on S. The above results accrued in plasmas with largely Maxwellian electrons and ions. With the addition of neutral-beam-injected fast (25 keV) ions in MST, the likelihood of QSH in low-S plasmas decreases further. In high-S plasmas, the likelihood of QSH is largely unaffected by the fast ions. The dominant mode in MST can reach 8% of the equilibrium field. This, combined with the reduced secondary modes, leads to a locally enhanced Te in the core and a 50% improvement in energy confinement. The secondary modes are further reduced by slowly ramping down Ip, a form of current profile control. This leads to a larger Te >1 keV and a tripling of the energy confinement. These results were achieved with zero applied Bt (infinite toroidal beta). The 3D magnetic topology was measured directly for the first time in MST via Faraday rotation. This and other

  16. Multidimensional morphometric 3D MRI analyses for detecting brain abnormalities in children: impact of control population.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko; Rose, Douglas F; Holland, Scott K; Leach, James L

    2014-07-01

    Automated morphometric approaches are used to detect epileptogenic structural abnormalities in 3D MR images in adults, using the variance of a control population to obtain z-score maps in an individual patient. Due to the substantial changes the developing human brain undergoes, performing such analyses in children is challenging. This study investigated six features derived from high-resolution T1 datasets in four groups: normal children (1.5T or 3T data), normal clinical scans (3T data), and patients with structural brain lesions (3T data), with each n = 10. Normative control data were obtained from the NIH study on normal brain development (n = 401). We show that control group size substantially influences the captured variance, directly impacting the patient's z-scores. Interestingly, matching on gender does not seem to be beneficial, which was unexpected. Using data obtained at higher field scanners produces slightly different base rates of suprathreshold voxels, as does using clinically derived normal studies, suggesting a subtle but systematic effect of both factors. Two approaches for controlling suprathreshold voxels in a multidimensional approach (combining features and requiring a minimum cluster size) were shown to be substantial and effective in reducing this number. Finally, specific strengths and limitations of such an approach could be demonstrated in individual cases. PMID:25050423

  17. Spatio-temporal control of LbL films for biomedical applications: from 2D to 3D

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Claire; Almodóvar, Jorge; Boudou, Thomas; Picart, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Introduced in the 90’s by Prof Moehwald, Lvov and Decher, the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polyelectrolytes has become a popular technique to engineer various types of objects such as films, capsules and free standing membranes, with an unprecedented control at the nanometer and micrometer scales. The LbL technique allows to engineer biofunctional surface coatings, which may be dedicated to biomedical applications in vivo but also to fundamental studies and diagnosis in vitro. Initially mostly developed as 2D coatings and hollow capsules, the range of complex objects created by the LbL technique has greatly expanded in the past 10 years. In this review, our aim was to highlight the recent progress in the field of LbL films for biomedical applications and discuss the various ways to control spatially and temporally the biochemical and mechanical properties of multilayers. In particular, we will discuss three major developments of LbL films: 1) the new methods and templates to engineer LbL films and control cellular processes from adhesion to differentiation, 2) the major ways to achieve temporal control by chemical, biological and physical triggers and, 3) the combinations of LbL technique, cells and scaffolds for repairing 3D tissues, including cardio-vascular devices, bone implants and neuro-prosthetic devices. PMID:25627563

  18. Use of 3D Printed Models in Medical Education: A Randomized Control Trial Comparing 3D Prints versus Cadaveric Materials for Learning External Cardiac Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kah Heng Alexander; Loo, Zhou Yaw; Goldie, Stephen J.; Adams, Justin W.; McMenamin, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technology capable of readily producing accurate anatomical models, however, evidence for the use of 3D prints in medical education remains limited. A study was performed to assess their effectiveness against cadaveric materials for learning external cardiac anatomy. A double blind randomized…

  19. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  20. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  1. Computer simulated screening of dentin bonding primer monomers through analysis of their chemical functions and their spatial 3D alignment.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, J; Vaidyanathan, T K; Ravichandran, S

    2009-02-01

    Binding interactions between dentin bonding primer monomers and dentinal collagen were studied by an analysis of their chemical functions and their spatial 3D alignment. A trial set of 12 monomers used as primers in dentin adhesives was characterized to assess them for binding to a complementary target. HipHop utility in the Catalyst software from Accelrys was used for the study. Ten hypotheses were generated by HipHop procedures involving (a) conformational generation using a poling technique to promote conformational variation, (b) extraction of functions to remodel ligands as function-based structures, and (c) identification of common patterns of functional alignment displayed by low energy conformations. The hypotheses, designated as pharmacaphores, were also scored and ranked. Analysis of pharmacaphore models through mapping of ligands revealed important differences between ligands. Top-ranked poses from direct docking simulations using type 1 collagen target were mapped in a rigid manner to the highest ranked pharmacophore model. The visual match observed in mapping and associated fit values suggest a strong correspondence between direct and indirect docking simulations. The results elegantly demonstrate that an indirect approach used to identify pharmacaphore models from adhesive ligands without a target may be a simple and viable approach to assess their intermolecular interactions with an intended target. Inexpensive indirect/direct virtual screening of hydrophilic monomer candidates may be a practical way to assess their initial promise for dentin primer use well before additional experimental evaluation of their priming/bonding efficacy. This is also of value in the search/design of new compounds for priming dentin. PMID:18546179

  2. In-situ 3D high-spatial resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic parameter distribution at decameter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, L.; Qiu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a major challenge in aquifer characterization is the determination of hydraulic parameters with high-spatial resolution. Since the mid-90's, various working groups have developed numerical evaluation approaches for hydraulic tomography: the inversion of hydraulic tests that have been recorded using tomographic arrangements. The practical application is often associated with long test times, complex evaluations, and prolonged computation times. In our study, a hydraulic tomographical data set consisted of 450 drawdown curves produced by a series of short term pumping tests conducted over 4 working days. Data was collected by two scientists without a technical staff. The tests were performed at the test site "Stegemühle", Göttingen, Germany in a confined sand and gravel aquifer with a thickness of 2-3 m. For the inversion, an approach has been used, which is based on the transformation of the groundwater flow equation into a form of Eikonal equation (Vasco et al., 2000). Utilizing this approach, the hydraulic data can be inverted using an Eikonal solver e.g. SIRT. This Eikonal solver is considerably computationally efficient and allows hundreds of draw down curves to be inverted on a standard laptop within minutes. Following the methodology described in Brauchler et al. 2013, 3D distribution of diffusivity and specific storage were directly reconstructed, and subsequently their product: the hydraulic conductivity. This study exemplifies that the required data can be recorded and analyzed efficiently in the field, which is a vital precondition for the in-situ field aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. Literature Vasco, D.W., Keers, H., Karasaki, K. (2000) Estimation of reservoir properties using transient pressure data: An asymptotic approach. Water Resour. Res. 36(12), 3447-3465 Brauchler, R., Hu, R., Hu, L., Jimenéz, S., Bayer, P., Ptak, T. (2013) Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography for resolving aquifer heterogeneity in

  3. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-01

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future. PMID:26626828

  4. Affective SSVEP BCI to effectively control 3D objects by using a prism array-based display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    3D objects with depth information can provide many benefits to users in education, surgery, and interactions. In particular, many studies have been done to enhance sense of reality in 3D interaction. Viewing and controlling stereoscopic 3D objects with crossed or uncrossed disparities, however, can cause visual fatigue due to the vergenceaccommodation conflict generally accepted in 3D research fields. In order to avoid the vergence-accommodation mismatch and provide a strong sense of presence to users, we apply a prism array-based display to presenting 3D objects. Emotional pictures were used as visual stimuli in control panels to increase information transfer rate and reduce false positives in controlling 3D objects. Involuntarily motivated selective attention by affective mechanism can enhance steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) amplitude and lead to increased interaction efficiency. More attentional resources are allocated to affective pictures with high valence and arousal levels than to normal visual stimuli such as white-and-black oscillating squares and checkerboards. Among representative BCI control components (i.e., eventrelated potentials (ERP), event-related (de)synchronization (ERD/ERS), and SSVEP), SSVEP-based BCI was chosen in the following reasons. It shows high information transfer rates and takes a few minutes for users to control BCI system while few electrodes are required for obtaining reliable brainwave signals enough to capture users' intention. The proposed BCI methods are expected to enhance sense of reality in 3D space without causing critical visual fatigue to occur. In addition, people who are very susceptible to (auto) stereoscopic 3D may be able to use the affective BCI.

  5. Effects of flow control over a 3D turret -- Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan; Andino, Marlyn; Schmit, Ryan; Camphouse, Chris; Myatt, James; Glauser, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Building upon the 3D turret work done at Syracuse University an extended study was conducted in the Air Force Research Laboratory's Subsonic Aerodynamic Research Laboratory (SARL) wind tunnel at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The SARL experiments were performed at higher Reynolds and Mach numbers and therefore present a more complex, more challenging flow. Synthetic jets mounted upstream of the aperture were used to generate multiple actuation cases in order to provide a rich ensemble for plant model development based on the split POD method of Camphouse (2007). PIV velocity data was acquired along with simultaneous surface pressure data at various planes across the turret with and without open-loop control. In addition, a simple proportional closed-loop control was performed using the bandpass filtered first POD mode coefficient of the surface pressure as the feedback signal. The amplitude of the feedback signal was calibrated using the open-loop results which were the most effective in reducing the separation zone of the turret.

  6. Controlled Experimental Study Depicting Moving Objects in View-Shared Time-Resolved 3D MRA

    PubMed Central

    Mostardi, Petrice M.; Haider, Clifton R.; Rossman, Phillip J.; Borisch, Eric A.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Various methods have been used for time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), many involving view sharing. However, the extent to which the resultant image time series represents the actual dynamic behavior of the contrast bolus is not always clear. Although numerical simulations can be used to estimate performance, an experimental study can allow more realistic characterization. The purpose of this work was to use a computer-controlled motion phantom for study of the temporal fidelity of 3D time-resolved sequences in depicting a contrast bolus. It is hypothesized that the view order of the acquisition and the selection of views in the reconstruction can affect the positional accuracy and sharpness of the leading edge of the bolus and artifactual signal preceding the edge. Phantom studies were performed using dilute gadolinium-filled vials that were moved along tabletop tracks by a computer-controlled motor. Several view orders were tested, which use view-sharing and Cartesian sampling. Compactness of measuring the k-space center, consistency of view ordering within each reconstruction frame, and sampling the k-space center near the end of the temporal footprint were shown to be important in accurate portrayal of the leading edge of the bolus. A number of findings were confirmed in an in vivo CE-MRA study. PMID:19319897

  7. Controlled experimental study depicting moving objects in view-shared time-resolved 3D MRA.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, Petrice M; Haider, Clifton R; Rossman, Phillip J; Borisch, Eric A; Riederer, Stephen J

    2009-07-01

    Various methods have been used for time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA), many involving view sharing. However, the extent to which the resultant image time series represents the actual dynamic behavior of the contrast bolus is not always clear. Although numerical simulations can be used to estimate performance, an experimental study can allow more realistic characterization. The purpose of this work was to use a computer-controlled motion phantom for study of the temporal fidelity of three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved sequences in depicting a contrast bolus. It is hypothesized that the view order of the acquisition and the selection of views in the reconstruction can affect the positional accuracy and sharpness of the leading edge of the bolus and artifactual signal preceding the edge. Phantom studies were performed using dilute gadolinium-filled vials that were moved along tabletop tracks by a computer-controlled motor. Several view orders were tested using view-sharing and Cartesian sampling. Compactness of measuring the k-space center, consistency of view ordering within each reconstruction frame, and sampling the k-space center near the end of the temporal footprint were shown to be important in accurate portrayal of the leading edge of the bolus. A number of findings were confirmed in an in vivo CE-MRA study. PMID:19319897

  8. Control of vascular network location in millimeter-sized 3D-tissues by micrometer-sized collagen coated cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yen; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-25

    Engineering three-dimensional (3D) vascularized constructs remains a central challenge because capillary network structures are important for sufficient oxygen and nutrient exchange to sustain the viability of engineered constructs. However, construction of 3D-tissues at single cell level has yet to be reported. Previously, we established a collagen coating method for fabricating a micrometer-sized collagen matrix on cell surfaces to control cell distance or cell densities inside tissues. In this study, a simple fabrication method is presented for constructing vascular networks in 3D-tissues over micrometer-sized or even millimeter-sized with controlled cell densities. From the results, well vascularized 3D network structures can be observed with a fluorescence label method mixing collagen coated cells and endothelia cells, indicating that constructed ECM rich tissues have the potential for vascularization, which opens up the possibility for various applications in pharmaceutical or tissue engineering fields. PMID:26920051

  9. Softworms: the design and control of non-pneumatic, 3D-printed, deformable robots.

    PubMed

    Umedachi, T; Vikas, V; Trimmer, B A

    2016-04-01

    Robots that can easily interact with humans and move through natural environments are becoming increasingly essential as assistive devices in the home, office and hospital. These machines need to be safe, effective, and easy to control. One strategy towards accomplishing these goals is to build the robots using soft and flexible materials to make them much more approachable and less likely to damage their environment. A major challenge is that comparatively little is known about how best to design, fabricate and control deformable machines. Here we describe the design, fabrication and control of a novel soft robotic platform (Softworms) as a modular device for research, education and public outreach. These robots are inspired by recent neuromechanical studies of crawling and climbing by larval moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera, caterpillars). Unlike most soft robots currently under development, the Softworms do not rely on pneumatic or fluidic actuators but are electrically powered and actuated using either shape-memory alloy microcoils or motor tendons, and they can be modified to accept other muscle-like actuators such as electroactive polymers. The technology is extremely versatile, and different designs can be quickly and cheaply fabricated by casting elastomeric polymers or by direct 3D printing. Softworms can crawl, inch or roll, and they are steerable and even climb steep inclines. Softworms can be made in any shape but here we describe modular and monolithic designs requiring little assembly. These modules can be combined to make multi-limbed devices. We also describe two approaches for controlling such highly deformable structures using either model-free state transition-reward matrices or distributed, mechanically coupled oscillators. In addition to their value as a research platform, these robots can be developed for use in environmental, medical and space applications where cheap, lightweight and shape-changing deformable robots will provide new

  10. Design control for clinical translation of 3D printed modular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Scott J; Flanagan, Colleen L; Zopf, David A; Morrison, Robert J; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Wheeler, Matthew B; Green, Glenn E

    2015-03-01

    founded on 3D printing for developing tissue engineering therapies and (2) illustrate the design control process for modular implementation of two scaffold based tissue engineering therapies: airway reconstruction and bone tissue engineering based spine fusion. PMID:25666115

  11. Design Control for Clinical Translation of 3D Printed Modular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Scott J.; Flanagan, Colleen L.; Zopf, David A.; Morrison, Robert J.; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J.; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N.; Wheeler, Matthew B.; Green, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    founded on 3D printing for developing tissue engineering therapies and (2) illustrate the design control process for modular implementation of two scaffold based tissue engineering therapies: airway reconstruction and bone tissue engineering based spine fusion. PMID:25666115

  12. Enhanced Gas Sensitivity and Selectivity on Aperture-Controllable 3D Interconnected Macro-Mesoporous ZnO Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Huang, Huawen; Zhao, Heng; Yan, Xiaoting; Wu, Sijia; Li, Yu; Wu, Min; Chen, Lihua; Yang, Xiaoyu; Su, Bao-Lian

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) macro-mesoporous structures demonstrate effective performance for gas sensing. In this work, we have designed and successfully prepared aperture-controllable three-dimensional interconnected macro-mesoporous ZnO (3D-IMM-ZnO) nanostructures by template-based layer-by-layer filtration deposition. XRD, SEM, and TEM have been used to characterize the obtained hexagonal wurzite 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructures. Owing to its special 3D interconnected hierarchically porous structure, the 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructures exhibit excellent gas sensing performances toward acetone and methanol. The 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructure with the largest macropore demonstrates the best gas sensitivity owing to its largest cavity providing enough space for gas diffusion. On the basis of the results and analyses, we propose that the synergistic effect of electron liberation and electron density of acetone and the special structure make the 3D-IMM-ZnO nanostructures demonstrate better gas sensing properties than many other porous ZnO nanostructures and preferred selectivity to acetone. PMID:26998736

  13. Effects of Spatial Ability, Gender Differences, and Pictorial Training on Children Using 2-D and 3-D Environments to Recall Landmark Locations from Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Otumfuor, Beryl A.; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of spatial ability, gender differences, and pictorial training on fourth grade students' ability to recall landmark locations from memory. Ninety-six students used Google Earth over a 3-week period to locate landmarks (3-D) and mark their location on a 2-D topographical map. Analysis of covariance on posttest scores…

  14. Linearly perturbed MHD equilibria and 3D eddy current coupling via the control surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portone, A.; Villone, F.; Liu, Y.; Albanese, R.; Rubinacci, G.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a coupling strategy based on the control surface concept is used to self-consistently couple linear MHD solvers to 3D codes for the eddy current computation of eddy currents in the metallic structures surrounding the plasma. The coupling is performed by assuming that the plasma inertia (and, with it, all Alfven wave-like phenomena) can be neglected on the time scale of interest, which is dictated by the relevant electromagnetic time of the metallic structures. As is shown, plasma coupling with the metallic structures results in perturbations to the inductance matrix operator. In particular, by adopting the Fourier decomposition in poloidal and toroidal modes, it turns out that each toroidal mode can be associated with a matrix (additively) perturbing the inductance matrix that commonly describes the magnetic coupling of currents in vacuum. In this way, the treatment of resistive wall modes instabilities of various toroidal mode numbers and their possible cross-talk through the currents induced in the metallic structures can be easily studied.

  15. Quality control of dose volume histogram computation characteristics of 3D treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitsa, E.; Rosenwald, J. C.; Kappas, C.

    1998-10-01

    Detailed quality control (QC) protocols are a necessity for modern radiotherapy departments. The established QC protocols for treatment planning systems (TPS) do not include recommendations on the advanced features of three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning, like the dose volume histograms (DVH). In this study, a test protocol for DVH characteristics was developed. The protocol assesses the consistency of the DVH computation to the dose distribution calculated by the same TPS by comparing DVH parameters with values obtained by the isodose distributions. The computation parameters (such as the dimension of the computation grid) that are applied to the TPS during the tests are not fixed but set by the user as if the test represents a typical clinical case. Six commercial TPS were examined with this protocol within the frame of the EC project Dynarad (Biomed I). The results of the intercomparison prove the consistency of the DVH results to the isodose values for most of the examined TPS. However, special attention should be paid when working with cases of adverse conditions such as high dose gradient regions. In these cases, higher errors are derived, especially when an insufficient number of dose calculation points are used for the DVH computation.

  16. Osteogenic effect of controlled released rhBMP-2 in 3D printed porous hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai; Wu, Gui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Kui; Yin, Bo; Su, Xinlin; Qiu, Guixing; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Xianglin; Zhou, Gang; Wu, Zhihong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, 3D printing as effective technology has been highlighted in the biomedical field. Previously, a porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffold with the biocompatibility and osteoconductivity has been developed by this method. However, its osteoinductivity is limited. The main purpose of this study was to improve it by the introduction of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). This scaffold was developed by coating rhBMP-2-delivery microspheres with collagen. These synthesized scaffolds were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), a delivery test in vitro, cell culture, and the experiments in vivo by a Micro-computed tomography (μCT) scan and histological evaluation of VanGieson staining. SEM results indicated the surface of scaffolds were more fit for the adhesion of hMSCs to coat collagen/rhBMP-2 microspheres. Biphasic release of rhBMP-2 could continue for more than 21 days, and keep its osteoinductivity to induce osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in vitro. In addition, the experiments in vivo showed that the scaffold had a good bone regeneration capacity. These findings demonstrate that the HA/Collagen/Chitosan Microspheres system can simultaneously achieve localized long-term controlled release of rhBMP-2 and bone regeneration, which provides a promising route for improving the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26896655

  17. Acoustical vortices on a Chip for 3D single particle manipulation and vorticity control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Bou Matar, Olivier; Baudoin, Michael

    Surface acoustic waves offer most of the basic functions required for on-chip actuation of fluids at small scales: efficient flow mixing, integrated pumping, particles separation, droplet displacement, atomization, division and fusion. Nevertheless some more advanced functions such as 3D particles manipulation and vorticity control require the introduction of some specific kind of waves called acoustic vortices. These helical waves propagate spinning around a phase singularity called the dark core. On the one hand, the beam angular momentum can be transferred to the fluid and create point-wise vorticity for confined mixing, and on the other the dark core can trap individual particles in an acoustic well for single object manipulation. In this presentation, I will show how acoustical vortices on-a-chip can be synthesized with a programmable electronics and an array of transducers. I will then highlight how some of their specificities can be used for acoustical tweezing and twisting. This work is supported by ANR Project No. ANR-12-BS09-0021-01 and ANR-12- BS09-0021-02, and Rgion Nord Pas de Calais.

  18. Upper body balance control strategy during continuous 3D postural perturbation in young adults.

    PubMed

    Amori, V; Petrarca, M; Patané, F; Castelli, E; Cappa, P

    2015-01-01

    We explored how changes in vision and perturbation frequency impacted upright postural control in healthy adults exposed to continuous multiaxial support-surface perturbation. Ten subjects were asked to maintain equilibrium in standing stance with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) during sinusoidal 3D rotations at 0.25 (L) and 0.50 Hz (H). We measured upper-body kinematics--head, trunk, and pelvis--and analyzed differences in horizontal displacements and roll, pitch, and yaw sways. The presence of vision significantly decreased upper-body displacements in the horizontal plane, especially at the head level, while in EC the head was the most unstable segment. H trials produced a greater segment stabilization compared to L ones in EO and EC. Analysis of sways showed that in EO participants stabilized their posture by reducing the variability of trunk angles; in H trials a sway decrease for the examined segments was observed in the yaw plane and, for the pelvis only, in the pitch plane. Our results suggest that, during continuous multiaxial perturbations, visual information induced: (i) in L condition, a continuous reconfiguration of multi-body-segments orientation to follow the perturbation; (ii) in H condition, a compensation for the ongoing perturbation. These findings were not confirmed in EC where the same strategy--that is, the use of the pelvis as a reference frame for the body balance was adopted both in L and H. PMID:25205381

  19. Geostatistical analysis of 3D microCT images of porous media for stochastic upscaling of spatially variable reactive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The 3D imaging of porous media through micro tomography allows the characterization of porous space and mineral abundances with unprecedented resolution. Such images can be used to perform computational determination of permeability and to obtain a realistic measure of the mineral surfaces exposed to fluid flow and thus to chemical interactions. However, the volume of the plugs that can be analysed with such detail is in the order of 1 cm3, so that their representativity at a larger scale, i.e. as needed for reactive transport modelling at Darcy scale, is questionable at best. In fact, the fine scale heterogeneity (from plug to plug at few cm distance within the same core) would originate substantially different readings of the investigated properties. Therefore, a comprehensive approach including the spatial variability and heterogeneity at the micro- and plug scale needs to be adopted to gain full advantage from the high resolution images in view of the upscaling to Darcy scale. In the framework of the collaborative project H2STORE, micro-CT imaging of different core samples from potential H2-storage sites has been performed by partners at TU Clausthal and Jena University before and after treatment with H2/CO2 mixtures in pressurized autoclaves. We present here the workflow which has been implemented to extract the relevant features from the available data concerning the heterogeneity of the medium at the microscopic and plug scale and to correlate the observed chemical reactions and changes in the porous structure with the geometrical features of the medium. First, a multivariate indicator-based geostatistical model for the microscopic structure of the plugs has been built and fitted to the available images. This involved the implementation of exploratory analysis algorithms such as experimental indicator variograms and cross-variograms. The implemented methods are able to efficiently deal with images in the order of 10003 voxels making use of parallelization

  20. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  1. Computer numerical control (CNC) lithography: light-motion synchronized UV-LED lithography for 3D microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkwun; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Allen, Mark G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a computer-numerical-controlled ultraviolet light-emitting diode (CNC UV-LED) lithography scheme for three-dimensional (3D) microfabrication. The CNC lithography scheme utilizes sequential multi-angled UV light exposures along with a synchronized switchable UV light source to create arbitrary 3D light traces, which are transferred into the photosensitive resist. The system comprises a switchable, movable UV-LED array as a light source, a motorized tilt-rotational sample holder, and a computer-control unit. System operation is such that the tilt-rotational sample holder moves in a pre-programmed routine, and the UV-LED is illuminated only at desired positions of the sample holder during the desired time period, enabling the formation of complex 3D microstructures. This facilitates easy fabrication of complex 3D structures, which otherwise would have required multiple manual exposure steps as in the previous multidirectional 3D UV lithography approach. Since it is batch processed, processing time is far less than that of the 3D printing approach at the expense of some reduction in the degree of achievable 3D structure complexity. In order to produce uniform light intensity from the arrayed LED light source, the UV-LED array stage has been kept rotating during exposure. UV-LED 3D fabrication capability was demonstrated through a plurality of complex structures such as V-shaped micropillars, micropanels, a micro-‘hi’ structure, a micro-‘cat’s claw,’ a micro-‘horn,’ a micro-‘calla lily,’ a micro-‘cowboy’s hat,’ and a micro-‘table napkin’ array.

  2. 3D Numerical Analysis of Flow Control on Wind Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Onkar; Karaismail, Ertan

    2011-11-01

    Wind turbine blades are exposed to unsteady and spatially-varying loadings in a real field. These loadings result in fluctuating structural forces which in turn lead to failure of blades as well as gearbox. In this study, we perform numerical analysis of flow over a wind turbine blade placed in a wind tunnel; where dynamic motions are imposed to the blade in order to emulate scenarios observed in a real field. Furthermore, we also study the effect of active flow control (via synthetic-jets) on unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of the blade under dynamic motions; the idea is to be able to control aerodynamic loads and mitigate failures. Numerical analysis is based on massively parallel simulations using hybrid turbulence models. Comparisons with experimental data will also be included.

  3. Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Guignard, Jérémie; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface. PMID:25984986

  4. Maximizing modern distribution of complex anatomical spatial information: 3D reconstruction and rapid prototype production of anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyi; Nie, Lanying; Li, Zeyu; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Lei; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens are useful teaching aids. However, their use is limited due to ethical dilemmas associated with their production, their lack of perfect reproducibility, and their consumption of original specimens in the process of casting. In this study, new approaches with modern distribution of complex anatomical spatial information were explored to overcome these limitations through the digitalization of anatomical casts of human specimens through three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, rapid prototype production, and Web-based 3D atlas construction. The corrosion cast of a lung, along with its associated arteries, veins, trachea, and bronchial tree was CT-scanned, and the data was then processed by Mimics software. Data from the lung casts were then reconstructed into 3D models using a hybrid method, utilizing both "image threshold" and "region growing." The fine structures of the bronchial tree, arterial, and venous network of the lung were clearly displayed and demonstrated their distinct relationships. The multiple divisions of bronchi and bronchopulmonary segments were identified. The 3D models were then uploaded into a rapid prototype 3D printer to physically duplicate the cast. The physically duplicated model of the lung was rescanned by CT and reconstructed to detect its production accuracy. Gross observation and accuracy detection were used to evaluate the duplication and few differences were found. Finally, Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) was used to edit the 3D casting models to construct a Web-based 3D atlas accessible through Internet Explorer with 3D display and annotation functions. PMID:22653786

  5. Structural control on the Tohoku earthquake rupture process investigated by 3D FEM, tsunami and geodetic data

    PubMed Central

    Romano, F.; Trasatti, E.; Lorito, S.; Piromallo, C.; Piatanesi, A.; Ito, Y.; Zhao, D.; Hirata, K.; Lanucara, P.; Cocco, M.

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw = 9.1) highlighted previously unobserved features for megathrust events, such as the large slip in a relatively limited area and the shallow rupture propagation. We use a Finite Element Model (FEM), taking into account the 3D geometrical and structural complexities up to the trench zone, and perform a joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data to retrieve the earthquake slip distribution. We obtain a close spatial correlation between the main deep slip patch and the local seismic velocity anomalies, and large shallow slip extending also to the North coherently with a seismically observed low-frequency radiation. These observations suggest that the friction controlled the rupture, initially confining the deeper rupture and then driving its propagation up to the trench, where it spreads laterally. These findings are relevant to earthquake and tsunami hazard assessment because they may help to detect regions likely prone to rupture along the megathrust, and to constrain the probability of high slip near the trench. Our estimate of ~40 m slip value around the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) drilling zone contributes to constrain the dynamic shear stress and friction coefficient of the fault obtained by temperature measurements to ~0.68 MPa and ~0.10, respectively. PMID:25005351

  6. Structural control on the Tohoku earthquake rupture process investigated by 3D FEM, tsunami and geodetic data.

    PubMed

    Romano, F; Trasatti, E; Lorito, S; Piromallo, C; Piatanesi, A; Ito, Y; Zhao, D; Hirata, K; Lanucara, P; Cocco, M

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw = 9.1) highlighted previously unobserved features for megathrust events, such as the large slip in a relatively limited area and the shallow rupture propagation. We use a Finite Element Model (FEM), taking into account the 3D geometrical and structural complexities up to the trench zone, and perform a joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data to retrieve the earthquake slip distribution. We obtain a close spatial correlation between the main deep slip patch and the local seismic velocity anomalies, and large shallow slip extending also to the North coherently with a seismically observed low-frequency radiation. These observations suggest that the friction controlled the rupture, initially confining the deeper rupture and then driving its propagation up to the trench, where it spreads laterally. These findings are relevant to earthquake and tsunami hazard assessment because they may help to detect regions likely prone to rupture along the megathrust, and to constrain the probability of high slip near the trench. Our estimate of ~40 m slip value around the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) drilling zone contributes to constrain the dynamic shear stress and friction coefficient of the fault obtained by temperature measurements to ~0.68 MPa and ~0.10, respectively. PMID:25005351

  7. Error control in the set-up of stereo camera systems for 3d animal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, A.; Creato, C.; Del Castello, L.; Giardina, I.; Melillo, S.; Parisi, L.; Viale, M.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of animal systems is the key to the comprehension of collective behavior. Experimental data collected via a stereo camera system allow the reconstruction of the 3d trajectories of each individual in the group. Trajectories can then be used to compute some quantities of interest to better understand collective motion, such as velocities, distances between individuals and correlation functions. The reliability of the retrieved trajectories is strictly related to the accuracy of the 3d reconstruction. In this paper, we perform a careful analysis of the most significant errors affecting 3d reconstruction, showing how the accuracy depends on the camera system set-up and on the precision of the calibration parameters.

  8. A low volume 3D-printed temperature-controllable cuvette for UV visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pisaruka, Jelena; Dymond, Marcus K

    2016-10-01

    We report the fabrication of a 3D-printed water-heated cuvette that fits into a standard UV visible spectrophotometer. Full 3D-printable designs are provided and 3D-printing conditions have been optimised to provide options to print the cuvette in either acrylonitrile butadiene styrene or polylactic acid polymers, extending the range of solvents that are compatible with the design. We demonstrate the efficacy of the cuvette by determining the critical micelle concentration of sodium dodecyl sulphate at 40 °C, the molar extinction coefficients of cobalt nitrate and dsDNA and by reproducing the thermochromic UV visible spectrum of a mixture of cobalt chloride, water and propan-2-ol. PMID:27443958

  9. Simulation on an optimal combustion control strategy for 3-D temperature distributions in tangentially pc-fired utility boiler furnaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-fen; Zhou, Huai-chun

    2005-01-01

    The control of 3-D temperature distribution in a utility boiler furnace is essential for the safe, economic and clean operation of pc-fired furnace with multi-burner system. The development of the visualization of 3-D temperature distributions in pc-fired furnaces makes it possible for a new combustion control strategy directly with the furnace temperature as its goal to improve the control quality for the combustion processes. Studied in this paper is such a new strategy that the whole furnace is divided into several parts in the vertical direction, and the average temperature and its bias from the center in every cross section can be extracted from the visualization results of the 3-D temperature distributions. In the simulation stage, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code served to calculate the 3-D temperature distributions in a furnace, then a linear model was set up to relate the features of the temperature distributions with the input of the combustion processes, such as the flow rates of fuel and air fed into the furnaces through all the burners. The adaptive genetic algorithm was adopted to find the optimal combination of the whole input parameters which ensure to form an optimal 3-D temperature field in the furnace desired for the operation of boiler. Simulation results showed that the strategy could soon find the factors making the temperature distribution apart from the optimal state and give correct adjusting suggestions. PMID:16295911

  10. Novel implementations of optical switch control module and 3D-CSP for 10 Gbps active optical access system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Koji; Okuno, Michitaka; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Hosomi, Kazuhiko; Sagawa, Misuzu; Sugawara, Toshiki

    2009-11-01

    We propose an optical switch control procedure for high-performance and cost-effective 10 Gbps Active Optical Access System (AOAS) in which optical switches are used instead of optical splitters in PON (Passive Optical Network). We demonstrate the implemented optical switch control module on Optical Switching Unit (OSW) with logic circuits works effectively. We also propose a compact optical 3D-CSP (Chip Scale Package) to achieve the high performance of AOAS without losing cost advantage of PON. We demonstrate the implemented 3D-CSP works effectively.

  11. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best represented the…

  12. Anticipatory Spatial Representation of 3D Regions Explored by Sighted Observers and a Deaf-and-Blind-Observer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intraub, Helene

    2004-01-01

    Viewers who study photographs of scenes tend to remember having seen beyond the boundaries of the view ["boundary extension"; J. Exp. Psychol. Learn. Mem. Cogn. 15 (1989) 179]. Is this a fundamental aspect of scene representation? Forty undergraduates explored bounded regions of six common (3D) scenes, visually or haptically (while blindfolded)…

  13. Diffractive control of 3D multifilamentation in fused silica with micrometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesús

    2016-07-11

    We show that a simple diffractive phase element (DPE) can be used to manipulate at will the positions and energy of multiple filaments generated in fused silica under femtosecond pulsed illumination. The method allows obtaining three-dimensional distributions of controlled filaments whose separations can be in the order of few micrometers. With such small distances we are able to study the mutual coherence among filaments from the resulted interference pattern, without needing a two-arm interferometer. The encoding of the DPE into a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) provides an extra degree of freedom to the optical set-up, giving more versatility for implementing different DPEs in real time. Our proposal might be particularly suited for applications at which an accurate manipulation of multiple filaments is required. PMID:27410807

  14. Evaluation of potential human health effects associated with the agricultural uses of 1,3-D: Spatial and temporal stochastic risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Driver, Jeffrey H; Price, Paul S; Van Wesenbeeck, Ian; Ross, John H; Gehen, Sean; Holden, Larry R; Landenberger, Bryce; Hastings, Kerry; Yan, Zhongyu June; Rasoulpour, Reza

    2016-11-15

    Dow AgroSciences (DAS) markets and sells 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D), the active ingredient in Telone®, which is used as a pre-plant soil fumigant nematicide in economically important crops in California. 1,3-D has been regulated as a "probable human carcinogen" and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation limits use of 1,3-D based on human health risk assessments for bystanders. This paper presents a risk characterization for bystanders based on advances in the assessment of both exposure and hazard. The revised bystander risk assessment incorporates significant advances: 1) new data on residency duration and mobility in communities where 1,3-D is in high demand; 2) new information on spatial and temporal concentrations of 1,3-D in air based on multi-year modeling using a validated model; and 3) a new stochastic spatial and temporal model of long-term exposures. Predicted distributions of long-term, chronic exposures indicate that current, and anticipated uses of 1,3-D would result in lifetime average daily doses lower than 0.002mg/kg/d, a dose associated with theoretical lifetime excess cancer risk of <10(-5) to >95% of the local population based on a non-threshold risk assessment approach. Additionally, examination of 1,3-D toxicity studies including new chronic toxicity data and mechanism of action supports the use of a non-linear, threshold based risk assessment approach. The estimated maximum annual average daily dose of <0.0016mg/kg/d derived from the updated exposure assessment was then compared with a threshold point of departure. The calculated margin of exposure is >1000-fold, a clear indication of acceptable risk for human health. In summary, the best available science supports 1,3-D's threshold nature of hazard and the revised exposure assessment supports that current agricultural uses of 1,3-D are associated with reasonable certainty of no harm, i.e., estimated long-term exposures pose insignificant health risks to bystanders even when the

  15. Objective Assessment and Design Improvement of a Staring, Sparse Transducer Array by the Spatial Crosstalk Matrix for 3D Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, Ivan; Raess, Avery

    2015-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA) images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT) staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD). The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate). The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization. PMID:25875177

  16. Land 3D-seismic data: Preprocessing quality control utilizing survey design specifications, noise properties, normal moveout, first breaks, and offset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.

    2009-01-01

    The recent proliferation of the 3D reflection seismic method into the near-surface area of geophysical applications, especially in response to the emergence of the need to comprehensively characterize and monitor near-surface carbon dioxide sequestration in shallow saline aquifers around the world, justifies the emphasis on cost-effective and robust quality control and assurance (QC/QA) workflow of 3D seismic data preprocessing that is suitable for near-surface applications. The main purpose of our seismic data preprocessing QC is to enable the use of appropriate header information, data that are free of noise-dominated traces, and/or flawed vertical stacking in subsequent processing steps. In this article, I provide an account of utilizing survey design specifications, noise properties, first breaks, and normal moveout for rapid and thorough graphical QC/QA diagnostics, which are easy to apply and efficient in the diagnosis of inconsistencies. A correlated vibroseis time-lapse 3D-seismic data set from a CO2-flood monitoring survey is used for demonstrating QC diagnostics. An important by-product of the QC workflow is establishing the number of layers for a refraction statics model in a data-driven graphical manner that capitalizes on the spatial coverage of the 3D seismic data. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  17. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Engin Vrana, Nihal

    2015-05-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  18. Water-based polyurethane 3D printed scaffolds with controlled release function for customized cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Che; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Dai, Lien-Guo; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2016-03-01

    Conventional 3D printing may not readily incorporate bioactive ingredients for controlled release because the process often involves the use of heat, organic solvent, or crosslinkers that reduce the bioactivity of the ingredients. Water-based 3D printing materials with controlled bioactivity for customized cartilage tissue engineering is developed in this study. The printing ink contains the water dispersion of synthetic biodegradable polyurethane (PU) elastic nanoparticles, hyaluronan, and bioactive ingredients TGFβ3 or a small molecule drug Y27632 to replace TGFβ3. Compliant scaffolds are printed from the ink at low temperature. These scaffolds promote the self-aggregation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and, with timely release of the bioactive ingredients, induce the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and produce matrix for cartilage repair. Moreover, the growth factor-free controlled release design may prevent cartilage hypertrophy. Rabbit knee implantation supports the potential of the novel 3D printing scaffolds in cartilage regeneration. We consider that the 3D printing composite scaffolds with controlled release bioactivity may have potential in customized tissue engineering. PMID:26774563

  19. SVR learning-based spatiotemporal fuzzy logic controller for nonlinear spatially distributed dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Xia; Jiang, Ye; Li, Han-Xiong; Li, Shao-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    A data-driven 3-D fuzzy-logic controller (3-D FLC) design methodology based on support vector regression (SVR) learning is developed for nonlinear spatially distributed dynamic systems. Initially, the spatial information expression and processing as well as the fuzzy linguistic expression and rule inference of a 3-D FLC are integrated into spatial fuzzy basis functions (SFBFs), and then the 3-D FLC can be depicted by a three-layer network structure. By relating SFBFs of the 3-D FLC directly to spatial kernel functions of an SVR, an equivalence relationship of the 3-D FLC and the SVR is established, which means that the 3-D FLC can be designed with the help of the SVR learning. Subsequently, for an easy implementation, a systematic SVR learning-based 3-D FLC design scheme is formulated. In addition, the universal approximation capability of the proposed 3-D FLC is presented. Finally, the control of a nonlinear catalytic packed-bed reactor is considered as an application to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed 3-D FLC. PMID:24808600

  20. Large-scale 3D inversion of marine controlled source electromagnetic data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Cuma, M.; Black, N.; Wilson, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The marine controlled source electromagnetic (MCSEM) method has become widely used in offshore oil and gas exploration. Interpretation of MCSEM data is still a very challenging problem, especially if one would like to take into account the realistic 3D structure of the subsurface. The inversion of MCSEM data is complicated by the fact that the EM response of a hydrocarbon-bearing reservoir is very weak in comparison with the background EM fields generated by an electric dipole transmitter in complex geoelectrical structures formed by a conductive sea-water layer and the terranes beneath it. In this paper, we present a review of the recent developments in the area of large-scale 3D EM forward modeling and inversion. Our approach is based on using a new integral form of Maxwell’s equations allowing for an inhomogeneous background conductivity, which results in a numerically effective integral representation for 3D EM field. This representation provides an efficient tool for the solution of 3D EM inverse problems. To obtain a robust inverse model of the conductivity distribution, we apply regularization based on a focusing stabilizing functional which allows for the recovery of models with both smooth and sharp geoelectrical boundaries. The method is implemented in a fully parallel computer code, which makes it possible to run large-scale 3D inversions on grids with millions of inversion cells. This new technique can be effectively used for active EM detection and monitoring of the subsurface targets.

  1. Fabrication of controlled-release budesonide tablets via desktop (FDM) 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Chang, Hanah; Sedough, Daniel; Hatton, Grace B; Wang, Jie; Buanz, Asma; Gaisford, Simon; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of using fused deposition modelling (FDM) 3D printing (3DP) technology with hot melt extrusion (HME) and fluid bed coating to fabricate modified-release budesonide dosage forms. Budesonide was sucessfully loaded into polyvinyl alcohol filaments using HME. The filaments were engineered into capsule-shaped tablets (caplets) containing 9mg budesonide using a FDM 3D printer; the caplets were then overcoated with a layer of enteric polymer. The final printed formulation was tested in a dynamic dissolution bicarbonate buffer system, and two commercial budesonide products, Cortiment® (Uceris®) and Entocort®, were also investigated for comparison. Budesonide release from the Entocort® formulation was rapid in conditions of the upper small intestine while release from the Cortiment® product was more delayed and very slow. In contrast, the new 3D printed caplet formulation started to release in the mid-small intestine but release then continued in a sustained manner throughout the distal intestine and colon. This work has demonstrated the potential of combining FDM 3DP with established pharmaceutical processes, including HME and film coating, to fabricate modified release oral dosage forms. PMID:26481468

  2. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  3. The Relationship between Spatial Visualization Ability and Students' Ability to Model 3D Objects from Engineering Assembly Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branoff, T. J.; Dobelis, M.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial abilities have been used as a predictor of success in several engineering and technology disciplines (Strong & Smith, 2001). In engineering graphics courses, scores on spatial tests have also been used to predict success (Adanez & Velasco, 2002; Leopold, Gorska, & Sorby, 2001). Other studies have shown that some type of intervention,…

  4. How Students Solve Problems in Spatial Geometry while Using a Software Application for Visualizing 3D Geometric Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widder, Mirela; Gorsky, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In schools, learning spatial geometry is usually dependent upon a student's ability to visualize three dimensional geometric configurations from two dimensional drawings. Such a process, however, often creates visual obstacles which are unique to spatial geometry. Useful software programs which realistically depict three dimensional geometric…

  5. Controls on the Flow Regime and Thermal Structure of the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: A Systematic 2-D and 3-D Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voci, Giuseppe; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Arc volcanism at subduction zones is likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure and, hence, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the principal controls on mantle wedge conditions. Here, we build on these previous studies by undertaking the first systematic 2-D and 3-D numerical investigation, across a wide parameter-space, into how hydration and thermal buoyancy influence the wedge's flow regime and associated thermal structure, above a kinematically driven subducting plate. We find that small-scale convection (SSC), resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, or drips, off the base of the overriding lithosphere, is a typical occurrence, if: (i) viscosities are < 5×1018 Pa s; and (ii) hydrous weakening of wedge rheology extends at least 100-150 km from the trench. In 2-D models, instabilities generally take the form of 'drips'. Although along-strike averages of wedge velocities and temperature in 3-D structure are consistent with those in 2-D, fluctuations are larger in 3-D. Furthermore, in 3-D, two separate, but interacting, longitudinal Richter roll systems form (with their axes aligned perpendicular to the trench), the first below the arc region and the second below the back-arc region. These instabilities result in transient and spatial temperature fluctuations of 100-150K, which are sufficient to influence melting, the stability of hydrous minerals and the dehydration of crustal material. Furthermore, they are efficient at eroding the overriding lithosphere, particularly in 3-D and, thus, provide a means to explain observations of high heat flow and thin back-arc lithosphere at many subduction zones, if back-arc mantle is hydrated.

  6. 3D joint inversion using seismic data and marine controlled-source electromagnetic data for evaluating gas hydrate concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Byun, J.; Seol, S. J.; Jeong, S.; Chung, Y.; Kwon, T.

    2015-12-01

    For many decades, gas hydrates have been received great attention as a potential source of natural gas. Therefore, the detailed information of structures of buried gas hydrates and their concentrations are prerequisite for the production for the gas hydrate as a reliable source of alternate energy. Recently, for this reason, a lot of gas hydrate assessment methods have been proposed by many researchers. However, it is still necessary to establish as new method for the further improvement of the accuracy of the 3D gas hydrate distribution. In this study, we present a 3D joint inversion method that provides superior quantitative information of gas hydrate distributions using 3D seismic data obtained by ocean-bottom cable (OBC) and marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. To verify our inversion method, we first built the general 3D gas hydrate model containing vertical methane-flow pathways. With the described model, we generated synthetic 3D OBC data and marine CSEM data using finite element modeling algorithms, respectively. In the joint inversion process, to obtain the high-resolution volumetric P-wave velocity structure, we applied the 3D full waveform inversion algorithm to the acquired OBC data. After that, the obtained P-wave velocity model is used as the structure constraint to compute cross-gradients with the updated resistivity model in the EM inversion process. Finally, petrophysical relations were applied to estimate volumetric gas hydrate concentrations. The proposed joint inversion process makes possible to obtain more precise quantitative gas hydrate assessment than inversion processes using only seismic or EM data. This technique can be helpful for accurate decision-making in gas hydrate development as well as in their production monitoring.

  7. Percolation properties of 3-D multiscale pore networks: how connectivity controls soil filtration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, E. M. A.; Bird, N. R. A.; Rieutord, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    Quantifying the connectivity of pore networks is a key issue not only for modelling fluid flow and solute transport in porous media but also for assessing the ability of soil ecosystems to filter bacteria, viruses and any type of living microorganisms as well inert particles which pose a contamination risk. Straining is the main mechanical component of filtration processes: it is due to size effects, when a given soil retains a conveyed entity larger than the pores through which it is attempting to pass. We postulate that the range of sizes of entities which can be trapped inside soils has to be associated with the large range of scales involved in natural soil structures and that information on the pore size distribution has to be complemented by information on a Critical Filtration Size (CFS) delimiting the transition between percolating and non percolating regimes in multiscale pore networks. We show that the mass fractal dimensions which are classically used in soil science to quantify scaling laws in observed pore size distributions can also be used to build 3-D multiscale models of pore networks exhibiting such a critical transition. We extend to the 3-D case a new theoretical approach recently developed to address the connectivity of 2-D fractal networks (Bird and Perrier, 2009). Theoretical arguments based on renormalisation functions provide insight into multi-scale connectivity and a first estimation of CFS. Numerical experiments on 3-D prefractal media confirm the qualitative theory. These results open the way towards a new methodology to estimate soil filtration efficiency from the construction of soil structural models to be calibrated on available multiscale data.

  8. Percolation properties of 3-D multiscale pore networks: how connectivity controls soil filtration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, E. M. A.; Bird, N. R. A.; Rieutord, T. B.

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying the connectivity of pore networks is a key issue not only for modelling fluid flow and solute transport in porous media but also for assessing the ability of soil ecosystems to filter bacteria, viruses and any type of living microorganisms as well inert particles which pose a contamination risk. Straining is the main mechanical component of filtration processes: it is due to size effects, when a given soil retains a conveyed entity larger than the pores through which it is attempting to pass. We postulate that the range of sizes of entities which can be trapped inside soils has to be associated with the large range of scales involved in natural soil structures and that information on the pore size distribution has to be complemented by information on a critical filtration size (CFS) delimiting the transition between percolating and non percolating regimes in multiscale pore networks. We show that the mass fractal dimensions which are classically used in soil science to quantify scaling laws in observed pore size distributions can also be used to build 3-D multiscale models of pore networks exhibiting such a critical transition. We extend to the 3-D case a new theoretical approach recently developed to address the connectivity of 2-D fractal networks (Bird and Perrier, 2009). Theoretical arguments based on renormalisation functions provide insight into multi-scale connectivity and a first estimation of CFS. Numerical experiments on 3-D prefractal media confirm the qualitative theory. These results open the way towards a new methodology to estimate soil filtration efficiency from the construction of soil structural models to be calibrated on available multiscale data.

  9. Examination about Influence for Precision of 3d Image Measurement from the Ground Control Point Measurement and Surface Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anai, T.; Kochi, N.; Yamada, M.; Sasaki, T.; Otani, H.; Sasaki, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kimoto, K.; Yasui, N.

    2015-05-01

    As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching) by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results of analysis made

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of Cu-Au-Mo ore deposits along the western Tethyan convergent margin: a link with the 3D subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, A.; Bertrand, G.; Loiselet, C.; Guillou-Frottier, L.; Jolivet, L.

    2012-12-01

    numerous mineralized systems within the upper crust. The Au-rich Oligocene - Neogene metallogenic episode in the eastern Mediterranean region is also correlated with an increase of mantle-derived and/or subduction-modified lithospheric mantle components in magmas. This feature may be a consequence of the emplacement of hot asthenosphere at shallow depth related to (1) the development of a wide back-arc region due to slab retreat such as in the Aegean domain and (2) a slab tear and/or a lithospheric delamination, suspected notably in the Carpathians and western Turkey where alkaline to shoshonitic volcanism occurs. As the behavior of the slab and asthenosphere below the upper plate seems to play a key-role in controlling the distribution of ore deposits, it is worth studying the dynamics of the 3D mantle flow related to slab retreat. Thus, 3D numerical models of subduction dynamics with realistic rheologies have been developed. Around the slab edges, the poloidal (i.e. in a vertical plane) and toroidal (i.e. in a horizontal plane) components of the mantle flow in subduction zone appear to depend on the slab rollback to plate velocity ratio. Heat and mass transfers induced by such 3D mantle flow, promote thermal anomalies in back-arc domain, observed on seismic tomographic models and necessary to produce fertile magmatism.

  11. Development status of a CZT spectrometer prototype with 3D spatial resolution for hard x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, N.; Caroli, E.; Basili, A.; Benassi, G.; Budtz Jørgensen, C.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Kuvvetli, I.; Milano, L.; Moscatelli, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Zanichelli, M.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-07-01

    The development of new focusing optics based on wide band Laue lenses operating from ~60 keV up to several hundred keV is particularly challenging. This type of hard X-ray or gamma ray optics requires a high performance focal plane detector in order to exploit to the best their intrinsic capabilities. We describe a three dimensional (3D) position sensitive detector prototype suitable as the basic module for a high efficiency Laue lens focal plane detector. This detector configuration is currently under study for use in a balloon payload dedicated to performing a high significance measurement of the polarization status of the Crab between 100 and 500 keV. The prototype is made by packing 8 linear modules, each composed of one basic sensitive unit bonded onto a thin supporting ceramic layer. Each unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode is segmented into 8 detection cells, each comprising one collecting strip and 8 surrounding drift strips. The drift strips are biased by a voltage divider. The cathode is divided into 4 horizontal strips for the reconstruction of the Z interaction position. The detector readout electronics is based on RENA-3 ASIC and the data handling system uses a custom electronics based on FPGA to provide the ASIC setting, the event handling logic, and the data acquisition. This paper mainly describes the components and the status of the undergoing activities for the construction of the proposed 3D CZT prototype and shows the results of the electronics tests.

  12. Microfluidic Fabrication of Bio-Inspired Microfibers with Controllable Magnetic Spindle-Knots for 3D Assembly and Water Collection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Heng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Ying-Mei; Jiang, Ming-Yue; Wu, Fang; Deng, Ke; Liu, Zhuang; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-08-12

    A simple and flexible approach is developed for controllable fabrication of spider-silk-like microfibers with tunable magnetic spindle-knots from biocompatible calcium alginate for controlled 3D assembly and water collection. Liquid jet templates with volatile oil drops containing magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles are generated from microfluidics for fabricating spider-silk-like microfibers. The structure of jet templates can be precisely adjusted by simply changing the flow rates to tailor the structures of the resultant spider-silk-like microfibers. The microfibers can be well manipulated by external magnetic fields for controllably moving, and patterning and assembling into different 2D and 3D structures. Moreover, the dehydrated spider-silk-like microfibers, with magnetic spindle-knots for collecting water drops, can be controllably assembled into spider-web-like structures for excellent water collection. These spider-silk-like microfibers are promising as functional building blocks for engineering complex 3D scaffolds for water collection, cell culture, and tissue engineering. PMID:26192108

  13. In vivo measurement of arterial and venous oxygenation in the rat using 3D spectral-spatial electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, P; Shankar, R A; Zweier, J L

    1998-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) instrumentation, enabling the performance of three-dimensional spectral-spatial images of free radicals, has been developed to study spatially defined differences in tissue metabolism and oxygenation. Using this instrumentation 3D images of nitroxides in rat tail were obtained. The images visualize the arterial and venous vasculature in the tail segment. Based on the exchange broadening influence of oxygen on the EPR linewidth of nitroxides, we performed localized oxygen measurements in the in vivo rat. An oxygen concentration of 300+/-30 microM was measured in the arteries and 50+/-20 microM in the veins. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing in vivo, non-invasive measurements and mapping of localized oxygenation in small animals using spectral-spatial EPR imaging techniques. PMID:9703045

  14. Designing a binding interface for control of cancer cell adhesion via 3D topography and metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    PubMed

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J

    2011-08-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three-dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac(5)ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analog of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bio-orthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  15. Magnetic field induced controllable self-assembly of maghemite nanocrystals: From 3D arrays to 1D nanochains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Chen, Qianwang; Chen, Rongsheng

    2015-08-01

    A hydrothermal process has been used to synthesize walnut-like maghemite superstructures which can be further self-assembled in a controllable manner into ordered three-dimensional (3D) architectures and one-dimensional (1D) nanochains in the presence of different external magnetic field. The assembly behavior of the maghemite nanoparticles isclosely related to the van der Waals interactions and external-field-induced magnetic dipole interactions. The magnetic properties of these nanostructures are also investigated.

  16. Myosin-II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in 3D by minimizing cell surface curvature

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert A.; Myers, Kenneth A.; Desai, Ravi A.; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S.; Adelstein, Robert; Waterman, Clare M.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We utilized endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin-II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin-II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell surface curvature. Utilizing micro-fabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin-II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between myosin-II regulation by and control of curvature drives cycles of localized cortical myosin-II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration. PMID:25621949

  17. Statistical Analysis of 3D Images Detects Regular Spatial Distributions of Centromeres and Chromocenters in Animal and Plant Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Biot, Eric; Adenot, Pierre-Gaël; Hue-Beauvais, Cathy; Houba-Hérin, Nicole; Duranthon, Véronique; Devinoy, Eve; Beaujean, Nathalie; Gaudin, Valérie; Maurin, Yves; Debey, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the interphase nucleus is organized in morphologically and/or functionally distinct nuclear “compartments”. Numerous studies highlight functional relationships between the spatial organization of the nucleus and gene regulation. This raises the question of whether nuclear organization principles exist and, if so, whether they are identical in the animal and plant kingdoms. We addressed this issue through the investigation of the three-dimensional distribution of the centromeres and chromocenters. We investigated five very diverse populations of interphase nuclei at different differentiation stages in their physiological environment, belonging to rabbit embryos at the 8-cell and blastocyst stages, differentiated rabbit mammary epithelial cells during lactation, and differentiated cells of Arabidopsis thaliana plantlets. We developed new tools based on the processing of confocal images and a new statistical approach based on G- and F- distance functions used in spatial statistics. Our original computational scheme takes into account both size and shape variability by comparing, for each nucleus, the observed distribution against a reference distribution estimated by Monte-Carlo sampling over the same nucleus. This implicit normalization allowed similar data processing and extraction of rules in the five differentiated nuclei populations of the three studied biological systems, despite differences in chromosome number, genome organization and heterochromatin content. We showed that centromeres/chromocenters form significantly more regularly spaced patterns than expected under a completely random situation, suggesting that repulsive constraints or spatial inhomogeneities underlay the spatial organization of heterochromatic compartments. The proposed technique should be useful for identifying further spatial features in a wide range of cell types. PMID:20628576

  18. GPU-Accelerated Forward and Back-Projections with Spatially Varying Kernels for 3D DIRECT TOF PET Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ha, S.; Matej, S.; Ispiryan, M.; Mueller, K.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a GPU-accelerated framework that efficiently models spatially (shift) variant system response kernels and performs forward- and back-projection operations with these kernels for the DIRECT (Direct Image Reconstruction for TOF) iterative reconstruction approach. Inherent challenges arise from the poor memory cache performance at non-axis aligned TOF directions. Focusing on the GPU memory access patterns, we utilize different kinds of GPU memory according to these patterns in order to maximize the memory cache performance. We also exploit the GPU instruction-level parallelism to efficiently hide long latencies from the memory operations. Our experiments indicate that our GPU implementation of the projection operators has slightly faster or approximately comparable time performance than FFT-based approaches using state-of-the-art FFTW routines. However, most importantly, our GPU framework can also efficiently handle any generic system response kernels, such as spatially symmetric and shift-variant as well as spatially asymmetric and shift-variant, both of which an FFT-based approach cannot cope with. PMID:23531763

  19. Chemotaxis of Caenorhabditis elegans in complex media: crawling, burrowing, 2D and 3D swimming, and controlled fluctuations hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amar; Bilbao, Alejandro; Rahman, Mizanur; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful genetic model, essential for studies in diverse areas ranging from behavior to neuroscience to aging, and locomotion and chemotaxis are the two key observables used. We combine our recently developed theory of nematode locomotion and turning maneuvers [Phys. Fluids 25, 081902 (2013)] with simple models of chemosensation to analyze nematode chemotaxis strategies in 2D and 3D environments. We show that the sharp-turn (pirouette) chemotaxis mechanism is efficient in diverse media; in particular, the nematode does not need to adjust the sensing or motion-control parameters to efficiently chemotax in 2D crawling, 3D burrowing, and 2D or 3D swimming. In contrast, the graduate-turn mechanism becomes inefficient in swimming, unless a phase-shift is introduced between the sensing signal and modulation of body wave to generate the gradual turn. We hypothesize that there exists a new ``controlled fluctuations'' chemotaxis mechanism, in which the nematode changes the intensity of undulation fluctuations to adjust the persistence length of the trajectory in response to a variation in chemoattractant concentration. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET 1059745.

  20. Spatially Resolved Energetic Electron Properties for the 21 May 2004 Flare from Radio Observations and 3D Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated in detail the 21 May 2004 flare using simultaneous observations of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, the Nobeyama Radiopolarimeters, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The flare images in different spectral ranges reveal a well-defined single flaring loop in this event. We simulated the gyrosynchrotron microwave emission using the recently developed interactive IDL tool GX Simulator. By comparing the simulation results with the observations, we deduced the spatial and spectral properties of the non-thermal electron distribution. The microwave emission has been found to be produced by the high-energy electrons (> 100 keV) with a relatively hard spectrum ( δ≃2); the electrons were strongly concentrated near the loop top. At the same time, the number of high-energy electrons near the footpoints was too low to be detected in the RHESSI images and spatially unresolved data. The SOHO Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope images and the low-frequency microwave spectra suggest the presence of an extended "envelope" of the loop with lower magnetic field. Most likely, the energetic electron distribution in the considered flare reflects the localized (near the loop top) particle acceleration (injection) process accompanied by trapping and scattering.

  1. Controlling integrin specificity and stem cell differentiation in 2-D and 3-D environments through regulation of fibronectin domain stability

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Rothenfluh, Dominique A.; Rempel, Sandra A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) exerts powerful control over many cellular phenomena, including stem cell differentiation. As such, design and modulation of ECM analogs to ligate specific integrin is a promising approach to control cellular processes in vitro and in vivo for regenerative medicine strategies. Although fibronectin (FN), a crucial ECM protein in tissue development and repair, and its RGD peptide are widely used for cell adhesion, the promiscuity with which they engage integrins leads to difficulty in control of receptor-specific interactions. Recent simulations of force-mediated unfolding of FN domains and sequences analysis of human versus mouse FN suggest that the structural stability of the FN’s central cell-binding domains (FN III9-10) affects its integrin specificity. Through production of FN III9-10 variants with variable stabilities, we obtained ligands that present different specificities for the integrin α5β1 and that can be covalently linked into fibrin matrices. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of α5β1 integrin-specific engagement to influence human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) behavior in 2D and 3D environments. Our data indicate that α5β1 has an important role in the control of MSC osteogenic differentiation. FN fragments with increased specificity for α5β1 versus αvβ3 results in significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in 2D and in a clinically relevant 3D fibrin matrix system, although attachment/spreading and proliferation were comparable with that on full-length FN. This work shows how integrin-dependant cellular interactions with the ECM can be engineered to control stem cell fate, within a system appropriate for both 3D cell culture and tissue engineering. PMID:19027948

  2. Remote sensing solution using 3-D flash LADAR for automated control of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Brian J.; Fuka, Jennifer A.; Burwell, Alan C.; Gray, Stephen W.; Hubbard, Mason J.; Schenkel, Joseph W.

    2015-09-01

    The majority of image quality studies in the field of remote sensing have been performed on systems with conventional aperture functions. These systems have well-understood image quality tradeoffs, characterized by the General Image Quality Equation (GIQE). Advanced, next-generation imaging systems present challenges to both post-processing and image quality prediction. Examples include sparse apertures, synthetic apertures, coded apertures and phase elements. As a result of the non-conventional point spread functions of these systems, post-processing becomes a critical step in the imaging process and artifacts arise that are more complicated than simple edge overshoot. Previous research at the Rochester Institute of Technology's Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory has resulted in a modeling methodology for sparse and segmented aperture systems, the validation of which will be the focus of this work. This methodology has predicted some unique post-processing artifacts that arise when a sparse aperture system with wavefront error is used over a large (panchromatic) spectral bandpass. Since these artifacts are unique to sparse aperture systems, they have not yet been observed in any real-world data. In this work, a laboratory setup and initial results for a model validation study will be described. Initial results will focus on the validation of spatial frequency response predictions and verification of post-processing artifacts. The goal of this study is to validate the artifact and spatial frequency response predictions of this model. This will allow model predictions to be used in image quality studies, such as aperture design optimization, and the signal-to-noise vs. post-processing artifact tradeoff resulting from choosing a panchromatic vs. multispectral system.

  3. spMC: an R-package for 3D lithological reconstructions based on spatial Markov chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luca; Fabbri, Paolo; Gaetan, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the spatial Markov Chains (spMC) R-package and a case study of subsoil simulation/prediction located in a plain site of Northeastern Italy. spMC is a quite complete collection of advanced methods for data inspection, besides spMC implements Markov Chain models to estimate experimental transition probabilities of categorical lithological data. Furthermore, simulation methods based on most known prediction methods (as indicator Kriging and CoKriging) were implemented in spMC package. Moreover, other more advanced methods are available for simulations, e.g. path methods and Bayesian procedures, that exploit the maximum entropy. Since the spMC package was developed for intensive geostatistical computations, part of the code is implemented for parallel computations via the OpenMP constructs. A final analysis of this computational efficiency compares the simulation/prediction algorithms by using different numbers of CPU cores, and considering the example data set of the case study included in the package.

  4. Pitching motion control of a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing-body model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Minami, Keisuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2014-11-01

    Free flights and a pitching motion control of a butterfly-like flapping wing-body model are numerically investigated by using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. The model flaps downward for generating the lift force and backward for generating the thrust force. Although the model can go upward against the gravity by the generated lift force, the model generates the nose-up torque, consequently gets off-balance. In this study, we discuss a way to control the pitching motion by flexing the body of the wing-body model like an actual butterfly. The body of the model is composed of two straight rigid rod connected by a rotary actuator. It is found that the pitching angle is suppressed in the range of +/-5° by using the proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) control for the input torque of the rotary actuator.

  5. 3D micropositioning control based on stereo microscopic visual servoing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Xiaopeng; Li, Huiguang; Wang, Shuai; Li, Zhiquan; Li, Guoyou

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the global visual servoing micropositioning control method is analyzed and the imaging model is derived based on the CMO type stereo light microscopes (SLM). The model contains no depth information and the left and right image information is used to obtain the image Jacobian matrix. Considering the kinematics characteristics of micro robot, we design an image-based controller. The experimental and simulation results based on the four degree-offreedom (DOF) microrobot system demonstrate the validity of the theory in this paper.

  6. Shallow subsurface control on earthquake damage patterns: first results from a 3D geological voxel model study (Tokyo Lowland, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafleu, Jan; Busschers, Freek; Tanabe, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The Tokyo Lowland is situated in a Neogene sedimentary basin near the triple junction of the North American, Pacific, and Philippine tectonic plates. The basin is filled with Neogene and Quaternary sediments up to a thickness of 3 km. In the upper 70 m of the basin, thick sequences of soft Holocene sediments occur which are assumed to have played a key role in the spatial variation of damage intensity during the 1923 Kanto earthquake (Magnitude 7.9 to 8.3). Historical records show this earthquake destroyed large parts of the Tokyo urban area which in that time was largely made up by wooden houses. Although the epicentre was 70 km to the southwest of Tokyo, severe damage occurred north of the city centre, presumably due to ground motion amplification in the soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface. In order to assess the presumed relation between the damage pattern of the 1923 earthquake and the occurrence of soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface, we constructed a 3D geological voxel model of the central part of the Tokyo Lowland. The model was constructed using a methodology originally developed for the lowlands of the Netherlands. The modelling workflow basically consists of three steps. First, some 10,000 borehole descriptions (gathered for geomechanical purposes), were subdivided into geological units that have uniform sediment characteristics, using both lithological and geomechanical (N-value) criteria. Second, 2D bounding surfaces were constructed, representing tops and bases of the geological units. These surfaces were used to place each voxel (100 by 100 by 1 m) within the correct geological unit. The N-values and lithological units in the borehole descriptions were subsequently used to perform a 3D stochastic interpolation of N-value and lithological class within each geological unit. Using a vertical voxel stack analysis, we were able to create a map showing the accumulated thickness of soft muds in the Holocene succession. A

  7. Spatial filters for shape control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has emerged a new class of sensors, called spatial filters, for structures which respond over a significant gauge length. Examples include piezoelectric laminate PVDF film, modal domain optical fiber sensors, and holographic sensors. These sensors have a unique capability in that they can be fabricated to locally alter their sensitivity to the measurand. In this paper we discuss how these sensors can be used for the implementation of control algorithms for the suppression of acoustic radiation from flexible structures. Based on this relationship between the total power radiated to the far field to the modal velocities of the structure, we show how the sensor placement to optimize the control algorithm to suppress the radiated power.

  8. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Preliminary Experiences with Rotational Acquisitions and 3D Reconstructions for Therapy Control

    SciTech Connect

    Hodek-Wuerz, Roman Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Wilhelm, Kai; Lovblad, Karl O.; Babic, Drazenko; Rufenacht, Daniel A.; Wetzel, Stefan G.

    2006-10-15

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is carried out under fluoroscopic control in most centers. The exclusion of implant leakage and the assessment of implant distribution might be difficult to assess based on two-dimensional radiographic projection images only. We evaluated the feasibility of performing a follow-up examination after PVP with rotational acquisitions and volumetric reconstructions in the angio suite. Twenty consecutive patients underwent standard PVP procedures under fluoroscopic control. Immediate postprocedure evaluation of the implant distribution in the angio suite (BV 3000; Philips, The Netherlands) was performed using rotational acquisitions (typical parameters for the image acquisition included a 17-cm field-of-view, 200 acquired images for a total angular range of 180{sup o}). Postprocessing of acquired volumetric datasets included multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and volume rendering technique (VRT) images that were displayed as two-dimensional slabs or as entire three-dimensional volumes. Image evaluation included lesion and implant assessment with special attention given to implant leakage. Findings from rotational acquisitions were compared to findings from postinterventional CT. The time to perform and to postprocess the rotational acquisitions was in all cases less then 10 min. Assessment of implant distribution after PVP using rotational image acquisition methods and volumetric reconstructions was possible in all patients. Cement distribution and potential leakage sites were visualized best on MIP images presented as slabs. From a total of 33 detected leakages with CT, 30 could be correctly detected by rotational image acquisition. Rotational image acquisitions and volumetric reconstruction methods provided a fast method to control radiographically the result of PVP in our cases.

  9. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyka, Grzegorz; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  10. Depth Camera-Based 3D Hand Gesture Controls with Immersive Tactile Feedback for Natural Mid-Air Gesture Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangtaek; Kim, Joongrock; Choi, Jaesung; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Sangyoun

    2015-01-01

    Vision-based hand gesture interactions are natural and intuitive when interacting with computers, since we naturally exploit gestures to communicate with other people. However, it is agreed that users suffer from discomfort and fatigue when using gesture-controlled interfaces, due to the lack of physical feedback. To solve the problem, we propose a novel complete solution of a hand gesture control system employing immersive tactile feedback to the user's hand. For this goal, we first developed a fast and accurate hand-tracking algorithm with a Kinect sensor using the proposed MLBP (modified local binary pattern) that can efficiently analyze 3D shapes in depth images. The superiority of our tracking method was verified in terms of tracking accuracy and speed by comparing with existing methods, Natural Interaction Technology for End-user (NITE), 3D Hand Tracker and CamShift. As the second step, a new tactile feedback technology with a piezoelectric actuator has been developed and integrated into the developed hand tracking algorithm, including the DTW (dynamic time warping) gesture recognition algorithm for a complete solution of an immersive gesture control system. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the integrated system were conducted with human subjects, and the results demonstrate that our gesture control with tactile feedback is a promising technology compared to a vision-based gesture control system that has typically no feedback for the user's gesture inputs. Our study provides researchers and designers with informative guidelines to develop more natural gesture control systems or immersive user interfaces with haptic feedback. PMID:25580901

  11. Depth camera-based 3D hand gesture controls with immersive tactile feedback for natural mid-air gesture interactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangtaek; Kim, Joongrock; Choi, Jaesung; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Sangyoun

    2015-01-01

    Vision-based hand gesture interactions are natural and intuitive when interacting with computers, since we naturally exploit gestures to communicate with other people. However, it is agreed that users suffer from discomfort and fatigue when using gesture-controlled interfaces, due to the lack of physical feedback. To solve the problem, we propose a novel complete solution of a hand gesture control system employing immersive tactile feedback to the user's hand. For this goal, we first developed a fast and accurate hand-tracking algorithm with a Kinect sensor using the proposed MLBP (modified local binary pattern) that can efficiently analyze 3D shapes in depth images. The superiority of our tracking method was verified in terms of tracking accuracy and speed by comparing with existing methods, Natural Interaction Technology for End-user (NITE), 3D Hand Tracker and CamShift. As the second step, a new tactile feedback technology with a piezoelectric actuator has been developed and integrated into the developed hand tracking algorithm, including the DTW (dynamic time warping) gesture recognition algorithm for a complete solution of an immersive gesture control system. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the integrated system were conducted with human subjects, and the results demonstrate that our gesture control with tactile feedback is a promising technology compared to a vision-based gesture control system that has typically no feedback for the user's gesture inputs. Our study provides researchers and designers with informative guidelines to develop more natural gesture control systems or immersive user interfaces with haptic feedback. PMID:25580901

  12. A Portable Streambed Permeameter Built With 3-D Printed and Arduino Controller/Data-Logger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selker, A.; Drake, S. A.; Selker, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Streambed permeability is an important but difficult to measure parameter that regulates fluid exchange and riverine biological activity. We developed a portable, in-situ permeameter that works in streambeds characterized by a range of soil particle sizes. The device uses an Arduino controller to drive a pump that establishes a varying pressure head across the medium of interest. This requires a secure seal between the streambed and permeameter housing. Much of our effort was devoted to establishing this seal using unconventional means, including castable ultra-soft rubber. We determine relative permeability using both the difference in amplitude between the measured pressure gradient and that given by the hydrostatic forces of the fluid column, as well as the phase shift between the hydrostatic forcing and the responding pressure as characterized by Darcian flow through the permeable medium. We consider it notable that the data acquisition, control and fluid delivery system could equally be employed as a well-mounted permeameter for small wells, lab permeability tests in cores, as well as air permeability tests in snow and soil.

  13. 3-D Coupled FE Analysis and Experimental Validation of Restrained Welding to Control Angular Distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damale, A. V.; Nandurkar, K. N.

    2012-10-01

    Welding induced distortion is one of the critical defects in the welded structures. Angular distortion is most pronounced which badly affects the welded structures. Non-uniform heating during welding develops this angular distortion. Various methods are available to control/minimize the welding distortions. One of the methods available to control this distortion is restraining, in which clamping pressure is applied on the deforming edges of the plates. In the present study, a 3-dimensional coupled transient thermal analysis is done for simulating the restraining phenomenon of welding. The developed transient thermal heat source was used to simulate the arc welding phenomenon. The element birth and death technique was used for simulating filler material deposition. Thermal model was verified by comparing the macrograph of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and the weld and verification of structural model was done by comparing the measured and predicted angular distortions. Experimental and Finite Element (FE) analysis is done for both conventional welding and welding under restraining pressure. Transient thermal and non-linear structural analyses were carried out in order to predict angular distortions. The Finite Element Method analysis and experimental verification is done for manual metal arc welding process.

  14. Field calibration of binocular stereo vision based on fast reconstruction of 3D control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Changjie; Fu, Luhua; Guo, Yin

    2015-08-01

    Construction of high-speed railway in China has entered a period of rapid growth. To accurately and quickly obtain the dynamic envelope curve of high-speed vehicle is an important guarantee for safe driving. The measuring system is based on binocular stereo vision. Considering the difficulties in field calibration such as environmental changes and time limits, carried out a field calibration method based on fast reconstruction of three-dimensional control field. With the rapid assembly of pre-calibrated three-dimensional control field, whose coordinate accuracy is guaranteed by manufacture accuracy and calibrated by V-STARS, two cameras take a quick shot of it at the same time. The field calibration parameters are then solved by the method combining linear solution with nonlinear optimization. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy can reach up to +/- 0.5mm, and more importantly, in the premise of guaranteeing accuracy, the speed of the calibration and the portability of the devices have been improved considerably.

  15. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  16. 3D decompaction and sequential restoration: a tool to quantify sedimentary and tectonic control on elusive Quaternary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrogi, Chiara; Emanuele Maesano, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Basin-wide detailed 3D model, deeply constrained by the interpretation of an impressive dense seismic dataset (12.000 km, provided confidentially by ENI S.p.A.) and 136 well stratigraphies, is the core of a workflow of decompaction and sequential restoration in 3D aimed to quantify the sedimentation and uplift rate in the central part of the Po Plain (northern Italy), during Quaternary. The Po basin is the common foredeep of two opposite verging chains, the Southern Alps, to the north, and the Northern Apennines, to the south, that influenced the evolution of the foreland basin from Paleogene onward. In this particular setting there are many examples of interaction of sedimentary processes and tectonics, both at regional and local scale. During the Quaternary the complex interaction of tectonic processes, sea-level fluctuations, climate changes, and sediment supply produced the filling of the basin with the progradation of the fluvio-deltaic system, from west toward east. The most important tectonic phases can be easily recognized along the basin margin marked by the deformation and tilting of river terraces and of exposed syntectonic sediments; conversely their detection is particularly difficult in the central-distal part of the basin. In such structurally complex area analysis of syntectonic deposits and growth strata are strategic to describe the basin evolution and tectonic control; in their analysis 3D decompaction and regional tilting must be taken into account to assess the residual vertical separation that can be attributed to tectonic processes only. The Pleistocene portion of a detailed 3D model, build in the framework of the EU-funded GeoMol Project, is the starting point of a sequential restoration workflow in 3D that included the unfolding and decompaction of 6, chronologically constrained, sedimentary units ranging from 1.5 to 0.45 Myr. This previously unavailable detail in the definition of the geometry of Quaternary bodies in the central part of

  17. Analytical solution to 3D SPECT reconstruction with non-uniform attenuation, scatter, and spatially-variant resolution variation for variable focal-length fan-beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junhai; Lu, Hongbing; Li, Tianfang; Liang, Zhengrong

    2003-05-01

    In the past decades, analytical (non-iterative) methods have been extensively investigated and developed for the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, it becomes possible only recently when the exact analytic non-uniform attenuation reconstruction algorithm was derived. Based on the explicit inversion formula for the attenuated Radon transform discovered by Novikov (2000), we extended the previous researches of inverting the attenuated Radon transform of parallel-beam collimation geometry to fan-beam and variable focal-length fan-beam (VFF) collimators and proposed an efficient, analytical solution to 3D SPECT reconstruction with VFF collimators, which compensates simultaneously for non-uniform attenuation, scatter, and spatially-variant or distance-dependent resolution variation (DDRV), as well as suppression of signal-dependent non-stationary Poisson noise. In this procedure, to avoid the reconstructed images being corrupted by the presence of severe noise, we apply a Karhune-Loève (K-L) domain adaptive Wiener filter, which accurately treats the non-stationary Poisson noise. The scatter is then removed by our scatter estimation method, which is based on the energy spectrum and modified from the triple-energy-window acquisition protocol. For the correction of DDRV, a distance-dependent deconvolution is adapted to provide a solution that realistically characterizes the resolution kernel in a real SPECT system. Finally image is reconstructed using our VFF non-uniform attenuation inversion formula.

  18. A contractile and counterbalancing adhesion system controls the 3D shape of crawling cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Dylan T.; Shao, Lin; Ott, Carolyn; Pasapera, Ana M.; Fischer, Robert S.; Baird, Michelle A.; Der Loughian, Christelle; Delanoe-Ayari, Helene; Paszek, Matthew J.; Davidson, Michael W.; Betzig, Eric

    2014-01-01

    How adherent and contractile systems coordinate to promote cell shape changes is unclear. Here, we define a counterbalanced adhesion/contraction model for cell shape control. Live-cell microscopy data showed a crucial role for a contractile meshwork at the top of the cell, which is composed of actin arcs and myosin IIA filaments. The contractile actin meshwork is organized like muscle sarcomeres, with repeating myosin II filaments separated by the actin bundling protein α-actinin, and is mechanically coupled to noncontractile dorsal actin fibers that run from top to bottom in the cell. When the meshwork contracts, it pulls the dorsal fibers away from the substrate. This pulling force is counterbalanced by the dorsal fibers’ attachment to focal adhesions, causing the fibers to bend downward and flattening the cell. This model is likely to be relevant for understanding how cells configure themselves to complex surfaces, protrude into tight spaces, and generate three-dimensional forces on the growth substrate under both healthy and diseased conditions. PMID:24711500

  19. Improving the management of multimorbidity in general practice: protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial (The 3D Study)

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Katherine; Bower, Peter; Brookes, Sara; Fitzpatrick, Bridie; Guthrie, Bruce; Shaw, Alison; Mercer, Stewart; Rafi, Imran; Thorn, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of people are living with multimorbidity. The evidence base for how best to manage these patients is weak. Current clinical guidelines generally focus on single conditions, which may not reflect the needs of patients with multimorbidity. The aim of the 3D study is to develop, implement and evaluate an intervention to improve the management of patients with multimorbidity in general practice. Methods and analysis This is a pragmatic two-arm cluster randomised controlled trial. 32 general practices around Bristol, Greater Manchester and Glasgow will be randomised to receive either the ‘3D intervention’ or usual care. 3D is a complex intervention including components affecting practice organisation, the conduct of patient reviews, integration with secondary care and measures to promote change in practice organisation. Changes include improving continuity of care and replacing reviews of each disease with patient-centred reviews with a focus on patients' quality of life, mental health and polypharmacy. We aim to recruit 1383 patients who have 3 or more chronic conditions. This provides 90% power at 5% significance level to detect an effect size of 0.27 SDs in the primary outcome, which is health-related quality of life at 15 months using the EQ-5D-5L. Secondary outcome measures assess patient centredness, illness burden and treatment burden. The primary analysis will be a multilevel regression model adjusted for baseline, stratification/minimisation, clustering and important co-variables. Nested process evaluation will assess implementation, mechanisms of effectiveness and interaction of the intervention with local context. Economic analysis of cost-consequences and cost-effectiveness will be based on quality-adjusted life years. Ethics and dissemination This study has approval from South-West (Frenchay) National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee (14/SW/0011). Findings will be disseminated via final report, peer

  20. High temporal and spatial resolution 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the hands and feet.

    PubMed

    Haider, Clifton R; Riederer, Stephen J; Borisch, Eric A; Glockner, James F; Grimm, Roger C; Hulshizer, Thomas C; Macedo, Thanila A; Mostardi, Petrice M; Rossman, Phillip J; Vrtiska, Terri J; Young, Phillip M

    2011-07-01

    Methods are described for generating 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiograms of the hands and feet. Given targeted spatial resolution and frame times, it is shown that acceleration of about one order of magnitude or more is necessary. This is obtained by a combination of 2D sensitivity encoding (SENSE) and homodyne (HD) acceleration methods. Image update times from 3.4-6.8 seconds are provided in conjunction with view sharing. Modular receiver coil arrays are described which can be designed to the targeted vascular region. Images representative of the technique are generated in the vasculature of the hands and feet in volunteers and in patient studies. PMID:21698702

  1. Flexible Fabrication of Shape-Controlled Collagen Building Blocks for Self-Assembly of 3D Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Meng, Zhaoxu; Ma, Jingyun; Shi, Yang; Xu, Hui; Lykkemark, Simon; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-08-12

    Creating artificial tissue-like structures that possess the functionality, specificity, and architecture of native tissues remains a big challenge. A new and straightforward strategy for generating shape-controlled collagen building blocks with a well-defined architecture is presented, which can be used for self-assembly of complex 3D microtissues. Collagen blocks with tunable geometries are controllably produced and released via a membrane-templated microdevice. The formation of functional microtissues by embedding tissue-specific cells into collagen blocks with expression of specific proteins is described. The spontaneous self-assembly of cell-laden collagen blocks into organized tissue constructs with predetermined configurations is demonstrated, which are largely driven by the synergistic effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. This new strategy would open up new avenues for the study of tissue/organ morphogenesis, and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25920010

  2. 3D Tomography of Accretionary Lapilli From The Island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy): Spatial Arrangement, Internal Structure, Grain Size Distribution and Chemical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Ielpo, M.; Valentini, L.; Laeger, K.; Paredes, J.; Petrelli, M.; Costa, A.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Secche di Lazzaro formation (7 Ka) is a phreatomagmatic deposit in the south-western part of the island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). The volcanic sequence is constituted by three main sub-units. In two of them abundant accretionary lapilli are present. We performed granulometric analysis to describe the spatial arrangement and the grain-size distribution of the lapilli inside the deposit. Lapilli were characterized by SEM investigations (BSE images). EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses of major and trace elements on glasses and minerals were performed. Although BSE images provide accurate morphological information, they do not allow the real 3D microstructure to be accessed. Therefore, non-invasive 3D imaging of the lapilli was performed by X-ray micro-tomography (X-mCT). The results of the X-mCT measurements provided a set of 2D cross-sectional slices stacked along the vertical axis, with a voxel size varying between 2.7 and 4.1 mm, depending on the size of the sample. The X-mCT images represent a mapping of X-ray attenuation, which in turn depends on the density of the phases distributed within the sample. This technique helped us to better constrain the particle and crystal distribution inside the accretionary lapilli. The recognized phases are: glass, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and Ti-Fe minerals. We discover also a high concentration of Na, Cl and SO3 in the ash matrix. This evidence is ubiquitous in all the accretionary lapilli. The work presented here could define a new route for future studies in the field of physical volcanology as X-ray micro-tomography could be a useful, non destructive technique to better characterize the internal structure of accretionary lapilli helping us to describe grain-size distribution of component particles and their spatial distribution within aggregates.

  3. The Spatial Extent and Distribution of Star Formation in 3D-HST Mergers at z is approximately 1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; da Cunha, Elisabete; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cox, Thomas J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Jonsson, Patrik; Lundgren, Britt; Maseda, Michael V.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of star formation in a sample of 60 visually identified galaxy merger candidates at z greater than 1. Our sample, drawn from the 3D-HST survey, is flux-limited and was selected to have high star formation rates based on fits of their broad-band, low spatial resolution spectral energy distributions. It includes plausible pre-merger (close pairs) and post-merger (single objects with tidal features) systems,with total stellar masses and star formation rates derived from multi-wavelength photometry. Here we use near-infrared slitless spectra from 3D-HST which produce H or [OIII] emission line maps as proxies for star-formation maps. This provides a first comprehensive high-resolution, empirical picture of where star formation occurred in galaxy mergers at the epoch of peak cosmic star formation rate. We find that detectable star formation can occur in one or both galaxy centres, or in tidal tails. The most common case (58%) is that star formation is largely concentrated in a single, compact region, coincident with the centre of (one of) the merger components. No correlations between star formation morphology and redshift, total stellar mass, or star formation rate are found. A restricted set of hydrodynamical merger simulationsbetween similarly massive and gas-rich objects implies that star formation should be detectable in both merger components, when the gas fractions of the individual components are the same. This suggests that z is approximately 1.5 mergers typically occur between galaxies whose gas fractions, masses, andor star formation rates are distinctly different from one another.

  4. Enhanced detection of 3D individual trees in forested areas using airborne full-waveform LiDAR data by combining normalized cuts with spatial density clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W.; Krzystek, P.; Heurich, M.

    2013-10-01

    A detailed understanding of the spatial distribution of forest understory is important but difficult. LiDAR remote sensing has been developing as a promising additional instrument to the conventional field work towards automated forest inventory. Unfortunately, understory (up to 50% of the top-tree height) in mixed and multilayered forests is often ignored due to a difficult observation scenario and limitation of the tree detection algorithm. Currently, the full-waveform (FWF) LiDAR with high penetration ability against overstory crowns can give us new hope to resolve the forest understory. Former approach based on 3D segmentation confirmed that the tree detection rates in both middle and lower forest layers are still low. Therefore, detecting sub-dominant and suppressed trees cannot be regarded as fully solved. In this work, we aim to improve the performance of the FWF laser scanner for the mapping of forest understory. The paper is to develop an enhanced methodology for detecting 3D individual trees by partitioning point clouds of airborne LiDAR. After extracting 3D coordinates of the laser beam echoes, the pulse intensity and width by waveform decomposition, the newly developed approach resolves 3D single trees are by an integrated approach, which delineates tree crowns by applying normalized cuts segmentation to the graph structure of local dense modes in point clouds constructed by mean shift clustering. In the context of our strategy, the mean shift clusters approximate primitives of (sub) single trees in LiDAR data and allow to define more significant features to reflect geometric and reflectional characteristics towards the single tree level. The developed methodology can be regarded as an object-based point cloud analysis approach for tree detection and is applied to datasets captured with the Riegl LMS-Q560 laser scanner at a point density of 25 points/m2 in the Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany, respectively under leaf-on and leaf-off conditions

  5. From Rice Bran to High Energy Density Supercapacitors: A New Route to Control Porous Structure of 3D Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianhua; Cao, Chuanbao; Ma, Xilan; Idrees, Faryal; Xu, Bin; Hao, Xin; Lin, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Controlled micro/mesopores interconnected structures of three-dimensional (3D) carbon with high specific surface areas (SSA) are successfully prepared by carbonization and activation of biomass (raw rice brans) through KOH. The highest SSA of 2475 m2 g−1 with optimized pore volume of 1.21 cm3 g−1 (40% for mesopores) is achieved for KOH/RBC = 4 mass ratio, than others. The as-prepared 3D porous carbon-based electrode materials for supercapacitors exhibit high specific capacitance specifically at large current densities of 10 A g−1 and 100 A g−1 i.e., 265 F g−1 and 182 F g−1 in 6 M KOH electrolyte, respectively. Moreover, a high power density ca. 1223 W kg−1 (550 W L−1) and energy density 70 W h kg−1 (32 W h L−1) are achieved on the base of active material loading (~10 mg cm2) in the ionic liquid. The findings can open a new avenue to use abundant agricultural by-products as ideal materials with promising applications in high-performance energy-storage devices. PMID:25434348

  6. 3D phenotyping and quantitative trait locus mapping identify core regions of the rice genome controlling root architecture

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Christopher N.; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S.; Anderson, Jill T.; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Zurek, Paul R.; Symonova, Olga; Zheng, Ying; Bucksch, Alexander; Mileyko, Yuriy; Galkovskyi, Taras; Moore, Brad T.; Harer, John; Edelsbrunner, Herbert; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Weitz, Joshua S.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of genes that control root system architecture in crop plants requires innovations that enable high-throughput and accurate measurements of root system architecture through time. We demonstrate the ability of a semiautomated 3D in vivo imaging and digital phenotyping pipeline to interrogate the quantitative genetic basis of root system growth in a rice biparental mapping population, Bala × Azucena. We phenotyped >1,400 3D root models and >57,000 2D images for a suite of 25 traits that quantified the distribution, shape, extent of exploration, and the intrinsic size of root networks at days 12, 14, and 16 of growth in a gellan gum medium. From these data we identified 89 quantitative trait loci, some of which correspond to those found previously in soil-grown plants, and provide evidence for genetic tradeoffs in root growth allocations, such as between the extent and thoroughness of exploration. We also developed a multivariate method for generating and mapping central root architecture phenotypes and used it to identify five major quantitative trait loci (r2 = 24–37%), two of which were not identified by our univariate analysis. Our imaging and analytical platform provides a means to identify genes with high potential for improving root traits and agronomic qualities of crops. PMID:23580618

  7. Combining controlled-source seismology and receiver function information to derive 3-D Moho topography for Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, M.; Bianchi, I.; Kissling, E.; Agostinetti, N. Piana; Wiemer, S.

    2013-08-01

    The accurate definition of 3-D crustal structures and, in primis, the Moho depth, are the most important requirement for seismological, geophysical and geodynamic modelling in complex tectonic regions. In such areas, like the Mediterranean region, various active and passive seismic experiments are performed, locally reveal information on Moho depth, average and gradient crustal Vp velocity and average Vp/Vs velocity ratios. Until now, the most reliable information on crustal structures stems from controlled-source seismology experiments. In most parts of the Alpine region, a relatively large number of controlled-source seismology information are available though the overall coverage in the central Mediterranean area is still sparse due to high costs of such experiments. Thus, results from other seismic methodologies, such as local earthquake tomography, receiver functions and ambient noise tomography can be used to complement the controlled-source seismology information to increase coverage and thus the quality of 3-D crustal models. In this paper, we introduce a methodology to directly combine controlled-source seismology and receiver functions information relying on the strengths of each method and in relation to quantitative uncertainty estimates for all data to derive a well resolved Moho map for Italy. To obtain a homogeneous elaboration of controlled-source seismology and receiver functions results, we introduce a new classification/weighting scheme based on uncertainty assessment for receiver functions data. In order to tune the receiver functions information quality, we compare local receiver functions Moho depths and uncertainties with a recently derived well-resolved local earthquake tomography-derived Moho map and with controlled-source seismology information. We find an excellent correlation in the Moho information obtained by these three methodologies in Italy. In the final step, we interpolate the controlled-source seismology and receiver functions

  8. Benchmark of Atucha-2 PHWR RELAP5-3D control rod model by Monte Carlo MCNP5 core calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Pecchia, M.; D'Auria, F.; Mazzantini, O.

    2012-07-01

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed PHWR reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarities require the adoption of advanced Monte Carlo codes for performing realistic neutronic simulations. Therefore core models of Atucha-2 PHWR were developed using MCNP5. In this work a methodology was set up to collect the flux in the hexagonal mesh by which the Atucha-2 core is represented. The scope of this activity is to evaluate the effect of obliquely inserted control rod on neutron flux in order to validate the RELAP5-3D{sup C}/NESTLE three dimensional neutron kinetic coupled thermal-hydraulic model, applied by GRNSPG/UNIPI for performing selected transients of Chapter 15 FSAR of Atucha-2. (authors)

  9. Estimating porosity with ground-penetrating radar reflection tomography: A controlled 3-D experiment at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, John H.; Clement, William P.; Barrash, Warren

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the uncertainty of water-saturated sediment velocity and porosity estimates derived from surface-based, ground-penetrating radar reflection tomography, we conducted a controlled field experiment at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). The BHRS is an experimental well field located near Boise, Idaho. The experimental data set consisted of 3-D multioffset radar acquired on an orthogonal 20 × 30 m surface grid that encompassed a set of 13 boreholes. Experimental control included (1) 1-D vertical velocity functions determined from traveltime inversion of vertical radar profiles (VRP) and (2) neutron porosity logs. We estimated the porosity distribution in the saturated zone using both the Topp and Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) equations and found the CRIM estimates in better agreement with the neutron logs. We found that when averaged over the length of the borehole, surface-derived velocity measurements were within 5% of the VRP velocities and that the porosity differed from the neutron log by less than 0.05. The uncertainty, however, is scale dependent. We found that the standard deviation of differences between ground-penetrating-radar-derived and neutron-log-derived porosity values was as high as 0.06 at an averaging length of 0.25 m but decreased to less than 0.02 at length scale of 11 m. Additionally, we used the 3-D porosity distribution to identify a relatively high-porosity anomaly (i.e., local sedimentary body) within a lower-porosity unit and verified the presence of the anomaly using the neutron porosity logs. Since the reflection tomography approach requires only surface data, it can provide rapid assessment of bulk hydrologic properties, identify meter-scale anomalies of hydrologic significance, and may provide input for other higher-resolution measurement methods.

  10. Robust and high resolution hyperpolarized metabolic imaging of the rat heart at 7 t with 3d spectral‐spatial EPI

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Lau, Angus Z.; Teh, Irvin; Schneider, Jürgen E.; Kinchesh, Paul; Smart, Sean; Ball, Vicky; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and management of diseases where metabolism is dysregulated, such as heart disease. We investigated the feasibility of imaging rodent myocardial metabolism at high resolution at 7 T. Methods We present here a fly‐back spectral‐spatial radiofrequency pulse that sidestepped maximum gradient strength requirements and enabled high resolution metabolic imaging of the rodent myocardium. A 3D echo‐planar imaging readout followed, with centric ordered z‐phase encoding. The cardiac gated sequence was used to image metabolism in rodents whose metabolic state had been manipulated by being fasted, fed, or fed and given the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor dichloroacetate. Results We imaged hyperpolarized metabolites with a spatial resolution of 2×2×3.8 mm3 and a temporal resolution of 1.8 s in the rat heart at 7 T. Significant differences in myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase flux were observed between the three groups of animals, concomitant with the known biochemistry. Conclusion The proposed sequence was able to image in vivo metabolism with excellent spatial resolution in the rat heart. The field of view enabled the simultaneous multi‐organ acquisition of metabolic information from the rat, which is of great utility for preclinical research in cardiovascular disease. Magn Reson Med 000:000–000, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1515–1524, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991606

  11. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    PubMed

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  12. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  13. Informatics in radiology: Intuitive user interface for 3D image manipulation using augmented reality and a smartphone as a remote control.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Norio; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Hirai, Naoya; Miyamoto, Yukio; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2012-01-01

    Although widely used as a pointing device on personal computers (PCs), the mouse was originally designed for control of two-dimensional (2D) cursor movement and is not suited to complex three-dimensional (3D) image manipulation. Augmented reality (AR) is a field of computer science that involves combining the physical world and an interactive 3D virtual world; it represents a new 3D user interface (UI) paradigm. A system for 3D and four-dimensional (4D) image manipulation has been developed that uses optical tracking AR integrated with a smartphone remote control. The smartphone is placed in a hard case (jacket) with a 2D printed fiducial marker for AR on the back. It is connected to a conventional PC with an embedded Web camera by means of WiFi. The touch screen UI of the smartphone is then used as a remote control for 3D and 4D image manipulation. Using this system, the radiologist can easily manipulate 3D and 4D images from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in an AR environment with high-quality image resolution. Pilot assessment of this system suggests that radiologists will be able to manipulate 3D and 4D images in the reading room in the near future. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.324115086/-/DC1. PMID:22556316

  14. Modeling the spatial and temporal population dynamics of the copepod Centropages typicus in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea during the year 2001 using a 3D ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, F.; Eisenhauer, L.; Campbell, R.; Diaz, F.

    2014-07-01

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of a simulated Centropages typicus (Kröyer) population during the year 2001 at the regional scale of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea are addressed using a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The setup of the coupled biological model comprises a pelagic plankton ecosystem model and a stage-structured population model forced by the 3D velocity and temperature fields provided by an eddy-resolving regional circulation model. The population model for C. typicus (C. t. below) represents demographic processes through five groups of developmental stages, which depend on underlying individual growth and development processes and are forced by both biotic (prey and predator fields) and abiotic (temperature, advection) factors from the coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The objective is to characterize C. t. ontogenic habitats driven by physical and trophic processes. The annual dynamics are presented for two of the main oceanographic stations in the Gulf of Lions, which are representative of shelf and open sea conditions, while the spatial distributions over the whole area are presented for three dates during the year, in early and late spring and in winter. The simulated spatial patterns of C. t. developmental stages are closely related to mesoscale hydrodynamic features and circulation patterns. The seasonal and spatial distributions on the Gulf of Lions shelf depend on the seasonal interplay between the Rhône river plume, the mesoscale eddies on the shelf and the Northern Current acting as either as a dynamic barrier between the shelf and the open sea or allowing cross-shelf exchanges. In the central gyre of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, the patchiness of plankton is tightly linked to mesoscale frontal systems, surface eddies and filaments and deep gradients. Due to its flexibility in terms of its diet, C. t. succeeds in maintaining its population in both coastal and offshore areas year round. The simulations suggest that

  15. 3D model reconstruction of underground goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuanmin; Zuo, Xiaoqing; Jin, Baoxuan

    2005-10-01

    Constructing 3D model of underground goaf, we can control the process of mining better and arrange mining work reasonably. However, the shape of goaf and the laneway among goafs are very irregular, which produce great difficulties in data-acquiring and 3D model reconstruction. In this paper, we research on the method of data-acquiring and 3D model construction of underground goaf, building topological relation among goafs. The main contents are as follows: a) The paper proposed an efficient encoding rule employed to structure the field measurement data. b) A 3D model construction method of goaf is put forward, which by means of combining several TIN (triangulated irregular network) pieces, and an efficient automatic processing algorithm of boundary of TIN is proposed. c) Topological relation of goaf models is established. TIN object is the basic modeling element of goaf 3D model, and the topological relation among goaf is created and maintained by building the topological relation among TIN objects. Based on this, various 3D spatial analysis functions can be performed including transect and volume calculation of goaf. A prototype is developed, which can realized the model and algorithm proposed in this paper.

  16. The influence of the spatial resolution of topographic input data on the accuracy of 3-D UV actinic flux and irradiance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Schreier, S. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Simic, S.; Webb, A. R.

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of a digital elevation map (DEM) on the three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer performance for both spectral ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and actinic flux at 305 nm. Model simulations were performed for clear sky conditions for three case studies: the first and second one using three sites in the Innsbruck area and the third one using three sites at the Sonnblick observatory and surrounding area. It was found that the DEM resolution may change the altitude at some locations by up to 500 m, resulting in changes in the sky obscured by the horizon of up to 15%. The geographical distribution of UV irradiance and actinic flux shows that with larger pixel size, uncertainties in UV irradiance and actinic flux determination of up to 100% are possible. These large changes in incident irradiance and actinic flux with changing pixel size are strongly connected to shading effects. The effect of the DEM pixel size on irradiance and actinic flux was studied at the six locations, and it was found that significant increases in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM pixel size occurred at one valley location at high solar zenith angles in the Innsbruck area as well as for one steep valley location in the Sonnblick area. This increase in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM resolution is most likely to be connected to shading effects affecting the reflections from the surroundings.

  17. The influence of the spatial resolution of topographic input data on the accuracy of 3-D UV actinic flux and irradiance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Schreier, S. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Simic, S.; Webb, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of a digital elevation map (DEM) on the three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer performance for both spectral ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and actinic flux at 305 nm. Model simulations were performed for clear sky conditions for three case studies: the first and second one using three sites in the Innsbruck area and the third one using three sites at the Sonnblick Observatory and surrounding area. It was found that DEM resolution may change the altitude at some locations by up to 500 m, resulting in changes in the sky obscured by the horizon of up to 15%. The geographical distribution of UV irradiance and actinic flux shows that with larger pixel size, uncertainties in UV irradiance and actinic flux determination of up to 100% are possible. These large changes in incident irradiance and actinic flux with changing pixel size are strongly connected to shading effects. The effect of DEM pixel size on irradiance and actinic flux was studied at the six locations, and it was found that significant increases in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM pixel size occurred at one valley location at high solar zenith angles in the Innsbruck area as well as for one steep valley location in the Sonnblick area. This increase in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM resolution is most likely to be connected to shading effects affecting the reflections from the surroundings.

  18. Template-Free 3D Microprinting of Metals Using a Force-Controlled Nanopipette for Layer-by-Layer Electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Luca; Ihle, Stephan; Pan, Zhijian; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Reiser, Alain; Wheeler, Jeffrey M; Spolenak, Ralph; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-03-23

    A novel 3D printing method for voxel-by-voxel metal printing is presented. Hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers are used to locally supply metal ions in an electrochemical cell, enabling a localized electroplating reaction. By exploiting the deflection feedback of these probes, electrochemical 3D metal printing is, for the first time, demonstrated in a layer-by-layer fashion, enabling the fabrication of arbitrary-shaped geometries. PMID:26783090

  19. Fingerprint authentication via joint transform correlator and its application in remote access control of a 3D microscopic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenqi; Lai, Hongji; Wang, Meng; Liu, Zeyi; Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang

    2014-05-01

    We present a fingerprint authentication scheme based on the optical joint transform correlator (JTC) and further describe its application to the remote access control of a Network-based Remote Laboratory (NRL). It is built to share a 3D microscopy system of our realistic laboratory in Shenzhen University with the remote co-researchers in Stuttgart University. In this article, we would like to focus on the involved security issues, mainly on the verification of various remote visitors to our NRL. By making use of the JTC-based optical pattern recognition technique as well as the Personal Identification Number (PIN), we are able to achieve the aim of authentication and access control for any remote visitors. Note that only the authorized remote visitors could be guided to the Virtual Network Computer (VNC), a cross-platform software, which allows the remote visitor to access the desktop applications and visually manipulate the instruments of our NRL through the internet. Specifically to say, when a remote visitor attempts to access to our NRL, a PIN is mandatory required in advance, which is followed by fingerprint capturing and verification. Only if both the PIN and the fingerprint are correct, can one be regarded as an authorized visitor, and then he/she would get the authority to visit our NRL by the VNC. It is also worth noting that the aforementioned "two-step verification" strategy could be further applied to verify the identity levels of various remote visitors, and therefore realize the purpose of diversified visitor management.

  20. Spatial Integration under Contextual Control in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Gambet, Boris; Bugallo, Mehdi; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    The role of context was examined in the selection and integration of independently learned spatial relationships. Using a dynamic 3D virtual environment, participants learned one spatial relationship between landmarks A and B which was established in one virtual context (e.g., A is left of B) and a different spatial relationship which was…

  1. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  2. Microfluidic 3D cell culture: from tools to tissue models.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Vincent; Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Joore, Jos; Vulto, Paul; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The transition from 2D to 3D cell culture techniques is an important step in a trend towards better biomimetic tissue models. Microfluidics allows spatial control over fluids in micrometer-sized channels has become a valuable tool to further increase the physiological relevance of 3D cell culture by enabling spatially controlled co-cultures, perfusion flow and spatial control over of signaling gradients. This paper reviews most important developments in microfluidic 3D culture since 2012. Most efforts were exerted in the field of vasculature, both as a tissue on its own and as part of cancer models. We observe that the focus is shifting from tool building to implementation of specific tissue models. The next big challenge for the field is the full validation of these models and subsequently the implementation of these models in drug development pipelines of the pharmaceutical industry and ultimately in personalized medicine applications. PMID:26094109

  3. Spatial and Spectral Characterization, Mapping, and 3D Reconstructing of Ice-wedge Polygons Using High Resolution LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Painter, S. L.; Gable, C. W.; Bui, Q.; Short, L. S.; Liljedahl, A.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H. M.; Dafflon, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Kumar, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    In landscapes with ice-wedge polygons, fine-scale land surface characterization is critically important because the processes that govern the carbon cycle and hydrological dynamics are controlled by features on the order of a few to tens of meters. To characterize the fine-scale features in polygonal ground in Barrow, Alaska, we use high-resolution LiDAR-derived topographic data (such as elevation, slope, curvature, and a novel 'directed distance (DD)') to develop quantitative metrics that allow for the discretization and characterization of polygons (formed by seasonal freeze and thaw processes). First, we used high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR to show that the high and low centered polygon features exhibit a unique signature in the Fourier power spectrum where the landscape signature on freeze and thaw process (~ 5 to 100 m) is super imposed on the coarse scale fluvial eroded landscape (rudimentary river network) signature. We next convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively choose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used a Delaunay triangulation to connect the ice-wedge network and map the topologically connected polygons. This analysis allows us to explore the 3D morphometry of these high- and low-centered polygons and develop a supervised set of ensemble characteristic templates for each polygon type as a function of directed distance (DD). These templates are used to classify the ice-wedge polygon landscape into low-centered polygons with limited troughs, and high- and low-centered polygons with well-developed trough network. We further extend the characteristic templates to polygon ensemble slopes and curvatures as a function of DD and develop a classification scheme for microtopographic features including troughs, rims, elevated ridges, and centers for both high-centered and low-centered polygon

  4. Independent and arbitrary generation of spots in the 3D space domain with computer generated holograms written on a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jian; Xia, Yang; Wang, Hao

    2012-10-01

    An improved multiple independent iterative plane algorithm, based on a projection optimization idea, is proposed for the independent and arbitrary generation of one spot or multiple spots in a speckle-suppressed 3D work-area. Details of the mathematical expressions of the algorithm are given to theoretically show how it is improved for 3D spot generation. Both simulations and experiments are conducted to investigate the performance of the algorithm for independent and arbitrary 3D spot generation in several different cases. Simulation results agree well with experimental results, which validates the effectiveness of the algorithm proposed. Several additional experiments are demonstrated for fast and independent generation of four or more spots in the 3D space domain, which confirms the capabilities and practicalities of the algorithm further.

  5. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  6. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  7. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  8. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  9. Design, calibration and validation of a novel 3D printed instrumented spatial linkage that measures changes in the rotational axes of the tibiofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Daniel P; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2014-01-01

    An accurate axis-finding technique is required to measure any changes from normal caused by total knee arthroplasty in the flexion-extension (F-E) and longitudinal rotation (LR) axes of the tibiofemoral joint. In a previous paper, we computationally determined how best to design and use an instrumented spatial linkage (ISL) to locate the F-E and LR axes such that rotational and translational errors were minimized. However, the ISL was not built and consequently was not calibrated; thus the errors in locating these axes were not quantified on an actual ISL. Moreover, previous methods to calibrate an ISL used calibration devices with accuracies that were either undocumented or insufficient for the device to serve as a gold-standard. Accordingly, the objectives were to (1) construct an ISL using the previously established guidelines,(2) calibrate the ISL using an improved method, and (3) quantify the error in measuring changes in the F-E and LR axes. A 3D printed ISL was constructed and calibrated using a coordinate measuring machine, which served as a gold standard. Validation was performed using a fixture that represented the tibiofemoral joint with an adjustable F-E axis and the errors in measuring changes to the positions and orientations of the F-E and LR axes were quantified. The resulting root mean squared errors (RMSEs) of the calibration residuals using the new calibration method were 0.24, 0.33, and 0.15 mm for the anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and proximal-distal positions, respectively, and 0.11, 0.10, and 0.09 deg for varus-valgus, flexion-extension, and internal-external orientations, respectively. All RMSEs were below 0.29% of the respective full-scale range. When measuring changes to the F-E or LR axes, each orientation error was below 0.5 deg; when measuring changes in the F-E axis, each position error was below 1.0 mm. The largest position RMSE was when measuring a medial-lateral change in the LR axis (1.2 mm). Despite the large size

  10. Comparison of 2.5D and 3D Quantification of Femoral Head Coverage in Normal Control Subjects and Patients with Hip Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui; Liu, Li; Yu, Weimin; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Dianzhong; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    Hip dysplasia is characterized by insufficient femoral head coverage (FHC). Quantification of FHC is of importance as the underlying goal of the surgery to treat hip dysplasia is to restore a normal acetabular morphology and thereby to improve FHC. Unlike a pure 2D X-ray radiograph-based measurement method or a pure 3D CT-based measurement method, previously we presented a 2.5D method to quantify FHC from a single anteriorposterior (AP) pelvic radiograph. In this study, we first quantified and compared 3D FHC between a normal control group and a patient group using a CT-based measurement method. Taking the CT-based 3D measurements of FHC as the gold standard, we further quantified the bias, precision and correlation between the 2.5D measurements and the 3D measurements on both the control group and the patient group. Based on digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs), we investigated the influence of the pelvic tilt on the 2.5D measurements of FHC. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for absolute agreement was used to quantify interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of the 2.5D measurement technique. The Pearson correlation coefficient, r, was used to determine the strength of the linear association between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements. Student's t-test was used to determine whether the differences between different measurements were statistically significant. Our experimental results demonstrated that both the interobserver reliability and the intraobserver reproducibility of the 2.5D measurement technique were very good (ICCs > 0.8). Regression analysis indicated that the correlation was very strong between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Student's t-test showed that there were no statistically significant differences between the 2.5D and the 3D measurements of FHC on the patient group (p > 0.05). The results of this study provided convincing evidence demonstrating the validity of the 2.5D measurements

  11. Spatial Control of Condensation using Chemical Micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kevin; Hansen, Ryan; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Surfaces exhibiting wettability patterns can spatially control the nucleation of condensation to enable enhanced fog harvesting and phase-change heat transfer. To date, studies of patterned condensation have utilized a combination of chemical and topographical features, making it difficult to isolate the effects of intrinsic wettability versus surface roughness on spatially controlling the condensate. Here, we fabricate chemical micropatterns consisting of hydrophilic silicon oxide and a smooth hydrophobic silane monolayer to isolate the effects of changes in intrinsic wettability on the spatial control of condensation. Complete spatial control, defined as every nucleation and growth event occurring exclusively on the hydrophilic features, was observed even for supercooled droplets at high water vapor supersaturation. However, this complete spatial control was found to break down beyond a critical spacing that depended upon the extent of supersaturation. The average diameter of condensate was found to be smaller for the chemically micropatterned surfaces compared to a uniformly hydrophobic surface. Control of inter-droplet spacing between supercooled condensate through chemical patterning can be employed to minimize the growth of inter-droplet frost on cold surfaces.

  12. Spatially controlled simultaneous patterning of multiple growth factors in three-dimensional hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Ryan G.; Ahsan, Shoeb; Aizawa, Yukie; Maxwell, Karen L.; Morshead, Cindi M.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) protein-patterned scaffolds provide a more biomimetic environment for cell culture than traditional two-dimensional surfaces, but simultaneous 3D protein patterning has proved difficult. We developed a method to spatially control the immobilization of different growth factors in distinct volumes in 3D hydrogels, and to specifically guide differentiation of stem/progenitor cells therein. Stem-cell differentiation factors sonic hedgehog (SHH) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were simultaneously immobilized using orthogonal physical binding pairs, barnase-barstar and streptavidin-biotin, respectively. Barnase and streptavidin were sequentially immobilized using two-photon chemistry for subsequent concurrent complexation with fusion proteins barstar-SHH and biotin-CNTF, resulting in bioactive 3D patterned hydrogels. The technique should be broadly applicable to the patterning of a wide range of proteins.

  13. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  14. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  15. Geological interpretation and analysis of surface based, spatially referenced planetary imagery data using PRoGIS 2.0 and Pro3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R.; Gupta, S.; Giordano, M.; Morley, J. G.; Muller, J. P.; Tao, Y.; Sprinks, J.; Traxler, C.; Hesina, G.; Ortner, T.; Sander, K.; Nauschnegg, B.; Paar, G.; Willner, K.; Pajdla, T.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the capabilities of the geospatial environment PRoGIS 2.0 and the real time rendering viewer PRo3D to geological analysis of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover-B (MER-B Opportunity rover) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL Curiosity rover) datasets. Short baseline and serendipitous long baseline stereo Pancam rover imagery are used to create 3D point clouds which can be combined with super-resolution images derived from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE orbital data, andsuper-resolution outcrop images derived from MER Pancam, as well as hand-lens scale images for geology and outcrop characterization at all scales. Data within the PRoViDE database are presented and accessed through the PRoGIS interface. Simple geological measurement tools are implemented within the PRoGIS and PRo3D web software to accurately measure the dip and strike of bedding in outcrops, create detailed stratigraphic logs for correlation between the areas investigated, and to develop realistic 3D models for the characterization of planetary surface processes. Annotation tools are being developed to aid discussion and dissemination of the observations within the planetary science community.

  16. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh K; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C

    2015-08-12

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic-abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) "on the fly" programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients. PMID:26042472

  17. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Maneesh K.; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N.; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic–abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) “on the fly” programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients. PMID:26042472

  18. Modified fibrin hydrogel matrices: both, 3D-scaffolds and local and controlled release systems to stimulate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Heike

    2007-01-01

    Sufficient blood perfusion is essential for all tissues to guarantee nutrient- and gas exchange. As many diseases are induced by the reduction of blood perfusion such that these tissues gradually loose their ability to function properly, therapeutic angiogenesis aims to increase blood flow in ischemic tissues by stimulating the patient's endogenous capacity to develop new blood vessels. These studies include application of angiogenesis stimulating (growth) factors and adhesion sequences as well as local gene therapy. One approach is to rationally design 3D-fibrin hydrogel matrices that provide specific adhesion sequences such as a receptor for alpha v beta 3-integrin expressed on angiogenic endothelial cells and that, in addition, are able to store and release angiogenic growth factors such as VEGF-A(165) and bFGF that target cell type-specific responses. Moreover, these matrices can be modified to release complexed plasmid DNA that transfect surrounding cells and improve angiogenesis. During wound healing, cells infiltrate into the scaffold and degrade it, thereby releasing entrapped growth factors or complexed plasmid DNA, and with the speed of tissue regeneration the scaffold is completely removed when tissue healing is achieved. The long-term aim is to develop biomimetic 3D-matrices for applications in a biomaterials context that can be applied directly at the site of injury by minimal invasive surgery. 3D-fibrin matrices constitute a scaffold and release system for single or combined therapeutic biomolecules and may therefore be able to contribute to the patients' endogenous healing response resulting in the functional recovery of a diseased tissue or organ. PMID:18220797

  19. Control of Retinal Ganglion Cell Positioning and Neurite Growth: Combining 3D Printing with Radial Electrospun Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kador, Karl E; Grogan, Shawn P; Dorthé, Erik W; Venugopalan, Praseeda; Malek, Monisha F; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; D'lima, Darryl D

    2016-02-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are responsible for the transfer of signals from the retina to the brain. As part of the central nervous system, RGCs are unable to regenerate following injury, and implanted cells have limited capacity to orient and integrate in vivo. During development, secreted guidance molecules along with signals from extracellular matrix and the vasculature guide cell positioning, for example, around the fovea, and axon outgrowth; however, these changes are temporally regulated and are not the same in the adult. Here, we combine electrospun cell transplantation scaffolds capable of RGC neurite guidance with thermal inkjet 3D cell printing techniques capable of precise positioning of RGCs on the scaffold surface. Optimal printing parameters are developed for viability, electrophysiological function and, neurite pathfinding. Different media, commonly used to promote RGC survival and growth, were tested under varying conditions. When printed in growth media containing both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), RGCs maintained survival and normal electrophysiological function, and displayed radial axon outgrowth when printed onto electrospun scaffolds. These results demonstrate that 3D printing technology may be combined with complex electrospun surfaces in the design of future retinal models or therapies. PMID:26729061

  20. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  1. 3D Printing technologies for drug delivery: a review.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; Smyth, Hugh

    2016-07-01

    With the FDA approval of the first 3D printed tablet, Spritam®, there is now precedence set for the utilization of 3D printing for the preparation of drug delivery systems. The capabilities for dispensing low volumes with accuracy, precise spatial control and layer-by-layer assembly allow for the preparation of complex compositions and geometries. The high degree of flexibility and control with 3D printing enables the preparation of dosage forms with multiple active pharmaceutical ingredients with complex and tailored release profiles. A unique opportunity for this technology for the preparation of personalized doses to address individual patient needs. This review will highlight the 3D printing technologies being utilized for the fabrication of drug delivery systems, as well as the formulation and processing parameters for consideration. This article will also summarize the range of dosage forms that have been prepared using these technologies, specifically over the last 10 years. PMID:26625986

  2. Structural properties of spatial representations in blind people: Scanning images constructed from haptic exploration or from locomotion in a 3-D audio virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Amandine; Blum, Alan; Katz, Brian F G; Tarroux, Philippe; Borst, Grégoire; Denis, Michel

    2010-07-01

    When people scan mental images, their response times increase linearly with increases in the distance to be scanned, which is generally taken as reflecting the fact that their internal representations incorporate the metric properties of the corresponding objects. In view of this finding, we investigated the structural properties of spatial mental images created from nonvisual sources in three groups (blindfolded sighted, late blind, and congenitally blind). In Experiment 1, blindfolded sighted and late blind participants created metrically accurate spatial representations of a small-scale spatial configuration under both verbal and haptic learning conditions. In Experiment 2, late and congenitally blind participants generated accurate spatial mental images after both verbal and locomotor learning of a full-scale navigable space (created by an immersive audio virtual reality system), whereas blindfolded sighted participants were selectively impaired in their ability to generate precise spatial representations from locomotor experience. These results attest that in the context of a permanent lack of sight, encoding spatial information on the basis of the most reliable currently functional system (the sensorimotor system) is crucial for building a metrically accurate representation of a spatial environment. The results also highlight the potential of spatialized audio-rendering technology for exploring the spatial representations of visually impaired participants. PMID:20551339

  3. Metasurface Spatial Processor for Electromagnetic Remote Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achouri, Karim; Lavigne, Guillaume; Salem, Mohamed A.; Caloz, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    We introduce the concept of metasurface spatial processor, whose transmission is remotely and coherently controlled by the superposition of an incident wave and a control wave through the metasurface. The conceptual operation of this device is analogous to both that of a transistor and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, while offering much more diversity in terms of electromagnetic transformations. We demonstrate two metasurfaces, that perform the operation of electromagnetic switching and amplification.

  4. Drug-releasing nano-engineered titanium implants: therapeutic efficacy in 3D cell culture model, controlled release and stability.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Kogawa, Masakazu; Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J; Losic, Dusan

    2016-12-01

    There is an ongoing demand for new approaches for treating localized bone pathologies. Here we propose a new strategy for treatment of such conditions, via local delivery of hormones/drugs to the trauma site using drug releasing nano-engineered implants. The proposed implants were prepared in the form of small Ti wires/needles with a nano-engineered oxide layer composed of array of titania nanotubes (TNTs). TNTs implants were inserted into a 3D collagen gel matrix containing human osteoblast-like, and the results confirmed cell migration onto the implants and their attachment and spread. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, TNTs/Ti wires loaded with parathyroid hormone (PTH), an approved anabolic therapeutic for the treatment of severe bone fractures, were inserted into 3D gels containing osteoblast-like cells. Gene expression studies revealed a suppression of SOST (sclerostin) and an increase in RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) mRNA expression, confirming the release of PTH from TNTs at concentrations sufficient to alter cell function. The performance of the TNTs wire implants using an example of a drug needed at relatively higher concentrations, the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin, is also demonstrated. Finally, the mechanical stability of the prepared implants was tested by their insertion into bovine trabecular bone cores ex vivo followed by retrieval, which confirmed the robustness of the TNT structures. This study provides proof of principle for the suitability of the TNT/Ti wire implants for localized bone therapy, which can be customized to cater for specific therapeutic requirements. PMID:27612777

  5. Controllable Production of Transplantable Adult Human High-Passage Dermal Papilla Spheroids Using 3D Matrigel Culture

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Ya Bin; Liu, Bing Cheng; Jiang, Jin Dou

    2014-01-01

    We have succeeded in culturing human dermal papilla (DP) cell spheroids and developed a three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel (basement membrane matrix) culture technique that can enhance and restore DP cells unique characteristics in vitro. When 1×104 DP cells were cultured on the 96-well plates precoated with Matrigel for 5 days, both passage 2 and passage 8 DP cells formed spheroidal microtissues with a diameter of 150–250 μm in an aggregative and proliferative manner. We transferred and recultured these DP spheroids onto commercial plates. Cells within DP spheres could disaggregate and migrate out, which was similar to primary DP. Moreover, we examined the expression of several genes and proteins associated with hair follicle inductivity of DP cells, such as NCAM, Versican, and α-smooth muscle actin, and confirmed that their expression level was elevated in the spheres compared with the dissociated DP cells. To examine the hair-inducing ability of DP spheres, hair germinal matrix cells (HGMCs) and DP spheres were mixed and cultured on Matrigel. Unlike the dissociated DP cells and HGMCs cocultured in two dimensions, HGMCs can differentiate into hair-like fibers under the induction of the DP spheres made from the high-passage cells (passage 8) in vitro. We are the first to show that passage 3 human HGMCs differentiate into hair-like fibers in the presence of human DP spheroids. These results suggest that the 3D Matrigel culture technique is an ideal culture model for forming DP spheroids and that sphere formation partially models the intact DP, resulting in hair induction, even by high-passage DP cells. PMID:24528213

  6. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  7. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  8. Controlled synthesis of monodispersed AgGaS{sub 2} 3D nanoflowers and the shape evolution from nanoflowers to colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yanping; Zai, Jiantao; Su, Yuezeng; Qian, Xuefeng

    2011-05-15

    Monodispersed AgGaS{sub 2} three-dimensional (3D) nanoflowers have been successfully synthesized in a 'soft-chemical' system with the mixture of 1-octyl alcohol and cyclohexane as reaction medium and oleylamine as surfactant. The crystal phase, morphology and chemical composition of the as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution TEM (HTEM), respectively. Results reveal that the as-synthesized AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers are in tetragonal structure with 3D flower-like shape. Controlled experiments demonstrated that the shape transformation of AgGaS{sub 2} nanocrystals from 3D nanoflowers (50 nm) to nanoparticles (10-20 nm) could be readily realized by tuning the reaction parameters, e.g., the ratio of octanol to cyclohexane, the length of carbon chain of fatty alcohol, the concentration of oleylamine, etc. The UV-vis and PL spectra of the obtained AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers and colloids were researched. In addition, the photoelectron energy conversion (SPV) of AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers was further researched by the surface photovoltage spectra. -- Graphical abstract: Various AgGaS{sub 2} nanocrystals with different morphologies and sizes including 3D nanoflowers (a) and colloids (b) were synthesized in mixed solvent reaction system and their PL spectra was researched (c). Display Omitted highlights: > Ternary chalcogenide AgGaS{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized in a simple mixed solvent system. > The shape and size transformation of AgGaS{sub 2} from 3D nanoflowers to colloids could be tuned effectively. > AgGaS{sub 2} nanoflowers was obtained with relatively insufficient ligands protection in reaction system, otherwise, AgGaS{sub 2} colloids was obtained. > Provide a new choice to prepare ternary nanomaterials and further understand the reaction mechanisms along with the growth kinetics of ternary nanocrystals.

  9. On the spatial variability of the hyporheic zone: in-situ investigation of porosity and grain size using diving bells and 3D photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the ecological status of rivers, lakes and other water bodies, recent legislation, such as the European Water Framework Directive, requires for each water body an assessment of its suitability as habitat for organisms. Such an assessment, though, is not easy. This is especially true for the lowest part of the water body: the substrate or hyporheic zone. Even if it is known which kind of hyporheic zone is preferred by an organism, it remains difficult to determine where it can be found, because it is often impossible to observe the hyporheic zone from the banks or shores. It has become common to classify an entire water body as suitable or unsuitable as habitat, using only limited field observations of the hyporheic zone. This is a doubtful practice, which disregards the huge spatial variability of this zone. The objective of this study was to quantify the spatial variability in hyporheic-zone characteristics in the river Rhine. We focused on two basic characteristics: grain size and porosity, the latter being a primary control on the transport of nutrients, heat, oxygen and organic matter. A diving bell (caisson) was used to obtain access to the river bed, which enabled undisturbed sampling of the hyporheic zone. Between 1968 and 2009 6436 sediment samples were taken and sieved to determine their grain size distribution. Furthermore, in 2009 and 2011 about 100 porosity measurements were carried out, using a novel technique based on a combination of field measurements using three-dimensional photogrammetry and laboratory measurements using the water displacement method. The measurements revealed a strong cross-sectional variability in porosity and grain size. Each river cross-section contains spots with high porosity (order 0.40) and spots with low porosity (order 0.10). The large cross-sectional variability made it impossible to recognize systematic streamwise porosity trends from the data. Therefore we investigated if porosity was correlated to

  10. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  11. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  12. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  13. Rational Design of Prevascularized Large 3D Tissue Constructs Using Computational Simulations and Biofabrication of Geometrically Controlled Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bongio, Matilde; Talò, Giuseppe; Bersini, Simone; Enomoto, Junko; Fukuda, Junji; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge in the development of clinically relevant 3D tissue constructs is the formation of vascular networks for oxygenation, nutrient supply, and waste removal. To this end, this study implements a multimodal approach for the promotion of vessel-like structures formation in stiff fibrin hydrogels. Computational simulations have been performed to identify the easiest microchanneled configuration assuring normoxic conditions throughout thick cylindrical hydrogels (8 mm height, 6 mm ∅), showing that in our configuration a minimum of three microchannels (600 μm ∅), placed in a non-planar disposition, is required. Using small hydrogel bricks with oxygen distribution equal to the microchanneled configuration, this study demonstrates that among different culture conditions, co-culture of mesenchymal and endothelial cells supplemented with ANG-1 and VEGF leads to the most developed vascular network. Microchanneled hydrogels have been then cultured in the same conditions both statically and in a bioreactor for 7 d. Unexpectedly, the combination between shear forces and normoxic conditions is unable to promote microvascular networks formation in three-channeled hydrogels. Differently, application of either shear forces or normoxic conditions alone results in microvessels outgrowth. These results suggest that to induce angiogenesis in engineered constructs, complex interactions between several biochemical and biophysical parameters have to be modulated. PMID:27191352

  14. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering. PMID:27321481

  15. Spatial constraints control cell proliferation in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Streichan, Sebastian J.; Hoerner, Christian R.; Schneidt, Tatjana; Holzer, Daniela; Hufnagel, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Control of cell proliferation is a fundamental aspect of tissue formation in development and regeneration. Cells experience various spatial and mechanical constraints depending on their environmental context in the body, but we do not fully understand if and how such constraints influence cell cycle progression and thereby proliferation patterns in tissues. Here, we study the impact of mechanical manipulations on the cell cycle of individual cells within a mammalian model epithelium. By monitoring the response to experimentally applied forces, we find a checkpoint at the G1–S boundary that, in response to spatial constraints, controls cell cycle progression. This checkpoint prevents cells from entering S phase if the available space remains below a characteristic threshold because of crowding. Stretching the tissue results in fast cell cycle reactivation, whereas compression rapidly leads to cell cycle arrest. Our kinetic analysis of this response shows that cells have no memory of past constraints and allows us to formulate a biophysical model that predicts tissue growth in response to changes in spatial constraints in the environment. This characteristic biomechanical cell cycle response likely serves as a fundamental control mechanism to maintain tissue integrity and to ensure control of tissue growth during development and regeneration. PMID:24706777

  16. Cell cycle control of a Burkitt lymphoma cell line: responsiveness to growth signals engaging the C3D/EBV receptor.

    PubMed

    Pernegger, G; Schulz, T F; Hosp, M; Myones, B L; Petzer, A L; Eigentler, A; Böck, G; Wick, G; Dierich, M P

    1988-10-01

    CR2, the receptor for the C3d fragment of the third complement component and for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown, on mouse B cells, to be involved in the control of B-cell proliferation by acting as a receptor for macrophage-derived growth factors. We examined whether the growth of a Burkitt lymphoma cell line, RAJI, could be influenced by ligands of human CR2. In serum-free culture, purified human C3d, as well as three monoclonal antibodies to distinct epitopes on human CR2, were capable of enhancing the growth rate of RAJI cells two to five-fold. This effect could not be observed if even trace amounts of serum were present in the culture medium. Simultaneous addition of pairs of antibodies did not enhance the growth rate, suggesting that a particular engagement of CR2 may be critical in order to induce a stimulatory effect. These results indicate that in a homologous serum-free human B-cell system human C3d as well as monoclonal antibodies to human CR2 can induce B-cell proliferation and that CR2-mediated triggering of B cells can be induced via epitopes other than the C3d-binding site. In addition we conclude that--unlike normal human B cells--at least some human B-lymphoma cells respond to CR2-mediated stimuli in the absence of any T-cell derived factors. Therefore the control mechanisms exerted through CR2 must still be intact on these autonomously growing cells. PMID:2461345

  17. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  18. Short Term Reproducibility of a High Contrast 3-D Isotropic Optic Nerve Imaging Sequence in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short-term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON. PMID:27175048

  19. Hinge-loop mutation can be used to control 3D domain swapping and amyloidogenesis of human cystatin C.

    PubMed

    Orlikowska, Marta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Kołodziejczyk, Robert; Jaskólski, Mariusz; Szymańska, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Cystatins are natural inhibitors of cysteine proteases, enzymes that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Human cystatin C (hCC) has been also recognized as an aggregating protein directly involved in the formation of pathological amyloid fibrils, and these amyloidogenic properties greatly increase in a naturally occurring L68Q hCC variant. For a long time only dimeric structure of wild-type hCC has been known. The dimer is created through 3D domain swapping process, in which two parts of the cystatin structure become separated from each other and next exchanged between two molecules. Important role in the domain swapping plays the L1 loop, which connects the exchanging segments and, upon dimerization, transforms from a β-turn into a part of a long β-strand. In the very recently published first monomeric structure of human cystatin C (hCC-stab1), dimerization was abrogated due to clasping of the β-strands from the swapping domains by an engineered disulfide bridge. We have designed and constructed another mutated cystatin C with the smallest possible structural intervention, that is a single-point mutation replacing hydrophobic V57 from the L1 loop by polar asparagine, known as a stabilizer of a β-turn motif. V57N hCC mutant occurred to be stable in its monomeric form and crystallized as a monomer, revealing typical cystatin fold with a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet wrapped around an α-helix. Here we report a 2.04 Å resolution crystal structure of V57N hCC and discuss the architecture of the protein in comparison to chicken cystatin, hCC-stab1 and dimeric hCC. PMID:21074623

  20. 3D seismic geomorphology and geologic controls on gas hydrate accumulation mechanism in the Miyazaki-oki forearc basin, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Fujii, T.

    2015-12-01

    The stratigraphy of the Miyazaki-oki forearc basin along the Southwest Japan Arc comprises the early Miocene to early Pleistocene Miyazaki Group and the Hyuganada Group. These groups comprise sediments (up to 5000 m) deposited in deep marine to shallow marine environments. Based on characteristics of well data outside seismic exploration area and stratigraphy of land areas, the Miyazaki Group was divided into four seismic units and the Hyuganada Group was divided into two seismic units. In this area, bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) have been widely observed and considered as representing lower boundaries of methane-hydrate-bearing deposits. However, the gas hydrate accumulation mechanism for this area is not yet well understood. We show the relation between sandy sediment distribution identified from the 3D seismic geomorphological analysis and methane hydrate occurrence to identify the accumulation mechanism. A submarine fan system was subdivided into four seismic facies: Submarine canyon complexes; Leveed channel complexes; Submarine fan complexes; Mass transport complexes (MTD). Depositional systems of target layers are characterized by a transition from submarine fan deposits (Miyazaki Group) to channel-levee deposits and MTD (Hyuganada Group). This transition of depositional environments is strongly influenced by global tectonics since early Miocene in the Southwest Japan Arc. A part of channel-fill located around structural wing and middle fan deposits above the BSR is inferred as sediments intercalated with sandy layers. We consider that these deposits contain methane hydrate because the sandy sediment distribution approximately coincides with a high-velocity zone as an indicator of gas hydrate. The comparison of the areal extent of the seismic facies and the mapped structural configuration, suggest that the gas hydrate accumulation represent combination structural-stratigraphic trap.

  1. Short term reproducibility of a high contrast 3-D isotropic optic nerve imaging sequence in healthy controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short- term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON.

  2. True-Depth: a new type of true 3D volumetric display system suitable for CAD, medical imaging, and air-traffic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgoff, Eugene

    1998-04-01

    Floating Images, Inc. is developing a new type of volumetric monitor capable of producing a high-density set of points in 3D space. Since the points of light actually exist in space, the resulting image can be viewed with continuous parallax, both vertically and horizontally, with no headache or eyestrain. These 'real' points in space are always viewed with a perfect match between accommodation and convergence. All scanned points appear to the viewer simultaneously, making this display especially suitable for CAD, medical imaging, air-traffic control, and various military applications. This system has the potential to display imagery so accurately that a ruler could be placed within the aerial image to provide precise measurement in any direction. A special virtual imaging arrangement allows the user to superimpose 3D images on a solid object, making the object look transparent. This is particularly useful for minimally invasive surgery in which the internal structure of a patient is visible to a surgeon in 3D. Surgical procedures can be carried out through the smallest possible hole while the surgeon watches the procedure from outside the body as if the patient were transparent. Unlike other attempts to produce volumetric imaging, this system uses no massive rotating screen or any screen at all, eliminating down time due to breakage and possible danger due to potential mechanical failure. Additionally, it is also capable of displaying very large images.

  3. Evaluation and control of eutrophication in Helsinki sea area with the help of a nested 3D-ecohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpinen, Päivi; Kiirikki, Mikko; Koponen, Jorma; Peltoniemi, Hannu; Sarkkula, Juha

    2004-04-01

    Helsinki is located on the southern coast of Finland by the Baltic Sea. The ecological state of the archipelago in front of Helsinki is affected by several factors. The effects of local point and scattered loads are mixed with the transboundary effects from neighbouring countries and atmospheric deposition. Municipal waste waters of 800 000 inhabitants of the capital area are released outside the archipelago into the open Gulf of Finland (GoF). In addition, river Vantaanjoki is transporting load originating from agriculture, industry and settlements of the drainage area to the shores of Helsinki. Toxic algal blooms and annoying filamentous algal mats have become a problem to the users of the coastal zone. A local nested 3D-hydrodynamic model with water quality and ecosystem modules was set up in the Helsinki sea area. The model gives us an opportunity to examine ecosystem processes in a simplified format. The whole Gulf of Finland is included into the calculation area with low resolution (5000 m) increasing in two steps towards the coastal area around Helsinki (1000- and 250-m resolution). The model calculates water flows, transport of nutrients and growth of two groups of phytoplankton and one group of littoral filamentous algae. For model validation, a measurement program was carried out (flows, nutrients, chlorophyll- a, littoral filamentous algal biomass). Two nutrient load reduction scenarios were analysed with the validated model. The first scenario describes planned improvements in the efficiency of Helsinki municipal wastewater treatment, and the second scenario decrease in riverine load from the drainage area. The wastewater scenario decreased both phytoplankton and filamentous algal biomass by 5-15% in the vicinity of the outlet located in the outer archipelago of Helsinki. Changes in the inner archipelago and close to the shoreline were hardly detectable. The effects of the agriculture scenario on the algal biomasses stayed mainly below the arbitrarily

  4. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  5. New portable FELIX 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Knut; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis; Bahr, Detlef; Vogt, Carsten; Blohm, Christian; Scharschmidt, Karl-Heinz

    1998-04-01

    An improved generation of our 'FELIX 3D Display' is presented. This system is compact, light, modular and easy to transport. The created volumetric images consist of many voxels, which are generated in a half-sphere display volume. In that way a spatial object can be displayed occupying a physical space with height, width and depth. The new FELIX generation uses a screen rotating with 20 revolutions per second. This target screen is mounted by an easy to change mechanism making it possible to use appropriate screens for the specific purpose of the display. An acousto-optic deflection unit with an integrated small diode pumped laser draws the images on the spinning screen. Images can consist of up to 10,000 voxels at a refresh rate of 20 Hz. Currently two different hardware systems are investigated. The first one is based on a standard PCMCIA digital/analog converter card as an interface and is controlled by a notebook. The developed software is provided with a graphical user interface enabling several animation features. The second, new prototype is designed to display images created by standard CAD applications. It includes the development of a new high speed hardware interface suitable for state-of-the- art fast and high resolution scanning devices, which require high data rates. A true 3D volume display as described will complement the broad range of 3D visualization tools, such as volume rendering packages, stereoscopic and virtual reality techniques, which have become widely available in recent years. Potential applications for the FELIX 3D display include imaging in the field so fair traffic control, medical imaging, computer aided design, science as well as entertainment.

  6. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  7. FELIX: a volumetric 3D laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Detlef; Langhans, Knut; Gerken, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach of a true 3D image presentation in a space filling, volumetric laser display will be described. The introduced prototype system is based on a moving target screen that sweeps the display volume. Net result is the optical equivalent of a 3D array of image points illuminated to form a model of the object which occupies a physical space. Wireframe graphics are presented within the display volume which a group of people can walk around and examine simultaneously from nearly any orientation and without any visual aids. Further to the detailed vector scanning mode, a raster scanned system and a combination of both techniques are under development. The volumetric 3D laser display technology for true reproduction of spatial images can tremendously improve the viewers ability to interpret data and to reliably determine distance, shape and orientation. Possible applications for this development range from air traffic control, where moving blips of light represent individual aircrafts in a true to scale projected airspace of an airport, to various medical applications (e.g. electrocardiography, computer-tomography), to entertainment and education visualization as well as imaging in the field of engineering and Computer Aided Design.

  8. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  9. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  10. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  11. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia. PMID:26854878

  12. Deformation above mobile substrates, salt rheology and spatial distribution of salt structures: A 3D seismic study of the Permian southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Karina; Mitchell, Neil; Huuse, Mads

    2016-04-01

    At ~255 Ma, cycles of evaporation of seawater led to deposition of evaporites including halite (rock salt) in the North Sea Basin. After later burial by denser sediments, the salt beds rose as pillows and diapirs. Assuming mobilization is due to Rayleigh-Taylor gravitational instability of heavy fluid (sediments) overlying light fluid (salts), theory suggests that the spacing between diapirs should be proportional to the original thickness of the salt layer. For example, a description of the theory in Turcotte and Schubert (1982) predicts structure wavelength to be 2.6 times the salt thickness. Previous research has explored mobilization of salt deposits assuming they have uniform rheology. However, this is not justified as halite rheology varies with temperature, grain size and pore brine content. Furthermore, evaporitic sequences contain various minerals besides halite (e.g., anhydrite, gypsum), which have different rheological properties. 3D seismic and well data reveal the internal structure of salt beds. The data have allowed characterization of structure wavelengths and salt thickness, so that the impact of internal composition and other properties on halokinetic behaviour can be assessed.

  13. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Tang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  14. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Tang, Hui; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-12-10

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Test the Effectiveness of an Immersive 3D Video Game for Anxiety Prevention among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Hanneke; Malmberg, Monique; Lobel, Adam; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Granic, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent anxiety is debilitating, the most frequently diagnosed adolescent mental health problem, and leads to substantial long-term problems. A randomized controlled trial (n = 138) was conducted to test the effectiveness of a biofeedback video game (Dojo) for adolescents with elevated levels of anxiety. Adolescents (11–15 years old) were randomly assigned to play Dojo or a control game (Rayman 2: The Great Escape). Initial screening for anxiety was done on 1,347 adolescents in five high schools; only adolescents who scored above the “at-risk” cut-off on the Spence Children Anxiety Survey were eligible. Adolescents’ anxiety levels were assessed at pre-test, post-test, and at three month follow-up to examine the extent to which playing Dojo decreased adolescents’ anxiety. The present study revealed equal improvements in anxiety symptoms in both conditions at follow-up and no differences between Dojo and the closely matched control game condition. Latent growth curve models did reveal a steeper decrease of personalized anxiety symptoms (not of total anxiety symptoms) in the Dojo condition compared to the control condition. Moderation analyses did not show any differences in outcomes between boys and girls nor did age differentiate outcomes. The present results are of importance for prevention science, as this was the first full-scale randomized controlled trial testing indicated prevention effects of a video game aimed at reducing anxiety. Future research should carefully consider the choice of control condition and outcome measurements, address the potentially high impact of participants’ expectations, and take critical design issues into consideration, such as individual- versus group-based intervention and contamination issues. PMID:26816292

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Test the Effectiveness of an Immersive 3D Video Game for Anxiety Prevention among Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Hanneke; Malmberg, Monique; Lobel, Adam; Engels, Rutger C M E; Granic, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent anxiety is debilitating, the most frequently diagnosed adolescent mental health problem, and leads to substantial long-term problems. A randomized controlled trial (n = 138) was conducted to test the effectiveness of a biofeedback video game (Dojo) for adolescents with elevated levels of anxiety. Adolescents (11-15 years old) were randomly assigned to play Dojo or a control game (Rayman 2: The Great Escape). Initial screening for anxiety was done on 1,347 adolescents in five high schools; only adolescents who scored above the "at-risk" cut-off on the Spence Children Anxiety Survey were eligible. Adolescents' anxiety levels were assessed at pre-test, post-test, and at three month follow-up to examine the extent to which playing Dojo decreased adolescents' anxiety. The present study revealed equal improvements in anxiety symptoms in both conditions at follow-up and no differences between Dojo and the closely matched control game condition. Latent growth curve models did reveal a steeper decrease of personalized anxiety symptoms (not of total anxiety symptoms) in the Dojo condition compared to the control condition. Moderation analyses did not show any differences in outcomes between boys and girls nor did age differentiate outcomes. The present results are of importance for prevention science, as this was the first full-scale randomized controlled trial testing indicated prevention effects of a video game aimed at reducing anxiety. Future research should carefully consider the choice of control condition and outcome measurements, address the potentially high impact of participants' expectations, and take critical design issues into consideration, such as individual- versus group-based intervention and contamination issues. PMID:26816292

  17. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W = 4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure.

  18. Endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan in Concentrated Ambient Particles Induce Rapid Increase in Blood Pressure in Controlled Human Exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia; Urch, Bruce; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Thorne, Peter S; Scott, James; Liu, Ling; Brook, Robert D; Behbod, Behrooz; Gibson, Heike; Silverman, Frances; Mittleman, Murray A; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Gold, Diane R

    2015-09-01

    Short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased blood pressure (BP) in epidemiological studies. Understanding the impact of specific PM components on BP is essential in developing effective risk-reduction strategies. We investigated the association between endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan-two major biological PM components-and BP. We also examined whether vascular endothelial growth factor, a vasodilatory inflammatory marker, modified these associations. We conducted a single-blind, randomized, crossover trial of controlled human exposure to concentrated ambient particles with 50 healthy adults. Particle-associated-endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan were sampled using polycarbonate-membrane-filters. Supine resting systolic BP and diastolic BP were measured pre-, 0.5-hour post-, and 20-hour postexposure. Urine vascular endothelial growth factor concentration was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and creatinine-corrected. Exposures to endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan for 130 minutes were associated with increases in BPs: at 0.5-hour postexposure, every doubling in endotoxin concentration was associated with 1.73 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.28, 3.18; P=0.02) and 2.07 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.74, 3.39; P=0.003); every doubling in β-1,3-d-Glucan concentration was associated with 0.80 mm Hg higher systolic BP (95% confidence interval, -0.07, 1.67; P=0.07) and 0.88 mm Hg higher diastolic BP (95% confidence interval, 0.09, 1.66; P=0.03). Vascular endothelial growth factor rose after concentrated ambient particle endotoxin exposure and attenuated the association between endotoxin and 0.5-hour postexposure diastolic BP (Pinteraction=0.02). In healthy adults, short-term endotoxin and β-1,3-d-Glucan exposures were associated with increased BP. Our findings suggest that the biological PM components contribute to PM-related cardiovascular outcomes, and postexposure vascular endothelial

  19. Computer-controlled multi-parameter mapping of 3D compressible flowfields using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, James M.; Victor, Kenneth G.; Mcdaniel, James C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-controlled technique, using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence, for measuring complex compressible flowfields is presented. A new laser permits the use of a planar two-line temperature technique so that all parameters can be measured with the laser operated narrowband. Pressure and temperature measurements in a step flowfield show agreement within 10 percent of a CFD model except in regions close to walls. Deviation of near wall temperature measurements from the model was decreased from 21 percent to 12 percent compared to broadband planar temperature measurements. Computer-control of the experiment has been implemented, except for the frequency tuning of the laser. Image data storage and processing has been improved by integrating a workstation into the experimental setup reducing the data reduction time by a factor of 50.

  20. Pore-controlled formation of 0D metal complexes in anionic 3D metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, MW; Bosch, M; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    The host-guest chemistry between a series of anionic MOFs and their trapped counterions was investigated by single crystal XRD. The PCN-514 series contains crystallographically identifiable metal complexes trapped in the pores, where their formation is controlled by the size and shape of the MOF pores. A change in the structure and pore size of PCN-518 indicates that the existence of guest molecules may reciprocally affect the formation of host MOFs.

  1. Open and closed-loop control of transonic buffet on 3D turbulent wings using fluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandois, Julien; Lepage, Arnaud; Dor, Jean-Bernard; Molton, Pascal; Ternoy, Frédéric; Geeraert, Arnaud; Brunet, Vincent; Coustols, Éric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the work performed recently at ONERA on the control of the buffet phenomenon. This aerodynamic instability induces strong wall pressure fluctuations and as such limits aircraft envelope; consequently, it is interesting to try to delay its onset, in order to enlarge aircraft flight envelop, but also to provide more flexibility during the design phase. Several types of flow control have been investigated, either passive (mechanical vortex generators) or active (fluidic VGs, fluidic trailing-edge device (TED)). It is shown than mechanical and fluidic VGs are able to delay buffet onset in the angle-of-attack domain by suppressing the separation downstream of the shock. The effect of the fluidic TED is different, the separation is not suppressed, but the rear wing loading is increased and consequently the buffet onset is not delayed to higher angles of attack, but only to higher lift coefficient. Then, a closed loop control methodology based on a quasi-static approach is defined and several architectures are tested for various parameters such as the input signal, the objective function or, the tuning of the feedback gain. All closed loop methods are implemented on a dSPACE device calculating in real time the fluidic actuators command from the unsteady pressure sensors data.

  2. A right-lateral structural model for Poui Field, offshore Trinidad, from 3D seismic interpretation and subsurface well control

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, J.E.; Sobol, F.T. )

    1993-02-01

    A new wrench fault structural model is developed for Poui Field, in the Colombus Basin, offshore Trinidad. A strain ellipse for a right-lateral simple shear stress field is demonstrated from observed fault patterns on recent seismic mapping of deep hydrocarbon-bearing sands at Poui Field. The seismic interpretation is calibrated by 20 points of well control which penetrated the best, continuous, mappable reflector at these deep sand levels. Seismic cross-sections taken over the Poui structure, which are perpendicular to the structural axis of the feature, and constrained by well control, demonstrate geometries typical of wrench faulting observed along the Los Bajos fault complex, onshore Trinidad, and along the San Andreas wrench fault systems of southern California. Variable dip rate along the fault, flower structures with associated sag features, asymmetry of the structure, an extensional duplex, and a possible horsetail splay appear on the maps and cross-sections, and support the wrench fault model. Various pieces of subsurface information, observed in the Field from well control, support the wrench hypothesis: isolated, pressure separated compartments, abrupt facies changes across faults and hydrocarbon migration anomalies. Subsequent extensional faulting created an overprinting of rotated, normal faulting that followed fracture planes created by the right-lateral simple shear stress field. Regional mapping indicates that this wrench fault is a stress field. Regional mapping indicates that this wrench fault is a continuation of the right-lateral fault system mapped onshore Trinidad as the Marcel Main fault system.

  3. Surface Tension Guided Hanging-Drop: Producing Controllable 3D Spheroid of High-Passaged Human Dermal Papilla Cells and Forming Inductive Microtissues for Hair-Follicle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bojie; Miao, Yong; Wang, Jin; Fan, Zhexiang; Du, Lijuan; Su, Yongsheng; Liu, Bingcheng; Hu, Zhiqi; Xing, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Human dermal papilla (DP) cells have been studied extensively when grown in the conventional monolayer. However, because of great deviation from the real in vivo three-dimensional (3D) environment, these two-dimensional (2D) grown cells tend to lose the hair-inducible capability during passaging. Hence, these 2D caused concerns have motivated the development of novel 3D culture techniques to produce cellular microtissues with suitable mimics. The hanging-drop approach is based on surface tension-based technique and the interaction between surface tension and gravity field that makes a convergence of liquid drops. This study used this technique in a converged drop to form cellular spheroids of dermal papilla cells. It leads to a controllable 3Dspheroid model for scalable fabrication of inductive DP microtissues. The optimal conditions for culturing high-passaged (P8) DP spheroids were determined first. Then, the morphological, histological and functional studies were performed. In addition, expressions of hair-inductive markers including alkaline phosphatase, α-smooth muscle actin and neural cell adhesion molecule were also analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunostaining and immunoblotting. Finally, P8-DP microtissues were coimplanted with newborn mouse epidermal cells (EPCs) into nude mice. Our results indicated that the formation of 3D microtissues not only endowed P8-DP microtissues many similarities to primary DP, but also confer these microtissues an enhanced ability to induce hair-follicle (HF) neogenesis in vivo. This model provides a potential to elucidate the native biology of human DP, and also shows the promising for the controllable and scalable production of inductive DP cells applied in future follicle regeneration. PMID:26886167

  4. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  5. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Control of Surfactant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent progress on approaches leading to spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems. The approaches revolve around the use of redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants. Perspectives are presented on experiments that have realized approaches for active control of interfacial properties of aqueous surfactant systems, reversible control of microstructures and nanostructures formed within bulk solutions, and in situ manipulation of the interactions of surfactants with polymers, DNA and proteins. A particular focus of this review is devoted to studies of amphiphiles that contain the redox-active group ferrocene – reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocene leads to changes in the charge/hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles, resulting in substantial changes in their self-assembly. Light-sensitive surfactants containing azobenzene, which undergo changes in shape/polarity upon illumination with light, are a second focus of this review. Examples of both redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants that lead to large (> 20mN/m) and spatially localized (~mm) changes in surface tensions on a time scale of seconds are presented. Systems that permit reversible transformations of bulk solution nanostructures – such as micelle-to-vesicle transitions or monomer-to-micelle transitions – are also described. The broad potential utility of these emerging classes of amphiphiles are illustrated by the ability to drive changes in functional properties of surfactant systems, such as rheological properties and reversible solubilization of oils, as well as the ability to control interactions of surfactants with biomolecules to modulate their transport into cells. PMID:19665723

  7. Alignment issues, correlation techniques and their assessment for a visible light imaging-based 3D printer quality control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Quality control is critical to manufacturing. Frequently, techniques are used to define object conformity bounds, based on historical quality data. This paper considers techniques for bespoke and small batch jobs that are not statistical model based. These techniques also serve jobs where 100% validation is needed due to the mission or safety critical nature of particular parts. One issue with this type of system is alignment discrepancies between the generated model and the physical part. This paper discusses and evaluates techniques for characterizing and correcting alignment issues between the projected and perceived data sets to prevent errors attributable to misalignment.

  8. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  9. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  10. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  11. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  12. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  13. Do melt-rich shear zones lubricate rift flanks? 3-D spatial gradients in anisotropy beneath the East African Rift in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, B. K.; Gaherty, J. B.; Kendall, J.; Stuart, G.

    2006-12-01

    -Kenya broadband seismic experiments; the observations will be inverted for 3-D variations in velocity and anisotropy within the rift and its flanks. We then apply a model of elastic properties to estimate degrees of melt segregation.

  14. Syzygium aromaticum extract mediated, rapid and facile biogenic synthesis of shape-controlled (3D) silver nanocubes.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Anuj N; Ingale, Arun G

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis of metal nano materials with controllable geometry has received extensive attention of researchers from the past decade. In this study, we report an unexplored new route for rapid and facile biogenic synthesis of silver nanocubes (AgNCs) by systematic reduction of silver ions with crude clove (Syzygium aromaticum) extract at room temperature. The formation and plasmonic properties of AgNCs were observed and the UV-vis spectra show characteristic absorption peak of AgNCs with broaden region at 430 nm along with the intense (124), (686), (454) and (235) peak in X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the formation and crystallinity of AgNCs. The average size of AgNC cubes were found to be in the range of ~80 to 150 nm and it was confirmed by particles size distribution, scanning and transmission electron microscopy with elemental detection by EDAX. Further FTIR spectra provide the various functional groups present in the S. aromaticum extract which are supposed to be responsible and participating in the reaction for the synthesis of AgNCs. The AgNCs casted over glass substrate show an electrical conductivity of ~0.55 × 10(6) S/m demonstrating AgNCs to be a potential next generation conducting material due to its high conductivity. This work provides a novel and effective approach to control the shape of silver nanomaterial for impending applications. The current synthesis mode is eco-friendly, low cost and promises different potential applications such as biosensing, nanoelectronics, etc. PMID:26921103

  15. Functional electrical stimulation mediated by iterative learning control and 3D robotics reduces motor impairment in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Novel stroke rehabilitation techniques that employ electrical stimulation (ES) and robotic technologies are effective in reducing upper limb impairments. ES is most effective when it is applied to support the patients’ voluntary effort; however, current systems fail to fully exploit this connection. This study builds on previous work using advanced ES controllers, and aims to investigate the feasibility of Stimulation Assistance through Iterative Learning (SAIL), a novel upper limb stroke rehabilitation system which utilises robotic support, ES, and voluntary effort. Methods Five hemiparetic, chronic stroke participants with impaired upper limb function attended 18, 1 hour intervention sessions. Participants completed virtual reality tracking tasks whereby they moved their impaired arm to follow a slowly moving sphere along a specified trajectory. To do this, the participants’ arm was supported by a robot. ES, mediated by advanced iterative learning control (ILC) algorithms, was applied to the triceps and anterior deltoid muscles. Each movement was repeated 6 times and ILC adjusted the amount of stimulation applied on each trial to improve accuracy and maximise voluntary effort. Participants completed clinical assessments (Fugl-Meyer, Action Research Arm Test) at baseline and post-intervention, as well as unassisted tracking tasks at the beginning and end of each intervention session. Data were analysed using t-tests and linear regression. Results From baseline to post-intervention, Fugl-Meyer scores improved, assisted and unassisted tracking performance improved, and the amount of ES required to assist tracking reduced. Conclusions The concept of minimising support from ES using ILC algorithms was demonstrated. The positive results are promising with respect to reducing upper limb impairments following stroke, however, a larger study is required to confirm this. PMID:22676920

  16. Molecular Signaling Pathways Controlling Vascular Tube Morphogenesis and Pericyte-Induced Tube Maturation in 3D Extracellular Matrices.

    PubMed

    Bowers, S L K; Norden, P R; Davis, G E

    2016-01-01

    During capillary network formation, ECs establish interconnecting tubes with defined lumens that reside within vascular guidance tunnels (physical spaces generated during EC tubulogenesis). Pericytes are recruited to EC tubes within these tunnels and capillary basement membrane deposition occurs to facilitate tube maturation. Here, we discuss molecular mechanisms controlling EC tubulogenesis demonstrating the involvement of integrins, MT1-MMP, extracellular matrix, Cdc42, Rac1, Rac2, k-Ras, Rap1b, and key downstream effectors including Pak2, Pak4, IQGAP1, MRCKβ, and Rasip1. These molecules activate kinase cascades controlling EC tube formation, in conjunction with growth factor receptor signaling, which involve PKCɛ, Src family, Raf, Mek, and Erk kinases. These molecules and signaling cascades stimulate EC lumen and tube formation by: regulating MT-MMP-dependent lumen expansion and vascular guidance tunnel formation; generation of intracellular vacuoles/vesicles to create EC apical membranes; and establishing cytoskeletal polarity with acetylated tubulin distributed subapically (and F-actin basally) to facilitate vacuole trafficking/fusion in a polarized, perinuclear region. Using defined serum-free models, we have demonstrated that human EC tubulogenesis and EC-pericyte tube coassembly requires five exogenously applied growth factors which are SCF, IL-3, SDF-1α, FGF-2, and insulin (Factors). Also, we have demonstrated that EC-derived PDGF-BB and HB-EGF are necessary for pericytes to proliferate, recruit to tubes, and induce basement membrane assembly. Finally, we have shown that VEGF fails to directly stimulate EC tubulogenesis. In contrast, it acts as an upstream EC primer of downstream "Factor"-induced tubulogenic and EC-pericyte tube coassembly by upregulating c-Kit, IL-3Rα, and CXCR4 as well as PDGF-BB and HB-EGF expression. PMID:27451100

  17. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  18. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Gilmer; Robinson, Clifford; Lee, Percy; Morel, Delphine; Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  19. HALL EFFECT CONTROLLED GAS DYNAMICS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. FULL 3D SIMULATIONS TOWARD THE OUTER DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2015-01-10

    We perform three-dimensional stratified shearing-box magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations on the gas dynamics of protoplanetary disks with a net vertical magnetic flux of B {sub z0}. All three nonideal MHD effects, Ohmic resistivity, the Hall effect, and ambipolar diffusion, are included in a self-consistent manner based on equilibrium chemistry. We focus on regions toward outer disk radii, from 5 to 60 AU, where Ohmic resistivity tends to become negligible, ambipolar diffusion dominates over an extended region across the disk height, and the Hall effect largely controls the dynamics near the disk midplane. We find that at around R = 5 AU the system launches a laminar or weakly turbulent magnetocentrifugal wind when the net vertical field B {sub z0} is not too weak. Moreover, the wind is able to achieve and maintain a configuration with reflection symmetry at the disk midplane. The case with anti-aligned field polarity (Ω⋅B{sub z0}<0) is more susceptible to the magnetorotational instability (MRI) when B {sub z0} decreases, leading to an outflow oscillating in radial directions and very inefficient angular momentum transport. At the outer disk around and beyond R = 30 AU, the system shows vigorous MRI turbulence in the surface layer due to far-UV ionization, which efficiently drives disk accretion. The Hall effect affects the stability of the midplane region to the MRI, leading to strong/weak Maxwell stress for aligned/anti-aligned field polarities. Nevertheless, the midplane region is only very weakly turbulent in both cases. Overall, the basic picture is analogous to the conventional layered accretion scenario applied to the outer disk. In addition, we find that the vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated into thin, azimuthally extended shells in most of our simulations beyond 15 AU, leading to enhanced radial density variations know as zonal flows. Theoretical implications and observational consequences are briefly discussed.

  20. 3-D Reconstruction of Macular Type II Cell Innervation Patterns in Space-Flight and Control Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel Dorothy; Montgomery, K.; Linton, S.; Cheng, R.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A semiautomated method for reconstructing objects from serial thin sections has been developed in the Biocomputation Center. The method is being used to completely, for the first time, type II hair cells and their innervations. The purposes are to learn more about the fundamental circuitry of the macula on Earth and to determine whether changes in connectivities occur under space flight conditions. Data captured directly from a transmission electron microscope via a video camera are sent to a graphics workstation. There, the digitized micrographs are mosaicked into sections and contours are traced, registered and displayed by semiautomated methods. Current reconstructions are of type II cells from the medial part of rat maculas collected in-flight on the Space Life Sciences-2 mission, 4.5 hrs post-flight, and from a ground control. Results show that typical type II cells receive processes from tip to six nearby calyces or afferents. Nearly all processes are elongated and have bouton-like enlargements; some have numerous vesicles. Multiple (2 to 4) processes from a single calyx to a type II cell are common, and approximately 1/3 of the processes innervale 2 or 3 type II cells or a neighboring cluster. From 2% to 6% of the cells resemble type I cells morphologically but have demi-calyces. Thus far, increments in synaptic number in type II cells of flight rats are prominent along processes that supply two hair cells. It is clear that reconstruction methods provide insights into details of macular circuitry not obtainable by other techniques. The results demonstrate a morphological basis for interactions between adjacent receptive fields through feed back-feed forward connections, and for dynamic alterations in receptive field range and activity during preprocessing of linear acceleratory information by the maculas. The reconstruction method we have developed will find further applications in the study of the details of neuronal architecture of more complex systems, to

  1. Single-Step 3-D Image Reconstruction in Magnetic Induction Tomography: Theoretical Limits of Spatial Resolution and Contrast to Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Karl; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Merwa, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality for reconstructing the changes of the complex conductivity in an object. MIT is based on determining the perturbation of an alternating magnetic field, which is coupled from several excitation coils to the object. The conductivity distribution is reconstructed from the corresponding voltage changes induced in several receiver coils. Potential medical applications comprise the continuous, non-invasive monitoring of tissue alterations which are reflected in the change of the conductivity, e.g. edema, ventilation disorders, wound healing and ischemic processes. MIT requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse eddy current problem. A linearized version of this problem was solved for 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils with a model of two spherical perturbations within a cylindrical phantom. The method was tested with simulated measurement data. Images were reconstructed with a regularized single-step Gauss–Newton approach. Theoretical limits for spatial resolution and contrast/noise ratio were calculated and compared with the empirical results from a Monte-Carlo study. The conductivity perturbations inside a homogeneous cylinder were localized for a SNR between 44 and 64 dB. The results prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT and give some quantitative data on the limitations of the method. PMID:17031597

  2. Controllable synthesis of 3D BiVO₄ superstructures with visible-light-induced photocatalytic oxidation of NO in the gas phase and mechanistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Man; Nie, Haoyu; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Zhong, Lei

    2015-11-21

    A surfactant-free solvothermal method was developed for the controlled synthesis of diverse 3D ms-BiVO4 superstructures, including a flower, a double-layer half-open flower and a hollow tube with square cross-sections, via facilely adjusting the pH values with the aid of NH3·H2O. The effects of the morphologies of the prepared 3D ms-BiVO4 superstructure on the photocatalytic oxidation of NO were investigated, indicating that the enhanced photoactivity was not related to the surface area, but associated with the unique morphology, surface structure and good crystallinity. Moreover, the flower-like ms-BiVO4 photocatalyst with a more (040) reactive crystal plane exhibited higher photoactivity than those of other samples. The unique morphology helped with flushing the oxidation products accumulated on the surface of photocatalysts in the H2O2 system, and further improved the photoactivity. A trapping experiment was also conducted to examine the effects of the active species involved in the PCO of NO intuitively. PMID:26451402

  3. 3-D SAR image formation from sparse aperture data using 3-D target grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Li, Junfei; Ling, Hao

    2005-05-01

    The performance of ATR systems can potentially be improved by using three-dimensional (3-D) SAR images instead of the traditional two-dimensional SAR images or one-dimensional range profiles. 3-D SAR image formation of targets from radar backscattered data collected on wide angle, sparse apertures has been identified by AFRL as fundamental to building an object detection and recognition capability. A set of data has been released as a challenge problem. This paper describes a technique based on the concept of 3-D target grids aimed at the formation of 3-D SAR images of targets from sparse aperture data. The 3-D target grids capture the 3-D spatial and angular scattering properties of the target and serve as matched filters for SAR formation. The results of 3-D SAR formation using the backhoe public release data are presented.

  4. Spatial control of rabies on heterogeneous landscapes.

    PubMed

    Russell, Colin A; Real, Leslie A; Smith, David L

    2006-01-01

    Rabies control in terrestrial wildlife reservoirs relies heavily on an oral rabies vaccine (ORV). In addition to direct ORV delivery to protect wildlife in natural habitats, vaccine corridors have been constructed to control the spread; these corridors are often developed around natural barriers, such as rivers, to enhance the effectiveness of vaccine deployment. However, the question of how to optimally deploy ORV around a river (or other natural barrier) to best exploit the barrier for rabies control has not been addressed using mathematical models. Given an advancing epidemic wave, should the vaccine be distributed on both sides of barrier, behind the barrier, or in front of it? Here, we introduce a new mathematical model for the dynamics of raccoon rabies on a spatially heterogeneous landscape that is both simple and realistic. We demonstrate that the vaccine should always be deployed behind a barrier to minimize the recurrence of subsequent epidemics. Although the oral rabies vaccine is sufficient to induce herd immunity inside the vaccinated area, it simultaneously creates a demographic refuge. When that refuge is in front of a natural barrier, seasonal dispersal from the vaccine corridor into an endemic region sustains epidemic oscillations of raccoon rabies. When the vaccine barrier creates a refuge behind the river, the low permeability of the barrier to host movement limits dispersal of the host population from the protected populations into the rabies endemic area and limits subsequent rabies epidemics. PMID:17183654

  5. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  6. Patterned illumination for analysing neuronal function in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Mary Ann; Stricker, Christian; Redman, Steve; Bachor, Hans; Daria, Vincent R.

    2012-06-01

    We use patterned 3D multi-spot illumination to perform neuronal multi-site stimulation in rat brain tissue. Using a spatial light modulator, we holograpically project 3D light fields for multi-site two-photon photolysis of caged neurotransmitters to generate synaptic inputs to a neuron. Controlled photostimulation of multiple synapses from various locations in the dendritic tree provides a way to analyze how neurons integrate multiple inputs. Our holographic projection setup is incorporated into a two-photon 3D imaging microscope for visualization and for accurate positioning of specific uncaging sites along the neuron's dendritic tree. We show two-photon images and the neuron's response to holographic photostimulation of synapses along dendrites.

  7. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G.; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness the interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behaviors. Here, we review the nanoscale tissue engineering technologies for both two- and three-dimensional studies (2- and 3D), and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffolds technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D, however, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and the temporal changes in cellular microenvironment. PMID:21451238

  8. Controlling the carrier lifetime of nearly threading-dislocation-free ZnO homoepitaxial films by 3d transition-metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichibu, S. F.; Kojima, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Furusawa, K.; Uedono, A.

    2016-01-01

    Carrier lifetime in nearly threading-dislocation-free ZnO homoepitaxial films was controlled by doping 3d transition-metals (TMs), Ni and Mn. The photoluminescence lifetime of the near-band-edge emission (τPL) was decreased linearly by increasing TM concentration, indicating that such TMs are predominant nonradiative recombination centers (NRCs). From this relationship, exciton capture-cross-section ( σex ) of 2.4 × 10-15 cm2 is obtained. Because σex of native-NRCs (Zn-vacancy complexes) is likely larger than this value, the linear dependence of the internal quantum efficiency on τPL observed in our TM-doped ZnO and unintentionally doped ZnO in literatures indicates that the concentrations of native-NRCs in the latter are "lower than" 1016-1017 cm-3.

  9. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  10. Recent developments in stereoscopic and holographic 3D display technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Kalluri

    2014-06-01

    Currently, there is increasing interest in the development of high performance 3D display technologies to support a variety of applications including medical imaging, scientific visualization, gaming, education, entertainment, air traffic control and remote operations in 3D environments. In this paper we will review the attributes of the various 3D display technologies including stereoscopic and holographic 3D, human factors issues of stereoscopic 3D, the challenges in realizing Holographic 3D displays and the recent progress in these technologies.

  11. Creeping proteins in microporous structures: polymer brush-assisted fabrication of 3D gradients for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gunnewiek, Michel Klein; Di Luca, Andrea; Bollemaat, Hermannes Z; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Vancso, G Julius; Moroni, Lorenzo; Benetti, Edmondo M

    2015-06-01

    Coupling of rapid prototyping techniques and surface-confined polymerizations allows the fabrication of 3D multidirectional gradients of biomolecules within microporous scaffolds. The compositional gradients can be tailored by polymer-brush-assisted diffusion of protein solutions. This technique allows spatial control over stem cells manipulation within 3D environments. PMID:25676461

  12. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect reloaded: Probing the 3D spin-orbit geometry, differential stellar rotation, and the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum of star-planet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, H. M.; Lovis, C.; Bourrier, V.; Beeck, B.; Watson, C. A.; Pepe, F.

    2016-04-01

    When a planet transits its host star, it blocks regions of the stellar surface from view; this causes a distortion of the spectral lines and a change in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities, known as the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect. Since the LOS velocities depend, in part, on the stellar rotation, the RM waveform is sensitive to the star-planet alignment (which provides information on the system's dynamical history). We present a new RM modelling technique that directly measures the spatially-resolved stellar spectrum behind the planet. This is done by scaling the continuum flux of the (HARPS) spectra by the transit light curve, and then subtracting the in- from the out-of-transit spectra to isolate the starlight behind the planet. This technique does not assume any shape for the intrinsic local profiles. In it, we also allow for differential stellar rotation and centre-to-limb variations in the convective blueshift. We apply this technique to HD 189733 and compare to 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. We reject rigid body rotation with high confidence (>99% probability), which allows us to determine the occulted stellar latitudes and measure the stellar inclination. In turn, we determine both the sky-projected (λ ≈ -0.4 ± 0.2°) and true 3D obliquity (ψ ≈ 7+12-4°). We also find good agreement with the MHD simulations, with no significant centre-to-limb variations detectable in the local profiles. Hence, this technique provides a new powerful tool that can probe stellar photospheres, differential rotation, determine 3D obliquities, and remove sky-projection biases in planet migration theories. This technique can be implemented with existing instrumentation, but will become even more powerful with the next generation of high-precision radial velocity spectrographs.

  13. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  14. 3-D architecture modeling using high-resolution seismic data and sparse well control: Example from the Mars {open_quotes}Pink{close_quotes} reservoir, Mississippi Canyon Area, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Chapin, M.A.; Tiller, G.M.; Mahaffie, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Economic considerations of the deep-water turbidite play, in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere, require large reservoir volumes to be drained by relatively few, very expensive wells. Deep-water development projects to date have been planned on the basis of high-quality 3-D seismic data and sparse well control. The link between 3-D seismic, well control, and the 3-D geological and reservoir architecture model are demonstrated here for Pliocene turbidite sands of the {open_quotes}Pink{close_quotes} reservoir, Prospect Mars, Mississippi Canyon Areas 763 and 807, Gulf of Mexico. This information was used to better understand potential reservoir compartments for development well planning.

  15. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  16. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S. Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D.; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  17. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y; Hyman, Bradley T; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  18. Optimal arrangements of fiber optic probes to enhance the spatial resolution in depth for 3D reflectance diffuse optical tomography with time-resolved measurements performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic probes with a width limited to a few centimeters can enable diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in intern organs like the prostate or facilitate the measurements on extern organs like the breast or the brain. We have recently shown on 2D tomographic images that time-resolved measurements with a large dynamic range obtained with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) could push forward the imaged depth range in a diffusive medium at short source-detector separation compared with conventional non-gated approaches. In this work, we confirm these performances with the first 3D tomographic images reconstructed with such a setup and processed with the Mellin- Laplace transform. More precisely, we investigate the performance of hand-held probes with short interfiber distances in terms of spatial resolution and specifically demonstrate the interest of having a compact probe design featuring small source-detector separations. We compare the spatial resolution obtained with two probes having the same design but different scale factors, the first one featuring only interfiber distances of 15 mm and the second one, 10 mm. We evaluate experimentally the spatial resolution obtained with each probe on the setup with fast-gated SPADs for optical phantoms featuring two absorbing inclusions positioned at different depths and conclude on the potential of short source-detector separations for DOT.

  19. The impact of including spatially longitudinal heterogeneities of vessel oxygen content and vascular fraction in 3D tumor oxygenation models on predicted radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Oxygen distribution models have been used to analyze the influences of oxygen tensions on tissue response after radiotherapy. These distributions are often generated assuming constant oxygen tension in the blood vessels. However, as red blood cells progress through the vessels, oxygen is continuously released into the plasma and the surrounding tissue, resulting in longitudinally varying oxygen levels in the blood vessels. In the present study, the authors investigated whether a tumor oxygenation model that incorporated longitudinally varying oxygen levels would provide different predictions of necrotic fractions and radiosensitivity compared to commonly used models with a constant oxygen pressure. Methods: Our models simulated oxygen diffusion based on a Green's function approach and oxygen consumption according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The authors constructed tumor models with different vascular fractions (VFs), from which they generated depth oxygenation curves and a look-up table of oxygen pressure gradients. The authors evaluated models of spherical tumors of various sizes, from 1 to 10{sup 4} mg. The authors compared the results from a model with constant vessel oxygen (CVO) pressure to those from models with longitudinal variations in oxygen saturation and either a constant VF (CVF) or variable VF (VVF) within the tumor tissue. The authors monitored the necrotic fractions, defined as tumor regions with an oxygen pressure below 1 mmHg. Tumor radiation sensitivity was expressed as D{sub 99,} the homogeneous radiation dose required for a tumor control probability of 0.99. Results: In the CVO saturation model, no necrosis was observed, and decreasing the VF could only decrease the D{sub 99} by up to 10%. Furthermore, the D{sub 99} vs VF dependence was similar for different tumor masses. Compared to the CVO model, the extended CVF and VVF models provided clearly different results, including pronounced effects of VF and tumor size on the necrotic

  20. Applications of 2D to 3D conversion for educational purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koido, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Saki; Takeuchi, Soya; Maruyama, Wataru; Nakagori, Toshio; Hirakata, Masataka; Shinkai, Hirohisa; Kawai, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    There are three main approaches creating stereoscopic S3D content: stereo filming using two cameras, stereo rendering of 3D computer graphics, and 2D to S3D conversion by adding binocular information to 2D material images. Although manual "off-line" conversion can control the amount of parallax flexibly, 2D material images are converted according to monocular information in most cases, and the flexibility of 2D to S3D conversion has not been exploited. If the depth is expressed flexibly, comprehensions and interests from converted S3D contents are anticipated to be differed from those from 2D. Therefore, in this study we created new S3D content for education by applying 2D to S3D conversion. For surgical education, we created S3D surgical operation content under a surgeon using a partial 2D to S3D conversion technique which was expected to concentrate viewers' attention on significant areas. And for art education, we converted Ukiyoe prints; traditional Japanese artworks made from a woodcut. The conversion of this content, which has little depth information, into S3D, is expected to produce different cognitive processes from those evoked by 2D content, e.g., the excitation of interest, and the understanding of spatial information. In addition, the effects of the representation of these contents were investigated.

  1. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  2. Efficient and Controlled Generation of 2D and 3D Bile Duct Tissue from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Ye, Zhaohui; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-08-01

    While in vitro liver tissue engineering has been increasingly studied during the last several years, presently engineered liver tissues lack the bile duct system. The lack of bile drainage not only hinders essential digestive functions of the liver, but also leads to accumulation of bile that is toxic to hepatocytes and known to cause liver cirrhosis. Clearly, generation of bile duct tissue is essential for engineering functional and healthy liver. Differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to bile duct tissue requires long and/or complex culture conditions, and has been inefficient so far. Towards generating a fully functional liver containing biliary system, we have developed defined and controlled conditions for efficient 2D and 3D bile duct epithelial tissue generation. A marker for multipotent liver progenitor in both adult human liver and ductal plate in human fetal liver, EpCAM, is highly expressed in hepatic spheroids generated from human iPSCs. The EpCAM high hepatic spheroids can, not only efficiently generate a monolayer of biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes), in a 2D differentiation condition, but also form functional ductal structures in a 3D condition. Importantly, this EpCAM high spheroid based biliary tissue generation is significantly faster than other existing methods and does not require cell sorting. In addition, we show that a knock-in CK7 reporter human iPSC line generated by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology greatly facilitates the analysis of biliary differentiation. This new ductal differentiation method will provide a more efficient method of obtaining bile duct cells and tissues, which may facilitate engineering of complete and functional liver tissue in the future. PMID:27138846

  3. 3-D Relativistic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaw, K.-I.; Frank, J.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Koide, S.; Sakai, J.-I.; Sol, H.; Mutel, R. L.

    1998-12-01

    We present 3-D numerical simulations of moderately hot, supersonic jets propagating initially along or obliquely to the field lines of a denser magnetized background medium with Lorentz factors of W=4.56 and evolving in a four-dimensional spacetime. The new results are understood as follows: Relativistic simulations have consistently shown that these jets are effectively heavy and so they do not suffer substantial momentum losses and are not decelerated as efficiently as their nonrelativistic counterparts. In addition, the ambient magnetic field, however strong, can be pushed aside with relative ease by the beam, provided that the degrees of freedom associated with all three spatial dimensions are followed self-consistently in the simulations. This effect is analogous to pushing Japanese ``noren'' or vertical Venetian blinds out of the way while the slats are allowed to bend in 3-D space rather than as a 2-D slab structure. We also simulate jets with the more realistic initial conditions for injecting jets for helical mangetic field, perturbed density, velocity, and internal energy, which are supposed to be caused in the process of jet generation. Three possible explanations for the observed variability are (i) tidal disruption of a star falling into the black hole, (ii) instabilities in the relativistic accretion disk, and (iii) jet-related PRocesses. New results will be reported at the meeting.

  4. Rapid Assembly of Heterogeneous 3D Cell Microenvironments in a Microgel Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwei; Chen, Pu; Wang, Yachao; Yan, Shuangqian; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Koehler, Stephan A; Demirci, Utkan; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Heterogeneous 3D cell microenvironment arrays are rapidly assembled by combining surface-wettability-guided assembly and microdroplet-array-based operations. This approach enables precise control over individual shapes, sizes, chemical concentrations, cell density, and 3D spatial distribution of multiple components. This technique provides a cost-effective solution to meet the increasing demand of stem cell research, tissue engineering, and drug screening. PMID:26991071

  5. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  6. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  7. 3-D Maps and Compasses in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Arseny; Las, Liora; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2016-07-01

    The world has a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) spatial structure, but until recently the neural representation of space was studied primarily in planar horizontal environments. Here we review the emerging literature on allocentric spatial representations in 3-D and discuss the relations between 3-D spatial perception and the underlying neural codes. We suggest that the statistics of movements through space determine the topology and the dimensionality of the neural representation, across species and different behavioral modes. We argue that hippocampal place-cell maps are metric in all three dimensions, and might be composed of 2-D and 3-D fragments that are stitched together into a global 3-D metric representation via the 3-D head-direction cells. Finally, we propose that the hippocampal formation might implement a neural analogue of a Kalman filter, a standard engineering algorithm used for 3-D navigation. PMID:27442069

  8. 3D-patterned polymer brush surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuechang; Liu, Xuqing; Xie, Zhuang; Zheng, Zijian

    2011-12-01

    Polymer brush-based three-dimensional (3D) structures are emerging as a powerful platform to engineer a surface by providing abundant spatially distributed chemical and physical properties. In this feature article, we aim to give a summary of the recent progress on the fabrication of 3D structures with polymer brushes, with a particular focus on the micro- and nanoscale. We start with a brief introduction on polymer brushes and the challenges to prepare their 3D structures. Then, we highlight the recent advances of the fabrication approaches on the basis of traditional polymerization time and grafting density strategies, and a recently developed feature density strategy. Finally, we provide some perspective outlooks on the future directions of engineering the 3D structures with polymer brushes.

  9. Inflammation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2012-06-14

    Our view of the response to infection is limited by current methodologies, which provide minimal spatial information on the systemic inflammatory response. In this issue, Attia et al. (2012) describe a cutting-edge approach to image the inflammatory response to infection, which includes identification of host proteins in three dimensions. PMID:22704615

  10. Angular description for 3D scattering centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Raynal, Ann Marie; Ling, Hao; Moore, John; Velten, Vincent J.

    2006-05-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field from an electrically large target can often be well modeled as if it is emanating from a discrete set of scattering centers (see Fig. 1). In the scattering center extraction tool we developed previously based on the shooting and bouncing ray technique, no correspondence is maintained amongst the 3D scattering center extracted at adjacent angles. In this paper we present a multi-dimensional clustering algorithm to track the angular and spatial behaviors of 3D scattering centers and group them into features. The extracted features for the Slicy and backhoe targets are presented. We also describe two metrics for measuring the angular persistence and spatial mobility of the 3D scattering centers that make up these features in order to gather insights into target physics and feature stability. We find that features that are most persistent are also the most mobile and discuss implications for optimal SAR imaging.

  11. Laser-ignited frontal polymerization of shape-controllable poly(VI-co-AM) hydrogels based on 3D templates toward adsorption of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Suzhen; Liu, Sisi; Wang, Xiao-Qiao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-06-01

    Given the increasing heavy metal pollution issue, fast preparation of polymeric hydrogels with excellent adsorption property toward heavy metal ions is very attractive. In this work, a series of poly( N-vinylimidazole-co-acrylamide) (poly(VI-co-AM)) hydrogels were synthesized via laser-ignited frontal polymerization (LIFP) for the first time. The dependence of frontal velocity and temperature on two factors monomer ratios and initiator concentrations was systematically investigated. Poly(VI-co-AM) hydrogels with any self-supporting shapes can be synthesized by a one-step LIFP in seconds through the application of 3D templates. These shape-persistent hydrogels are pH-responsive and exhibit excellent adsorption/desorption characteristics toward Mn(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions, and the adsorption conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The reusability of the hydrogels toward mental ions adsorption was further researched, which suggested that the hydrogels can be reused without serious decrease in adsorption capacity. This work might open a promising strategy to facilely prepare shape-controllable hydrogels and expand the application of LIFP.

  12. Switchable field-tuned control of magnetic domain wall pinning along Co microwires by 3D e-beam lithographed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Roldán, C.; Quirós, C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G.; Vélez, M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic circuits composed of Co microwires crossed by elevated Co bridges have been patterned on Si substrate by e-beam lithography and lift-off process. The lithographic procedure includes a double resist procedure that optimizes the shape of the bridge, so that 200 nm air gaps can be routinely achieved in between the wire and bridge elements. Microwire magnetization reversal processes have been analyzed by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy with different remanent bridge configurations. When the Co bridge is magnetized along the in-plane direction parallel to the wire axis, its stray field induces a marked pinning effect on domain wall propagation along the wire below it, even without being in contact. Changing the sign of the remanent state of the bridge, domain wall pinning can be selected to occur in either the ascending or descending branches of the wire hysteresis loop. Thus, these wire-bridge 3D circuits provide a simple system for tunable domain wall pinning controllable through the pre-recorded bridge remanent state.

  13. Late Cretaceous Localized Crustal Thickening as a Primary Control on the 3-D Architecture and Exhumation Histories of Cordilleran Metamorphic Core Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, P. B.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-01

    The juxtaposition of mylonitic mid-crustal rocks and faulted supracrustal rocks in metamorphic core complexes (MMCs) is usually portrayed in 2 dimensions and attributed to a single event of large-scale slip ± isostatic doming along a low-angle "detachment fault"/ shear zone. This paradigm does not explain dramatic along strike (3-D) variations in slip magnitude, footwall architecture, and burial / exhumation histories of most MMCs. A fundamental question posed by MMCs is how did their earlier thickening and exhumation histories influence the geometric evolution and 3-D slip distribution on the subsequent detachment faults? New geologic mapping and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology from the Snake Range-Kern Mts-Deep Creek Mts (SKDC) complex in eastern Nevada offer important insights into this question. Crustal shortening and thickening by large-scale non-cylindrical recumbent folds and associated thrust faults during the late Cretaceous (90-80 Ma) resulted in deep burial (650°C, 20-25 km) of the central part of the footwall, but metamorphic grade decreases dramatically to the N and S in concert with decreasing amplitude on the shortening structures. Subsequent Paleogene extensional exhumation by normal faulting and ESE-directed mylonitic shearing is greatest in areas of maximum earlier thickening and brought highest grade rocks back to depths of~10-12 km. After ≥15 Ma of quiescence, rapid E-directed slip initiated along the brittle Miocene Snake Range detachment at 20 Ma and reactivated the Eocene shear zone. The ≥200°C gradient across the footwall at this time implies that the Miocene slip surface originated as a moderately E-dipping normal fault. This Miocene slip surface can be tracked for more than 100 km along strike, but the greatest amount of Miocene slip also coincides with parts of the footwall that were most deeply buried in the Cretaceous. These relations indicate that not only is the SKDC MMC a composite feature, but that the crustal welt created by

  14. High precision Differential Earthquake Location in 3D models: Evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Alfredo Stabile, Tony; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Anthony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival-times as data, and the possibility to use a 3D velocity model both for absolute and relative locations, essential to obtain accurate differentials locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential times data-set allowed us to carry out an high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helped to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent micro-seismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines, in the crustal volume embedding the fault system which generated the 1980, M 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (M<3) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011, and used the 3D P- and S-wave velocity models, optimized for the area under study. Both catalogue and cross-correlation first arrival-times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 Irpinia M 6.9 earthquake on sub-parallel, predominantly normal faults. Corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals), we evidence an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across a SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity. This "barrier" appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 sec) and the second (20 sec) rupture episodes of the 80's Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier can have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly controlled the delayed times of

  15. High-precision differential earthquake location in 3-D models: evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Stabile, Tony Alfredo; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Antony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival times as data and the possibility to use a 3-D velocity model both for absolute and double-difference locations, all of which help to obtain accurate differential locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential time data set allowed us to carry out a high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helps to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent microseismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines in the crustal volume embedding the fault system that generated the 1980 MS 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations, we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (ML < 3.1) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011 and used the 3-D P- and S-wave velocity models optimized for the area under study. Both manually refined and cross-correlation refined absolute arrival times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 MS 6.9 Irpinia earthquake on subparallel, predominantly normal faults. We find an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across an SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals). This `barrier' appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 s) and the second (18 s) rupture episodes of the 1980s Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier could have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly

  16. Development of a Web-Based 3D Module for Enhanced Neuroanatomy Education.

    PubMed

    Allen, Lauren K; Ren, He Zhen; Eagleson, Roy; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is a challenging subject, with novice medical students often experiencing difficulty grasping the intricate 3D spatial relationships. Most of the anatomical teaching in undergraduate medicine utilizes conventional 2D resources. E-learning technologies facilitate the development of learner-centered educational tools that can be tailored to meet each student's educational needs, and may foster improved learning in neuroanatomy, however this has yet to be examined fully in the literature. An interactive 3D e-learning module was developed to complement gross anatomy laboratory instruction. Incorporating such 3D modules may provide additional support for students in areas of anatomy that are spatially challenging, such as neuroanatomy. Specific anatomical structures and their relative spatial positions to other structures can be clearly defined in the 3D virtual environment from viewpoints that may not readily be available using cadaveric or 2D image modalities. Providing an interactive user interface for the 3D module in which the student controls many factors may enable the student to develop an improved understanding of the spatial relationships. This work outlines the process for the development of a 3D interactive module of the cerebral structures included in the anatomy curriculum for undergraduate medical students in their second year of study. PMID:27046544

  17. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. Recent developments in DFD (depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Shiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2015-05-01

    We will report our recent developments in DFD (Depth-fused 3D) display and arc 3D display, both of which have smooth movement parallax. Firstly, fatigueless DFD display, composed of only two layered displays with a gap, has continuous perceived depth by changing luminance ratio between two images. Two new methods, called "Edge-based DFD display" and "Deep DFD display", have been proposed in order to solve two severe problems of viewing angle and perceived depth limitations. Edge-based DFD display, layered by original 2D image and its edge part with a gap, can expand the DFD viewing angle limitation both in 2D and 3D perception. Deep DFD display can enlarge the DFD image depth by modulating spatial frequencies of front and rear images. Secondly, Arc 3D display can provide floating 3D images behind or in front of the display by illuminating many arc-shaped directional scattering sources, for example, arcshaped scratches on a flat board. Curved Arc 3D display, composed of many directional scattering sources on a curved surface, can provide a peculiar 3D image, for example, a floating image in the cylindrical bottle. The new active device has been proposed for switching arc 3D images by using the tips of dual-frequency liquid-crystal prisms as directional scattering sources. Directional scattering can be switched on/off by changing liquid-crystal refractive index, resulting in switching of arc 3D image.

  20. A low-resolution 3D holographic volumetric display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Javid; Underwood, Ian; Greenaway, Alan; Halonen, Mikko

    2010-05-01

    A simple low resolution volumetric display is presented, based on holographic volume-segments. The display system comprises a proprietary holographic screen, laser projector, associated optics plus a control unit. The holographic screen resembles a sheet of frosted glass about A4 in size (20x30cm). The holographic screen is rear-illuminated by the laser projector, which is in turn driven by the controller, to produce simple 3D images that appear outside the plane of the screen. A series of spatially multiplexed and interleaved interference patterns are pre-encoded across the surface of the holographic screen. Each illumination pattern is capable of reconstructing a single holographic volume-segment. Up to nine holograms are multiplexed on the holographic screen in a variety of configurations including a series of numeric and segmented digits. The demonstrator has good results under laboratory conditions with moving colour 3D images in front of or behind the holographic screen.

  1. Understanding spatial relationships in US: a computer-based training tool that utilizes inexpensive off-the-shelf game controllers.

    PubMed

    Teistler, Michael; Brunberg, James A; Bott, Oliver J; Breiman, Richard S; Ebert, Lars C; Ross, Steffen G; Dresing, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a simulation-based ultrasonographic (US) training tool that can help improve the understanding of spatial relationships in US. Use of a game controller to simulate a US probe allows examination of different virtual three-dimensional (3D) objects. These 3D objects are either completely artificial simple geometric objects (eg, spheres, tubes, and ellipsoids, or more complex combinations thereof) or derived from photographed gross anatomic data (eg, the Visible Human dataset [U.S. National Library of Medicine]) or clinical computed tomographic (CT) data. The virtual US probe allows infinitely variable real-time positioning of a "slice" that is displayed as a two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional image and as part of a 3D view. Combining the 2D and 3D views helps elucidate the spatial relationships between a 3D object and derived 2D images. This training tool provides reliable real-time interactivity and is widely available and easily affordable, since it utilizes standard personal computer technology and off-the-shelf gaming hardware. For instance, it can be used at home by medical students or residents as a complement to conventional US training. In the future, this system could be adapted to support training for US-guided needle biopsy, with use of a second game controller to control the biopsy needle. Furthermore, it could be used as a more general interactive visualization tool for the evaluation of clinical 3D CT and magnetic resonance imaging data, allowing efficient and intuitive real-time creation of oblique multiplanar reformatted images. PMID:25110963

  2. Basement Structure Controls on the Evolution and Geometry of Rift Systems - Insights from Offshore S. Norway using 3D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas; Jackson, Christopher; Bell, Rebecca; Duffy, Oliver; Fossen, Haakon

    2015-04-01

    Rift basins form within lithosphere containing a range of heterogeneities, such as thin-skinned thrust belts and larger scale structures such as thick-skinned shear zones or crustal sutures. How the presence and reactivation of these structures during later rift events affect the geometry and evolution of rifts remains poorly understood as they are not typically well imaged on seismic data. The main reasons for this are that crystalline basement is often buried beneath thick sedimentary successions and contains small impedance contrasts. Furthermore, larger, crustal-scale, lineaments and sutures may not be imaged at all on seismic data due to their large scale and depth. In this study, we use borehole-constrained 2D and 3D seismic reflection data located around the Egersund and Farsund Basins, offshore south Norway. In both areas, crystalline basement is exceptionally well-imaged on typical 2D and 3D reflection data due to large impedance contrasts within a highly heterogeneous, shallow basement. This allows us to map a series of intrabasement reflections and overlying rift systems. Within the Egersund area, two main types of intrabasement structure are identified and mapped: i) thin (100 m), shallowly dipping (0-10°W) reflections showing a ramp-flat geometry; and ii) thick (1-1.5 km), low angle (c. 30°W) structures comprising of packages of reflections. These structures correlate along-strike northwards to Caledonian orogeny related structures mapped onshore Norway. The thin structures are interpreted as thin-skinned Caledonian thrusts, whereas the thicker structures represent thick-skinned Devonian shear zones formed through orogenic collapse of the Caledonides. Through seismic-stratigraphic analysis of the cover, we document multiple stages of extensional reactivation along these structures during Devonian, Permian-Triassic and Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous extension followed by reverse reactivation during Late Cretaceous compression. The Farsund Basin is

  3. Spatial changes of the peri-acetabular pelvic in developmental dysplasia of the hip---a combined 3-dimentional computed tomography (3D-CT) study in patients and experimental study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Cong; Liu, Tianjing; Xie, Hengcui; Li, Jianjun; Gao, Sizhe; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Enbo

    2014-01-01

    Few previous studies noticed the three bony structures that formed the acetabulum in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). This study aimed at investigating the spatial changes of the peri-acetabular pelvis in developmental dysplasia of the hip through radiological evaluation of the patients and experimental observations in rat models. 115 unilateral DDH patients were studied through 3D-CT. In reconstruction workstation, the iliopubic inner plate angle, ilioischial inner plate angle and ischialpubic inner plate angle were measured and compared. 58 neonatal Wistar rats were divided into two groups and the rats in experiment group were swaddled to establish DDH models. The hips were sectioned, stained. The same three angles were measured and compared. The ilioischial inner plate angle of the affected hip decreased while the ischialpubic inner plate angle increased compared to those of the contralateral side. The iliopubic inner plate angle showed no difference between the affected and unaffected hips. In animal models we observed the same pathological pattern. The three angles measured on the sections showed similar tendency as those in the patients with DDH. The ischium rotates up and forwardly around the posterior and vertical limbs of the triradiate cartilage complex in DDH, just as a lifted piece of Pizza. PMID:25663996

  4. LeasyScan: a novel concept combining 3D imaging and lysimetry for high-throughput phenotyping of traits controlling plant water budget

    PubMed Central

    Vadez, Vincent; Kholová, Jana; Hummel, Grégoire; Zhokhavets, Uladzimir; Gupta, S.K.; Hash, C. Tom

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the thought process and initial data behind the development of an imaging platform (LeasyScan) combined with lysimetric capacity, to assess canopy traits affecting water use (leaf area, leaf area index, transpiration). LeasyScan is based on a novel 3D scanning technique to capture leaf area development continuously, a scanner-to-plant concept to increase imaging throughput and analytical scales to combine gravimetric transpiration measurements. The paper presents how the technology functions, how data are visualised via a web-based interface and how data extraction and analysis is interfaced through ‘R’ libraries. Close agreement between scanned and observed leaf area data of individual plants in different crops was found (R2 between 0.86 and 0.94). Similar agreement was found when comparing scanned and observed area of plants cultivated at densities reflecting field conditions (R2 between 0.80 and 0.96). An example in monitoring plant transpiration by the analytical scales is presented. The last section illustrates some of the early ongoing applications of the platform to target key phenotypes: (i) the comparison of the leaf area development pattern of fine mapping recombinants of pearl millet; (ii) the leaf area development pattern of pearl millet breeding material targeted to different agro-ecological zones; (iii) the assessment of the transpiration response to high VPD in sorghum and pearl millet. This new platform has the potential to phenotype for traits controlling plant water use at a high rate and precision, of critical importance for drought adaptation, and creates an opportunity to harness their genetics for the breeding of improved varieties. PMID:26034130

  5. LeasyScan: a novel concept combining 3D imaging and lysimetry for high-throughput phenotyping of traits controlling plant water budget.

    PubMed

    Vadez, Vincent; Kholová, Jana; Hummel, Grégoire; Zhokhavets, Uladzimir; Gupta, S K; Hash, C Tom

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the thought process and initial data behind the development of an imaging platform (LeasyScan) combined with lysimetric capacity, to assess canopy traits affecting water use (leaf area, leaf area index, transpiration). LeasyScan is based on a novel 3D scanning technique to capture leaf area development continuously, a scanner-to-plant concept to increase imaging throughput and analytical scales to combine gravimetric transpiration measurements. The paper presents how the technology functions, how data are visualised via a web-based interface and how data extraction and analysis is interfaced through 'R' libraries. Close agreement between scanned and observed leaf area data of individual plants in different crops was found (R(2) between 0.86 and 0.94). Similar agreement was found when comparing scanned and observed area of plants cultivated at densities reflecting field conditions (R(2) between 0.80 and 0.96). An example in monitoring plant transpiration by the analytical scales is presented. The last section illustrates some of the early ongoing applications of the platform to target key phenotypes: (i) the comparison of the leaf area development pattern of fine mapping recombinants of pearl millet; (ii) the leaf area development pattern of pearl millet breeding material targeted to different agro-ecological zones; (iii) the assessment of the transpiration response to high VPD in sorghum and pearl millet. This new platform has the potential to phenotype for traits controlling plant water use at a high rate and precision, of critical importance for drought adaptation, and creates an opportunity to harness their genetics for the breeding of improved varieties. PMID:26034130

  6. Protocol for a process evaluation of a cluster randomised controlled trial to improve management of multimorbidity in general practice: the 3D study

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alison; Guthrie, Bruce; Wye, Lesley; Brookes, Sara; Bower, Peter; Mercer, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As an increasing number of people are living with more than 1 long-term condition, identifying effective interventions for the management of multimorbidity in primary care has become a matter of urgency. Interventions are challenging to evaluate due to intervention complexity and the need for adaptability to different contexts. A process evaluation can provide extra information necessary for interpreting trial results and making decisions about whether the intervention is likely to be successful in a wider context. The 3D (dimensions of health, drugs and depression) study will recruit 32 UK general practices to a cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate effectiveness of a patient-centred intervention. Practices will be randomised to intervention or usual care. Methods and analysis The aim of the process evaluation is to understand how and why the intervention was effective or ineffective and the effect of context. As part of the intervention, quantitative data will be collected to provide implementation feedback to all intervention practices and will contribute to evaluation of implementation fidelity, alongside case study data. Data will be collected at the beginning and end of the trial to characterise each practice and how it provides care to patients with multimorbidity. Mixed methods will be used to collect qualitative data from 4 case study practices, purposively sampled from among intervention practices. Qualitative data will be analysed using techniques of constant comparison to develop codes integrated within a flexible framework of themes. Quantitative and qualitative data will be integrated to describe case study sites and develop possible explanations for implementation variation. Analysis will take place prior to knowing trial outcomes. Ethics and dissemination Study approved by South West (Frenchay) National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee (14/SW/0011). Findings will be disseminated via a final report, peer

  7. What is 3D good for? A review of human performance on stereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, John P.; Havig, Paul R.; Geiselman, Eric E.

    2012-06-01

    This work reviews the human factors-related literature on the task performance implications of stereoscopic 3D displays, in order to point out the specific performance benefits (or lack thereof) one might reasonably expect to observe when utilizing these displays. What exactly is 3D good for? Relative to traditional 2D displays, stereoscopic displays have been shown to enhance performance on a variety of depth-related tasks. These tasks include judging absolute and relative distances, finding and identifying objects (by breaking camouflage and eliciting perceptual "pop-out"), performing spatial manipulations of objects (object positioning, orienting, and tracking), and navigating. More cognitively, stereoscopic displays can improve the spatial understanding of 3D scenes or objects, improve memory/recall of scenes or objects, and improve learning of spatial relationships and environments. However, for tasks that are relatively simple, that do not strictly require depth information for good performance, where other strong cues to depth can be utilized, or for depth tasks that lie outside the effective viewing volume of the display, the purported performance benefits of 3D may be small or altogether absent. Stereoscopic 3D displays come with a host of unique human factors problems including the simulator-sickness-type symptoms of eyestrain, headache, fatigue, disorientation, nausea, and malaise, which appear to effect large numbers of viewers (perhaps as many as 25% to 50% of the general population). Thus, 3D technology should be wielded delicately and applied carefully; and perhaps used only as is necessary to ensure good performance.

  8. Volumetric 3D display using a DLP projection engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we describe a volumetric 3D display system based on the high speed DLPTM (Digital Light Processing) projection engine. Existing two-dimensional (2D) flat screen displays often lead to ambiguity and confusion in high-dimensional data/graphics presentation due to lack of true depth cues. Even with the help of powerful 3D rendering software, three-dimensional (3D) objects displayed on a 2D flat screen may still fail to provide spatial relationship or depth information correctly and effectively. Essentially, 2D displays have to rely upon capability of human brain to piece together a 3D representation from 2D images. Despite the impressive mental capability of human visual system, its visual perception is not reliable if certain depth cues are missing. In contrast, volumetric 3D display technologies to be discussed in this article are capable of displaying 3D volumetric images in true 3D space. Each "voxel" on a 3D image (analogous to a pixel in 2D image) locates physically at the spatial position where it is supposed to be, and emits light from that position toward omni-directions to form a real 3D image in 3D space. Such a volumetric 3D display provides both physiological depth cues and psychological depth cues to human visual system to truthfully perceive 3D objects. It yields a realistic spatial representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them.

  9. Modulation of cortical activity in 2D versus 3D virtual reality environments: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Slobounov, Semyon M; Ray, William; Johnson, Brian; Slobounov, Elena; Newell, Karl M

    2015-03-01

    There is a growing empirical evidence that virtual reality (VR) is valuable for education, training, entertaining and medical rehabilitation due to its capacity to represent real-life events and situations. However, the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral confounds in VR environments are still poorly understood. In two experiments, we examined the effect of fully immersive 3D stereoscopic presentations and less immersive 2D VR environments on brain functions and behavioral outcomes. In Experiment 1 we examined behavioral and neural underpinnings of spatial navigation tasks using electroencephalography (EEG). In Experiment 2, we examined EEG correlates of postural stability and balance. Our major findings showed that fully immersive 3D VR induced a higher subjective sense of presence along with enhanced success rate of spatial navigation compared to 2D. In Experiment 1 power of frontal midline EEG (FM-theta) was significantly higher during the encoding phase of route presentation in the 3D VR. In Experiment 2, the 3D VR resulted in greater postural instability and modulation of EEG patterns as a function of 3D versus 2D environments. The findings support the inference that the fully immersive 3D enriched-environment requires allocation of more brain and sensory resources for cognitive/motor control during both tasks than 2D presentations. This is further evidence that 3D VR tasks using EEG may be a promising approach for performance enhancement and potential applications in clinical/rehabilitation settings. PMID:25448267

  10. Robot Control Based On Spatial-Operator Algebra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Guillermo; Kreutz, Kenneth K.; Jain, Abhinandan

    1992-01-01

    Method for mathematical modeling and control of robotic manipulators based on spatial-operator algebra providing concise representation and simple, high-level theoretical frame-work for solution of kinematical and dynamical problems involving complicated temporal and spatial relationships. Recursive algorithms derived immediately from abstract spatial-operator expressions by inspection. Transition from abstract formulation through abstract solution to detailed implementation of specific algorithms to compute solution greatly simplified. Complicated dynamical problems like two cooperating robot arms solved more easily.

  11. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  12. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  13. Evolutionary approach to introduce 3D into the cockpit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theunissen, Eric; Sachs, Gottfried; Dobler, Klaus

    1998-07-01

    Perspective flightpath displays and the depiction of 3-D terrain are regarded as a potential means to increase safety. Although the technology to generate such presentations in real-time is available, other issues which are required for a safe introduction must still be resolved. This paper focuses on some of the major obstacles which are still present. It discusses several objections against perspective flightpath displays and shows why most of them are no longer justified. The potential for an increase in safety is related to navigation, guidance, and control task requirements, and potential implementations, ranging in complexity, to satisfy these requirements are discussed. This classification allows a gradual transition from today's 2-D symbolic displays to future spatial displays. The paper proposes an approach which supports an evolutionary introduction of 3-D navigation displays into the cockpit.

  14. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  15. Formation of Spatially and Geometrically Controlled Three-Dimensional Tissues in Soft Gels by Sacrificial Micromolding

    PubMed Central

    Cerchiari, Alec; Garbe, James C.; Todhunter, Michael E.; Jee, Noel Y.; Pinney, James R.; LaBarge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Patterned three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models aim to more accurately represent the in vivo architecture of a tissue for the purposes of testing drugs, studying multicellular biology, or engineering functional tissues. However, patterning 3D multicellular structures within very soft hydrogels (<500 Pa) that mimic the physicochemical environment of many tissues remains a challenge for existing methods. To overcome this challenge, we use a Sacrificial Micromolding technique to temporarily form spatially and geometrically defined 3D cell aggregates in degradable scaffolds before transferring and culturing them in a reconstituted extracellular matrix. Herein, we demonstrate that Sacrificial Micromolding (1) promotes cyst formation and proper polarization of established epithelial cell lines, (2) allows reconstitution of heterotypic cell–cell interactions in multicomponent epithelia, and (3) can be used to control the lumenization-state of epithelial cysts as a function of tissue size. In addition, we discuss the potential of Sacrificial Micromolding as a cell-patterning tool for future studies. PMID:25351430

  16. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  17. A contest of sensors in close range 3D imaging: performance evaluation with a new metric test object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M.; Robson, S.; Hosseininaveh Ahmadabadian, A.

    2014-06-01

    An independent means of 3D image quality assessment is introduced, addressing non-professional users of sensors and freeware, which is largely characterized as closed-sourced and by the absence of quality metrics for processing steps, such as alignment. A performance evaluation of commercially available, state-of-the-art close range 3D imaging technologies is demonstrated with the help of a newly developed Portable Metric Test Artefact. The use of this test object provides quality control by a quantitative assessment of 3D imaging sensors. It will enable users to give precise specifications which spatial resolution and geometry recording they expect as outcome from their 3D digitizing process. This will lead to the creation of high-quality 3D digital surrogates and 3D digital assets. The paper is presented in the form of a competition of teams, and a possible winner will emerge.

  18. SNARC Struggles: Instant Control over Spatial-Numerical Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfister, Roland; Schroeder, Philipp A.; Kunde, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Numbers and space are tightly linked--a phenomenon that is referred to as the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect (Dehaene, Bossini, & Giraux, 1993). The present study investigates how quickly and flexibly the behavioral impact of such spatial-numerical associations can be controlled. Participants performed a parity…

  19. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  20. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  1. Immersive 3D geovisualisation in higher education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2014-05-01

    Through geovisualisation we explore spatial data, we analyse it towards a specific questions, we synthesise results, and we present and communicate them to a specific audience (MacEachren & Kraak 1997). After centuries of paper maps, the means to represent and visualise our physical environment and its abstract qualities have changed dramatically since the 1990s - and accordingly the methods how to use geovisualisation in teaching. Whereas some people might still consider the traditional classroom as ideal setting for teaching and learning geographic relationships and its mapping, we used a 3D CAVE (computer-animated virtual environment) as environment for a problem-oriented learning project called "GEOSimulator". Focussing on this project, we empirically investigated, if such a technological advance like the CAVE make 3D visualisation, including 3D geovisualisation, not only an important tool for businesses (Abulrub et al. 2012) and for the public (Wissen et al. 2008), but also for educational purposes, for which it had hardly been used yet. The 3D CAVE is a three-sided visualisation platform, that allows for immersive and stereoscopic visualisation of observed and simulated spatial data. We examined the benefits of immersive 3D visualisation for geographic research and education and synthesized three fundamental technology-based visual aspects: First, the conception and comprehension of space and location does not need to be generated, but is instantaneously and intuitively present through stereoscopy. Second, optical immersion into virtual reality strengthens this spatial perception which is in particular important for complex 3D geometries. And third, a significant benefit is interactivity, which is enhanced through immersion and allows for multi-discursive and dynamic data exploration and knowledge transfer. Based on our problem-oriented learning project, which concentrates on a case study on flood risk management at the Wilde Weisseritz in Germany, a river

  2. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  3. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  4. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  5. Finite sampling corrected 3D noise with confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Haefner, David P; Burks, Stephen D

    2015-05-20

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. The goal was to decompose the 3D noise process into spatial and temporal components identify potential sources of origin. To characterize a sensor in terms of its 3D noise values, a finite number of samples in each of the three dimensions (two spatial, one temporal) were performed. In this correspondence, we developed the full sampling corrected 3D noise measurement and the corresponding confidence bounds. The accuracy of these methods was demonstrated through Monte Carlo simulations. Both the sampling correction as well as the confidence intervals can be applied a posteriori to the classic 3D noise calculation. The Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange ["Finite sampling corrected 3D noise with confidence intervals," https://www.mathworks.com/matlabcentral/fileexchange/49657-finite-sampling-corrected-3d-noise-with-confidence-intervals.]. PMID:26192530

  6. 3D Photofixation Lithography in Diels–Alder Networks

    PubMed Central

    Adzima, Brian J.; Kloxin, Christopher J.; DeForest, Cole A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2013-01-01

    3D structures were written and developed in a crosslinked polymer initially formed by a Diels–Alder reaction. Unlike conventional liquid resists, small features cannot sediment, as the reversible crosslinks function as a support, and the modulus of the material is in the MPa range at room temperature. The support structure, however, can be easily removed by heating the material which depolymerizes the polymer into a mixture of low-viscosity monomers. Complex shapes were written into the polymer network using two-photon techniques to spatially control the photoinitiation and subsequent thiol–ene reaction to selectively convert the Diels–Alder adducts into irreversible crosslinks. PMID:23080017

  7. On Alternative Approaches to 3D Image Perception: Monoscopic 3D Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2015-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.

  8. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  9. Spatial regulation of controlled bioactive factor delivery for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Samorezov, Julia E.; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-01-01

    Limitations of current treatment options for critical size bone defects create a significant clinical need for tissue engineered bone strategies. This review describes how control over the spatiotemporal delivery of growth factors, nucleic acids, and drugs and small molecules may aid in recapitulating signals present in bone development and healing, regenerating interfaces of bone with other connective tissues, and enhancing vascularization of tissue engineered bone. State-of-the-art technologies used to create spatially controlled patterns of bioactive factors on the surfaces of materials, to build up 3D materials with patterns of signal presentation within their bulk, and to pattern bioactive factor delivery after scaffold fabrication are presented, highlighting their applications in bone tissue engineering. As these techniques improve in areas such as spatial resolution and speed of patterning, they will continue to grow in value as model systems for understanding cell responses to spatially regulated bioactive factor signal presentation in vitro, and as strategies to investigate the capacity of the defined spatial arrangement of these signals to drive bone regeneration in vivo. PMID:25445719

  10. Mechanisms of spatial attention control in frontal and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Sara M; Konen, Christina S; Kastner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Theories of spatial attentional control have been largely based upon studies of patients suffering from visuospatial neglect, resulting from circumscribed lesions of frontal and posterior parietal cortex. In the intact brain, the control of spatial attention has been related to a distributed frontoparietal attention network. Little is known about the nature of the control mechanisms exerted by this network. Here, we used a novel region-of-interest approach to relate activations of the attention network to recently described topographic areas in frontal cortex [frontal eye field (FEF), PreCC/IFS (precentral cortex/inferior frontal sulcus)] and parietal cortex [intraparietal sulcus areas (IPS1-IPS5) and an area in the superior parietal lobule (SPL1)] to examine their spatial attention signals. We found that attention signals in most topographic areas were spatially specific, with stronger responses when attention was directed to the contralateral than to the ipsilateral visual field. Importantly, two hemispheric asymmetries were found. First, a region in only right, but not left SPL1 carried spatial attention signals. Second, left FEF and left posterior parietal cortex (IPS1/2) generated stronger contralateral biasing signals than their counterparts in the right hemisphere. These findings are the first to characterize spatial attention signals in topographic frontal and parietal cortex and provide a neural basis in support of an interhemispheric competition account of spatial attentional control. PMID:20053897

  11. Light control in Ge2Sb2Te5-coated opaline photonic crystals mediated by interplay of Wood anomalies and 3D Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A. B.; Poddubny, A. N.; Yakovlev, S. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Golubev, V. G.

    2013-04-01

    We present experimental and theoretical study of light reflection spectra from hybrid structures formed by Ge2Sb2Te5 chalcogenide film on top of 3D opaline photonic crystal. We demonstrate the presence of diffraction anomalies (Wood anomalies) in the spectra. These anomalies are caused by the light scattering on the hybrid structure surface of hexagonal symmetry. To interpret the experimental results, we develop a qualitative theoretical model, taking into account the dispersion of quasi-waveguide modes supported by the surface layer of the hybrid structure. We consider the conditions for the coupling between the Bragg resonances associated with the diffraction of light on the 3D opal lattice and the resonances due to Wood anomalies.

  12. Anodization control for barrier-oxide thinning and 3D interconnected pores and direct electrodeposition of nanowire networks on native aluminium substrates.

    PubMed

    Gillette, Eleanor; Wittenberg, Stefanie; Graham, Lauren; Lee, Kwijong; Rubloff, Gary; Banerjee, Parag; Lee, Sang Bok

    2015-02-01

    Here we report a strategy for combining techniques for pore branching and barrier layer thinning to produce 3D porous anodized aluminum oxide films with direct ohmic contact to the native aluminum. This method provides an example of a rationally designed template which need not be removed from the aluminum, but which is also not constrained to traditional 2D pore geometry. We first demonstrate the barrier layer removal and pore branching techniques independently, and then combine them to produce free standing arrays of interconnected Ni nanostructures. Nickel nanostructures are deposited directly onto the aluminum to demonstrate the success of the structural modification, and showcase the potential for these films to be used as templates. This approach is the first to demonstrate the design and execution of multiple pore modification techniques in the same membrane, and demonstrates the first directly deposited 3D structures on aluminum substrates. PMID:25562070

  13. Controlled synthesis, asymmetrical transport behavior and luminescence properties of lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dan; Lu, Wei; Jin, Lin; Li, Chunyang; Luo, Wen; Wang, Mengnan; Wang, Zhenling; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-11-21

    Lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures have been fabricated by polyol-mediated method and characterized by various microstructural and optical techniques. The results indicate that the as-prepared ZnO:Ln(3+) (Ln = Tb, Eu) samples have a hexagonal phase structure and possess a mushroom-like 3D hierarchical morphology. The length of the whole mushroom from stipe bottom to pileus top is about 1.0 μm, and the diameters of pileus and stipe are about 0.8 μm and 0.4 μm, respectively. It is found that the flow of N2 is the key parameter for the formation of the novel ZnO structure and the addition of (NH4)2HPO4 has a prominent effect on the phase structure and the growth of mushroom-like morphology. The potential mechanism of forming this morphology is proposed. The pileus of the formed mushroom is assembled by several radial ZnO:Ln(3+) nanorods, whereas the stipe is composed of over layered ZnO:Ln(3+) nanosheets. Moreover, asymmetrical I-V characteristic curves of ZnO:Ln(3+) mushrooms indicate that the texture composition of the 3D hierarchical morphology might lead to the asymmetrical transport behavior of electrical conductivity. Lanthanide doped ZnO samples can exhibit red or green emission under the excitation of UV light. PMID:25293373

  14. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  15. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  16. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  17. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  18. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  20. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the recent years 3D waveform inversion has become achievable procedure for seismic data processing. A number of datasets has been inverted and presented (Warner el al 2008, Ben Hadj at all, Sirgue et all 2010) using isotropic 3D waveform inversion. However the question arises will the results be affected by isotropic assumption. Full-wavefield inversion techniques seek to match field data, wiggle-for-wiggle, to synthetic data generated by a high-resolution model of the sub-surface. In this endeavour, correctly matching the travel times of the principal arrivals is a necessary minimal requirement. In many, perhaps most, long-offset and wide-azimuth datasets, it is necessary to introduce some form of p-wave velocity anisotropy to match the travel times successfully. If this anisotropy is not also incorporated into the wavefield inversion, then results from the inversion will necessarily be compromised. We have incorporated anisotropy into our 3D wavefield tomography codes, characterised as spatially varying transverse isotropy with a tilted axis of symmetry - TTI anisotropy. This enhancement approximately doubles both the run time and the memory requirements of the code. We show that neglect of anisotropy can lead to significant artefacts in the recovered velocity models. We will present inversion results of inverting anisotropic 3D dataset by assuming isotropic earth and compare them with anisotropic inversion result. As a test case Marmousi model extended to 3D with no velocity variation in third direction and with added spatially varying anisotropy is used. Acquisition geometry is assumed as OBC with sources and receivers everywhere at the surface. We attempted inversion using both 2D and full 3D acquisition for this dataset. Results show that if no anisotropy is taken into account although image looks plausible most features are miss positioned in depth and space, even for relatively low anisotropy, which leads to incorrect result. This may lead to

  1. Wave-CAIPI for Highly Accelerated 3D Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bilgic, Berkin; Gagoski, Borjan A.; Cauley, Stephen F.; Fan, Audrey P.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Grant, P. Ellen; Wald, Lawrence L.; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To introduce the Wave-CAIPI (Controlled Aliasing in Parallel Imaging) acquisition and reconstruction technique for highly accelerated 3D imaging with negligible g-factor and artifact penalties. Methods The Wave-CAIPI 3D acquisition involves playing sinusoidal gy and gz gradients during the readout of each kx encoding line, while modifying the 3D phase encoding strategy to incur inter-slice shifts as in 2D-CAIPI acquisitions. The resulting acquisition spreads the aliasing evenly in all spatial directions, thereby taking full advantage of 3D coil sensitivity distribution. By expressing the voxel spreading effect as a convolution in image space, an efficient reconstruction scheme that does not require data gridding is proposed. Rapid acquisition and high quality image reconstruction with Wave-CAIPI is demonstrated for high-resolution magnitude and phase imaging and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). Results Wave-CAIPI enables full-brain gradient echo (GRE) acquisition at 1 mm isotropic voxel size and R=3×3 acceleration with maximum g-factors of 1.08 at 3T, and 1.05 at 7T. Relative to the other advanced Cartesian encoding strategies 2D-CAIPI and Bunched Phase Encoding, Wave-CAIPI yields up to 2-fold reduction in maximum g-factor for 9-fold acceleration at both field strengths. Conclusion Wave-CAIPI allows highly accelerated 3D acquisitions with low artifact and negligible g-factor penalties, and may facilitate clinical application of high-resolution volumetric imaging. PMID:24986223

  2. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  4. User experience while viewing stereoscopic 3D television

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C.A.; Bohr, Iwo

    2014-01-01

    3D display technologies have been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. In a lab-based study with a between-subjects design, 433 viewers aged from 4 to 82 years watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (S3D), and subjectively reported on a range of aspects of their viewing experience. Our results suggest that a minority of viewers, around 14%, experience adverse effects due to viewing S3D, mainly headache and eyestrain. A control experiment where participants viewed 2D content through 3D glasses suggests that around 8% may report adverse effects which are not due directly to viewing S3D, but instead are due to the glasses or to negative preconceptions about S3D (the ‘nocebo effect'). Women were slightly more likely than men to report adverse effects with S3D. We could not detect any link between pre-existing eye conditions or low stereoacuity and the likelihood of experiencing adverse effects with S3D. Practitioner Summary: Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) has been linked to visual discomfort and fatigue. Viewers watched the same movie in either 2D or stereo 3D (between-subjects design). Around 14% reported effects such as headache and eyestrain linked to S3D itself, while 8% report adverse effects attributable to 3D glasses or negative expectations. PMID:24874550

  5. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  6. State-Of of 3d National Mapping in 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoter, Jantien; Vallet, Bruno; Lithen, Thomas; Pla, Maria; Wozniak, Piotr; Kellenberger, Tobias; Streilein, Andre; Ilves, Risto; Ledoux, Hugo

    2016-06-01

    Techniques for 3D mapping are maturing. At the same time the need for 3D data is increasing. This has pushed national (and regional) mapping agencies (NMAs) to consider extending their traditional task of providing topographic data into the third dimension. To show how research results in 3D mapping obtained over the past twenty years have been adopted by practice, this paper presents the ongoing work on 3D mapping within seven NMAs, all member of the 3D Special Interest Group of European Spatial Data Research (EuroSDR). The paper shows that some NMAs are still in the initial (experimental) phase of 3D mapping, while others have already built solid databases to maintain 2.5D and 3D topographic data covering their whole country.

  7. Two Eyes, 3D: Stereoscopic Design Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron; Subbarao, M.; Wyatt, R.

    2013-01-01

    Two Eyes, 3D is a NSF-funded research project about how people perceive highly spatial objects when shown with 2D or stereoscopic ("3D") representations. As part of the project, we produced a short film about SN 2011fe. The high definition film has been rendered in both 2D and stereoscopic formats. It was developed according to a set of stereoscopic design principles we derived from the literature and past experience producing and studying stereoscopic films. Study participants take a pre- and post-test that involves a spatial cognition assessment and scientific knowledge questions about Type-1a supernovae. For the evaluation, participants use iPads in order to record spatial manipulation of the device and look for elements of embodied cognition. We will present early results and also describe the stereoscopic design principles and the rationale behind them. All of our content and software is available under open source licenses. More information is at www.twoeyes3d.org.

  8. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an