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Sample records for 3d spatial resolution

  1. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  2. Spatial resolution limits for the isotropic-3D PET detector X’tal cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a popular imaging method in metabolism, neuroscience, and molecular imaging. For dedicated human brain and small animal PET scanners, high spatial resolution is needed to visualize small objects. To improve the spatial resolution, we are developing the X’tal cube, which is our new PET detector to achieve isotropic 3D positioning detectability. We have shown that the X’tal cube can achieve 1 mm3 uniform crystal identification performance with the Anger-type calculation even at the block edges. We plan to develop the X’tal cube with even smaller 3D grids for sub-millimeter crystal identification. In this work, we investigate spatial resolution of a PET scanner based on the X’tal cube using Monte Carlo simulations for predicting resolution performance in smaller 3D grids. For spatial resolution evaluation, a point source emitting 511 keV photons was simulated by GATE for all physical processes involved in emission and interaction of positrons. We simulated two types of animal PET scanners. The first PET scanner had a detector ring 14.6 cm in diameter composed of 18 detectors. The second PET scanner had a detector ring 7.8 cm in diameter composed of 12 detectors. After the GATE simulations, we converted the interacting 3D position information to digitalized positions for realistic segmented crystals. We simulated several X’tal cubes with cubic crystals from (0.5 mm)3 to (2 mm)3 in size. Also, for evaluating the effect of DOI resolution, we simulated several X’tal cubes with crystal thickness from (0.5 mm)3 to (9 mm)3. We showed that sub-millimeter spatial resolution was possible using cubic crystals smaller than (1.0 mm)3 even with the assumed physical processes. Also, the weighted average spatial resolutions of both PET scanners with (0.5 mm)3 cubic crystals were 0.53 mm (14.6 cm ring diameter) and 0.48 mm (7.8 cm ring diameter). For the 7.8 cm ring diameter, spatial resolution with 0.5×0.5×1.0 mm3 crystals

  3. 3D resolution enhancement of deep-tissue imaging based on virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, I-Cheng; Hsu, Kuo-Jen; Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-07-25

    During the last decades, several resolution enhancement methods for optical microscopy beyond diffraction limit have been developed. Nevertheless, those hardware-based techniques typically require strong illumination, and fail to improve resolution in deep tissue. Here we develop a high-speed computational approach, three-dimensional virtual spatial overlap modulation microscopy (3D-vSPOM), which immediately solves the strong-illumination issue. By amplifying only the spatial frequency component corresponding to the un-scattered point-spread-function at focus, plus 3D nonlinear value selection, 3D-vSPOM shows significant resolution enhancement in deep tissue. Since no iteration is required, 3D-vSPOM is much faster than iterative deconvolution. Compared to non-iterative deconvolution, 3D-vSPOM does not need a priori information of point-spread-function at deep tissue, and provides much better resolution enhancement plus greatly improved noise-immune response. This method is ready to be amalgamated with two-photon microscopy or other laser scanning microscopy to enhance deep-tissue resolution. PMID:27464077

  4. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  5. High Spatial Resolution Isotope Ratio Imaging and 3D Reconstruction of Presolar SiC Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, I. C.; Henkel, T.; Clarke, A.

    2015-07-01

    Presolar SiC grains have been analysed with a new NanoSIMS for isotope ratio measurements of C, N and Si. High spatial resolution imaging suggests that nitrogen isotope heterogeneity within the grains may lead to anomalous results in the literature.

  6. CCTV Coverage Index Based on Surveillance Resolution and Its Evaluation Using 3D Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoungah; Lee, Impyeong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to evaluating how effectively a closed circuit television (CCTV) system can monitor a targeted area. With 3D models of the target area and the camera parameters of the CCTV system, the approach produces surveillance coverage index, which is newly defined in this study as a quantitative measure for surveillance performance. This index indicates the proportion of the space being monitored with a sufficient resolution to the entire space of the target area. It is determined by computing surveillance resolution at every position and orientation, which indicates how closely a specific object can be monitored with a CCTV system. We present full mathematical derivation for the resolution, which depends on the location and orientation of the object as well as the geometric model of a camera. With the proposed approach, we quantitatively evaluated the surveillance coverage of a CCTV system in an underground parking area. Our evaluation process provided various quantitative-analysis results, compelling us to examine the design of the CCTV system prior to its installation and understand the surveillance capability of an existing CCTV system. PMID:26389909

  7. CCTV Coverage Index Based on Surveillance Resolution and Its Evaluation Using 3D Spatial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoungah; Lee, Impyeong

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to evaluating how effectively a closed circuit television (CCTV) system can monitor a targeted area. With 3D models of the target area and the camera parameters of the CCTV system, the approach produces surveillance coverage index, which is newly defined in this study as a quantitative measure for surveillance performance. This index indicates the proportion of the space being monitored with a sufficient resolution to the entire space of the target area. It is determined by computing surveillance resolution at every position and orientation, which indicates how closely a specific object can be monitored with a CCTV system. We present full mathematical derivation for the resolution, which depends on the location and orientation of the object as well as the geometric model of a camera. With the proposed approach, we quantitatively evaluated the surveillance coverage of a CCTV system in an underground parking area. Our evaluation process provided various quantitative-analysis results, compelling us to examine the design of the CCTV system prior to its installation and understand the surveillance capability of an existing CCTV system. PMID:26389909

  8. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  9. Modeling the crystal distribution of lead-sulfate in lead-acid batteries with 3D spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Moritz; Badeda, Julia; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-04-01

    For the reliability of lead-acid batteries it is important to have an accurate prediction of its response to load profiles. A model for the lead-sulfate growth is presented, which is embedded in a physical-chemical model with 3D spatial resolution is presented which is used for analyzing the different mechanism influencing the cell response. One import factor is the chemical dissolution and precipitation of lead-sulfate, since its dissolution speed limits the charging reaction and the accumulation of indissolvable of lead-sulfate leads to capacity degradation. The cell performance/behavior is not only determined by the amount of the sulfate but also by the radii and distribution of the crystals. The presented model can be used to for an improved understanding of the interaction of the different mechanisms.

  10. High Temporal and Spatial Resolution 3D Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography of the Hands and Feet

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Clifton R.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Borisch, Eric A.; Glockner, James F.; Grimm, Roger C.; Hulshizer, Thomas C.; Macedo, Thanila A.; Mostardi, Petrice M.; Rossman, Phillip J.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Young, Phillip M.

    2010-01-01

    Methods are described for generating 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiograms of the hands and feet. Given targeted spatial resolution and frame times, it is shown that acceleration of about one order of magnitude or more is necessary. This is obtained by a combination of 2D Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) and homodyne (HD) acceleration methods. Image update times from 3.4 to 6.8 sec are provided in conjunction with view sharing. Modular receiver coil arrays are described which can be designed to the targeted vascular region. Images representative of the technique are generated in the vasculature of the hands and feet in volunteers and in patient studies. PMID:21698702

  11. In-situ 3D high-spatial resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic parameter distribution at decameter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, L.; Qiu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a major challenge in aquifer characterization is the determination of hydraulic parameters with high-spatial resolution. Since the mid-90's, various working groups have developed numerical evaluation approaches for hydraulic tomography: the inversion of hydraulic tests that have been recorded using tomographic arrangements. The practical application is often associated with long test times, complex evaluations, and prolonged computation times. In our study, a hydraulic tomographical data set consisted of 450 drawdown curves produced by a series of short term pumping tests conducted over 4 working days. Data was collected by two scientists without a technical staff. The tests were performed at the test site "Stegemühle", Göttingen, Germany in a confined sand and gravel aquifer with a thickness of 2-3 m. For the inversion, an approach has been used, which is based on the transformation of the groundwater flow equation into a form of Eikonal equation (Vasco et al., 2000). Utilizing this approach, the hydraulic data can be inverted using an Eikonal solver e.g. SIRT. This Eikonal solver is considerably computationally efficient and allows hundreds of draw down curves to be inverted on a standard laptop within minutes. Following the methodology described in Brauchler et al. 2013, 3D distribution of diffusivity and specific storage were directly reconstructed, and subsequently their product: the hydraulic conductivity. This study exemplifies that the required data can be recorded and analyzed efficiently in the field, which is a vital precondition for the in-situ field aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. Literature Vasco, D.W., Keers, H., Karasaki, K. (2000) Estimation of reservoir properties using transient pressure data: An asymptotic approach. Water Resour. Res. 36(12), 3447-3465 Brauchler, R., Hu, R., Hu, L., Jimenéz, S., Bayer, P., Ptak, T. (2013) Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography for resolving aquifer heterogeneity in

  12. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyka, Grzegorz; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  13. Development status of a CZT spectrometer prototype with 3D spatial resolution for hard x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, N.; Caroli, E.; Basili, A.; Benassi, G.; Budtz Jørgensen, C.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Kuvvetli, I.; Milano, L.; Moscatelli, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Zanichelli, M.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-07-01

    The development of new focusing optics based on wide band Laue lenses operating from ~60 keV up to several hundred keV is particularly challenging. This type of hard X-ray or gamma ray optics requires a high performance focal plane detector in order to exploit to the best their intrinsic capabilities. We describe a three dimensional (3D) position sensitive detector prototype suitable as the basic module for a high efficiency Laue lens focal plane detector. This detector configuration is currently under study for use in a balloon payload dedicated to performing a high significance measurement of the polarization status of the Crab between 100 and 500 keV. The prototype is made by packing 8 linear modules, each composed of one basic sensitive unit bonded onto a thin supporting ceramic layer. Each unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode is segmented into 8 detection cells, each comprising one collecting strip and 8 surrounding drift strips. The drift strips are biased by a voltage divider. The cathode is divided into 4 horizontal strips for the reconstruction of the Z interaction position. The detector readout electronics is based on RENA-3 ASIC and the data handling system uses a custom electronics based on FPGA to provide the ASIC setting, the event handling logic, and the data acquisition. This paper mainly describes the components and the status of the undergoing activities for the construction of the proposed 3D CZT prototype and shows the results of the electronics tests.

  14. Robust and high resolution hyperpolarized metabolic imaging of the rat heart at 7 t with 3d spectral‐spatial EPI

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jack J.; Lau, Angus Z.; Teh, Irvin; Schneider, Jürgen E.; Kinchesh, Paul; Smart, Sean; Ball, Vicky; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hyperpolarized metabolic imaging has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and management of diseases where metabolism is dysregulated, such as heart disease. We investigated the feasibility of imaging rodent myocardial metabolism at high resolution at 7 T. Methods We present here a fly‐back spectral‐spatial radiofrequency pulse that sidestepped maximum gradient strength requirements and enabled high resolution metabolic imaging of the rodent myocardium. A 3D echo‐planar imaging readout followed, with centric ordered z‐phase encoding. The cardiac gated sequence was used to image metabolism in rodents whose metabolic state had been manipulated by being fasted, fed, or fed and given the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor dichloroacetate. Results We imaged hyperpolarized metabolites with a spatial resolution of 2×2×3.8 mm3 and a temporal resolution of 1.8 s in the rat heart at 7 T. Significant differences in myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase flux were observed between the three groups of animals, concomitant with the known biochemistry. Conclusion The proposed sequence was able to image in vivo metabolism with excellent spatial resolution in the rat heart. The field of view enabled the simultaneous multi‐organ acquisition of metabolic information from the rat, which is of great utility for preclinical research in cardiovascular disease. Magn Reson Med 000:000–000, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Magn Reson Med 75:1515–1524, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. PMID:25991606

  15. Analytical solution to 3D SPECT reconstruction with non-uniform attenuation, scatter, and spatially-variant resolution variation for variable focal-length fan-beam collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junhai; Lu, Hongbing; Li, Tianfang; Liang, Zhengrong

    2003-05-01

    In the past decades, analytical (non-iterative) methods have been extensively investigated and developed for the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, it becomes possible only recently when the exact analytic non-uniform attenuation reconstruction algorithm was derived. Based on the explicit inversion formula for the attenuated Radon transform discovered by Novikov (2000), we extended the previous researches of inverting the attenuated Radon transform of parallel-beam collimation geometry to fan-beam and variable focal-length fan-beam (VFF) collimators and proposed an efficient, analytical solution to 3D SPECT reconstruction with VFF collimators, which compensates simultaneously for non-uniform attenuation, scatter, and spatially-variant or distance-dependent resolution variation (DDRV), as well as suppression of signal-dependent non-stationary Poisson noise. In this procedure, to avoid the reconstructed images being corrupted by the presence of severe noise, we apply a Karhune-Loève (K-L) domain adaptive Wiener filter, which accurately treats the non-stationary Poisson noise. The scatter is then removed by our scatter estimation method, which is based on the energy spectrum and modified from the triple-energy-window acquisition protocol. For the correction of DDRV, a distance-dependent deconvolution is adapted to provide a solution that realistically characterizes the resolution kernel in a real SPECT system. Finally image is reconstructed using our VFF non-uniform attenuation inversion formula.

  16. High temporal and spatial resolution 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the hands and feet.

    PubMed

    Haider, Clifton R; Riederer, Stephen J; Borisch, Eric A; Glockner, James F; Grimm, Roger C; Hulshizer, Thomas C; Macedo, Thanila A; Mostardi, Petrice M; Rossman, Phillip J; Vrtiska, Terri J; Young, Phillip M

    2011-07-01

    Methods are described for generating 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiograms of the hands and feet. Given targeted spatial resolution and frame times, it is shown that acceleration of about one order of magnitude or more is necessary. This is obtained by a combination of 2D sensitivity encoding (SENSE) and homodyne (HD) acceleration methods. Image update times from 3.4-6.8 seconds are provided in conjunction with view sharing. Modular receiver coil arrays are described which can be designed to the targeted vascular region. Images representative of the technique are generated in the vasculature of the hands and feet in volunteers and in patient studies. PMID:21698702

  17. The influence of the spatial resolution of topographic input data on the accuracy of 3-D UV actinic flux and irradiance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Schreier, S. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Simic, S.; Webb, A. R.

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of a digital elevation map (DEM) on the three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer performance for both spectral ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and actinic flux at 305 nm. Model simulations were performed for clear sky conditions for three case studies: the first and second one using three sites in the Innsbruck area and the third one using three sites at the Sonnblick observatory and surrounding area. It was found that the DEM resolution may change the altitude at some locations by up to 500 m, resulting in changes in the sky obscured by the horizon of up to 15%. The geographical distribution of UV irradiance and actinic flux shows that with larger pixel size, uncertainties in UV irradiance and actinic flux determination of up to 100% are possible. These large changes in incident irradiance and actinic flux with changing pixel size are strongly connected to shading effects. The effect of the DEM pixel size on irradiance and actinic flux was studied at the six locations, and it was found that significant increases in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM pixel size occurred at one valley location at high solar zenith angles in the Innsbruck area as well as for one steep valley location in the Sonnblick area. This increase in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM resolution is most likely to be connected to shading effects affecting the reflections from the surroundings.

  18. The influence of the spatial resolution of topographic input data on the accuracy of 3-D UV actinic flux and irradiance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Wagner, J. E.; Schreier, S. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Simic, S.; Webb, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the spatial resolution of a digital elevation map (DEM) on the three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer performance for both spectral ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and actinic flux at 305 nm. Model simulations were performed for clear sky conditions for three case studies: the first and second one using three sites in the Innsbruck area and the third one using three sites at the Sonnblick Observatory and surrounding area. It was found that DEM resolution may change the altitude at some locations by up to 500 m, resulting in changes in the sky obscured by the horizon of up to 15%. The geographical distribution of UV irradiance and actinic flux shows that with larger pixel size, uncertainties in UV irradiance and actinic flux determination of up to 100% are possible. These large changes in incident irradiance and actinic flux with changing pixel size are strongly connected to shading effects. The effect of DEM pixel size on irradiance and actinic flux was studied at the six locations, and it was found that significant increases in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM pixel size occurred at one valley location at high solar zenith angles in the Innsbruck area as well as for one steep valley location in the Sonnblick area. This increase in irradiance and actinic flux with increasing DEM resolution is most likely to be connected to shading effects affecting the reflections from the surroundings.

  19. Spatial Visualization by Realistic 3D Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the popular Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization by Rotations (PSVT-R) in isometric drawings was recreated with CAD software that allows 3D solid modeling and rendering to provide more realistic pictorial views. Both the original and the modified PSVT-R tests were given to students and their scores on the two tests were…

  20. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  1. Spatial and Spectral Characterization, Mapping, and 3D Reconstructing of Ice-wedge Polygons Using High Resolution LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Painter, S. L.; Gable, C. W.; Bui, Q.; Short, L. S.; Liljedahl, A.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H. M.; Dafflon, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Kumar, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    In landscapes with ice-wedge polygons, fine-scale land surface characterization is critically important because the processes that govern the carbon cycle and hydrological dynamics are controlled by features on the order of a few to tens of meters. To characterize the fine-scale features in polygonal ground in Barrow, Alaska, we use high-resolution LiDAR-derived topographic data (such as elevation, slope, curvature, and a novel 'directed distance (DD)') to develop quantitative metrics that allow for the discretization and characterization of polygons (formed by seasonal freeze and thaw processes). First, we used high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR to show that the high and low centered polygon features exhibit a unique signature in the Fourier power spectrum where the landscape signature on freeze and thaw process (~ 5 to 100 m) is super imposed on the coarse scale fluvial eroded landscape (rudimentary river network) signature. We next convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively choose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used a Delaunay triangulation to connect the ice-wedge network and map the topologically connected polygons. This analysis allows us to explore the 3D morphometry of these high- and low-centered polygons and develop a supervised set of ensemble characteristic templates for each polygon type as a function of directed distance (DD). These templates are used to classify the ice-wedge polygon landscape into low-centered polygons with limited troughs, and high- and low-centered polygons with well-developed trough network. We further extend the characteristic templates to polygon ensemble slopes and curvatures as a function of DD and develop a classification scheme for microtopographic features including troughs, rims, elevated ridges, and centers for both high-centered and low-centered polygon

  2. Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies

  3. A low-resolution 3D holographic volumetric display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Javid; Underwood, Ian; Greenaway, Alan; Halonen, Mikko

    2010-05-01

    A simple low resolution volumetric display is presented, based on holographic volume-segments. The display system comprises a proprietary holographic screen, laser projector, associated optics plus a control unit. The holographic screen resembles a sheet of frosted glass about A4 in size (20x30cm). The holographic screen is rear-illuminated by the laser projector, which is in turn driven by the controller, to produce simple 3D images that appear outside the plane of the screen. A series of spatially multiplexed and interleaved interference patterns are pre-encoded across the surface of the holographic screen. Each illumination pattern is capable of reconstructing a single holographic volume-segment. Up to nine holograms are multiplexed on the holographic screen in a variety of configurations including a series of numeric and segmented digits. The demonstrator has good results under laboratory conditions with moving colour 3D images in front of or behind the holographic screen.

  4. Developing 3D Spatial Skills for K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorby, Sheryl A.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional spatial skills have been shown to be critical to success in engineering and other technological fields. Well-developed 3D spatial skills are particularly important for success in engineering graphics courses. Further, 3D spatial skills of women lag significantly behind those of their male counterparts, which could hinder their…

  5. Single-Step 3-D Image Reconstruction in Magnetic Induction Tomography: Theoretical Limits of Spatial Resolution and Contrast to Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Karl; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Merwa, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality for reconstructing the changes of the complex conductivity in an object. MIT is based on determining the perturbation of an alternating magnetic field, which is coupled from several excitation coils to the object. The conductivity distribution is reconstructed from the corresponding voltage changes induced in several receiver coils. Potential medical applications comprise the continuous, non-invasive monitoring of tissue alterations which are reflected in the change of the conductivity, e.g. edema, ventilation disorders, wound healing and ischemic processes. MIT requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse eddy current problem. A linearized version of this problem was solved for 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils with a model of two spherical perturbations within a cylindrical phantom. The method was tested with simulated measurement data. Images were reconstructed with a regularized single-step Gauss–Newton approach. Theoretical limits for spatial resolution and contrast/noise ratio were calculated and compared with the empirical results from a Monte-Carlo study. The conductivity perturbations inside a homogeneous cylinder were localized for a SNR between 44 and 64 dB. The results prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT and give some quantitative data on the limitations of the method. PMID:17031597

  6. High Resolution Coherent 3d Spectroscopy of Bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangfeld, Benjamin R.; Wells, Thresa A.; House, Zuri R.; Chen, Peter C.

    2013-06-01

    The high resolution gas phase electronic spectrum of bromine is rather congested due to many overlapping vibrational and rotational transitions with similar transition frequencies, and also due to isotopomeric effects. Expansion into the second dimension will remove some of this congestion; however through the implementation of High Resolution Coherent 3D Spectroscopy, the density of peaks is further reduced by at least two orders of magnitude. This allows for the selective examination of a small number of spatially resolved multidimensional bands, separated by vibrational quantum number and by isotopomer, which facilitates the fitting of many rovibrational peaks in bromine. The ability to derive information about the molecular constants for the electronic states involved will be discussed.

  7. High resolution 3D fluorescence tomography using ballistic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Kwong, Jessica; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a ballistic-photon based approach for improving the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography using time-domain measurements. This approach uses early photon information contained in measured time-of-fight distributions originating from fluorescence emission. The time point spread functions (TPSF) from both excitation light and emission light are acquired with gated single photon Avalanche detector (SPAD) and time-correlated single photon counting after a short laser pulse. To determine the ballistic photons for reconstruction, the lifetime of the fluorophore and the time gate from the excitation profiles will be used for calibration, and then the time gate of the fluorescence profile can be defined by a simple time convolution. By mimicking first generation CT data acquisition, the sourcedetector pair will translate across and also rotate around the subject. The measurement from each source-detector position will be reshaped into a histogram that can be used by a simple back-projection algorithm in order to reconstruct high resolution fluorescence images. Finally, from these 2D sectioning slides, a 3D inclusion can be reconstructed accurately. To validate the approach, simulation of light transport is performed for biological tissue-like media with embedded fluorescent inclusion by solving the diffusion equation with Finite Element Method using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation. The reconstruction results from simulation studies have confirmed that this approach drastically improves the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography. Moreover, all the results have shown the feasibility of this technique for high resolution small animal imaging up to several centimeters.

  8. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  9. Optimal arrangements of fiber optic probes to enhance the spatial resolution in depth for 3D reflectance diffuse optical tomography with time-resolved measurements performed with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puszka, Agathe; Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Hervé, Lionel; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Koenig, Anne; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    Fiber optic probes with a width limited to a few centimeters can enable diffuse optical tomography (DOT) in intern organs like the prostate or facilitate the measurements on extern organs like the breast or the brain. We have recently shown on 2D tomographic images that time-resolved measurements with a large dynamic range obtained with fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) could push forward the imaged depth range in a diffusive medium at short source-detector separation compared with conventional non-gated approaches. In this work, we confirm these performances with the first 3D tomographic images reconstructed with such a setup and processed with the Mellin- Laplace transform. More precisely, we investigate the performance of hand-held probes with short interfiber distances in terms of spatial resolution and specifically demonstrate the interest of having a compact probe design featuring small source-detector separations. We compare the spatial resolution obtained with two probes having the same design but different scale factors, the first one featuring only interfiber distances of 15 mm and the second one, 10 mm. We evaluate experimentally the spatial resolution obtained with each probe on the setup with fast-gated SPADs for optical phantoms featuring two absorbing inclusions positioned at different depths and conclude on the potential of short source-detector separations for DOT.

  10. [3D Super-resolution Reconstruction and Visualization of Pulmonary Nodules from CT Image].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Fan, Xing; Yang, Ying; Tian, Xuedong; Gu, Lixu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to propose an algorithm for three-dimensional projection onto convex sets (3D POCS) to achieve super resolution reconstruction of 3D lung computer tomography (CT) images, and to introduce multi-resolution mixed display mode to make 3D visualization of pulmonary nodules. Firstly, we built the low resolution 3D images which have spatial displacement in sub pixel level between each other and generate the reference image. Then, we mapped the low resolution images into the high resolution reference image using 3D motion estimation and revised the reference image based on the consistency constraint convex sets to reconstruct the 3D high resolution images iteratively. Finally, we displayed the different resolution images simultaneously. We then estimated the performance of provided method on 5 image sets and compared them with those of 3 interpolation reconstruction methods. The experiments showed that the performance of 3D POCS algorithm was better than that of 3 interpolation reconstruction methods in two aspects, i.e., subjective and objective aspects, and mixed display mode is suitable to the 3D visualization of high resolution of pulmonary nodules. PMID:26710449

  11. High resolution 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Frank M.; Cornelius, Iwan; Blencowe, Anton; Franich, Rick D.; Geso, Moshi

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) techniques are under investigation at synchrotrons worldwide. Favourable outcomes from animal and cell culture studies have proven the efficacy of MRT. The aim of MRT researchers currently is to progress to human clinical trials in the near future. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the high resolution and 3D imaging of synchrotron generated microbeams in PRESAGE® dosimeters using laser fluorescence confocal microscopy. Methods: Water equivalent PRESAGE® dosimeters were fabricated and irradiated with microbeams on the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Microbeam arrays comprised of microbeams 25–50 μm wide with 200 or 400 μm peak-to-peak spacing were delivered as single, cross-fire, multidirectional, and interspersed arrays. Imaging of the dosimeters was performed using a NIKON A1 laser fluorescence confocal microscope. Results: The spatial fractionation of the MRT beams was clearly visible in 2D and up to 9 mm in depth. Individual microbeams were easily resolved with the full width at half maximum of microbeams measured on images with resolutions of as low as 0.09 μm/pixel. Profiles obtained demonstrated the change of the peak-to-valley dose ratio for interspersed MRT microbeam arrays and subtle variations in the sample positioning by the sample stage goniometer were measured. Conclusions: Laser fluorescence confocal microscopy of MRT irradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters has been validated in this study as a high resolution imaging tool for the independent spatial and geometrical verification of MRT beam delivery.

  12. Ultra-High Resolution 3D Imaging of Whole Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Sirinakis, George; Allgeyer, Edward S; Schroeder, Lena K; Duim, Whitney C; Kromann, Emil B; Phan, Thomy; Rivera-Molina, Felix E; Myers, Jordan R; Irnov, Irnov; Lessard, Mark; Zhang, Yongdeng; Handel, Mary Ann; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Lusk, C Patrick; Rothman, James E; Toomre, Derek; Booth, Martin J; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2016-08-11

    Fluorescence nanoscopy, or super-resolution microscopy, has become an important tool in cell biological research. However, because of its usually inferior resolution in the depth direction (50-80 nm) and rapidly deteriorating resolution in thick samples, its practical biological application has been effectively limited to two dimensions and thin samples. Here, we present the development of whole-cell 4Pi single-molecule switching nanoscopy (W-4PiSMSN), an optical nanoscope that allows imaging of three-dimensional (3D) structures at 10- to 20-nm resolution throughout entire mammalian cells. We demonstrate the wide applicability of W-4PiSMSN across diverse research fields by imaging complex molecular architectures ranging from bacteriophages to nuclear pores, cilia, and synaptonemal complexes in large 3D cellular volumes. PMID:27397506

  13. 3-D Optical Interference Microscopy at the Lateral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Niehues, Jan; Tereschenko, Stanislav

    2014-10-01

    For applications in micro- and nanotechnologies the lateral resolution of optical 3-D microscopes becomes an issue of increasing relevance. However, lateral resolution of 3-D microscopes is hard to define in a satisfying way. Therefore, we first study the measurement capabilities of a highly resolving white-light interference (WLI) microscope close to the limit of lateral resolution. Results of measurements and simulations demonstrate that better lateral resolution seems to be achievable based on the envelope evaluation of a WLI signal. Unfortunately, close to the lateral resolution limit errors in the measured amplitude of micro-structures appear. On the other hand, results of interferometric phase evaluation seem to be strongly low-pass filtered in this case. Furthermore, the instrument transfer characteristics and the lateral resolution capabilities of WLI instruments are also affected by polarization. TM polarized light is less sensitive to edge diffraction and thus systematic errors can be avoided. However, apart from ghost steps due to fringe order errors, the results of phase evaluation seem to be closer to the real surface topography if TE polarized light is used. The lateral resolution can be further improved by combining WLI and structured illumination microscopy. Since the measured height of rectangular profiles close to the lateral resolution limit is generally too small compared to the real height, we introduce a method based on phase evaluation which characterizes the heights of barely laterally resolved rectangular gratings correctly.

  14. Using 3D Geometric Models to Teach Spatial Geometry Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoline, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    An explanation of 3-D Computer Aided Design (CAD) usage to teach spatial geometry concepts using nontraditional techniques is presented. The software packages CADKEY and AutoCAD are described as well as their usefulness in solving space geometry problems. (KR)

  15. 3D-High Resolution Manometry of the Esophagogastric Junction

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Monika A.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is a complex structure that challenges accurate manometric recording. This study aimed to define EGJ pressure morphology relative to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) during respiration with 3D high-resolution manometry (3D-HRM). METHODS A 7.5 cm long 3D-HRM array with 96 independent solid-state pressure sensors (axial spacing 0.75 cm, radial spacing 45°) was used to record EGJ pressure in 15 normal subjects. Concurrent videofluoroscopy was used to localize the SCJ marked with an endoclip. Ex-vivo experiments were done on the effect of bending the probe to match that seen fluoroscopically. RESULTS 3D-HRM EGJ pressure recordings were dominated by an asymmetric pressure peak superimposed on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) attributable to the crural diaphragm (CD). Median peak CD pressure at expiration and inspiration (51 and 119 mmHg respectively) was much greater in 3D-HRM than evident in HRM with circumferential pressure averaging. EGJ length, defined as the zone of circumferential pressure exceeding that of adjacent esophagus or stomach was also substantially shorter (2.4 cm) than evident in conventional HRM. No consistent circumferential EGJ pressure was evident distal to the SCJ in 3D-HRM recordings and ex-vivo experiments suggested that the intrgastric pressure peak seen contralateral to the CD related to bending the assembly rather than the sphincter per se. CONCLUSION 3D-HRM demonstrated a profoundly asymmetric and vigorous CD component to EGJ pressure superimposed on the LES. EGJ length was shorter than evident with conventional HRM and the distal margin of the EGJ sphincteric zone closely correlated with the SCJ. PMID:21595803

  16. High Resolution, Large Deformation 3D Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    López-Fagundo, Cristina; Reichner, Jonathan; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM) have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients. PMID:24740435

  17. 3D spatial information infrastructure: The case of Port Rotterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatanova, S.; Beetz, J.

    2012-10-01

    The development and maintenance of the infrastructure, facilities, logistics and other assets of the Port of Rotterdam requires a broad spectrum of heterogeneous information. This information concerns features, which are spatially distributed above ground, underground, in the air and in the water. The data are managed in a variety of data models with varying levels of dimensionality, granularity, accuracy and up-to-dateness. Additionally increasing number of 3D design models is becoming available. This complexity of tasks and diversity of information challenges the Port authority to look for more advanced 3D solutions. This paper presents research in progress related to developing a 3D SII in support of information and process management within the Port of Rotterdam.

  18. Effects of spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the effects of spatial resolution on extraction of geologic information are woefully lacking but spatial resolution effects can be examined as they influence two general categories: detection of spatial features per se; and the effects of IFOV on the definition of spectral signatures and on general mapping abilities.

  19. A miniature high resolution 3-D imaging sonar.

    PubMed

    Josserand, Tim; Wolley, Jason

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses the design and development of a miniature, high resolution 3-D imaging sonar. The design utilizes frequency steered phased arrays (FSPA) technology. FSPAs present a small, low-power solution to the problem of underwater imaging sonars. The technology provides a method to build sonars with a large number of beams without the proportional power, circuitry and processing complexity. The design differs from previous methods in that the array elements are manufactured from a monolithic material. With this technique the arrays are flat and considerably smaller element dimensions are achievable which allows for higher frequency ranges and smaller array sizes. In the current frequency range, the demonstrated array has ultra high image resolution (1″ range×1° azimuth×1° elevation) and small size (<3″×3″). The design of the FSPA utilizes the phasing-induced frequency-dependent directionality of a linear phased array to produce multiple beams in a forward sector. The FSPA requires only two hardware channels per array and can be arranged in single and multiple array configurations that deliver wide sector 2-D images. 3-D images can be obtained by scanning the array in a direction perpendicular to the 2-D image field and applying suitable image processing to the multiple scanned 2-D images. This paper introduces the 3-D FSPA concept, theory and design methodology. Finally, results from a prototype array are presented and discussed. PMID:21112066

  20. High-Resolution Variable-Density 3D Cones Coronary MRA

    PubMed Central

    Addy, Nii Okai; Ingle, R. Reeve; Wu, Holden H.; Hu, Bob S.; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To improve the spatial/temporal resolution of whole-heart coronary MR angiography (CMRA) by developing a variable-density (VD) 3D cones acquisition suitable for image reconstruction with parallel imaging and compressed sensing techniques. Methods A VD 3D cones trajectory design incorporates both radial and spiral trajectory undersampling techniques to achieve higher resolution. This design is used to generate a VD cones trajectory with 0.8 mm/66 ms isotropic spatial/temporal resolution, using a similar number of readouts as our previous fully sampled cones trajectory (1.2 mm/100 ms). Scans of volunteers and patients are performed to evaluate the performance of the VD trajectory, using non-Cartesian L1-ESPIRiT for high-resolution image reconstruction. Results With gridding reconstruction, the high-resolution scans experience an expected drop in signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios, but with L1-ESPIRiT, the apparent noise is substantially reduced. Compared to 1.2 mm images, in each volunteer, the L1-ESPIRiT 0.8 mm images exhibit higher vessel sharpness values in the right and left anterior descending arteries. Conclusion CMRA with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution and high temporal resolution can be performed with VD 3D cones to improve the depiction of coronary arteries. PMID:26172829

  1. Atomic-Resolution 3D Electron Microscopy with Dynamic Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Meisheng, Hu

    2005-02-15

    Achievement of atomic-resolution electron-beam tomography will allow determination of the three-dimensional structure of nanoparticles (and other suitable specimens) at atomic resolution. Three-dimensional reconstructions will yield ''section'' images that resolve atoms overlapped in normal electron microscope images (projections), resolving lighter atoms such as oxygen in the presence of heavier atoms, and atoms that lie on non-lattice sites such as those in non-periodic defect structures. Lower-resolution electron microscope tomography has been used to produce reconstructed 3D images of nanoparticles [1] but extension to atomic resolution is considered not to be straightforward. Accurate three-dimensional reconstruction from two-dimensional projections generally requires that intensity in the series of 2-D images be a monotonic function of the specimen structure (often specimen density, but in our case atomic potential). This condition is not satisfied in electron microscopy when specimens with strong periodicity are tilted close to zone-axis orientation and produce ''anomalous'' image contrast because of strong dynamic diffraction components. Atomic-resolution reconstructions from tilt series containing zone-axis images (with their contrast enhanced by strong dynamical scattering) can be distorted when the stronger zone-axis images overwhelm images obtained in other ''random'' orientations in which atoms do not line up in neat columns. The first demonstrations of 3-D reconstruction to atomic resolution used five zone-axis images from test specimens of staurolite consisting of a mix of light and heavy atoms [2,3]. Initial resolution was to the 1.6{angstrom} Scherzer limit of a JEOL-ARM1000. Later experiments used focal-series reconstruction from 5 to 10 images to produce staurolite images from the ARM1000 with resolution extended beyond the Scherzer limit to 1.38{angstrom} [4,5]. To obtain a representation of the three-dimensional structure, images were obtained

  2. 3D GIS spatial operation based on extended Euler operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongbo; Lu, Guonian; Sheng, Yehua; Zhou, Liangchen; Guo, Fei; Shang, Zuoyan; Wang, Jing

    2008-10-01

    The implementation of 3 dimensions spatial operations, based on certain data structure, has a lack of universality and is not able to treat with non-manifold cases, at present. ISO/DIS 19107 standard just presents the definition of Boolean operators and set operators for topological relationship query, and OGC GeoXACML gives formal definitions for several set functions without implementation detail. Aiming at these problems, based mathematical foundation on cell complex theory, supported by non-manifold data structure and using relevant research in the field of non-manifold geometry modeling for reference, firstly, this paper according to non-manifold Euler-Poincaré formula constructs 6 extended Euler operators and inverse operators to carry out creating, updating and deleting 3D spatial elements, as well as several pairs of supplementary Euler operators to convenient for implementing advanced functions. Secondly, we change topological element operation sequence of Boolean operation and set operation as well as set functions defined in GeoXACML into combination of extended Euler operators, which separates the upper functions and lower data structure. Lastly, we develop underground 3D GIS prototype system, in which practicability and credibility of extended Euler operators faced to 3D GIS presented by this paper are validated.

  3. Improved resolution of 3D printed scaffolds by shrinking.

    PubMed

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP) uses inkjet printheads to selectively deposit liquid binder to adjoin powder particles in a layer-by-layer fashion to create a computer-modeled 3D object. Two general approaches for 3DP have been described for biomedical applications (direct and indirect 3DP). The two approaches offer competing advantages, and both are limited by print resolution. This study describes a materials processing strategy to enhance 3DP resolution by controlled shrinking net-shape scaffolds. Briefly, porogen preforms are printed and infused with the desired monomer or polymer solution. After solidification or polymerization, the porogen is leached and the polymer is allowed to shrink by controlled drying. Heat treatment is performed to retain the dimensions against swelling forces. The main objective of this study is to determine the effects of polymer content and post-processing on dimension, microstructure, and thermomechanical properties of the scaffold. For polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA), reducing polymer content corresponded with greater shrinkage with maximum shrinkage of ∼80 vol% at 20% vol% PEG-DA. The secondary heat treatment retains the microarchitecture and new dimensions of the scaffolds, even when the heat-treated scaffolds are immersed into water. To demonstrate shrinkage predictability, 3D components with interlocking positive and negative features were printed, processed, and fitted. This material processing strategy provides an alternative method to enhance the resolution of 3D scaffolds, for a wide range of polymers, without optimizing the binder-powder interaction physics to print each material combination. PMID:25404276

  4. Resolution-limited optical recording in 3D.

    PubMed

    Orlic, Susanna; Dietz, Enrico; Frohmann, Sven; Rass, Jens

    2011-08-15

    We present an optical write/read system for high density optical data storage in 3-D. The microholographic approach relies on submicron-sized reflection gratings that encode the digital data. As in conventional optical data storage, the physical limitations are imposed by both the diffraction of light and resolution of the recording material. We demonstrate resolution-limited volume recording in photopolymer materials sensitive in the green and violet spectral range. The volume occupied by a micrograting scales down by the transition in the write/read wavelength. Readout yields a micrograting width of 306 nm at 532 nm and 197 nm at 405 nm. To our knowledge these are the smallest volume holograms ever recorded. The recordings demonstrate the potential of the technique for volumetric optical structuring, data storage and encryption. PMID:21934972

  5. Developing Spatial Reasoning Through 3D Representations of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, F.; Eisenhamer, B.; McCallister, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mental models of astronomical objects are often greatly hampered by the flat two-dimensional representation of pictures from telescopes. Lacking experience with the true structures in much of the imagery, there is no basis for anything but the default interpretation of a picture postcard. Using astronomical data and scientific visualizations, our professional development session allows teachers and their students to develop their spatial reasoning while forming more accurate and richer mental models. Examples employed in this session include star positions and constellations, morphologies of both normal and interacting galaxies, shapes of planetary nebulae, and three dimensional structures in star forming regions. Participants examine, imagine, predict, and confront the 3D interpretation of well-known 2D imagery using authentic data from NASA, the Hubble Space Telescope, and other scientific sources. The session's cross-disciplinary nature includes science, math, and artistic reasoning while addressing common cosmic misconceptions. Stars of the Orion Constellation seen in 3D explodes the popular misconception that stars in a constellation are all at the same distance. A scientific visualization of two galaxies colliding provides a 3D comparison for Hubble images of interacting galaxies.

  6. Gravity and spatial orientation in virtual 3D-mazes.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manuel; Lipshits, Mark; McIntyre, Joseph; Berthoz, Alain

    2003-01-01

    In order to bring new insights into the processing of 3D spatial information, we conducted experiments on the capacity of human subjects to memorize 3D-structured environments, such as buildings with several floors or the potentially complex 3D structure of an orbital space station. We had subjects move passively in one of two different exploration modes, through a visual virtual environment that consisted of a series of connected tunnels. In upright displacement, self-rotation when going around corners in the tunnels was limited to yaw rotations. For horizontal translations, subjects faced forward in the direction of motion. When moving up or down through vertical segments of the 3D tunnels, however, subjects facing the tunnel wall, remaining upright as if moving up and down in a glass elevator. In the unconstrained displacement mode, subjects would appear to climb or dive face-forward when moving vertically; thus, in this mode subjects could experience visual flow consistent with rotations about any of the 3 canonical axes. In a previous experiment, subjects were asked to determine whether a static, outside view of a test tunnel corresponded or not to the tunnel through which they had just passed. Results showed that performance was better on this task for the upright than for the unconstrained displacement mode; i.e. when subjects remained "upright" with respect to the virtual environment as defined by subject's posture in the first segment. This effect suggests that gravity may provide a key reference frame used in the shift between egocentric and allocentric representations of the 3D virtual world. To check whether it is the polarizing effects of gravity that leads to the favoring of the upright displacement mode, the experimental paradigm was adapted for orbital flight and performed by cosmonauts onboard the International Space Station. For these flight experiments the previous recognition task was replaced by a computerized reconstruction task, which proved

  7. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  8. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on three-dimensional super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision. PMID:25866640

  9. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  10. 3-D Separation Control using Spatially-Compact, Pulsed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, George T. K.; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of controlled 3-D transitory attachment of stalled flow over a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil are investigated in wind tunnel experiments. Pulsed actuation is effected over a spanwise fraction of the separated domain on a time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's characteristic convective time scale using surface-integrated pulsed, combustion-driven actuator jets. The formation, evolution, and advection of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in its near wake are computed from high-resolution, phase-locked PIV measurements of the flow field in multiple cross-stream planes. It is shown that transitory attachment spreads toward the outboard, unactuated flow domains and exceeds the spanwise width of the actuation. The attachment is preceded by the formation of 3-D vortical structures that are advected and shed into the near wake. The effect of the actuation on the variation of the lift and pitching moment during the pitching cycle is altered significantly with its phase delay relative to the airfoil's pitching motion and can significantly mitigate the adverse aerodynamic effects of the dynamic stall. Supported by AFOSR.

  11. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  12. Development of a High Resolution 3D Infant Stomach Model for Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudry, Qaiser; Raza, S. Hussain; Lee, Jeonggyu; Xu, Yan; Wulkan, Mark; Wang, May D.

    Medical surgical procedures have not changed much during the past century due to the lack of accurate low-cost workbench for testing any new improvement. The increasingly cheaper and powerful computer technologies have made computer-based surgery planning and training feasible. In our work, we have developed an accurate 3D stomach model, which aims to improve the surgical procedure that treats the infant pediatric and neonatal gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We generate the 3-D infant stomach model based on in vivo computer tomography (CT) scans of an infant. CT is a widely used clinical imaging modality that is cheap, but with low spatial resolution. To improve the model accuracy, we use the high resolution Visible Human Project (VHP) in model building. Next, we add soft muscle material properties to make the 3D model deformable. Then we use virtual reality techniques such as haptic devices to make the 3D stomach model deform upon touching force. This accurate 3D stomach model provides a workbench for testing new GERD treatment surgical procedures. It has the potential to reduce or eliminate the extensive cost associated with animal testing when improving any surgical procedure, and ultimately, to reduce the risk associated with infant GERD surgery.

  13. Inclusion of high resolution MODIS maps on a 3D tropospheric water vapor GPS tomography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Pedro; Catalao, Joao; Nico, Giovanni; Miranda, Pedro M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Observing the water vapor distribution on the troposphere remains a challenge for the weather forecast. Radiosondes provide precise water vapor profiles of the troposphere, but lack geographical and temporal coverage, while satellite meteorological maps have good spatial resolution but even poorer temporal resolution. GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapor in all weather conditions with high temporal sampling frequency. However these measurements lack a vertical water vapor discretization. Reconstruction of the slant path GPS observation to the satellite allows oblique water vapor measurements. Implementation of a 3D grid of voxels along the troposphere over an area where GPS stations are available enables the observation ray tracing. A relation between the water vapor density and the distanced traveled inside the voxels is established, defining GPS tomography. An inverse problem formulation is needed to obtain a water vapor solution. The combination of precipitable water vapor (PWV) maps obtained from MODIS satellite data with the GPS tomography is performed in this work. The MODIS PWV maps can have 1 or 5 km pixel resolution, being obtained 2 times per day in the same location at most. The inclusion of MODIS PWV maps provides an enhanced horizontal resolution for the tomographic solution and benefits the stability of the inversion problem. A 3D tomographic grid was adjusted over a regional area covering Lisbon, Portugal, where a GNSS network of 9 receivers is available. Radiosonde measurements in the area are used to evaluate the 3D water vapor tomography maps.

  14. 2D and 3D X-Ray Structural Microscopy Using Submicron-Resolution Laue Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Budai, John D.; Yang, Wenge; Larson, Bennett C.; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.

    2010-11-10

    We have developed a scanning, polychromatic x-ray microscopy technique with submicron spatial resolution at the Advanced Photon Source. In this technique, white undulator radiation is focused to submicron diameter using elliptical mirrors. Laue diffraction patterns scattered from the sample are collected with an area detector and then analyzed to obtain the local crystal structure, lattice orientation, and strain tensor. These new microdiffraction capabilities have enabled both 2D and 3D structural studies of materials on mesoscopic length-scales of tenths-to-hundreds of microns. For thin samples such as deposited films, 2D structural maps are obtained by step-scanning the area of interest. For example, 2D x-ray microscopy has been applied in studies of the epitaxial growth of oxide films. For bulk samples, a 3D differential-aperture x-ray microscopy technique has been developed that yields the full diffraction information from each submicron volume element. The capabilities of 3D x-ray microscopy are demonstrated here with measurements of grain orientations and grain boundary motion in polycrystalline aluminum during 3D thermal grain growth. X-ray microscopy provides the needed, direct link between the experimentally measured 3D microstructural evolution and the results of theory and modeling of materials processes on mesoscopic length scales.

  15. High-resolution 3D imaging laser radar flight test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Richard M.; Davis, W. R.; Rich, G. C.; McLaughlin, J. L.; Lee, E. I.; Stanley, B. M.; Burnside, J. W.; Rowe, G. S.; Hatch, R. E.; Square, T. E.; Skelly, L. J.; O'Brien, M.; Vasile, A.; Heinrichs, R. M.

    2005-05-01

    Situation awareness and accurate Target Identification (TID) are critical requirements for successful battle management. Ground vehicles can be detected, tracked, and in some cases imaged using airborne or space-borne microwave radar. Obscurants such as camouflage net and/or tree canopy foliage can degrade the performance of such radars. Foliage can be penetrated with long wavelength microwave radar, but generally at the expense of imaging resolution. The goals of the DARPA Jigsaw program include the development and demonstration of high-resolution 3-D imaging laser radar (ladar) ensor technology and systems that can be used from airborne platforms to image and identify military ground vehicles that may be hiding under camouflage or foliage such as tree canopy. With DARPA support, MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed a rugged and compact 3-D imaging ladar system that has successfully demonstrated the feasibility and utility of this application. The sensor system has been integrated into a UH-1 helicopter for winter and summer flight campaigns. The sensor operates day or night and produces high-resolution 3-D spatial images using short laser pulses and a focal plane array of Geiger-mode avalanche photo-diode (APD) detectors with independent digital time-of-flight counting circuits at each pixel. The sensor technology includes Lincoln Laboratory developments of the microchip laser and novel focal plane arrays. The microchip laser is a passively Q-switched solid-state frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser transmitting short laser pulses (300 ps FWHM) at 16 kilohertz pulse rate and at 532 nm wavelength. The single photon detection efficiency has been measured to be > 20 % using these 32x32 Silicon Geiger-mode APDs at room temperature. The APD saturates while providing a gain of typically > 106. The pulse out of the detector is used to stop a 500 MHz digital clock register integrated within the focal-plane array at each pixel. Using the detector in this binary response mode

  16. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

  17. Assimilation of high resolution satellite imagery into the 3D-CMCC forest ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, S.; Collalti, A.; Candini, A.; Della Vecchia, A.; Valentini, R.

    2012-04-01

    The use of satellite observations for the accurate monitoring of the terrestrial biosphere has been carried out since the very early stage of remote sensing applications. The possibility to observe the ground surface with different wavelengths and different observation modes (namely active and passive observations) has given to the scientific community an invaluable tool for the observation of wide areas with a resolution down to the single tree. On the other hand, the continuous development of forest ecosystem models has permitted to perform simulations of complex ("natural") forest scenarios to evaluate forest status, forest growth and future dynamics. Both remote sensing and modelling forest assessment methods have advantages and disadvantages that could be overcome by the adoption of an integrated approach. In the framework of the European Space Agency Project KLAUS, high resolution optical satellite data has been integrated /assimilated into a forest ecosystem model (named 3D-CMCC) specifically developed for multi-specie, multi-age forests. 3D-CMCC permits to simulate forest areas with different forest layers, with different trees at different age on the same point. Moreover, the model permits to simulate management activities on the forest, thus evaluating the carbon stock evolution following a specific management scheme. The model has been modified including satellite data at 10m resolution, permitting the use of directly measured information, adding to the model the real phenological cycle of each simulated point. Satellite images have been collected by the JAXA ALOS-AVNIR-2 sensor. The integration schema has permitted to identify a spatial domain in which each pixel is characterised by a forest structure (species, ages, soil parameters), meteo-climatological parameters and estimated Leaf Area Index from satellite. The resulting software package (3D-CMCC-SAT) is built around 3D-CMCC: 2D / 3D input datasets are processed iterating on each point of the

  18. Object-oriented urban 3D spatial data model organization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-wen; Li, Wen-qing; Lv, Nan; Su, Tao

    2015-12-01

    This paper combined the 3d data model with object-oriented organization method, put forward the model of 3d data based on object-oriented method, implemented the city 3d model to quickly build logical semantic expression and model, solved the city 3d spatial information representation problem of the same location with multiple property and the same property with multiple locations, designed the space object structure of point, line, polygon, body for city of 3d spatial database, and provided a new thought and method for the city 3d GIS model and organization management.

  19. View planetary differentiation process through high-resolution 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Core-mantle separation is one of the most important processes in planetary evolution, defining the structure and chemical distribution in the planets. Iron-dominated core materials could migrate through silicate mantle to the core by efficient liquid-liquid separation and/or by percolation of liquid metal through solid silicate matrix. We can experimentally simulate these processes to examine the efficiency and time of core formation and its geochemical signatures. The quantitative measure of the efficiency of percolation is usually the dihedral angle, related to the interfacial energies of the liquid and solid phases. To determine the true dihedral angle at high pressure and temperatures, it is necessary to measure the relative frequency distributions of apparent dihedral angles between the quenched liquid metal and silicate grains for each experiment. Here I present a new imaging technique to visualize the distribution of liquid metal in silicate matrix in 3D by combination of focus ion beam (FIB) milling and high-resolution SEM image. The 3D volume rendering provides precise determination of the dihedral angle and quantitative measure of volume fraction and connectivity. I have conducted a series of experiments using mixtures of San Carlos olivine and Fe-S (10wt%S) metal with different metal-silicate ratios, up to 25 GPa and at temperatures above 1800C. High-quality 3D volume renderings were reconstructed from FIB serial sectioning and imaging with 10-nm slice thickness and 14-nm image resolution for each quenched sample. The unprecedented spatial resolution at nano scale allows detailed examination of textural features and precise determination of the dihedral angle as a function of pressure, temperature and composition. The 3D reconstruction also allows direct assessment of connectivity in multi-phase matrix, providing a new way to investigate the efficiency of metal percolation in a real silicate mantle.

  20. Test target for characterizing 3D resolution of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Hao, Bingtao; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Li, Jiao

    2014-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive 3D imaging technology which has been applied or investigated in many diagnostic fields including ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, cardiovasology, endoscopy, brain imaging and so on. Optical resolution is an important characteristic that can describe the quality and utility of an image acquiring system. We employ 3D printing technology to design and fabricate a test target for characterizing 3D resolution of optical coherence tomography. The test target which mimics USAF 1951 test chart was produced with photopolymer. By measuring the 3D test target, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of a spectral domain OCT system was evaluated. For comparison, conventional microscope and surface profiler were employed to characterize the 3D test targets. The results demonstrate that the 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  1. Sparse Bayesian framework applied to 3D super-resolution reconstruction in fetal brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Laura C.; Velasco Toledo, Nelson; Romero Castro, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Magnetic Resonance (FMR) is an imaging technique that is becoming increasingly important as allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities, spatial resolution is limited by the short acquisition time and the unpredictable fetus movements, in consequence the resulting images are characterized by non-parallel projection planes composed by anisotropic voxels. The sparse Bayesian representation is a flexible strategy which is able to model complex relationships. The Super-resolution is approached as a regression problem, the main advantage is the capability to learn data relations from observations. Quantitative performance evaluation was carried out using synthetic images, the proposed method demonstrates a better reconstruction quality compared with standard interpolation approach. The presented method is a promising approach to improve the information quality related with the 3-D fetal brain structure. It is important because allows assessing brain development and thus make an early diagnostic of congenital abnormalities.

  2. Think3d!: Training Spatial Thinking Fundamental to STEM Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Holly A.; Hutton, Allyson

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the initial implementation of an innovative program for elementary-age children involving origami and pop-up paper engineering to promote visuospatial thinking. While spatial ability measures correlate with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) success, a focus on spatial thinking is all but missing in elementary…

  3. Influences on 3D image quality in a high-resolution Xray laminography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebensperger, T.; Rimbach, C.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that projective X-ray microscopy is feasible with a two-dimensional spatial resolution down to 100 nm by using laboratory nanofocus X-ray sources and a geometric magnification of up to 1000x. Based on these previous results, we developed a high-resolution X-ray laminography system which uses an optimized thin-film X-ray transmission target together with a modified electron probe micro analyzer. Unlike conventional axial computed tomography (CT), 3D laminography imaging involves a linear translation of both detector and object with respect to a stationary point source. In this contribution we present a detailed characterization of the setup concerning especially the laminographic imaging mode. The quality of the volume reconstruction is assessed by simulating an ideal setup with an analytical model including features down to 200 nm which are resolved in the setup given a high enough SNR in the projections. We further address the issue of a drop in the detector resolution under oblique X-ray illumination which is a common problem to such systems. The finite penetration depth of the X-rays into the detector pixels causes an anisotropic blurring of the detector point spread function (PSF) under oblique irradiation. We tested the influence of this blurring by calculating the illumination-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF) of the detector. Our measurements are supported by numerical simulations of the detector MTF. Both simulations and measurements show a drop in spatial resolution (20% of the MTF) from 12.5 lp/mm (irradiation perpendicular to the detector screen) down to 5.2 lp/mm (irradiation 30° oblique to the screen). Furthermore, first examples of 3D imaging of test structures and material imaging are given.

  4. 3D-CAD Effects on Creative Design Performance of Different Spatial Abilities Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Students' creativity is an important focus globally and is interrelated with students' spatial abilities. Additionally, three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing (3D-CAD) overcomes barriers to spatial expression during the creative design process. Does 3D-CAD affect students' creative abilities? The purpose of this study was to…

  5. 3D active stabilization system with sub-micrometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Kursu, Olli; Tuukkanen, Tuomas; Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95% attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70% attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  6. 3D Active Stabilization System with Sub-Micrometer Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95 % attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70 % attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  7. Experiment for Integrating Dutch 3d Spatial Planning and Bim for Checking Building Permits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, L.; Dijkmans, T.; Stoter, J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a research project in The Netherlands in which several SMEs collaborated to create a 3D model of the National spatial planning information. This 2D information system described in the IMRO data standard holds implicit 3D information that can be used to generate an explicit 3D model. The project realized a proof of concept to generate a 3D spatial planning model. The team used the model to integrate it with several 3D Building Information Models (BIMs) described in the open data standard Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Goal of the project was (1) to generate a 3D BIM model from spatial planning information to be used by the architect during the early design phase, and (2) allow 3D checking of building permits. The team used several technologies like CityGML, BIM clash detection and GeoBIM to explore the potential of this innovation. Within the project a showcase was created with a part of the spatial plan from the city of The Hague. Several BIM models were integrated in the 3D spatial plan of this area. A workflow has been described that demonstrates the benefits of collaboration between the spatial domain and the AEC industry in 3D. The research results in a showcase with conclusions and considerations for both national and international practice.

  8. Subpixel Resolution In Depth Perceived Via 3-D Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika; Fender, Derek H.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiment in which two black vertical bars on featureless white background placed near intersection of optical axes of two charge-coupled-device video cameras positioned to give stereoscopic views. Trained human observers found to perceive depths at subpixel resolutions in stereoscopic television images. This finding significant for remote stereoscopic monitoring, expecially during precise maneuvers of remotely controlled manipulators. Also significant for research in processing of visual information by human brain.

  9. Effect of spatial behavior of scatter on 3D PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Meei-Ling; Pei, Cheng-Chih

    1997-05-01

    In 3D positron emission tomography (PET), all the coincidence events can be collected to increase the sensitivity of signal detection. However, the sensitivity increase results in the enlargement of scatter fraction which degrades image quality. For improving the accuracy of PET images, an effective scatter correction technique is necessary. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations were done according to the system configuration of the animal PET design at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research. From the simulation data we could understand what the scatter effect of our planned system will be. The convolution-subtraction method was chosen to correct for the scatter. A new approach to determine the scatter kernel function which could do better job on scatter correction will be presented.

  10. Jacob's Interpretation Method Revisited: Accounting for 3-D Spatial Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Carrera, J.

    2005-12-01

    Traditional approaches to hydraulic test interpretation provide typically individual aquifer parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity (K) and storativity (S) values. The values obtained somehow incorporate some averaging values of aquifer heterogeneity, while the averaging functions are a direct consequence of the method of analysis employed. In recent years most work, casted in a stochastic framework, focused on the relationship between pumping rate and ensemble mean or variance of drawdown, thus having to pre-specify the parameters characterizing the underlying random spatial function. On the contrary, we contend that additional highly relevant information about heterogeneity can be obtained by looking to the spatial distribution of drawdown in individual realizations of the heterogeneous K field, without the need for invoking ergodic arguments. We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of time-dependent drawdown in a tridimensional aquifer produced by constant rate pumping in a fully penetrating well. The aquifer is considered of infinite extension in the x, y directions, and we assume no-flow boundaries in the aquifer top and bottom. The observation point is a fully penetrating piezometer. We consider an unknown spatial distribution of K(x,y,z), and using a perturbation expansion up to second order, we look at the late-time behavior of drawdown at any given observation vertical line. We conclude that: (1) at any given observation line the late-time behavior of drawdown would display a straight line in a drawdown versus log time plot, thus allowing the use of Jacob's method for test interpretation; (2) the slope of the straight line is the same for each observation line, thus providing a global average of K(x,y,z) through the aquifer; (3) the intercept point of the line in the same plot depends on location and is related to connectivity issues between the pumping and observation locations; (4) the intercept value is a weighted function of the local

  11. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, I.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Kalemci, E.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Auricchio, N.

    2014-07-01

    At DTU Space we have developed a high resolution three dimensional (3D) position sensitive CZT detector for high energy astronomy. The design of the 3D CZT detector is based on the CZT Drift Strip detector principle. The position determination perpendicular to the anode strips is performed using a novel interpolating technique based on the drift strip signals. The position determination in the detector depth direction, is made using the DOI technique based the detector cathode and anode signals. The position determination along the anode strips is made with the help of 10 cathode strips orthogonal to the anode strips. The position resolutions are at low energies dominated by the electronic noise and improve therefore with increased signal to noise ratio as the energy increases. The achievable position resolution at higher energies will however be dominated by the extended spatial distribution of the photon produced ionization charge. The main sources of noise contribution of the drift signals are the leakage current between the strips and the strip capacitance. For the leakage current, we used a metallization process that reduces the leakage current by means of a high resistive thin layer between the drift strip electrodes and CZT detector material. This method was applied to all the proto type detectors and was a very effective method to reduce the surface leakage current between the strips. The proto type detector was recently investigated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble which provided a fine 50 × 50 μm2 collimated X-ray beam covering an energy band up to 600 keV. The Beam positions are resolved very well with a ~ 0.2 mm position resolution (FWHM ) at 400 keV in all directions.

  12. Indoor 3D Route Modeling Based On Estate Spatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wen, Y.; Jiang, J.; Huang, W.

    2014-04-01

    Indoor three-dimensional route model is essential for space intelligence navigation and emergency evacuation. This paper is motivated by the need of constructing indoor route model automatically and as far as possible. By comparing existing building data sources, this paper firstly explained the reason why the estate spatial management data is chosen as the data source. Then, an applicable method of construction three-dimensional route model in a building is introduced by establishing the mapping relationship between geographic entities and their topological expression. This data model is a weighted graph consist of "node" and "path" to express the spatial relationship and topological structure of a building components. The whole process of modelling internal space of a building is addressed by two key steps: (1) each single floor route model is constructed, including path extraction of corridor using Delaunay triangulation algorithm with constrained edge, fusion of room nodes into the path; (2) the single floor route model is connected with stairs and elevators and the multi-floor route model is eventually generated. In order to validate the method in this paper, a shopping mall called "Longjiang New City Plaza" in Nanjing is chosen as a case of study. And the whole building space is constructed according to the modelling method above. By integrating of existing path finding algorithm, the usability of this modelling method is verified, which shows the indoor three-dimensional route modelling method based on estate spatial data in this paper can support indoor route planning and evacuation route design very well.

  13. Measuring the impact of 3D data geometric modeling on spatial analysis: Illustration with Skyview factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasebin, M.; Perret, J.; Mustière, S.; Weber, C.

    2012-10-01

    The increased availability of 3D urban data reflects a growing interest in 3D spatial analysis. As 3D spatial analysis often uses complex 3D data, studies of the potential gains of using more detailed 3D urban databases for specific uses is an important issue. First, more complex data implies an increase in time and memory usage for the analysis (and calls for more research on the efficiency of the algorithms used). Second, detailed 3D urban data are complex to produce, expensive and it is important to be well informed in order to decide whether of not to invest in such data. Currently, many studies have been led about the fitness for use of 2D data but they are very scarce concerning 3D data. This article presents a method to determine the influence of 3D modeling on the results of 3D analysis by isolating the potential sources of errors (such as roof modeling and geometric accuracy). This method is applied on two 3D datasets (LOD1 and LOD2) and a 3D indicator (the sky view factor or SVF). The results show that the significant influence of roof modeling is globally compensated by the difference in geometric modeling but that important local variations are noticed. Nevertheless, for 75% of the SVF processed the difference between the results using these two databases is lower than 2%.

  14. 3D constrained inversion of geophysical and geological information applying Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Ploug, C.; Mendoza, J. A.; Martínez, K.

    2009-05-01

    The need for increaseding accuracy and reduced ambiguities in the inversion results has resulted in focus on the development of more advanced inversion methods of geophysical data. Over the past few years more advanced inversion techniques have been developed to improve the results. Real 3D-inversion is time consuming and therefore often not the best solution in a cost-efficient perspective. This has motivated the development of 3D constrained inversions, where 1D-models are constrained in 3D, also known as a Spatial Constrained Inversion (SCI). Moreover, inversion of several different data types in one inversion has been developed, known as Mutually Constrained Inversion (MCI). In this paper a presentation of a Spatial Mutually Constrained Inversion method (SMCI) is given. This method allows 1D-inversion applied to different geophysical datasets and geological information constrained in 3D. Application of two or more types of geophysical methods in the inversion has proved to reduce the equivalence problem and to increase the resolution in the inversion results. The use of geological information from borehole data or digital geological models can be integrated in the inversion. In the SMCI, a 1D inversion code is used to model soundings that are constrained in three dimensions according to their relative position in space. This solution enhances the accuracy of the inversion and produces distinct layers thicknesses and resistivities. It is very efficient in the mapping of a layered geology but still also capable of mapping layer discontinuities that are, in many cases, related to fracturing and faulting or due to valley fills. Geological information may be included in the inversion directly or used only to form a starting model for the individual soundings in the inversion. In order to show the effectiveness of the method, examples are presented from both synthetic data and real data. The examples include DC-soundings as well as land-based and airborne TEM

  15. Types of Reasoning in 3D Geometry Thinking and Their Relation with Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittalis, Marios; Christou, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyse the structure of 3D geometry thinking by identifying different types of reasoning and to examine their relation with spatial ability. To achieve this goal, two tests were administered to students in grades 5 to 9. The results of the study showed that 3D geometry thinking could be described by four…

  16. M3D: a kernel-based test for spatially correlated changes in methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Tom R.; Schweikert, Gabriele; Sanguinetti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA methylation is an intensely studied epigenetic mark implicated in many biological processes of direct clinical relevance. Although sequencing-based technologies are increasingly allowing high-resolution measurements of DNA methylation, statistical modelling of such data is still challenging. In particular, statistical identification of differentially methylated regions across different conditions poses unresolved challenges in accounting for spatial correlations within the statistical testing procedure. Results: We propose a non-parametric, kernel-based method, M3D, to detect higher order changes in methylation profiles, such as shape, across pre-defined regions. The test statistic explicitly accounts for differences in coverage levels between samples, thus handling in a principled way a major confounder in the analysis of methylation data. Empirical tests on real and simulated datasets show an increased power compared to established methods, as well as considerable robustness with respect to coverage and replication levels. Availability and implementation: R/Bioconductor package M3D. Contact: G.Sanguinetti@ed.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25398611

  17. Special subpixel arrangement-based 3D display with high horizontal resolution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guo-Jiao; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Zhao, Wu-Xiang; Wu, Fei

    2014-11-01

    A special subpixel arrangement-based 3D display is proposed. This display consists of a 2D display panel and a parallax barrier. On the 2D display panel, subpixels have a special arrangement, so they can redefine the formation of color pixels. This subpixel arrangement can bring about triple horizontal resolution for a conventional 2D display panel. Therefore, when these pixels are modulated by the parallax barrier, the 3D images formed also have triple horizontal resolution. A prototype of this display is developed. Experimental results show that this display with triple horizontal resolution can produce a better display effect than the conventional one. PMID:25402897

  18. High-resolution modelling of 3D hydrodynamics in coastal archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettunen, Elina; Tuomi, Laura; Ropponen, Janne; Lignell, Risto

    2016-04-01

    Dynamics of the coastal seas are affected by eutrophication, over-fishing, coastal construction and climate change. To enable the sustainable development of these areas, monitoring and modelling of the state of the sea are needed. The Archipelago Sea, located in the northern part of the semi-enclosed and brackish water Baltic Sea, is one of the most complex coastal areas with over 40 000 small islands and islets. It is also very vulnerable area already heavily stressed with eutrophication. Applicable modelling tools are needed to support the decision making and to provide sufficiently reliable information on the effects of the planned actions on the state of the coastal waters. We used 3D hydrodynamic model COHERENS to model the Archipelago Sea area with high spatial resolution of 0.25 nmi. Boundary conditions for this limited area were provided from coarser resolution, 2 nmi, Baltic Sea grid. In order to evaluate the performance of the high-resolution coastal model implementation a comprehensive measurement dataset was gathered, including hydrographic data from three intensive monitoring stations and several more rarely visited monitoring or research stations. The hydrodynamic model was able to simulate the surface temperature and salinity fields and their seasonal variation with good accuracy in this complex area. The sharp depth gradients typical for this area provided some challenges to the modelling. There was some over mixing and related to too strong vertical currents in the steep slopes of the deeper fault lines. Also the water exchange between the more open sea and coastal areas through narrow channels between the islands is not sufficiently well reproduced with the current resolution, leading to too high bottom temperatures.

  19. The spatial accuracy of cellular dose estimates obtained from 3D reconstructed serial tissue autoradiographs.

    PubMed

    Humm, J L; Macklis, R M; Lu, X Q; Yang, Y; Bump, K; Beresford, B; Chin, L M

    1995-01-01

    In order to better predict and understand the effects of radiopharmaceuticals used for therapy, it is necessary to determine more accurately the radiation absorbed dose to cells in tissue. Using thin-section autoradiography, the spatial distribution of sources relative to the cells can be obtained from a single section with micrometre resolution. By collecting and analysing serial sections, the 3D microscopic distribution of radionuclide relative to the cellular histology, and therefore the dose rate distribution, can be established. In this paper, a method of 3D reconstruction of serial sections is proposed, and measurements are reported of (i) the accuracy and reproducibility of quantitative autoradiography and (ii) the spatial precision with which tissue features from one section can be related to adjacent sections. Uncertainties in the activity determination for the specimen result from activity losses during tissue processing (4-11%), and the variation of grain count per unit activity between batches of serial sections (6-25%). Correlation of the section activity to grain count densities showed deviations ranging from 6-34%. The spatial alignment uncertainties were assessed using nylon fibre fiduciary markers incorporated into the tissue block, and compared to those for alignment based on internal tissue landmarks. The standard deviation for the variation in nylon fibre fiduciary alignment was measured to be 41 microns cm-1, compared to 69 microns cm-1 when internal tissue histology landmarks were used. In addition, tissue shrinkage during histological processing of up to 10% was observed. The implications of these measured activity and spatial distribution uncertainties upon the estimate of cellular dose rate distribution depends upon the range of the radiation emissions. For long-range beta particles, uncertainties in both the activity and spatial distribution translate linearly to the uncertainty in dose rate of < 15%. For short-range emitters (< 100

  20. How spatial abilities and dynamic visualizations interplay when learning functional anatomy with 3D anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material presentation formats, spatial abilities, and anatomical tasks. First, to understand the cognitive challenges a novice learner would be faced with when first exposed to 3D anatomical content, a six-step cognitive task analysis was developed. Following this, an experimental study was conducted to explore how presentation formats (dynamic vs. static visualizations) support learning of functional anatomy, and affect subsequent anatomical tasks derived from the cognitive task analysis. A second aim was to investigate the interplay between spatial abilities (spatial visualization and spatial relation) and presentation formats when the functional anatomy of a 3D scapula and the associated shoulder flexion movement are learned. Findings showed no main effect of the presentation formats on performances, but revealed the predictive influence of spatial visualization and spatial relation abilities on performance. However, an interesting interaction between presentation formats and spatial relation ability for a specific anatomical task was found. This result highlighted the influence of presentation formats when spatial abilities are involved as well as the differentiated influence of spatial abilities on anatomical tasks. PMID:25689057

  1. How Attention Affects Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Marisa; Barbot, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We summarize and discuss a series of psychophysical studies on the effects of spatial covert attention on spatial resolution, our ability to discriminate fine patterns. Heightened resolution is beneficial in most, but not all, visual tasks. We show how endogenous attention (voluntary, goal driven) and exogenous attention (involuntary, stimulus driven) affect performance on a variety of tasks mediated by spatial resolution, such as visual search, crowding, acuity, and texture segmentation. Exogenous attention is an automatic mechanism that increases resolution regardless of whether it helps or hinders performance. In contrast, endogenous attention flexibly adjusts resolution to optimize performance according to task demands. We illustrate how psychophysical studies can reveal the underlying mechanisms of these effects and allow us to draw linking hypotheses with known neurophysiological effects of attention. PMID:25948640

  2. A physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Hao, Bingtao; Wang, Lele; Li, Jiao

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely employed as non-invasive 3D imaging diagnostic instrument, particularly in the field of ophthalmology. Although OCT has been approved for use in clinic in USA, Europe and Asia, international standardization of this technology is still in progress. Validation of OCT imaging capabilities is considered extremely important to ensure its effective use in clinical diagnoses. Phantom with appropriate test targets can assist evaluate and calibrate imaging performance of OCT at both installation and throughout lifetime of the instrument. In this paper, we design and fabricate a physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets to characterize OCT imaging performance. The model eye was fabricated with transparent resin to simulate realistic ophthalmic testing environment, and most key optical elements including cornea, lens and vitreous body were realized. The test targets which mimic USAF 1951 test chart were fabricated on the fundus of the model eye by 3D printing technology. Differing from traditional two dimensional USAF 1951 test chart, a group of patterns which have different thickness in depth were fabricated. By measuring the 3D test targets, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of an OCT system can be evaluated at the same time with this model eye. To investigate this specialized model eye, it was measured by a scientific spectral domain OCT instrument and a clinical OCT system respectively. The results demonstrate that the model eye with 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  3. Fine resolution 3D temperature fields off Kerguelen from instrumented penguins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrassin, Jean-Benoît; Park, Young-Hyang; Le Maho, Yvon; Bost, Charles-André

    2004-12-01

    The use of diving animals as autonomous vectors of oceanographic instruments is rapidly increasing, because this approach yields cost-efficient new information and can be used in previously poorly sampled areas. However, methods for analyzing the collected data are still under development. In particular, difficulties may arise from the heterogeneous data distribution linked to animals' behavior. Here we show how raw temperature data collected by penguin-borne loggers were transformed to a regular gridded dataset that provided new information on the local circulation off Kerguelen. A total of 16 king penguins ( Aptenodytes patagonicus) were equipped with satellite-positioning transmitters and with temperature-time-depth recorders (TTDRs) to record dive depth and sea temperature. The penguins' foraging trips recorded during five summers ranged from 140 to 600 km from the colony and 11,000 dives >100 m were recorded. Temperature measurements recorded during diving were used to produce detailed 3D temperature fields of the area (0-200 m). The data treatment included dive location, determination of the vertical profile for each dive, averaging and gridding of those profiles onto 0.1°×0.1° cells, and optimal interpolation in both the horizontal and vertical using an objective analysis. Horizontal fields of temperature at the surface and 100 m are presented, as well as a vertical section along the main foraging direction of the penguins. Compared to conventional temperature databases (Levitus World Ocean Atlas and historical stations available in the area), the 3D temperature fields collected from penguins are extremely finely resolved, by one order finer. Although TTDRs were less accurate than conventional instruments, such a high spatial resolution of penguin-derived data provided unprecedented detailed information on the upper level circulation pattern east of Kerguelen, as well as the iron-enrichment mechanism leading to a high primary production over the Kerguelen

  4. First MMS Observations of High Time Resolution 3D Electric and Magnetic fields at the Dayside Magnetopause.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Le Contel, O.; Vaith, H.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Rau, D.; Needell, J.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Chutter, M.; Dors, I.; Argall, M. R.; Shuster, J. R.; Olsson, G.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Eriksson, A. I.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Steller, M.; Bromund, K. R.; Le, G.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Tucker, S.; Westfall, J.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electrodynamics at the magnetopause is key to our understanding of ion and electron acceleration within reconnection regions. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) fleet of four spacecraft was launched into its Phase-1 equatorial orbit of 12 Re apogee specifically to investigate these regions at the Earth's magnetopause. In addition to a comprehensive suite of particle measurements, MMS makes very high time resolution 3D electric and magnetic field measurements of high accuracy using flux-gate, search coil, 3-axis double probe, and electron drift sensors. In September 2015, the MMS fleet will begin to encounter the dusk-side magnetopause in its initial configuration of approximately 160 km separation, allowing investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of important electrodynamics during reconnection. Using these field and particle measurements, we present first observations of 3D magnetic and electric fields (including their parallel component), and inferred current sheets, during active magnetopause crossings using the highest time resolution data available on MMS.

  5. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:25939085

  6. Temporal-spatial modeling of fast-moving and deforming 3D objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoliang; Wei, Youzhi

    1998-09-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the method and techniques developed for the modeling and reconstruction of fast moving and deforming 3D objects. A new approach using close-range digital terrestrial photogrammetry in conjunction with high speed photography and videography is proposed. A sequential image matching method (SIM) has been developed to automatically process pairs of images taken continuously of any fast moving and deforming 3D objects. Using the SIM technique a temporal-spatial model (TSM) of any fast moving and deforming 3D objects can be developed. The TSM would include a series of reconstructed surface models of the fast moving and deforming 3D object in the form of 3D images. The TSM allows the 3D objects to be visualized and analyzed in sequence. The SIM method, specifically the left-right matching and forward-back matching techniques are presented in the paper. An example is given which deals with the monitoring of a typical blast rock bench in a major open pit mine in Australia. With the SIM approach and the TSM model it is possible to automatically and efficiently reconstruct the 3D images of the blasting process. This reconstruction would otherwise be impossible to achieve using a labor intensive manual processing approach based on 2D images taken from conventional high speed cameras. The case study demonstrates the potential of the SIM approach and the TSM for the automatic identification, tracking and reconstruction of any fast moving and deforming 3D targets.

  7. Characterization of the 3D resolution of topometric sensors based on fringe and speckle pattern projection by a 3D transfer function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Dekiff, Markus; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    The increasing importance of optical 3D measurement techniques and the growing number of available methods and systems require a fast and simple method to characterize the measurement accuracy. However, the conventional approach of comparing measured coordinates to known reference coordinates of a test target faces two major challenges: the precise fabrication of the target and - in case of pattern projecting systems - finding the position of the reference points in the obtained point cloud. The modulation transfer function (MTF) on the other hand is an established instrument to describe the resolution characteristics of 2D imaging systems. Here, the MTF concept is applied to two different topometric systems based on fringe and speckle pattern projection to obtain a 3D transfer function. We demonstrate that in the present case fringe projection provides typically 3.5 times the 3D resolution achieved with speckle pattern projection. By combining measurements of the 3D transfer function with 2D MTF measurements the dependency of 2D and 3D resolutions are characterized. We show that the method allows for a simple comparison of the 3D resolution of two 3D sensors using a low cost test target, which is easy to manufacture.

  8. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A; Bishop, Logan D C; Kelly, Kevin F; Landes, Christy F

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions. PMID:27488312

  9. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-08-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions.

  10. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions. PMID:27488312

  11. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  12. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering. PMID:25058941

  13. High-resolution real-time 3D shape measurement on a portable device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpinsky, Nikolaus; Hoke, Morgan; Chen, Vincent; Zhang, Song

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in technology have enabled the acquisition of high-resolution 3D models in real-time though the use of structured light scanning techniques. While these advances are impressive, they require large amounts of computing power, thus being limited to using large desktop computers with high end CPUs and sometimes GPUs. This is undesirable in making high-resolution real-time 3D scanners ubiquitous in our mobile lives. To address this issue, this work describes and demonstrates a real-time 3D scanning system that is realized on a mobile device, namely a laptop computer, which can achieve speeds of 20fps 3D at a resolution of 640x480 per frame. By utilizing a graphics processing unit (GPU) as a multipurpose parallel processor, along with a parallel phase shifting technique, we are able to realize the entire 3D processing pipeline in parallel. To mitigate high speed camera transfer problems, which typically require a dedicated frame grabber, we make use of USB 3.0 along with direct memory access (DMA) to transfer camera images to the GPU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique, we experiment with the scanner on both static geometry of a statue and dynamic geometry of a deforming material sample in front of the system.

  14. Representing 3D virtual objects: interaction between visuo-spatial ability and type of exploration.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Frank; van den Broek, Egon L

    2010-03-17

    We investigated individual differences in interactively exploring 3D virtual objects. 36 participants explored 24 simple and 24 difficult objects (composed of respectively three and five Biederman geons) actively, passively, or not at all. Both their 3D mental representation of the objects and visuo-spatial ability was assessed. Results show that, regardless of the object's complexity, people with a low VSA benefit from active exploration of objects, where people with a middle or high VSA do not. These findings extend and refine earlier research on interactively learning visuo-spatial information and underline the importance to take individual differences into account. PMID:20116394

  15. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with {{≤ft(2.5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. {{≤ft(5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} . In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  16. Ultra-high-resolution 3D digitalized imaging of the cerebral angioarchitecture in rats using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng-Qi; Zhou, Luo; Deng, Qian-Fang; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Cao, Yu-Ze; Zhang, Ji-Wen; Chen, Xu-Meng; Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The angioarchitecture is a fundamental aspect of brain development and physiology. However, available imaging tools are unsuited for non-destructive cerebral mapping of the functionally important three-dimensional (3D) vascular microstructures. To address this issue, we developed an ultra-high resolution 3D digitalized angioarchitectural map for rat brain, based on synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging (SR-PCI) with pixel size of 5.92 μm. This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents. From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum. We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D. The SR-PCI method for systematic visualization of cerebral microvasculature holds considerable promise for wider application in life sciences, including 3D micro-imaging in experimental models of neurodevelopmental and vascular disorders. PMID:26443231

  17. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  18. An impedance method for spatial sensing of 3D cell constructs--towards applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Canali, C; Mazzoni, C; Larsen, L B; Heiskanen, A; Martinsen, Ø G; Wolff, A; Dufva, M; Emnéus, J

    2015-09-01

    We present the characterisation and validation of multiplexed 4-terminal (4T) impedance measurements as a method for sensing the spatial location of cell aggregates within large three-dimensional (3D) gelatin scaffolds. The measurements were performed using an array of four rectangular chambers, each having eight platinum needle electrodes for parallel analysis. The electrode positions for current injection and voltage measurements were optimised by means of finite element simulations to maximise the sensitivity field distribution and spatial resolution. Eight different 4T combinations were experimentally tested in terms of the spatial sensitivity. The simulated sensitivity fields were validated using objects (phantoms) with different conductivity and size placed in different positions inside the chamber. This provided the detection limit (volume sensitivity) of 16.5%, i.e. the smallest detectable volume with respect to the size of the measurement chamber. Furthermore, the possibility for quick single frequency analysis was demonstrated by finding a common frequency of 250 kHz for all the presented electrode combinations. As final proof of concept, a high density of human hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells were encapsulated in gelatin to form artificial 3D cell constructs and detected when placed in different positions inside large gelatin scaffolds. Taken together, these results open new perspectives for impedance-based sensing technologies for non-invasive monitoring in tissue engineering applications providing spatial information of constructs within biologically relevant 3D environments. PMID:26198701

  19. Analyzing 3D xylem networks in Vitis vinifera using High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) have made it possible to visualize three dimensional (3D) xylem networks without time consuming, labor intensive physical sectioning. Here we describe a new method to visualize complex vessel networks in plants and produce a quantitat...

  20. The Best of Both Worlds: 3D X-ray Microscopy with Ultra-high Resolution and a Large Field of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gelb, J.; Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Tian, Y.

    2011-09-01

    3D visualizations of complex structures within various samples have been achieved with high spatial resolution by X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT). While high spatial resolution generally comes at the expense of field of view (FOV). Here we proposed an approach that stitched several 3D volumes together into a single large volume to significantly increase the size of the FOV while preserving resolution. Combining this with nano-CT, 18-μm FOV with sub-60-nm resolution has been achieved for non-destructive 3D visualization of clustered yeasts that were too large for a single scan. It shows high promise for imaging other large samples in the future.

  1. How Spatial Abilities and Dynamic Visualizations Interplay When Learning Functional Anatomy with 3D Anatomical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material…

  2. Who Benefits from Learning with 3D Models?: The Case of Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huk, T.

    2006-01-01

    Empirical studies that focus on the impact of three-dimensional (3D) visualizations on learning are to date rare and inconsistent. According to the ability-as-enhancer hypothesis, high spatial ability learners should benefit particularly as they have enough cognitive capacity left for mental model construction. In contrast, the…

  3. Ultra-Wideband Time-Difference-of-Arrival High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, Jianjun; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dekome, Kent; Dusl, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a research and development effort for a prototype ultra-wideband (UWB) tracking system that is currently under development at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The system is being studied for use in tracking of lunar./Mars rovers and astronauts during early exploration missions when satellite navigation systems are not available. U IATB impulse radio (UWB-IR) technology is exploited in the design and implementation of the prototype location and tracking system. A three-dimensional (3D) proximity tracking prototype design using commercially available UWB products is proposed to implement the Time-Difference- Of-Arrival (TDOA) tracking methodology in this research effort. The TDOA tracking algorithm is utilized for location estimation in the prototype system, not only to exploit the precise time resolution possible with UWB signals, but also to eliminate the need for synchronization between the transmitter and the receiver. Simulations show that the TDOA algorithm can achieve the fine tracking resolution with low noise TDOA estimates for close-in tracking. Field tests demonstrated that this prototype UWB TDOA High Resolution 3D Proximity Tracking System is feasible for providing positioning-awareness information in a 3D space to a robotic control system. This 3D tracking system is developed for a robotic control system in a facility called "Moonyard" at Honeywell Defense & System in Arizona under a Space Act Agreement.

  4. Isotropic 3D Super-resolution Imaging with a Self-bending Point Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shu; Vaughan, Joshua C.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Airy beams maintain their intensity profiles over a large propagation distance without substantial diffraction and exhibit lateral bending during propagation1-5. This unique property has been exploited for micromanipulation of particles6, generation of plasma channels7 and guidance of plasmonic waves8, but has not been explored for high-resolution optical microscopy. Here, we introduce a self-bending point spread function (SB-PSF) based on Airy beams for three-dimensional (3D) super-resolution fluorescence imaging. We designed a side-lobe-free SB-PSF and implemented a two-channel detection scheme to enable unambiguous 3D localization of fluorescent molecules. The lack of diffraction and the propagation-dependent lateral bending make the SB-PSF well suited for precise 3D localization of molecules over a large imaging depth. Using this method, we obtained super-resolution imaging with isotropic 3D localization precision of 10-15 nm over a 3 μm imaging depth from ∼2000 photons per localization. PMID:25383090

  5. Quantification of Spatial Parameters in 3D Cellular Constructs Using Graph Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A. W.; Bilgin, C. C.; Hasan, M. A.; McKeen, L. M.; Stegemann, J. P.; Yener, B.; Zaki, M. J.; Plopper, G. E.

    2009-01-01

    Multispectral three-dimensional (3D) imaging provides spatial information for biological structures that cannot be measured by traditional methods. This work presents a method of tracking 3D biological structures to quantify changes over time using graph theory. Cell-graphs were generated based on the pairwise distances, in 3D-Euclidean space, between nuclei during collagen I gel compaction. From these graphs quantitative features are extracted that measure both the global topography and the frequently occurring local structures of the “tissue constructs.” The feature trends can be controlled by manipulating compaction through cell density and are significant when compared to random graphs. This work presents a novel methodology to track a simple 3D biological event and quantitatively analyze the underlying structural change. Further application of this method will allow for the study of complex biological problems that require the quantification of temporal-spatial information in 3D and establish a new paradigm in understanding structure-function relationships. PMID:19920859

  6. Airborne LIDAR and high resolution satellite data for rapid 3D feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Panditrao, S. N.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    This work uses the canopy height model (CHM) based workflow for individual tree crown delineation and 3D feature extraction approach (Overwatch Geospatial's proprietary algorithm) for building feature delineation from high-density light detection and ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data in an urban environment and evaluates its accuracy by using very high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) (spatial) and 8-band (multispectral) WorldView-2 (WV-2) imagery. LiDAR point cloud data over San Francisco, California, USA, recorded in June 2010, was used to detect tree and building features by classifying point elevation values. The workflow employed includes resampling of LiDAR point cloud to generate a raster surface or digital terrain model (DTM), generation of a hill-shade image and an intensity image, extraction of digital surface model, generation of bare earth digital elevation model (DEM) and extraction of tree and building features. First, the optical WV-2 data and the LiDAR intensity image were co-registered using ground control points (GCPs). The WV-2 rational polynomial coefficients model (RPC) was executed in ERDAS Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) using supplementary *.RPB file. In the second stage, ortho-rectification was carried out using ERDAS LPS by incorporating well-distributed GCPs. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the WV-2 was estimated to be 0.25 m by using more than 10 well-distributed GCPs. In the second stage, we generated the bare earth DEM from LiDAR point cloud data. In most of the cases, bare earth DEM does not represent true ground elevation. Hence, the model was edited to get the most accurate DEM/ DTM possible and normalized the LiDAR point cloud data based on DTM in order to reduce the effect of undulating terrain. We normalized the vegetation point cloud values by subtracting the ground points (DEM) from the LiDAR point cloud. A normalized digital surface model (nDSM) or CHM was calculated from the LiDAR data by subtracting the DEM from the DSM

  7. Detection of 3D tree root systems using high resolution ground penetration radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altdorff, D.; Honds, M.; Botschek, J.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of root systems and its distribution are important for biomass estimation as well as for the prevention of subsurface distribution network damages. Ground penetration radar (GPR) is a promising technique that enables a non-invasive imaging of tree roots. Due to the polarisation-dependent reflection coefficients and complicated three-dimensional root structure, accurate measurements with perpendicularly polarized antennas are needed. In this study, we show GPR data from two planes and one chestnut at two locations with different soil conditions. Perpendicular 10 x 10 cm grid measurements were made with a shielded 250 MHz antenna in combination with a high precision self-tracking laser theodolite that provides geo-referenced traces with a spatial resolution of ~ 2 cm. After selecting potential root hyperbolas within the perpendicular GPR profiles, the corresponding three-dimensional coordinates were extracted and visualized in planar view to reveal any linear structure that indicates a possible tree root. The coordinates of the selected linear structures were projected back to the surface by means of the laser-theodolite to indicate the locations for groundtruthing. Additionally, we interpolated the measured data into a 3D cube where time slices confirmed the locations of linear reflection events. We validated the indicated predictions by excavation of the soil with a suction dredge. Subsequent georeferencing of the true root distribution and comparison with the selected linear events showed that the approach was able to identify the precise position of roots with a diameter between 3 and 10 cm and a depth of up to 70 cm. However, not all linear events were roots; also mouse channels were found in these depths, since they also generate GPR hyperbolas aligned in linear structures. Roots at a second location at depths of 1 to 1.20 m did not generate identifiable hyperboles, which was probably due to an increased electrical conductivity below 86 cm depth. The

  8. Insights on the Subduction Process from High-Resolution 3D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, Margarete

    2015-04-01

    This is an exciting time in geodynamics as the use of unprecedented high-resolution 3D modeling allows us to ask new questions that were previously unattainable. It is now relatively straightforward to run 3D numerical simulations, with local mesh refinement to ~1 km, input data mapped onto over 100 million finite element nodes, and using tens of thousands of compute hours per model, e.g. Jadamec et al. [2012]. With the additional computational resources, comes a new approach to modeling the tectonic problem. For example, mapping tectonic plates onto a high-resolution 3D geodynamic model grid forces the modeler to ask questions much as a field geologist would ask when constructing a geologic map. In this process of moving from textbook models of subduction to using models based on observation, the modeler is forced to explain the more complicated geometries and features in the Earth, allowing for the new computational approaches to be powerful tools for scientific discovery. Subduction modeling of this kind has expanded the classical view of two-dimensional corner flow, e.g. McKenzie [1969], to a slab driven flow that can be quite complex with predictions for upper mantle flow rates that can be over ten times surface plate motions, e.g. Jadamec et al. [2010] and others. In this talk, I will investigate the role of the third-dimension and non-linearity in plate boundary deformation. I will present high-resolution 3D numerical models that examine the effect of observationally based slab geometry, multiple subducting plates, non-linear rheology, and variations in overriding plate thickness on the subduction related deformation of plate margins. Specific examples include the Alaska and Central America subduction systems. In addition, I will highlight future directions in subduction modeling, and how these can be advanced by the increased incorporation of observational data, high-performance computing, focused numerical algorithms, and 3D interactive data visualization.

  9. Laser 3D printing with sub-microscale resolution of porous elastomeric scaffolds for supporting human bone stem cells.

    PubMed

    Petrochenko, Peter E; Torgersen, Jan; Gruber, Peter; Hicks, Lucas A; Zheng, Jiwen; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L; Liska, Robert; Stampfl, Jürgen; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2015-04-01

    A reproducible method is needed to fabricate 3D scaffold constructs that results in periodic and uniform structures with precise control at sub-micrometer and micrometer length scales. In this study, fabrication of scaffolds by two-photon polymerization (2PP) of a biodegradable urethane and acrylate-based photoelastomer is demonstrated. This material supports 2PP processing with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The high photoreactivity of the biophotoelastomer permits 2PP processing at a scanning speed of 1000 mm s(-1), facilitating rapid fabrication of relatively large structures (>5 mm(3)). These structures are custom printed for in vitro assay screening in 96-well plates and are sufficiently flexible to enable facile handling and transplantation. These results indicate that stable scaffolds with porosities of greater than 60% can be produced using 2PP. Human bone marrow stromal cells grown on 3D scaffolds exhibit increased growth and proliferation compared to smooth 2D scaffold controls. 3D scaffolds adsorb larger amounts of protein than smooth 2D scaffolds due to their larger surface area; the scaffolds also allow cells to attach in multiple planes and to completely infiltrate the porous scaffolds. The flexible photoelastomer material is biocompatible in vitro and is associated with facile handling, making it a viable candidate for further study of complex 3D-printed scaffolds. PMID:25522214

  10. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Lina; Holden, Seamus J; Douglass, Kyle M; Manley, Suliana

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR) requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope's pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE) at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample. PMID:26600467

  11. Correction of a Depth-Dependent Lateral Distortion in 3D Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Suliana

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) localization-based super-resolution microscopy (SR) requires correction of aberrations to accurately represent 3D structure. Here we show how a depth-dependent lateral shift in the apparent position of a fluorescent point source, which we term `wobble`, results in warped 3D SR images and provide a software tool to correct this distortion. This system-specific, lateral shift is typically > 80 nm across an axial range of ~ 1 μm. A theoretical analysis based on phase retrieval data from our microscope suggests that the wobble is caused by non-rotationally symmetric phase and amplitude aberrations in the microscope’s pupil function. We then apply our correction to the bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ in live bacteria and demonstrate that the corrected data more accurately represent the true shape of this vertically-oriented ring-like structure. We also include this correction method in a registration procedure for dual-color, 3D SR data and show that it improves target registration error (TRE) at the axial limits over an imaging depth of 1 μm, yielding TRE values of < 20 nm. This work highlights the importance of correcting aberrations in 3D SR to achieve high fidelity between the measurements and the sample. PMID:26600467

  12. Resolution Influence on 3D Anthropometric Data Clustering for Fitting Design.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jianwei; Li, Zhizhong; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2009-10-01

    Sizing based on 3D anthropometric data may lead to significant improvement in fitting comfort of wearing products. However, the required computational load is a common problem in 3D data processing. In a previous study, wavelet analysis was adopted to establish a multi-resolution description of 3D anthropometric data to reduce computational load and modeling complexity. K-means clustering was subsequently performed on the decomposed 3D samples. This study further examines the influence of decomposition level on clustering results. As a case study, 378 face samples, 447 head samples and 432 upper head samples were analyzed. Cluster membership variation on five different resolution levels was examined by using Cluster Membership Accuracy Rate (CMAR), which denotes the clustering consistency on the decomposed levels compared with the clustering results on the original data sets. For the face data sets, the CMAR values on the five decomposition levels are 100, 99.21, 97.88, 93.92 and 93.39%, respectively; for upper heads, the CMAR values are 99.3, 99.1, 98.4, 92.1 and 84.3%, respectively; while for whole heads, the CMAR values are 99.3, 98.2, 95.1, 85.5 and 77.9%, respectively. These results indicate that clustering on the third decomposition level is proper for face and head scans in reducing computational load while maintaining at least 95% clustering accuracy. PMID:19834268

  13. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  14. Octree-based indexing for 3D pointclouds within an Oracle Spatial DBMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Bianca; Mosa, Abu Saleh Mohammad; Laefer, Debra F.; Bertolotto, Michela

    2013-02-01

    A large proportion of today's digital datasets have a spatial component. The effective storage and management of which poses particular challenges, especially with light detection and ranging (LiDAR), where datasets of even small geographic areas may contain several hundred million points. While in the last decade 2.5-dimensional data were prevalent, true 3-dimensional data are increasingly commonplace via LiDAR. They have gained particular popularity for urban applications including generation of city-scale maps, baseline data disaster management, and utility planning. Additionally, LiDAR is commonly used for flood plane identification, coastal-erosion tracking, and forest biomass mapping. Despite growing data availability, current spatial information systems do not provide suitable full support for the data's true 3D nature. Consequently, one system is needed to store the data and another for its processing, thereby necessitating format transformations. The work presented herein aims at a more cost-effective way for managing 3D LiDAR data that allows for storage and manipulation within a single system by enabling a new index within existing spatial database management technology. Implementation of an octree index for 3D LiDAR data atop Oracle Spatial 11g is presented, along with an evaluation showing up to an eight-fold improvement compared to the native Oracle R-tree index.

  15. 3D, high-resolution deep x-ray absorber mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Grigore, Luminita

    2000-08-01

    Although, by using gray-tone lithography and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it's easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3-D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations too. E-beam writing implies a maximum of only 200 gray-levels on the project retilce, and the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. That's why we applied a new approach to enhance the 3-D resolution of gray-tone lithography. By combining gray-tone lithography with binary masking technique, it was possible to obtain a high resolution (vertical and horizontal directions) into thick resist. Considering it as a primary mold, a metallic variable absorber mask for deep X-ray lithography may be processed. Previously, it's necessary to transform the resist surface into a conductive layer as follows: conditioning, nucleation and electroless plating, respectively. After that, a metallic deposit is obtained by electroplating at a desired thickness, resulting in a complementary shape of the mold resist. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by preliminary experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3-D structuring of thick resists in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1.

  16. A compact high-resolution 3-D imaging spectrometer for discovering Oases on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, J.; Ren, D.; Lunine, J.I.; Brown, R.H.; Yelle, R.V.; Soderblom, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    A new design for a very lightweight, very high throughput reflectance sectrometer enabled by two new technologies being developed is presented. These new technologies include integral field unit optics to enable simultaneous imaging and spectroscopy at high spatial resolution with an infrared (IR) array, and silicon grisms to enable compact and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  17. High-resolution 3D micro-CT imaging of breast microcalcifications: a preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of microcalcifications on mammograms indicates the presence of breast lesion, and the shapes of the microcalcifications as seen by conventional mammography correlates with the probability of malignancy. This preliminary study evaluated the 3D shape of breast microcalcifications using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and compared the findings with those obtained using anatomopathological analysis. Methods The study analyzed breast biopsy samples from 11 women with findings of suspicious microcalcifications on routine mammograms. The samples were imaged using a micro-CT (SkyScan 1076) at a resolution of 35 μm. Images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and analyzed in 3D using surface rendering. The samples were subsequently analyzed by the pathology service. Reconstructed 3D images were compared with the corresponding histological slices. Results Anatomopathological analysis showed that 5 of 11 patients had ductal breast carcinoma in situ. One patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Individual object analysis was performed on 597 microcalcifications. Malignant microcalcifications tended to be thinner and to have a smaller volume and surface area, while their surface area-to-volume ratio was greater than that of benign microcalcifications. The structure model index values were the same for malignant and benign microcalcifications. Conclusions This is the first study to use micro-CT for quantitative 3D analysis of microcalcifications. This high-resolution imaging technique will be valuable for gaining a greater understanding of the morphologic characteristics of malignant and benign microcalcifications. The presence of many small microcalcifications can be an indication of malignancy. For the larger microcalcifications, 3D parameters confirmed the more irregular shape of malignant microcalcifications. PMID:24393444

  18. Dubai 3d Textuerd Mesh Using High Quality Resolution Vertical/oblique Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb Madani, Adib; Ziad Ahmad, Abdullateef; Christoph, Lueken; Hammadi, Zamzam; Manal Abdullah Sabeal, Manal Abdullah x.

    2016-06-01

    Providing high quality 3D data with reasonable quality and cost were always essential, affording the core data and foundation for developing an information-based decision-making tool of urban environments with the capability of providing decision makers, stakeholders, professionals, and public users with 3D views and 3D analysis tools of spatial information that enables real-world views. Helps and assist in improving users' orientation and also increase their efficiency in performing their tasks related to city planning, Inspection, infrastructures, roads, and cadastre management. In this paper, the capability of multi-view Vexcel UltraCam Osprey camera images is examined to provide a 3D model of building façades using an efficient image-based modeling workflow adopted by commercial software's. The main steps of this work include: Specification, point cloud generation, and 3D modeling. After improving the initial values of interior and exterior parameters at first step, an efficient image matching technique such as Semi Global Matching (SGM) is applied on the images to generate point cloud. Then, a mesh model of points is calculated using and refined to obtain an accurate model of buildings. Finally, a texture is assigned to mesh in order to create a realistic 3D model. The resulting model has provided enough LoD2 details of the building based on visual assessment. The objective of this paper is neither comparing nor promoting a specific technique over the other and does not mean to promote a sensor-based system over another systems or mechanism presented in existing or previous paper. The idea is to share experience.

  19. 3D surface reconstruction and visualization of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc at cellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linge; Widmann, Thomas; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian; Breen, David

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying and visualizing the shape of developing biological tissues provide information about the morphogenetic processes in multicellular organisms. The size and shape of biological tissues depend on the number, size, shape, and arrangement of the constituting cells. To better understand the mechanisms that guide tissues into their final shape, it is important to investigate the cellular arrangement within tissues. Here we present a data processing pipeline to generate 3D volumetric surface models of epithelial tissues, as well as geometric descriptions of the tissues' apical cell cross-sections. The data processing pipeline includes image acquisition, editing, processing and analysis, 2D cell mesh generation, 3D contourbased surface reconstruction, cell mesh projection, followed by geometric calculations and color-based visualization of morphological parameters. In their first utilization we have applied these procedures to construct a 3D volumetric surface model at cellular resolution of the wing imaginal disc of Drosophila melanogaster. The ultimate goal of the reported effort is to produce tools for the creation of detailed 3D geometric models of the individual cells in epithelial tissues. To date, 3D volumetric surface models of the whole wing imaginal disc have been created, and the apicolateral cell boundaries have been identified, allowing for the calculation and visualization of cell parameters, e.g. apical cross-sectional area of cells. The calculation and visualization of morphological parameters show position-dependent patterns of cell shape in the wing imaginal disc. Our procedures should offer a general data processing pipeline for the construction of 3D volumetric surface models of a wide variety of epithelial tissues.

  20. X-Ray Nanofocus CT: Visualising Of Internal 3D-Structures With Submicrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinekoetter, Christian

    2008-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows the visualization and failure analysis of the internal micro structure of objects—even if they have complicated 3D-structures where 2D X-ray microscopy would give unclear information. During the past several years, computed tomography has progressed to higher resolution and quicker reconstruction of the 3D-volume. Most recently it even allows a three-dimensional look into the inside of materials with submicron resolution. With the use of nanofocus® tube technology, nanoCT®-systems are pushing forward into application fields that were exclusive to high cost and rare available synchrotron techniques. The study was performed with the new nanotom, a very compact laboratory system which allows the analysis of samples up to 120 mm in diameter and weighing up to 1 kg with exceptional voxel-resolution down to <500 nm (<0.5 microns). It is the first 180 kV nanofocus® computed tomography system in the world which is tailored specifically to the highest-resolution applications in the fields of material science, micro electronics, geology and biology. Therefore it is particularly suitable for nanoCT-examinations e.g. of synthetic materials, metals, ceramics, composite materials, mineral and organic samples. There are a few physical effects influencing the CT quality, such as beam-hardening within the sample or ring-artefacts, which can not be completely avoided. To optimize the quality of high resolution 3D volumes, the nanotom® includes a variety of effective software tools to reduce ring-artefacts and correct beam hardenings or drift effects which occurred during data acquisition. The resulting CT volume data set can be displayed in various ways, for example by virtual slicing and sectional views in any direction of the volume. By the fact that this requires only a mouse click, this technique will substitute destructive mechanical slicing and cutting in many applications. The initial CT results obtained with the

  1. P-Cable: New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Acquisition Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, Sverre; Berndt, Christian; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan; Eriksen, Frode N.; Eriksen, Ola K.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new cost-efficient technology for acquisition of high-resolution 3D seismic data: the P-Cable system. This technology is very well suited for deep water exploration, site surveys, and studies of shallow gas and fluid migration associated with gas hydrates or leaking reservoirs. It delivers unparalleled 3D seismic images of subsurface sediment architectures. The P-Cable system consists of a seismic cable towed perpendicular to a vessel's steaming direction. This configuration allows us to image an up to 150 m wide swath of the sub-surface for each sail line. Conventional 3D seismic technology relies on several very long streamers (up to 10 km long streamers are common), large sources, and costly operations. In contrast, the P-Cable system is light-weight and fast to deploy from small vessels. Only a small source is required as the system is made for relatively shallow imaging, typically above the first water-bottom multiple. The P-Cable system is particularly useful for acquisition of small 3D cubes, 10-50 km2, in focus areas, rather than extensive mapping of large regions. The rapid deployment and recovery of the system makes it possible to acquire several small cubes (10 to 30 km2) with high-resolution (50-250 Hz) seismic data in during one cruise. The first development of the P-Cable system was a cooperative project achieved by Volcanic Basin Petroleum Research (VBPR), University of Tromsø, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, and industry partners. Field trials using a 12-streamer system were conducted on sites with active fluid-leakage systems on the Norwegian-Barents-Svalbard margin, the Gulf of Cadiz, and the Mediterranean. The second phase of the development introduced digital streamers. The new P-Cable2 system also includes integrated tow and cross cables for power and data transmission and improved doors to spread the larger cross cable. This digital system has been successfully used during six cruises by the University of Troms

  2. X-ray ptychographic computed tomography at 16 nm isotropic 3D resolution

    PubMed Central

    Holler, M.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Karvinen, P.; Färm, Elina; Härkönen, Emma; Ritala, Mikko; Menzel, A.; Raabe, J.; Bunk, O.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray ptychography is a scanning variant of coherent diffractive imaging with the ability to image large fields of view at high resolution. It further allows imaging of non-isolated specimens and can produce quantitative mapping of the electron density distribution in 3D when combined with computed tomography. The method does not require imaging lenses, which makes it dose efficient and suitable to multi-keV X-rays, where efficient photon counting, pixelated detectors are available. Here we present the first highly resolved quantitative X-ray ptychographic tomography of an extended object yielding 16 nm isotropic 3D resolution recorded at 2 Å wavelength. This first-of-its-kind demonstration paves the way for ptychographic X-ray tomography to become a promising method for X-ray imaging of representative sample volumes at unmatched resolution, opening tremendous potential for characterizing samples in materials science and biology by filling the resolution gap between electron microscopy and other X-ray imaging techniques. PMID:24457289

  3. Accuracy evaluation of segmentation for high resolution imagery and 3D laser point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Nina; Chen, Ninghua; Chen, Jianyu

    2014-09-01

    High resolution satellite imagery and 3D laser point cloud data provide precise geometry, rich spectral information and clear texture of feature. The segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images and 3D laser point cloud is the basis of object-oriented remote sensing image analysis, for the segmentation results will directly influence the accuracy of subsequent analysis and discrimination. Currently, there still lacks a common segmentation theory to support these algorithms. So when we face a specific problem, we should determine applicability of the segmentation method through segmentation accuracy assessment, and then determine an optimal segmentation. To today, the most common method for evaluating the effectiveness of a segmentation method is subjective evaluation and supervised evaluation. For providing a more objective evaluation result, we have carried out following work. Analysis and comparison previous proposed image segmentation accuracy evaluation methods, which are area-based metrics, location-based metrics and combinations metrics. 3D point cloud data, which was gathered by Reigl VZ1000, was used to make two-dimensional transformation of point cloud data. The object-oriented segmentation result of aquaculture farm, building and farmland polygons were used as test object and adopted to evaluate segmentation accuracy.

  4. Multi-resolution Gabor wavelet feature extraction for needle detection in 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtaherian, Arash; Zinger, Svitlana; Mihajlovic, Nenad; de With, Peter H. N.; Huang, Jinfeng; Ng, Gary C.; Korsten, Hendrikus H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging is employed for needle guidance in various minimally invasive procedures such as biopsy guidance, regional anesthesia and brachytherapy. Unfortunately, a needle guidance using 2D ultrasound is very challenging, due to a poor needle visibility and a limited field of view. Nowadays, 3D ultrasound systems are available and more widely used. Consequently, with an appropriate 3D image-based needle detection technique, needle guidance and interventions may significantly be improved and simplified. In this paper, we present a multi-resolution Gabor transformation for an automated and reliable extraction of the needle-like structures in a 3D ultrasound volume. We study and identify the best combination of the Gabor wavelet frequencies. High precision in detecting the needle voxels leads to a robust and accurate localization of the needle for the intervention support. Evaluation in several ex-vivo cases shows that the multi-resolution analysis significantly improves the precision of the needle voxel detection from 0.23 to 0.32 at a high recall rate of 0.75 (gain 40%), where a better robustness and confidence were confirmed in the practical experiments.

  5. Multi-scale modelling of strongly heterogeneous 3D composite structures using spatial Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Said, Bassam; Ivanov, Dmitry; Long, Andrew C.; Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    3D composite materials are characterized by complex internal yarn architectures, leading to complex deformation and failure development mechanisms. Net-shaped preforms, which are originally periodic in nature, lose their periodicity when the fabric is draped, deformed on a tool, and consolidated to create geometrically complex composite components. As a result, the internal yarn architecture, which dominates the mechanical behaviour, becomes dependent on the structural geometry. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of 3D composites requires an accurate representation of the yarn architecture within structural scale models. When applied to 3D composites, conventional finite element modelling techniques are limited to either homogenised properties at the structural scale, or the unit cell scale for a more detailed material property definition. Consequently, these models fail to capture the complex phenomena occurring across multiple length scales and their effects on a 3D composite's mechanical response. Here a multi-scale modelling approach based on a 3D spatial Voronoi tessellation is proposed. The model creates an intermediate length scale suitable for homogenisation to deal with the non-periodic nature of the final material. Information is passed between the different length scales to allow for the effect of the structural geometry to be taken into account on the smaller scales. The stiffness and surface strain predictions from the proposed model have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The proposed modelling framework has been used to gain important insight into the behaviour of this category of materials. It has been observed that the strain and stress distributions are strongly dependent on the internal yarn architecture and consequently on the final component geometry. Even for simple coupon tests, the internal architecture and geometric effects dominate the mechanical response. Consequently, the behaviour of 3D woven

  6. High-resolution restoration of 3D structures from widefield images with extreme low signal-to-noise-ratio

    PubMed Central

    Arigovindan, Muthuvel; Fung, Jennifer C.; Elnatan, Daniel; Mennella, Vito; Chan, Yee-Hung Mark; Pollard, Michael; Branlund, Eric; Sedat, John W.; Agard, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Four-dimensional fluorescence microscopy—which records 3D image information as a function of time—provides an unbiased way of tracking dynamic behavior of subcellular components in living samples and capturing key events in complex macromolecular processes. Unfortunately, the combination of phototoxicity and photobleaching can severely limit the density or duration of sampling, thereby limiting the biological information that can be obtained. Although widefield microscopy provides a very light-efficient way of imaging, obtaining high-quality reconstructions requires deconvolution to remove optical aberrations. Unfortunately, most deconvolution methods perform very poorly at low signal-to-noise ratios, thereby requiring moderate photon doses to obtain acceptable resolution. We present a unique deconvolution method that combines an entropy-based regularization function with kernels that can exploit general spatial characteristics of the fluorescence image to push the required dose to extreme low levels, resulting in an enabling technology for high-resolution in vivo biological imaging. PMID:24106307

  7. The power spectrum of solar convection flows from high-resolution observations and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelles Chaouche, L.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Bonet, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Understanding solar surface magnetoconvection requires the study of the Fourier spectra of the velocity fields. Nowadays, observations are available that resolve very small spatial scales, well into the subgranular range, almost reaching the scales routinely resolved in numerical magnetoconvection simulations. Comparison of numerical and observational data at present can provide an assessment of the validity of the observational proxies. Aims: Our aims are: (1) to obtain Fourier spectra for the photospheric velocity fields using the spectropolarimetric observations with the highest spatial resolution so far (~120 km), thus reaching for the first time spatial scales well into the subgranular range; (2) to calculate corresponding Fourier spectra from realistic 3D numerical simulations of magnetoconvection and carry out a proper comparison with their observational counterparts considering the residual instrumental degradation in the observational data; and (3) to test the observational proxies on the basis of the numerical data alone, by comparing the actual velocity field in the simulations with synthetic observations obtained from the numerical boxes. Methods: (a) For the observations, data from the SUNRISE/IMaX spectropolarimeter are used. (b) For the simulations, we use four series of runs obtained with the STAGGER code for different average signed vertical magnetic field values (0, 50, 100, and 200 G). Spectral line profiles are synthesized from the numerical boxes for the same line observed by IMaX (Fe I 5250.2 Å) and degraded to match the performance of the IMaX instrument. Proxies for the velocity field are obtained via Dopplergrams (vertical component) and local correlation tracking (LCT, for the horizontal component). Fourier power spectra are calculated and a comparison between the synthetic and observational data sets carried out. (c) For the internal comparison of the numerical data, velocity values on constant optical depth surfaces are used

  8. Spatial resolution in visual memory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shalom, Asaf; Ganel, Tzvi

    2015-04-01

    Representations in visual short-term memory are considered to contain relatively elaborated information on object structure. Conversely, representations in earlier stages of the visual hierarchy are thought to be dominated by a sensory-based, feed-forward buildup of information. In four experiments, we compared the spatial resolution of different object properties between two points in time along the processing hierarchy in visual short-term memory. Subjects were asked either to estimate the distance between objects or to estimate the size of one of the objects' features under two experimental conditions, of either a short or a long delay period between the presentation of the target stimulus and the probe. When different objects were referred to, similar spatial resolution was found for the two delay periods, suggesting that initial processing stages are sensitive to object-based properties. Conversely, superior resolution was found for the short, as compared with the long, delay when features were referred to. These findings suggest that initial representations in visual memory are hybrid in that they allow fine-grained resolution for object features alongside normal visual sensitivity to the segregation between objects. The findings are also discussed in reference to the distinction made in earlier studies between visual short-term memory and iconic memory. PMID:25112394

  9. Multi-sensor super-resolution for hybrid range imaging with application to 3-D endoscopy and open surgery.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Thomas; Haase, Sven; Bauer, Sebastian; Wasza, Jakob; Kilgus, Thomas; Maier-Hein, Lena; Stock, Christian; Hornegger, Joachim; Feußner, Hubertus

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-sensor super-resolution framework for hybrid imaging to super-resolve data from one modality by taking advantage of additional guidance images of a complementary modality. This concept is applied to hybrid 3-D range imaging in image-guided surgery, where high-quality photometric data is exploited to enhance range images of low spatial resolution. We formulate super-resolution based on the maximum a-posteriori (MAP) principle and reconstruct high-resolution range data from multiple low-resolution frames and complementary photometric information. Robust motion estimation as required for super-resolution is performed on photometric data to derive displacement fields of subpixel accuracy for the associated range images. For improved reconstruction of depth discontinuities, a novel adaptive regularizer exploiting correlations between both modalities is embedded to MAP estimation. We evaluated our method on synthetic data as well as ex-vivo images in open surgery and endoscopy. The proposed multi-sensor framework improves the peak signal-to-noise ratio by 2 dB and structural similarity by 0.03 on average compared to conventional single-sensor approaches. In ex-vivo experiments on porcine organs, our method achieves substantial improvements in terms of depth discontinuity reconstruction. PMID:26201876

  10. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  11. 3D Cryo-Imaging: A Very High-Resolution View of the Whole Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant J.; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We developed the Case Cryo-imaging system that provides information rich, very high-resolution, color brightfield, and molecular fluorescence images of a whole mouse using a section-and-image block-face imaging technology. The system consists of a mouse-sized, motorized cryo-microtome with special features for imaging, a modified, brightfield/ fluorescence microscope, and a robotic xyz imaging system positioner, all of which is fully automated by a control system. Using the robotic system, we acquired microscopic tiled images at a pixel size of 15.6 µm over the block face of a whole mouse sectioned at 40 µm, with a total data volume of 55 GB. Viewing 2D images at multiple resolutions, we identified small structures such as cardiac vessels, muscle layers, villi of the small intestine, the optic nerve, and layers of the eye. Cryo-imaging was also suitable for imaging embryo mutants in 3D. A mouse, in which enhanced green fluorescent protein was expressed under gamma actin promoter in smooth muscle cells, gave clear 3D views of smooth muscle in the urogenital and gastrointestinal tracts. With cryo-imaging, we could obtain 3D vasculature down to 10 µm, over very large regions of mouse brain. Software is fully automated with fully programmable imaging/sectioning protocols, email notifications, and automatic volume visualization. With a unique combination of field-of-view, depth of field, contrast, and resolution, the Case Cryo-imaging system fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology. PMID:19248166

  12. Two Eyes, 3D Early Results: Stereoscopic vs 2D Representations of Highly Spatial Scientific Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    "Two Eyes, 3D" is a 3-year NSF funded research project to study the educational impacts of using stereoscopic representations in informal settings. The first study conducted as part of the project tested children 5-12 on their ability to perceive spatial elements of slides of scientific objects shown to them in either stereoscopic or 2D format. Children were also tested for prior spatial ability. Early results suggest that stereoscopy does not have a major impact on perceiving spatial elements of an image, but it does have a more significant impact on how the children apply that knowledge when presented with a common sense situation. The project is run by the AAVSO and this study was conducted at the Boston Museum of Science.

  13. Positron Emission Tomography with improved spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drukier, A.K.

    1990-04-01

    Applied Research Corporation (ARC) proposed the development of a new class of solid state detectors called Superconducting Granular Detectors (SGD). These new detectors permit considerable improvements in medical imaging, e.g. Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The biggest impact of this technique will be in imaging of the brain. It should permit better clinical diagnosis of such important diseases as Altzheimer's or schizophrenia. More specifically, we will develop an improved PET-imager; a spatial resolution 2 mm may be achievable with SGD. A time-of-flight capability(t {approx} 100 psec) will permit better contrast and facilitate 3D imaging. In the following, we describe the results of the first 9 months of the development.

  14. Ultra-Compact, High-Resolution LADAR System for 3D Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jing; Gutierrez, Roman

    2009-01-01

    An eye-safe LADAR system weighs under 500 grams and has range resolution of 1 mm at 10 m. This laser uses an adjustable, tiny microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror that was made in SiWave to sweep laser frequency. The size of the laser device is small (70x50x13 mm). The LADAR uses all the mature fiber-optic telecommunication technologies in the system, making this innovation an efficient performer. The tiny size and light weight makes the system useful for commercial and industrial applications including surface damage inspections, range measurements, and 3D imaging.

  15. Inner-shell excitations of krypton 3d investigated by electron impact with high resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhensheng; Zhu Linfan; Liu Xiaojing; Li Wenbin; Cheng Huadong; Sun Jianmin; Xu Kezun

    2005-06-15

    The inner-shell excitation spectra of krypton 3d electrons were measured at scattering angles of 0 deg. and 4 deg. by a fast-electron energy-loss spectrometer at an incident energy of 2.5 keV with an energy resolution better than 80 meV. Some interesting optically forbidden transitions were observed and the natural widths of the optically allowed and optically forbidden transitions were analyzed. It shows that the natural widths for the resonances having the same core hole are nearly equal, no matter whether they are optically allowed, optically forbidden, or different members of a Rydberg series.

  16. Cell mediated contraction in 3D cell-matrix constructs leads to spatially regulated osteogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Darinka D.; Zhao, Xuanhe; Mooney, David J.; Smit, Theo H.

    2013-01-01

    During embryonic development, morphogenetic processes give rise to a variety of shapes and patterns that lead to functional tissues and organs. While the impact of chemical signals in these processes is widely studied, the role of physical cues is less understood. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the interplay of cell mediated contraction and mechanical boundary conditions alone can result in spatially regulated differentiation in simple 3D constructs. An experimental model consisting of a 3D cell-gel construct and a finite element (FE) model were used to study the effect of cellular traction exerted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on an initially homogeneous matrix under inhomogeneous boundary conditions. A robust shape change is observed due to contraction under time-varying mechanical boundary conditions, which is explained by the finite element model. Furthermore, distinct local differences of osteogenic differentiation are observed, with a spatial pattern independent of osteogenic factors in the culture medium. Regions that are predicted to have experienced relatively high shear stress at any time during contraction, correlate with the regions of distinct osteogenesis. Taken together, these results support the underlying hypothesis that cellular contractility and mechanical boundary conditions alone can result in spatially regulated differentiation. These results will have important implications for tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:23925497

  17. High-resolution 3D seismic imaging of a pull-apart basin in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutchley, G.; Berndt, C.; Klaeschen, D.; Gutscher, M.

    2009-12-01

    In 2006, high-resolution 3D seismic data were acquired in the Gulf of Cadiz and the Mediterranean Sea aboard the RRS Charles Darwin as part of the HERMES (Hotspot Ecosystem Research on the Margins of European Seas) project. The P-Cable system, a cost-efficient set-up for fast acquisition of 3D seismic data on 12 single-channel streamers, was utilized to acquire seismic cubes at four different targets. Here, we present results from the second target - a WNW-ESE-oriented pull-apart basin in the southeastern Gulf of Cadiz. Initial processing has included: 1) spatial positioning of each recording channel from GPS data acquired on the outer two channels, 2) improved positioning of shot points and channels from the inversion of first arrival times, 3) application of a swell filter to improve reflection coherency, 4) CDP binning and stacking and 5) migration. The new data confirm that the southeastern Gulf of Cadiz north of the Rharb submarine valley is structurally controlled by numerous strike slip faults that were active until quite recently (within the resolution of the data). Given the location of this basin, between the extensional domain on the upper slope and the compressional toe of the accretionary wedge, we interpret the origin to be gravitational sliding on a detachment layer, possibly containing salt, but at this stage not imaged by our profiles.

  18. Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.

    2009-04-01

    Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology S. Scherer1, E. Cristea1, O. Huber1, A. Krenn1 1 ALICONA GmbH Graz, Austria The need for increasing accuracy is a characteristic of all geo-applications, and hence of the instruments contributing to obtaining relevant data. Small and fine sensors are being developed, measuring different parameters of our geosystem and requiring continuous validation and calibration. These sensors have often very small components (fine sensors able to sense dust, atmospheric water vapour characteristics, pressure change, gravimeters, satellite micro-components), showing complex topographies including steep flanks and having varying reflective properties. In order to get valid and reliable results, quality assurance of these instruments and sensors is required. The optical technology Focus-Variation, developed by Alicona and added in the latest draft of the upcoming ISO standard 25178, provides high resolution 3D surface metrology even at those complex topographies. The technique of Focus-Variation combines the small depth of focus of an optical system with vertical scanning to provide topographical and color information from the variation of focus. It is used for high-resolution optical 3D surface measurements. The traceable and repeatable measurement results are further being used for calibration and validation purposes. Some of the characteristics of the technology are: - Measurement of instruments / samples with steep flanks up to 80° - Measurement of materials with strongly varying reflection properties - Measurement of surfaces presenting fine (from 10nm) or strong roughness Here, we present the operating principle and possible applications of the optical 3D measurement system "InfiniteFocus", which is based on the technology of Focus-Variation and used for quality assurance in the lab and in production. With the vertical resolution of up to 10nm, InfiniteFocus yields meaningful form and

  19. A novel technique for visualizing high-resolution 3D terrain maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, John

    2007-02-01

    A new technique is presented for visualizing high-resolution terrain elevation data. It produces realistic images at small scales on the order of the data resolution and works particularly well when natural objects are present. Better visualization at small scales opens up new applications, like site surveillance for security and Google Earth-type local search and exploration tasks that are now done with 2-D maps. The large 3-D maps are a natural for high-resolution stereo display. The traditional technique drapes a continuous surface over the regularly spaced elevation values. This technique works well when displaying large areas or in cities with large buildings, but falls apart at small scales or for natural objects like trees. The new technique visualizes the terrain as a set of disjoint square patches. It is combined with an algorithm that identifies smooth areas within the scene. Where the terrain is smooth, such as in grassy areas, roads, parking lots and rooftops, it warps the patches to create a smooth surface. For trees or shrubs or other areas where objects are under-sampled, however, the patches are left disjoint. This has the disadvantage of leaving gaps in the data, but the human mind is very adept at filling in this missing information. It has the strong advantage of making natural terrain look realistic, trees and bushes look stylized but still look natural and are easy to interpret. Also, it does not add artifacts to the map, like filling in blank vertical walls where there are alcoves and other structure and extending bridges and overpasses down to the ground. The new technique is illustrated using very large 1-m resolution 3-D maps from the Rapid Terrain Visualization (RTV) program, and comparisons are made with traditional visualizations using these maps.

  20. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  1. Using 3D Glyph Visualization to Explore Real-time Seismic Data on Immersive and High-resolution Display Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. M.; Lindquist, K.; Kilb, D.; Newman, R.; Vernon, F.; Leigh, J.; Johnson, A.; Renambot, L.

    2003-12-01

    The study of time-dependent, three-dimensional natural phenomena like earthquakes can be enhanced with innovative and pertinent 3D computer graphics. Here we display seismic data as 3D glyphs (graphics primitives or symbols with various geometric and color attributes), allowing us to visualize the measured, time-dependent, 3D wave field from an earthquake recorded by a certain seismic network. In addition to providing a powerful state-of-health diagnostic of the seismic network, the graphical result presents an intuitive understanding of the real-time wave field that is hard to achieve with traditional 2D visualization methods. We have named these 3D icons `seismoglyphs' to suggest visual objects built from three components of ground motion data (north-south, east-west, vertical) recorded by a seismic sensor. A seismoglyph changes color with time, spanning the spectrum, to indicate when the seismic amplitude is largest. The spatial extent of the glyph indicates the polarization of the wave field as it arrives at the recording station. We compose seismoglyphs using the real time ANZA broadband data (http://www.eqinfo.ucsd.edu) to understand the 3D behavior of a seismic wave field in Southern California. Fifteen seismoglyphs are drawn simultaneously with a 3D topography map of Southern California, as real time data is piped into the graphics software using the Antelope system. At each station location, the seismoglyph evolves with time and this graphical display allows a scientist to observe patterns and anomalies in the data. The display also provides visual clues to indicate wave arrivals and ~real-time earthquake detection. Future work will involve adding phase detections, network triggers and near real-time 2D surface shaking estimates. The visuals can be displayed in an immersive environment using the passive stereoscopic Geowall (http://www.geowall.org). The stereographic projection allows for a better understanding of attenuation due to distance and earth

  2. High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imaging of Fluid Flow Anomalies in the Southwest Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, S.; Eriksen, F. N.; Eriksen, O. K.; Assad, M.; Stokke, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow features imaged as gas flares in the water column, pockmarks and mud volcanoes on the seabed, and high-amplitude cross-cutting reflections and bright spots in the sub-surface are abundant in the SW Barents Sea offshore northern Norway. This region is covered by extensive conventional 2D and 3D deep penetration seismic reflection data and multibeam bathymetry. High-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic data have been acquired in the SW Barents Sea over the past few years to image the uppermost ca. 500 m of the sub-surface. The P-Cable system consist of 12 to 16 short streamers (25 m) that are towed on a cross-cable perpendicular to the vessel's steaming direction. This configuration allows for acquisition of seismic data with high trace density, typically with 6 m in-line separation. The vertical resolution is a good as 1-2 m using conventional site survey air gun configurations. The sedimentary succession in the SW Barents Sea consists of upper Paleozoic evaporites overlaid by Mesozoic and Cenozoic clastic sediments. There are several organic-rich intervals in the sequence, including Paleozoic coals and Triassic and Jurassic marine source rocks that are locally in the oil or gas maturation windows. Glacial erosion has locally removed kilometer thick Cenozoic and Mesozoic successions, leaving the Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata in shallow sub-surface. The new high-resolution 3D surveys have targeted shallow fluid anomalies in the subsurface. These are imaged as high-amplitude reflections in fault blocks and structural highs, locally cross-cutting well-defined Mesozoic reflections. Commonly, disturbed reflections are present in overlying sequences, or high-amplitude reflections are imaged in the glacial overburden sediments. Locally, hundreds of pockmarks are imaged by the seafloor reflection. The deep cross-cutting reflections are interpreted as hydrocarbon accumulations that locally migrate towards the surface. The fluids are stored in shallow gas pockets or

  3. Fast similarity search for protein 3D structures using topological pattern matching based on spatial relations.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hee; Ryu, Keun Ho; Gilbert, David

    2005-08-01

    Similarity search for protein 3D structures become complex and computationally expensive due to the fact that the size of protein structure databases continues to grow tremendously. Recently, fast structural similarity search systems have been required to put them into practical use in protein structure classification whilst existing comparison systems do not provide comparison results on time. Our approach uses multi-step processing that composes of a preprocessing step to represent geometry of protein structures with spatial objects, a filter step to generate a small candidate set using approximate topological string matching, and a refinement step to compute a structural alignment. This paper describes the preprocessing and filtering for fast similarity search using the discovery of topological patterns of secondary structure elements based on spatial relations. Our system is fully implemented by using Oracle 8i spatial. We have previously shown that our approach has the advantage of speed of performance compared with other approach such as DALI. This work shows that the discovery of topological relations of secondary structure elements in protein structures by using spatial relations of spatial databases is practical for fast structural similarity search for proteins. PMID:16187404

  4. Sensor Spatial Distortion, Visual Latency, and Update Rate Effects on 3D Tracking in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Baumeler, S.; Jense, G. J.; Jacoby, R. H.; Trejo, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several common defects that we have sought to minimize in immersing virtual environments are: static sensor spatial distortion, visual latency, and low update rates. Human performance within our environments during large amplitude 3D tracking was assessed by objective and subjective methods in the presence and absence of these defects. Results show that 1) removal of our relatively small spatial sensor distortion had minor effects on the tracking activity, 2) an Adapted Cooper-Harper controllability scale proved the most sensitive subjective indicator of the degradation of dynamic fidelity caused by increasing latency and decreasing frame rates, and 3) performance, as measured by normalized RMS tracking error or subjective impressions, was more markedly influenced by changing visual latency than by update rate.

  5. Application of high resolution 2D/3D spectral induced polarization (SIP) in metalliferous ore exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Zhao, X.; Yao, H.; He, X.; Zeng, P.; Chang, F.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xi, X.; He, L.

    2015-12-01

    Induced polarization (IP) is a powerful tool in metalliferous ore exploration. However, there are many sources, such as clay and graphite, which can generate IP anomaly. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measures IP response on a wide frequency range. This method provides a way to discriminate IP response generated by metalliferous ore or other objects. The best way to explore metalliferous ore is 3D SIP exploration. However, if we consider the exploration cost and efficiency, we can use SIP profiling to find an anomaly, and then use 2D/3D SIP sounding to characterize the anomaly. Based on above idea, we used a large-scale distributed SIP measurement system which can realize 800 sounding sites in one direction at the same time. This system can be used for SIP profiling, 2D/3D SIP sounding with high efficiency, high resolution, and large depth of investigation (> 1000 m). Qiushuwan copper - molybdenum deposit is located in Nanyang city, Henan province, China. It is only a middle-size deposit although over 100 holes were drilled and over 40 years of exploration were spent because of very complex geological setting. We made SIP measurement over 100 rock and ore samples to discriminate IP responses of ore and rock containing graphite. Then we carried out 7 lines of 2D SIP exploration with the depth of investigation great than 1000 m. The minimum electode spacing for potential difference is only 20 m. And we increase the spacing of current electodes at linear scale. This acquisition setting ensures high density data acquired and high quality data acquisition. Modeling and inversion result proves that we can get underground information with high resolution by our method. Our result shows that there exists a strong SIP response related to ore body in depth > 300 m. Pseudo-3D inversion of five 2D SIP sounding lines shows the location and size of IP anomaly. The new drillings based our result found a big copper-molybdenum ore body in new position with depth > 300 m and

  6. 3D resolution tests of two-plane wave approach using synthetic seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, S.; Larmat, C. S.; Sandvol, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Two-plane wave tomography (TPWT) is becoming a standard approach to obtain fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities for a variety of tectonic settings. A recent study by Ceylan et al. (2012) has applied this method to eastern Tibet, using data from INDEPTH-IV and Namche-Barwa seismic experiments. The TPWT assumes that distortion of wavefronts at each station can be expressed as the sum of two plane waves. However, there is currently no robust or complete resolution test for TPWT, to address its limitations such as wavefront healing. In this study, we test the capabilities of TPWT and resolution of INDEPTH-IV seismic experiment, by performing 3D resolution tests using synthetic seismograms. Utilizing SPECFEM3D software, we compute synthetic data sets resolving periods down to ~30 s. We implement a checkerboard upper mantle (for depths between 50 and 650 km) with variable cell sizes, superimposed to PREM as the background model. We then calculate fundamental mode surface wave phase velocities using TPWT for periods between 33-143 seconds, using synthetic seismograms computed from our three dimensional hypothetical model. Assuming a constant Poisson's ratio, we use partial derivatives from Saito (1988) to invert for shear wave velocities. We show that the combination of TPWT and Saito (1988) methods is capable of retrieving anomalies down to depths of ~200 km for Rayleigh waves. Below these depths, we observe evidence of both lateral and vertical smearing. We also find that the traditional method for estimating the resolution of TPWT consistently overestimates phase velocity resolutions. Love waves exhibit adequate resolution down to depths of ~100 km. At depths greater than 100 km, smearing is more evident in SH wave results than those of SV waves. Increased smearing of SH waves is most probably due to propagation characteristics and shallower sensitivity of Love waves. Our results imply that TPWT can be applied to Love waves, making future investigations of

  7. A Residual Kriging method for the reconstruction of 3D high-resolution meteorological fields from airborne and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiti, Lavinia; Zardi, Dino; de Franceschi, Massimiliano; Rampanelli, Gabriele

    2013-04-01

    Manned light aircrafts and remotely piloted aircrafts represent very valuable and flexible measurement platforms for atmospheric research, as they are able to provide high temporal and spatial resolution observations of the atmosphere above the ground surface. In the present study the application of a geostatistical interpolation technique called Residual Kriging (RK) is proposed for the mapping of airborne measurements of scalar quantities over regularly spaced 3D grids. In RK the dominant (vertical) trend component underlying the original data is first extracted to filter out local anomalies, then the residual field is separately interpolated and finally added back to the trend; the determination of the interpolation weights relies on the estimate of the characteristic covariance function of the residuals, through the computation and modelling of their semivariogram function. RK implementation also allows for the inference of the characteristic spatial scales of variability of the target field and its isotropization, and for an estimate of the interpolation error. The adopted test-bed database consists in a series of flights of an instrumented motorglider exploring the atmosphere of two valleys near the city of Trento (in the southeastern Italian Alps), performed on fair-weather summer days. RK method is used to reconstruct fully 3D high-resolution fields of potential temperature and mixing ratio for specific vertical slices of the valley atmosphere, integrating also ground-based measurements from the nearest surface weather stations. From RK-interpolated meteorological fields, fine-scale features of the atmospheric boundary layer developing over the complex valley topography in connection with the occurrence of thermally-driven slope and valley winds, are detected. The performance of RK mapping is also tested against two other commonly adopted interpolation methods, i.e. the Inverse Distance Weighting and the Delaunay triangulation methods, comparing the results

  8. RELAP5-3D Resolution of Known Restart/Backup Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George L.; Anderson, Nolan A.

    2014-12-01

    The state-of-the-art nuclear reactor system safety analysis computer program developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), RELAP5-3D, continues to adapt to changes in computer hardware and software and to develop to meet the ever-expanding needs of the nuclear industry. To continue at the forefront, code testing must evolve with both code and industry developments, and it must work correctly. To best ensure this, the processes of Software Verification and Validation (V&V) are applied. Verification compares coding against its documented algorithms and equations and compares its calculations against analytical solutions and the method of manufactured solutions. A form of this, sequential verification, checks code specifications against coding only when originally written then applies regression testing which compares code calculations between consecutive updates or versions on a set of test cases to check that the performance does not change. A sequential verification testing system was specially constructed for RELAP5-3D to both detect errors with extreme accuracy and cover all nuclear-plant-relevant code features. Detection is provided through a “verification file” that records double precision sums of key variables. Coverage is provided by a test suite of input decks that exercise code features and capabilities necessary to model a nuclear power plant. A matrix of test features and short-running cases that exercise them is presented. This testing system is used to test base cases (called null testing) as well as restart and backup cases. It can test RELAP5-3D performance in both standalone and coupled (through PVM to other codes) runs. Application of verification testing revealed numerous restart and backup issues in both standalone and couple modes. This document reports the resolution of these issues.

  9. 3D-information fusion from very high resolution satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, T.; d'Angelo, P.; Kuschk, G.; Tian, J.; Partovi, T.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we show the pre-processing and potential for environmental applications of very high resolution (VHR) satellite stereo imagery like these from WorldView-2 or Pl'eiades with ground sampling distances (GSD) of half a metre to a metre. To process such data first a dense digital surface model (DSM) has to be generated. Afterwards from this a digital terrain model (DTM) representing the ground and a so called normalized digital elevation model (nDEM) representing off-ground objects are derived. Combining these elevation based data with a spectral classification allows detection and extraction of objects from the satellite scenes. Beside the object extraction also the DSM and DTM can directly be used for simulation and monitoring of environmental issues. Examples are the simulation of floodings, building-volume and people estimation, simulation of noise from roads, wave-propagation for cellphones, wind and light for estimating renewable energy sources, 3D change detection, earthquake preparedness and crisis relief, urban development and sprawl of informal settlements and much more. Also outside of urban areas volume information brings literally a new dimension to earth oberservation tasks like the volume estimations of forests and illegal logging, volume of (illegal) open pit mining activities, estimation of flooding or tsunami risks, dike planning, etc. In this paper we present the preprocessing from the original level-1 satellite data to digital surface models (DSMs), corresponding VHR ortho images and derived digital terrain models (DTMs). From these components we present how a monitoring and decision fusion based 3D change detection can be realized by using different acquisitions. The results are analyzed and assessed to derive quality parameters for the presented method. Finally the usability of 3D information fusion from VHR satellite imagery is discussed and evaluated.

  10. Development of a 3D high-resolution physical anthropomorphic breast phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of complex imaging tasks requires a phantom that simulates the patient anatomy. We have developed a technique to fabricate 3D physical anthropomorphic breast phantoms for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying size, shape, glandularity, and internal composition. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the computer model of the glandular tissue, skin and Coopers' ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototype printing using a single tissue equivalent material. The adipose tissue regions in the sections are filled using an epoxy-based resin combined with phenolic microspheres. The phantom sections are then stacked. The phantom is provided with an extra section modified to include iodine-enhanced masses. We fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue deformed to represent a 5 cm compressed thickness. The rapid prototype and epoxy based resin phantom materials attenuate x rays similar to 50% glandular tissue and 100% adipose tissue, respectively. The iodinated masses are between 4.0 and 9.6 mm thick and contain 2.5 mg/ml and 5 mg/ml iodine. Digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis images of the phantom are qualitatively similar in appearance to clinical images. In summary, a method to fabricate a 3D physical anthropomorphic breast phantom has been developed with known ground truth in the form of a companion voxel phantom. This combined system of physical and computational phantoms allows for both qualitative and quantitative image quality assessment.

  11. Optimizing penetration depth, contrast, and resolution in 3D dermatologic OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneesh, Alex; Považay, Boris; Hofer, Bernd; Zhang, Edward Z.; Kendall, Catherine; Laufer, Jan; Popov, Sergei; Glittenberg, Carl; Binder, Susanne; Stone, Nicholas; Beard, Paul C.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2010-02-01

    High speed, three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D OCT) at 800nm, 1060nm and 1300nm with approximately 4μm, 7μm and 6μm axial and less than 15μm transverse resolution is demonstrated to investigate the optimum wavelength region for in vivo human skin imaging in terms of contrast, dynamic range and penetration depth. 3D OCT at 1300nm provides deeper penetration, while images obtained at 800nm were better in terms of contrast and speckle noise. 1060nm region was a compromise between 800nm and 1300nm in terms of penetration depth and image contrast. Optimizing sensitivity, penetration and contrast enabled unprecedented visualization of micro-structural morphology underneath the glabrous skin, hairy skin and in scar tissue. Higher contrast obtained at 800 nm appears to be critical in the in vitro tumor study. A multimodal approach combining OCT and PA helped to obtain morphological as well as vascular information from deeper regions of skin.

  12. High-resolution 3D simulations of NIF ignition targets performed on Sequoia with HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, M. M.; Clark, D. S.; Jones, O. S.; Kerbel, G. D.; Sepke, S.; Patel, M. V.; Koning, J. M.; Schroeder, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Developments in the multiphysics ICF code HYDRA enable it to perform large-scale simulations on the Sequoia machine at LLNL. With an aggregate computing power of 20 Petaflops, Sequoia offers an unprecedented capability to resolve the physical processes in NIF ignition targets for a more complete, consistent treatment of the sources of asymmetry. We describe modifications to HYDRA that enable it to scale to over one million processes on Sequoia. These include new options for replicating parts of the mesh over a subset of the processes, to avoid strong scaling limits. We consider results from a 3D full ignition capsule-only simulation performed using over one billion zones run on 262,000 processors which resolves surface perturbations through modes l = 200. We also report progress towards a high-resolution 3D integrated hohlraum simulation performed using 262,000 processors which resolves surface perturbations on the ignition capsule through modes l = 70. These aim for the most complete calculations yet of the interactions and overall impact of the various sources of asymmetry for NIF ignition targets. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. GIS-based 3D spatial-temporal assessment of landslide hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, M.; Qiu, C.; Liu, X.

    2009-04-01

    A desirable landslide hazard assessment should give answers to three key questions: the magnitude, the location, and the occurrence time of failure(s). It is thus necessary to evaluate the effects of both the static variables (such as geological and geotechnical properties that contribute to landslide susceptibility) and the dynamic variables (such as rainfall and earthquake that tend to trigger landslides in an area of given susceptibility) on slope stability at the same time. With the fast development in earth observation science and geotechnology, there are more and more techniques available for acquiring data of both static and dynamic variables, and for carrying out a more reliable analysis to explain the triggering mechanism of landslide. Taking advantage of these techniques can result in an efficient and advanced spatial-temporal assessment of landslide hazard. It means that all the necessary data, including geological and geomorphological data and real-time monitoring data on rainfall or earthquake, should be acquired and integrated into a database, and being quickly analyzed at any time by an advanced method which developed by, for example, coupling geotechnical and hydrological models, to evaluate what will happen in certain situations. To achieve this task, a uniform platform is also needed to integrate various types of data and models into a standardized form for efficient treatment and easy implementation. Based on the above consideration, a GIS-based three-dimensional spatial-temporal assessment methodology is proposed. In this methodology, a GIS raster-based framework is delivered to achieve 3D slope stability analysis; a Monte Carlo technique is used to locate the potential slip surfaces by means of minimizing the 3D safety factor through an iterative procedure, based on a simulation of ellipsoid for the 3D shape of slip surfaces; a GIS-based model is developed by coupling a dynamic rainfall-infiltration model with a GIS-based 3D model to quantify

  14. The Effect of 3D-Modeling Training on Students' Spatial Reasoning Relative to Gender and Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šafhalter, Andrej; Vukman, Karin Bakracevic; Glodež, Srecko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to establish whether gender and age have an impact on spatial reasoning and its development through the use of 3D modeling. The study was conducted on a sample of 196 children from sixth to ninth grade, of whom 95 represented the experimental group and 101 the control group. The experimental group received 3D modeling…

  15. Interpreting Irradiance Distributions Using High-Resolution 3D MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Courtney; Rast, Mark; Criscuoli, Serena; Uitenbroek, Han; Rempel, Matthias D.

    2016-05-01

    We present initial results of studies aimed at understanding the impact of the unresolved magnetic field distribution on solar spectral irradiance. Using high-resolution 3D MHD simulations (from MURaM code) and spectral synthesis (with the RH code), we examine the emergent spectra of two atmospheres with similar mean field strengths but differing imposed-field conditions at wavelengths spanning from visible to infrared. Comparing the contrast against the magnetic field strength for the two magnetic simulations, we find differences in the distributions of contrasts versus field strength. We repeat the analysis after convolving the images with the PSF of a typical solar telescope (1-meter) and discuss the potential implications for irradiance modeling and future steps.

  16. Development and characterization of a 3D high-resolution terrain database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkosz, Aaron; Williams, Bryan L.; Motz, Steve

    2000-07-01

    A top-level description of methods used to generate elements of a high resolution 3D characterization database is presented. The database elements are defined as ground plane elevation map, vegetation height elevation map, material classification map, discrete man-made object map, and temperature radiance map. The paper will cover data collection by means of aerial photography, techniques of soft photogrammetry used to derive the elevation data, and the methodology followed to generate the material classification map. The discussion will feature the development of the database elements covering Fort Greely, Alaska. The developed databases are used by the US Army Aviation and Missile Command to evaluate the performance of various missile systems.

  17. A 3D map of the human genome at kilobase resolution reveals principles of chromatin looping.

    PubMed

    Rao, Suhas S P; Huntley, Miriam H; Durand, Neva C; Stamenova, Elena K; Bochkov, Ivan D; Robinson, James T; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Omer, Arina D; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2014-12-18

    We use in situ Hi-C to probe the 3D architecture of genomes, constructing haploid and diploid maps of nine cell types. The densest, in human lymphoblastoid cells, contains 4.9 billion contacts, achieving 1 kb resolution. We find that genomes are partitioned into contact domains (median length, 185 kb), which are associated with distinct patterns of histone marks and segregate into six subcompartments. We identify ∼10,000 loops. These loops frequently link promoters and enhancers, correlate with gene activation, and show conservation across cell types and species. Loop anchors typically occur at domain boundaries and bind CTCF. CTCF sites at loop anchors occur predominantly (>90%) in a convergent orientation, with the asymmetric motifs "facing" one another. The inactive X chromosome splits into two massive domains and contains large loops anchored at CTCF-binding repeats. PMID:25497547

  18. A High-Resolution 3D Weather Radar, MSG, and Lightning Sensor Observation Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Malte; Senf, Fabian; Wapler, Kathrin; Simmer, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    Within the research group 'Object-based Analysis and SEamless prediction' (OASE) of the Hans Ertel Centre for Weather Research programme (HerZ), a data composite containing weather radar, lightning sensor, and Meteosat Second Generation observations is being developed for the use in object-based weather analysis and nowcasting. At present, a 3D merging scheme combines measurements of the Bonn and Jülich dual polarimetric weather radar systems (data provided by the TR32 and TERENO projects) into a 3-dimensional polar-stereographic volume grid, with 500 meters horizontal, and 250 meters vertical resolution. The merging takes into account and compensates for various observational error sources, such as attenuation through hydrometeors, beam blockage through topography and buildings, minimum detectable signal as a function of noise threshold, non-hydrometeor echos like insects, and interference from other radar systems. In addition to this, the effect of convection during the radar 5-minute volume scan pattern is mitigated through calculation of advection vectors from subsequent scans and their use for advection correction when projecting the measurements into space for any desired timestamp. The Meteosat Second Generation rapid scan service provides a scan in 12 spectral visual and infrared wavelengths every 5 minutes over Germany and Europe. These scans, together with the derived microphysical cloud parameters, are projected into the same polar stereographic grid used for the radar data. Lightning counts from the LINET lightning sensor network are also provided for every 2D grid pixel. The combined 3D radar and 2D MSG/LINET data is stored in a fully documented netCDF file for every 5 minute interval, and is made ready for tracking and object based weather analysis. At the moment, the 3D data only covers the Bonn and Jülich area, but the algorithms are planed to be adapted to the newly conceived DWD polarimetric C-Band 5 minute interval volume scan strategy. An

  19. Research on the key technologies of 3D spatial data organization and management for virtual building environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Zhu, Qing

    2006-10-01

    As the special case of VGE in the fields of AEC (architecture, engineering and construction), Virtual Building Environment (VBE) has been broadly concerned. Highly complex, large-scale 3d spatial data is main bottleneck of VBE applications, so 3d spatial data organization and management certainly becomes the core technology for VBE. This paper puts forward 3d spatial data model for VBE, and the performance to implement it is very high. Inherent storage method of CAD data makes data redundant, and doesn't concern efficient visualization, which is a practical bottleneck to integrate CAD model, so An Efficient Method to Integrate CAD Model Data is put forward. Moreover, Since the 3d spatial indices based on R-tree are usually limited by their weakness of low efficiency due to the severe overlap of sibling nodes and the uneven size of nodes, a new node-choosing algorithm of R-tree are proposed.

  20. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-01

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future. PMID:26626828

  1. 3D PET image reconstruction including both motion correction and registration directly into an MR or stereotaxic spatial atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravel, Paul; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the feasibility and impact of including both the motion correction and the image registration transformation parameters from positron emission tomography (PET) image space to magnetic resonance (MR), or stereotaxic, image space within the system matrix of PET image reconstruction. This approach is motivated by the fields of neuroscience and psychiatry, where PET is used to investigate differences in activation patterns between different groups of participants, requiring all images to be registered to a common spatial atlas. Currently, image registration is performed after image reconstruction which introduces interpolation effects into the final image. Furthermore, motion correction (also requiring registration) introduces a further level of interpolation, and the overall result of these operations can lead to resolution degradation and possibly artifacts. It is important to note that performing such operations on a post-reconstruction basis means, strictly speaking, that the final images are not ones which maximize the desired objective function (e.g. maximum likelihood (ML), or maximum a posteriori reconstruction (MAP)). To correctly seek parameter estimates in the desired spatial atlas which are in accordance with the chosen reconstruction objective function, it is necessary to include the transformation parameters for both motion correction and registration within the system modeling stage of image reconstruction. Such an approach not only respects the statistically chosen objective function (e.g. ML or MAP), but furthermore should serve to reduce the interpolation effects. To evaluate the proposed method, this work investigates registration (including motion correction) using 2D and 3D simulations based on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner geometry, with and without resolution modeling, using the ML expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The quality of reconstruction was assessed using bias

  2. On the feasibility of comprehensive high-resolution 3D remote dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, Titania; Grant, Ryan; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Oldham, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the feasibility of remote high-resolution 3D dosimetry with the PRESAGE®/Optical-CT system. In remote dosimetry, dosimeters are shipped out from a central base institution to a remote institution for irradiation, then shipped back to the base institution for subsequent readout and analysis. Methods: Two nominally identical optical-CT scanners for 3D dosimetry were constructed and placed at the base (Duke University) and remote (Radiological Physics Center) institutions. Two formulations of PRESAGE® (SS1, SS2) radiochromic dosimeters were investigated. Higher sensitivity was expected in SS1, which had higher initiator content (0.25% bromotrichloromethane), while greater temporal stability was expected in SS2. Four unirradiated PRESAGE® dosimeters (two per formulation, cylindrical dimensions 11 cm diameter, 8.5–9.5 cm length) were imaged at the base institution, then shipped to the remote institution for planning and irradiation. Each dosimeter was irradiated with the same simple treatment plan: an isocentric 3-field “cross” arrangement of 4 × 4 cm open 6 MV beams configured as parallel opposed laterals with an anterior beam. This simple plan was amenable to accurate and repeatable setup, as well as accurate dose modeling by a commissioned treatment planning system (Pinnacle). After irradiation and subsequent (within 1 h) optical-CT readout at the remote institution, the dosimeters were shipped back to the base institution for remote dosimetry readout 3 days postirradiation. Measured on-site and remote relative 3D dose distributions were registered to the Pinnacle dose calculation, which served as the reference distribution for 3D gamma calculations with passing criteria of 5%/2 mm, 3%/3 mm, and 3%/2 mm with a 10% dose threshold. Gamma passing rates, dose profiles, and color-maps were all used to assess and compare the performance of both PRESAGE® formulations for remote dosimetry. Results: The best agreements between the

  3. Spatial parallelism of a 3D finite difference, velocity-stress elastic wave propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately, finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. The authors model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MPI library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speedup. Because I/O is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) the authors have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle I/O. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ghost cells. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, they observe excellent scaled speedup. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, they achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  4. Spatial Parallelism of a 3D Finite Difference, Velocity-Stress Elastic Wave Propagation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MINKOFF,SUSAN E.

    1999-12-09

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately. finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. We model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MP1 library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speed up. Because i/o is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) we have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle i/o. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ''ghost cells''. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, we observe excellent scaled speed up. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, we achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  5. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  6. a Web-Based Interactive Tool for Multi-Resolution 3d Models of a Maya Archaeological Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agugiaro, G.; Remondino, F.; Girardi, G.; von Schwerin, J.; Richards-Rissetto, H.; De Amicis, R.

    2011-09-01

    Continuous technological advances in surveying, computing and digital-content delivery are strongly contributing to a change in the way Cultural Heritage is "perceived": new tools and methodologies for documentation, reconstruction and research are being created to assist not only scholars, but also to reach more potential users (e.g. students and tourists) willing to access more detailed information about art history and archaeology. 3D computer-simulated models, sometimes set in virtual landscapes, offer for example the chance to explore possible hypothetical reconstructions, while on-line GIS resources can help interactive analyses of relationships and change over space and time. While for some research purposes a traditional 2D approach may suffice, this is not the case for more complex analyses concerning spatial and temporal features of architecture, like for example the relationship of architecture and landscape, visibility studies etc. The project aims therefore at creating a tool, called "QueryArch3D" tool, which enables the web-based visualisation and queries of an interactive, multi-resolution 3D model in the framework of Cultural Heritage. More specifically, a complete Maya archaeological site, located in Copan (Honduras), has been chosen as case study to test and demonstrate the platform's capabilities. Much of the site has been surveyed and modelled at different levels of detail (LoD) and the geometric model has been semantically segmented and integrated with attribute data gathered from several external data sources. The paper describes the characteristics of the research work, along with its implementation issues and the initial results of the developed prototype.

  7. Robust and Blind 3D Mesh Watermarking in Spatial Domain Based on Faces Categorization and Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Amir Masoud; Ebrahimnezhad, Hossein; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a 3D watermarking algorithm in spatial domain is presented with blind detection. In the proposed method, a negligible visual distortion is observed in host model. Initially, a preprocessing is applied on the 3D model to make it robust against geometric transformation attacks. Then, a number of triangle faces are determined as mark triangles using a novel systematic approach in which faces are categorized and sorted robustly. In order to enhance the capability of information retrieval by attacks, block watermarks are encoded using Reed-Solomon block error-correcting code before embedding into the mark triangles. Next, the encoded watermarks are embedded in spherical coordinates. The proposed method is robust against additive noise, mesh smoothing and quantization attacks. Also, it is stout next to geometric transformation, vertices and faces reordering attacks. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is designed so that it is robust against the cropping attack. Simulation results confirm that the watermarked models confront very low distortion if the control parameters are selected properly. Comparison with other methods demonstrates that the proposed method has good performance against the mesh smoothing attacks.

  8. Spatial Sense and Perspective: A 3-D Model of the Orion Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, I.; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2012-08-01

    Building a scale model of the Orion constellation provides spatial perspective for students studying astronomy. For this activity, students read a passage from literature that refers to stars being strange when seen from a different point of view. From a data set of the seven major stars of Orion they construct a 3-D distance scale model. This involves the subject areas of astronomy, mathematics, literature and art, as well as the skill areas of perspective, relative distances, line-of-sight, and basic algebra. This model will appear from one side exactly the way we see it from Earth. But when looking at it from any other angle the familiar constellation will look very alien. Students are encouraged to come up with their own names and stories to go with these new constellations. This activity has been used for K-12 teacher professional development classes, and would be most suitable for grades 6-12.

  9. 3D hierarchical spatial representation and memory of multimodal sensory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Deepak; Dow, Paul A.; Huber, David J.

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes an efficient method and system for representing, processing and understanding multi-modal sensory data. More specifically, it describes a computational method and system for how to process and remember multiple locations in multimodal sensory space (e.g., visual, auditory, somatosensory, etc.). The multimodal representation and memory is based on a biologically-inspired hierarchy of spatial representations implemented with novel analogues of real representations used in the human brain. The novelty of the work is in the computationally efficient and robust spatial representation of 3D locations in multimodal sensory space as well as an associated working memory for storage and recall of these representations at the desired level for goal-oriented action. We describe (1) A simple and efficient method for human-like hierarchical spatial representations of sensory data and how to associate, integrate and convert between these representations (head-centered coordinate system, body-centered coordinate, etc.); (2) a robust method for training and learning a mapping of points in multimodal sensory space (e.g., camera-visible object positions, location of auditory sources, etc.) to the above hierarchical spatial representations; and (3) a specification and implementation of a hierarchical spatial working memory based on the above for storage and recall at the desired level for goal-oriented action(s). This work is most useful for any machine or human-machine application that requires processing of multimodal sensory inputs, making sense of it from a spatial perspective (e.g., where is the sensory information coming from with respect to the machine and its parts) and then taking some goal-oriented action based on this spatial understanding. A multi-level spatial representation hierarchy means that heterogeneous sensory inputs (e.g., visual, auditory, somatosensory, etc.) can map onto the hierarchy at different levels. When controlling various machine

  10. Amoeboid migration mode adaption in quasi-3D spatial density gradients of varying lattice geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelashvili, Mari; Emmert, Martin; Hodeck, Kai F.; Heinrich, Doris

    2014-07-01

    Cell migration processes are controlled by sensitive interaction with external cues such as topographic structures of the cell’s environment. Here, we present systematically controlled assays to investigate the specific effects of spatial density and local geometry of topographic structure on amoeboid migration of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This is realized by well-controlled fabrication of quasi-3D pillar fields exhibiting a systematic variation of inter-pillar distance and pillar lattice geometry. By time-resolved local mean-squared displacement analysis of amoeboid migration, we can extract motility parameters in order to elucidate the details of amoeboid migration mechanisms and consolidate them in a two-state contact-controlled motility model, distinguishing directed and random phases. Specifically, we find that directed pillar-to-pillar runs are found preferably in high pillar density regions, and cells in directed motion states sense pillars as attractive topographic stimuli. In contrast, cell motion in random probing states is inhibited by high pillar density, where pillars act as obstacles for cell motion. In a gradient spatial density, these mechanisms lead to topographic guidance of cells, with a general trend towards a regime of inter-pillar spacing close to the cell diameter. In locally anisotropic pillar environments, cell migration is often found to be damped due to competing attraction by different pillars in close proximity and due to lack of other potential stimuli in the vicinity of the cell. Further, we demonstrate topographic cell guidance reflecting the lattice geometry of the quasi-3D environment by distinct preferences in migration direction. Our findings allow to specifically control amoeboid cell migration by purely topographic effects and thus, to induce active cell guidance. These tools hold prospects for medical applications like improved wound treatment, or invasion assays for immune cells.

  11. Low-resolution characterization of the 3D structure of the Euglena gracilis photoreceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barsanti, Laura; Coltelli, Primo; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2008-10-24

    This paper deals with the first characterization of the structure of the photoreceptive organelle of the unicellular alga Euglena gracilis (Euglenophyta). This organelle has a three-dimensional organization consisting of up to 50 closely stacked membrane lamellae. Ionically induced unstacking of the photoreceptor lamellae revealed ordered arrays well suited to structural analysis by electron microscopy and image analysis, which ultimately yielded a low-resolution picture of the structure. Each lamella is formed by the photoreceptive membrane protein of the cell assembled within the membrane layer in a hexagonal lattice. The first order diffraction spots in the calculated Fourier transform reveals the presence of 6-fold symmetrized topography (better resolution about 90 A). The 2D and 3D structural data are very similar with those recently published on proteorodopsin, a membrane protein used by marine bacterio-plankton as light-driven proton pump. In our opinion these similarity indicate that a photoreceptive protein belonging to the same superfamily of proteorodopsin could form the Euglena photoreceptor.

  12. High-content 3D multicolor super-resolution localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Pedro M; Almada, Pedro; Henriques, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution (SR) methodologies permit the visualization of cellular structures at near-molecular scale (1-30 nm), enabling novel mechanistic analysis of key events in cell biology not resolvable by conventional fluorescence imaging (∼300-nm resolution). When this level of detail is combined with computing power and fast and reliable analysis software, high-content screenings using SR becomes a practical option to address multiple biological questions. The importance of combining these powerful analytical techniques cannot be ignored, as they can address phenotypic changes on the molecular scale and in a statistically robust manner. In this work, we suggest an easy-to-implement protocol that can be applied to set up a high-content 3D SR experiment with user-friendly and freely available software. The protocol can be divided into two main parts: chamber and sample preparation, where a protocol to set up a direct STORM (dSTORM) sample is presented; and a second part where a protocol for image acquisition and analysis is described. We intend to take the reader step-by-step through the experimental process highlighting possible experimental bottlenecks and possible improvements based on recent developments in the field. PMID:25640426

  13. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Timothy D.; Gershoni, David; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    1996-03-01

    Several recent reports employing high spatial resolution have revealed the dominance of exciton localization in the low temperature luminescence of semiconductor quantum structures.^[1-3] Understanding this localization is of critical importance for the reliable studies of low dimensional structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. We report on low temperature and high spatial resolution photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies of cleaved edge overgrown (CEO) single quantum wires. These samples permit the direct and unambiguous comparison between the optical properties of a (100) oriented quantum well, a (110) oriented quantum well, and the quantum wire which is formed at their intersection. Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature in both the 2d systems and the genuinely 1D wire system. We also measure the absorption strength of the 1D system and find it to be a factor of 3 stronger than the absorption of the associated 2D systems.^[2] Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we also determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature. ^[1] H. F. Hess, E. Betzig, T. D. Harris, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Science 264, 1740 (1994). ^[2] T. D. Harris, D. Gershoni, R. D. Grober, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, and N. Chand, Appl. Phys. Lett, in press (1996) ^[3] D. Gammon, E. S. Snow, and D. S. Katzer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 2391 (1995)

  14. Quantifying the Spatial Distribution of Hill Slope Erosion Using a 3-D Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, B. N.; Bogonko, M.; He, Y.; Beighley, R. E.; Milberg, C. T.

    2007-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complicated process involving many interdependent variables including rainfall intensity and duration, drop size, soil characteristics, ground cover, and surface slope. The interplay of these variables produces differing spatial patterns of rill versus inter-rill erosion by changing the effective energy from rain drop impacts and the quantities and timing of sheet and shallow, concentrated flow. The objective of this research is to characterize the spatial patterns of rill and inter-rill erosion produced from simulated rainfall on different soil densities and surface slopes using a 3-D laser scanner. The soil used in this study is a sandy loam with bulk density due to compaction ranging from 1.25-1.65 g/cm3. The surface slopes selected for this study are 25, 33, and 50 percent and represent common slopes used for grading on construction sites. The spatial patterns of soil erosion are measured using a Trimble GX DR 200+ 3D Laser Scanner which employs a time of flight calculation averaged over 4 points using a class 2, pulsed, 532 nm, green laser at a distance of 2 to 11 m from the surface. The scanner measures point locations on an approximately 5 mm grid. The pre- and post-erosion scan surfaces are compared to calculate the change in volume and the dimensions of rills and inter-rill areas. The erosion experiments were performed in the Soil Erosion Research Laboratory (SERL), part of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at San Diego State University. SERL experiments utilize a 3-m by 10-m tilting soil bed with a soil depth of 0.5 meters. Rainfall is applied to the soil surface using two overhead Norton ladder rainfall simulators, which produce realistic rain drop diameters (median = 2.25 mm) and impact velocities. Simulated storm events used in this study consist of rainfall intensities ranging from 5, 10 to 15 cm/hr for durations of 20 to 30 minutes. Preliminary results are presented that illustrate a change in runoff processes and

  15. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26419771

  16. 3D ToF-SIMS Analysis of Peptide Incorporation into MALDI Matrix Crystals with Sub-micrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körsgen, Martin; Pelster, Andreas; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical sensitivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is largely affected by the specific analyte-matrix interaction, in particular by the possible incorporation of the analytes into crystalline MALDI matrices. Here we used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to visualize the incorporation of three peptides with different hydrophobicities, bradykinin, Substance P, and vasopressin, into two classic MALDI matrices, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA). For depth profiling, an Ar cluster ion beam was used to gradually sputter through the matrix crystals without causing significant degradation of matrix or biomolecules. A pulsed Bi3 ion cluster beam was used to image the lateral analyte distribution in the center of the sputter crater. Using this dual beam technique, the 3D distribution of the analytes and spatial segregation effects within the matrix crystals were imaged with sub-μm resolution. The technique could in the future enable matrix-enhanced (ME)-ToF-SIMS imaging of peptides in tissue slices at ultra-high resolution.

  17. Review and comparison of temporal- and spatial-phase shift speckle pattern interferometry for 3D deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Yang, Lianxiang; Chen, Xu; Xu, Nan; Wang, Yonghong

    2013-10-01

    High accuracy full field three dimensional (3D) deformation measurements have always been an essential problem for the manufacturing, instrument, and aerospace industry. 3D deformations, which can be translated further into 3D strain and stress, are the key parameter for design, manufacturing and quality control. Due to the fast development of the manufacturing industry, especially in the automobile and airspace industry, rapid design and optimization concepts have already widely accepted. These concepts all require the support of rapid, high sensitive and accuracy 3D deformation measurement. Advanced optical methods are gaining widely acceptance for deformation and stain measurement by industry due to the advantages of non-contact, full-field and high measurement sensitivity. Of these methods, Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is the most sensitive and accurate method for 3D deformation measurement in micro and sub micro-level. ESPI measures deformation by evaluating the phase difference of two recorded speckle interferograms under different loading conditions. Combined with a phase shift technique, ESPI systems can measure the 3D deformation with dozens of nanometer level sensitivity. Cataloged by phase calculation methods, ESPI systems can be divided into temporal phase shift ESPI systems and spatial phase shift ESPI system. This article provides a review and a comparison of temporal and spatial phase shift speckle pattern interferometry for 3D deformation measurement. After an overview of the fundamentals of ESPI theory, temporal phase-shift and spatial phase-shift techniques, 3D deformation measurements by the temporal phase-shift ESPI which is suited well for static measurement and by the spatial phase-shift ESPI which is particularly useful for dynamic measurement will be discussed in detail. Basic theory, brief derivation and different optical layouts for the two systems will be presented. The potentials and limitations of the both ESPI

  18. High-resolution 3D seismic model of the crustal and uppermost mantle structure in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin; Ostaficzuk, Stanisław R.

    2016-01-01

    In the area of Poland a contact between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe and the Carpathians has a complicated structure and a complex P-wave velocity of the sedimentary cover, crystalline crust, Moho depth and the uppermost mantle. The geometry of the uppermost several kilometers of sediments is relatively well recognized from over 100,000 boreholes. The vertical seismic profiling (VSP) from 1188 boreholes provided detailed velocity data for regional tectonic units and for stratigraphic successions from Permian to the Tertiary and Quaternary deposits. These data, however, do not provide information about the velocity and basement depth in the central part of the Trans-European suture zone (TESZ) and in the Carpathians. So, the data set is supplemented by 2D velocity models from 32 deep seismic sounding refraction profiles which also provide information about the crust and uppermost mantle. Together with the results of other methods: vertical seismic profiling, magnetotelluric, allow for the creation of a detailed, high-resolution 3D model for the entire Earth's crust and the uppermost mantle down to a depth of 60 km. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclise is only 0.3 to 1 km thick, which increases to 7 to 8 km along the East European Craton (EEC) margin, and 9 to 12 km in the TESZ. The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1-4 km thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sedimentary layers, up to about 20 km. The crystalline crust is differentiated and has a layered structure. The crust beneath the West European Platform (WEP; Variscan domain) is characterized by P-wave velocities of 5.8-6.6 km/s. The upper and middle crusts beneath the EEC are characterized by velocities of 6.1-6.6 km/s, and are underlain by a high velocity lower crust with a velocity of about 7 km/s. A general decrease in velocity is observed from the older to the younger tectonic domains. The TESZ is associated with a steep dip

  19. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  20. A multi-resolution fractal additive scheme for blind watermarking of 3D point data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmes, Mark; Wilder, Kathy; Fox, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    We present a fractal feature space for 3D point watermarking to make geospatial systems more secure. By exploiting the self similar nature of fractals, hidden information can be spatially embedded in point cloud data in an acceptable manner as described within this paper. Our method utilizes a blind scheme which provides automatic retrieval of the watermark payload without the need of the original cover data. Our method for locating similar patterns and encoding information in LiDAR point cloud data is accomplished through a look-up table or code book. The watermark is then merged into the point cloud data itself resulting in low distortion effects. With current advancements in computing technologies, such as GPGPUs, fractal processing is now applicable for processing of big data which is present in geospatial as well as other systems. This watermarking technique described within this paper can be important for systems where point data is handled by numerous aerial collectors including analysts use for systems such as a National LiDAR Data Layer.

  1. Clean localization super-resolution microscopy for 3D biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    We propose clean localization microscopy (a variant of fPALM) using a molecule filtering technique. Localization imaging involves acquiring a large number of images containing single molecule signatures followed by one-to-one mapping to render a super-resolution image. In principle, this process can be repeated for other z-planes to construct a 3D image. But, single molecules observed from off-focal planes result in false representation of their presence in the focal plane, resulting in incorrect quantification and analysis. We overcome this with a single molecule filtering technique that imposes constraints on the diffraction limited spot size of single molecules in the image plane. Calibration with sub-diffraction size beads puts a natural cutoff on the actual diffraction-limited size of single molecules in the focal plane. This helps in distinguishing beads present in the focal plane from those in the off-focal planes thereby providing an estimate of the single molecules in the focal plane. We study the distribution of actin (labeled with a photoactivatable CAGE 552 dye) in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells.

  2. High Resolution Ultrasonic Method for 3D Fingerprint Representation in Biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maev, R. Gr.; Bakulin, E. Y.; Maeva, E. Y.; Severin, F. M.

    Biometrics is an important field which studies different possible ways of personal identification. Among a number of existing biometric techniques fingerprint recognition stands alone - because very large database of fingerprints has already been acquired. Also, fingerprints are an important evidence that can be collected at a crime scene. Therefore, of all automated biometric techniques, especially in the field of law enforcement, fingerprint identification seems to be the most promising. Ultrasonic method of fingerprint imaging was originally introduced over a decade as the mapping of the reflection coefficient at the interface between the finger and a covering plate and has shown very good reliability and free from imperfections of previous two methods. This work introduces a newer development of the ultrasonic fingerprint imaging, focusing on the imaging of the internal structures of fingerprints (including sweat pores) with raw acoustic resolution of about 500 dpi (0.05 mm) using a scanning acoustic microscope to obtain images and acoustic data in the form of 3D data array. C-scans from different depths inside the fingerprint area of fingers of several volunteers were obtained and showed good contrast of ridges-and-valleys patterns and practically exact correspondence to the standard ink-and-paper prints of the same areas. Important feature reveled on the acoustic images was the clear appearance of the sweat pores, which could provide additional means of identification.

  3. Construction of an MRI 3D high resolution sheep brain template.

    PubMed

    Ella, Arsène; Keller, Matthieu

    2015-12-01

    Sheep is a developing animal model used in the field of neurosciences for the study of many behavioral, physiological or pathophysiological mechanisms, including for example, the central control of social behavior, brain injury or neurodegenerative diseases. However, sheep remains an orphan species in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, a mean image (template), resulting of registrations of multiple subject images is needed and currently does not exist. In this study, we: i) computed multimodal high resolution 3D in-vivo sheep brain templates of T1 weighted (T1W) and T2W images, ii) computed gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) prior probability maps using linear and optimized non-linear registrations iii) used prior probability maps to perform the segmentation of a single brain tissues. Computed multimodal sheep brain templates showed to preserve and underline all brain patterns of a single T1W or T2W image, and prior probability maps allowed to improve the segmentation of brain tissues. Finally, we demonstrated that these templates and prior probability maps were able to be portable in other publicly available imaging software and could be used as standardized spaces for multi-institution neuroimaging studies or other neuroscience methods. PMID:26363468

  4. In vivo high-resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging of superficial vascular anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, E. Z.; Laufer, J. G.; Pedley, R. B.; Beard, P. C.

    2009-02-01

    The application of a photoacoustic imaging instrument based upon a Fabry-Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor to imaging the superficial vasculature is described. This approach provides a backward mode-sensing configuration that has the potential to overcome the limitations of current piezoelectric based detection systems used in superficial photoacoustic imaging. The system has been evaluated by obtaining non-invasive images of the vasculature in human and mouse skin as well as mouse models of human colorectal tumours. These studies showed that the system can provide high-resolution 3D images of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. It is considered that this type of instrument may find a role in the clinical assessment of conditions characterized by changes in the vasculature such as skin tumours and superficial soft tissue damage due to burns, wounds or ulceration. It may also find application in the characterization of small animal cancer models where it is important to follow the tumour vasculature over time in order to study its development and/or response to therapy.

  5. High-resolution 3D modelling and visualization of Mount Everest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Armin; Murai, Shunji

    In the year 1988, a new topographical map 1:50,000 of the Mount Everest region was published by the National Geographic Society. The full map content was derived from aerial images of scale 1:35,000, acquired in a 1984 photogrammetric flight. This highly acclaimed topographical map, produced with Swiss photogrammetric and cartographic know-how, serves until nowadays as an important work of reference. We took the analogue data (images, contours), converted them into digital form through scanning, and produced a texture-mapped 3D computer model. With a DTM of 10 m grid-size and natural texture pixel-size of 1 m this model is currently the best dataset available for an area of 25 by 25 km 2 around the summit of Mount Everest. This paper reports about the production procedure of the model and shows some high-resolution photorealistic visualization results. The dataset has been used in the meantime by cartographers and animation experts for the production of new map-related visualization products and is much sought after by scientists of various disciplines.

  6. High-resolution 3D seismic investigation of giant seafloor craters in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waage, Malin; Bünz, Stefan; Andreassen, Karin

    2016-04-01

    Multiple giant craters exist on the seafloor in an area of ~ 100 km2 east of Bear Island Trough in the west-central Barents Sea. It has been hypothesized that these craters might have been caused by gas eruptions following the last deglaciation. Gas seepage from the seafloor occurs abundantly in this area. The crater area is still likely to represent one of the largest hot-spots for shallow marine methane release in the arctic. In summer 2015, we acquired high-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data in this area covering several of the craters and their associated pingo structures. Due to the shallow and hard Triassic bedrock, penetration of the seismic signals is limited to approximately 450 ms bsf. The crater structures are up to 1 km wide and 40 m deep. Pingo structures occur on the rim of some of the craters and are up to 700 m wide and up to 15 m high above the surrounding seafloor. The 3D seismic data reveals faults, fracture networks and weakness zone that resemble pipes or similar vertical, focused fluid-flow structures in the Triassic sedimentary rocks below the craters. The principal orientation of the faults is in a ~ NW-SE direction that coincides with regional faulting from Permo-Triassic extension. The seismic data also show high-amplitude anomalies beneath some of representing shallow gas accumulations that might be the intermediate source of the gas seepage. This might suggest that craters are caused by high pressured gas that migrated from deeper petroleum systems and accumulated in the shallow Triassic rocks during the last glaciation. Previous work indicate that craters of similar size are likely a cause of enormous blow-outs of gas. Our study discusses the formation mechanisms and timing of these potential blow-out craters and whether they formed during the last deglaciation, when this area was likely quite unstable as severe glacial erosion caused localized high isostatic rebound rates here. We also investigate the role of gas hydrates that might

  7. High-Resolution 3-D Imaging and Tissue Differentiation with Transmission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmarelis, V. Z.; Jeong, J.; Shin, D. C.; Do, S.

    A three-dimensional High-resolution Ultrasonic Transmission Tomography (HUTT) system has been developed recently under the sponsorship of the Alfred Mann Institute at the University of Southern California that holds the promise of early detection of breast cancer (mm-size lesions) with greater sensitivity (true positives) and specificity (true negatives) than current x-ray mammograghy. In addition to sub-mm resolution in 3-D, the HUTT system has the unique capability of reliable tissue classification by means of the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics of individual voxels that are extracted from the tomographic data through novel signal processing methods. These methods yield "multi-band signatures" of the various tissue types that are utilized to achieve reliable tissue differentiation via novel segmentation and classification algorithms. The unparalleled high-resolution and tissue differentiation capabilities of the HUTT system have been demonstrated so far with man-made and animal-tissue phantoms. Illustrative results are presented that corroborate these claims, although several challenges remain to make HUTT a clinically acceptable technology. The next critical step is to collect and analyze data from human subjects (female breasts) in order to demonstrate the key capability of the HUTT system to detect breast lesions early (at the mm-size stage) and to differentiate between malignant and benign lesions in a manner that is far superior (in terms of sensitivity and specificity) to the current x-ray mammography. The key initial application of the HUTT imaging technology is envisioned to be the early (at the mm-size) detection of breast cancer, which represents a major threat to the well-being of women around the world. The potential impact is estimated in hundreds of thousands lives saved, millions of unnecessary biopsies avoided, and billions of dollars saved in national health-care costs every year - to say nothing of the tens of thousands of

  8. The impact of stereo 3D sports TV broadcasts on user's depth perception and spatial presence experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, K.; Wiemeyer, J.

    2014-03-01

    This work examines the impact of content and presentation parameters in 2D versus 3D on depth perception and spatial presence, and provides guidelines for stereoscopic content development for 3D sports TV broadcasts and cognate subjects. Under consideration of depth perception and spatial presence experience, a preliminary study with 8 participants (sports: soccer and boxing) and a main study with 31 participants (sports: soccer and BMX-Miniramp) were performed. The dimension (2D vs. 3D) and camera position (near vs. far) were manipulated for soccer and boxing. In addition for soccer, the field of view (small vs. large) was examined. Moreover, the direction of motion (horizontal vs. depth) was considered for BMX-Miniramp. Subjective assessments, behavioural tests and qualitative interviews were implemented. The results confirm a strong effect of 3D on both depth perception and spatial presence experience as well as selective influences of camera distance and field of view. The results can improve understanding of the perception and experience of 3D TV as a medium. Finally, recommendations are derived on how to use various 3D sports ideally as content for TV broadcasts.

  9. “Taller and Shorter”: Human 3-D Spatial Memory Distorts Familiar Multilevel Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Thomas; Huber, Markus; Schramm, Hannah; Kugler, Günter; Dieterich, Marianne; Glasauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments report contradictory findings on the presence of a behavioural and neuronal anisotropy exhibited in vertical and horizontal capabilities of spatial orientation and navigation. We performed a pointing experiment in humans on the imagined 3-D direction of the location of various invisible goals that were distributed horizontally and vertically in a familiar multilevel hospital building. The 21 participants were employees who had worked for years in this building. The hypothesis was that comparison of the experimentally determined directions and the true directions would reveal systematic inaccuracy or dimensional anisotropy of the localizations. The study provides first evidence that the internal representation of a familiar multilevel building was distorted compared to the dimensions of the true building: vertically 215% taller and horizontally 51% shorter. This was not only demonstrated in the mathematical reconstruction of the mental model based on the analysis of the pointing experiments but also by the participants’ drawings of the front view and the ground plan of the building. Thus, in the mental model both planes were altered in different directions: compressed for the horizontal floor plane and stretched for the vertical column plane. This could be related to human anisotropic behavioural performance of horizontal and vertical navigation in such buildings. PMID:26509927

  10. 3D imaging of radiation damage in silicon sensor and spatial mapping of charge collection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, M.; Jakubek, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Platkevic, M.; Havranek, V.; Semian, V.

    2013-03-01

    Radiation damage in semiconductor sensors alters the response and degrades the performance of many devices ultimately limiting their stability and lifetime. In semiconductor radiation detectors the homogeneity of charge collection becomes distorted while decreasing the overall detection efficiency. Moreover the damage can significantly increase the detector noise and degrade other electrical properties such as leakage current. In this work we present a novel method for 3D mapping of the semiconductor radiation sensor volume allowing displaying the three dimensional distribution of detector properties such as charge collection efficiency and charge diffusion rate. This technique can visualize the spatially localized changes of local detector performance after radiation damage. Sensors used were 300 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip which serves as an imaging multichannel microprobe (256 × 256 square pixels with pitch of 55 μm, i.e. all together 65 thousand channels). Per pixel energy sensitivity of the Timepix chip allows to evaluate the local charge collection efficiency and also the charge diffusion rate. In this work we implement an X-ray line scanning technique for systematic evaluation of changes in the performance of a silicon sensor intentionally damaged by energetic protons.

  11. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  12. High throughput assembly of spatially controlled 3D cell clusters on a micro/nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Sharma, Sadhana; Reen, Rashmeet K; Palmer, Andre F; Gooch, Keith J; Lee, L James; Lannutti, John J; Hansford, Derek J

    2010-03-21

    Guided assembly of microscale tissue subunits (i.e. 3D cell clusters/aggregates) has found applications in cell therapy/tissue engineering, cell and developmental biology, and drug discovery. As cluster size and geometry are known to influence cellular responses, the ability to spatially control cluster formation in a high throughput manner could be advantageous for many biomedical applications. In this work, a micro- and nanofabricated platform was developed for this purpose, consisting of a soft-lithographically fabricated array of through-thickness microwells structurally bonded to a sheet of electrospun fibers. The microwells and fibers were manufactured from several polymers of biomedical interest. Human hepatocytes were used as model cells to demonstrate the ability of the platform to allow controlled cluster formation. In addition, the ability of the device to support studies on semi-controlled heterotypic interactions was demonstrated by co-culturing hepatocytes and fibroblasts. Preliminary experiments with other cells of interest (pancreatic cells, embryonic stem cells, and cardiomyocytes) were also conducted. Our platform possesses several advantages over previously developed microwell arrays: a more in vivo-like topographical stimulation of cells; better nutrient/waste exchange through the underlying nanofiber mat; and easy integration into standard two-chamber cell culture well systems. PMID:20221567

  13. "Taller and Shorter": Human 3-D Spatial Memory Distorts Familiar Multilevel Buildings.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Thomas; Huber, Markus; Schramm, Hannah; Kugler, Günter; Dieterich, Marianne; Glasauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Animal experiments report contradictory findings on the presence of a behavioural and neuronal anisotropy exhibited in vertical and horizontal capabilities of spatial orientation and navigation. We performed a pointing experiment in humans on the imagined 3-D direction of the location of various invisible goals that were distributed horizontally and vertically in a familiar multilevel hospital building. The 21 participants were employees who had worked for years in this building. The hypothesis was that comparison of the experimentally determined directions and the true directions would reveal systematic inaccuracy or dimensional anisotropy of the localizations. The study provides first evidence that the internal representation of a familiar multilevel building was distorted compared to the dimensions of the true building: vertically 215% taller and horizontally 51% shorter. This was not only demonstrated in the mathematical reconstruction of the mental model based on the analysis of the pointing experiments but also by the participants' drawings of the front view and the ground plan of the building. Thus, in the mental model both planes were altered in different directions: compressed for the horizontal floor plane and stretched for the vertical column plane. This could be related to human anisotropic behavioural performance of horizontal and vertical navigation in such buildings. PMID:26509927

  14. Wavelength selection and evolution in high-resolution 3D numerical models of multilayer detachment folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.; Kaus, B. J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts are dominated by crustal scale folding that exhibits fairly regular fold spacing. For example, the Fars region in the Zagros Mountains shows a fold spacing with a normal distribution around a dominant wavelength of 14 Km ± 3 Km, yet having a wide variability of aspect ratios (length to wavelength ratios; Yamato et al., 2011). To which extend this is consistent with a crustal-scale folding instability or how the regional spacing of folding can be used to constrain regional rheological parameters are not fully resolved questions. To get insights into these problems we have investigated the dominant wavelength selection and evolution in a true multilayer system (Schmid and Podlachikov, 2006) with three different viscosities: lower salt layer (ηs), and overlying weak layers (ηw) and competent layers (ηc). This has been done by means of two tools: a semi-analytical solution and numerical models. The 2D semi-analytical approach was applied to derive mechanical phase diagrams that can be used to distinguish different folding modes using two viscosity ratios (R1= ηc/ ηs and R2= ηc/ ηw). To test the validity of the phase diagrams beyond the initial stages of folding for which the analytical approach is valid, we performed several 3D high-resolution forward numerical runs using a finite element code (LaMEM). Additionally, irregular bottom topography was implemented in the numerical runs in order to account for variable salt thickness distribution and consequently study its effect on the wavelength selection. A straight but gradual salt thickness variation, sudden thickness variations due to a basement step or an arc shaped salt basin among other cases could be investigated. It was observed that the bottom topography exerts an impact on the velocity field of the different folding modes and as a result, its influence can be observed on the resulting topography. However, not all the folding modes exhibit an initial wavelength that is dependent

  15. An analysis of the mechanical parameters used for finite element compression of a high-resolution 3D breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T.

    2011-01-01

    properties that impact displacement the most are mesh density, friction between the skin and the plates, and the relative stiffness of the different tissue types. Conclusions: The authors have developed a 3D, FE breast model that can yield high spatial resolution breast deformations under uniaxial compression for imaging research purposes and demonstrated that small changes in the mechanical properties can affect images generated using the phantom. PMID:21992390

  16. Spatial 3D infrastructure: display-independent software framework, high-speed rendering electronics, and several new displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Won-Suk; Napoli, Joshua; Cossairt, Oliver S.; Dorval, Rick K.; Hall, Deirdre M.; Purtell, Thomas J., II; Schooler, James F.; Banker, Yigal; Favalora, Gregg E.

    2005-03-01

    We present a software and hardware foundation to enable the rapid adoption of 3-D displays. Different 3-D displays - such as multiplanar, multiview, and electroholographic displays - naturally require different rendering methods. The adoption of these displays in the marketplace will be accelerated by a common software framework. The authors designed the SpatialGL API, a new rendering framework that unifies these display methods under one interface. SpatialGL enables complementary visualization assets to coexist through a uniform infrastructure. Also, SpatialGL supports legacy interfaces such as the OpenGL API. The authors" first implementation of SpatialGL uses multiview and multislice rendering algorithms to exploit the performance of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) to enable real-time visualization of 3-D graphics from medical imaging, oil & gas exploration, and homeland security. At the time of writing, SpatialGL runs on COTS workstations (both Windows and Linux) and on Actuality"s high-performance embedded computational engine that couples an NVIDIA GeForce 6800 Ultra GPU, an AMD Athlon 64 processor, and a proprietary, high-speed, programmable volumetric frame buffer that interfaces to a 1024 x 768 x 3 digital projector. Progress is illustrated using an off-the-shelf multiview display, Actuality"s multiplanar Perspecta Spatial 3D System, and an experimental multiview display. The experimental display is a quasi-holographic view-sequential system that generates aerial imagery measuring 30 mm x 25 mm x 25 mm, providing 198 horizontal views.

  17. High Resolution 3-D Waveform Tomography of the Lithospheric Structure of the Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamara, Samir; Friederich, Wolfgang; Schumacher, Florian; Meier, Thomas; Egelados Working Group

    2015-04-01

    We present a high-resolution lithospheric shear-wave velocity model of the Hellenic subduction zone obtained by full waveform tomography of the EGELADOS project data. This high quality data was collected with the broadband amphibian seismic network EGELADOS that was deployed all over the southern Aegean from October 2005 to April 2007 providing a sampling of the south Aegean lithosphere with a resolution never reached before. Because of the strong deformations in the Hellenic subduction zone and the linear approximation in solving the full waveform inverse problem, a special care was taken to guarantee the best possible accuracy of earthquakes parameters and initial reference models. The accurate locations of the selected earthquakes were hence re-estimated and the best moment tensors were selected by computing the misfits between the observed seismograms for one event and a set of synthetics calculated for every value of the fault angles (strike, dip and rake) and hypocenter depths. On the other hand, instead of using an average 1D reference model for the complete region, a 1D path-specific approach permitted to obtain the 1D initial model for each source-receiver pair by waveform fitting using a grid search varying the Moho depth and the average S-wave velocity in the crust. These models were then refined by a 1D inversion and used to calculate the sensitivity kernels for each source-receiver pair. For the inversion, we adopted a special formulation including a correction term which permits to use the path-specific sensitivity kernels in an inversion for 3D velocity perturbations relative to a single 1D reference model constructed from all these 1D initial models. The inversion was done in frequency domain with a frequency window ranging from 0.03 Hz to 0.1 Hz. For the selected 2695 paths the total number of data values reached 140140. The model was discretized in volume cells with a varying vertical width and a fixed lateral one of approximately 15 km, resulting

  18. Depiction of Achilles Tendon Microstructure In-Vivo Using High-Resolution 3D Ultrashort Echo-Time MRI at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Han, Misung; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Liu, Jing; Krug, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the feasibility of depicting the internal structure of the Achilles tendon in vivo using high-resolution 3D ultrashort echo-time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T. Materials and Methods For our UTE imaging, a minimum-phase radiofrequency pulse and an anisotropic field-of-view 3D radial acquisition were used to minimize the echo time and scan time. A fat saturation pulse was applied every eight spoke acquisitions to reduce blurring and chemical shift artifacts from fat and to improve dynamic range of the tendon signal. Five healthy volunteers and one patient were scanned with an isotropic spatial resolution of up to 0.6 mm. Fat-suppressed UTE images were qualitatively evaluated and compared to non-fat-suppressed UTE images and longer echo-time images. Results High-resolution UTE imaging was able to visualize the microstructure of the Achilles tendon. Fat suppression substantially improved the depiction of the internal structure. The UTE images revealed a fascicular pattern in the Achilles tendon and fibrocartilage at the tendon insertion. In a patient who had tendon elongation surgery after birth there was clear depiction of disrupted tendon structure. Conclusions High-resolution fat-suppressed 3D UTE imaging at 7T allows for evaluation of the Achilles tendon microstructure in vivo. PMID:24500089

  19. Educational Research in Developing 3-D Spatial Skills for Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorby, Sheryl A.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to visualize in three dimensions is a cognitive skill that has been shown to be important for success in engineering and other technological fields. For engineering, the ability to mentally rotate 3-D objects is especially important. Unfortunately, of all the cognitive skills, 3-D rotation abilities exhibit robust gender differences,…

  20. Full Spatial Resolution Infrared Sounding Application in the Preconvection Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, G.; Lin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced infrared (IR) sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) provide atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles with high vertical resolution and high accuracy in preconvection environments. The derived atmospheric stability indices such as convective available potential energy (CAPE) and lifted index (LI) from advanced IR soundings can provide critical information 1 ; 6 h before the development of severe convective storms. Three convective storms are selected for the evaluation of applying AIRS full spatial resolution soundings and the derived products on providing warning information in the preconvection environments. In the first case, the AIRS full spatial resolution soundings revealed local extremely high atmospheric instability 3 h ahead of the convection on the leading edge of a frontal system, while the second case demonstrates that the extremely high atmospheric instability is associated with the local development of severe thunderstorm in the following hours. The third case is a local severe storm that occurred on 7-8 August 2010 in Zhou Qu, China, which caused more than 1400 deaths and left another 300 or more people missing. The AIRS full spatial resolution LI product shows the atmospheric instability 3.5 h before the storm genesis. The CAPE and LI from AIRS full spatial resolution and operational AIRS/AMSU soundings along with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Sounder derived product image (DPI) products were analyzed and compared. Case studies show that full spatial resolution AIRS retrievals provide more useful warning information in the preconvection environments for determining favorable locations for convective initiation (CI) than do the coarser spatial resolution operational soundings and lower spectral resolution GOES Sounder retrievals. The retrieved soundings are also tested in a regional data assimilation WRF 3D-var system to evaluate the

  1. High-resolution 3-D imaging of surface damage sites in fused silica with Optical Coherence Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, G; Bass, I; Hackel, R; Mailhiot, C; Demos, S G

    2007-10-30

    In this work, we present the first successful demonstration of a non-contact technique to precisely measure the 3D spatial characteristics of laser induced surface damage sites in fused silica for large aperture laser systems by employing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). What makes OCT particularly interesting in the characterization of optical materials for large aperture laser systems is that its axial resolution can be maintained with working distances greater than 5 cm, whether viewing through air or through the bulk of thick optics. Specifically, when mitigating surface damage sites against further growth by CO{sub 2} laser evaporation of the damage, it is important to know the depth of subsurface cracks below the damage site. These cracks are typically obscured by the damage rubble when imaged from above the surface. The results to date clearly demonstrate that OCT is a unique and valuable tool for characterizing damage sites before and after the mitigation process. We also demonstrated its utility as an in-situ diagnostic to guide and optimize our process when mitigating surface damage sites on large, high-value optics.

  2. High-resolution, real-time simultaneous 3D surface geometry and temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    An, Yatong; Zhang, Song

    2016-06-27

    This paper presents a method to simultaneously measure three-dimensional (3D) surface geometry and temperature in real time. Specifically, we developed 1) a holistic approach to calibrate both a structured light system and a thermal camera under exactly the same world coordinate system even though these two sensors do not share the same wavelength; and 2) a computational framework to determine the sub-pixel corresponding temperature for each 3D point as well as discard those occluded points. Since the thermal 2D imaging and 3D visible imaging systems do not share the same spectrum of light, they can perform sensing simultaneously in real time: we developed a hardware system that can achieve real-time 3D geometry and temperature measurement at 26 Hz with 768 × 960 points per frame. PMID:27410608

  3. 3D printing of high-resolution PLA-based structures by hybrid electrohydrodynamic and fused deposition modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Seong, Baekhoon; Nguyen, VuDat; Byun, Doyoung

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has received much attention for shape forming and manufacturing. The fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer is one of the various 3D printers available and has become widely used due to its simplicity, low-cost, and easy operation. However, the FDM technique has a limitation whereby its patterning resolution is too low at around 200 μm. In this paper, we first present a hybrid mechanism of electrohydrodynamic jet printing with the FDM technique, which we name E-FDM. We then develop a novel high-resolution 3D printer based on the E-FDM process. To determine the optimal condition for structuring, we also investigated the effect of several printing parameters, such as temperature, applied voltage, working height, printing speed, flow-rate, and acceleration on the patterning results. This method was capable of fabricating both high resolution 2D and 3D structures with the use of polylactic acid (PLA). PLA has been used to fabricate scaffold structures for tissue engineering, which has different hierarchical structure sizes. The fabrication speed was up to 40 mm/s and the pattern resolution could be improved to 10 μm.

  4. High resolution cone beam X-ray computed tomography of 3D-microstructures of cast Al-alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Johann; Harrer, Bernhard; Degischer, H. Peter

    2011-01-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important method for non-destructive 3D-characterisation of materials. XCT systems with cone beam geometry, micro- or nano-focus tubes and matrix detectors are increasingly used in research and non-destructive testing. Spatial resolutions down to 1 {mu}m can be reached with such XCT-systems for heterogeneities in metals with high absorption contrast. High resolution cone beam XCT is applied to five different Al-alloys: AlMg5Si7, AlCu4Mg1, AlZn6Mg2Cu2, AlZn8Mg2Cu2 and AlSi12Ni1. Up to four different types of inhomogeneities are segmented in one alloy using voxel sizes between (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} and (2.3 {mu}m){sup 3}. Target metallography and elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis are used to identify the inhomogeneities. The possibilities and restrictions of XCT applied to Al-alloys are discussed. AlMg5Si7 XCT-data with a voxel size of (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} show inhomogeneities with brighter grey-values than the Al-matrix identified as elongated Fe-aluminides, and those with lower grey-values identified as pores and Mg{sub 2}Si-particles with a 'Chinese script-like' structure. Higher-absorbing interdendritic Al-Al{sub 2}Cu-eutectic regions appear brighter than the Al-dendrites in the CT-data of AlCu4Mg1 with (1.1 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, whereas pores > 4 {mu}m appear darker than the Al-matrix. The size and the 3D-structure of the {alpha}-Al dendrite arms with a diameter of 50-100 {mu}m are determined in samples from chill cast billets of AlCu4Mg1 and AlZn6Mg2Cu2 alloys. The irregular interdendritic regions containing eutectic segregations with Cu- and Zn-rich phases are > 5 {mu}m wide. Equally absorbing primary equi-axed Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles > 5 {mu}m are distinguished in the centres of the dendrites by the level of sphericity values. The distribution of Ni- and Fe-aluminides in a squeeze cast AlSi12Ni1-alloy is imaged with (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, but the Si-phase cannot be segmented.

  5. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  6. High-resolution 3D seismic data characterize fluid flow systems in the SW Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Stefan; Mienert, Jürgen; Rajan, Anupama

    2010-05-01

    The flow of fluids through marine sediments is one of the most dominant and pervasive processes in continental margins. These processes control the evolution of a sedimentary basin and its seafloor environment, and have implications for hydrocarbon exploration and seabed ecosystems. Many seep sites at the seafloor are associated with large but complex faunal communities that have received significant attention in recent years. However, there is a need for a better understanding of the driving mechanism of fluid flow in various geological settings, the accumulation of fluids in the subsurface and their focused flow through conduits and/or faults to the seabed. The Barents Sea is a large hydrocarbon-prone basin of the Norwegian Arctic region. A significant portion of the hydrocarbons has leaked or migrated into the shallow subsurface and is now trapped in gas-hydrate and shallow-gas reservoirs. Furthermore, there are few places in the Barents Sea, where methane gas is leaking from the seafloor into the oceanosphere. Accumulations of free gas in the shallow subsurface are considered a geohazard. They constitute a risk for safe drilling operations and they may pose a threat to global climate if the seal that is trapping them is breached. P-Cable 3D high-resolution seismic data from the Ringvassøya Fault Complex and the Polheim Sub-Platform provide new and detailed insight into fluid flow controls and accumulation mechanisms. The data shows a wide variety of fluid flow features, mostly in the form of pockmarks, bright spots, wipe-out zones or vertical zones of disturbed reflectivity. Fluids migrate by both diapiric mechanism and channelized along sedimentary layers. Glacigenic sediments generally form a strong boundary for fluid flow in the very shallow section. However, we can recognize pockmarks not only at the seafloor but also at one subsurface layer approximately 50 m below sea floor indicating a former venting period in the SW Barents Sea. At few locations high

  7. Automated detection, 3D segmentation and analysis of high resolution spine MR images using statistical shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Fripp, J.; Engstrom, C.; Schwarz, R.; Lauer, L.; Salvado, O.; Crozier, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine provide a basis for the automated assessment of intervertebral disc (IVD) and vertebral body (VB) anatomy. High resolution three-dimensional (3D) morphological information contained in these images may be useful for early detection and monitoring of common spine disorders, such as disc degeneration. This work proposes an automated approach to extract the 3D segmentations of lumbar and thoracic IVDs and VBs from MR images using statistical shape analysis and registration of grey level intensity profiles. The algorithm was validated on a dataset of volumetric scans of the thoracolumbar spine of asymptomatic volunteers obtained on a 3T scanner using the relatively new 3D T2-weighted SPACE pulse sequence. Manual segmentations and expert radiological findings of early signs of disc degeneration were used in the validation. There was good agreement between manual and automated segmentation of the IVD and VB volumes with the mean Dice scores of 0.89 ± 0.04 and 0.91 ± 0.02 and mean absolute surface distances of 0.55 ± 0.18 mm and 0.67 ± 0.17 mm respectively. The method compares favourably to existing 3D MR segmentation techniques for VBs. This is the first time IVDs have been automatically segmented from 3D volumetric scans and shape parameters obtained were used in preliminary analyses to accurately classify (100% sensitivity, 98.3% specificity) disc abnormalities associated with early degenerative changes.

  8. Designing Spatial Visualisation Tasks for Middle School Students with a 3D Modelling Software: An Instrumental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih; Uygan, Candas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, certain task designs to enhance middle school students' spatial visualisation ability, in the context of an instrumental approach, have been developed. 3D modelling software, SketchUp®, was used. In the design process, software tools were focused on and, thereafter, the aim was to interpret the instrumental genesis and spatial…

  9. 3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyeon; Kim, Dong-Eun; Sohn, MyungHee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness of 3D simulation technology for enhancing spatial visualization skills in apparel design education and further to suggest an innovative teaching approach using the technology. Apparel design majors in an introductory patternmaking course, at a large Midwestern University in the United…

  10. Adaptive multi-resolution 3D Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solver for nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J. C.; Fann, G. I.; Harrison, R. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Shi, Yue; Thornton, S.

    2014-08-01

    Background: Complex many-body systems, such as triaxial and reflection-asymmetric nuclei, weakly bound halo states, cluster configurations, nuclear fragments produced in heavy-ion fusion reactions, cold Fermi gases, and pasta phases in neutron star crust, are all characterized by large sizes and complex topologies in which many geometrical symmetries characteristic of ground-state configurations are broken. A tool of choice to study such complex forms of matter is an adaptive multi-resolution wavelet analysis. This method has generated much excitement since it provides a common framework linking many diversified methodologies across different fields, including signal processing, data compression, harmonic analysis and operator theory, fractals, and quantum field theory. Purpose: To describe complex superfluid many-fermion systems, we introduce an adaptive pseudospectral method for solving self-consistent equations of nuclear density functional theory in three dimensions, without symmetry restrictions. Methods: The numerical method is based on the multi-resolution and computational harmonic analysis techniques with a multi-wavelet basis. The application of state-of-the-art parallel programming techniques include sophisticated object-oriented templates which parse the high-level code into distributed parallel tasks with a multi-thread task queue scheduler for each multi-core node. The internode communications are asynchronous. The algorithm is variational and is capable of solving coupled complex-geometric systems of equations adaptively, with functional and boundary constraints, in a finite spatial domain of very large size, limited by existing parallel computer memory. For smooth functions, user-defined finite precision is guaranteed. Results: The new adaptive multi-resolution Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) solver madness-hfb is benchmarked against a two-dimensional coordinate-space solver hfb-ax that is based on the B-spline technique and a three-dimensional solver

  11. The potential of 3D-FISH and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for studies of 3D nuclear architecture: 3D structured illumination microscopy of defined chromosomal structures visualized by 3D (immuno)-FISH opens new perspectives for studies of nuclear architecture.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Fiedler, Susanne; Schmid, Volker J; Schermelleh, Lothar; Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) has opened up new possibilities to study nuclear architecture at the ultrastructural level down to the ~100 nm range. We present first results and assess the potential using 3D-SIM in combination with 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) for the topographical analysis of defined nuclear targets. Our study also deals with the concern that artifacts produced by FISH may counteract the gain in resolution. We address the topography of DAPI-stained DNA in nuclei before and after 3D-FISH, nuclear pores and the lamina, chromosome territories, chromatin domains, and individual gene loci. We also look at the replication patterns of chromocenters and the topographical relationship of Xist-RNA within the inactive X-territory. These examples demonstrate that an appropriately adapted 3D-FISH/3D-SIM approach preserves key characteristics of the nuclear ultrastructure and that the gain in information obtained by 3D-SIM yields new insights into the functional nuclear organization. PMID:22508100

  12. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures.

    PubMed

    Zenou, M; Sa'ar, A; Kotler, Z

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  13. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    PubMed Central

    Zenou, M.; Sa’ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures. PMID:26602432

  14. Laser jetting of femto-liter metal droplets for high resolution 3D printed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'Ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is employed in a special, high accuracy jetting regime, by adequately matching the sub-nanosecond pulse duration to the metal donor layer thickness. Under such conditions, an effective solid nozzle is formed, providing stability and directionality to the femto-liter droplets which are printed from a large gap in excess of 400 μm. We illustrate the wide applicability of this method by printing several 3D metal objects. First, very high aspect ratio (A/R > 20), micron scale, copper pillars in various configuration, upright and arbitrarily bent, then a micron scale 3D object composed of gold and copper. Such a digital printing method could serve the generation of complex, multi-material, micron-scale, 3D materials and novel structures.

  15. Mars US rover traverse co-registration using multi-resolution Orbital 3D imaging datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, W. D.

    2013-09-01

    Co-registered 3D Digital terrain Models (DTMs) and orthorectified imaging (ORI) orbital datasets have been produced of all the major US Mars landing sites. These have been sourced from HiRise, HRSC and MOLA. Co-registration was achieved using manual tiepointing within ARCgis v10. These DTM and ORI products were sourced from publicly available datasets or from EU-FP7-PRoViSG partners or generated using internal UCL 3D-RPIF [1] resources. For rover traverses, this results in substantial transformations which implies that all the SPICE kernels will need to be recomputed.

  16. A hybrid 3D spatial access method based on quadtrees and R-trees for globe data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jun; Ke, Shengnan; Li, Xiaomin; Qi, Shuhua

    2009-10-01

    3D spatial access method for globe data is very crucial technique for virtual earth. This paper presents a brand-new maintenance method to index 3d objects distributed on the whole surface of the earth, which integrates the 1:1,000,000- scale topographic map tiles, Quad-tree and R-tree. Furthermore, when traditional methods are extended into 3d space, the performance of spatial index deteriorates badly, for example 3D R-tree. In order to effectively solve this difficult problem, a new algorithm of dynamic R-tree is put forward, which includes two sub-procedures, namely node-choosing and node-split. In the node-choosing algorithm, a new strategy is adopted, not like the traditional mode which is from top to bottom, but firstly from bottom to top then from top to bottom. This strategy can effectively solve the negative influence of node overlap. In the node-split algorithm, 2-to-3 split mode substitutes the traditional 1-to-2 mode, which can better concern the shape and size of nodes. Because of the rational tree shape, this R-tree method can easily integrate the concept of LOD. Therefore, it will be later implemented in commercial DBMS and adopted in time-crucial 3d GIS system.

  17. The spatial resolution of epidemic peaks.

    PubMed

    Mills, Harriet L; Riley, Steven

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of novel respiratory pathogens can challenge the capacity of key health care resources, such as intensive care units, that are constrained to serve only specific geographical populations. An ability to predict the magnitude and timing of peak incidence at the scale of a single large population would help to accurately assess the value of interventions designed to reduce that peak. However, current disease-dynamic theory does not provide a clear understanding of the relationship between: epidemic trajectories at the scale of interest (e.g. city); population mobility; and higher resolution spatial effects (e.g. transmission within small neighbourhoods). Here, we used a spatially-explicit stochastic meta-population model of arbitrary spatial resolution to determine the effect of resolution on model-derived epidemic trajectories. We simulated an influenza-like pathogen spreading across theoretical and actual population densities and varied our assumptions about mobility using Latin-Hypercube sampling. Even though, by design, cumulative attack rates were the same for all resolutions and mobilities, peak incidences were different. Clear thresholds existed for all tested populations, such that models with resolutions lower than the threshold substantially overestimated population-wide peak incidence. The effect of resolution was most important in populations which were of lower density and lower mobility. With the expectation of accurate spatial incidence datasets in the near future, our objective was to provide a framework for how to use these data correctly in a spatial meta-population model. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental spatial resolution for any pathogen-population pair. If underlying interactions between pathogens and spatially heterogeneous populations are represented at this resolution or higher, accurate predictions of peak incidence for city-scale epidemics are feasible. PMID:24722420

  18. Identifying Key Structural Features and Spatial Relationships in Archean Microbialites Using 2D and 3D Visualization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, E. W.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Microbialites in the 2521 ± 3 Ma Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, have several different end-member morphologies which show distinct growth structures and spatial relationships. We characterized several growth structures and spatial relationships in two samples (DK20 and 2_06) using a combination of 2D and 3D analytical techniques. There are two main goals in studying complicated microbialites with a combination of 2D and 3D methods. First, one can better understand microbialite growth by identifying important structures and structural relationships. Once structures are identified, the order in which the structures formed and how they are related can be inferred from observations of crosscutting relationships. Second, it is important to use both 2D and 3D methods to correlate 3D observations with those in 2D that are more common in the field. Combining analysis provides significantly more insight into the 3D morphology of microbial structures. In our studies, 2D analysis consisted of describing polished slabs and serial sections created by grinding down the rock 100 microns at a time. 3D analysis was performed on serial sections visualized in 3D using Vrui and 3DVisualizer software developed at KeckCAVES, UCD (http://keckcaves.org). Data were visualized on a laptop and in an immersive cave system. Both samples contain microbial laminae and more vertically orients microbial "walls" called supports. The relationships between these features created voids now filled with herringbone and blocky calcite crystals. DK20, a classic plumose structure, contains two types of support structures. Both are 1st order structures (1st order structures with organic inclusions and 1st without organic inclusions) interpreted as planar features based on 2D analysis. In the 2D analysis the 1st order structures show v branching relationships as well as single cuspate relationships (two 1st order structures with inclusions merging upward), and single tented relationships (three supports

  19. Fast high-resolution 3D total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy by incidence angle scanning and azimuthal averaging

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Jérôme; Gueudry, Charles; Münch, Daniel; Cinquin, Bertrand; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Bardin, Sabine; Guérin, Christophe; Senger, Fabrice; Blanchoin, Laurent; Salamero, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is the method of choice to visualize a variety of cellular processes in particular events localized near the plasma membrane of live adherent cells. This imaging technique not relying on particular fluorescent probes provides a high sectioning capability. It is, however, restricted to a single plane. We present here a method based on a versatile design enabling fast multiwavelength azimuthal averaging and incidence angles scanning to computationally reconstruct 3D images sequences. We achieve unprecedented 50-nm axial resolution over a range of 800 nm above the coverslip. We apply this imaging modality to obtain structural and dynamical information about 3D actin architectures. We also temporally decipher distinct Rab11a-dependent exocytosis events in 3D at a rate of seven stacks per second. PMID:25404337

  20. Does spatial variation in environmental conditions affect recruitment? A study using a 3-D model of Peruvian anchovy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Rose, Kenneth A.; Chai, Fei; Chavez, Francisco P.; Ayón, Patricia

    2015-11-01

    We used a 3-dimensional individual-based model (3-D IBM) of Peruvian anchovy to examine how spatial variation in environmental conditions affects larval and juvenile growth and survival, and recruitment. Temperature, velocity, and phytoplankton and zooplankton concentrations generated from a coupled hydrodynamic Nutrients-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model, mapped to a three dimensional rectangular grid, were used to simulate anchovy populations. The IBM simulated individuals as they progressed from eggs to recruitment at 10 cm. Eggs and yolk-sac larvae were followed hourly through the processes of development, mortality, and movement (advection), and larvae and juveniles were followed daily through the processes of growth, mortality, and movement (advection plus behavior). A bioenergetics model was used to grow larvae and juveniles. The NPZD model provided prey fields which influence both food consumption rate as well as behavior mediated movement with individuals going to grids cells having optimal growth conditions. We compared predicted recruitment for monthly cohorts for 1990 through 2004 between the full 3-D IBM and a point (0-D) model that used spatially-averaged environmental conditions. The 3-D and 0-D versions generated similar interannual patterns in monthly recruitment for 1991-2004, with the 3-D results yielding consistently higher survivorship. Both versions successfully captured the very poor recruitment during the 1997-1998 El Niño event. Higher recruitment in the 3-D simulations was due to higher survival during the larval stage resulting from individuals searching for more favorable temperatures that lead to faster growth rates. The strong effect of temperature was because both model versions provided saturating food conditions for larval and juvenile anchovies. We conclude with a discussion of how explicit treatment of spatial variation affected simulated recruitment, other examples of fisheries modeling analyses that have used a

  1. Prototype Development Capabilities of 3D Spatial Interactions and Failures During Scenario Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Tony Koonce

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a prototype for using 3D modeling and simulation engine to improve risk analysis and evaluate reactor structures and components for a given scenario. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  2. 3-D Visualisation: Using Internet-based Activities to Enhance Student Understanding of 3-dimensional Spatial Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, A. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, P.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial ability forms its own category separate from verbal ability. Various spatial abilities have been identified over the last three decades and classified into three types: mental rotation, spatial rotation and spatial visualization, which have been linked to high performance in STEM subjects. Geoscience demands spatial thinking from learners and practitioners, and spatial literacy has been seen as a fundamental skill in Geography, Earth & Environmental Sciences (GEES disciplines) essential for progression. First year GEES students not only have to cope with new learning and teaching environments (Maguire et al., 2008), but, arriving with different science backgrounds, are faced with the challenge of developing essential skills that may be novel for them. These essential skills are subject-specific, as well as transferable, and require an understanding of 3-dimensional spatial relationships. However, spatial skills can be troublesome for some students to master. Not only do many students find difficulty in acquiring spatial skills, facing a succession of hurdles that need to be overcome in developing their understanding, but also educators, often strong spatial thinkers themselves and unaware of the degree to which some students are spatially-challenged, may find it difficult to help. Recent studies have suggested that performance on abstract and applied spatial tasks may be enhanced through instruction and practice and spatially-intensive geoscience courses may strengthen performance on spatial tasks. At Liverpool, many first year geoscience modules require understanding of 3-D spatial relationships, often from initial 2-D observations (e.g. mineralogy, petrography, vulcanology, sedimentology, palaeontology, geological map work, structural geology and fieldwork). In this paper we outline work, supported by the UK Subject Centre for Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences (GEES), involving first year geosciences students at Liverpool, in which we explored

  3. 3D high resolution mineral phase distribution and seismic velocity structure of the transition zone: predicted by a full spherical-shell compressible mantle convection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Heister, T.; Van Den Berg, A. P.; Jacobs, M.; Bangerth, W.

    2011-12-01

    We present high resolution 3D results of the complex mineral phase distribution in the transition zone obtained by numerical modelling of mantle convection. We extend the work by [Jacobs and van den Berg, 2011] to 3D and illustrate the efficiency of adaptive mesh refinement for capturing the complex spatial distribution and sharp phase transitions as predicted by their model. The underlying thermodynamical model is based on lattice dynamics which allows to predict thermophysical properties and seismic wave speeds for the applied magnesium-endmember olivine-pyroxene mineralogical model. The use of 3D geometry allows more realistic prediction of phase distribution and seismic wave speeds resulting from 3D flow processes involving the Earth's transition zone and more significant comparisons with interpretations from seismic tomography and seismic reflectivity studies aimed at the transition zone. Model results are generated with a recently developed geodynamics modeling application based on dealII (www.dealii.org). We extended this model to incorporate both a general thermodynamic model, represented by P,T space tabulated thermophysical properties, and a solution strategy that allows for compressible flow. When modeling compressible flow in the so called truncated anelastic approximation framework we have to adapt the solver strategy that has been proven by several authors to be highly efficient for incompressible flow to incorporate an extra term in the continuity equation. We present several possible solution strategies and discuss their implication in terms of robustness and computational efficiency.

  4. Automatic 3D Segmentation and Quantification of Lenticulostriate Arteries from High-Resolution 7 Tesla MRA Images.

    PubMed

    Wei Liao; Rohr, Karl; Chang-Ki Kang; Zang-Hee Cho; Worz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel hybrid approach for automatic 3D segmentation and quantification of high-resolution 7 Tesla magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images of the human cerebral vasculature. Our approach consists of two main steps. First, a 3D model-based approach is used to segment and quantify thick vessels and most parts of thin vessels. Second, remaining vessel gaps of the first step in low-contrast and noisy regions are completed using a 3D minimal path approach, which exploits directional information. We present two novel minimal path approaches. The first is an explicit approach based on energy minimization using probabilistic sampling, and the second is an implicit approach based on fast marching with anisotropic directional prior. We conducted an extensive evaluation with over 2300 3D synthetic images and 40 real 3D 7 Tesla MRA images. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation shows that our approach achieves superior results compared with a previous minimal path approach. Furthermore, our approach was successfully used in two clinical studies on stroke and vascular dementia. PMID:26571526

  5. Parameter Estimation of Fossil Oysters from High Resolution 3D Point Cloud and Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricic, Ana; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Mandic, Oleg; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    A unique fossil oyster reef was excavated at Stetten in Lower Austria, which is also the highlight of the geo-edutainment park 'Fossilienwelt Weinviertel'. It provides the rare opportunity to study the Early Miocene flora and fauna of the Central Paratethys Sea. The site presents the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome formed about 16.5 million years ago in a tropical estuary of the Korneuburg Basin. About 15,000 up to 80-cm-long shells of Crassostrea gryphoides cover a 400 m2 large area. Our project 'Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef' combines methods of photogrammetry, geology and paleontology to document, evaluate and quantify the shell bed. This interdisciplinary approach will be applied to test hypotheses on the genesis of the taphocenosis (e.g.: tsunami versus major storm) and to reconstruct pre- and post-event processes. Hence, we are focusing on using visualization technologies from photogrammetry in geology and paleontology in order to develop new methods for automatic and objective evaluation of 3D point clouds. These will be studied on the basis of a very dense surface reconstruction of the oyster reef. 'Smart Geology', as extension of the classic discipline, exploits massive data, automatic interpretation, and visualization. Photogrammetry provides the tools for surface acquisition and objective, automated interpretation. We also want to stress the economic aspect of using automatic shape detection in paleontology, which saves manpower and increases efficiency during the monitoring and evaluation process. Currently, there are many well known algorithms for 3D shape detection of certain objects. We are using dense 3D laser scanning data from an instrument utilizing the phase shift measuring principle, which provides accurate geometrical basis < 3 mm. However, the situation is difficult in this multiple object scenario where more than 15,000 complete or fragmentary parts of an object with random orientation are found. The goal

  6. 3D silicon sensors with variable electrode depth for radiation hard high resolution particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Vià, C.; Borri, M.; Dalla Betta, G.; Haughton, I.; Hasi, J.; Kenney, C.; Povoli, M.; Mendicino, R.

    2015-04-01

    3D sensors, with electrodes micro-processed inside the silicon bulk using Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, were industrialized in 2012 and were installed in the first detector upgrade at the LHC, the ATLAS IBL in 2014. They are the radiation hardest sensors ever made. A new idea is now being explored to enhance the three-dimensional nature of 3D sensors by processing collecting electrodes at different depths inside the silicon bulk. This technique uses the electric field strength to suppress the charge collection effectiveness of the regions outside the p-n electrodes' overlap. Evidence of this property is supported by test beam data of irradiated and non-irradiated devices bump-bonded with pixel readout electronics and simulations. Applications include High-Luminosity Tracking in the high multiplicity LHC forward regions. This paper will describe the technical advantages of this idea and the tracking application rationale.

  7. 2.9 Å Resolution Cryo-EM 3D Reconstruction of Close-Packed Virus Particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Guo, Fei; Wang, Feng; Li, Tian-Cheng; Jiang, Wen

    2016-02-01

    Single-particle cryoelectron microscopy typically discards close-packed particle images as unusable data. Here, we report an image processing strategy and case study of obtaining near-atomic resolution 3D reconstructions from close-packed particles. Multiple independent de novo initial models were constructed to determine and cross-validate the particle parameters. The particles with consistent views were further refined including not only Euler angles and center positions but also defocus, astigmatism, beam tilt, and overall and anisotropic magnification. We demonstrated this strategy with a 2.9 Å resolution reconstruction of a 1.67 MDa virus-like particle of a circovirus, PCV2, recorded on 86 photographic films. The map resolution was further validated with a phase-randomization test and local resolution assessment, and the atomic model was validated with MolProbity and EMRinger. Close-packed virus particles were thus shown not only to be useful for high-resolution 3D reconstructions but also to allow data collection at significantly improved throughput for near-atomic resolution reconstructions. PMID:26777413

  8. Exploring 3-D Virtual Reality Technology for Spatial Ability and Chemistry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Z.; Goetz, E. T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, W.; Cifuentes, L.; Kwok, O.; Davis, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the potential of Second Life® (SL), a three-dimensional (3-D) virtual world, to enhance undergraduate students' learning of a vital chemistry concept. A quasi-experimental pre-posttest control group design was used to conduct the study. A total of 387 participants completed three assignment activities either in SL or using…

  9. Does spatial arrangement of 3D plants affect light transmission and extinction coefficient within maize crops?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Row spacing effects on light interception and extinction coefficient have been inconsistent for maize (Zea mays L.) when calculated with field measurements. To avoid inconsistencies due to variable light conditions and variable leaf canopies, we used a model to describe three-dimensional (3D) shoot ...

  10. Improving the Pan-STARRs/2MASS 3-D dust map: Regularization for increased resolution and fidelity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Green, Gregory; Lee, Albert; Ford Schlafly, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Green et al. (2015) 3-D map of interstellar dust uses photometry of nearly 1 billion stars from Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS to infer the distribution of dust in the Milky Way. The current map treats each angular pixel (~ 6 arcmin) independently, and estimates the dust in 30 distance bins. However, dust structures cut across pixels and the fit could be improved by coupling the dust density in neighboring pixels. This also has the advantage that fewer stars would be required per pixel, allowing finer angular resolution. We propose a simple way to do this, and show that it allows the use of smaller angular pixels and produces sharper resolution in the distance direction for a test case in Orion. We intend to incorporate similar regularization into the next full-sky 3-D dust map.

  11. First steps toward 3D high resolution imaging using adaptive optics and full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Leonardo; Blavier, Marie; Glanc, Marie; Pouplard, Florence; Tick, Sarah; Maksimovic, Ivan; Chenegros, Guillaume; Mugnier, Laurent; Lacombe, Francois; Rousset, Gérard; Paques, Michel; Le Gargasson, Jean-François; Sahel, Jose-Alain

    2008-09-01

    We describe here two parts of our future 3D fundus camera coupling Adaptive Optics and full-field Optical Coherence Tomography. The first part is an Adaptive Optics flood imager installed at the Quinze-Vingts Hospital, regularly used on healthy and pathological eyes. A posteriori image reconstruction is performed, increasing the final image quality and field of view. The instrument lateral resolution is better than 2 microns. The second part is a full-field Optical Coherence Tomograph, which has demonstrated capability of performing a simple kind of "4 phases" image reconstruction of non biological samples and ex situ retinas. Final aim is to couple both parts in order to achieve 3D high resolution mapping of in vivo retinas.

  12. Annual to sub-annual 3D surface evolution of an Antarctic blue-ice moraine using multi-platform, multi-temporal high resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westoby, Matthew; Dunning, Stuart; Woodward, John; Hein, Andrew; Marrero, Shasta; Winter, Kate; Sugden, David

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution topographic data products are now routinely used for the geomorphological characterisation of Earth surface landforms and landscapes, whilst the acquisition and differencing of such datasets are swiftly becoming the preferred method for quantifying the transfer of mass through landscapes at the spatial scales of observation at which many processes operate. In this research, we employ 3-D differencing of repeat high-resolution topography to quantify the surface evolution of a 0.3 km2 blue-ice moraine complex in front of Patriot Hills, Antarctica. We used terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to acquire multiple overlapping 3D datasets of the moraine surface at the beginning and end of the austral summer season in 2012/2013 and during a resurvey campaign in 2014. An additional topographic dataset was acquired at the end of season 1 through the application of a Structure-from-Motion with Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) workflow to a set of aerial photographs acquired during a single unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) sortie. 3D cloud-to-cloud differencing was undertaken using the M3C2 algorithm. The results of 3D differencing revealed net uplift (median ~0.05 m) and lateral (xy) movement (median 0.02 m) of the moraine crests within season 1. Analysis of results from the longest differencing epoch (start of season 1 to season 2) suggests gradual but persistent surface uplift (median ~0.11 m) and sustained lateral movement (median ~0.05 m). Locally, lowering of a similar magnitude to uplift was observed in inter-moraine troughs and close to the current ice margin. This research demonstrates that it is possible to detect dynamic surface topographic change across glacial moraines over short timescales through the acquisition and differencing of high-resolution topographic datasets. Such data and methods of analysis offer new opportunities to understand glaciological and geomorphological process linkages in remote glacial environments.

  13. 3D reconstruction and spatial auralization of the "Painted Dolmen" of Antelas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Paulo; Campos, Guilherme; Santos, Vítor; Casaleiro, Ricardo; Seco, Ricardo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the development of a 3D audiovisual model of the Anta Pintada (painted dolmen) of Antelas, a Neolithic chamber tomb located in Oliveira de Frades and listed as Portuguese national monument. The final aim of the project is to create a highly accurate Virtual Reality (VR) model of this unique archaeological site, capable of providing not only visual but also acoustic immersion based on its actual geometry and physical properties. The project started in May 2006 with in situ data acquisition. The 3D geometry of the chamber was captured using a Laser Range Finder. In order to combine the different scans into a complete 3D visual model, reconstruction software based on the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm was developed using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK). This software computes the boundaries of the room on a 3D uniform grid and populates its interior with "free-space nodes", through an iterative algorithm operating like a torchlight illuminating a dark room. The envelope of the resulting set of "free-space nodes" is used to generate a 3D iso-surface approximating the interior shape of the chamber. Each polygon of this surface is then assigned the acoustic absorption coefficient of the corresponding boundary material. A 3D audiovisual model operating in real-time was developed for a VR Environment comprising head-mounted display (HMD) I-glasses SVGAPro, an orientation sensor (tracker) InterTrax 2 with 3 Degrees Of Freedom (3DOF) and stereo headphones. The auralisation software is based on a geometric model. This constitutes a first approach, since geometric acoustics have well-known limitations in rooms with irregular surfaces. The immediate advantage lies in their inherent computational efficiency, which allows real-time operation. The program computes the early reflections forming the initial part of the chamber's impulse response (IR), which carry the most significant cues for source localisation. These early

  14. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Satellite Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This document in the form of viewslides, reviews various low-cost alternatives to high spatial resolution thermal satellite technologies. There exists no follow-on to Landsat 7 or ASTER high spatial resolution thermal systems. This document reviews the results of the investigation in to the use of new technologies to create a low-cost useful alternative. Three suggested technologies are examined. 1. Conventional microbolometer pushbroom modes offers potential for low cost Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) thermal or ASTER capability with at least 60-120 ground sampling distance (GSD). 2. Backscanning could produce MultiSpectral Thermal Imager performance without cooled detectors. 3. Cooled detector could produce hyperspectral thermal class system or extremely high spatial resolution class instrument.

  15. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  16. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  17. Fast 3D Spatial EPR Imaging Using Spiral Magnetic Field Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yuanmu; Petryakov, Sergy; He, Guanglong; Kesselring, Eric; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Zweier, Jay L.

    2007-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) provides direct detection and mapping of free radicals. The continuous wave (CW) EPRI technique, in particular, has been widely used in a variety of applications in the fields of biology and medicine due to its high sensitivity and applicability to a wide range of free radicals and paramagnetic species. However, the technique requires long image acquisition periods, and this limits its use for many in vivo applications where relatively rapid changes occur in the magnitude and distribution of spins. Therefore, there has been a great need to develop fast EPRI techniques. We report the development of a fast 3D CW EPRI technique using spiral magnetic field gradient. By spiraling the magnetic field gradient and stepping the main magnetic field, this approach acquires a 3D image in one sweep of the main magnetic field, enabling significant reduction of the imaging time. A direct one-stage 3D image reconstruction algorithm, modified for reconstruction of the EPR images from the projections acquired with the spiral magnetic field gradient, was used. We demonstrated using a home-built L-band EPR system that the spiral magnetic field gradient technique enabled a 4 to 7-fold accelerated acquisition of projections. This technique has great potential for in vivo studies of free radicals and their metabolism. PMID:17267252

  18. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R; Murshudov, Garib N; Short, Judith M; Scheres, Sjors H W; Henderson, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  19. High-Resolution Multibeam Sonar Survey and Interactive 3-D Exploration of the D-Day Wrecks off Normandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Calder, B.; Schmidt, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Historically, archaeological investigations use sidescan sonar and marine magnetometers as initial search tools. Targets are then examined through direct observation by divers, video, or photographs. Magnetometers can demonstrate the presence, absence, and relative susceptibility of ferrous objects but provide little indication of the nature of the target. Sidescan sonar can present a clear image of the overall nature of a target and its surrounding environment, but the sidescan image is often distorted and contains little information about the true 3-D shape of the object. Optical techniques allow precise identification of objects but suffer from very limited range, even in the best of situations. Modern high-resolution multibeam sonar offers an opportunity to cover a relatively large area from a safe distance above the target, while resolving the true three-dimensional (3-D) shape of the object with centimeter-level resolution. The combination of 3-D mapping and interactive 3-D visualization techniques provides a powerful new means to explore underwater artifacts. A clear demonstration of the applicability of high-resolution multibeam sonar to wreck and artifact investigations occurred when the Naval Historical Center (NHC), the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) at the University of New Hampshire, and Reson Inc., collaborated to explore the state of preservation and impact on the surrounding environment of a series of wrecks located off the coast of Normandy, France, adjacent to the American landing sectors The survey augmented previously collected magnetometer and high-resolution sidescan sonar data using a Reson 8125 high-resolution focused multibeam sonar with 240, 0.5° (at nadir) beams distributed over a 120° swath. The team investigated 21 areas in water depths ranging from about three -to 30 meters (m); some areas contained individual targets such as landing craft, barges, a destroyer, troop carrier, etc., while others contained multiple smaller

  20. The variants of an LOD of a 3D building model and their influence on spatial analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biljecki, Filip; Ledoux, Hugo; Stoter, Jantien; Vosselman, George

    2016-06-01

    The level of detail (LOD) of a 3D city model indicates the model's grade and usability. However, there exist multiple valid variants of each LOD. As a consequence, the LOD concept is inconclusive as an instruction for the acquisition of 3D city models. For instance, the top surface of an LOD1 block model may be modelled at the eaves of a building or at its ridge height. Such variants, which we term geometric references, are often overlooked and are usually not documented in the metadata. Furthermore, the influence of a particular geometric reference on the performance of a spatial analysis is not known. In response to this research gap, we investigate a variety of LOD1 and LOD2 geometric references that are commonly employed, and perform numerical experiments to investigate their relative difference when used as input for different spatial analyses. We consider three use cases (estimation of the area of the building envelope, building volume, and shadows cast by buildings), and compute the deviations in a Monte Carlo simulation. The experiments, carried out with procedurally generated models, indicate that two 3D models representing the same building at the same LOD, but modelled according to different geometric references, may yield substantially different results when used in a spatial analysis. The outcome of our experiments also suggests that the geometric reference may have a bigger influence than the LOD, since an LOD1 with a specific geometric reference may yield a more accurate result than when using LOD2 models.

  1. Use of High Resolution 3D Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Study Brain White Matter Development in Live Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yu; McMurray, Matthew S.; Oguz, Ipek; Yuan, Hong; Styner, Martin A.; Lin, Weili; Johns, Josephine M.; An, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    High resolution diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can provide important information on brain development, yet it is challenging in live neonatal rats due to the small size of neonatal brain and motion-sensitive nature of DTI. Imaging in live neonatal rats has clear advantages over fixed brain scans, as longitudinal and functional studies would be feasible to understand neuro-developmental abnormalities. In this study, we developed imaging strategies that can be used to obtain high resolution 3D DTI images in live neonatal rats at postnatal day 5 (PND5) and PND14, using only 3 h of imaging acquisition time. An optimized 3D DTI pulse sequence and appropriate animal setup to minimize physiological motion artifacts are the keys to successful high resolution 3D DTI imaging. Thus, a 3D rapid acquisition relaxation enhancement DTI sequence with twin navigator echoes was implemented to accelerate imaging acquisition time and minimize motion artifacts. It has been suggested that neonatal mammals possess a unique ability to tolerate mild-to-moderate hypothermia and hypoxia without long term impact. Thus, we additionally utilized this ability to minimize motion artifacts in magnetic resonance images by carefully suppressing the respiratory rate to around 15/min for PND5 and 30/min for PND14 using mild-to-moderate hypothermia. These imaging strategies have been successfully implemented to study how the effect of cocaine exposure in dams might affect brain development in their rat pups. Image quality resulting from this in vivo DTI study was comparable to ex vivo scans. fractional anisotropy values were also similar between the live and fixed brain scans. The capability of acquiring high quality in vivo DTI imaging offers a valuable opportunity to study many neurological disorders in brain development in an authentic living environment. PMID:22013426

  2. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  3. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab

  4. A 3-D spectral-element and frequency-wave number hybrid method for high-resolution seismic array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tseng, Tai-Lin; Hung, Shu-Huei; Chen, Chin-Wu; Basini, Piero; Liu, Qinya

    2014-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid method that interfaces the spectral-element method (SEM) with the frequency-wave number (FK) technique to model the propagation of teleseismic plane waves beneath seismic arrays. The accuracy of the resulting 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method is benchmarked against semianalytical FK solutions for 1-D models. The accuracy of 2.5-D modeling based on 2-D SEM-FK hybrid method is also investigated through comparisons to this 3-D hybrid method. Synthetic examples for structural models of the Alaska subduction zone and the central Tibet crust show that this method is capable of accurately capturing interactions between incident plane waves and local heterogeneities. This hybrid method presents an essential tool for the receiver function and scattering imaging community to verify and further improve their techniques. These numerical examples also show the promising future of the 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method in high-resolution regional seismic imaging based on waveform inversions of converted/scattered waves recorded by seismic array.

  5. Automatic Building Damage Detection Method Using High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images and 3d GIS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jihui; Sui, Haigang; Feng, Wenqing; Song, Zhina

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a novel approach of building damaged detection is proposed using high resolution remote sensing images and 3D GIS-Model data. Traditional building damage detection method considers to detect damaged building due to earthquake, but little attention has been paid to analyze various building damaged types(e.g., trivial damaged, severely damaged and totally collapsed.) Therefore, we want to detect the different building damaged type using 2D and 3D feature of scenes because the real world we live in is a 3D space. The proposed method generalizes that the image geometric correction method firstly corrects the post-disasters remote sensing image using the 3D GIS model or RPC parameters, then detects the different building damaged types using the change of the height and area between the pre- and post-disasters and the texture feature of post-disasters. The results, evaluated on a selected study site of the Beichuan earthquake ruins, Sichuan, show that this method is feasible and effective in building damage detection. It has also shown that the proposed method is easily applicable and well suited for rapid damage assessment after natural disasters.

  6. Multicolor 3D super-resolution imaging by quantum dot stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianquan; Tehrani, Kayvan F; Kner, Peter

    2015-03-24

    We demonstrate multicolor three-dimensional super-resolution imaging with quantum dots (QSTORM). By combining quantum dot asynchronous spectral blueing with stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy and adaptive optics, we achieve three-dimensional imaging with 24 nm lateral and 37 nm axial resolution. By pairing two short-pass filters with two appropriate quantum dots, we are able to image single blueing quantum dots on two channels simultaneously, enabling multicolor imaging with high photon counts. PMID:25703291

  7. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of

  8. Brief communication: Impact of mesh resolution for MISMIP and MISMIP3d experiments using Elmer/Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardini, O.; Brondex, J.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Tavard, L.; Peyaud, V.; Durand, G.

    2016-02-01

    The dynamical contribution of marine ice sheets to sea level rise is largely controlled by grounding line (GL) dynamics. Two marine ice sheet model intercomparison exercises, namely MISMIP and MISMIP3d, have been proposed to the community to test and compare the ability of models to capture the GL dynamics. Both exercises are known to present a discontinuity of the friction at the GL, which is believed to increase the model sensitivity to mesh resolution. Here, using Elmer/Ice, the only Stokes model which completed both intercomparisons, the sensitivity to the mesh resolution is studied from an extended MISMIP experiment in which the friction continuously decreases over a transition distance and equals zero at the GL. Using this MISMIP-like setup, it is shown that the sensitivity to the mesh resolution is not improved for a vanishing friction at the GL. For the original MISMIP experiment, i.e. for a discontinuous friction at the GL, we further show that the results are moreover very sensitive to the way the friction is interpolated in the close vicinity of the GL. In the light of these new insights, and thanks to increased computing resources, new results for the MISMIP3d experiments obtained for higher resolutions than previously published are made available for future comparisons as the Supplement.

  9. [High-resolution 3-D imaging in MR tomographic knee joint diagnosis. Correlation with arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Högerle, S; Sievers, K W; Albrecht, T; Letsch, R; Löhr, E

    1994-10-01

    84 knee joints were examined by a 3-dimensional MR method and the results correlated with subsequent arthroscopy. The findings showed good demonstration of the normal anatomical structures and excellent reliability for the diagnosis of meniscus tears (sensitivity 91%, specificity 95%), cruciate ligament lesions (sensitivity 90%, specificity 99%) and serious cartilage damage (sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%). Demonstration of mild cartilage damage (sensitivity 60%, specificity 99%) was better than with a spin echo technique but is not yet optimal. It is concluded that, by using a 3-dimensional technique, time-consuming spin echo sequences can be abandoned. Significant advantages of the 3-D method are the speed of the examination, narrow section thickness, marked flexibility in contrast rendering and the ability for multiplanar reconstruction. PMID:7948981

  10. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS-SPM instrument.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Yves; Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Using the recently developed SIMS-SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  11. High-Resolution 3D Structure Determination of Kaliotoxin by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Korukottu, Jegannath; Schneider, Robert; Vijayan, Vinesh; Lange, Adam; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy can provide structural information of proteins that cannot be studied by X-ray crystallography or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to determine a protein structure by solid-state NMR to a resolution comparable to that by solution NMR. Using an iterative assignment and structure calculation protocol, a large number of distance restraints was extracted from 1H/1H mixing experiments recorded on a single uniformly labeled sample under magic angle spinning conditions. The calculated structure has a coordinate precision of 0.6 Å and 1.3 Å for the backbone and side chain heavy atoms, respectively, and deviates from the structure observed in solution. The approach is expected to be applicable to larger systems enabling the determination of high-resolution structures of amyloid or membrane proteins. PMID:18523586

  12. Quantitative 3D petrography using X-ray tomography 2: Combining information at various resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.

    2010-12-02

    X-ray tomography is a nondestructive technique that can be used to study rocks and other materials in three dimensions over a wide range of sizes. Samples that range from decimeters to micrometers in size can be analyzed, and micrometer- to centimeter-sized crystals, vesicles, and other particles can be identified and quantified. In many applications, quantification of a large spectrum of sizes is important, but this cannot be easily accomplished using a single tomogram due to a common trade-off between sample size and image resolution. This problem can be circumvented by combining tomograms acquired for a single sample at a variety of resolutions. We have successfully applied this method to obtain crystal size distributions (CSDs) for magnetite, pyroxene + biotite, and quartz + feldspar in Bishop Tuff pumice. Five cylinders of systematically varying size (1-10 mm diameter and height) were analyzed from each of five pumice clasts. Cylinder size is inversely proportional to image resolution, such that resolution ranges from 2.5 to 17 {micro}m/voxel with increasing sample size. This allows quantification of crystals 10-1000 {micro}m in size. We obtained CSDs for each phase in each sample by combining information from all resolutions, each size bin containing data from the resolution that best characterizes crystals of that size. CSDs for magnetite and pyroxene + biotite in late-erupted Bishop pumice obtained using this method are fractal, but do not seem to result from crystal fragmentation. CSDs for quartz + feldspar reveal a population of abundant crystals <35 {micro}m in size, and a population of crystals >50 {micro}m in size, which will be the focus of a separate publication.

  13. Geostatistical analysis of 3D microCT images of porous media for stochastic upscaling of spatially variable reactive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The 3D imaging of porous media through micro tomography allows the characterization of porous space and mineral abundances with unprecedented resolution. Such images can be used to perform computational determination of permeability and to obtain a realistic measure of the mineral surfaces exposed to fluid flow and thus to chemical interactions. However, the volume of the plugs that can be analysed with such detail is in the order of 1 cm3, so that their representativity at a larger scale, i.e. as needed for reactive transport modelling at Darcy scale, is questionable at best. In fact, the fine scale heterogeneity (from plug to plug at few cm distance within the same core) would originate substantially different readings of the investigated properties. Therefore, a comprehensive approach including the spatial variability and heterogeneity at the micro- and plug scale needs to be adopted to gain full advantage from the high resolution images in view of the upscaling to Darcy scale. In the framework of the collaborative project H2STORE, micro-CT imaging of different core samples from potential H2-storage sites has been performed by partners at TU Clausthal and Jena University before and after treatment with H2/CO2 mixtures in pressurized autoclaves. We present here the workflow which has been implemented to extract the relevant features from the available data concerning the heterogeneity of the medium at the microscopic and plug scale and to correlate the observed chemical reactions and changes in the porous structure with the geometrical features of the medium. First, a multivariate indicator-based geostatistical model for the microscopic structure of the plugs has been built and fitted to the available images. This involved the implementation of exploratory analysis algorithms such as experimental indicator variograms and cross-variograms. The implemented methods are able to efficiently deal with images in the order of 10003 voxels making use of parallelization

  14. Atomic-resolution 3D structure of amyloid β fibrils: The Osaka mutation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schutz, Anne K.; Wall, Joseph; Vagt, Toni; Huber, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Oxana Y.; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Guntert, Peter; Bockmann, Anja; Glockshuber, Rudi; Meier, Beat H.

    2014-11-13

    Despite its central importance for understanding the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-resolution structural information on amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils, which are intimately linked with AD, is scarce. We report an atomic-resolution fibril structure of the Aβ 1-40 peptide with the Osaka mutation (E22Δ), associated with early-onset AD. The structure, which differs substantially from all previously proposed models, is based on a large number of unambiguous intra- and intermolecular solid-state NMR distance restraints

  15. A new method for determining the 3D spatial orientation of molar microwear.

    PubMed

    Tausch, Jeremy; Kullmer, Ottmar; Bromage, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    Many types of behavioral and dietary information can be extracted from studies of tooth microwear. Some studies have even been successful at determining the overall directionality of microwear in order to establish gross masticatory movement (Williams et al., 2009, PNAS, 106, 11194-11199). However, microwear has never been successfully visualized in situ in 3 dimensions (3D), visualized virtually and quantified. The ability to accomplish this yields information on exact masticatory movement which can then be used to address any number of eco-biological and physiological questions in extant and extinct organisms. In order to create 3D virtual reality (VR) representation of microwear, fossil molars from the Javanese Sangiran 7 (S7) Homo erectus tooth collection and from historic hunter/gatherer meta-populations were imaged, the microwear in 3 dimensions was extracted, this information was then placed back on VR representations of the molars and quantified. The methodology contained herein demonstrates the efficacy and importance of such a technique in determining gross masticatory movement in fossil and recent hominin molars. This methodology could, in theory, be applied to any organism which produces microwear on its dentition. Applications in the fields of dentistry, orthodontics, climatology and dietary and habitat reconstructions can also be envisioned. PMID:26114579

  16. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  17. Possible use of small UAV to create high resolution 3D model of vertical rock faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, János; Kerkovits, Krisztian

    2014-05-01

    One of the newest and mostly emerging acquisition technologies is the use of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to photogrammetry and remote sensing. Several successful research project or industrial use can be found worldwide (mine investigation, precision agriculture, mapping etc.) but those surveys are focusing mainly on the survey of horizontal areas. In our research a mixed acquisition method was developed and tested to create a dense, 3D model about a columnar outcrop close to Kő-hegy (Pest County). Our primary goal was to create a model whereat the pattern of different layers is clearly visible and measurable, as well as to test the robustness of our idea. Our method uses a consumer grade camera to take digital photographs about the outcrop. A small, custom made tricopter was built to carry the camera above middle and top parts of the rock, the bottom part can be photographed only from several ground positions. During the field survey ground control points were installed and measured using a kinematic correction GPS. These latter data were used during the georeferencing of generated point cloud. Free online services built on Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms and desktop software also were tested to generate the relative point cloud and for further processing and analysis.

  18. High sensitivity and high resolution element 3D analysis by a combined SIMS–SPM instrument

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Summary Using the recently developed SIMS–SPM prototype, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data was combined with topographical data from the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) module for five test structures in order to obtain accurate chemical 3D maps: a polystyrene/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PS/PVP) polymer blend, a nickel-based super-alloy, a titanium carbonitride-based cermet, a reticle test structure and Mg(OH)2 nanoclusters incorporated inside a polymer matrix. The examples illustrate the potential of this combined approach to track and eliminate artefacts related to inhomogeneities of the sputter rates (caused by samples containing various materials, different phases or having a non-flat surface) and inhomogeneities of the secondary ion extraction efficiencies due to local field distortions (caused by topography with high aspect ratios). In this respect, this paper presents the measured relative sputter rates between PVP and PS as well as in between the different phases of the TiCN cermet. PMID:26171285

  19. High resolution 3D imaging of bump-bonds by means of synchrotron radiation computed laminography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, A.; Hamann, E.; Koenig, T.; Xu, F.; Cheng, Y.; Helfen, L.; Ruat, M.; Scheel, M.; Zuber, M.; Baumbach, T.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.

    2013-12-01

    During the flip-chip bonding process of a semiconductor sensor onto readout electronics, a formation of defects may take place, like solder joint displacements, voids, cracks, pores and bridges. This may result in blind spots on the detector, which are insensitive to photons and thus reduce the detector performance. In this work, the flip-chip interconnections of selected CdTe and GaAs Medipix detectors were investigated by synchrotron radiation computed laminography at a micrometer scale. The analysis of the volume rendering proved the presence of voids in the CdTe sensor flip-chip interconnections, with sizes between 3 μm and 9 μm. These voids can be harmful for the long term use of the device, because their presence weakens the adhesive strength between a contact and the readout electronics. Consequently, their formation needs to be avoided. The GaAs Medipix detectors investigated include two sensors that were produced with different flip-chip methods. The comparison of the 3D renderings of the bump-bond interconnections in the two GaAs sensors demonstrated the presence of a misalignment in the range of 5-12 μm between pixel passivation and bump-bonds in the detector produced with an older technique. In contrast to this, no misalignment was observed for the most recently produced detector. The only remarkable observation is the presence of ``satellites'' of solder that do not compromise the detector operation.

  20. Euro-Maps 3D- A Transnational, High-Resolution Digital Surface Model For Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenthaler, A.; Barner, F.; Hass, T.; Makiola, J.; d'Angelo, P.; Reinartz, P.; Carl, S.; Steiner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Euro-Maps 3D is a homogeneous 5 m spaced digital surface model (DSM) semi-automatically derived by Euromap from 2.5 m in-flight stereo data provided by the Indian IRS-P5 Cartosat-1 satellite. This new and innovative product has been developed in close co- operation with the Remote Sensing Technology Institute (IMF) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and is being jointly exploited. The very detailed and accurate representation of the surface is achieved by using a sophisticated and well adapted algorithm implemented on the basis of the Semi-Global Matching approach. In addition, the final product includes detailed flanking information consisting of several pixel-based quality and traceability layers also including an ortho layer. The product is believed to provide maximum accuracy and transparency. The DSM product meets and exceeds HRE80 qualification standards. The DSM product will be made available transnational in a homogeneous quality for most parts of Europe, North Africa and Turkey by Euromap step-by-step. Other areas around the world are processed on demand.

  1. A Computational Framework for 3D Mechanical Modeling of Plant Morphogenesis with Cellular Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gilles, Benjamin; Hamant, Olivier; Boudaoud, Arezki; Traas, Jan; Godin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The link between genetic regulation and the definition of form and size during morphogenesis remains largely an open question in both plant and animal biology. This is partially due to the complexity of the process, involving extensive molecular networks, multiple feedbacks between different scales of organization and physical forces operating at multiple levels. Here we present a conceptual and modeling framework aimed at generating an integrated understanding of morphogenesis in plants. This framework is based on the biophysical properties of plant cells, which are under high internal turgor pressure, and are prevented from bursting because of the presence of a rigid cell wall. To control cell growth, the underlying molecular networks must interfere locally with the elastic and/or plastic extensibility of this cell wall. We present a model in the form of a three dimensional (3D) virtual tissue, where growth depends on the local modulation of wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure. The model shows how forces generated by turgor-pressure can act both cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously to drive growth in different directions. We use simulations to explore lateral organ formation at the shoot apical meristem. Although different scenarios lead to similar shape changes, they are not equivalent and lead to different, testable predictions regarding the mechanical and geometrical properties of the growing lateral organs. Using flower development as an example, we further show how a limited number of gene activities can explain the complex shape changes that accompany organ outgrowth. PMID:25569615

  2. A computational framework for 3D mechanical modeling of plant morphogenesis with cellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Boudon, Frédéric; Chopard, Jérôme; Ali, Olivier; Gilles, Benjamin; Hamant, Olivier; Boudaoud, Arezki; Traas, Jan; Godin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The link between genetic regulation and the definition of form and size during morphogenesis remains largely an open question in both plant and animal biology. This is partially due to the complexity of the process, involving extensive molecular networks, multiple feedbacks between different scales of organization and physical forces operating at multiple levels. Here we present a conceptual and modeling framework aimed at generating an integrated understanding of morphogenesis in plants. This framework is based on the biophysical properties of plant cells, which are under high internal turgor pressure, and are prevented from bursting because of the presence of a rigid cell wall. To control cell growth, the underlying molecular networks must interfere locally with the elastic and/or plastic extensibility of this cell wall. We present a model in the form of a three dimensional (3D) virtual tissue, where growth depends on the local modulation of wall mechanical properties and turgor pressure. The model shows how forces generated by turgor-pressure can act both cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously to drive growth in different directions. We use simulations to explore lateral organ formation at the shoot apical meristem. Although different scenarios lead to similar shape changes, they are not equivalent and lead to different, testable predictions regarding the mechanical and geometrical properties of the growing lateral organs. Using flower development as an example, we further show how a limited number of gene activities can explain the complex shape changes that accompany organ outgrowth. PMID:25569615

  3. Correlated fluorescence and 3D electron microscopy with high sensitivity and spatial precision

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Wanda; Schorb, Martin; Welsch, Sonja; Picco, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Correlative electron and fluorescence microscopy has the potential to elucidate the ultrastructural details of dynamic and rare cellular events, but has been limited by low precision and sensitivity. Here we present a method for direct mapping of signals originating from ∼20 fluorescent protein molecules to 3D electron tomograms with a precision of less than 100 nm. We demonstrate that this method can be used to identify individual HIV particles bound to mammalian cell surfaces. We also apply the method to image microtubule end structures bound to mal3p in fission yeast, and demonstrate that growing microtubule plus-ends are flared in vivo. We localize Rvs167 to endocytic sites in budding yeast, and show that scission takes place halfway through a 10-s time period during which amphiphysins are bound to the vesicle neck. This new technique opens the door for direct correlation of fluorescence and electron microscopy to visualize cellular processes at the ultrastructural scale. PMID:21200030

  4. A phantom with reduced complexity for spatial 3-D ultrasound calibration.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Sangita; Li, Yinbo; Molloy, Janelle; Hossack, John

    2005-08-01

    The design of a new phantom for 3-D ultrasound calibration is presented. The phantom provides a viable alternative to existing phantoms that are significantly more complex and require high precision fabrication. The phantom, referred to as a "plane-of-wires" phantom, consists of two wires mounted at the same fixed height above the bottom of a water tank. Data collection for calibration involved rotating and translating the phantom so that the wires remained in a single plane parallel to the tank bottom. The mean reconstruction accuracy of the plane-of-wires calibration is 0.66 mm at a mean depth of 12.3 mm, with a precision of 1.23 mm at the same mean depth. The calibration was used to determine the volume of a cube with known volume with an error of 2.51%. The calibration performance achieved is comparable with that of existing approaches. PMID:16085099

  5. Generation of 3D Spatially Variable Anisotropy for Groundwater Flow Simulations.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Andrea; Renard, Philippe; Courrioux, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary units generally present anisotropy in their hydraulic properties, with higher hydraulic conductivity along bedding planes, rather than perpendicular to them. This common property leads to a modeling challenge if the sedimentary structure is folded. In this paper, we show that the gradient of the geological potential used by implicit geological modeling techniques can be used to compute full hydraulic conductivity tensors varying in space according to the geological orientation. For that purpose, the gradient of the potential, a vector normal to the bedding, is used to construct a rotation matrix that allows the estimation of the 3D hydraulic conductivity tensor in a single matrix operation. A synthetic 2D cross section example is used to illustrate the method and show that flow simulations performed in such a folded environment are highly influenced by this rotating anisotropy. When using the proposed method, the streamlines follow very closely the folded formation. This is not the case with an isotropic model. PMID:25648610

  6. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ~10-20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ~74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  7. High Resolution 3d Imaging during the Construction of National Radioactive Waste Repository from BÁTAAPÁTI, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaich, A.; Deák, F.; Pötsch, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Hungarian National Radioactive Waste Repository is being built in the neighborhood of the village called Bátaapáti. The program of the new disposal facility for the low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW) is conducted by PURAM (Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management). The Bátaapáti underground research program began in February 2005, with the excavation of the two inclined exploratory tunnels. These tunnels have 30 m distance between their axes, 10% inclination and 1.7 km length, and have reached the 0 m Baltic sea-level in the Mórágy Granite Formation. The safety of nuclear repository mainly is influenced by the ground behaviour and its fracturing hence mapping of the geological features has a great importance. Because of the less stable ground, the cavern walls were shotcreted after every tunnelling advance. The site geologists were required to make the tunnel mapping after every drill and blast cycle. The time interval was short and the documenting work was unrepeatable due to the shotcrete supported walls, so it was very important to use a modern, precise system to create 3D photorealistic models of the rock surfaces on the excavated tunnel walls. We have chosen the photogrammetric method, because it has adequate resolution and quality for the photo combined 3D models. At the beginning, we had used the JointMetriX3D (JMX) system and subsequently ShapeMetriX3D (SMX) in the repository chamber excavation phase. From the acquired 3D images through geological mapping is performed as the system allows directly measuring geometric information on visible discontinuities such as dip and dip direction. Descriptive rock mass parameters such as spacing, area, roughness are instantly available. In this article we would like to continue that research having made by JMX model of a tunnel face of "TSZV" access tunnel and using SMX model of a tunnel face from "DEK" Chamber. Our studies were carried out by field engineering geologists on further

  8. High resolution processing of 3D seismic data for thin coal seam in Guqiao coal mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoling; Peng, Suping; Zou, Guangui

    2015-04-01

    Accurate identification of small faults for coal seams is very important for coal-field exploration, which can greatly improve mining efficiency and safety. However, coal seams in China are mostly thin layers, ranging from 2-5 m. Moreover, the shallow coal seam with strong reflection forms a shield underneath thin coal seam which is only about 40 m deeper. This causes great difficulty in seismic processing and interpretation. The primary concern is to obtain high-resolution seismic image of underneath thin coal seam for mining safety. In this paper, field data is carefully analyzed and fit-for-purpose solutions are adopted in order to improve the quality of reprocessed data and resolution of target coal seam. Identification of small faults has been enhanced significantly.

  9. High-resolution direct 3D printed PLGA scaffolds: print and shrink.

    PubMed

    Chia, Helena N; Wu, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional printing (3DP) produces the final part composed of the powder and binder used in fabrication. An advantage of direct 3DP is control over both the microarchitecture and macroarchitecture. Prints which use porogen incorporated in the powder result in high pore interconnectivity, uniform porosity, and defined pore size after leaching. The main limitations of direct 3DP for synthetic polymers are the use of organic solvents which can dissolve polymers used in most printheads and limited resolution due to unavoidable spreading of the binder droplet after contact with the powder. This study describes a materials processing strategy to eliminate the use of organic solvent during the printing process and to improve 3DP resolution by shrinking with a non-solvent plasticizer. Briefly, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) powder was prepared by emulsion solvent evaporation to form polymer microparticles. The printing powder was composed of polymer microparticles dry mixed with sucrose particles. After printing with a water-based liquid binder, the polymer microparticles were fused together to form a network by solvent vapor in an enclosed vessel. The sucrose is removed by leaching and the resulting scaffold is placed in a solution of methanol. The methanol acts as a non-solvent plasticizer and allows for polymer chain rearrangement and efficient packing of polymer chains. The resulting volumetric shrinkage is ∼80% at 90% methanol. A complex shape (honey-comb) was designed, printed, and shrunken to demonstrate isotropic shrinking with the ability to reach a final resolution of ∼400 μm. The effect of type of alcohol (i.e. methanol or ethanol), concentration of alcohol, and temperature on volumetric shrinking was studied. This study presents a novel materials processing strategy to overcome the main limitations of direct 3DP to produce high resolution PLGA scaffolds. PMID:25514829

  10. High-Resolution 3D Bathymetric Mapping for Small Streams Using Low-Altitude Aerial Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, J. T.; Duffin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomorphic monitoring of river restoration projects is a critical component of measuring their success. In smaller streams, with depths less than 2 meters, one of the more difficult variables to map at high-resolution is bathymetry. In larger rivers, bathymetry can be measured with instruments like multi-beam sonar, bathymetric airborne LiDAR, or acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP). However, these systems are often limited by their minimum operating depths, which makes them ineffective in shallow water. Remote sensing offers several potential solutions for collecting bathymetry, spectral depth mapping and photogrammetric measurement (e.g. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) multi-view photogrammetry). In this case study, we use SfM to produce both high-resolution above water topography and below water bathymetry for two reaches of a stream restoration project on the Middle Fork of the John Day River in eastern Oregon and one reach on the White River in Vermont. We collected low-allitude multispectral (RGB+NIR) aerial photography at all of the sites at altitudes of 30 to 50 meters. The SfM survey was georeferenced with RTK-GPS ground control points and the bathymetry was refraction-corrected using additional RTK-GPS sample points. The resulting raster data products have horizontal resolutions of ~4-8 centimeters for the topography and ~8-15 cm for the bathymetry. This methodology, like many fluvial remote sensing methods, will only work under ideal conditions (e.g. clear water), but it provides an additional tool for collecting high-resolution bathymetric datasets for geomorphic monitoring efforts.

  11. Sub-millimeter resolution 3D optical imaging of living tissue using laminar optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Burgess, Sean A.

    2009-01-01

    In-vivo imaging of optical contrast in living tissues can allow measurement of functional parameters such as blood oxygenation and detection of targeted and active fluorescent contrast agents. However, optical imaging must overcome the effects of light scattering, which limit the penetration depth and can affect quantitation and sensitivity. This article focuses on a technique for high-resolution, high-speed depth-resolved optical imaging of superficial living tissues called laminar optical tomography (LOT), which is capable of imaging absorbing and fluorescent contrast in living tissues to depths of 2–3 mm with 100–200 micron resolution. An overview of the advantages and challenges of in-vivo optical imaging is followed by a review of currently available techniques for high-resolution optical imaging of tissues. LOT is then described, including a description of the imaging system design and discussion of data analysis and image reconstruction approaches. Examples of recent applications of LOT are then provided and compared to other existing technologies. By measuring multiply-scattered light, Laminar Optical Tomography can probe beneath the surface of living tissues such as the skin and brain. PMID:19844595

  12. High-resolution 3D OCT imaging with a MEMS scanning endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li S.; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Wu, Ming C.; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Herz, Paul R.; Chen, Yu; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional imaging is achieved by optical coherence tomography (OCT) integrated with a two-axis MEMS scanner to enable noninvasive volume imaging of biological tissues. The longitudinal scan is obtained by optical coherence interferometry. The transverse scan is obtained by tilting the two-axis MEMS mirror to scan the optical beam across the target. High-resolution OCT imaging has enabled in vivo observation of tissue architectural layers and differentiation of normal from tumor lesions within the human gastrointestinal tract. MEMS scanner based catheters with distal beam scanning can image with higher speed, precision, and repeatability than conventional linear scanning catheters. In this work, a 1-mm diameter MEMS scanning mirror with collimator and focusing optics is integrated into a compact 5-mm diameter package that is compatible with limited space in the endoscope. A large fill factor mirror provides high aperture over large scan angle and frequencies of hundreds of Hz in both axes. Using a broadband femtosecond laser light source, high axial image resolution of ~5 um is achieved at 1.06 um wavelength. Transverse resolution of ~ 12-um is demonstrated for cross-sectional image with the endoscope.

  13. MExLab Planetary Geoportal: 3D-access to planetary images and results of spatial data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, I.; Garov, A.

    2015-10-01

    MExLab Planetary Geoportal was developed as Geodesy and Cartography Node which provide access to results of study of celestial bodies such as DEM and orthoimages, as well as basemaps, crater catalogues and derivative products: slope, roughness, crater density (http://cartsrv.mexlab.ru/geoportal). The main feature of designed Geoportal is the ability of spatial queries and access to the contents selecting from the list of available data set (Phobos, Mercury, Moon, including Lunokhod's archive data). Prior version of Geoportal has been developed using Flash technology. Now we are developing new version which will use 3D-API (OpenGL, WebGL) based on shaders not only for standard 3D-functionality, but for 2D-mapping as well. Users can obtain quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the objects in graphical, tabular and 3D-forms. It will bring the advantages of unification of code and speed of processing and provide a number of functional advantages based on GIS-tools such as: - possibility of dynamic raster transform for needed map projection; - effective implementation of the co-registration of planetary images by combining spatial data geometries; - presentation in 3D-form different types of data, including planetary atmospheric measurements, subsurface radar data, ect. The system will be created with a new software architecture, which has a potential for development and flexibility in reconfiguration based on cross platform solution: - an application for the three types of platforms: desktop (Windows, Linux, OSX), web platform (any HTML5 browser), and mobile application (Android, iOS); - a single codebase shared between platforms (using cross compilation for Web); - a new telecommunication solution to connect between modules and external system like PROVIDE WebGIS (http://www.provide-space.eu/progis/). The research leading to these result was partly supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n

  14. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Mory, Cyril; Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo; Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk; Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D.; Rit, Simon; Peyrin, Françoise; Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  15. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús; Máynez, Leticia O.; Vergara Villegas, Osslan O.; Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G.

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  16. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, T.; Philipp, P.; Audinot, J.-N.; Dowsett, D.; Eswara, S.

    2015-10-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  17. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, T; Philipp, P; Audinot, J-N; Dowsett, D; Eswara, S

    2015-10-30

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM). PMID:26436905

  18. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 ‑ 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  19. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Early Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions using a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and a mantle potential temperature increase (ΔTp, compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanics and plutonics. For an increase in mantle potential temperature ΔTp= 250 K, presumably corresponding to an Archean mantle, models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of magmatism, which in turn influence the dynamics. In a first active phase (10-20 Ma) rising diapirs within the crust lead to the formation of the typical dome and keel pattern (e.g. Kaapvaal craton in South Africa, Pilbara craton in northwest Australia). A long passive phase follows with strong growth of crust and lithosphere. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermal-chemical instabilities assisted by lower crust eclogitization. Eclogitization depth is reached after ~80 Ma and linear or cylindrical drips originate at the crust or lithosphere bottom. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere then occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within the next 20 Ma.

  20. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2014-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. For a minor increase in temperature ΔTp < 175 K a subduction-collision style ensues which is largely similar to present day plate tectonics. For a moderate increase in ΔTp = 175-250 K subduction can still occur, however plates are strongly weakened and buckling, delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor style dripping of the plate is observed in addition. For higher temperatures ΔTp > 250 K no subduction can be observed anymore and tectonics is dominated by delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions and a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a thermal anomaly in the bottom temperature boundary introduces a plume. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic over dacitic to granitic depending on its source rock. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of new formed crust which in turn influences the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped plutons of mafic or felsic composition can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of upper crust, volcanics and sediments are formed. These structures look similar to, for example, the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton

  1. Bioelasticity imaging:II. Spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Larry T.; Zhu, Yanning; Hall, Timothy J.; Insana, Michael F.

    2000-04-01

    The large elasticity contrast possible with strain imaging promises new diagnostic information to augment x-ray, MRI, and ultrasound for the detection of tumors in soft tissue. In the past, we described the design of an elastographic system using the Fourier crosstalk concept introduced by Barrett and Gifford. The diagonal of the crosstalk matrix is related to the pre-sampled modulation transfer function (MTF) of the strain image. Another approach to measuring the spatial resolution of an elasticity image employs a linear frequency- modulated (chirp) strain pattern imposed upon a simulated ultrasonic echo field to study the strain modulation over a range of spatial frequencies in the image. In experiments, high contrast inclusions positioned at varying separations were imaged to apply the Rayleigh criterion for resolution measurement. We measured MTF curves that fell to 0.2 at a spatial frequency of 0.5 mm-1 to 1 mm-1 under realistic conditions. The spatial resolution for ultrasonic strain imaging strongly depends on the transducer properties and deformation patterns applied to the object. Experiments with tissue-like phantoms mimicking the properties of early breast cancer show that 2 mm spheres three times stiffer than the background can be readily resolved. Thus, the potential for using elasticity imaging to detect early breast cancers is excellent.

  2. Improving 8th Grades Spatial Thinking Abilities through a 3D Modeling Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toptas, Veli; Celik, Serkan; Karaca, E. Tugce

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of emerging technology in sub disciplines of mathematics education provides a potential for educators to elaborate the capacity of digitized learning for human being. Spatial thinking is considered as a factor of scientific deduction from a multi disciplinary point of view. This paper reports a study aimed at exploring the effect of…

  3. Effect of spatial dispersion on transient acoustic wave propagation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Every, A G

    2006-12-22

    Spatial dispersion is the variation of wave speed with wavelength. It sets in when the acoustic wavelength approaches the natural scale of length of the medium, which could, for example, be the lattice constant of a crystal, the repeat distance in a superlattice, or the grain size in a granular material. In centrosymmetric media, the first onset of dispersion is accommodated by the introduction of fourth order spatial derivatives into the wave equation. These lead to a correction to the phase velocity which is quadratic in the spatial frequency. This paper treats the effect of spatial dispersion on the point force elastodynamic Green's functions of solids. The effects of dispersion are shown to be most pronounced in the vicinity of wave arrivals. These lose their singular form, and are transformed into wave trains known as quasi-arrivals. The step and ramp function wave arrivals are treated, and it is shown that their unfolded quasi-arrival forms can be expressed in terms of integrals involving the Airy function. PMID:16828830

  4. Inferring Cross Sections of 3D Objects: A New Spatial Thinking Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Cheryl A.; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A new spatial ability test was administered online to 223 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory science courses. The 30-item multiple choice test measures individual differences in ability to identify the two-dimensional cross section of a three-dimensional geometric solid, a skill that has been identified as important in science,…

  5. Increasing axial resolution of 3D data sets using deconvolution algorithms.

    PubMed

    Topor, P; Zimanyi, M; Mateasik, A

    2011-09-01

    Deconvolution algorithms are tools for the restoration of data degraded by blur and noise. An incorporation of regularization functions into the iterative form of reconstruction algorithms can improve the restoration performance and characteristics (e.g. noise and artefact handling). In this study, algorithms based on Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm are tested. The ability of these algorithms to improve axial resolution of three-dimensional data sets is evaluated on model synthetic data. Finally, unregularized Richardson-Lucy algorithm is selected for the evaluation and reconstruction of three-dimensional chromosomal data sets of Drosophila melanogaster. Problems concerning the reconstruction process are discussed and further improvements are proposed. PMID:21599665

  6. Polarization imaging with enhanced spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinado, A.; Lizana, A.; Iemmi, C.; Campos, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and the experimental implementation of a new imaging set-up, based on Liquid Crystal technology, able to obtain super-resolved polarimetric images of polarimetric samples when the resolution is detector limited. The proposed set-up is a combination of two modules. One of them is an imaging Stokes polarimeter, based on Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal cells, which is used to analyze the polarization spatial distribution of an incident beam. The other module is used to obtain high resolved intensity images of the sample in an optical system whose resolution is mainly limited by the CCD pixel geometry. It contains a calibrated Parallel Aligned Liquid Crystal on Silicon display employed to introduce controlled linear phases. As a result, a set of different low resolved intensity images with sub-pixel displacements are captured by the CCD. By properly combining these images and after applying a deconvolution process, a super-resolved intensity image of the object is obtained. Finally, the combination of the two different optical modules permits to employ super-resolved images during the polarimetric data reduction calculation, leading to a final polarization image with enhanced spatial resolution. The proposed optical set-up performance is implemented and experimentally validated by providing super-resolved images of an amplitude resolution test and a birefringent resolution test. A significant improvement in the spatial resolution (by a factor of 1.4) of the obtained polarimetric images, in comparison with the images obtained with the regular imaging system, is clearly observed when applying our proposed technique.

  7. Fast, high-resolution 3D dosimetry utilizing a novel optical-CT scanner incorporating tertiary telecentric collimation.

    PubMed

    Sakhalkar, H S; Oldham, M

    2008-01-01

    This study introduces a charge coupled device (CCD) area detector based optical-computed tomography (optical-CT) scanner for comprehensive verification of radiation dose distributions recorded in nonscattering radiochromic dosimeters. Defining characteristics include: (i) a very fast scanning time of approximately 5 min to acquire a complete three-dimensional (3D) dataset, (ii) improved image formation through the use of custom telecentric optics, which ensures accurate projection images and minimizes artifacts from scattered and stray-light sources, and (iii) high resolution (potentially 50 microm) isotropic 3D dose readout. The performance of the CCD scanner for 3D dose readout was evaluated by comparison with independent 3D readout from the single laser beam OCTOPUS-scanner for the same PRESAGE dosimeters. The OCTOPUS scanner was considered the "gold standard" technique in light of prior studies demonstrating its accuracy. Additional comparisons were made against calculated dose distributions from the ECLIPSE treatment-planning system. Dose readout for the following treatments were investigated: (i) a single rectangular beam irradiation to investigate small field and very steep dose gradient dosimetry away from edge effects, (ii) a 2-field open beam parallel-opposed irradiation to investigate dosimetry along steep dose gradients, and (iii) a 7-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) irradiation to investigate dosimetry for complex treatment delivery involving modulation of fluence and for dosimetry along moderate dose gradients. Dose profiles, dose-difference plots, and gamma maps were employed to evaluate quantitative estimates of agreement between independently measured and calculated dose distributions. Results indicated that dose readout from the CCD scanner was in agreement with independent gold-standard readout from the OCTOPUS-scanner as well as the calculated ECLIPSE dose distribution for all treatments, except in regions within a few

  8. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Russell S.; Andersen, George J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers’ reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  9. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Russell S; Andersen, George J

    2014-06-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers' reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  10. High-resolution imaging and inversion of 3D GPR data for layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slob, Evert

    2013-04-01

    Ground penetrating radar is increasingly being used to provide quantitative information of layered structures. For application in civil engineering these can be roads, highway pavements, airport runways, bridges, tunnels, or buildings. Monitoring is important for the management and safety of these structures. Standard imaging uses a modeled wavefield extrapolator to image the data and the quality of the image depends heavily on the quality of the modeled extrapolator. Usually, data inversion is implemented by minimizing a cost function involving the measured data and the modeled data. The model is modified such that data computed from the model fits to the measured data. The data itself is not used, except as a measure of the model data fit. A recently developed alternative method is to use results from inverse scattering theory to first construct an image while all multiple reflections are simultaneously eliminated from the data. This image can be constructed from surface reflection data if the data allows separating the subsurface reflection response from the down going emitted field. For 3D waves in a layered medium this requires knowledge of all horizontal electric and magnetic field components. If the data is properly sampled the solution is unique. In layered media the plane wave decomposition allows computing the image for each angle of incidence separately as a function of image time that is equal to the one-way intercept time. Once the image is constructed for all available angles of incidence a simple matrix inversion leads to the desired electric permittivity and magnetic permeability values in each layer. Finally these values provide interval velocities that can be used to convert image time to depth and the inverse problem is solved. The theory requires infinite bandwidth frequency domain data, which is equivalent to measuring the true impulse response. This is not possible in practice and numerical results show that data with finite bandwidths can be

  11. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions using a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a hot lower thermal boundary layer is used to introduce spontaneously developing mantle plumes. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics and/or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic to granitic depending on its source rock. For a major increase in the mantle temperature, presumably corresponding to an Archean mantle (ΔTp = 200 - 300K compared to present day conditions), models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of volcanics, which in turn influence the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped felsic plutons can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of downwelling basalt and sediments are formed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermo-chemical instabilities assisted by lower crust eclogitization: linear or cylindrical drips originating at the crust or lithosphere bottom or delamination of lower crust or lithosphere. Very similar examples of dome and belt structures are still preserved in Archean cratons. One example is the Kaapvaal craton is South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, mainly built from mafic rocks and sediments, is surrounded

  12. High spatial resolution restoration of IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Inguva, R.; Dyck, H. Melvin; Canterna, R.; Hackwell, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A general technique to improve the spatial resolution of the IRAS AO data was developed at The Aerospace Corporation using the Maximum Entropy algorithm of Skilling and Gull. The technique has been applied to a variety of fields and several individual AO MACROS. With this general technique, resolutions of 15 arcsec were achieved in 12 and 25 micron images and 30 arcsec in 60 and 100 micron images. Results on galactic plane fields show that both photometric and positional accuracy achieved in the general IRAS survey are also achieved in the reconstructed images.

  13. 3D electromagnetic simulation of spatial autoresonance acceleration of electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; González, J. D.; Orozco, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The results of full electromagnetic simulations of the electron beam acceleration by a TE 112 linear polarized electromagnetic field through Space Autoresonance Acceleration mechanism are presented. In the simulations, both the self-sustaned electric field and selfsustained magnetic field produced by the beam electrons are included into the elaborated 3D Particle in Cell code. In this system, the space profile of the magnetostatic field maintains the electron beams in the acceleration regime along their trajectories. The beam current density evolution is calculated applying the charge conservation method. The full magnetic field in the superparticle positions is found by employing the trilinear interpolation of the mesh node data. The relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation presented in the centered finite difference form is solved using the Boris algorithm that provides visualization of the beam electrons pathway and energy evolution. A comparison between the data obtained from the full electromagnetic simulations and the results derived from the motion equation depicted in an electrostatic approximation is carried out. It is found that the self-sustained magnetic field is a factor which improves the resonance phase conditions and reduces the beam energy spread.

  14. Influence of spatial disorder on the superconducting state of a 3D superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Carolina; Niestemski, Francis; Giraldo-Gallo, Paula; Contryman, Alex W.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Fisher, Ian R.; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the first measurements of the local tunneling density of states on the three-dimensional superconductor BaPb1 - x BixO3 as a function of Bi doping. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements are performed on a sequence of samples which exhibit a field-tuned superconductor-to-insulator (SIT) transition. Our study shows that gap variations in the superconducting (SC) state (as a sign of SC disorder level) increase when the system moves towards the SIT phase boundary, with spatial inhomogeneity comparable in size to the material's coherence length. We demonstrate that this highly inhomogeneous local gap size is always finite at every location, even for Bi concentration closest to the SIT, where local insulating behavior is expected and globally confirmed in transport experiments. Our results also suggest a method for increasing the critical temperature for this material by reducing its spatial disorder in the appropriate part of the phase diagram.

  15. Integration of GIS, Geostatistics, and 3-D Technology to Assess the Spatial Distribution of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, M.; Tsegaye, T.; Tadesse, W.; Coleman, T. L.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of near surface soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many physical, biological, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. However, knowledge of these space-time dynamics and the processes which control them remains unclear. The integration of geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics together promise a simple mechanism to evaluate and display the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital hydrologic and physical variable. Therefore, this research demonstrates the use of geostatistics and GIS to predict and display soil moisture distribution under vegetated and non-vegetated plots. The research was conducted at the Winfred Thomas Agricultural Experiment Station (WTAES), Hazel Green, Alabama. Soil moisture measurement were done on a 10 by 10 m grid from tall fescue grass (GR), alfalfa (AA), bare rough (BR), and bare smooth (BS) plots. Results indicated that variance associated with soil moisture was higher for vegetated plots than non-vegetated plots. The presence of vegetation in general contributed to the spatial variability of soil moisture. Integration of geostatistics and GIS can improve the productivity of farm lands and the precision of farming.

  16. Diffractive control of 3D multifilamentation in fused silica with micrometric resolution.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Carbonell-Leal, Miguel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesús

    2016-07-11

    We show that a simple diffractive phase element (DPE) can be used to manipulate at will the positions and energy of multiple filaments generated in fused silica under femtosecond pulsed illumination. The method allows obtaining three-dimensional distributions of controlled filaments whose separations can be in the order of few micrometers. With such small distances we are able to study the mutual coherence among filaments from the resulted interference pattern, without needing a two-arm interferometer. The encoding of the DPE into a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) provides an extra degree of freedom to the optical set-up, giving more versatility for implementing different DPEs in real time. Our proposal might be particularly suited for applications at which an accurate manipulation of multiple filaments is required. PMID:27410807

  17. MRI data driven partial volume effects correction in PET imaging using 3D local multi-resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pogam, Adrien; Lamare, Frederic; Hatt, Mathieu; Fernandez, Philippe; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2013-02-01

    PET partial volume effects (PVE) resulting from the limited resolution of PET scanners is still a quantitative issue that PET/MRI scanners do not solve by themselves. A recently proposed voxel-based locally adaptive 3D multi-resolution PVE correction based on the mutual analysis of wavelet decompositions was applied on 12 clinical 18F-FLT PET/T1 MRI images of glial tumors, and compared to a PET only voxel-wise iterative deconvolution approach. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrated the interest of exploiting PET/MRI information with higher uptake increases (19±8% vs. 11±7%, p=0.02), as well as more convincing visual restoration of details within tumors with respect to deconvolution of the PET uptake only. Further studies are now required to demonstrate the accuracy of this restoration with histopathological validation of the uptake in tumors.

  18. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Edwards, Thayne L.; James, Conrad D.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet. PMID:27375939

  19. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Edwards, Thayne L.; James, Conrad D.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single moleculemore » super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet.« less

  20. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Meddens, Marjolein B M; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S; Edwards, Thayne L; James, Conrad D; Lidke, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet. PMID:27375939

  1. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Edwards, Thayne L.; James, Conrad D.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet.

  2. Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, O.

    2009-04-01

    Focus Variation - A New Technology for High Resolution Optical 3D Surface Metrology in the Micro- and Nanometer Range S. Scherer1, E. Cristea1, O. Huber1, A. Krenn1 1 ALICONA GmbH Graz, Austria The need for increasing accuracy is a characteristic of all geo-applications, and hence of the instruments contributing to obtaining relevant data. Small and fine sensors are being developed, measuring different parameters of our geosystem and requiring continuous validation and calibration. These sensors have often very small components (fine sensors able to sense dust, atmospheric water vapour characteristics, pressure change, gravimeters, satellite micro-components), showing complex topographies including steep flanks and having varying reflective properties. In order to get valid and reliable results, quality assurance of these instruments and sensors is required. The optical technology Focus-Variation, developed by Alicona and added in the latest draft of the upcoming ISO standard 25178, provides high resolution 3D surface metrology even at those complex topographies. The technique of Focus-Variation combines the small depth of focus of an optical system with vertical scanning to provide topographical and color information from the variation of focus. It is used for high-resolution optical 3D surface measurements. The traceable and repeatable measurement results are further being used for e.g. calibration and validation purposes. Some of the characteristics of the technology are: - Measurement of instruments / samples with steep flanks up to 80° - Measurement of materials with strongly varying reflection properties - Measurement of surfaces presenting fine (from 10nm) or strong roughness Here, we present the operating principle and possible applications of the optical 3D measurement system "InfiniteFocus", which is based on the technology of Focus-Variation. With the vertical resolution of up to 10nm, InfiniteFocus yields meaningful form and roughness measurements. The

  3. Super-resolution 3D tomography of interactions and competition in the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiong; Goryaynov, Alexander; Yang, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    A selective barrier formed by intrinsically disordered Phe-Gly (FG) nucleoporins (Nups) allows transport receptor (TR)-facilitated translocation of signal-dependent cargos through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) of eukaryotic cells. However, the configuration of the FG-Nup barrier and its interactions with multiple TRs in native NPCs remain obscure. Here, we mapped the interaction sites of various TRs or FG segments within the FG-Nup barrier by using high-speed super-resolution microscopy and used these sites to reconstruct the three-dimensional tomography of the native barrier in the NPC. We found that each TR possesses a unique interaction zone within the FG-Nup barrier and that two major TRs, importin β1 and Crm1, outcompete other TRs in binding FG Nups. Moreover, TRs may alter the tomography of the FG-Nup barrier and affect one another's pathways under circumstances of heavy competition. PMID:26878241

  4. Two-photon luminescence thermometry: towards 3D high-resolution thermal imaging of waveguides.

    PubMed

    He, Ruiyun; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez; Pedrola, Ginés Lifante; Chen, Feng; Jaque, Daniel

    2016-07-11

    We report on the use of the Erbium-based luminescence thermometry to realize high resolution, three dimensional thermal imaging of optical waveguides. Proof of concept is demonstrated in a 980-nm laser pumped ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide in Er:Yb phosphate glass. Multi-photon microscopy images revealed the existence of well confined intra-waveguide temperature increments as large as 200 °C for moderate 980-nm pump powers of 120 mW. Numerical simulations and experimental data reveal that thermal loading can be substantially reduced if pump events are separated more than the characteristic thermal time that for the waveguides investigated is in the ms time scale. PMID:27410882

  5. A Multi-Resolution Approach for an Automated Fusion of Different Low-Cost 3D Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Jan; Paulus, Stefan; Behmann, Jan; Plümer, Lutz; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The 3D acquisition of object structures has become a common technique in many fields of work, e.g., industrial quality management, cultural heritage or crime scene documentation. The requirements on the measuring devices are versatile, because spacious scenes have to be imaged with a high level of detail for selected objects. Thus, the used measuring systems are expensive and require an experienced operator. With the rise of low-cost 3D imaging systems, their integration into the digital documentation process is possible. However, common low-cost sensors have the limitation of a trade-off between range and accuracy, providing either a low resolution of single objects or a limited imaging field. Therefore, the use of multiple sensors is desirable. We show the combined use of two low-cost sensors, the Microsoft Kinect and the David laserscanning system, to achieve low-resolved scans of the whole scene and a high level of detail for selected objects, respectively. Afterwards, the high-resolved David objects are automatically assigned to their corresponding Kinect object by the use of surface feature histograms and SVM-classification. The corresponding objects are fitted using an ICP-implementation to produce a multi-resolution map. The applicability is shown for a fictional crime scene and the reconstruction of a ballistic trajectory. PMID:24763255

  6. True 3D kinematic analysis for slope instability assessment in the Siq of Petra (Jordan), from high resolution TLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigli, Giovanni; Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Ruther, Heinz; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    released, stratigraphic setting and tectonic activity can be recognized. As a consequence, rock-falls have been occurring, even recently, with unstable rock mass volumes ranging from 0.1 m3 up to over some hundreds m3. Slope instability, acceleration of crack deformation and consequent increasing of rock-fall hazard conditions, could threaten the safety of tourist as well as the integrity of the heritage. 3D surface model coming from Terrestrial Laser Scanner acquisitions was developed almost all over the site of Petra, including the Siq. Comprehensively, a point cloud of five billion points was generated making the site of Petra likely the largest scanned archaeological site in the word. As far as the Siq, the scanner was positioned on the path floor at intervals of not more than 10 meters from each station. The total number of scans in the Siq was 220 with an average point cloud interval of approximately 3 cm. Subsequently, for the definition of the main rockfall source areas, a spatial kinematic analysis for the whole Siq has been performed, by using discontinuity orientation data extracted from the point cloud by means of the software Diana. Orientation, number of sets, spacing/frequency, persistence, block size and scale dependent roughness was obtained combining fieldwork and automatic analysis. This kind of analysis is able to establish where a particular instability mechanism is kinematically feasible, given the geometry of the slope, the orientation of discontinuities and shear strength of the rock. The final outcome of this project was a detail landslide kinematic index map, reporting main potential instability mechanisms for a given area. The kinematic index was finally calibrated for each instability mechanism (plane failure; wedge failure; block toppling; flexural toppling) surveyed in the site. The latter is including the collapse occurred in May 2015, likely not producing any victim, in a sector clearly identified by the susceptibility maps produced by the

  7. a Cache Design Method for Spatial Information Visualization in 3d Real-Time Rendering Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, X.; Xiong, H.; Zheng, X.

    2012-07-01

    A well-designed cache system has positive impacts on the 3D real-time rendering engine. As the amount of visualization data getting larger, the effects become more obvious. They are the base of the 3D real-time rendering engine to smoothly browsing through the data, which is out of the core memory, or from the internet. In this article, a new kind of caches which are based on multi threads and large file are introduced. The memory cache consists of three parts, the rendering cache, the pre-rendering cache and the elimination cache. The rendering cache stores the data that is rendering in the engine; the data that is dispatched according to the position of the view point in the horizontal and vertical directions is stored in the pre-rendering cache; the data that is eliminated from the previous cache is stored in the eliminate cache and is going to write to the disk cache. Multi large files are used in the disk cache. When a disk cache file size reaches the limit length(128M is the top in the experiment), no item will be eliminated from the file, but a new large cache file will be created. If the large file number is greater than the maximum number that is pre-set, the earliest file will be deleted from the disk. In this way, only one file is opened for writing and reading, and the rest are read-only so the disk cache can be used in a high asynchronous way. The size of the large file is limited in order to map to the core memory to save loading time. Multi-thread is used to update the cache data. The threads are used to load data to the rendering cache as soon as possible for rendering, to load data to the pre-rendering cache for rendering next few frames, and to load data to the elimination cache which is not necessary for the moment. In our experiment, two threads are designed. The first thread is to organize the memory cache according to the view point, and created two threads: the adding list and the deleting list, the adding list index the data that should be

  8. A super-resolution framework for 3-D high-resolution and high-contrast imaging using 2-D multislice MRI.

    PubMed

    Shilling, Richard Z; Robbie, Trevor Q; Bailloeul, Timothée; Mewes, Klaus; Mersereau, Russell M; Brummer, Marijn E

    2009-05-01

    A novel super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) framework in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is proposed. Its purpose is to produce images of both high resolution and high contrast desirable for image-guided minimally invasive brain surgery. The input data are multiple 2-D multislice inversion recovery MRI scans acquired at orientations with regular angular spacing rotated around a common frequency encoding axis. The output is a 3-D volume of isotropic high resolution. The inversion process resembles a localized projection reconstruction problem. Iterative algorithms for reconstruction are based on the projection onto convex sets (POCS) formalism. Results demonstrate resolution enhancement in simulated phantom studies, and ex vivo and in vivo human brain scans, carried out on clinical scanners. A comparison with previously published SRR methods shows favorable characteristics in the proposed approach. PMID:19272995

  9. What's the Point of a Raster ? Advantages of 3D Point Cloud Processing over Raster Based Methods for Accurate Geomorphic Analysis of High Resolution Topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.

    2014-12-01

    High Resolution Topographic (HRT) datasets are predominantly stored and analyzed as 2D raster grids of elevations (i.e., Digital Elevation Models). Raster grid processing is common in GIS software and benefits from a large library of fast algorithms dedicated to geometrical analysis, drainage network computation and topographic change measurement. Yet, all instruments or methods currently generating HRT datasets (e.g., ALS, TLS, SFM, stereo satellite imagery) output natively 3D unstructured point clouds that are (i) non-regularly sampled, (ii) incomplete (e.g., submerged parts of river channels are rarely measured), and (iii) include 3D elements (e.g., vegetation, vertical features such as river banks or cliffs) that cannot be accurately described in a DEM. Interpolating the raw point cloud onto a 2D grid generally results in a loss of position accuracy, spatial resolution and in more or less controlled interpolation. Here I demonstrate how studying earth surface topography and processes directly on native 3D point cloud datasets offers several advantages over raster based methods: point cloud methods preserve the accuracy of the original data, can better handle the evaluation of uncertainty associated to topographic change measurements and are more suitable to study vegetation characteristics and steep features of the landscape. In this presentation, I will illustrate and compare Point Cloud based and Raster based workflows with various examples involving ALS, TLS and SFM for the analysis of bank erosion processes in bedrock and alluvial rivers, rockfall statistics (including rockfall volume estimate directly from point clouds) and the interaction of vegetation/hydraulics and sedimentation in salt marshes. These workflows use 2 recently published algorithms for point cloud classification (CANUPO) and point cloud comparison (M3C2) now implemented in the open source software CloudCompare.

  10. A Compact 3D Omnidirectional Range Sensor of High Resolution for Robust Reconstruction of Environments

    PubMed Central

    Marani, Roberto; Renò, Vito; Nitti, Massimiliano; D'Orazio, Tiziana; Stella, Ettore

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an accurate range sensor for the three-dimensional reconstruction of environments is designed and developed. Following the principles of laser profilometry, the device exploits a set of optical transmitters able to project a laser line on the environment. A high-resolution and high-frame-rate camera assisted by a telecentric lens collects the laser light reflected by a parabolic mirror, whose shape is designed ad hoc to achieve a maximum measurement error of 10 mm when the target is placed 3 m away from the laser source. Measurements are derived by means of an analytical model, whose parameters are estimated during a preliminary calibration phase. Geometrical parameters, analytical modeling and image processing steps are validated through several experiments, which indicate the capability of the proposed device to recover the shape of a target with high accuracy. Experimental measurements show Gaussian statistics, having standard deviation of 1.74 mm within the measurable range. Results prove that the presented range sensor is a good candidate for environmental inspections and measurements. PMID:25621605

  11. 3D segmentation of non-isolated pulmonary nodules in high resolution CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangwei; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to segment small size non-isolated pulmonary nodules in high resolution helical CT scans. A new automated method of segmenting juxtapleural nodules was proposed, in which a quadric surface fitting procedure was used to create a boundary between a juxtapleural nodule and its neighboring pleural surface. Experiments on some real CT nodule data showed that this method was able to yield results that reflect the local shape of the pleural surface. Additionally, a scheme based on parametrically deformable geometric model was developed to deal with the problem of segmenting nodules attached to vessels. A vessel segment connected to a nodule was modeled using superquadrics with parametric deformations. The boundary between a vascularized nodule and the attached vessels can be recovered by finding the deformed superquadrics which approximates the vessels. Gradient descent scheme was utilized to optimize the parameters of the superquadrics. Simple experiments on synthetic data showed this scheme is promising.

  12. Lidar imaging with on-the-fly adaptable spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riu, J.; Royo, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present our work in the design and construction of a novel type of lidar device capable of measuring 3D range images with an spatial resolution which can be reconfigured through an on-the-fly configuration approach, adjustable by software and on the image area, and which can reach the 2Mpixel value. A double-patented novel concept of scanning system enables to change dynamically the image resolution depending on external information provided by the image captured in a previous cycle or on other sensors like greyscale or hyperspectral 2D imagers. A prototype of an imaging lidar system which can modify its spatial resolution on demand from one image to the next according to the target nature and state has been developed, and indoor and outdoor sample images showing its performance are presented. Applications in object detection, tracking and identification through a real-time adaptable scanning system for each situation and target behaviour are currently being pursued in different areas.

  13. Implementation of the Blade Element Momentum Method into a High-Resolution 3-D Atmospheric Model: Evaluating a Parameterization for Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sta. Maria, M.; Ketefian, G. S.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    In order to simulate better the effects of wind turbines on meteorology and climate, a parameterization based on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory was developed and integrated into a high-resolution 3-D non-hydrostatic atmospheric model that conserves several domain-integrated quantities. The BEM model calculates the forces the blade exerts on the atmosphere and feeds it back as body forces in the momentum equations of the atmospheric model. Since the BEM method calculates these forces along a turbine blade, the parameterization allows for model spatial resolutions on the order of a few to tens of meters. This study examines the advantages and limitations of such a parameterization. The BEM calculates the rotational force that the blades exert on the air, and this study investigates whether this parameterization is able to capture rotation in the wake. The dependency on model resolution is also studied to determine the optimum model resolution for simulating wind turbine-atmosphere interactions. The atmospheric model is also used to estimate the distance downwind of a turbine at which wind speeds recover. This is an important parameter for determining optimal wind farm spacing. Model results will be compared with previous parameterizations and wake data gathered in the field and from wind tunnel studies.

  14. Zooplankton mortality in 3D ecosystem modelling considering variable spatial-temporal fish consumptions in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Rindorf, Anna; Møller, Eva Friis; Christensen, Asbjørn; Madsen, Kristine S.; van Deurs, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    We tested the feasibility of imposing mesozooplankton mortality into a 3D model based on estimated consumption rates of the dominant planktivorous fish in the North Sea-Kattegat area. The spatial biomass distribution of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), sandeel (Ammodytidae) and European sprat (Sprattus sprattus) was derived from quarterly scientific trawl surveys and Danish commercial catches. Spatio-temporal indices of mortality were created based on the estimated biomasses and ingestion rates from the literature. The fish larvae grazing pressure was obtained from a spatial, size-based larval community model. In this model, larvae, herring and sandeel were the most important fish predators on mesozooplankton, but these groups had different spatial and temporal (seasonal) distributions. Fish larvae were particularly dominant in the eastern and southern areas in early summer. Herring and sandeel had the highest consumption in the central and north-western areas and were more important in late summer. The fish index changed the perceived annual, seasonal and spatial patterns in modelled mesozooplankton biomass, production and mortality. In the present study, the index was kept relatively simple and can be further developed with respect to the description of fish as well carnivorous zooplankton ingestion rates. The data input required to create the fish index is (i) planktivorous fish stock biomasses and (ii) relative fish spawning distribution information and (iii) physics (ocean currents and temperatures) for the region and situation of interest. The fish index seems promising as a realistic mortality term for lower trophic levels in 3D ecosystem models in areas with available data on fish stocks to improve management of marine resources.

  15. High order spatial expansion for the method of characteristics applied to 3-D geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Naymeh, L.; Masiello, E.; Sanchez, R.

    2013-07-01

    The method of characteristics is an efficient and flexible technique to solve the neutron transport equation and has been extensively used in two-dimensional calculations because it permits to deal with complex geometries. However, because of a very fast increase in storage requirements and number of floating operations, its direct application to three-dimensional routine transport calculations it is not still possible. In this work we introduce and analyze several modifications aimed to reduce memory requirements and to diminish the computing burden. We explore high-order spatial approximation, the use of intermediary trajectory-dependent flux expansions and the possibility of dynamic trajectory reconstruction from local tracking for typed subdomains. (authors)

  16. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions. PMID:26561090

  17. Quantification of gully volume using very high resolution DSM generated through 3D reconstruction from airborne and field digital imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Laredo, Mario; Gómez, Jose Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    Major advances have been made recently in automatic 3D photo-reconstruction techniques using uncalibrated and non-metric cameras (James and Robson, 2012). However, its application on soil conservation studies and landscape feature identification is currently at the outset. The aim of this work is to compare the performance of a remote sensing technique using a digital camera mounted on an airborne platform, with 3D photo-reconstruction, a method already validated for gully erosion assessment purposes (Castillo et al., 2012). A field survey was conducted in November 2012 in a 250 m-long gully located in field crops on a Vertisol in Cordoba (Spain). The airborne campaign was conducted with a 4000x3000 digital camera installed onboard an aircraft flying at 300 m above ground level to acquire 6 cm resolution imagery. A total of 990 images were acquired over the area ensuring a large overlap in the across- and along-track direction of the aircraft. An ortho-mosaic and the digital surface model (DSM) were obtained through automatic aerial triangulation and camera calibration methods. For the field-level photo-reconstruction technique, the gully was divided in several reaches to allow appropriate reconstruction (about 150 pictures taken per reach) and, finally, the resulting point clouds were merged into a unique mesh. A centimetric-accuracy GPS provided a benchmark dataset for gully perimeter and distinguishable reference points in order to allow the assessment of measurement errors of the airborne technique and the georeferenciation of the photo-reconstruction 3D model. The uncertainty on the gully limits definition was explicitly addressed by comparison of several criteria obtained by 3D models (slope and second derivative) with the outer perimeter obtained by the GPS operator identifying visually the change in slope at the top of the gully walls. In this study we discussed the magnitude of planimetric and altimetric errors and the differences observed between the

  18. Realtime infiltration process monitoring in macroporous soil - a plot-scale experiment accompanied by high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    Infiltration and quick vertical redistribution of event water through rapid subsurface flow in soil structures is one of the key issues in hydrology. Although the importance of preferential flow is broadly recognised, our theories, observation techniques and modelling approaches lose grounds when the assumption of well-mixed states in REVs collapses. To characterise the combination of advective and diffusive flow is especially challenging. We have shown in earlier studies that a combination of TDR monitoring, dye- and salt-tracer recovery and time-lapse 3D GPR in irrigation experiments provides means to characterise infiltration dynamics at the plot- and hillslope-scale also in highly structured soils. We pinpointed that the spatial and temporal resolution requires special attention and improvement - particularly owing to the facts of high velocity (10‑3 ms‑1) of advective flow and small scale (10‑2 m) of the respective flow structures. We present insights from a novel technique of continuous high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR measurements during and after a plot-scale (1 m x 1 m) irrigation experiment. Continuous TDR soil moisture measurements, dye tracer excavation and salt-tracer samples are used as qualitative and quantitative references. While classical infiltration experiments either look at spatial patterns or temporal dynamics at singular gauges, we highlight the advantage of combining both to achieve a more complete image of the infiltration process. Although operating at the limits of the techniques this setup enables non-invasive observation of preferential flow processes in the field and allows to explore and characterise macropore matrix exchange.

  19. 3D reconstruction and heat map of porcine recurrent laryngeal nerve anatomy: branching and spatial location.

    PubMed

    Mason, Nena Lundgreen; Christiansen, Marc; Wisco, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy is a common post-operative complication of many head and neck surgeries. Theoretically, the best treatment to restore partial function to a damaged recurrent laryngeal nerve would be reinnervation of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle via anastomosis of the recurrent laryngeal and phrenic nerves. The pig is an excellent model of human laryngeal anatomy and physiology but a more thorough knowledge of porcine laryngeal anatomy is necessary before the pig can be used to improve existing surgical strategies, and develop new ones. This study first identifies the three most common recurrent laryngeal nerve branching patterns in the pig. Secondly, this study presents three-dimensional renderings of the porcine larynx onto which the recurrent laryngeal nerve patterns are accurately mapped. Lastly, heat maps are presented to display the spatial variability of recurrent laryngeal nerve trunks and primary branches on each side of 15 subjects (28 specimens). We intend for this study to be useful to groups using a porcine model to study posterior cricoarytenoid muscle reinnervation techniques. PMID:27086418

  20. Recording, Visualization and Documentation of 3D Spatial Data for Monitoring Topography in Areas of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelakis, Emmanouel; Konstantaras, Antonios; Axaridou, Anastasia; Chrysakis, Ioannis; Xinogalos, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    . allowing them to interchange their knowledge, findings and observations at different time frames. Results outline the successful application of the above systems in certain Greek areas of important cultural heritage [3,11] were significant efforts are being made for their preservation through time. Acknowledgement The authors wish to thank the General Secretariat for Research and Technology of Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Culture and Sports in Greece for their financial support via program Cooperation: Partnership of Production and Research Institutions in Small and Medium Scale Projects, Project Title: "3D-SYSTEK - Development of a novel system for 3D Documentation, Promotion and Exploitation of Cultural Heritage Monuments via 3D data acquisition, 3D modeling and metadata recording". Keywords spatial data, land degradation monitoring, 3D modeling and visualization, terrestrial laser scanning, documentation and metadata repository, protection of cultural heritage References [1] Shalaby, A., and Tateishi, R.: Remote sensing and GIS for mapping and monitoring land cover and land-use changes in the northwestern coastal zone of egypt. Applied Geography, 27(1), 28-41, (2007) [2] Poesen, J. W. A., and Hooke, J. M.: Erosion, flooding and channel management in mediterranean environments of southern europe. Progress in Physical Geography, 21(2), 157-199, (1997) [3] Maravelakis, E., Bilalis, N., Mantzorou, I., Konstantaras, A., Antoniadis, A.: 3D modeling of the oldest olive tree of the world. IJCER 2(2), 340-347 (2012) [4] Manferdini, A.M., Remondino, F.: Reality-Based 3D Modeling, Segmentation and Web- Based Visualization. In: Ioannides, M., Fellner, D., Georgopoulos, A., Hadjimitsis, D.G. (eds.) EuroMed 2010. LNCS, vol. 6436, pp. 110-124. Springer, Heidelberg (2010) [5] Tapete, D., Casagli, N., Luzi, G., Fanti, R., Gigli, G., Leva, D.: Integrating radar and laserbased remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

  1. X-Ray tomography with micrometer spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, Carsten; Snigirev, Anatoly A.; Koch, Andreas; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor

    1997-10-01

    3D computed tomographic images with micrometer resolution were made in phase-contrast mode with high energy x-rays at a third generation synchrotron source. The phase-contrast technique enables one to obtain information not only about the amplitude of the wave field behind the object and thus about the absorption, but also about the refractive index distribution inside the sample. Increasing the x-ray energy from the soft x-ray region up to 10-60 keV simplifies the experimental setup and opens the possibility to study organic samples at room-temperature and under normal pressure conditions. The projection data is recorded with a fast, high-resolution x-ray camera consisting of a 5 micrometers thin YAG scintillator crystal, a visible light microscope optics and a slow scan 1k X 1k CCD camera. The spatial resolution of phase-contrast microtomography is currently limited by the resolution of the x-ray detector to about 1-2 micrometers . First applications in biology and geophysics are shown.

  2. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability

    PubMed Central

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L.; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities–defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them–have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are “mental rotation” (rotating mental models) and “visualisation” (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel “Bricks” test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  3. Rotation is visualisation, 3D is 2D: using a novel measure to investigate the genetics of spatial ability.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Rimfeld, Kaili; Schofield, Kerry L; Selzam, Saskia; Malanchini, Margherita; Rodic, Maja; Kovas, Yulia; Plomin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial abilities-defined broadly as the capacity to manipulate mental representations of objects and the relations between them-have been studied widely, but with little agreement reached concerning their nature or structure. Two major putative spatial abilities are "mental rotation" (rotating mental models) and "visualisation" (complex manipulations, such as identifying objects from incomplete information), but inconsistent findings have been presented regarding their relationship to one another. Similarly inconsistent findings have been reported for the relationship between two- and three-dimensional stimuli. Behavioural genetic methods offer a largely untapped means to investigate such relationships. 1,265 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study completed the novel "Bricks" test battery, designed to tap these abilities in isolation. The results suggest substantial genetic influence unique to spatial ability as a whole, but indicate that dissociations between the more specific constructs (rotation and visualisation, in 2D and 3D) disappear when tested under identical conditions: they are highly correlated phenotypically, perfectly correlated genetically (indicating that the same genetic influences underpin performance), and are related similarly to other abilities. This has important implications for the structure of spatial ability, suggesting that the proliferation of apparent sub-domains may sometimes reflect idiosyncratic tasks rather than meaningful dissociations. PMID:27476554

  4. 3D registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wen, Di; Brandt, Eric; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Farmazilian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    High resolution, 100 frames/sec intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and 3D registration methods, to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, brightfield and fluorescent cryoimage volumes, with optional, exactly registered cryo-histology. The innovation was a method to match an IVOCT pullback images, acquired in the catheter reference frame, to a true 3D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter, polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Local minima were possible, but when we started within reasonable ranges, every one of 24 digital phantom cases converged to a good solution with a registration error of only +1.34+/-2.65μm (signed distance). Registration was applied to 10 ex-vivo cadaver coronary arteries (LADs), resulting in 10 registered cryo and IVOCT volumes yielding a total of 421 registered 2D-image pairs. Image overlays demonstrated high continuity between vascular and plaque features. Bland- Altman analysis comparing cryo and IVOCT lumen area, showed mean and standard deviation of differences as 0.01+/-0.43 mm2. DICE coefficients were 0.91+/-0.04. Finally, visual assessment on 20 representative cases with easily identifiable features suggested registration accuracy within one frame of IVOCT (+/-200μm), eliminating significant misinterpretations introduced by 1mm errors in the literature. The method will provide 3D data for training of IVOCT plaque algorithms and can be used for validation of other intravascular imaging modalities.

  5. 3D registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wen, Di; Brandt, Eric; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S.; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Farmazilian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution, 100 frames/sec intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and 3D registration methods, to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, brightfield and fluorescent cryo-image volumes, with optional, exactly registered cryo-histology. The innovation was a method to match an IVOCT pull-back images, acquired in the catheter reference frame, to a true 3D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter, polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Local minima were possible, but when we started within reasonable ranges, every one of 24 digital phantom cases converged to a good solution with a registration error of only +1.34±2.65μm (signed distance). Registration was applied to 10 ex-vivo cadaver coronary arteries (LADs), resulting in 10 registered cryo and IVOCT volumes yielding a total of 421 registered 2D-image pairs. Image overlays demonstrated high continuity between vascular and plaque features. Bland-Altman analysis comparing cryo and IVOCT lumen area, showed mean and standard deviation of differences as 0.01±0.43 mm2. DICE coefficients were 0.91±0.04. Finally, visual assessment on 20 representative cases with easily identifiable features suggested registration accuracy within one frame of IVOCT (±200μm), eliminating significant misinterpretations introduced by 1mm errors in the literature. The method will provide 3D data for training of IVOCT plaque algorithms and can be used for validation of other intravascular imaging modalities. PMID:27162417

  6. Digitized crime scene forensics: automated trace separation of toolmarks on high-resolution 2D/3D CLSM surface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausing, Eric; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Locksmith forensics is an important and very challenging part of classic crime scene forensics. In prior work, we propose a partial transfer to the digital domain, to effectively support forensic experts and present approaches for a full process chain consisting of five steps: Trace positioning, 2D/3D acquisition with a confocal 3D laser scanning microscope, detection by segmentation, trace type determination, and determination of the opening method. In particular the step of trace segmentation on high-resolution 3D surfaces thereby turned out to be the part most difficult to implement. The reason for that is the highly structured and complex surfaces to be analyzed. These surfaces are cluttered with a high number of toolmarks, which overlap and distort each other. In Clausing et al., we present an improved approach for a reliable segmentation of relevant trace regions but without the possibility of separating single traces out of segmented trace regions. However, in our past research, especially features based on shape and dimension turned out to be highly relevant for a fully automated analysis and interpretation. In this paper, we consequently propose an approach for this separation. To achieve this goal, we use our segmentation approach and expand it with a combination of the watershed algorithm with a graph-based analysis. Found sub-regions are compared based on their surface character and are connected or divided depending on their similarity. We evaluate our approach with a test set of about 1,300 single traces on the exemplary locking cylinder component 'key pin' and thereby are able of showing the high suitability of our approach.

  7. The High Resolution Infrared Spectrum of CH 3D in the Region 900-1700 cm -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A.; Champion, J. P.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Brown, L. R.

    1997-07-01

    The high resolution absorption spectrum of CH3D in the region 900-1700 cm-1has been reexamined on the basis of new long path experimental data recorded with the Fourier transform spectrometer at Kitt Peak. A theoretical model used previously for spherical rotors has been adapted for symmetric top molecules in order to analyze the vibrational polyads of CH3D simultaneously. Both triad and nonad-triad band systems have been investigated. The hot band intensities were estimated through direct extrapolation of the triad dipole moments. Six hundred lines from the hot bands have been assigned and combined with other data for the triad. The main hot bands contributions are due to 2ν6- ν6, 2ν3- ν3, ν3+ ν6- ν3and ν3+ ν6- ν6bands. The standard deviation achieved for 3377 line positions of the triad was 0.56 10-3cm-1, representing an improvement of one order of magnitude with respect to the most recent analysis.

  8. Nanometer depth resolution in 3D topographic analysis of drug-loaded nanofibrous mats without sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Paaver, Urve; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Kassamakov, Ivan; Hæggström, Edward; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Nolvi, Anton; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Laidmäe, Ivo; Kogermann, Karin; Veski, Peep

    2014-02-28

    We showed that scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) can provide nanometer depth resolution in 3D topographic analysis of electrospun drug-loaded nanofibrous mats without sample preparation. The method permits rapidly investigating geometric properties (e.g. fiber diameter, orientation and morphology) and surface topography of drug-loaded nanofibers and nanomats. Electrospun nanofibers of a model drug, piroxicam (PRX), and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were imaged. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) served as a reference method. SWLI 3D images featuring 29 nm by 29 nm active pixel size were obtained of a 55 μm × 40 μm area. The thickness of the drug-loaded non-woven nanomats was uniform, ranging from 2.0 μm to 3.0 μm (SWLI), and independent of the ratio between HPMC and PRX. The average diameters (n=100, SEM) for drug-loaded nanofibers were 387 ± 125 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:1), 407 ± 144 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:2), and 290 ± 100 nm (HPMC and PRX 1:4). We found advantages and limitations in both techniques. SWLI permits rapid non-contacting and non-destructive characterization of layer orientation, layer thickness, porosity, and surface morphology of electrospun drug-loaded nanofibers and nanomats. Such analysis is important because the surface topography affects the performance of nanomats in pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:24378328

  9. The iRoCS Toolbox--3D analysis of the plant root apical meristem at cellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thorsten; Pasternak, Taras; Liu, Kun; Blein, Thomas; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Duerr, Jasmin; Teale, William; Ditengou, Franck A; Burkhardt, Hans; Ronneberger, Olaf; Palme, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    To achieve a detailed understanding of processes in biological systems, cellular features must be quantified in the three-dimensional (3D) context of cells and organs. We described use of the intrinsic root coordinate system (iRoCS) as a reference model for the root apical meristem of plants. iRoCS enables direct and quantitative comparison between the root tips of plant populations at single-cell resolution. The iRoCS Toolbox automatically fits standardized coordinates to raw 3D image data. It detects nuclei or segments cells, automatically fits the coordinate system, and groups the nuclei/cells into the root's tissue layers. The division status of each nucleus may also be determined. The only manual step required is to mark the quiescent centre. All intermediate outputs may be refined if necessary. The ability to learn the visual appearance of nuclei by example allows the iRoCS Toolbox to be easily adapted to various phenotypes. The iRoCS Toolbox is provided as an open-source software package, licensed under the GNU General Public License, to make it accessible to a broad community. To demonstrate the power of the technique, we measured subtle changes in cell division patterns caused by modified auxin flux within the Arabidopsis thaliana root apical meristem. PMID:24417645

  10. High-Resolution B Dot Probe for Measuring 3D Magnetic Fields in the MOCHI Labjet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuara Rosales, Manuel; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The MOCHI Labjet experiment will use a triple electrode planar plasma gun to explore canonical helicity transport in laboratory astrophysical jets. Canonical helicity transport suggests that destabilizing magnetic energy can be converted into stabilizing shear flows at two-fluid spatial scales li ~c/wpi . A high-resolution . B probe array, capable of measuring magnetic field dynamics at length and time scales important to canonical helicity transport is being built. The probe array consists of three tridents, made of 5 . 13 mm OD and 4 . 32 mm ID stainless steel tubes of 102 cm length, enclosing a total of 1215 commercial inductor chips with a three axis spatial resolution of 11 mm. The average value for the effective NA of each inductor chip is 1 . 21 .10-4 m2. The probe array lays in a plane perpendicular to the jet, and is axially translatable. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  11. A simple and high-resolution stereolithography-based 3D bioprinting system using visible light crosslinkable bioinks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongjie; Abdulla, Raafa; Parker, Benjamin; Samanipour, Roya; Ghosh, Sanjoy; Kim, Keekyoung

    2015-01-01

    Bioprinting is a rapidly developing technique for biofabrication. Because of its high resolution and the ability to print living cells, bioprinting has been widely used in artificial tissue and organ generation as well as microscale living cell deposition. In this paper, we present a low-cost stereolithography-based bioprinting system that uses visible light crosslinkable bioinks. This low-cost stereolithography system was built around a commercial projector with a simple water filter to prevent harmful infrared radiation from the projector. The visible light crosslinking was achieved by using a mixture of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) and gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel with eosin Y based photoinitiator. Three different concentrations of hydrogel mixtures (10% PEG, 5% PEG + 5% GelMA, and 2.5% PEG + 7.5% GelMA, all w/v) were studied with the presented systems. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the developed bioink were measured and discussed in detail. Several cell-free hydrogel patterns were generated to demonstrate the resolution of the solution. Experimental results with NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells show that this system can produce a highly vertical 3D structure with 50 μm resolution and 85% cell viability for at least five days. The developed system provides a low-cost visible light stereolithography solution and has the potential to be widely used in tissue engineering and bioengineering for microscale cell patterning. PMID:26696527

  12. The Spatial Extent and Distribution of Star Formation in 3D-HST Mergers at z is approximately 1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Kasper B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; da Cunha, Elisabete; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Cox, Thomas J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Jonsson, Patrik; Lundgren, Britt; Maseda, Michael V.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of star formation in a sample of 60 visually identified galaxy merger candidates at z greater than 1. Our sample, drawn from the 3D-HST survey, is flux-limited and was selected to have high star formation rates based on fits of their broad-band, low spatial resolution spectral energy distributions. It includes plausible pre-merger (close pairs) and post-merger (single objects with tidal features) systems,with total stellar masses and star formation rates derived from multi-wavelength photometry. Here we use near-infrared slitless spectra from 3D-HST which produce H or [OIII] emission line maps as proxies for star-formation maps. This provides a first comprehensive high-resolution, empirical picture of where star formation occurred in galaxy mergers at the epoch of peak cosmic star formation rate. We find that detectable star formation can occur in one or both galaxy centres, or in tidal tails. The most common case (58%) is that star formation is largely concentrated in a single, compact region, coincident with the centre of (one of) the merger components. No correlations between star formation morphology and redshift, total stellar mass, or star formation rate are found. A restricted set of hydrodynamical merger simulationsbetween similarly massive and gas-rich objects implies that star formation should be detectable in both merger components, when the gas fractions of the individual components are the same. This suggests that z is approximately 1.5 mergers typically occur between galaxies whose gas fractions, masses, andor star formation rates are distinctly different from one another.

  13. 1D-3D hybrid modeling—from multi-compartment models to full resolution models in space and time

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Stephan; Stepniewski, Martin; Reiter, Sebastian; Knodel, Markus M.; Queisser, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling and simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling and simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in their level of detail, in order to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing the spatial aspect of each cell. For single cell or networks with relatively small numbers of neurons, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the full three-dimensional morphology of cells and organelles into three-dimensional, space and time-dependent, simulations. While every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. In this paper we present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g., the NEURON simulator—which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed three-dimensional morphology of neurons and organelles. In order to couple 1D- and 3D-simulations, we present a geometry-, membrane potential- and intracellular concentration mapping framework, with which graph- based morphologies, e.g., in the swc- or hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron and computational data from 1D-simulations can be used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations and vice versa. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to

  14. A High-resolution 3D Geodynamical Model of the Present-day India-Asia Collision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Baumann, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a high-resolution, 3D geodynamic model of the present-day India-Asia collision system. The model is separated into multiple tectonic blocks, for which we estimate the first order rheological properties and the impact on the dynamics of the collision system. This is done by performing systematic simulations with different rheologies to minimize the misfit to observational constraints such as the GPS-velocity field. The simulations are performed with the parallel staggered grid FD code LaMEM using a numerical resolution of at least 512x512x256 cells to resolve dynamically important shear zones reasonably well. A fundamental part of this study is the reconstruction of the 3D present-day geometry of Tibet and the adjacent regions. Our interpretations of crust and mantle lithosphere geometry are jointly based on a globally available shear wave tomography (Schaeffer and Lebedev, 2013) and the Crust 1.0 model (Laske et al. http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust1.html). We regionally refined and modified our interpretations based on seismicity distributions and focal mechanisms and incorporated regional receiver function studies to improve the accuracy of the Moho in particular. Results suggest that we can identify at least one "best-fit" solution in terms of rheological model properties that reproduces the observed velocity field reasonably well, including the strong rotation of the GPS velocity around the eastern syntax of the Himalaya. We also present model co-variances to illustrate the trade-offs between the rheological model parameters, their respective uncertainties, and the model fit. Schaeffer, A.J., Lebedev, S., 2013. Global shear speed structure of the upper mantle and transition zone. Geophysical Journal International 194, 417-449. doi:10.1093/gji/ggt095

  15. High-resolution 3-D S-wave Tomography of upper crust structures in Yilan Plain from Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai-Xun; Chen, Po-Fei; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chen, Li-Wei; Gung, YuanCheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yilan Plain (YP) in NE Taiwan locates on the western YP of the Okinawa Trough and displays high geothermal gradients with abundant hot springs, likely resulting from magmatism associated with the back-arc spreading as attested by the offshore volcanic island (Kueishantao). YP features NS distinctive characteristics that the South YP exhibits thin top sedimentary layer, high on-land seismicity and significant SE movements, relative those of the northern counterpart. A dense network (~2.5 km station interval) of 89 Texan instruments was deployed in Aug. 2014, covering most of the YP and its vicinity. The ray path coverage density of each 0.015 degree cells are greater than 150 km that could provide the robustness assessment of tomographic results. We analyze ambient noise signals to invert a high-resolution 3D S-wave model for shallow velocity structures in and around YP. The aim is to investigate the velocity anomalies corresponding to geothermal resources and the NS geological distinctions aforementioned. We apply the Welch's method to generate empirical Rayleigh wave Green's functions between two stations records of continuous vertical components. The group velocities of thus derived functions are then obtained by the multiple-filter analysis technique measured at the frequency range between 0.25 and 1 Hz. Finally, we implement a wavelet-based multi-scale parameterization technique to construct 3D model of S-wave velocity. Our first month results exhibit low velocity in the plain, corresponding existing sediments, those of whole YP show low velocity offshore YP and those of high-resolution south YP reveal stark velocity contrast across the Sanshin fault. Key words: ambient seismic noises, Welch's method, S-wave, Yilan Plain

  16. Trade-off between angular and spatial resolutions in in vivo fiber tractography.

    PubMed

    Vos, Sjoerd B; Aksoy, Murat; Han, Zhaoying; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Maclaren, Julian; Viergever, Max A; Leemans, Alexander; Bammer, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Tractography is becoming an increasingly popular method to reconstruct white matter connections in vivo. The diffusion MRI data that tractography is based on requires a high angular resolution to resolve crossing fibers whereas high spatial resolution is required to distinguish kissing from crossing fibers. However, scan time increases with increasing spatial and angular resolutions, which can become infeasible in clinical settings. Here we investigated the trade-off between spatial and angular resolutions to determine which of these factors is most worth investing scan time in. We created a unique diffusion MRI dataset with 1.0 mm isotropic resolution and a high angular resolution (100 directions) using an advanced 3D diffusion-weighted multi-slab EPI acquisition. This dataset was reconstructed to create subsets of lower angular (75, 50, and 25 directions) and lower spatial (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 mm) resolution. Using all subsets, we investigated the effects of angular and spatial resolutions in three fiber bundles-the corticospinal tract, arcuate fasciculus and corpus callosum-by analyzing the volumetric bundle overlap and anatomical correspondence between tracts. Our results indicate that the subsets of 25 and 50 directions provided inferior tract reconstructions compared with the datasets with 75 and 100 directions. Datasets with spatial resolutions of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm were comparable, while the lowest resolution (2.5 mm) datasets had discernible inferior quality. In conclusion, we found that angular resolution appeared to be more influential than spatial resolution in improving tractography results. Spatial resolutions higher than 2.0 mm only appear to benefit multi-fiber tractography methods if this is not at the cost of decreased angular resolution. PMID:26774615

  17. High Spatial Resolution Commercial Satellite Imaging Product Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert E.; Pagnutti, Mary; Blonski, Slawomir; Ross, Kenton W.; Stnaley, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    NASA Stennis Space Center's Remote Sensing group has been characterizing privately owned high spatial resolution multispectral imaging systems, such as IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3. Natural and man made targets were used for spatial resolution, radiometric, and geopositional characterizations. Higher spatial resolution also presents significant adjacency effects for accurate reliable radiometry.

  18. Recording, Visualization and Documentation of 3D Spatial Data for Monitoring Topography in Areas of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelakis, Emmanouel; Konstantaras, Antonios; Axaridou, Anastasia; Chrysakis, Ioannis; Xinogalos, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    . allowing them to interchange their knowledge, findings and observations at different time frames. Results outline the successful application of the above systems in certain Greek areas of important cultural heritage [3,11] were significant efforts are being made for their preservation through time. Acknowledgement The authors wish to thank the General Secretariat for Research and Technology of Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Culture and Sports in Greece for their financial support via program Cooperation: Partnership of Production and Research Institutions in Small and Medium Scale Projects, Project Title: "3D-SYSTEK - Development of a novel system for 3D Documentation, Promotion and Exploitation of Cultural Heritage Monuments via 3D data acquisition, 3D modeling and metadata recording". Keywords spatial data, land degradation monitoring, 3D modeling and visualization, terrestrial laser scanning, documentation and metadata repository, protection of cultural heritage References [1] Shalaby, A., and Tateishi, R.: Remote sensing and GIS for mapping and monitoring land cover and land-use changes in the northwestern coastal zone of egypt. Applied Geography, 27(1), 28-41, (2007) [2] Poesen, J. W. A., and Hooke, J. M.: Erosion, flooding and channel management in mediterranean environments of southern europe. Progress in Physical Geography, 21(2), 157-199, (1997) [3] Maravelakis, E., Bilalis, N., Mantzorou, I., Konstantaras, A., Antoniadis, A.: 3D modeling of the oldest olive tree of the world. IJCER 2(2), 340-347 (2012) [4] Manferdini, A.M., Remondino, F.: Reality-Based 3D Modeling, Segmentation and Web- Based Visualization. In: Ioannides, M., Fellner, D., Georgopoulos, A., Hadjimitsis, D.G. (eds.) EuroMed 2010. LNCS, vol. 6436, pp. 110-124. Springer, Heidelberg (2010) [5] Tapete, D., Casagli, N., Luzi, G., Fanti, R., Gigli, G., Leva, D.: Integrating radar and laserbased remote sensing techniques for monitoring structural deformation of archaeological monuments

  19. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  20. A system for high resolution 3D mapping using laser radar and requiring no beam scanning mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Paul

    1988-06-01

    The inherently high angular and range resolution capabilities associated with radar systems operating at optical frequencies are at once a blessing and a curse. Standard implementations consist of very narrow field of view optical receivers operating in conjunction with laser transmitters or even narrower illumination beamwidth. While high angular resolution is thus achieved, mechanical scanning is required to gather data over extended fields of view. The many laser pulse transmissions necessary to cover the entire field of view increase the detectability of the system by enemy sensors. A system concept is proposed which, through the use of a single laser transmitter and multiple optical receivers, largely eliminate these deficiencies. Complete 3D data over a broad angular field of view and depth of field can be gathered based upon the reflections from a single transmitted laser pulse. Covert operation is enhanced as a result of the sparse laser transmissions required. The eye safety characteristics of the system are also enhanced. Proprietary coding of optical shutters in each of the multiple optical receivers permits the number of such receivers to be reduced to a very practical few. An alternative configuration of the system reduces the number of receivers required to one, at the expense of increased data acquisition time. The multiple receiver configuration is simply a parallel processing implementation of the single receiver approach. While data rate is reduced by the single receiver configuration, it still greatly exceeds that of scanning systems, and hardware complexity is also reduced significantly.

  1. High-resolution non-invasive 3D imaging of paint microstructure by synchrotron-based X-ray laminography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischig, Péter; Helfen, Lukas; Wallert, Arie; Baumbach, Tilo; Dik, Joris

    2013-06-01

    The characterisation of the microstructure and micromechanical behaviour of paint is key to a range of problems related to the conservation or technical art history of paintings. Synchrotron-based X-ray laminography is demonstrated in this paper to image the local sub-surface microstructure in paintings in a non-invasive and non-destructive way. Based on absorption and phase contrast, the method can provide high-resolution 3D maps of the paint stratigraphy, including the substrate, and visualise small features, such as pigment particles, voids, cracks, wood cells, canvas fibres etc. Reconstructions may be indicative of local density or chemical composition due to increased attenuation of X-rays by elements of higher atomic number. The paint layers and their interfaces can be distinguished via variations in morphology or composition. Results of feasibility tests on a painting mockup (oak panel, chalk ground, vermilion and lead white paint) are shown, where lateral and depth resolution of up to a few micrometres is demonstrated. The method is well adapted to study the temporal evolution of the stratigraphy in test specimens and offers an alternative to destructive sampling of original works of art.

  2. High-resolution 3D analyses of the shape and internal constituents of small volcanic ash particles: The contribution of SEM micro-computed tomography (SEM micro-CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonlanthen, Pierre; Rausch, Juanita; Ketcham, Richard A.; Putlitz, Benita; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Grobéty, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of small volcanic ash particles is fundamental to our understanding of magma fragmentation, and in transport modeling of volcanic plumes and clouds. Until recently, the analysis of 3D features in small objects (< 250 μm) was either restricted to extrapolations from 2D approaches, partial stereo-imaging, or CT methods having limited spatial resolution and/or accessibility. In this study, an X-ray computed-tomography technique known as SEM micro-CT, also called 3D X-ray ultramicroscopy (3D XuM), was used to investigate the 3D morphology of small volcanic ash particles (125-250 μm sieve fraction), as well as their vesicle and microcrystal distribution. The samples were selected from four stratigraphically well-established tephra layers of the Meerfelder Maar (West Eifel Volcanic Field, Germany). Resolution tests performed on a Beametr v1 pattern sample along with Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray emission volumes indicated that a spatial resolution of 0.65 μm was obtained for X-ray shadow projections using a standard thermionic SEM and a bulk brass target as X-ray source. Analysis of a smaller volcanic ash particle (64-125 μm sieve fraction) showed that features with volumes > 20 μm3 (~ 3.5 μm in diameter) can be successfully reconstructed and quantified. In addition, new functionalities of the Blob3D software were developed to allow the particle shape factors frequently used as input parameters in ash transport and dispersion models to be calculated. This study indicates that SEM micro-CT is very well suited to quantify the various aspects of shape in fine volcanic ash, and potentially also to investigate the 3D morphology and internal structure of any object < 0.1 mm3.

  3. GRID3D-v2: An updated version of the GRID2D/3D computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped three-dimensional spatial domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Shih, T. I-P.; Roelke, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    In order to generate good quality systems for complicated three-dimensional spatial domains, the grid-generation method used must be able to exert rather precise controls over grid-point distributions. Several techniques are presented that enhance control of grid-point distribution for a class of algebraic grid-generation methods known as the two-, four-, and six-boundary methods. These techniques include variable stretching functions from bilinear interpolation, interpolating functions based on tension splines, and normalized K-factors. The techniques developed in this study were incorporated into a new version of GRID3D called GRID3D-v2. The usefulness of GRID3D-v2 was demonstrated by using it to generate a three-dimensional grid system in the coolent passage of a radial turbine blade with serpentine channels and pin fins.

  4. Max CAPR: High-Resolution 3D Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography With Acquisition Times Under 5 Seconds

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Clifton R.; Borisch, Eric A.; Glockner, James F.; Mostardi, Petrice M.; Rossman, Phillip J.; Young, Phillip M.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    High temporal and spatial resolution is desired in imaging of vascular abnormalities having short arterial-to-venous transit times. Methods that exploit temporal correlation to reduce the observed frame time demonstrate temporal blurring, obfuscating bolus dynamics. Previously, a Cartesian acquisition with projection reconstruction-like (CAPR) sampling method has been demonstrated for three-dimensional contrast-enhanced angiographic imaging of the lower legs using two-dimensional sensitivity-encoding acceleration and partial Fourier acceleration, providing 1mm isotropic resolution of the calves, with 4.9-sec frame time and 17.6-sec temporal footprint. In this work, the CAPR acquisition is further undersampled to provide a net acceleration approaching 40 by eliminating all view sharing. The tradeoff of frame time and temporal footprint in view sharing is presented and characterized in phantom experiments. It is shown that the resultant 4.9-sec acquisition time, three-dimensional images sets have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to clearly portray arterial and venous phases of contrast passage. It is further hypothesized that these short temporal footprint sequences provide diagnostic quality images. This is tested and shown in a series of nine contrast-enhanced MR angiography patient studies performed with the new method. PMID:20715291

  5. Max CAPR: high-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography with acquisition times under 5 seconds.

    PubMed

    Haider, Clifton R; Borisch, Eric A; Glockner, James F; Mostardi, Petrice M; Rossman, Phillip J; Young, Phillip M; Riederer, Stephen J

    2010-10-01

    High temporal and spatial resolution is desired in imaging of vascular abnormalities having short arterial-to-venous transit times. Methods that exploit temporal correlation to reduce the observed frame time demonstrate temporal blurring, obfuscating bolus dynamics. Previously, a Cartesian acquisition with projection reconstruction-like (CAPR) sampling method has been demonstrated for three-dimensional contrast-enhanced angiographic imaging of the lower legs using two-dimensional sensitivity-encoding acceleration and partial Fourier acceleration, providing 1mm isotropic resolution of the calves, with 4.9-sec frame time and 17.6-sec temporal footprint. In this work, the CAPR acquisition is further undersampled to provide a net acceleration approaching 40 by eliminating all view sharing. The tradeoff of frame time and temporal footprint in view sharing is presented and characterized in phantom experiments. It is shown that the resultant 4.9-sec acquisition time, three-dimensional images sets have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to clearly portray arterial and venous phases of contrast passage. It is further hypothesized that these short temporal footprint sequences provide diagnostic quality images. This is tested and shown in a series of nine contrast-enhanced MR angiography patient studies performed with the new method. PMID:20715291

  6. Crust Uppermost Mantle Structure beneath Eastern Asia: Progress towards a Uniform, Tightly Constrained, High Resolution 3-D Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Ritzwoller, M. H.; Zheng, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Kim, Y.; Ning, J.; Kang, D.; Feng, L.; Wiens, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decade, large and dense seismic arrays have been deployed across much of eastern Asia (e.g., the "CEArray" and the "China Array" deployed by the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), the NECESS Array deployed collaboratively by China, Japan and the US, Korean Seismic Network, KNET and other networks in Japan, and historical PASSCAL installations), which have been used to produce increasingly well resolved models of the crust and uppermost mantle at different length scales. These models, however, do not cover eastern Asia uniformly. In this presentation, we report on an effort to generate a uniform high resolution 3-D model of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath eastern Asia using state-of-art surface wave and body wave inversion techniques. Highlights of this effort include: 1) We collect ambient noise cross-correlations using more than 1,800 seismic stations from multiple seismic arrays in this area and perform uniform surface wave tomography for the study area. 2) We collect P-wave receiver functions for over 1,000 stations and Rayleigh wave H/V ratio measurements for over 200 stations in this area. 3) We adopt a Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion to the Rayleigh wave dispersion maps and produce a uniform 3-D model with uncertainties of the crust and uppermost mantle. 4) In the areas where receiver functions and/or Rayleigh wave H/V ratios are collected, we replace the surface wave inversion by a joint inversion of surface waves and these seismic observables. The resulting model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle which we summarize and discuss with focus on the relationship between the observed crustal variations and tectonic/geological boundaries and lithospheric modifications associated with volcanism in Northeast China.

  7. Identification of damage in buildings based on gaps in 3D point clouds from very high resolution oblique airborne images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrivel, Anand; Gerke, Markus; Kerle, Norman; Vosselman, George

    2015-07-01

    Point clouds generated from airborne oblique images have become a suitable source for detailed building damage assessment after a disaster event, since they provide the essential geometric and radiometric features of both roof and façades of the building. However, they often contain gaps that result either from physical damage or from a range of image artefacts or data acquisition conditions. A clear understanding of those reasons, and accurate classification of gap-type, are critical for 3D geometry-based damage assessment. In this study, a methodology was developed to delineate buildings from a point cloud and classify the present gaps. The building delineation process was carried out by identifying and merging the roof segments of single buildings from the pre-segmented 3D point cloud. This approach detected 96% of the buildings from a point cloud generated using airborne oblique images. The gap detection and classification methods were tested using two other data sets obtained with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images with a ground resolution of around 1-2 cm. The methods detected all significant gaps and correctly identified the gaps due to damage. The gaps due to damage were identified based on the surrounding damage pattern, applying Gabor wavelets and a histogram of gradient orientation features. Two learning algorithms - SVM and Random Forests were tested for mapping the damaged regions based on radiometric descriptors. The learning model based on Gabor features with Random Forests performed best, identifying 95% of the damaged regions. The generalization performance of the supervised model, however, was less successful: quality measures decreased by around 15-30%.

  8. Innovative radar products for the 3D, high-resolution and real-time monitoring of the convective activity in the airspace around airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabary, P.; Bousquet, O.; Sénési, S.; Josse, P.

    2009-09-01

    Airports are recognized to become critical areas in the future given the expected doubling in air traffic by 2020. The increased density of aircrafts in the airport airspaces calls for improved systems and products to monitor in real-time potential hazards and thus meet the airport objectives in terms of safety and throughput. Among all meteorological hazards, convection is certainly the most impacting one. We describe here some innovative radar products that have recently been developed and tested at Météo France around the Paris airports. Those products rely on the French Doppler radar network consisting today of 24 elements with some of them being polarimetric. Reflectivity and Doppler volumetric data are concentrated from all 24 radar sites in real-time at the central level (Toulouse) where 3D Cartesian mosaics covering the entire French territory (i.e. a typical 1,000 by 1,000 km² area) are elaborated. The innovation with respect to what has been done previously is that the three components of the wind are retrieved by operational combination of the radial velocities. The final product, available in real-time every 15 minutes with a spatial resolution of 2.5 km horizontally and 500 m vertically, is a 3D grid giving the interpolated reflectivity and wind field (u, v and w) values. The 2.5 km resolution, arising from the fact that the retrieval is carried out every 15 minutes from radars typically spaced apart by 150 km, is not sufficient for airport airspace monitoring but is valuable for en-route monitoring. Its extension to the entire European space is foreseen. To address the specific needs in the airport areas, a downscaling technique has been proposed to merge the above-mentioned low-resolution 3D wind and reflectivity fields with the high resolution (5 minutes and 1 km²) 2D imagery of the Trappes radar that is the one that covers the Paris airports. The merging approach is based on the assumption that the Vertical Profile of Reflectivity (i.e. the

  9. Spatial resolution effect of light coupling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juntao; Li, Kezheng; Schuster, Christian; Su, Rongbin; Wang, Xuehua; Borges, Ben-Hur V.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Martins, Emiliano R.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of light between free space and thin film semiconductors is an essential requirement of modern optoelectronic technology. For monochromatic and single mode devices, high performance grating couplers have been developed that are well understood. For broadband and multimode devices, however, more complex structures, here referred to as “coupling surfaces”, are required, which are often difficult to realise technologically. We identify general design rules based on the Fourier properties of the coupling surface and show how they can be used to determine the spatial resolution required for the coupler’s fabrication. To our knowledge, this question has not been previously addressed, but it is important for the understanding of diffractive nanostructures and their technological realisation. We exemplify our insights with solar cells and UV photodetectors, where high-performance nanostructures that can be realised cost-effectively are essential.

  10. Spatial resolution effect of light coupling structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juntao; Li, Kezheng; Schuster, Christian; Su, Rongbin; Wang, Xuehua; Borges, Ben-Hur V.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Martins, Emiliano R.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of light between free space and thin film semiconductors is an essential requirement of modern optoelectronic technology. For monochromatic and single mode devices, high performance grating couplers have been developed that are well understood. For broadband and multimode devices, however, more complex structures, here referred to as “coupling surfaces”, are required, which are often difficult to realise technologically. We identify general design rules based on the Fourier properties of the coupling surface and show how they can be used to determine the spatial resolution required for the coupler’s fabrication. To our knowledge, this question has not been previously addressed, but it is important for the understanding of diffractive nanostructures and their technological realisation. We exemplify our insights with solar cells and UV photodetectors, where high-performance nanostructures that can be realised cost-effectively are essential. PMID:26678574

  11. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2011-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process. PMID:21533072

  12. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 1: Theory and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Bailey, R. T.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  13. Voxelization algorithms for geospatial applications: Computational methods for voxelating spatial datasets of 3D city models containing 3D surface, curve and point data models.

    PubMed

    Nourian, Pirouz; Gonçalves, Romulo; Zlatanova, Sisi; Ohori, Ken Arroyo; Vu Vo, Anh

    2016-01-01

    Voxel representations have been used for years in scientific computation and medical imaging. The main focus of our research is to provide easy access to methods for making large-scale voxel models of built environment for environmental modelling studies while ensuring they are spatially correct, meaning they correctly represent topological and semantic relations among objects. In this article, we present algorithms that generate voxels (volumetric pixels) out of point cloud, curve, or surface objects. The algorithms for voxelization of surfaces and curves are a customization of the topological voxelization approach [1]; we additionally provide an extension of this method for voxelization of point clouds. The developed software has the following advantages:•It provides easy management of connectivity levels in the resulting voxels.•It is not dependant on any external library except for primitive types and constructs; therefore, it is easy to integrate them in any application.•One of the algorithms is implemented in C++ and C for platform independence and efficiency. PMID:27408832

  14. Detection of latent fingerprints using high-resolution 3D confocal microscopy in non-planar acquisition scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Stefan; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    In digitized forensics the support of investigators in any manner is one of the main goals. Using conservative lifting methods, the detection of traces is done manually. For non-destructive contactless methods, the necessity for detecting traces is obvious for further biometric analysis. High resolutional 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) grants the possibility for a detection by segmentation approach with improved detection results. Optimal scan results with CLSM are achieved on surfaces orthogonal to the sensor, which is not always possible due to environmental circumstances or the surface's shape. This introduces additional noise, outliers and a lack of contrast, making a detection of traces even harder. Prior work showed the possibility of determining angle-independent classification models for the detection of latent fingerprints (LFP). Enhancing this approach, we introduce a larger feature space containing a variety of statistical-, roughness-, color-, edge-directivity-, histogram-, Gabor-, gradient- and Tamura features based on raw data and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) using high resolutional data. Our test set consists of eight different surfaces for the detection of LFP in four different acquisition angles with a total of 1920 single scans. For each surface and angles in steps of 10, we capture samples from five donors to introduce variance by a variety of sweat compositions and application influences such as pressure or differences in ridge thickness. By analyzing the present test set with our approach, we intend to determine angle- and substrate-dependent classification models to determine optimal surface specific acquisition setups and also classification models for a general detection purpose for both, angles and substrates. The results on overall models with classification rates up to 75.15% (kappa 0.50) already show a positive tendency regarding the usability of the proposed methods for LFP detection on varying surfaces in non

  15. Plant Tissues in 3D via X-Ray Tomography: Simple Contrasting Methods Allow High Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Staedler, Yannick M.; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  16. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  17. Giant Impacts on Terrestrial Planets: A High-Resolution 3D Study of Magma Ocean Formation and Atmospheric Blowoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Sarah

    The end stages of terrestrial planet formation are dominated by giant impact events, which may significantly affect the final composition of a planet. The physical changes from giant impacts include formation of magma oceans and atmospheric blowoff. We propose to conduct unique numerical experiments to investigate the physics of giant impacts in order to determine their effect on the thermal state and volatile budget of terrestrial planets (0.1 to 10 Earth masses). Proposed work: High-resolution 3D giant impacts between differentiated silicate-iron and ice-silicate planets will be modeled with both the widely-used CTH shock physics code and a new second-order Godunov finite-volume hydrocode called AREPO. AREPO's powerful arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian grid and computational efficiency allows for unprecedented resolution of planetary structure (e.g., crust and ocean). Expected results: (1) We will calculate the amount of melt generated and fraction of atmosphere lost during different classes of giant impacts (merging, graze and merge, hit and run, and erosion/disruption). (2) We will derive general scaling laws to describe these complicated phenomena. (3) We will consider the effect of re-accretion of ejected material at late times on the total thermal input of giant impact events. (4) And we will test the giant impact hypothesis for the high bulk density of Mercury by conducting orbital integrations of ejected debris to determine the amount of re-accreted mantle material for different impact orientations. The science team has an established collaborative body of work in giant impact simulations and hydrocode development. As in previous studies, the simulation results will be generalized into sets of simple equations describing collision outcomes that are suitable for N-body planet formation models. The proposed work supports the goals of the Origins of Solar Systems program by conducting a fundamental theoretical investigation of a key stage of planet formation

  18. Preliminary study of statistical pattern recognition-based coin counterfeit detection by means of high resolution 3D scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leich, Marcus; Kiltz, Stefan; Krätzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2011-03-01

    According to the European Commission around 200,000 counterfeit Euro coins are removed from circulation every year. While approaches exist to automatically detect these coins, satisfying error rates are usually only reached for low quality forgeries, so-called "local classes". High-quality minted forgeries ("common classes") pose a problem for these methods as well as for trained humans. This paper presents a first approach for statistical analysis of coins based on high resolution 3D data acquired with a chromatic white light sensor. The goal of this analysis is to determine whether two coins are of common origin. The test set for these first and new investigations consists of 62 coins from not more than five different sources. The analysis is based on the assumption that, apart from markings caused by wear such as scratches and residue consisting of grease and dust, coins from equal origin have a more similar height field than coins from different mints. First results suggest that the selected approach is heavily affected by influences of wear like dents and scratches and the further research is required the eliminate this influence. A course for future work is outlined.

  19. Use of Very High-Resolution Airborne Images to Analyse 3d Canopy Architecture of a Vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, S.; Mota, M.; Noll, D.; Cannelle, B.

    2015-08-01

    Differencing between green cover and grape canopy is a challenge for vigour status evaluation in viticulture. This paper presents the acquisition methodology of very high-resolution images (4 cm), using a Sensefly Swinglet CAM unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and their processing to construct a 3D digital surface model (DSM) for the creation of precise digital terrain models (DTM). The DTM was obtained using python processing libraries. The DTM was then subtracted to the DSM in order to obtain a differential digital model (DDM) of a vineyard. In the DDM, the vine pixels were then obtained by selecting all pixels with an elevation higher than 50 [cm] above the ground level. The results show that it was possible to separate pixels from the green cover and the vine rows. The DDM showed values between -0.1 and + 1.5 [m]. A manually delineation of polygons based on the RGB image belonging to the green cover and to the vine rows gave a highly significant differences with an average value of 1.23 [m] and 0.08 [m] for the vine and the ground respectively. The vine rows elevation is in good accordance with the topping height of the vines 1.35 [m] measured on the field. This mask could be used to analyse images of the same plot taken at different times. The extraction of only vine pixels will facilitate subsequent analyses, for example, a supervised classification of these pixels.

  20. Soil process-oriented modelling of within-field variability based on high-resolution 3D soil type distribution maps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bönecke, Eric; Lück, Erika; Gründling, Ralf; Rühlmann, Jörg; Franko, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Today, the knowledge of within-field variability is essential for numerous purposes, including practical issues, such as precision and sustainable soil management. Therefore, process-oriented soil models have been applied for a considerable time to answer question of spatial soil nutrient and water dynamics, although, they can only be as consistent as their variation and resolution of soil input data. Traditional approaches, describe distribution of soil types, soil texture or other soil properties for greater soil units through generalised point information, e.g. from classical soil survey maps. Those simplifications are known to be afflicted with large uncertainties. Varying soil, crop or yield conditions are detected even within such homogenised soil units. However, recent advances of non-invasive soil survey and on-the-go monitoring techniques, made it possible to obtain vertical and horizontal dense information (3D) about various soil properties, particularly soil texture distribution which serves as an essential soil key variable affecting various other soil properties. Thus, in this study we based our simulations on detailed 3D soil type distribution (STD) maps (4x4 m) to adjacently built-up sufficient informative soil profiles including various soil physical and chemical properties. Our estimates of spatial STD are based on high-resolution lateral and vertical changes of electrical resistivity (ER), detected by a relatively new multi-sensor on-the-go ER monitoring device. We performed an algorithm including fuzzy-c-mean (FCM) logic and traditional soil classification to estimate STD from those inverted and layer-wise available ER data. STD is then used as key input parameter for our carbon, nitrogen and water transport model. We identified Pedological horizon depths and inferred hydrological soil variables (field capacity, permanent wilting point) from pedotransferfunctions (PTF) for each horizon. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of soil organic carbon

  1. Comparison of 3D Maximum A Posteriori and Filtered Backprojection algorithms for high resolution animal imaging in microPET

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Qi, J.; Moore, A.; Annala, A.; Nguyen, K.; Leahy, R.M.; Cherry, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of two three dimensional reconstruction algorithms with data acquired from microPET, a high resolution tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging. The first was a linear filtered-backprojection algorithm (FBP) with reprojection of the missing data and the second was a statistical maximum-aposteriori probability algorithm (MAP). The two algorithms were evaluated in terms of their resolution performance, both in phantoms and in vivo. Sixty independent realizations of a phantom simulating the brain of a baby monkey were acquired, each containing 3 million counts. Each of these realizations was reconstructed independently with both algorithms. The ensemble of the sixty reconstructed realizations was used to estimate the standard deviation as a measure of the noise for each reconstruction algorithm. More detail was recovered in the MAP reconstruction without an increase in noise relative to FBP. Studies in a simple cylindrical compartment phantom demonstrated improved recovery of known activity ratios with MAP. Finally in vivo studies also demonstrated a clear improvement in spatial resolution using the MAP algorithm. The quantitative accuracy of the MAP reconstruction was also evaluated by comparison with autoradiography and direct well counting of tissue samples and was shown to be superior.

  2. Computational hologram synthesis and representation on spatial light modulators for real-time 3D holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Leister, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    In dynamic computer-generated holography that utilizes spatial light modulators, both hologram synthesis and hologram representation are essential in terms of fast computation and high reconstruction quality. For hologram synthesis, i.e. the computation step, Fresnel transform based or point-source based raytracing methods can be applied. In the encoding step, the complex wave-field has to be optimally represented by the SLM with its given modulation capability. For proper hologram reconstruction that implies a simultaneous and independent amplitude and phase modulation of the input wave-field by the SLM. In this paper, we discuss full complex hologram representation methods on SLMs by considering inherent SLM parameter such as modulation type and bit depth on their reconstruction performance such as diffraction efficiency and SNR. We review the three implementation schemes of Burckhardt amplitude-only representation, phase-only macro-pixel representation, and two-phase interference representation. Besides the optical performance we address their hardware complexity and required computational load. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate holographic reconstructions of different representation schemes as obtained by functional prototypes utilizing SeeReal's viewing-window holographic display technology. The proposed hardware implementations enable a fast encoding of complex-valued hologram data and thus will pave the way for commercial real-time holographic 3D imaging in the near future.

  3. 3D imaging of soil apparent electrical conductivity from VERIS data using a 1D spatially constrained inversion algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Moral García, Francisco; Rebollo Castillo, Francisco Javier; Monteiro Santos, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Maps of apparent electrical conductivity of the soil are commonly used in precision agriculture to indirectly characterize some important properties like salinity, water, and clay content. Traditionally, these studies are made through an empirical relationship between apparent electrical conductivity and properties measured in soil samples collected at a few locations in the experimental area and at a few selected depths. Recently, some authors have used not the apparent conductivity values but the soil bulk conductivity (in 2D or 3D) calculated from measured apparent electrical conductivity through the application of an inversion method. All the published works used data collected with electromagnetic (EM) instruments. We present a new software to invert the apparent electrical conductivity data collected with VERIS 3100 and 3150 (or the more recent version with three pairs of electrodes) using the 1D spatially constrained inversion method (1D SCI). The software allows the calculation of the distribution of the bulk electrical conductivity in the survey area till a depth of 1 m. The algorithm is applied to experimental data and correlations with clay and water content have been established using soil samples collected at some boreholes. Keywords: Digital soil mapping; inversion modelling; VERIS; soil apparent electrical conductivity.

  4. Sea Level History in 3D: Early results of an ultra-high resolution MCS survey across IODP Expedition 313 drillsites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, G. S.; Kucuk, H. M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Austin, J. A., Jr.; Fulthorpe, C.; Newton, A.; Baldwin, K.; Johnson, C.; Stanley, J. N.; Bhatnagar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Although globally averaged sea level is rising at roughly 3 mm/yr (and is accelerating), rates of local sea-level change measured at coastlines may differ from this number by a factor of two or more; at some locations, sea level may even be falling. This is due to local processes that can match or even reverse the global trend, making it clear that reliable predictions of future impacts of sea-level rise require a firm understanding of processes at the local level. The history of local sea-level change and shoreline response is contained in the geologic record of shallow-water sediments. We report on a continuing study of sea-level history in sediments at the New Jersey continental margin, where compaction and glacial isostatic adjustment are currently adding 2 mm/yr to the globally averaged rise. We collected 570 sq km of ultra-high resolution 3D MCS data aboard the R/V Langseth in June-July 2015; innovative recording and preliminary results are described by Nedimovic et al. in this same session. The goal was to provide regional context to coring and logging at IODP Exp 313 sites 27-29 that were drilled 750 m into the New Jersey shelf in 2009. These sites recovered a nearly continuous record of post-Eocene sediments from non-marine soils, estuaries, shoreface, delta front, pro-delta and open marine settings. Existing seismic data are good but are 2D high-resolution profiles at line spacings too wide to enable mapping of key nearshore features. The Langseth 3D survey used shallow towing of a tuned air gun array to preserve high frequencies, and twenty-four 50-m PCables each 12.5 apart provided 6.25 x 3.125 m common-midpoint bins along seventy-seven 50-km sail lines. With this especially dense spatial resolution of a pre-stack time migrated volume we expect to map rivers, incised valleys, barrier islands, inlets and bays, pro-delta clinoforms, tidal deltas, sequence boundaries, debris flow aprons, and more. Seismic attributes linked to sedimentary facies and

  5. PRo3D - a tool for remote exploration and visual analysis of multi-resolution planetary terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traxler, C.; Hesina, G.; Ortner, T.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a viewer called PRo3D that enables planetary scientists to explore and analyze accurate reconstructions of planetary terrains. These reconstructions, derived from 3D-processing of images obtained by rovers, landers, and satellites, provide access to the corresponding planetary surfaces on Earth in a virtual space. PRo3D allows zooming through a broad range of geometric scales to study geologic structures from far away to microscopic close-up. The viewer provides various measurement tools to derive the true dimension of surface features and let scientists place annotations in 3D space. PRo3D is a component of the FP7-PRoViDE tool set.

  6. Effects of spatial resolution ratio in image fusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ling, Y.; Ehlers, M.; Usery, E.L.; Madden, M.

    2008-01-01

    In image fusion, the spatial resolution ratio can be defined as the ratio between the spatial resolution of the high-resolution panchromatic image and that of the low-resolution multispectral image. This paper attempts to assess the effects of the spatial resolution ratio of the input images on the quality of the fused image. Experimental results indicate that a spatial resolution ratio of 1:10 or higher is desired for optimal multisensor image fusion provided the input panchromatic image is not downsampled to a coarser resolution. Due to the synthetic pixels generated from resampling, the quality of the fused image decreases as the spatial resolution ratio decreases (e.g. from 1:10 to 1:30). However, even with a spatial resolution ratio as small as 1:30, the quality of the fused image is still better than the original multispectral image alone for feature interpretation. In cases where the spatial resolution ratio is too small (e.g. 1:30), to obtain better spectral integrity of the fused image, one may downsample the input high-resolution panchromatic image to a slightly lower resolution before fusing it with the multispectral image.

  7. 3D tissue-engineered construct analysis via conventional high-resolution microcomputed tomography without X-ray contrast.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; VanGordon, Samuel B; Shambaugh, Robert L; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I

    2013-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering develops, researchers are faced with a large number of degrees of freedom regarding the choice of material, architecture, seeding, and culturing. To evaluate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered strategy, histology is typically done by physically slicing and staining a construct (crude, time-consuming, and unreliable). However, due to recent advances in high-resolution biomedical imaging, microcomputed tomography (μCT) has arisen as a quick and effective way to evaluate samples, while preserving their structure in the original state. However, a major barrier for using μCT to do histology has been its inability to differentiate between materials with similar X-ray attenuation. Various contrasting strategies (hardware and chemical staining agents) have been proposed to address this problem, but at a cost of additional complexity and limited access. Instead, here we suggest a strategy for how virtual 3D histology in silico can be conducted using conventional μCT, and we provide an illustrative example from bone tissue engineering. The key to our methodology is an implementation of scaffold surface architecture that is ordered in relation to cells and tissue, in concert with straightforward image-processing techniques, to minimize the reliance on contrasting for material segmentation. In the case study reported, μCT was used to image and segment porous poly(lactic acid) nonwoven fiber mesh scaffolds that were seeded dynamically with mesenchymal stem cells and cultured to produce soft tissue and mineralized tissue in a flow perfusion bioreactor using an osteogenic medium. The methodology presented herein paves a new way for tissue engineers to identify and distinguish components of cell/tissue/scaffold constructs to easily and effectively evaluate the tissue-engineering strategies that generate them. PMID:23020551

  8. Enhanced spatial resolution on figures versus grounds.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Lauren N; Cosman, Joshua D; Vecera, Shaun P

    2016-07-01

    Much is known about the cues that determine figure-ground assignment, but less is known about the consequences of figure-ground assignment on later visual processing. Previous work has demonstrated that regions assigned figural status are subjectively more shape-like and salient than background regions. The increase in subjective salience of figural regions could be caused by a number of processes, one of which may be enhanced perceptual processing (e.g., an enhanced neural representation) of figures relative to grounds. We explored this hypothesis by having observers perform a perceptually demanding spatial resolution task in which targets appeared on either figure or ground regions. To rule out a purely attentional account of figural salience, observers discriminated targets on the basis of a region's color (red or green), which was equally likely to define the figure or the ground. The results of our experiments showed that targets appearing on figures were discriminated more accurately than those appearing in ground regions. In addition, targets appearing on figures were discriminated better than those presented in regions considered figurally neutral, but targets appearing within ground regions were discriminated more poorly than those appearing in figurally neutral regions. Taken together, our findings suggest that when two regions share a contour, regions assigned as figure are perceptually enhanced, whereas regions assigned as ground are perceptually suppressed. PMID:27048441

  9. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  10. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D. PMID:27619347

  11. Recent high resolution laboratory determinations of line broadening and intensity parameters: PH3, CH3D, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, C. B.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Valero, F. P. J.; Tarrago, G.

    1990-01-01

    Recent unpublished laboratory work on rovibrational line strengths and broadening coefficients which is of interest in the study of planetary atmospheres was reviewed. The molecules discussed are PH3, CH3D and CO2.

  12. Computer simulated screening of dentin bonding primer monomers through analysis of their chemical functions and their spatial 3D alignment.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, J; Vaidyanathan, T K; Ravichandran, S

    2009-02-01

    Binding interactions between dentin bonding primer monomers and dentinal collagen were studied by an analysis of their chemical functions and their spatial 3D alignment. A trial set of 12 monomers used as primers in dentin adhesives was characterized to assess them for binding to a complementary target. HipHop utility in the Catalyst software from Accelrys was used for the study. Ten hypotheses were generated by HipHop procedures involving (a) conformational generation using a poling technique to promote conformational variation, (b) extraction of functions to remodel ligands as function-based structures, and (c) identification of common patterns of functional alignment displayed by low energy conformations. The hypotheses, designated as pharmacaphores, were also scored and ranked. Analysis of pharmacaphore models through mapping of ligands revealed important differences between ligands. Top-ranked poses from direct docking simulations using type 1 collagen target were mapped in a rigid manner to the highest ranked pharmacophore model. The visual match observed in mapping and associated fit values suggest a strong correspondence between direct and indirect docking simulations. The results elegantly demonstrate that an indirect approach used to identify pharmacaphore models from adhesive ligands without a target may be a simple and viable approach to assess their intermolecular interactions with an intended target. Inexpensive indirect/direct virtual screening of hydrophilic monomer candidates may be a practical way to assess their initial promise for dentin primer use well before additional experimental evaluation of their priming/bonding efficacy. This is also of value in the search/design of new compounds for priming dentin. PMID:18546179

  13. Spatial Pattern Dynamics of 3D Stem Cell Loss of Pluripotency via Rules-Based Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas E.; Kinney, Melissa A.; McDevitt, Todd C.; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    powerful tool to predict stem cell behavior under a number of culture conditions that emulate characteristics of 3D stem cell niches. PMID:23516345

  14. Automated Verification of Spatial Resolution in Remotely Sensed Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Vaughn, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Image spatial resolution characteristics can vary widely among sources. In the case of aerial-based imaging systems, the image spatial resolution characteristics can even vary between acquisitions. In these systems, aircraft altitude, speed, and sensor look angle all affect image spatial resolution. Image spatial resolution needs to be verified with estimators that include the ground sample distance (GSD), the modulation transfer function (MTF), and the relative edge response (RER), all of which are key components of image quality, along with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and dynamic range. Knowledge of spatial resolution parameters is important to determine if features of interest are distinguishable in imagery or associated products, and to develop image restoration algorithms. An automated Spatial Resolution Verification Tool (SRVT) was developed to rapidly determine the spatial resolution characteristics of remotely sensed aerial and satellite imagery. Most current methods for assessing spatial resolution characteristics of imagery rely on pre-deployed engineered targets and are performed only at selected times within preselected scenes. The SRVT addresses these insufficiencies by finding uniform, high-contrast edges from urban scenes and then using these edges to determine standard estimators of spatial resolution, such as the MTF and the RER. The SRVT was developed using the MATLAB programming language and environment. This automated software algorithm assesses every image in an acquired data set, using edges found within each image, and in many cases eliminating the need for dedicated edge targets. The SRVT automatically identifies high-contrast, uniform edges and calculates the MTF and RER of each image, and when possible, within sections of an image, so that the variation of spatial resolution characteristics across the image can be analyzed. The automated algorithm is capable of quickly verifying the spatial resolution quality of all images within a data

  15. High-resolution 3-D P-wave tomographic imaging of the shallow magmatic system of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandomeneghi, D.; Aster, R. C.; Barclay, A. H.; Chaput, J. A.; Kyle, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Erebus volcano (Ross Island), the most active volcano in Antarctica, is characterized by a persistent phonolitic lava lake at its summit and a wide range of seismic signals associated with its underlying long-lived magmatic system. The magmatic structure in a 3 by 3 km area around the summit has been imaged using high-quality data from a seismic tomographic experiment carried out during the 2008-2009 austral field season (Zandomeneghi et al., 2010). An array of 78 short period, 14 broadband, and 4 permanent Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory seismic stations and a program of 12 shots were used to model the velocity structure in the uppermost kilometer over the volcano conduit. P-wave travel times were inverted for the 3-D velocity structure using the shortest-time ray tracing (50-m grid spacing) and LSQR inversion (100-m node spacing) of a tomography code (Toomey et al., 1994) that allows for the inclusion of topography. Regularization is controlled by damping and smoothing weights and smoothing lengths, and addresses complications that are inherent in a strongly heterogeneous medium featuring rough topography and a dense parameterization and distribution of receivers/sources. The tomography reveals a composite distribution of very high and low P-wave velocity anomalies (i.e., exceeding 20% in some regions), indicating a complex sub-lava-lake magmatic geometry immediately beneath the summit region and in surrounding areas, as well as the presence of significant high velocity shallow regions. The strongest and broadest low velocity zone is located W-NW of the crater rim, indicating the presence of an off-axis shallow magma body. This feature spatially corresponds to the inferred centroid source of VLP signals associated with Strombolian eruptions and lava lake refill (Aster et al., 2008). Other resolved structures correlate with the Side Crater and with lineaments of ice cave thermal anomalies extending NE and SW of the rim. High velocities in the summit area possibly

  16. 3D Transient Hydraulic Tomography (3DTHT): An Efficient Field and Modeling Method for High-Resolution Estimation of Aquifer Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M. A.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) is a major control on groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Our limited ability to determine 3D heterogeneous distributions of K is a major reason for increased costs and uncertainties associated with virtually all aspects of groundwater contamination management (e.g., site investigations, risk assessments, remediation method selection/design/operation, monitoring system design/operation). Hydraulic tomography (HT) is an emerging method for directly estimating the spatially variable distribution of K - in a similar fashion to medical or geophysical imaging. Here we present results from 3D transient field-scale experiments (3DTHT) which capture the heterogeneous K distribution in a permeable, moderately heterogeneous, coarse fluvial unconfined aquifer at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). The results are verified against high-resolution K profiles from multi-level slug tests at BHRS wells. The 3DTHT field system for well instrumentation and data acquisition/feedback is fully modular and portable, and the in-well packer-and-port system is easily assembled and disassembled without expensive support equipment or need for gas pressurization. Tests are run for 15-20 min and the aquifer is allowed to recover while the pumping equipment is repositioned between tests. The tomographic modeling software developed uses as input observations of temporal drawdown behavior from each of numerous zones isolated in numerous observation wells during a series of pumping tests conducted from numerous isolated intervals in one or more pumping wells. The software solves for distributed K (as well as storage parameters Ss and Sy, if desired) and estimates parameter uncertainties using: a transient 3D unconfined forward model in MODFLOW, the adjoint state method for calculating sensitivities (Clemo 2007), and the quasi-linear geostatistical inverse method (Kitanidis 1995) for the inversion. We solve for K at >100,000 sub-m3

  17. Effects of Spatial Ability, Gender Differences, and Pictorial Training on Children Using 2-D and 3-D Environments to Recall Landmark Locations from Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Otumfuor, Beryl A.; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of spatial ability, gender differences, and pictorial training on fourth grade students' ability to recall landmark locations from memory. Ninety-six students used Google Earth over a 3-week period to locate landmarks (3-D) and mark their location on a 2-D topographical map. Analysis of covariance on posttest scores…

  18. Ultra-high-resolution marine 2D-3D seismic investigation of the Liman Tepe/Karantina Island archaeological site (Urla/Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, C.; Woelz, S.; Ersoy, Y.; Boyce, J.; Jokisch, T.; Wendt, G.; Rabbel, W.

    2009-05-01

    2D and 3D high-resolution seismic investigations were performed on submerged coastal archaeological sites at Iskele and near to Karantina Island in the Bay of Izmir in western Turkey. Tectonic subsidence of the coastline has submerged a number of archaeological features associated with an important Early Bronze Archaic settlement (Liman Tepe) and the classical Ionian city of Clazomenae. Seismic surveys were focused on imaging of an Archaic harbour structure and other submerged Hellenistic and Roman architectural features. Seismic data were acquired with the SEAMAP-3D ultra-high-resolution 3D marine seismic acquisition system developed for detailed archaeological site investigation. A 2D reconnaissance survey was performed over a 2 km 2 area around Karantina Island to evaluate the seismic penetrability and to locate sites for further 3D investigation. This survey predominantly revealed marine sediment layers covering the local bedrock, which is characterized by scattering of seismic energy showing its rocky nature. Two ultra-high-resolution 3D seismic surveys were performed. The first covered a 350 m × 30 m area in the modern harbour targeting a prominent Archaic harbour structure. The second was acquired across a 120 m × 40 m area on the southeast shore of the Karantina Island close to a Roman architectural feature. The 3D surveys were acquired with nominal line spacings of 1 m, using a 8 × 4 pseudo-rigid hydrophone array and a Boomer source firing at 3 Hz shot frequency. Automated processing of the seismic data using a portable Linux cluster provided stacked 3D seismic volumes with 25 cm × 25 cm bin size on-site. The 3D seismic survey of the harbour clearly imaged the submerged Archaic structure and the underlying sediment sequence. The seismic time slices reveal two seismic anomalies (2-3 m in diameter) in the harbour basin sediments. The 3D surveys southeast of Karantina identified a thicker marine sediment sequence overlying steeply dipping bedrock

  19. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  20. The effect of spatial resolution on decoding accuracy in fMRI multivariate pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardumi, Anna; Ivanov, Dimo; Hausfeld, Lars; Valente, Giancarlo; Formisano, Elia; Uludağ, Kâmil

    2016-05-15

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) in fMRI has been used to extract information from distributed cortical activation patterns, which may go undetected in conventional univariate analysis. However, little is known about the physical and physiological underpinnings of MVPA in fMRI as well as about the effect of spatial smoothing on its performance. Several studies have addressed these issues, but their investigation was limited to the visual cortex at 3T with conflicting results. Here, we used ultra-high field (7T) fMRI to investigate the effect of spatial resolution and smoothing on decoding of speech content (vowels) and speaker identity from auditory cortical responses. To that end, we acquired high-resolution (1.1mm isotropic) fMRI data and additionally reconstructed them at 2.2 and 3.3mm in-plane spatial resolutions from the original k-space data. Furthermore, the data at each resolution were spatially smoothed with different 3D Gaussian kernel sizes (i.e. no smoothing or 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, or 8.8mm kernels). For all spatial resolutions and smoothing kernels, we demonstrate the feasibility of decoding speech content (vowel) and speaker identity at 7T using support vector machine (SVM) MVPA. In addition, we found that high spatial frequencies are informative for vowel decoding and that the relative contribution of high and low spatial frequencies is different across the two decoding tasks. Moderate smoothing (up to 2.2mm) improved the accuracies for both decoding of vowels and speakers, possibly due to reduction of noise (e.g. residual motion artifacts or instrument noise) while still preserving information at high spatial frequency. In summary, our results show that - even with the same stimuli and within the same brain areas - the optimal spatial resolution for MVPA in fMRI depends on the specific decoding task of interest. PMID:26899782

  1. Study of the spatial resolution for binary readout detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, R.; Maerschalk, T.; Lentdecker, G. De

    2016-07-01

    Often the binary readout is proposed for high granularity detectors to reduce the generated data volume to be readout at the price of a somewhat reduced spatial resolution compared to an analogue readout. We have been studying single hit resolutions obtained with a binary readout using simulations as well as analytical approaches. In this note we show that the detector geometry could be optimized to offer an equivalent spatial resolution than with an analogue readout.

  2. 3D High-Resolution Seismic Tomography in the Upper Mantle of Gulf of California Region by SEM Seismogram Simulation and Adjoint Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Forsyth, D. W.; Savage, B.

    2010-12-01

    In our previous surface wave study in Gulf of California area, we developed a moderate-resolution 3D shear velocity model by employing two-plane wave field representation array technique and 2D finite frequency kernels based on Born’s approximation. Using both amplitude and phase information of 22-111s teleseismic Rayleigh wave, we were able to constrain a lateral resolution on the order of 100 km in the upper 160 km depth. In order to enhance resolution beneath the highly heterogeneous Gulf region, we carry on further study using Spectral element method (SEM) for forward wave propagation simulation and adjoint method for tomographic inversion. The code we are using is SPECFEM3D_GLOBE by Komatitsch and Tromp et al. To enhance the resolution in the Gulf, we will minimize the waveform difference between the regional earthquake seismograms, recorded by NARS-Baja seismic array and stations in southern California, and synthetic seismograms simulated by SEM, to iteratively update the current model based on an adjoint inversion. Taking our current 3D moderate-resolution model as starting point and a recently developed crustal structure of Gulf region should help to reduce the number of iterations. There are two reasons that resolution should be enhanced compared to surface wave tomography: first, regional events contain more high frequency signals than teleseismic events; second, SEM is a full waveform synthesis method avoiding many of the usual approximations in tomographic studies. Improved tomographic images of 3D velocity heterogeneities in the upper mantle of Gulf of California will help to identify compositional and temperature variations, leading to a better understanding of mantle dynamics in the region.

  3. Inverse Kriging to Enhance Spatial Resolution of Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, Gregg M. ); Heasler, Patrick G. ); Perry, Eileen M. ); Thompson, Sandra E. ); Daly, Don S. )

    2002-12-15

    We describe a unique approach to image resolution enhancement, inverse kriging (IK), which takes advantage of the spatial relationship between high- and low-resolution images within an area of overlap. Once established, this mathematical relationship then can be applied across the entire low-resolution image to significantly sharpen the image. The mathematical relationship uses the spatial correlations within the low-resolution image and between the low and high spatial-resolution imagery. Two of the most important requirements of the technique are that the images be co-registered well within the resolution of the larger pixels and that the spatial structure of the training area (where the spatial correlation statistics are compared) is similar to the structure of the remaining image area where it will be applied. Testing was performed using same-sensor and multi-sensor imagery. We show results that indicate that the method does improve the low spatial-resolution imagery. The selection of a training area spatial structure similar to the area being processed is important, as areas with different spatial structure (e.g., vegetation versus buildings and roads) will produce poor results. Comparisons with bilinear interpolation demonstrate that IK could be used as an improved interpolation tool, for example, in the image-registration process.

  4. Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Guignard, Jérémie; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface. PMID:25984986

  5. Maximizing modern distribution of complex anatomical spatial information: 3D reconstruction and rapid prototype production of anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyi; Nie, Lanying; Li, Zeyu; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Lei; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens are useful teaching aids. However, their use is limited due to ethical dilemmas associated with their production, their lack of perfect reproducibility, and their consumption of original specimens in the process of casting. In this study, new approaches with modern distribution of complex anatomical spatial information were explored to overcome these limitations through the digitalization of anatomical casts of human specimens through three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, rapid prototype production, and Web-based 3D atlas construction. The corrosion cast of a lung, along with its associated arteries, veins, trachea, and bronchial tree was CT-scanned, and the data was then processed by Mimics software. Data from the lung casts were then reconstructed into 3D models using a hybrid method, utilizing both "image threshold" and "region growing." The fine structures of the bronchial tree, arterial, and venous network of the lung were clearly displayed and demonstrated their distinct relationships. The multiple divisions of bronchi and bronchopulmonary segments were identified. The 3D models were then uploaded into a rapid prototype 3D printer to physically duplicate the cast. The physically duplicated model of the lung was rescanned by CT and reconstructed to detect its production accuracy. Gross observation and accuracy detection were used to evaluate the duplication and few differences were found. Finally, Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) was used to edit the 3D casting models to construct a Web-based 3D atlas accessible through Internet Explorer with 3D display and annotation functions. PMID:22653786

  6. Studying the effect of noise on the performance of 2D and 3D texture measures for quantifying the trabecular bone structure as obtained with high resolution MR imaging at 3 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monetti, Roberto; Bauer, Jan; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Matsuura, Maiko; Eckstein, Felix; Sidorenko, Irina; Raeth, Christoph W.

    2008-03-01

    3.0 Tesla MRI devices are becoming popular in clinical applications since they render images with a higher signal-tonoise ratio than the former 1.5 Tesla MRI devices. Here, we investigate if higher signal-to-noise ratio can be beneficial for a quantitative image analysis in the context of bone research. We performed a detailed analysis of the effect of noise on the performance of 2D morphometric linear measures and a 3D nonlinear measure with respect to their correlation with biomechanical properties of the bone expressed by the maximum compressive strength. The performance of both 2D and 3D texture measures was relatively insensitive to superimposed artificial noise. This finding suggests that MR sequences for visualizing bone structures at 3T should rather be optimized to spatial resolution (or scanning time) than to signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Breaking the Crowther limit: combining depth-sectioning and tilt tomography for high-resolution, wide-field 3D reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Hovden, Robert; Ercius, Peter; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Héctor D; Elser, Veit; Muller, David A

    2014-05-01

    To date, high-resolution (<1 nm) imaging of extended objects in three-dimensions (3D) has not been possible. A restriction known as the Crowther criterion forces a tradeoff between object size and resolution for 3D reconstructions by tomography. Further, the sub-Angstrom resolution of aberration-corrected electron microscopes is accompanied by a greatly diminished depth of field, causing regions of larger specimens (>6 nm) to appear blurred or missing. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional imaging method that overcomes both these limits by combining through-focal depth sectioning and traditional tilt-series tomography to reconstruct extended objects, with high-resolution, in all three dimensions. The large convergence angle in aberration corrected instruments now becomes a benefit and not a hindrance to higher quality reconstructions. A through-focal reconstruction over a 390 nm 3D carbon support containing over 100 dealloyed and nanoporous PtCu catalyst particles revealed with sub-nanometer detail the extensive and connected interior pore structure that is created by the dealloying instability. PMID:24636875

  8. Solar system events at high spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, K H; Gavel, D T; Getz, A M; Gibbartd, S G; MacIntosh, B; Max, C E; McKay, C P; Young, E F; de Pater, I

    1999-02-19

    Until relatively recent advances in technology, astronomical observations from the ground were limited in image resolution by the blurring effects of earth's atmosphere. The blur extent, ranging typically from 0.5 to 2 seconds of arc at the best astronomical sights, precluded ground-based observations of the details of the solar system's moons, asteroids, and outermost planets. With the maturing of a high resolution image processing technique called speckle imaging the resolution limitation of the atmosphere can now be largely overcome. Over the past three years they have used speckle imaging to observe Titan, a moon of Saturn with an atmospheric density comparable to Earth's, Io, the volcanically active innermost moon of Jupiter, and Neptune, a gas giant outer planet which has continually changing planet-encircling storms. These observations were made at the world's largest telescope, the Keck telescope in Hawaii and represent the highest resolution infrared images of these objects ever taken.

  9. Three-dimensional (3D) microarchitecture correlations with 2D projection image gray-level variations assessed by trabecular bone score using high-resolution computed tomographic acquisitions: effects of resolution and noise.

    PubMed

    Winzenrieth, Renaud; Michelet, Franck; Hans, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the level of correlation between the 3-dimensional (3D) characteristics of trabecular bone microarchitecture, as evaluated using microcomputed tomography (μCT) reconstruction, and trabecular bone score (TBS), as evaluated using 2D projection images directly derived from 3D μCT reconstruction (TBSμCT). Moreover, we have evaluated the effects of image degradation (resolution and noise) and X-ray energy of projection on these correlations. Thirty human cadaveric vertebrae were acquired on a microscanner at an isotropic resolution of 93 μm. The 3D microarchitecture parameters were obtained using MicroView (GE Healthcare, Wauwatosa, MI). The 2D projections of these 3D models were generated using the Beer-Lambert law at different X-ray energies. Degradation of image resolution was simulated (from 93 to 1488 μm). Relationships between 3D microarchitecture parameters and TBSμCT at different resolutions were evaluated using linear regression analysis. Significant correlations were observed between TBSμCT and 3D microarchitecture parameters, regardless of the resolution. Correlations were detected that were strongly to intermediately positive for connectivity density (0.711 ≤ r² ≤ 0.752) and trabecular number (0.584 ≤ r² ≤ 0.648) and negative for trabecular space (-0.407 ≤ r² ≤ -0.491), up to a pixel size of 1023 μm. In addition, TBSμCT values were strongly correlated between each other (0.77 ≤ r² ≤ 0.96). Study results show that the correlations between TBSμCT at 93 μm and 3D microarchitecture parameters are weakly impacted by the degradation of image resolution and the presence of noise. PMID:22749406

  10. R2OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture

    PubMed Central

    Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R2OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R2OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R2OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  11. R(2)OBBIE-3D, a Fast Robotic High-Resolution System for Quantitative Phenotyping of Surface Geometry and Colour-Texture.

    PubMed

    Martins, António F; Bessant, Michel; Manukyan, Liana; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    While recent imaging techniques provide insights into biological processes from the molecular to the cellular scale, phenotypes at larger scales remain poorly amenable to quantitative analyses. For example, investigations of the biophysical mechanisms generating skin morphological complexity and diversity would greatly benefit from 3D geometry and colour-texture reconstructions. Here, we report on R(2)OBBIE-3D, an integrated system that combines a robotic arm, a high-resolution digital colour camera, an illumination basket of high-intensity light-emitting diodes and state-of-the-art 3D-reconstruction approaches. We demonstrate that R(2)OBBIE generates accurate 3D models of biological objects between 1 and 100 cm, makes multiview photometric stereo scanning possible in practical processing times, and enables the capture of colour-texture and geometric resolutions better than 15 μm without the use of magnifying lenses. R(2)OBBIE has the potential to greatly improve quantitative analyses of phenotypes in addition to providing multiple new applications in, e.g., biomedical science. PMID:26039509

  12. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best represented the…

  13. Anticipatory Spatial Representation of 3D Regions Explored by Sighted Observers and a Deaf-and-Blind-Observer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intraub, Helene

    2004-01-01

    Viewers who study photographs of scenes tend to remember having seen beyond the boundaries of the view ["boundary extension"; J. Exp. Psychol. Learn. Mem. Cogn. 15 (1989) 179]. Is this a fundamental aspect of scene representation? Forty undergraduates explored bounded regions of six common (3D) scenes, visually or haptically (while blindfolded)…

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Vascular Architecture by Skeletonization of High-resolution 3-D Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, F.; Meiburger, K. M.; Giustetto, P.; Rizzitelli, S.; Boffa, C.; Castano, M.; Terreno, E.

    2014-01-01

    The accurate characterization and description of the vascular network of a cancer lesion is of paramount importance in clinical practice and cancer research in order to improve diagnostic accuracy or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of liposomes as an ultrasound contrast agent to describe the 3-D vascular architecture of a tumor. Eight C57BL/6 mice grafted with syngeneic B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were injected with a bolus of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC)-based non-targeted liposomes and with a bolus of microbubbles. 3-D contrast-enhanced images of the tumor lesions were acquired in three conditions: pre-contrast, after the injection of microbubbles, and after the injection of liposomes. By using a previously developed reconstruction and characterization image processing technique, we obtained the 3-D representation of the vascular architecture in these three conditions. Six descriptive parameters of these networks were also computed: the number of vascular trees (NT), the vascular density (VD), the number of branches, the 2-D curvature measure, the number of vascular flexes of the vessels, and the 3-D curvature. Results showed that all the vascular descriptors obtained by liposome-based images were statistically equal to those obtained by using microbubbles, except the VD which was found to be lower for liposome images. All the six descriptors computed in pre-contrast conditions had values that were statistically lower than those computed in presence of contrast, both for liposomes and microbubbles. Liposomes have already been used in cancer therapy for the selective ultrasound-mediated delivery of drugs. This work demonstrated their effectiveness also as vascular diagnostic contrast agents, therefore proving that liposomes can be used as efficient “theranostic” (i.e. therapeutic + diagnostic) ultrasound probes. PMID:24206210

  15. Evaluation of potential human health effects associated with the agricultural uses of 1,3-D: Spatial and temporal stochastic risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Driver, Jeffrey H; Price, Paul S; Van Wesenbeeck, Ian; Ross, John H; Gehen, Sean; Holden, Larry R; Landenberger, Bryce; Hastings, Kerry; Yan, Zhongyu June; Rasoulpour, Reza

    2016-11-15

    Dow AgroSciences (DAS) markets and sells 1,3-Dichloropropene (1,3-D), the active ingredient in Telone®, which is used as a pre-plant soil fumigant nematicide in economically important crops in California. 1,3-D has been regulated as a "probable human carcinogen" and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation limits use of 1,3-D based on human health risk assessments for bystanders. This paper presents a risk characterization for bystanders based on advances in the assessment of both exposure and hazard. The revised bystander risk assessment incorporates significant advances: 1) new data on residency duration and mobility in communities where 1,3-D is in high demand; 2) new information on spatial and temporal concentrations of 1,3-D in air based on multi-year modeling using a validated model; and 3) a new stochastic spatial and temporal model of long-term exposures. Predicted distributions of long-term, chronic exposures indicate that current, and anticipated uses of 1,3-D would result in lifetime average daily doses lower than 0.002mg/kg/d, a dose associated with theoretical lifetime excess cancer risk of <10(-5) to >95% of the local population based on a non-threshold risk assessment approach. Additionally, examination of 1,3-D toxicity studies including new chronic toxicity data and mechanism of action supports the use of a non-linear, threshold based risk assessment approach. The estimated maximum annual average daily dose of <0.0016mg/kg/d derived from the updated exposure assessment was then compared with a threshold point of departure. The calculated margin of exposure is >1000-fold, a clear indication of acceptable risk for human health. In summary, the best available science supports 1,3-D's threshold nature of hazard and the revised exposure assessment supports that current agricultural uses of 1,3-D are associated with reasonable certainty of no harm, i.e., estimated long-term exposures pose insignificant health risks to bystanders even when the

  16. Objective Assessment and Design Improvement of a Staring, Sparse Transducer Array by the Spatial Crosstalk Matrix for 3D Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, Ivan; Raess, Avery

    2015-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA) images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT) staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD). The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate). The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization. PMID:25875177

  17. High resolution 3D ERT to help GPR data interpretation for researching archaeological items in a geologically complex subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, S.; Leucci, G.; Mazzone, F.

    2008-09-01

    Muro Leccese (Lecce) contains one the most important Messapian archaeological sites in southern Italy. The archaeological interest of the site arises from the discovery of the remains of Messapian walls, tombs, roads, etc. (4th-2nd centuries BC) in the neighbourhood. The archaeological remains were found at about 0.3 m depth. At present the site belongs to the municipality, which intends to build a new sewer network through it. The risk of destroying potentially interesting ancient archaeological structures during the works prompted an archaeological survey of the area. The relatively large dimensions of the area (almost 10,000 m 2), together with time and cost constraints, made it necessary to use geophysical investigations as a faster means to ascertain the presence of archaeological items. Since the most important targets were expected to be located at a soil depth of about 0.3 m, a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out in an area located near the archaeological excavations. Unfortunately the geological complexity did not allow an easy interpretation of the GPR data. Therefore a 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) scan was conducted in order to resolve these interpretation problems. A three-way comparison of the results of the dense ERT measurements parallel to the x axis, the results of the measurements parallel to the y axis and the combined results was performed. Subsequently the synthetic model approach was used to provide a better characterization of the resistivity anomalies visible on the ERT field data. The 3D inversion results clearly illustrate the capability to resolve in view of quality 3D structures of archaeological interest. According to the presented data the inversion models along one direction ( x or y) seems to be adequate in reconstructing the subsurface structures. Naturally field data produce good quality reconstructions of the archaeological features only if the x-line and y-line measurements are considered together

  18. A study of spatial resolution in pollution exposure modelling

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Emilie; Harrie, Lars; Gustafsson, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    Background This study is part of several ongoing projects concerning epidemiological research into the effects on health of exposure to air pollutants in the region of Scania, southern Sweden. The aim is to investigate the optimal spatial resolution, with respect to temporal resolution, for a pollutant database of NOx-values which will be used mainly for epidemiological studies with durations of days, weeks or longer periods. The fact that a pollutant database has a fixed spatial resolution makes the choice critical for the future use of the database. Results The results from the study showed that the accuracy between the modelled concentrations of the reference grid with high spatial resolution (100 m), denoted the fine grid, and the coarser grids (200, 400, 800 and 1600 meters) improved with increasing spatial resolution. When the pollutant values were aggregated in time (from hours to days and weeks) the disagreement between the fine grid and the coarser grids were significantly reduced. The results also illustrate a considerable difference in optimal spatial resolution depending on the characteristic of the study area (rural or urban areas). To estimate the accuracy of the modelled values comparison were made with measured NOx values. The mean difference between the modelled and the measured value were 0.6 μg/m3 and the standard deviation 5.9 μg/m3 for the daily difference. Conclusion The choice of spatial resolution should not considerably deteriorate the accuracy of the modelled NOx values. Considering the comparison between modelled and measured values we estimate that an error due to coarse resolution greater than 1 μg/m3 is inadvisable if a time resolution of one day is used. Based on the study of different spatial resolutions we conclude that for urban areas a spatial resolution of 200–400 m is suitable; and for rural areas the spatial resolution could be coarser (about 1600 m). This implies that we should develop a pollutant database that allows

  19. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  20. Fusion and Visualization of HiRISE Super-Resolution, Shape-from-Shading DTM with MER Stereo 3D Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Paar, G.; Muller, J. P.; Tao, Y.; Tyler, L.; Traxler, C.; Hesina, G.; Huber, B.; Nauschnegg, B.

    2014-12-01

    The FP7-SPACE project PRoViDE has assembled a major portion of the imaging data gathered so far from rover vehicles, landers and probes on extra-terrestrial planetary surfaces into a unique database, bringing them into a common planetary geospatial context and providing access to a complete set of 3D vision products. One major aim of PRoViDE is the fusion between orbiter and rover image products. To close the gap between HiRISE imaging resolution (down to 25cm for the OrthoRectified image (ORI), down to 1m for the DTM) and surface vision products, images from multiple HiRISE acquisitions are combined into a super resolution data set (Tao & Muller, 2014), increasing to 5cm resolution the Ortho images. Furthermore, shape-from-shading is applied to one of the ORIs at its original resolution for refinement of the HiRISE DTM, leading to DTM ground resolutions of up to 25 cm. After texture-based co-registration with these refined orbiter 3D products, MER PanCam and NavCam 3D image products can be smoothly pasted into a multi-resolution 3D data representation. Typical results from the MER mission are presented by a dedicated real-time rendering tool which is fed by a hierarchical 3D data structure that is able to cope with all involved scales from global planetary scale down to close-up reconstructions in the mm range. This allows us to explore and analyze the geological characteristics of rock outcrops, for example the detailed geometry and internal features of sedimentary rock layers, to aid paleoenvironmental interpretation. This integrated approach enables more efficient development of geological models of martian rock outcrops. The rendering tool also provides measurement tools to obtain geospatial data of surface points and distances between them. We report on novel scientific use cases and the added value potential of the resultant high-quality data set and presentation means to support further geologic investigations. The research leading to these results has

  1. Geological interpretation and analysis of surface based, spatially referenced planetary imagery data using PRoGIS 2.0 and Pro3D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R.; Gupta, S.; Giordano, M.; Morley, J. G.; Muller, J. P.; Tao, Y.; Sprinks, J.; Traxler, C.; Hesina, G.; Ortner, T.; Sander, K.; Nauschnegg, B.; Paar, G.; Willner, K.; Pajdla, T.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the capabilities of the geospatial environment PRoGIS 2.0 and the real time rendering viewer PRo3D to geological analysis of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover-B (MER-B Opportunity rover) and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL Curiosity rover) datasets. Short baseline and serendipitous long baseline stereo Pancam rover imagery are used to create 3D point clouds which can be combined with super-resolution images derived from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE orbital data, andsuper-resolution outcrop images derived from MER Pancam, as well as hand-lens scale images for geology and outcrop characterization at all scales. Data within the PRoViDE database are presented and accessed through the PRoGIS interface. Simple geological measurement tools are implemented within the PRoGIS and PRo3D web software to accurately measure the dip and strike of bedding in outcrops, create detailed stratigraphic logs for correlation between the areas investigated, and to develop realistic 3D models for the characterization of planetary surface processes. Annotation tools are being developed to aid discussion and dissemination of the observations within the planetary science community.

  2. Results of the spatial resolution simulation for multispectral data (resolution brochures)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The variable information content of Earth Resource products at different levels of spatial resolution and in different spectral bands is addressed. A low-cost brochure that scientists and laymen could use to visualize the effects of increasing the spatial resolution of multispectral scanner images was produced.

  3. Radiometric and Spatial Characterization of High-Spatial Resolution Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Zanoni, Vicki (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development and improvement of commercial hyperspatial sensors in recent years has increased the breadth of information that can be retrieved from spaceborne and airborne imagery. NASA, through it's Scientific Data Purchases, has successfully provided such data sets to its user community. A key element to the usefulness of these data are an understanding of the radiometric and spatial response quality of the imagery. This proposal seeks funding to examine the absolute radiometric calibration of the Ikonos sensor operated by Space Imaging and the recently-launched Quickbird sensor from DigitalGlobe. In addition, we propose to evaluate the spatial response of the two sensors. The proposed methods rely on well-understood, ground-based targets that have been used by the University of Arizona for more than a decade.

  4. Analysis of DOA estimation spatial resolution using MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Hongyuan; Luo, Bin

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of the spatial resolution of the direction of arrival (DOA) estimates attained by the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm for uncorrelated sources. The confidence interval of estimation angle which is much more intuitionistic will be considered as the new evaluation standard for the spatial resolution. Then, based on the statistic method, the qualitative analysis reveals the factors influencing the performance of the MUSIC algorithm. At last, quantitative simulations prove the theoretical analysis result exactly.

  5. High spatial resolution passive microwave sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staelin, D. H.; Rosenkranz, P. W.; Bonanni, P. G.; Gasiewski, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Two extensive series of flights aboard the ER-2 aircraft were conducted with the MIT 118 GHz imaging spectrometer together with a 53.6 GHz nadir channel and a TV camera record of the mission. Other microwave sensors, including a 183 GHz imaging spectrometer were flown simultaneously by other research groups. Work also continued on evaluating the impact of high-resolution passive microwave soundings upon numerical weather prediction models.

  6. The effects of spatial resolution on integral field spectrograph surveys at different redshifts - The CALIFA perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, D.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vílchez, J. M.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Walcher, C. J.; Husemann, B.; Márquez, I.; Marino, R. A.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Galbany, L.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Kehrig, C.; del Olmo, A.; Relaño, M.; Wisotzki, L.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Bekeraitè, S.; Papaderos, P.; Wild, V.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Ziegler, B.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; van de Ven, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Over the past decade, 3D optical spectroscopy has become the preferred tool for understanding the properties of galaxies and is now increasingly used to carry out galaxy surveys. Low redshift surveys include SAURON, DiskMass, ATLAS3D, PINGS, and VENGA. At redshifts above 0.7, surveys such as MASSIV, SINS, GLACE, and IMAGES have targeted the most luminous galaxies to study mainly their kinematic properties. The on-going CALIFA survey (z ~ 0.02) is the first of a series of upcoming integral field spectroscopy (IFS) surveys with large samples representative of the entire population of galaxies. Others include SAMI and MaNGA at lower redshift and the upcoming KMOS surveys at higher redshift. Given the importance of spatial scales in IFS surveys, the study of the effects of spatial resolution on the recovered parameters becomes important. Aims: We explore the capability of the CALIFA survey and a hypothetical higher redshift survey to reproduce the properties of a sample of objects observed with better spatial resolution at lower redshift. Methods: Using a sample of PINGS galaxies, we simulated observations at different redshifts. We then studied the behaviour of different parameters as the spatial resolution degrades with increasing redshift. Results: We show that at the CALIFA resolution, we are able to measure and map common observables in a galaxy study: the number and distribution of H ii regions (Hα flux structure), the gas metallicity (using the O3N2 method), the gas ionization properties (through the [N ii]/Hα and [O iii]/Hβ line ratios), and the age of the underlying stellar population (using the D4000 index). This supports the aim of the survey to characterise the observable properties of galaxies in the Local Universe. Our analysis of simulated IFS data cubes at higher redshifts highlights the importance of the projected spatial scale per spaxel as the most important figure of merit in the design of an integral field survey.

  7. Super Spatial Resolution (SSR) method for scintigraphic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinci, G.; Massari, R.; Scandellari, M.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes an innovative patented Super Spatial Resolution (SSR) method applied to scintigraphic devices. The aim of Super Resolution (SR) techniques is to enhance the resolution of an imaging system, using information from several images. SR reconstruction may be considered as a second generation problem of Image Restoration. It combines several slightly different Low Resolution (LR) images to obtain a High Resolution (HR) image. SR techniques are, widely, described in scientific literature mainly for applications in video communication, object recognition and image compression. In this paper we focus to apply the SR task to the scintigraphic imaging. Specifically, it is described as a patented method that uses a High Resolution Scintigraphic Camera (HRSC) to collect and process a set of scintigraphic images, in view of obtaining a very high resolution image. The HRSC device, which is currently used in Medical Imaging, is based on a parallel square holes collimator and on a Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes (PSPMT). The SSR method is applied to the synthetic images of three different phantoms, to verify the effective spatial resolution values. The results confirm that it is possible to achieve optimal spatial resolution values at different depths, useful in small object and small animal imaging. Our study confirms the feasibility of a very high resolution system in scintigraphic imaging and the possibility to have gamma cameras using the SSR method, to perform clinical applications on patients.

  8. A High-Resolution 3D Separated-Local-Field Experiment by Means of Magic-Angle Turning

    PubMed

    Hu; Alderman; Pugmire; Grant

    1997-05-01

    A 3D separated-local-field (SLF) experiment based on the 2D PHORMAT technique is described. In the 3D experiment, the conventional 2D SLF powder pattern for each chemically inequivalent carbon is separated according to their different isotropic chemical shifts. The dipolar coupling constant of a C-H pair, hence the bond distance, and the relative orientation of the chemical-shift tensor to the C-H vector can all be determined for the protonated carbons with a single measurement. As the sample turns at only about 30 Hz in a MAT experiment, the SLF patterns obtained approach those of a stationary sample, and an accuracy in the measurement similar to that obtained on a stationary sample is expected. The technique is demonstrated on 2,6-dimethoxynaphthalene, where the 13 C-1 H separated-local-field powder patterns for the six chemically inequivalent carbons are clearly identified and measured. The observed dipolar coupling for the methoxy carbon is effectively reduced by the fast rotation of the group about its C3 symmetry axis. The average angle between the C-H bond direction and the C3 rotation axis in the OCH3 group is found to be about 66°. PMID:9252281

  9. The Relationship between Spatial Visualization Ability and Students' Ability to Model 3D Objects from Engineering Assembly Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branoff, T. J.; Dobelis, M.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial abilities have been used as a predictor of success in several engineering and technology disciplines (Strong & Smith, 2001). In engineering graphics courses, scores on spatial tests have also been used to predict success (Adanez & Velasco, 2002; Leopold, Gorska, & Sorby, 2001). Other studies have shown that some type of intervention,…

  10. How Students Solve Problems in Spatial Geometry while Using a Software Application for Visualizing 3D Geometric Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widder, Mirela; Gorsky, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In schools, learning spatial geometry is usually dependent upon a student's ability to visualize three dimensional geometric configurations from two dimensional drawings. Such a process, however, often creates visual obstacles which are unique to spatial geometry. Useful software programs which realistically depict three dimensional geometric…

  11. Example Applications of A Physically-Based 3D Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Model Over Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudicky, E. A.; Park, Y. J.; Hwang, H. T.; Berg, S.; Frey, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is now generally accepted within the scientific community that the climate is changing, and that future climate change may have significant impact on water resources in both quantity and quality. Alterations of base flow to rivers due to changing subsurface flow patterns, fluctuations in soil moisture and in the depth of the groundwater table, water levels in lakes and wetlands, and altered groundwater recharge/discharge patterns are examples of possible consequences of future climate change. In this presentation, our physically-based model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), is first briefly described. It is a physically-based 3D control-volume finite element model representing 2D surface water flow and transport on the land surface together with 3D variably-saturated flow and transport in the subsurface. A globally implicit scheme used to solve the nonlinear surface and subsurface flow and transport equations simultaneously. The model can explicitly account for the hydrologic, solute and thermal interactions between surface and subsurface flow regimes as well as the atmospheric inputs in terms of air temperature, solar radiation and sensible/latent heat fluxes. A parallel computational framework has been implemented to facilitate model applications in high performance computing environments. The applicability of the model is demonstrated for a variety of problems, covering the hill slope scale to improve the understanding of the physical and chemical processes in the water cycle, to the assessment of the impact of climate change on water resources over the Canadian landmass in three dimensions. The climate-driven 3D basin-scale examples range from that of a highly characterized watershed in Southern Ontario having an area of about 7000 km2 to a large basin in Western Canada that covers an area of about 120,000 km2. The continental scale simulations explore the impacts of global climate change on Canada's surface and groundwater resources.

  12. IKONOS Spatial Resolution and Image Interpretability Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Baldridge, Braxton; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Choi, Taeyoung; Helder, Dennis L.; Blonski, Slawomir

    2003-01-01

    This paper contains research from five individual projects to characterize the spatial performance of the IKONOS commercial imaging sensor. The end result of the projects is determination of the spatial image quality of IKONOS data prodicts in terms of the National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale (NIIRS), the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the system stability over the first year, the characteristics of the Space Imaging MTF Compensation (MTFC) procedure, and the application-specific capabilities of IKONOS imagery. Both panchromatic and multispectral imagery were evaluated. Major conclusions of this work are that the system was stable im imaging performance during the first year of operation, tha its MTF meets the specification for the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program, that the initial MTFC processing appears to be transposed in the in-track and the cross-track directions, that the MTFC results in a noise amplification of 2x to 4x in addition to sharpening the imagery, and that IKONOS panchromatic imagery achieves an average NIIRS rating of 4.5.

  13. Experimental study of the maximum resolution and packing density achievable in sintered and non-sintered binder-jet 3D printed steel microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amy M; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub; Benedict, Michael; Kiggans Jr, James O

    2015-01-01

    Developing high resolution 3D printed metallic microchannels is a challenge especially when there is an essential need for high packing density of the primary material. While high packing density could be achieved by heating the structure to the sintering temperature, some heat sensitive applications require other strategies to improve the packing density of primary materials. In this study the goal is to develop high green or pack densities microchannels on the scale of 2-300 microns which have a robust mechanical structure. Binder-jet 3D printing is an additive manufacturing process in which droplets of binder are deposited via inkjet into a bed of powder. By repeatedly spreading thin layers of powder and depositing binder into the appropriate 2D profiles, complex 3D objects can be created one layer at time. Microchannels with features on the order of 500 microns were fabricated via binder jetting of steel powder and then sintered and/or infiltrated with a secondary material. The average particle size of the steel powder was varied along with the droplet volume of the inkjet-deposited binder. The resolution of the process, packing density of the primary material, the subsequent features sizes of the microchannels, and the overall microchannel quality were characterized as a function of particle size distribution, droplet sizes and heat treatment temperatures.

  14. Qualitative Evaluation of a High-Resolution 3D Multi-Sequence Intracranial Vessel Wall Protocol at 3 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjie; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Abrigo, Jill; Lee, Ka Lok; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Siero, Jeroen C. W.; Wong, Ka Sing; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Chen, Fiona Xiang Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Intracranial vessel wall imaging using MRI has great potential as a clinical method for assessing intracranial atherosclerosis. The purpose of the current study was to compare three 3T MRI vessel wall sequences with different contrast weightings (T1w, PD, T2w) and dedicated sagittal orientation perpendicular to the middle cerebral artery, to the reconstructed sagittal image from a transverse 3D T1w volumetric isotropically reconstructed turbo spin-echo acquisition (VIRTA), and provide a clinical recommendation. Materials and Methods The above-mentioned sequences were acquired in 10 consecutive Chinese ischemic stroke or TIA patients (age: 68 years, sex: 4 females) with angiographic-confirmed MCA stenosis at 3T. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Two raters qualitatively scored all images on overall image quality, presence of artifacts, and visibility of plaques. Data were compared using Repeated measures ANOVA and Sidak’s adjusted post hoc tests. Results All sequences except the T2w sequence were able to depict the walls of the large vessels of the Circle of Willis (p<0.05). T1w sagittal oblique VIRTA showed significantly more artifacts (p<0.01). Peripherally located plaques were sometimes missed on the sagittal sequences, but could be appreciated on the transverse T1w VIRTA. Conclusion With the 3T multi-sequence vessel wall protocol we were able to assess the intracranial plaque with two different image contrast weightings. The sequence of preference to include in a clinical protocol would be the transverse 3D T1w VIRTA based on absence of artifacts, larger coverage including the whole Circle of Willis, and excellent lesion depiction. PMID:27532106

  15. Hard X-ray Microscopy with sub 30 nm Spatial Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mau-Tsu; Song, Yen-Fang; Yin, Gung-Chian; Chen, Fu-Rong; Chen, Jian-Hua; Chen, Yi-Ming; Liang, Keng S.; Duewer, F.; Yun, Wenbing

    2007-01-01

    A transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) has been installed at the BL01B beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. This state-of-the-art TXM operational in a range 8-11 keV provides 2D images and 3D tomography with spatial resolution 60 nm, and with the Zernike-phase contrast mode for imaging light materials such as biological specimens. A spatial resolution of the TXM better than 30 nm, apparently the best result in hard X-ray microscopy, has been achieved by employing the third diffraction order of the objective zone plate. The TXM has been applied in diverse research fields, including analysis of failure mechanisms in microelectronic devices, tomographic structures of naturally grown photonic specimens, and the internal structure of fault zone gouges from an earthquake core. Here we discuss the scope and prospects of the project, and the progress of the TXM in NSRRC.

  16. Hard X-ray Microscopy with sub 30 nm Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M.-T.; Song, Y.-F.; Yin, G.-C.; Chen, J.-H.; Chen, Y.-M.; Liang, Keng S.; Chen, F.-R.; Duewer, F.; Yun Wenbing

    2007-01-19

    A transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) has been installed at the BL01B beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. This state-of-the-art TXM operational in a range 8-11 keV provides 2D images and 3D tomography with spatial resolution 60 nm, and with the Zernike-phase contrast mode for imaging light materials such as biological specimens. A spatial resolution of the TXM better than 30 nm, apparently the best result in hard X-ray microscopy, has been achieved by employing the third diffraction order of the objective zone plate. The TXM has been applied in diverse research fields, including analysis of failure mechanisms in microelectronic devices, tomographic structures of naturally grown photonic specimens, and the internal structure of fault zone gouges from an earthquake core. Here we discuss the scope and prospects of the project, and the progress of the TXM in NSRRC.

  17. Improving Nano-MRI Spatial Resolution with Phase Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Brad; Eichler, Alex; Degen, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning probe technique that allows measuring nuclear spin densities with resolution better than 10nm. Detecting such small volumes of spins (less than (10nm)3 corresponds to approximately 20,000 spins) requires long averaging of signals from statistically polarized nuclei. For instance, previous work demonstrated that imaging a single isotope (1H) of a Tobacco Mosaic Virus required averaging for 2 weeks, and therefore the chemical contrast abilities of MRFM had to be forfeited to enable higher spatial resolution. In order to reconcile the chemical selectivity of MRFM along with the proven high spatial resolution, we have developed a phase multiplexing technique capable of simultaneously acquiring spin signals from multiple isotopes and from up to six spatial locations. We have demonstrated this method using a nanowire test sample, and have achieved one-dimensional imaging resolution of less than 5 nm and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  18. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-03-06

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated.

  19. High-resolution 3D imaging of osteocytes and computational modelling in mechanobiology: insights on bone development, ageing, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Goggin, P M; Zygalakis, K C; Oreffo, R O; Schneider, P

    2016-01-01

    Osteocytes are involved in mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in bone and hence, are key to bone adaptation in response to development, ageing and disease. Thus, detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the osteocyte network (ON) and the surrounding lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is essential. Enhanced understanding of the ON&LCN will contribute to a better understanding of bone mechanics on cellular and sub-cellular scales, for instance through improved computational models of bone mechanotransduction. Until now, the location of the ON within the hard bone matrix and the sub-µm dimensions of the ON&LCN have posed significant challenges for 3D imaging. This review identifies relevant microstructural phenotypes of the ON&LCN in health and disease and summarises how light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray imaging techniques have been used in studies of osteocyte anatomy, pathology and mechanobiology to date. In this review, we assess the requirements for ON&LCN imaging and examine the state of the art in the fields of imaging and computational modelling as well as recent advances in high-resolution 3D imaging. Suggestions for future investigations using volume electron microscopy are indicated and we present new data on the ON&LCN using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. A correlative approach using these high-resolution 3D imaging techniques in conjunction with in silico modelling in bone mechanobiology will increase understanding of osteocyte function and, ultimately, lead to improved pathways for diagnosis and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27209400

  20. The beauty of resolution: The SN Ib factory NGC 2770 spatially resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.

    2015-02-01

    The late-type spiral NGC 2770 hosted 3 Type Ib supernovae (SNe) in or next to star-forming regions in its outer spiral arms. We study the properties of the SN sites and the galaxy at different spatial resolutions to infer propeties of the SN progenitors and the SF history of the galaxy. Several 3D techniques are used and, for the first time, we present images of metallicity, shocks and stellar population ages from OSIRIS/GTC imaging with tunable narrowband filters.

  1. WE-F-16A-04: Micro-Irradiator Treatment Verification with High-Resolution 3D-Printed Rodent-Morphic Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, S; Belley, M; Benning, R; Adamovics, J; Stanton, I; Therien, M; Yoshizumi, T; Oldham, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Pre-clinical micro-radiation therapy studies often utilize very small beams (∼0.5-5mm), and require accurate dose delivery in order to effectively investigate treatment efficacy. Here we present a novel high-resolution absolute 3D dosimetry procedure, capable of ∼100-micron isotopic dosimetry in anatomically accurate rodent-morphic phantoms Methods: Anatomically accurate rat-shaped 3D dosimeters were made using 3D printing techniques from outer body contours and spinal contours outlined on CT. The dosimeters were made from a radiochromic plastic material PRESAGE, and incorporated high-Z PRESASGE inserts mimicking the spine. A simulated 180-degree spinal arc treatment was delivered through a 2 step process: (i) cone-beam-CT image-guided positioning was performed to precisely position the rat-dosimeter for treatment on the XRad225 small animal irradiator, then (ii) treatment was delivered with a simulated spine-treatment with a 180-degree arc with 20mm x 10mm cone at 225 kVp. Dose distribution was determined from the optical density change using a high-resolution in-house optical-CT system. Absolute dosimetry was enabled through calibration against a novel nano-particle scintillation detector positioned in a channel in the center of the distribution. Results: Sufficient contrast between regular PRESAGE (tissue equivalent) and high-Z PRESAGE (spinal insert) was observed to enable highly accurate image-guided alignment and targeting. The PRESAGE was found to have linear optical density (OD) change sensitivity with respect to dose (R{sup 2} = 0.9993). Absolute dose for 360-second irradiation at isocenter was found to be 9.21Gy when measured with OD change, and 9.4Gy with nano-particle detector- an agreement within 2%. The 3D dose distribution was measured at 500-micron resolution Conclusion: This work demonstrates for the first time, the feasibility of accurate absolute 3D dose measurement in anatomically accurate rat phantoms containing variable density

  2. 3D noninvasive, high-resolution imaging using a photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and rapid wavelength-cycling lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Gross, Daniel; Klosner, Marc; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-05-01

    Globally, cancer is a major health issue as advances in modern medicine continue to extend the human life span. Breast cancer ranks second as a cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) provides high molecular contrast at greater depths in tissue without the use of ionizing radiation. In this work, we describe the development of a PA tomography (PAT) system and a rapid wavelength-cycling Alexandrite laser designed for clinical PAI applications. The laser produces 450 mJ/pulse at 25 Hz to illuminate the entire breast, which eliminates the need to scan the laser source. Wavelength cycling provides a pulse sequence in which the output wavelength repeatedly alternates between 755 nm and 797 nm rapidly within milliseconds. We present imaging results of breast phantoms with inclusions of different sizes at varying depths, obtained with this laser source, a 5-MHz 128-element transducer and a 128-channel Verasonics system. Results include PA images and 3D reconstruction of the breast phantom at 755 and 797 nm, delineating the inclusions that mimic tumors in the breast.

  3. Fluid Lensing, Applications to High-Resolution 3D Subaqueous Imaging & Automated Remote Biosphere Assessment from Airborne and Space-borne Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirayath, V.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid Lensing is a theoretical model and algorithm I present for fluid-optical interactions in turbulent flows as well as two-fluid surface boundaries that, when coupled with an unique computer vision and image-processing pipeline, may be used to significantly enhance the angular resolution of a remote sensing optical system with applicability to high-resolution 3D imaging of subaqueous regions and through turbulent fluid flows. This novel remote sensing technology has recently been implemented on a quadcopter-based UAS for imaging shallow benthic systems to create the first dataset of a biosphere with unprecedented sub-cm-level imagery in 3D over areas as large as 15 square kilometers. Perturbed two-fluid boundaries with different refractive indices, such as the surface between the ocean and air, may be exploited for use as lensing elements for imaging targets on either side of the interface with enhanced angular resolution. I present theoretical developments behind Fluid Lensing and experimental results from its recent implementation for the Reactive Reefs project to image shallow reef ecosystems at cm scales. Preliminary results from petabyte-scale aerial survey efforts using Fluid Lensing to image at-risk coral reefs in American Samoa (August, 2013) show broad applicability to large-scale automated species identification, morphology studies and reef ecosystem characterization for shallow marine environments and terrestrial biospheres, of crucial importance to understanding climate change's impact on coastal zones, global oxygen production and carbon sequestration.

  4. In vivo measurement of arterial and venous oxygenation in the rat using 3D spectral-spatial electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, P; Shankar, R A; Zweier, J L

    1998-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) instrumentation, enabling the performance of three-dimensional spectral-spatial images of free radicals, has been developed to study spatially defined differences in tissue metabolism and oxygenation. Using this instrumentation 3D images of nitroxides in rat tail were obtained. The images visualize the arterial and venous vasculature in the tail segment. Based on the exchange broadening influence of oxygen on the EPR linewidth of nitroxides, we performed localized oxygen measurements in the in vivo rat. An oxygen concentration of 300+/-30 microM was measured in the arteries and 50+/-20 microM in the veins. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing in vivo, non-invasive measurements and mapping of localized oxygenation in small animals using spectral-spatial EPR imaging techniques. PMID:9703045

  5. Statistical Analysis of 3D Images Detects Regular Spatial Distributions of Centromeres and Chromocenters in Animal and Plant Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Biot, Eric; Adenot, Pierre-Gaël; Hue-Beauvais, Cathy; Houba-Hérin, Nicole; Duranthon, Véronique; Devinoy, Eve; Beaujean, Nathalie; Gaudin, Valérie; Maurin, Yves; Debey, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the interphase nucleus is organized in morphologically and/or functionally distinct nuclear “compartments”. Numerous studies highlight functional relationships between the spatial organization of the nucleus and gene regulation. This raises the question of whether nuclear organization principles exist and, if so, whether they are identical in the animal and plant kingdoms. We addressed this issue through the investigation of the three-dimensional distribution of the centromeres and chromocenters. We investigated five very diverse populations of interphase nuclei at different differentiation stages in their physiological environment, belonging to rabbit embryos at the 8-cell and blastocyst stages, differentiated rabbit mammary epithelial cells during lactation, and differentiated cells of Arabidopsis thaliana plantlets. We developed new tools based on the processing of confocal images and a new statistical approach based on G- and F- distance functions used in spatial statistics. Our original computational scheme takes into account both size and shape variability by comparing, for each nucleus, the observed distribution against a reference distribution estimated by Monte-Carlo sampling over the same nucleus. This implicit normalization allowed similar data processing and extraction of rules in the five differentiated nuclei populations of the three studied biological systems, despite differences in chromosome number, genome organization and heterochromatin content. We showed that centromeres/chromocenters form significantly more regularly spaced patterns than expected under a completely random situation, suggesting that repulsive constraints or spatial inhomogeneities underlay the spatial organization of heterochromatic compartments. The proposed technique should be useful for identifying further spatial features in a wide range of cell types. PMID:20628576

  6. mr-PosEBR: a novel positive tone resist for high resolution electron beam lithography and 3D surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirrmann, Stefan; Kirchner, Robert; Lohse, Olga; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; Voigt, Anja; Harder, Irina; Kolander, Anett; Schift, Helmut; Grützner, Gabi

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, we present the results of a systematic material variation for the development of a resist material for high resolution positive tone electron beam lithography (EBL). Several acrylic copolymer materials with different compositions, that is varying mass fractions of the comonomers and different molecular weights, were synthesized and - as resist solutions - evaluated in terms of EBL performance at acceleration voltages of 30 kV and 100 kV. The resist material exhibiting the best combination of the desired properties, named mr-PosEBR, is two times more sensitive than PMMA 495k and performs comparably to the known high resolution resist ZEP520A at 30 kV. For example, a grating pattern with 29 nm wide lines with a period of 100 nm could be lithographically generated in films of mr-PosEBR with an area dose of 100 μC/cm2. In terms of resolution, single lines of only 35 nm width could be fabricated via metal liftoff. Furthermore, the dry etch stability of mr-PosEBR in a CF4/SF6 process is similar to the one of ZEP520A. Consequently, via dry etching nano patterns in mr-PosEBR could be smoothly transferred into the underlying Si substrate with high fidelity. Moreover, mr-PosEBR was evaluated as electron beam grayscale patterning and reflow resist. It was shown that the resist exhibits a good grayscale and reflow performance very similar to PMMA 120k and ZEP520A. Via these well controllable processes the generation of a wide variety of features and applications is possible.

  7. Non Destructive High-Resolution 3D Investigation of Vesicle Textures in Pumice and Scoria by Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Baker, D.; Mancini, L.; Tromba, G.; Zanini, F.

    2005-12-01

    High resolution X-ray computed microtomography was applied to investigate the 3D structure of pyroclastic material from different active, explosive, hazardous volcanic areas. The experiments were performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The 2D image slices resulting from tomography of selected pumice and scoria samples were transformed into volume renderings via specific tomographic software. The reconstructed volumes allowed us to test the applicability of this technique, novel in the field of volcanology, to volcanic specimens with different textural characteristics. The use of a third generation synchrotron radiation facility allowed optimal visualization of vesicle and crystal geometry in the reconstructed volume where conventional X-ray methods are strongly limited. The BLOB3D software package was used to accomplish quantitative descriptions of vesicle textures in terms of vesicularity, number density, volume and connectivity. The results exhibited complex patterns of the vesicle content, size, shape and distribution within the different pyroclasts and allowed us to track the degassing history of each single clast. With this preliminary study we demonstrate that computed microtomography is a feasible tool complementary to conventional microscopy methods for the full 3D textural characterization of volcanic clasts, and that it may be used to provide further constraints to models of degassing at active volcanoes.

  8. Low-Cost Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Mapping of Intertidal Rock Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, M.; Johnson-Roberson, M.; Murphy, R.

    2012-07-01

    Intertidal ecosystems have primarily been studied using field-based sampling; remote sensing offers the ability to collect data over large areas in a snapshot of time which could compliment field-based sampling methods by extrapolating them into the wider spatial and temporal context. Conventional remote sensing tools (such as satellite and aircraft imaging) provide data at relatively course, sub-meter resolutions or with limited temporal resolutions and relatively high costs for small-scale environmental science and ecology studies. In this paper, we describe a low-cost, kite-based imaging system and photogrammetric pipeline that was developed for constructing highresolution, 3D, photo-realistic terrain models of intertidal rocky shores. The processing pipeline uses automatic image feature detection and matching, structure-from-motion and photo-textured terrain surface reconstruction algorithms that require minimal human input and only a small number of ground control points and allow the use of cheap, consumer-grade digital cameras. The resulting maps combine colour and topographic information at sub-centimeter resolutions over an area of approximately 100m, thus enabling spatial properties of the intertidal environment to be determined across a hierarchy of spatial scales. Results of the system are presented for an intertidal rock platform at Cape Banks, Sydney, Australia. Potential uses of this technique include mapping of plant (micro- and macro-algae) and animal (e.g. gastropods) assemblages at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  9. Super Resolution from Hyperview Image Stack by Spatial Multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2016-09-01

    An image stack for a hyperview representation could contain millions of different perspective views with extreme image similarity. The recording of all views from a computational 3d model implicates a lateral displacement of the virtual camera. Because of the huge number of views, the offset in between two adjoining camera positions can be very minor. If such a virtual setup reproduces a real hyperview screen setup, the offset can be below the wavelength of the visible light. But even with such small changes, there is an intrinsic probability for a measurable difference in between two neighbour images. Such image dissimilarity can be proofed successfully also in very basic 3d scenes. By using a quantity of juxtapositional images from the hyperview image stack, the resolution of the rendered images can be considerably improved, which is commonly known as super resolution. The utilisation of super resolution images in hyperview could cut the necessity of full frame computing and will reduce the effective render time.

  10. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures of 3d transition metal oxides recorded at high-energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Mitterbauer, C; Kothleitner, G; Grogger, W; Zandbergen, H; Freitag, B; Tiemeijer, P; Hofer, F

    2003-09-01

    Near-edge fine structures of the metal L(2,3) and O K-edges in transition metal-oxides have been studied with a transmission electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and a high-resolution imaging filter. This system enables the recording of EELS spectra with an energy resolution of 0.1eV thus providing new near-edge fine structure details which could not be observed previously by EELS in conventional TEM instruments. EELS-spectra from well-defined oxides like titanium oxide (TiO(2)), vanadium oxide (V(2)O(5)), chromium oxide (Cr(2)O(3)), iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)), cobalt oxide (CoO) and nickel oxide (NiO) have been measured with the new system. These spectra are compared with EELS data obtained from a conventional microscope and the main spectral features are interpreted. Additionally, the use of monochromised TEMs is discussed in view of the natural line widths of K and L(2,3) edges. PMID:12871809

  11. Improving spatial-resolution in high cone-angle micro-CT by source deblurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Heyang; Kingston, Andrew; Myers, Glenn; Recur, Benoit; Turner, Michael; Sheppard, Andrian

    2014-09-01

    Micro scale computed tomography (CT) can resolve many features in cellular structures, bone formations, minerals properties and composite materials not seen at lower spatial-resolution. Those features enable us to build a more comprehensive model for the object of interest. CT resolution is limited by a fundamental trade off between source size and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given acquisition time. There is a limit on the X-ray flux that can be emitted from a certain source size, and fewer photons cause a lower SNR. A large source size creates penumbral blurring in the radiograph, limiting the effective spatial-resolution in the reconstruction. High cone-angle CT improves SNR by increasing the X-ray solid angle that passes through the sample. In the high cone-angle regime current source deblurring methods break down due to incomplete modelling of the physical process. This paper presents high cone-angle source de-blurring models. We implement these models using a novel multi-slice Richardson-Lucy (M-RL) and 3D Conjugate Gradient deconvolution on experimental high cone-angle data to improve the spatial-resolution of the reconstructed volume. In M-RL, we slice the back projection volume into subsets which can be considered to have a relative uniform convolution kernel. We compare these results to those obtained from standard reconstruction techniques and current source deblurring methods (i.e. 2D Richardson-Lucy in the radiograph and the volume respectively).

  12. Ground Deformation Analysis of Blast-Induced Liquefaction at a Simulated Airport Infrastructure Using High Resolution 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasian, D.; Kayen, R.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Sugano, T.

    2008-12-01

    In October 2007, the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) of the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation conducted a large-scale blast-induced liquefaction experiment in Ishikari, Hokkaido, Japan. Approximately 24,000 m2 of ground was liquefied using controlled blasting techniques to investigate the performance of airport infrastructure. The USGS and Oregon State University participated in the study and measured topographic changes in ground level using 3D laser scanning techniques (terrestrial lidar), as well as changes in shear wave velocity of the between the pre- and post-liquefied soil. This poster focuses on the lidar results. The overall objective of the PARI experiment is to assess the performance of airport infrastructure subjected to liquefaction. Specifically, the performance of pipelines and large concrete utility raceways located beneath runway pavements is of interest, as well as the performance of pavements and embankments with and without soil improvement techniques. At the site, 5-7 m of loose silty sand was placed as hydraulic fill on natural alluvial sand as an expansion of the Ishikari port facility. On a portion of the liquefied site, three 20 m by 50 m test sections were constructed to investigate the performance of improved ground beneath asphalt runways, concrete runway aprons, and open areas. Pipelines and concrete utility conduits were also buried in each section. The three ground improvement techniques investigated were sand-cement mixing, vertical drains, and colloidal silica injection. The PARI experiment provided an excellent opportunity to conduct terrestrial lidar measurements - a revolutionary tool for accurate characterization of fine-scale changes of topography and identification of subtle deformations. Lidar was used for characterizing post-blast deformations both immediately after the charges were used, and subsequently over time at intervals of 2 days, 4 days, and 5 months after blasting. Settlement

  13. Lenses and effective spatial resolution in macroscopic optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Bien, Harold; Parikh, Puja; Entcheva, Emilia

    2007-02-21

    Optical mapping of excitation dynamically tracks electrical waves travelling through cardiac or brain tissue by the use of fluorescent dyes. There are several characteristics that set optical mapping apart from other imaging modalities: dynamically changing signals requiring short exposure times, dim fluorescence demanding sensitive sensors and wide fields of view (low magnification) resulting in poor optical performance. These conditions necessitate the use of optics with good light gathering ability, i.e. lenses having high numerical aperture. Previous optical mapping studies often used sensor resolution to estimate the minimum spatial feature resolvable, assuming perfect optics and infinite contrast. We examine here the influence of finite contrast and real optics on the effective spatial resolution in optical mapping under broad-field illumination for both lateral (in-plane) resolution and axial (depth) resolution of collected fluorescence signals. PMID:17264363

  14. GPU-Accelerated Forward and Back-Projections with Spatially Varying Kernels for 3D DIRECT TOF PET Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ha, S.; Matej, S.; Ispiryan, M.; Mueller, K.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a GPU-accelerated framework that efficiently models spatially (shift) variant system response kernels and performs forward- and back-projection operations with these kernels for the DIRECT (Direct Image Reconstruction for TOF) iterative reconstruction approach. Inherent challenges arise from the poor memory cache performance at non-axis aligned TOF directions. Focusing on the GPU memory access patterns, we utilize different kinds of GPU memory according to these patterns in order to maximize the memory cache performance. We also exploit the GPU instruction-level parallelism to efficiently hide long latencies from the memory operations. Our experiments indicate that our GPU implementation of the projection operators has slightly faster or approximately comparable time performance than FFT-based approaches using state-of-the-art FFTW routines. However, most importantly, our GPU framework can also efficiently handle any generic system response kernels, such as spatially symmetric and shift-variant as well as spatially asymmetric and shift-variant, both of which an FFT-based approach cannot cope with. PMID:23531763

  15. Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-08-13

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

  16. Performance measurements of a high-spatial-resolution YAP camera.

    PubMed

    Uzunov, N; Bello, M; Boccaccio, P; Moschini, G; Baldazzi, G; Bollini, D; de Notaristefani, F; Mazzi, U; Riondato, M

    2005-02-01

    Physical properties of a position-sensitive camera for the analysis of biodistributions of gamma- and beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in small animals have been studied, in order to achieve optimal operating conditions. The camera consisted of a highly segmented yttrium-aluminate perovskite (YAP) scintillator, coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier. The energy resolution, the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, the spatial linearity and the count-rate linearity of the YAP camera have been determined. Images related to initial activity levels and successive biodistribution evolution in mice organs are presented as an illustration of the camera performance. PMID:15773730

  17. Reconstruction algorithm improving the spatial resolution of Micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Wei, Dongbo; Li, Bing; Zhang, Lei

    2008-03-01

    X-ray Micro computed tomography (Micro-CT) enables nondestructive visualization of the internal structure of objects with high-resolution images and plays an important role for industrial nondestructive testing, material evaluation and medical researches. Because the micro focus is much smaller than the ordinary focus, the geometry un-sharpness of Micro-CT projection is several decuples less than that of ordinary CT systems. So the scan conditions with high geometry magnification can be adopted to acquire the projection data with high sampling frequency. Based on this feature, a new filter back projection reconstruction algorithm is researched to improve the spatial resolution of Micro-CT. This algorithm permits the reconstruction center at any point on the line connecting the focus and the rotation center. It can reconstruct CT images with different geometry magnification by adjusting the position of the reconstruction center. So it can make the best of the above feature to improve the spatial resolution of Micro-CT. The computer simulation and the CT experiment of a special spatial resolution phantom are executed to check the validity of this method. The results demonstrate the effect of the new algorithm. Analysis shows that the spatial resolution can be improved 50%.

  18. 3-D GPR data analysis for high-resolution imaging of shallow subsurface faults: the Mt Vettore case study (Central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercoli, Maurizio; Pauselli, Cristina; Frigeri, Alessandro; Forte, Emanuele; Federico, Costanzo

    2014-07-01

    The activation of Late Quaternary faults in the Central Apennines (Italy) could generate earthquakes with magnitude of about 6.5, and the Monte Vettore fault system probably belongs to the same category of seismogenetic faults. Such structure has been defined `silent', because of its geological and geomorphological evidences of past activation, but the absence of historical records in the seismic catalogues to be associated with its activation. The `Piano di Castelluccio' intramountain basin, resulting from the Quaternary activity of normal faults, is characterized by a secondary fault strand highlighted by a NW-SE fault scarp: it has been already studied through palaeoseismological trenches, which highlighted evidences of Quaternary shallow faulting due to strong earthquakes, and through a 2-D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, showing the first geophysical signature of faulting for this site. Within the same place, a 3-D GPR volume over a 20 × 20 m area has been collected. The collection of radar echoes in three dimensions allows to map both the vertical and lateral continuity of shallow geometries of the fault zone (Fz), imaging features with high resolution, ranging from few metres to centimetres and therefore imaging also local variations at the microscale. Several geophysical markers of faulting, already highlighted on this site, have been taken as reference to plan the 3-D survey. In this paper, we provide the first 3-D subsurface imaging of an active shallow fault belonging to the Umbria-Marche Apennine highlighting the subsurface fault geometry and the stratigraphic sequence up to a depth of about 5 m. From our data, geophysical faulting signatures are clearly visible in three dimensions: diffraction hyperbolas, truncations of layers, local attenuated zones and varying dip of the layers have been detected within the Fz. The interpretation of the 3-D data set provided qualitative and quantitative geological information in addition to the fault location

  19. Assessment of Image Processing and Resolution on Permeability and Drainage Simulations Through 3D Pore-networks Obtained Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Willson, C. S.; Thompson, K. E.; Rivers, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Typically, continuum-scale flow parameters are obtained through laboratory experiments. Over the past several years, image-based modeling, which is a direct simulation of flow through the structural arrangements of the voids and solids obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in a sample porous medium, has become a reliable technique for predicting certain flow parameters. Even though XCT is capable of resolving micron-level details, the voxel resolution of the reconstructed image is still dependent upon a number of factors, including the sample size, X-ray energy and XCT beamline setup. Thus, each imaging experiment requires a tradeoff between the sample size that can be imaged, the voxel resolution, and the length scale of the pore space that can be extracted. In addition, the geometric and topological properties of the void space and 3D pore network structure are dictated by the image processing and the choice of pore network generation method. In this research, image-based pore network models are used to quantitatively assess the impact of image resolution, image processing and the choice of pore network generation methods on simulated parameters. A 5 mm diameter and ~15 mm in length Berea sandstone core was scanned two times. First, a ~12 mm long section of the entire cross-section was scanned at 4.1 micron voxel resolution; next, a ~1.4 mm diameter and ~4.12 mm length section within the 1st domain was scanned at 1 micron voxel resolution. The resulting 3D datasets were filtered and segmented into solid and void space. The low resolution image was filtered and segmented using two different approaches in order to evaluate the potential of each approach in identifying the different solid phases in the original 16 bit dataset. A set of networks were created by varying the pore density on both the high and low resolution datasets in order to assess the impact of these factors on flow simulations. Single-phase permeability and a two-phase drainage pore

  20. Accurate high-resolution measurements of 3-D tissue dynamics with registration-enhanced displacement encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Arnold D; Merchant, Samer S; Hsu, Edward W

    2014-06-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  1. Accurate High-Resolution Measurements of 3-D Tissue Dynamics With Registration-Enhanced Displacement Encoded MRI

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Samer S.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    Displacement fields are important to analyze deformation, which is associated with functional and material tissue properties often used as indicators of health. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques like DENSE and image registration methods like Hyperelastic Warping have been used to produce pixel-level deformation fields that are desirable in high-resolution analysis. However, DENSE can be complicated by challenges associated with image phase unwrapping, in particular offset determination. On the other hand, Hyperelastic Warping can be hampered by low local image contrast. The current work proposes a novel approach for measuring tissue displacement with both DENSE and Hyperelastic Warping, incorporating physically accurate displacements obtained by the latter to improve phase characterization in DENSE. The validity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using numerical and physical phantoms, and in vivo small animal cardiac MRI. PMID:24771572

  2. SU-C-BRE-04: Microbeam-Radiation-Therapy (MRT): Characterizing a Novel MRT Device Using High Resolution 3D Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q; Juang, T; Bache, S; Chang, S; Oldham, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of MRT has recently been demonstrated utilizing a new technology of Carbon-Nano-Tube(CNT) field emission x-ray sources.This approach can deliver very high dose(10's of Gy) in narrow stripes(sub-mm) of radiation which enables the study of novel radiation treatment approaches. Here we investigate the application of highresolution (50um isotropic) PRESAGE/Optical-CT 3D dosimetry techniques to characterize the radiation delivered in this extremely dosimetrically challenging scenario. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source irradiator comprises of a linear cathode array and a novel collimator alignment system. This allows a precise delivery of high-energy small beams up to 160 kVp. A cylindrical dosimeter (∼2.2cm in height ∼2.5cm in diameter) was irradiated by CNT MRT delivering 3 strips of radiation with a nominal entrance dose of 32 Gy.A second dosimeter was irradiated with similar entrance dose, with a regular x-ray irradiator collimated to microscopical strip-beams. 50um (isotropic) 3D dosimetry was performed using an in-house optical-CT system designed and optimized for high resolution imaging (including a stray light deconvolution correction).The percentage depth dose (PDD), peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and beam width (FWHM) data were obtained and analyzed in both cases. Results: High resolution 3D images were successfully achieved with the prototype system, enabling extraction of PDD and dose profiles. The PDDs for the CNT irradiation showed pronounced attenuation, but less build-up effect than that from the multibeam irradiation. The beam spacing between the three strips has an average value of 0.9mm while that for the 13 strips is 1.5 mm at a depth of 16.5 mm. The stray light corrected image shows line profiles with reduced noise and consistent PVR values. Conclusion: MRT dosimetry is extremely challenging due to the ultra small fields involved.This preliminary application of a novel, ultra-high resolution, optical-CT 3D

  3. Enabling multi-disciplinary climate science through the application of GIS and high-resolution spatial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, G.; Wilson, C. J.; Gangodagamage, C.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Multidisciplinary field studies in climate science require effective methods for communicating data needs across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment-Arctic seeks to reduce uncertainty in climate prediction by investigating critical land-atmosphere interactions in terrestrial ecosystems of Alaska. Using high-resolution LiDAR imagery and GIS, we applied geographic visualization principles to synthesize spatial data and facilitate cross-discipline communication for field planning, instrument implementation and model data integration. We hypothesized that providing three-dimensional (3D) representation of arctic landscape features would enhance perception and provide an effective medium to better optimize further field studies and analyses. Results indicate that key landscape features, such as polygonal ground and drained thaw lake basins (DTLB), represented in 3D maps offered superior recognition and differentiation among these features than traditional 2D maps. When overlaying 3D landscape features with high-resolution spatial data, such as WorldView-2 panchromatic imagery, digital elevation models (DEM), remotely derived indexes such as NDVI, or site instrumentation, further recognition and quantification of landscape processes was attained. Conversely, we observed that data inclusion in excess resulted in poor cognition of key features and/or themes. At various scales, 3D visualization proved to be effective at characterizing both large-scale (1:50) site level characteristics (polygon/trough), as well as small-scale (1:500) regional features (high vs. low polygon terrain). We conclude that applying GIS and high-resolution spatial data to create 3D visualizations is highly effective in representing key arctic landscape features across a wide range of scales. When combining multiple data layers (in moderation), these visualizations prove to be a valuable tool for communicating data needs, refining field

  4. 3D Assessment of Cortical Bone Porosity and Tissue Mineral Density Using High-Resolution Micro-CT: Effects of Resolution and Threshold Method

    PubMed Central

    Palacio-Mancheno, Paolo E.; Larriera, Adriana I.; Doty, Stephen B.; Cardoso, Luis; Fritton, Susannah P.

    2013-01-01

    Current micro-CT systems allow scanning bone at resolutions capable of three-dimensional characterization of intracortical vascular porosity and osteocyte lacunae. However, the scanning and reconstruction parameters along with the image segmentation method affect the accuracy of the measurements. In this study, the effects of scanning resolution and image threshold method in quantifying small features of cortical bone (vascular porosity, vascular canal diameter and separation, lacunar porosity and density, and tissue mineral density) were analyzed. Cortical bone from the tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats was scanned at 1-µm and 4-µm resolutions, reconstructions were density-calibrated, and volumes of interest were segmented using approaches based on edge-detection or histogram analysis. With 1-µm resolution scans, the osteocyte lacunar spaces could be visualized, and it was possible to separate the lacunar porosity from the vascular porosity. At 4-µm resolution, the vascular porosity and vascular canal diameter were underestimated, and osteocyte lacunae were not effectively detected, whereas the vascular canal separation and tissue mineral density were overestimated compared to 1-µm resolution. Resolution had a much greater effect on the measurements than did threshold method, with partial volume effects at resolutions coarser than 2 µm demonstrated in two separate analyses, one of which assessed the effect of resolution on an object of known size with similar architecture to a vascular pore. Although there was little difference when using the edge-detection versus histogram-based threshold approaches, edge-detection was somewhat more effective in delineating canal architecture at finer resolutions (1 – 2 µm). In addition, use of a high-resolution (1-µm) density-based threshold on lower resolution (4-µm) density-calibrated images was not effective in improving the lower-resolution measurements. In conclusion, if measuring cortical vascular microarchitecture

  5. A new 3D parallel high resolution electromagnetic nonlinear inversion based on new global magnetic integral and local differential decomposition (GILD)

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new 3D electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm is presented based on global integral and local differential equations decomposition (GILD). The GILD parallel nonlinear inversion algorithm consists of five parts: (1) the domain is decomposed into subdomain SI and subdomain SII; (2) a new global magnetic integral equation in SI and the local magnetic differential equations IN SII will be used together to obtain the magnetic field in the modeling step; (3) the new global magnetic integral Jacobian equation in SI and the local magnetic differential Jacobian equations in SII will be used together to update the electric conductivity and permittivity from the magnetic field data in the inversion step; (4) the subdomain SII can naturally and uniformly be decomposed into 2{sup n} smaller sub-cubic-domains; the sparse matrix in each sub-cubic-domain can be eliminated separately, in parallel; (5) a new parallel multiple hierarchy substructure algorithm will be used to solve the smaller full matrices in SI, in parallel. The applications of the new 3D parallel GILD EM modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm and software are: (1) to create high resolution controlled-source electric conductivity and permittivity imaging for interpreting electromagnetic field data acquired from cross hole, surface to borehole, surface to surface, single hole, and multiple holes; (2) to create the magnetotelluric high resolution imaging from the surface impedance and field data. The new GILD parallel nonlinear inversion will be a 3D/2.5D powerful imaging tool for the oil geophysical exploration and environmental remediation and monitoring.

  6. A Pilot Study of Improved Lesion Characterization in Breast MRI Using a 3D Radial Balanced SSFP Technique With Isotropic Resolution and Efficient Fat-Water Separation

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Catherine J.; Kelcz, Frederick; Jung, Youngkyoo; Brodsky, Ethan K.; Fain, Sean B.; Block, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess a 3D radial balanced steady state free precession technique that provides sub-millimeter isotropic resolution and inherently registered fat and water image volumes in comparison to conventional T2-weighted RARE imaging for lesion characterization in breast MRI. Materials and Methods 3D PRojection SSFP (3DPR-SSFP) combines a dual half-echo radial k-space trajectory with a linear combination fat/water separation technique (Linear Combination SSFP). A pilot study was performed in 20 patients to assess fat suppression and depiction of lesion morphology using 3DPR-SSFP. For all patients fat suppression was measured for the 3DPR-SSFP image volumes and depiction of lesion morphology was compared against corresponding T2-weighted Fast Spin Echo (FSE) datasets for 15 lesions in 11 patients. Results The isotropic 0.63 mm resolution of the 3DPR-SSFP sequence demonstrated improved depiction of lesion morphology in comparison to FSE. The 3DPR-SSFP fat and water datasets were available in a 5 minute scan time while average fat suppression with 3DPR-SSFP was 71% across all twenty patients. Conclusion 3DPR-SSFP has the potential to improve the lesion characterization information available in breast MRI, particularly in comparison to conventional FSE. A larger study is warranted to quantify the effect of 3DPR-SSFP on specificity. PMID:19557728

  7. Real-Time High Resolution 3D Imaging of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Adhering to and Escaping from the Vasculature of a Living Host

    PubMed Central

    Colarusso, Pina; Bankhead, Troy; Kubes, Paul; Chaconas, George

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are bacteria that cause a number of emerging and re-emerging diseases worldwide, including syphilis, leptospirosis, relapsing fever, and Lyme borreliosis. They navigate efficiently through dense extracellular matrix and cross the blood–brain barrier by unknown mechanisms. Due to their slender morphology, spirochetes are difficult to visualize by standard light microscopy, impeding studies of their behavior in situ. We engineered a fluorescent infectious strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease pathogen, which expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP). Real-time 3D and 4D quantitative analysis of fluorescent spirochete dissemination from the microvasculature of living mice at high resolution revealed that dissemination was a multi-stage process that included transient tethering-type associations, short-term dragging interactions, and stationary adhesion. Stationary adhesions and extravasating spirochetes were most commonly observed at endothelial junctions, and translational motility of spirochetes appeared to play an integral role in transendothelial migration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of high resolution 3D and 4D visualization of dissemination of a bacterial pathogen in a living mammalian host, and provides the first direct insight into spirochete dissemination in vivo. PMID:18566656

  8. Quantifying mangrove chlorophyll from high spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenkenda, Muditha K.; Joyce, Karen E.; Maier, Stefan W.; de Bruin, Sytze

    2015-10-01

    Lower than expected chlorophyll concentration of a plant can directly limit photosynthetic activity, and resultant primary production. Low chlorophyll concentration may also indicate plant physiological stress. Compared to other terrestrial vegetation, mangrove chlorophyll variations are poorly understood. This study quantifies the spatial distribution of mangrove canopy chlorophyll variation using remotely sensed data and field samples over the Rapid Creek mangrove forest in Darwin, Australia. Mangrove leaf samples were collected and analyzed for chlorophyll content in the laboratory. Once the leaf area index (LAI) of sampled trees was estimated using the digital cover photography method, the canopy chlorophyll contents were calculated. Then, the nonlinear random forests regression algorithm was used to describe the relationship between canopy chlorophyll content and remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 satellite image bands and their spectral transformations), and to estimate the spatial distribution of canopy chlorophyll variation. The imagery was evaluated at full 2 m spatial resolution, as well as at decreased resampled resolutions of 5 m and 10 m. The root mean squared errors with validation samples were 0.82, 0.64 and 0.65 g/m2 for maps at 2 m, 5 m and 10 m spatial resolution respectively. The correlation coefficient was analyzed for the relationship between measured and predicted chlorophyll values. The highest correlation: 0.71 was observed at 5 m spatial resolution (R2 = 0.5). We therefore concluded that estimating mangrove chlorophyll content from remotely sensed data is possible using red, red-edge, NIR1 and NIR2 bands and their spectral transformations as predictors at 5 m spatial resolution.

  9. Spatial resolution requirements for automated cartographic road extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benjamin, S.; Gaydos, L.

    1990-01-01

    Ground resolution requirements for detection and extraction of road locations in a digitized large-scale photographic database were investigated. A color infrared photograph of Sunnyvale, California was scanned, registered to a map grid, and spatially degraded to 1- to 5-metre reso