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Sample records for 3d spectral domain

  1. 3D-spectral domain computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Trevor; Segref, Armin; Frisken, Grant; Ferra, Herman; Lorenser, Dirk; Frisken, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept experiment utilizing a novel "snap-shot" spectral domain OCT technique that captures a phase coherent volume in a single frame. The sample is illuminated with a collimated beam of 75 μm diameter and the back-reflected light is analyzed by a 2-D matrix of spectral interferograms. A key challenge that is addressed is simultaneously maintaining lateral and spectral phase coherence over the imaged volume in the presence of sample motion. Digital focusing is demonstrated for 5.0 μm lateral resolution over an 800 μm axial range.

  2. Volumetric (3D) compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we proposed a novel three-dimensional compressive sensing (CS) approach for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) volumetric image acquisition and reconstruction. Instead of taking a spectral volume whose size is the same as that of the volumetric image, our method uses a sub set of the original spectral volume that is under-sampled in all three dimensions, which reduces the amount of spectral measurements to less than 20% of that required by the Shan-non/Nyquist theory. The 3D image is recovered from the under-sampled spectral data dimension-by-dimension using the proposed three-step CS reconstruction strategy. Experimental results show that our method can significantly reduce the sampling rate required for a volumetric SD OCT image while preserving the image quality. PMID:25426320

  3. Automated multilayer segmentation and characterization in 3D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaodong; Hariri, Amirhossein; Sadda, SriniVas R.

    2013-03-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a 3-D imaging technique, allowing direct visualization of retinal morphology and architecture. The various layers of the retina may be affected differentially by various diseases. In this study, an automated graph-based multilayer approach was developed to sequentially segment eleven retinal surfaces including the inner retinal bands to the outer retinal bands in normal SD-OCT volume scans at three different stages. For stage 1, the four most detectable and/or distinct surfaces were identified in the four-times-downsampled images and were used as a priori positional information to limit the graph search for other surfaces at stage 2. Eleven surfaces were then detected in the two-times-downsampled images at stage 2, and refined in the original image space at stage 3 using the graph search integrating the estimated morphological shape models. Twenty macular SD-OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis) volume scans from 20 normal subjects (one eye per subject) were used in this study. The overall mean and absolute mean differences in border positions between the automated and manual segmentation for all 11 segmented surfaces were -0.20 +/- 0.53 voxels (-0.76 +/- 2.06 μm) and 0.82 +/- 0.64 voxels (3.19 +/- 2.46 μm). Intensity and thickness properties in the resultant retinal layers were investigated. This investigation in normal subjects may provide a comparative reference for subsequent investigations in eyes with disease.

  4. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  5. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    PubMed Central

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the “non-progressing” and “progressing” glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection. PMID:25606299

  6. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  7. Monitoring adipose-derived stem cells within 3D carrier by combined dielectric spectroscopy and spectral domain optical coherence topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.

    2010-02-01

    Monitoring non-invasively the cellular events in three dimensional carriers is a major challenge for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine that prevents time-lapsed studies over large population of sample. The potential of optical coherence tomography has been demonstrated to assess tissue formation within porous matrices. In this study we explore the combination of dielectric spectroscopy (DS) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) to quality assess ADSCs loaded in three dimensional carriers. A SDOCT (930nm, FWHM 90nm) was combined to an open ended coaxial probe connected to material analyser, and broadband measurements between 20MHz and 1GHz were synchronized with Labview. Both ADSCs maintained in undifferentiated state within 3D carrier and induced towards osteoblasts were monitored with this multimodality technique and their DS spectra were acquired at high cell concentration simultaneously to 3D imaging. This multimodality technique will be instrumental to assess non-invasively cell loaded carriers for cell therapy.

  8. 3D fluorescence spectral data interpolation by using IDW.

    PubMed

    He, Qinghang; Zhang, Zhenxi; Yi, Chao

    2008-12-01

    Because measured precision of some spectral instruments such as fluorescence spectrometer HITACHI F-4500 cannot reach the requirement of spectral analytical technique, and measured data is finite, which causes some three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence spectral data missed. The fact of missing data can result in errors in interpretations of 3D fluorescence spectral data. This paper takes ethanol solution (volume percentage phi(beta)=0.400) 3D fluorescence spectral data for example, applies inverse distance weighting (IDW) to 3D fluorescence spectral data interpolation. The results prove that the more details of 3D fluorescence spectra are expressed well by using IDW in contrast to that of original 3D fluorescence spectra. To evaluate the effectiveness of interpolation by using IDW, this paper compares standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and the mean, median, maximum and minimum values of original ethanol solution (phi(beta)=0.400) 3D fluorescence spectral data and that of the interpolated, whose results suggest that the interpolation of the 3D fluorescence spectra data by using IDW is exact. PMID:18550425

  9. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  10. Spectral ladar: towards active 3D multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present our Spectral LADAR concept, an augmented implementation of traditional LADAR. This sensor uses a polychromatic source to obtain range-resolved 3D spectral images which are used to identify objects based on combined spatial and spectral features, resolving positions in three dimensions and up to hundreds of meters in distance. We report on a proof-of-concept Spectral LADAR demonstrator that generates spectral point clouds from static scenes. The demonstrator transmits nanosecond supercontinuum pulses generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Currently we use a rapidly tuned receiver with a high-speed InGaAs APD for 25 spectral bands with the future expectation of implementing a linear APD array spectrograph. Each spectral band is independently range resolved with multiple return pulse recognition. This is a critical feature, enabling simultaneous spectral and spatial unmixing of partially obscured objects when not achievable using image fusion of monochromatic LADAR and passive spectral imagers. This enables higher identification confidence in highly cluttered environments such as forested or urban areas (e.g. vehicles behind camouflage or foliage). These environments present challenges for situational awareness and robotic perception which can benefit from the unique attributes of Spectral LADAR. Results from this demonstrator unit are presented for scenes typical of military operations and characterize the operation of the device. The results are discussed here in the context of autonomous vehicle navigation and target recognition.

  11. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes using 3D SIFT feature point matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Lee, Kyungmoo; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2009-02-01

    The recent introduction of next generation spectral OCT scanners has enabled routine acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D OCT is used in the detection and management of serious eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. For follow-up studies, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. This work presents a registration method based on a recently introduced extension of the 2D Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) framework1 to 3D.2 The SIFT feature extractor locates minima and maxima in the difference of Gaussian scale space to find salient feature points. It then uses histograms of the local gradient directions around each found extremum in 3D to characterize them in a 4096 element feature vector. Matching points are found by comparing the distance between feature vectors. We apply this method to the rigid registration of optic nerve head- (ONH) and macula-centered 3D OCT scans of the same patient that have only limited overlap. Three OCT data set pairs with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness and accuracy when deformations of rotation and scaling were considered. Three-dimensional registration accuracy of 2.0+/-3.3 voxels was observed. The accuracy was assessed as average voxel distance error in N=1572 matched locations. The registration method was applied to 12 3D OCT scans (200 x 200 x 1024 voxels) of 6 normal eyes imaged in vivo to demonstrate the clinical utility and robustness of the method in a real-world environment.

  12. Coverage Assessment and Target Tracking in 3D Domains

    PubMed Central

    Boudriga, Noureddine; Hamdi, Mohamed; Iyengar, Sitharama

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in integrated electronic devices motivated the use of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in many applications including domain surveillance and mobile target tracking, where a number of sensors are scattered within a sensitive region to detect the presence of intruders and forward related events to some analysis center(s). Obviously, sensor deployment should guarantee an optimal event detection rate and should reduce coverage holes. Most of the coverage control approaches proposed in the literature deal with two-dimensional zones and do not develop strategies to handle coverage in three-dimensional domains, which is becoming a requirement for many applications including water monitoring, indoor surveillance, and projectile tracking. This paper proposes efficient techniques to detect coverage holes in a 3D domain using a finite set of sensors, repair the holes, and track hostile targets. To this end, we use the concepts of Voronoi tessellation, Vietoris complex, and retract by deformation. We show in particular that, through a set of iterative transformations of the Vietoris complex corresponding to the deployed sensors, the number of coverage holes can be computed with a low complexity. Mobility strategies are also proposed to repair holes by moving appropriately sensors towards the uncovered zones. The tracking objective is to set a non-uniform WSN coverage within the monitored domain to allow detecting the target(s) by the set of sensors. We show, in particular, how the proposed algorithms adapt to cope with obstacles. Simulation experiments are carried out to analyze the efficiency of the proposed models. To our knowledge, repairing and tracking is addressed for the first time in 3D spaces with different sensor coverage schemes. PMID:22163733

  13. 3D spectral imaging system for anterior chamber metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Trevor; Segref, Armin; Frisken, Grant; Frisken, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Accurate metrology of the anterior chamber of the eye is useful for a number of diagnostic and clinical applications. In particular, accurate corneal topography and corneal thickness data is desirable for fitting contact lenses, screening for diseases and monitoring corneal changes. Anterior OCT systems can be used to measure anterior chamber surfaces, however accurate curvature measurements for single point scanning systems are known to be very sensitive to patient movement. To overcome this problem we have developed a parallel 3D spectral metrology system that captures simultaneous A-scans on a 2D lateral grid. This approach enables estimates of the elevation and curvature of anterior and posterior corneal surfaces that are robust to sample movement. Furthermore, multiple simultaneous surface measurements greatly improve the ability to register consecutive frames and enable aggregate measurements over a finer lateral grid. A key element of our approach has been to exploit standard low cost optical components including lenslet arrays and a 2D sensor to provide a path towards low cost implementation. We demonstrate first prototypes based on 6 Mpixel sensor using a 250 μm pitch lenslet array with 300 sample beams to achieve an RMS elevation accuracy of 1μm with 95 dB sensitivity and a 7.0 mm range. Initial tests on Porcine eyes, model eyes and calibration spheres demonstrate the validity of the concept. With the next iteration of designs we expect to be able to achieve over 1000 simultaneous A-scans in excess of 75 frames per second.

  14. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  15. Spectral Element Modeling of 3D Site Effects in the Alpine Valley of Grenoble, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, E.; Cornou, C.; Gueguen, P.; Causse, M.; Komatitsch, D.

    2004-12-01

    Sitting on top of a 3D Y-shaped basin filled mostly with late quaternary deposits, the city of Grenoble (French Alps) is subject to strong amplification of seismic motion (see the SISMOVALP web site). In order to assess the magnitude and 3D complexity of these site effects, we propose a spectral element modeling approach previously applied to the prediction of strong ground motion in the Los Angeles sedimentary basin (Komatitstch et al., 2004). The spectral element method naturally accounts for depth variations of the free surface and of internal interfaces, such as the contact between the sediments and the bedrock. It is also well suited to model the propagation of surface waves generated at the basin edges. The 3D spectral element mesh honors the stiff surface topography of the mountains surrounding the city, as well as the bedrock depth obtained from extensive gravimetric measurements. In the basin, we use a generic 1D velocity model derived from geophysical measurements performed in a deep borehole that reached the substratum at 550 m depth in 1999. Results and comparison to data are shown in the time and frequency domain for small-size (Mw=2.5 and Mw=3.5) local events recorded in the past years. Then, a Mw=5.5 strike-slip event is simulated on the eastern border of the basin along the Belledonne fault, and the results are compared to those obtained by the method of Empirical Green Functions. References: http://www-lgit.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr/sismovalp/ Simulations of ground motion in the Los Angeles basin based upon the spectral- element method, Dimitri Komatitsch, Qinya Liu, Jeroen Tromp, Peter Süss, Christiane Stidham and John H. Shaw, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, vol. 94, p 187-206 (2004).

  16. 3D Spectral Element Method Simulations Of The Seismic Response of Caracas (Venezuela) Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavaud, E.; Vilotte, J.; Festa, G.; Cupillard, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present here 3D numerical simulations of the response of the Caracas (Venezuela) valley up to 5 Hz for different scenarios of plane wave excitation based on the regional seismicity. Attention is focused on the effects of the 3D basin geometry and of the adjacent regional topography. The simulations are performed using Spectral Element method (SEM) together with an unstructured hexahedral mesh discretization and perfectly matched layers (PML). These simulations show 3D amplification phenomena associated with complex wave reflexion, diffraction and focalisation patterns linked to the geometry of the basin. Time and frequency analysis reveal some interesting features both in terms of amplification and energy residence in the basin. The low frequency amplification pattern is mainly controlled by the early response of the basin to the incident plane wave while the high frequency amplification patterns result mainly from late arrivals where complex 3D wave diffraction phenomena are dominating and the memory of the initial excitation is lost. Interestingly enough, it is shown that H/V method correctly predict the low frequency amplification pattern when apply to the late part of the recorded seismograms. The complex high frequency amplification pattern is shown to be associated with surface wave generation at, and propagation from, sharp edges of the basin. Importance of 3D phenomena is assessed by comparison with simple 2D simulations. Significant differences in terms of time of residence, energy and amplification levels point out the interest of complete 3D modeling. In conclusions some of the limitations associated with the use of unstructured hexahedral meshes will be adressed. Despite the use of unstructured meshing tool, modeling the geometry of geological basins remain a complex and time consuming task. Possible extensions using more elaborate techniques like non conforming domain decomposition will be also discussed in conclusion.

  17. Simulation domain size requirements for elastic response of 3D polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Tugce; Stein, Clayton; Pokharel, Reeju; Hefferan, Christopher; Tucker, Harris; Jha, Sushant; John, Reji; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Kenesei, Peter; Suter, Robert M.; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    A fast Fourier transform (FFT) based spectral algorithm is used to compute the full field mechanical response of polycrystalline microstructures. The field distributions in a specific region are used to determine the sensitivity of the method to the number of surrounding grains through quantification of the divergence of the field values from the largest simulation domain, as successively smaller surrounding volumes are included in the simulation. The analysis considers a mapped 3D structure where the location of interest is taken to be a particular pair of surface grains that enclose a small fatigue crack, and synthetically created statistically representative microstructures to further investigate the effect of anisotropy, loading condition, loading direction, and texture. The synthetic structures are generated via DREAM3D and the measured material is a cyclically loaded, Ni-based, low solvus high refractory (LSHR) superalloy that was characterized via 3D high energy x-ray diffraction microscopy (HEDM). Point-wise comparison of distributions in the grain pairs shows that, in order to obtain a Pearson correlation coefficient larger than 99%, the domain must extend to at least the third nearest neighbor. For an elastic FFT calculation, the stress-strain distributions are not sensitive to the shape of the domain. The main result is that convergence can be specified in terms of the number of grains surrounding a region of interest.

  18. Spectral fusing Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Meemon, Panomsak; Widjaja, Joewono; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-02-01

    Gabor domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) is one of many variations of optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques that aims for invariant high resolution across a 3D field of view by utilizing the ability to dynamically refocus the imaging optics in the sample arm. GD-OCM acquires multiple cross-sectional images at different focus positions of the objective lens, and then fuses them to obtain an invariant high-resolution 3D image of the sample, which comes with the intrinsic drawback of a longer processing time as compared to conventional Fourier domain OCT. Here, we report on an alternative Gabor fusing algorithm, the spectral-fusion technique, which directly processes each acquired spectrum and combines them prior to the Fourier transformation to obtain a depth profile. The implementation of the spectral-fusion algorithm is presented and its performance is compared to that of the prior GD-OCM spatial-fusion approach. The spectral-fusion approach shows twice the speed of the spatial-fusion approach for a spectrum size of less than 2000 point sampling, which is a commonly used spectrum size in OCT imaging, including GD-OCM. PMID:26907410

  19. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  20. Registration of 3D spectral OCT volumes combining ICP with a graph-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Lee, Kyungmoo; Garvin, Mona K.; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The introduction of spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) scanners has enabled acquisition of high resolution, 3D cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina. 3D-OCT is used to detect and manage eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. To follow-up patients over time, image registration is a vital tool to enable more precise, quantitative comparison of disease states. In this work we present a 3D registrationmethod based on a two-step approach. In the first step we register both scans in the XY domain using an Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based algorithm. This algorithm is applied to vessel segmentations obtained from the projection image of each scan. The distance minimized in the ICP algorithm includes measurements of the vessel orientation and vessel width to allow for a more robust match. In the second step, a graph-based method is applied to find the optimal translation along the depth axis of the individual A-scans in the volume to match both scans. The cost image used to construct the graph is based on the mean squared error (MSE) between matching A-scans in both images at different translations. We have applied this method to the registration of Optic Nerve Head (ONH) centered 3D-OCT scans of the same patient. First, 10 3D-OCT scans of 5 eyes with glaucoma imaged in vivo were registered for a qualitative evaluation of the algorithm performance. Then, 17 OCT data set pairs of 17 eyes with known deformation were used for quantitative assessment of the method's robustness.

  1. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with <50 μm resolution to create a custom designed optical mount in a hand-held form factor. We examined the characteristics of the 3D printed optical system with finite element modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (LED) and mechanical (handling) strain on the optical system. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  2. Multivariate statistical analysis as a tool for the segmentation of 3D spectral data.

    PubMed

    Lucas, G; Burdet, P; Cantoni, M; Hébert, C

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) spectral data is nowadays common using many different microanalytical techniques. In order to proceed to the 3D reconstruction, data processing is necessary not only to deal with noisy acquisitions but also to segment the data in term of chemical composition. In this article, we demonstrate the value of multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) methods for this purpose, allowing fast and reliable results. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) coupled with a focused ion beam (FIB), a stack of spectrum images have been acquired on a sample produced by laser welding of a nickel-titanium wire and a stainless steel wire presenting a complex microstructure. These data have been analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and factor rotations. PCA allows to significantly improve the overall quality of the data, but produces abstract components. Here it is shown that rotated components can be used without prior knowledge of the sample to help the interpretation of the data, obtaining quickly qualitative mappings representative of elements or compounds found in the material. Such abundance maps can then be used to plot scatter diagrams and interactively identify the different domains in presence by defining clusters of voxels having similar compositions. Identified voxels are advantageously overlaid on secondary electron (SE) images with higher resolution in order to refine the segmentation. The 3D reconstruction can then be performed using available commercial softwares on the basis of the provided segmentation. To asses the quality of the segmentation, the results have been compared to an EDX quantification performed on the same data. PMID:24035679

  3. Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid For 3-D Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rubin, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    A Segmented Domain Decomposition Multigrid (SDDMG) procedure was developed for three-dimensional viscous flow problems as they apply to turbomachinery flows. The procedure divides the computational domain into a coarse mesh comprised of uniformly spaced cells. To resolve smaller length scales such as the viscous layer near a surface, segments of the coarse mesh are subdivided into a finer mesh. This is repeated until adequate resolution of the smallest relevant length scale is obtained. Multigrid is used to communicate information between the different grid levels. To test the procedure, simulation results will be presented for a compressor and turbine cascade. These simulations are intended to show the ability of the present method to generate grid independent solutions. Comparisons with data will also be presented. These comparisons will further demonstrate the usefulness of the present work for they allow an estimate of the accuracy of the flow modeling equations independent of error attributed to numerical discretization.

  4. Structure of Pseudoknot PK26 Shows 3D Domain Swapping in an RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lietzke, Susan E; Barnes, Cindy L.

    1998-01-01

    3D domain swapping provides a facile pathway for the evolution of oligomeric proteins and allosteric mechanisms and a means for using monomer-oligomer equilibria to regulate biological activity. The term "3D domain swapping" describes the exchange of identical domains between two protein monomers to create an oligomer. 3D domain swapping has, so far, only been recognized in proteins. In this study, the structure of the pseudoknot PK26 is reported and it is a clear example of 3D domain swapping in RNA. PK26 was chosen for study because RNA pseudoknots are required structures in several biological processes and they arise frequently in in vitro selection experiments directed against protein targets. PK26 specifically inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with nanomolar affinity. We have now determined the 3.1 A resolution crystal structure of PK26 and find that it forms a 3D domain swapped dimer. PK26 shows extensive base pairing between and within strands. Formation of the dimer requires the linker region between the pseudoknot folds to adopt a unique conformation that allows a base within a helical stem to skip one base in the stacking register. Rearrangement of the linker would permit a monomeric pseudoknot to form. This structure shows how RNA can use 3D domain swapping to build large scale oligomers like the putative hexamer in the packaging RNA of bacteriophage Phi29.

  5. Oxygen spectral line synthesis: 3D non-LTE with CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakapavičius, D.; Steffen, M.; Kučinskas, A.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Caffau, E.; Cayrel, R.

    In this work we present first results of our current project aimed at combining the 3D hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere approach with non-LTE (NLTE) spectral line synthesis for a number of key chemical species. We carried out a full 3D-NLTE spectrum synthesis of the oxygen IR 777 nm triplet, using a modified and improved version of our NLTE3D package to calculate departure coefficients for the atomic levels of oxygen in a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere. Spectral line synthesis was subsequently performed with the Linfor3D code. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the lines of the oxygen triplet produce deeper cores under NLTE conditions, due to the diminished line source function in the line forming region. This means that the solar oxygen IR 777 nm lines should be stronger in NLTE, leading to negative 3D NLTE-LTE abundance corrections. Qualitatively this result would support previous claims for a relatively low solar oxygen abundance. Finally, we outline several further steps that need to be taken in order to improve the physical realism and numerical accuracy of our current 3D-NLTE calculations.

  6. A Spectral Element Ocean Model on the Cray T3D: the interannual variability of the Mediterranean Sea general circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molcard, A. J.; Pinardi, N.; Ansaloni, R.

    A new numerical model, SEOM (Spectral Element Ocean Model, (Iskandarani et al, 1994)), has been implemented in the Mediterranean Sea. Spectral element methods combine the geometric flexibility of finite element techniques with the rapid convergence rate of spectral schemes. The current version solves the shallow water equations with a fifth (or sixth) order accuracy spectral scheme and about 50.000 nodes. The domain decomposition philosophy makes it possible to exploit the power of parallel machines. The original MIMD master/slave version of SEOM, written in F90 and PVM, has been ported to the Cray T3D. When critical for performance, Cray specific high-performance one-sided communication routines (SHMEM) have been adopted to fully exploit the Cray T3D interprocessor network. Tests performed with highly unstructured and irregular grid, on up to 128 processors, show an almost linear scalability even with unoptimized domain decomposition techniques. Results from various case studies on the Mediterranean Sea are shown, involving realistic coastline geometry, and monthly mean 1000mb winds from the ECMWF's atmospheric model operational analysis from the period January 1987 to December 1994. The simulation results show that variability in the wind forcing considerably affect the circulation dynamics of the Mediterranean Sea.

  7. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep white matter tracts and the surrounding tissue is the reverse of the contrast in water peak height images. This indicates the presence of a shoulder in

  8. Spectral/Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography is a low-coherence interferometric method for imaging of biological tissue [1, 2]. For more than a decade after its inception between 1988 and 1991, the dominant implementation has been time domain OCT (TD-OCT), in which the length of a reference arm is rapidly scanned. The first spectral or Fourier domain OCT (SD/FD-OCT) implementation was reported in 1995 [3]. In SD-OCT the reference arm is kept stationary, and the depth information is obtained by a Fourier transform of the spectrally resolved interference fringes in the detection arm of a Michelson interferometer. This approach has provided a significant advantage in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which despite reports as early as 1997 [4, 5] has taken about half a decade to be recognized fully by the OCT community in 2003 [6-8]. The first demonstration of SD-OCT for in vivo retinal imaging in 2002 [9] was followed by a full realization of the sensitivity advantage by video rate in vivo retinal imaging [10], including high-speed 3-D volumetric imaging [11], ultrahigh-resolution video rate imaging [12, 13], and Doppler blood flow determination in the human retina [14, 15]. The superior sensitivity of SD-OCT, combined with the lack of need for a fast mechanical scanning mechanism, has opened up the possibility of much faster scanning without loss of image quality and provided a paradigm shift from point sampling to volumetric mapping of biological tissue in vivo. The technology has been particularly promising for ophthalmology [16, 17]. In this chapter, the principles and system design considerations of SD-OCT will be discussed in more detail.

  9. From pixel to voxel: a deeper view of biological tissue by 3D mass spectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hui; Greer, Tyler; Li, Lingjun

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensional mass spectral imaging (3D MSI) is an exciting field that grants the ability to study a broad mass range of molecular species ranging from small molecules to large proteins by creating lateral and vertical distribution maps of select compounds. Although the general premise behind 3D MSI is simple, factors such as choice of ionization method, sample handling, software considerations and many others must be taken into account for the successful design of a 3D MSI experiment. This review provides a brief overview of ionization methods, sample preparation, software types and technological advancements driving 3D MSI research of a wide range of low- to high-mass analytes. Future perspectives in this field are also provided to conclude that the positive and promises ever-growing applications in the biomedical field with continuous developments of this powerful analytical tool. PMID:21320052

  10. 3D parallel computations of turbofan noise propagation using a spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghaddosi, Farzad

    2006-12-01

    A three-dimensional code has been developed for the simulation of tone noise generated by turbofan engine inlets using computational aeroacoustics. The governing equations are the linearized Euler equations, which are further simplified to a set of equations in terms of acoustic potential, using the irrotational flow assumption, and subsequently solved in the frequency domain. Due to the special nature of acoustic wave propagation, the spatial discretization is performed using a spectral element method, where a tensor product of the nth-degree polynomials based on Chebyshev orthogonal functions is used to approximate variations within hexahedral elements. Non-reflecting boundary conditions are imposed at the far-field using a damping layer concept. This is done by augmenting the continuity equation with an additional term without modifying the governing equations as in PML methods. Solution of the linear system of equations for the acoustic problem is based on the Schur complement method, which is a nonoverlapping domain decomposition technique. The Schur matrix is first solved using a matrix-free iterative method, whose convergence is accelerated with a novel local preconditioner. The solution in the entire domain is then obtained by finding solutions in smaller subdomains. The 3D code also contains a mean flow solver based on the full potential equation in order to take into account the effects of flow variations around the nacelle on the scattering of the radiated sound field. All aspects of numerical simulations, including building and assembling the coefficient matrices, implementation of the Schur complement method, and solution of the system of equations for both the acoustic and mean flow problems are performed on multiprocessors in parallel using the resources of the CLUMEQ Supercomputer Center. A large number of test cases are presented, ranging in size from 100 000-2 000 000 unknowns for which, depending on the size of the problem, between 8-48 CPU's are

  11. Reconstructing photorealistic 3D models from image sequence using domain decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-11-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Structured light and photogrammetry are two main methods to acquire 3D information, and both are expensive. Even if these expensive instruments are used, photorealistic 3D models are seldom available. In this paper, a new method to reconstruction photorealistic 3D models using a single camera is proposed. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the objects, and a sequence of about 20 images is taken. From the coded marks, the images are calibrated, and a snake algorithm is used to segment object from the background. A rough 3d model is obtained using shape from silhouettes algorithm. The silhouettes are decomposed into a combination of convex curves, which are used to partition the rough 3d model into some convex mesh patches. For each patch, the multi-view photo consistency constraints and smooth regulations are expressed as a finite element formulation, which can be resolved locally, and the information can be exchanged along the patches boundaries. The rough model is deformed into a fine 3d model through such a domain decomposition finite element method. The textures are assigned to each element mesh, and a photorealistic 3D model is got finally. A toy pig is used to verify the algorithm, and the result is exciting.

  12. Vessel segmentation in 3D spectral OCT scans of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; van Ginneken, Bram; Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2008-03-01

    The latest generation of spectral optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanners is able to image 3D cross-sectional volumes of the retina at a high resolution and high speed. These scans offer a detailed view of the structure of the retina. Automated segmentation of the vessels in these volumes may lead to more objective diagnosis of retinal vascular disease including hypertensive retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity. Additionally, vessel segmentation can allow color fundus images to be registered to these 3D volumes, possibly leading to a better understanding of the structure and localization of retinal structures and lesions. In this paper we present a method for automatically segmenting the vessels in a 3D OCT volume. First, the retina is automatically segmented into multiple layers, using simultaneous segmentation of their boundary surfaces in 3D. Next, a 2D projection of the vessels is produced by only using information from certain segmented layers. Finally, a supervised, pixel classification based vessel segmentation approach is applied to the projection image. We compared the influence of two methods for the projection on the performance of the vessel segmentation on 10 optic nerve head centered 3D OCT scans. The method was trained on 5 independent scans. Using ROC analysis, our proposed vessel segmentation system obtains an area under the curve of 0.970 when compared with the segmentation of a human observer.

  13. Computational Identification of Genomic Features That Influence 3D Chromatin Domain Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Raphaël; Cuvier, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in long-range Hi-C contact mapping have revealed the importance of the 3D structure of chromosomes in gene expression. A current challenge is to identify the key molecular drivers of this 3D structure. Several genomic features, such as architectural proteins and functional elements, were shown to be enriched at topological domain borders using classical enrichment tests. Here we propose multiple logistic regression to identify those genomic features that positively or negatively influence domain border establishment or maintenance. The model is flexible, and can account for statistical interactions among multiple genomic features. Using both simulated and real data, we show that our model outperforms enrichment test and non-parametric models, such as random forests, for the identification of genomic features that influence domain borders. Using Drosophila Hi-C data at a very high resolution of 1 kb, our model suggests that, among architectural proteins, BEAF-32 and CP190 are the main positive drivers of 3D domain borders. In humans, our model identifies well-known architectural proteins CTCF and cohesin, as well as ZNF143 and Polycomb group proteins as positive drivers of domain borders. The model also reveals the existence of several negative drivers that counteract the presence of domain borders including P300, RXRA, BCL11A and ELK1. PMID:27203237

  14. Tomographic Spectral Imaging with Multivariate Statistical Analysis: Comprehensive 3D Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R; Michael, Joseph R

    2006-02-01

    A comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) microanalysis procedure using a combined scanning electron microscope (SEM)/focused ion beam (FIB) system equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) has been developed. The FIB system was used first to prepare a site-specific region for X-ray microanalysis followed by the acquisition of an electron-beam generated X-ray spectral image. A small section of material was then removed by the FIB, followed by the acquisition of another X-ray spectral image. This serial sectioning procedure was repeated 10-12 times to sample a volume of material. The series of two-spatial-dimension spectral images were then concatenated into a single data set consisting of a series of volume elements or voxels each with an entire X-ray spectrum. This four-dimensional (three real space and one spectral dimension) spectral image was then comprehensively analyzed with Sandia's automated X-ray spectral image analysis software. This technique was applied to a simple Cu-Ag eutectic and a more complicated localized corrosion study where the powerful site-specific comprehensive analysis capability of tomographic spectral imaging (TSI) combined with multivariate statistical analysis is demonstrated. PMID:17481340

  15. Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion for the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo; Calandra, Henri

    2016-06-01

    Laplace-domain waveform inversion reconstructs long-wavelength subsurface models by using the zero-frequency component of damped seismic signals. Despite the computational advantages of Laplace-domain waveform inversion over conventional frequency-domain waveform inversion, an acoustic assumption and an iterative matrix solver have been used to invert 3D marine datasets to mitigate the intensive computing cost. In this study, we develop a Laplace-domain waveform modeling and inversion algorithm for 3D acoustic-elastic coupled media by using a parallel sparse direct solver library (MUltifrontal Massively Parallel Solver, MUMPS). We precisely simulate a real marine environment by coupling the 3D acoustic and elastic wave equations with the proper boundary condition at the fluid-solid interface. In addition, we can extract the elastic properties of the Earth below the sea bottom from the recorded acoustic pressure datasets. As a matrix solver, the parallel sparse direct solver is used to factorize the non-symmetric impedance matrix in a distributed memory architecture and rapidly solve the wave field for a number of shots by using the lower and upper matrix factors. Using both synthetic datasets and real datasets obtained by a 3D wide azimuth survey, the long-wavelength component of the P-wave and S-wave velocity models is reconstructed and the proposed modeling and inversion algorithm are verified. A cluster of 80 CPU cores is used for this study.

  16. Global regular solutions for the 3D Kawahara equation posed on unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Nikolai A.; Simões, Márcio Hiran

    2016-08-01

    An initial boundary value problem for the 3D Kawahara equation posed on a channel-type domain was considered. The existence and uniqueness results for global regular solutions as well as exponential decay of small solutions in the H 2-norm were established.

  17. Global regular solutions for the 3D Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation posed on unbounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    An initial-boundary value problem for the 3D Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation posed on unbounded domains is considered. Existence and uniqueness of a global regular solution as well as exponential decay of the H2-norm for small initial data are proven.

  18. In Vivo 3D Meibography of the Human Eyelid Using Real Time Imaging Fourier-Domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Sik; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported obtaining tomograms of meibomian glands from healthy volunteers using commercial anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), which is widely employed in clinics for examination of the anterior segment. However, we could not create 3D images of the meibomian glands, because the commercial OCT does not have a 3D reconstruction function. In this study we report the creation of 3D images of the meibomian glands by reconstructing the tomograms of these glands using high speed Fourier-Domain OCT (FD-OCT) developed in our laboratory. This research was jointly undertaken at the Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital (Seoul, Korea) and the Advanced Photonics Research Institute of Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Gwangju, Korea) with two healthy volunteers and seven patients with meibomian gland dysfunction. A real time imaging FD-OCT system based on a high-speed wavelength swept laser was developed that had a spectral bandwidth of 100 nm at the 1310 nm center wavelength. The axial resolution was 5 µm and the lateral resolution was 13 µm in air. Using this device, the meibomian glands of nine subjects were examined. A series of tomograms from the upper eyelid measuring 5 mm (from left to right, B-scan) × 2 mm (from upper part to lower part, C-scan) were collected. Three-D images of the meibomian glands were then reconstructed using 3D “data visualization, analysis, and modeling software”. Established infrared meibography was also performed for comparison. The 3D images of healthy subjects clearly showed the meibomian glands, which looked similar to bunches of grapes. These results were consistent with previous infrared meibography results. The meibomian glands were parallel to each other, and the saccular acini were clearly visible. Here we report the successful production of 3D images of human meibomian glands by reconstructing tomograms of these glands with high speed FD-OCT. PMID:23805297

  19. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions. PMID:27140495

  20. 3D modeling of satellite spectral images, radiation budget and energy budget of urban landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    DART EB is a model that is being developed for simulating the 3D (3 dimensional) energy budget of urban and natural scenes, possibly with topography and atmosphere. It simulates all non radiative energy mechanisms (heat conduction, turbulent momentum and heat fluxes, water reservoir evolution, etc.). It uses DART model (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) for simulating radiative mechanisms: 3D radiative budget of 3D scenes and their remote sensing images expressed in terms of reflectance or brightness temperature values, for any atmosphere, wavelength, sun/view direction, altitude and spatial resolution. It uses an innovative multispectral approach (ray tracing, exact kernel, discrete ordinate techniques) over the whole optical domain. This paper presents two major and recent improvements of DART for adapting it to urban canopies. (1) Simulation of the geometry and optical characteristics of urban elements (houses, etc.). (2) Modeling of thermal infrared emission by vegetation and urban elements. The new DART version was used in the context of the CAPITOUL project. For that, districts of the Toulouse urban data base (Autocad format) were translated into DART scenes. This allowed us to simulate visible, near infrared and thermal infrared satellite images of Toulouse districts. Moreover, the 3D radiation budget was used by DARTEB for simulating the time evolution of a number of geophysical quantities of various surface elements (roads, walls, roofs). Results were successfully compared with ground measurements of the CAPITOUL project.

  1. 3D topology and arrangement of proteins inside ceramide-rich domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhäuser, Christian; Gulbins, Heike; Gulbins, Erich; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2010-04-01

    Clustering of receptor and signalling molecules (such as CD95 or CD40) within ceramide-enriched membrane domains results in a very high density of these proteins facilitating activation of associated enzymes, the exclusion of inhibitory molecules and/or the recruitment of further signalling molecules to transmit the signal into the cells. However, at present the mechanisms of receptor clustering and the exact distribution of proteins within the ceramide-enriched domains are unknown. Therefore, we generated digital images from anti-CD95 stimulated JYcells that were stained with FITC-coupled anti-ceramide and Cy3-labelled anti-CD95 antibodies. We developed image processing methods to determine the spatial distribution of proteins in ceramide-enriched membrane domains and visualized them by volume rendering and surface models. After image preprocessing with appropriate filters for contrast enhancement, noise reduction and logarithmic scaling, 3D models were generated using adapted volume and surface reconstruction. To detect the colocalization of CD95 and ceramide molecules we developed several different methods rasterizing 3D data of each channel into cells and counting intensity values above a specified colour threshold value. The colocalization voxel was set either by normalized product of totals (product intensity) or depending on binarization. In addition, a cross-covariance function to quantify the colocalization was determined and embedded as a 3D object. These computerized techniques allowed for a quantitative analysis of the spatial arrangement of proteins in ceramide-rich domains of living cells.

  2. 3D versus 2D domain wall interaction in ideal and rough nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivano, A.; Dolocan, Voicu O.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between transverse magnetic domain walls (TDWs) in planar (2D) and cylindrical (3D) nanowires is examined using micromagnetic simulations. We show that in perfect and surface deformed wires the free TDWs behave differently, as the 3D TDWs combine into metastable states with average lifetimes of 300 ns depending on roughness, while the 2D TDWs do not due to 2D shape anisotropy. When the 2D and 3D TDWs are pinned at artificial constrictions, they behave similarly as they interact mainly through the dipolar field. This magnetostatic interaction is well described by the point charge model with multipole expansion. In surface deformed wires with artificial constrictions, the interaction becomes more complex as the depinning field decreases and dynamical pinning can lead to local resonances. This can strongly influence the control of TDWs in DW-based devices.

  3. 3D time-domain airborne EM modeling for an arbitrarily anisotropic earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Changchun; Qi, Yanfu; Liu, Yunhe

    2016-08-01

    Time-domain airborne EM data is currently interpreted based on an isotropic model. Sometimes, it can be problematic when working in the region with distinct dipping stratifications. In this paper, we simulate the 3D time-domain airborne EM responses over an arbitrarily anisotropic earth with topography by edge-based finite-element method. Tetrahedral meshes are used to describe the abnormal bodies with complicated shapes. We further adopt the Backward Euler scheme to discretize the time-domain diffusion equation for electric field, obtaining an unconditionally stable linear equations system. We verify the accuracy of our 3D algorithm by comparing with 1D solutions for an anisotropic half-space. Then, we switch attentions to effects of anisotropic media on the strengths and the diffusion patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses. For numerical experiments, we adopt three typical anisotropic models: 1) an anisotropic anomalous body embedded in an isotropic half-space; 2) an isotropic anomalous body embedded in an anisotropic half-space; 3) an anisotropic half-space with topography. The modeling results show that the electric anisotropy of the subsurface media has big effects on both the strengths and the distribution patterns of time-domain airborne EM responses; this effect needs to be taken into account when interpreting ATEM data in areas with distinct anisotropy.

  4. SOFIA: a flexible source finder for 3D spectral line data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Westmeier, Tobias; Giese, Nadine; Jurek, Russell; Flöer, Lars; Popping, Attila; Winkel, Benjamin; van der Hulst, Thijs; Meyer, Martin; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Courtois, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    We introduce SOFIA, a flexible software application for the detection and parametrization of sources in 3D spectral line data sets. SOFIA combines for the first time in a single piece of software a set of new source-finding and parametrization algorithms developed on the way to future H I surveys with ASKAP (WALLABY, DINGO) and APERTIF. It is designed to enable the general use of these new algorithms by the community on a broad range of data sets. The key advantages of SOFIA are the ability to: search for line emission on multiple scales to detect 3D sources in a complete and reliable way, taking into account noise level variations and the presence of artefacts in a data cube; estimate the reliability of individual detections; look for signal in arbitrarily large data cubes using a catalogue of 3D coordinates as a prior; provide a wide range of source parameters and output products which facilitate further analysis by the user. We highlight the modularity of SOFIA, which makes it a flexible package allowing users to select and apply only the algorithms useful for their data and science questions. This modularity makes it also possible to easily expand SOFIA in order to include additional methods as they become available. The full SOFIA distribution, including a dedicated graphical user interface, is publicly available for download.

  5. Characterizing Woody Vegetation Spectral and Structural Parameters with a 3-D Scene Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W.; Yang, L.

    2004-05-01

    Quantification of structural and biophysical parameters of woody vegetation is of great significance in understanding vegetation condition, dynamics and functionality. Such information over a landscape scale is crucial for global and regional land cover characterization, global carbon-cycle research, forest resource inventories, and fire fuel estimation. While great efforts and progress have been made in mapping general land cover types over large area, at present, the ability to quantify regional woody vegetation structural and biophysical parameters is limited. One approach to address this research issue is through an integration of physically based 3-D scene model with multiangle and multispectral remote sensing data and in-situ measurements. The first step of this work is to model woody vegetation structure and its radiation regime using a physically based 3-D scene model and field data, before a robust operational algorithm can be developed for retrieval of important woody vegetation structural/biophysical parameters. In this study, we use an advanced 3-D scene model recently developed by Qin and Gerstl (2000), based on L-systems and radiosity theories. This 3-D scene model has been successfully applied to semi-arid shrubland to study structure and radiation regime at a regional scale. We apply this 3-D scene model to a more complicated and heterogeneous forest environment dominated by deciduous and coniferous trees. The data used in this study are from a field campaign conducted by NASA in a portion of the Superior National Forest (SNF) near Ely, Minnesota during the summers of 1983 and 1984, and supplement data collected during our revisit to the same area of SNF in summer of 2003. The model is first validated with reflectance measurements at different scales (ground observations, helicopter, aircraft, and satellite). Then its ability to characterize the structural and spectral parameters of the forest scene is evaluated. Based on the results from this study

  6. Recasting the 3D Wigner-Liouville equation with spectral components of the force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    The phasespace approach to many-body quantum mechanics, by means of the Wigner-function is interesting through its connection to classical mechanics. Time-evolution of any statistical distribution of states under influence of a (time-dependent) Hamiltonian is obtained through use of the Wigner-Liouville equation. The standard form of this equation contains two 3D integrals, over the entire phase space. As a result, this form emphasizes the non-locality of the interaction of the potential, but lacks simplicity and ease of understanding. Furthermore, the integrals make numerical solution of the Wigner-Liouville equation challenging. We present an alternative form to the Wigner-Liouville equation based on the force rather than the potential, in alignment with the classical Boltzmann equation. Decomposition of the force in its spectral components yields a simpler form of the Wigner-Liouville equation. This new form has only one 3D integral over the spectral force components, and is local in position, simplifying both interpretation and numerical implementation. Because of its use of the force, it straightforwardly reduces to the Boltzmann equation under classical conditions.

  7. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Bruce Weisman, R.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and

  8. Early detection of skin cancer via terahertz spectral profiling and 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Anis; Rahman, Aunik K; Rao, Babar

    2016-08-15

    Terahertz scanning reflectometry, terahertz 3D imaging and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy have been used to identify features in human skin biopsy samples diagnosed for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and compared with healthy skin samples. It was found from the 3D images that the healthy skin samples exhibit regular cellular pattern while the BCC skin samples indicate lack of regular cell pattern. The skin is a highly layered structure organ; this is evident from the thickness profile via a scan through the thickness of the healthy skin samples, where, the reflected intensity of the terahertz beam exhibits fluctuations originating from different skin layers. Compared to the healthy skin samples, the BCC samples' profiles exhibit significantly diminished layer definition; thus indicating a lack of cellular order. In addition, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy reveals significant and quantifiable differences between the healthy and BCC skin samples. Thus, a combination of three different terahertz techniques constitutes a conclusive route for detecting the BCC condition on a cellular level compared to the healthy skin. PMID:27040943

  9. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  10. 3D homogeneity study in PMMA layers using a Fourier domain OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones-R., Manuel de J.; Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H. De La; Tavera, Cesar G.; Luna H., Juan M.; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Micro-metallic particles embedded in polymers are now widely used in several industrial applications in order to modify the mechanical properties of the bulk. A uniform distribution of these particles inside the polymers is highly desired for instance, when a biological backscattering is simulated or a bio-framework is designed. A 3D Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system to detect the polymer's internal homogeneity is proposed. This optical system has a 2D camera sensor array that records a fringe pattern used to reconstruct with a single shot the tomographic image of the sample. The system gathers the full 3D tomographic and optical phase information during a controlled deformation by means of a motion linear stage. This stage avoids the use of expensive tilting stages, which in addition are commonly controlled by piezo drivers. As proof of principle, a series of different deformations were proposed to detect the uniform or non-uniform internal deposition of copper micro particles. The results are presented as images coming from the 3D tomographic micro reconstruction of the samples, and the 3D optical phase information that identifies the in-homogeneity regions within the Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) volume.

  11. Dynamic earthquake rupture modelled with an unstructured 3-D spectral element method applied to the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, P.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Somala, S. N.; Nissen-Meyer, T.

    2014-08-01

    An important goal of computational seismology is to simulate dynamic earthquake rupture and strong ground motion in realistic models that include crustal heterogeneities and complex fault geometries. To accomplish this, we incorporate dynamic rupture modelling capabilities in a spectral element solver on unstructured meshes, the 3-D open source code SPECFEM3D, and employ state-of-the-art software for the generation of unstructured meshes of hexahedral elements. These tools provide high flexibility in representing fault systems with complex geometries, including faults with branches and non-planar faults. The domain size is extended with progressive mesh coarsening to maintain an accurate resolution of the static field. Our implementation of dynamic rupture does not affect the parallel scalability of the code. We verify our implementation by comparing our results to those of two finite element codes on benchmark problems including branched faults. Finally, we present a preliminary dynamic rupture model of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake including a non-planar plate interface with heterogeneous frictional properties and initial stresses. Our simulation reproduces qualitatively the depth-dependent frequency content of the source and the large slip close to the trench observed for this earthquake.

  12. 3D optical phase reconstruction within PMMA samples using a spectral OCT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones-R., Manuel d. J.; De La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique has proved to be a useful method in biomedical areas such as ophthalmology, dentistry, dermatology, among many others. In all these applications the main target is to reconstruct the internal structure of the samples from which the physician's expertise may recognize and diagnose the existence of a disease. Nowadays OCT has been applied one step further and is used to study the mechanics of some particular type of materials, where the resulting information involves more than just their internal structure and the measurement of parameters such as displacements, stress and strain. Here we report on a spectral OCT system used to image the internal 3D microstructure and displacement maps from a PMMA (Poly-methyl-methacrylate) sample, subjected to a deformation by a controlled three point bending and tilting. The internal mechanical response of the polymer is shown as consecutive 2D images.

  13. 3D Multi-spectral Image-guided Near-infrared Spectroscopy using Boundary Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Image guided (IG) Near-Infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has the ability to provide high-resolution metabolic and vascular characterization of tissue, with clinical applications in diagnosis of breast cancer. This method is specific to multimodality imaging where tissue boundaries obtained from alternate modalities such as MRI/CT, are used for NIRS recovery. IG-NIRS is severely limited in 3D by challenges such as volumetric meshing of arbitrary anatomical shapes and computational burden encountered by existing models which use finite element method (FEM). We present an efficient and feasible alternative to FEM using boundary element method (BEM). The main advantage is the use of surface discretization which is reliable and more easily generated than volume grids in 3D and enables automation for large number of clinical data-sets. The BEM has been implemented for the diffusion equation to model light propagation in tissue. Image reconstruction based on BEM has been tested in a multi-threading environment using four processors which provides 60% improvement in computational time compared to a single processor. Spectral priors have been implemented in this framework and applied to a three-region problem with mean error of 6% in recovery of NIRS parameters. PMID:21179380

  14. Large-scale 3D inversion of frequency domain controlled-source electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. R.; Routh, P. S.; Donaldson, P.; Oldenburg, D. W.

    2005-05-01

    Controlled Source Audio-Frequency Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) is a frequency domain EM sounding technique. The CSAMT source is a grounded horizontal electric dipole approximately one to two kilometers in length. This dipole source generates both inductive and galvanic currents so that the observed electric field arises due to both the static the vector potentials. At low frequencies, the behavior of the fields is similar to that observed in a geometric sounding such as a direct current experiment. At higher frequencies, the inductive character of the source modifies the behavior of the fields so that the experiment becomes more like a frequency sounding. Higher frequency data are useful for imaging near-surface features and lower frequency data are sensitive to deeper structure. Inversion of controlled source EM data provides a means to image the subsurface electrical conductivity structure. We consider a 3D CSAMT data set acquired over a known geothermal resource area in Western Idaho. The data are amplitudes and phases of the electric and magnetic fields acquired at 25 frequencies. The conductivity contrast between the geothermal fluid conduits and the resistive host material allows us to relate the inverted conductivity image to the distribution of fluid flow pathways in the geothermal system. Our 1D CSAMT inversion of the 3D data set indicates regions of conductive fluid pathways in the subsurface. Our next step is to invert these data using the full Maxwell's equations in 3D. Inversion of a single frequency data set at 2 Hz using the 3D frequency domain inversion algorithm (Haber et. al, 2004) shows regions of fluid circulation indicated by zones of higher conductivity. Comparing the images from different single frequency inversions allows us to identify persistent features in the conductivity image that adequately satisfy the data. With the aid of synthetic modeling we are investigating what frequencies? and what geometries? are appropriate to better resolve

  15. 3D Laplace-domain full waveform inversion using a single GPU card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungkyun; Ha, Wansoo; Jun, Hyunggu; Min, Dong-Joo; Shin, Changsoo

    2014-06-01

    The Laplace-domain full waveform inversion is an efficient long-wavelength velocity estimation method for seismic datasets lacking low-frequency components. However, to invert a 3D velocity model, a large cluster of CPU cores have commonly been required to overcome the extremely long computing time caused by a large impedance matrix and a number of source positions. In this study, a workstation with a single GPU card (NVIDIA GTX 580) is successfully used for the 3D Laplace-domain full waveform inversion rather than a large cluster of CPU cores. To exploit a GPU for our inversion algorithm, the routine for the iterative matrix solver is ported to the CUDA programming language for forward and backward modeling parts with minimized modification of the remaining parts, which were originally written in Fortran 90. Using a uniformly structured grid set, nonzero values in the sparse impedance matrix can be arranged according to certain rules, which efficiently parallelize the preconditioned conjugate gradient method for a number of threads contained in the GPU card. We perform a numerical experiment to verify the accuracy of a floating point operation performed by a GPU to calculate the Laplace-domain wavefield. We also measure the efficiencies of the original CPU and modified GPU programs using a cluster of CPU cores and a workstation with a GPU card, respectively. Through the analysis, the parallelized inversion code for a GPU achieves the speedup of 14.7-24.6x compared to a CPU-based serial code depending on the degrees of freedom of the impedance matrix. Finally, the practicality of the proposed algorithm is examined by inverting a 3D long-wavelength velocity model using wide azimuth real datasets in 3.7 days.

  16. 3D domain swapping in a chimeric c-Src SH3 domain takes place through two hinge loops.

    PubMed

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Ortiz-Salmerón, Emilia; Martín-García, José M

    2014-04-01

    In the Src Homology 3 domain (SH3) the RT and n-Src loops form a pocket that accounts for the specificity and affinity in binding of proline rich motifs (PRMs), while the distal and diverging turns play a key role in the folding of the protein. We have solved the structure of a chimeric mutant c-Src-SH3 domain where specific residues at the RT- and n-Src-loops have been replaced by those present in the corresponding Abl-SH3 domain. Crystals of the chimeric protein show a single molecule in the asymmetric unit, which appears in an unfolded-like structure that upon generation of the symmetry related molecules reveals the presence of a domain swapped dimer where both, RT- and n-Src loops, act as hinge loops. In contrast, the fold of the diverging type II β-turn and the distal loop are well conserved. Our results are the first evidence for the presence of a structured diverging type II β-turn in an unfolded-like intermediate of the c-Src-SH3 domain, which can be stabilized by interactions from the β-strands of the same polypeptide chain or from a neighboring one. Futhermore, this crystallographic structure opens a unique opportunity to study the effect of the amino acid sequence of the hinge loops on the 3D domain swapping process of c-Src-SH3. PMID:24556574

  17. Application of high resolution 2D/3D spectral induced polarization (SIP) in metalliferous ore exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Zhao, X.; Yao, H.; He, X.; Zeng, P.; Chang, F.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xi, X.; He, L.

    2015-12-01

    Induced polarization (IP) is a powerful tool in metalliferous ore exploration. However, there are many sources, such as clay and graphite, which can generate IP anomaly. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measures IP response on a wide frequency range. This method provides a way to discriminate IP response generated by metalliferous ore or other objects. The best way to explore metalliferous ore is 3D SIP exploration. However, if we consider the exploration cost and efficiency, we can use SIP profiling to find an anomaly, and then use 2D/3D SIP sounding to characterize the anomaly. Based on above idea, we used a large-scale distributed SIP measurement system which can realize 800 sounding sites in one direction at the same time. This system can be used for SIP profiling, 2D/3D SIP sounding with high efficiency, high resolution, and large depth of investigation (> 1000 m). Qiushuwan copper - molybdenum deposit is located in Nanyang city, Henan province, China. It is only a middle-size deposit although over 100 holes were drilled and over 40 years of exploration were spent because of very complex geological setting. We made SIP measurement over 100 rock and ore samples to discriminate IP responses of ore and rock containing graphite. Then we carried out 7 lines of 2D SIP exploration with the depth of investigation great than 1000 m. The minimum electode spacing for potential difference is only 20 m. And we increase the spacing of current electodes at linear scale. This acquisition setting ensures high density data acquired and high quality data acquisition. Modeling and inversion result proves that we can get underground information with high resolution by our method. Our result shows that there exists a strong SIP response related to ore body in depth > 300 m. Pseudo-3D inversion of five 2D SIP sounding lines shows the location and size of IP anomaly. The new drillings based our result found a big copper-molybdenum ore body in new position with depth > 300 m and

  18. 3D simulation of seismic wave propagation around a tunnel using the spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, L.; Friederich, W.

    2010-05-01

    We model seismic wave propagation in the environment of a tunnel for later application to reconnaissance. Elastic wave propagation can be simulated by different numerical techniques such as finite differences and pseudospectral methods. Their disadvantage is the lack of accuracy on free surfaces, numerical dispersion and inflexibility of the mesh. Here we use the software package SPECFEM3D_SESAME in an svn development version, which is based on the spectral element method (SEM) and can handle complex mesh geometries. A weak form of the elastic wave equation leads to a linear system of equations with a diagonal mass matrix, where the free surface boundary of the tunnel can be treated under realistic conditions and can be effectively implemented in parallel. We have designed a 3D external mesh including a tunnel and realistic features such as layers and holes to simulate elastic wave propagation in the zone around the tunnel. The source is acting at the tunnel surface so that we excite Rayleigh waves which propagate to the front face of the tunnel. A conversion takes place and a high amplitude S-wave is radiated in the direction of the tunnel axis. Reflections from perturbations in front of the tunnel can be measured by receivers implemented on the tunnel face. For a shallow tunnel the land surface has high influence on the wave propagation. By implementing additional receivers at this surface we intent to improve the prediction. It shows that the SEM is very capable to handle the complex geometry of the model and especially incorporates the free surfaces of the model.

  19. Induced Polarization with Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory, EMSP Project No. 73836

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F. Dale; Sogade, John

    2004-12-14

    This project was designed as a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for characterization of contaminated sites. It encompassed laboratory studies of the effects of chemistry on induced polarization, development of 3D forward modeling and inversion codes, and investigations of inductive and capacitive coupling problems. In the laboratory part of the project a physico-chemical model developed in this project was used to invert laboratory IP spectra for the grain size and the effective grain size distribution of the sedimentary rocks as well as the formation factor, porosity, specific surface area, and the apparent fractal dimension. Furthermore, it was established that the IP response changed with the solution chemistry, the concentration of a given solution chemistry, valence of the constituent ions, and ionic radius. In the field part of the project, a 3D complex forward and inverse model was developed. It was used to process data acquired at two frequencies (1/16 Hz and 1/ 4Hz) in a cross-borehole configuration at the A-14 outfall area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) during March 2003 and June 2004. The chosen SRS site was contaminated with Tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and Trichloroethylene (PCE) that were disposed in this area for several decades till the 1980s. The imaginary conductivity produced from the inverted 2003 data correlated very well with the log10 (PCE) concentration derived from point sampling at 1 ft spacing in five ground-truth boreholes drilled after the data acquisition. The equivalent result for the 2004 data revealed that there were significant contaminant movements during the period March 2003 and June 2004, probably related to ground-truth activities and nearby remediation activities. Therefore SIP was successfully used to develop conceptual models of volume distributions of PCE/TCE contamination. In addition, the project developed non-polarizing electrodes that can be deployed in boreholes for years. A total of 28

  20. 3D seismic data reconstruction based on complex-valued curvelet transform in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Xiaohong; Li, Hongxing

    2015-02-01

    Traditional seismic data sampling must follow the Nyquist Sampling Theorem. However, the field data acquisition may not meet the sampling criteria due to missing traces or limits in exploration cost, causing a prestack data reconstruction problem. Recently researchers have proposed many useful methods to regularize the seismic data. In this paper, a 3D seismic data reconstruction method based on the Projections Onto Convex Sets (POCS) algorithm and a complex-valued curvelet transform (CCT) has been introduced in the frequency domain. In order to improve reconstruction efficiency and reduce the computation time, the seismic data are transformed from the t-x-y domain to the f-x-y domain and the data reconstruction is processed for every frequency slice during the reconstruction process. The selection threshold parameter is important for reconstruction efficiency for each iteration, therefore an exponential square root decreased (ESRD) threshold is proposed. The experimental results show that the ESRD threshold can greatly reduce iterations and improve reconstruction efficiency compared to the other thresholds for the same reconstruction result. We also analyze the antinoise ability of the CCT-based POCS reconstruction method. The example studies on synthetic and real marine seismic data showed that our proposed method is more efficient and applicable.

  1. Robust and Blind 3D Mesh Watermarking in Spatial Domain Based on Faces Categorization and Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Amir Masoud; Ebrahimnezhad, Hossein; Sedaaghi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a 3D watermarking algorithm in spatial domain is presented with blind detection. In the proposed method, a negligible visual distortion is observed in host model. Initially, a preprocessing is applied on the 3D model to make it robust against geometric transformation attacks. Then, a number of triangle faces are determined as mark triangles using a novel systematic approach in which faces are categorized and sorted robustly. In order to enhance the capability of information retrieval by attacks, block watermarks are encoded using Reed-Solomon block error-correcting code before embedding into the mark triangles. Next, the encoded watermarks are embedded in spherical coordinates. The proposed method is robust against additive noise, mesh smoothing and quantization attacks. Also, it is stout next to geometric transformation, vertices and faces reordering attacks. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is designed so that it is robust against the cropping attack. Simulation results confirm that the watermarked models confront very low distortion if the control parameters are selected properly. Comparison with other methods demonstrates that the proposed method has good performance against the mesh smoothing attacks.

  2. Domain Decomposition PN Solutions to the 3D Transport Benchmark over a Range in Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this contribution are twofold. First, the Domain Decomposition (DD) method used in the parafish parallel transport solver is re-interpreted as a Generalized Schwarz Splitting as defined by Tang [SIAM J Sci Stat Comput, vol.13 (2), pp. 573-595, 1992]. Second, parafish provides spherical harmonic (i.e., PN) solutions to the NEA benchmark suite for 3D transport methods and codes over a range in parameter space. To the best of the author's knowledge, these are the first spherical harmonic solutions provided for this demanding benchmark suite. They have been obtained using 512 CPU cores of the JuRoPa machine installed at the Jülich Computing Center (Germany).

  3. An Automatic 3D Mesh Generation Method for Domains with Multiple Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Hughes, Thomas J R; Bajaj, Chandrajit L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic and efficient approach to construct unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral meshes for a composite domain made up of heterogeneous materials. The boundaries of these material regions form non-manifold surfaces. In earlier papers, we developed an octree-based isocontouring method to construct unstructured 3D meshes for a single-material (homogeneous) domain with manifold boundary. In this paper, we introduce the notion of a material change edge and use it to identify the interface between two or several different materials. A novel method to calculate the minimizer point for a cell shared by more than two materials is provided, which forms a non-manifold node on the boundary. We then mesh all the material regions simultaneously and automatically while conforming to their boundaries directly from volumetric data. Both material change edges and interior edges are analyzed to construct tetrahedral meshes, and interior grid points are analyzed for proper hexahedral mesh construction. Finally, edge-contraction and smoothing methods are used to improve the quality of tetrahedral meshes, and a combination of pillowing, geometric flow and optimization techniques is used for hexahedral mesh quality improvement. The shrink set of pillowing schemes is defined automatically as the boundary of each material region. Several application results of our multi-material mesh generation method are also provided. PMID:20161555

  4. FDFD: A 3D Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Code for Electromagnetic Induction Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Nathan J.; Berryman, James G.; Buettner, H. Michael

    2001-07-01

    A new 3D code for electromagnetic induction tomography with intended applications to environmental imaging problems has been developed. The approach consists of calculating the fields within a volume using an implicit finite-difference frequency-domain formulation. The volume is terminated by an anisotropic perfectly matched layer region that simulates an infinite domain by absorbing outgoing waves. Extensive validation of this code has been done using analytical and semianalytical results from other codes, and some of those results are presented in this paper. The new code is written in Fortran 90 and is designed to be easily parallelized. Finally, an adjoint field method of data inversion, developed in parallel for solving the fully nonlinear inverse problem for electrical conductivity imaging (e.g., for mapping underground conducting plumes), uses this code to provide solvers for both forward and adjoint fields. Results obtained from this inversion method for high-contrast media are encouraging and provide a significant improvement over those obtained from linearized inversion methods.

  5. Validating 3D Seismic Velocity Models Using the Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Allen, R. M.; Obrebski, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    As seismic instrumentation, data storage and dissemination and computational power improve, seismic velocity models attempt to resolve smaller structures and cover larger areas. However, it is unclear how accurate these velocity models are and, while the best models available are used for event determination, it is difficult to put uncertainties on seismic event parameters. Model validation is typically done using resolution tests that assume the imaging theory used is accurate and thus only considers the impact of the data coverage on resolution. We present the results of a more rigorous approach to model validation via full three-dimensional waveform propagation using Spectral Element Methods (SEM). This approach makes no assumptions about the theory used to generate the models but require substantial computational resources. We first validate 3D tomographic models for the Western USA generated using both ray-theoretical and finite-frequency methods. The Dynamic North America (DNA) Models of P- and S- velocity structure (DNA09-P and DNA09-S) use teleseismic body-wave traveltime residuals recorded at over 800 seismic stations provided by the Earthscope USArray and regional seismic networks. We performed systematic computations of synthetics for the dataset used to generate the DNA models. Direct comparison of these synthetic seismograms to the actual observations allows us to accurately assess and validate the models. Implementation of the method for a densely instrumented region such as that covered by the DNA model provides a useful testbed for the validation methods that we will subsequently apply to other, more challenging study areas.

  6. 3D micro profile measurement with the method of spatial frequency domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongxiang

    2015-10-01

    3D micro profiles are often needed for measurement in many fields, e.g., binary optics, electronic industry, mechanical manufacturing, aeronautic and space industry, etc. In the case where height difference between two neighboring points of a test profile is equal to or greater than λ / 4, microscopic interferometry based on laser source will no longer be applicable because of the uncertainty in phase unwrapping. As white light possesses the characteristic of interference length approximate to zero, applying it for micro profilometry can avoid the trouble and can yield accurate results. Using self-developed Mirau-type scanning interference microscope, a step-like sample was tested twice, with 128 scanning interferograms recorded for each test. To process each set of the interferograms, the method of spatial frequency domain analysis was adopted. That is, for each point, by use of Furrier transform, white-light interference intensities were decomposed in spatial frequency domain, thus obtaining phase values corresponding to different wavenumbers; by using least square fitting on phases and wave numbers, a group-velocity OPD was gained for the very point; and finally in terms of the relation between relative height and the group-velocity OPD, the profile of the test sample was obtained. Two tests yielded same profile result for the sample, and step heights obtained were 50.88 nm and 50.94 nm, respectively. Meantime, the sample was also measured with a Zygo Newview 7200 topography instrument, with same profile result obtained and step height differing by 0.9 nm. In addition, data processing results indicate that chromatic dispersion equal to and higher than 2nd order is negligible when applying spatial frequency domain analysis method.

  7. Signatures of small-scale heating events in EUV spectral lines as modeled from 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nuno; Haberreiter, Margit; Hansteen, Viggo; Curdt, Werner; Schmutz, Werner

    2014-05-01

    We aim at understanding the implications of small scale heating events in the solar atmosphere for the variations of the solar spectral irradiance. We present a technique for identification and characterization of these events in 3D simulations of the solar atmosphere. An accurate property determination of these events in time and space will help us to understand how spectral lines, in particular in the EUV, respond to them and which kind of spectral signatures one would expect to find in observations as from SOHO/SUMER and eventually from future space missions, as for example observations by SPICE on board Solar Orbiter.

  8. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: • Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. • Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. • Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  9. 3D domain swapping causes extensive multimerisation of human interleukin-10 when expressed in planta.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Lotte B; Wilbers, Ruud H P; Roosien, Jan; van de Velde, Jan; Goverse, Aska; Bakker, Jaap; Schots, Arjen

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous expression platforms of biopharmaceutical proteins have been significantly improved over the last decade. Further improvement can be established by examining the intrinsic properties of proteins. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine with a short half-life that plays an important role in re-establishing immune homeostasis. This homodimeric protein of 36 kDa has significant therapeutic potential to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study we show that the major production bottleneck of human IL-10 is not protein instability as previously suggested, but extensive multimerisation due to its intrinsic 3D domain swapping characteristic. Extensive multimerisation of human IL-10 could be visualised as granules in planta. On the other hand, mouse IL-10 hardly multimerised, which could be largely attributed to its glycosylation. By introducing a short glycine-serine-linker between the fourth and fifth alpha helix of human IL-10 a stable monomeric form of IL-10 (hIL-10(mono)) was created that no longer multimerised and increased yield up to 20-fold. However, hIL-10(mono) no longer had the ability to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Forcing dimerisation restored biological activity. This was achieved by fusing human IL-10(mono) to the C-terminal end of constant domains 2 and 3 of human immunoglobulin A (Fcα), a natural dimer. Stable dimeric forms of IL-10, like Fcα-IL-10, may not only be a better format for improved production, but also a more suitable format for medical applications. PMID:23049703

  10. Modified block-matching 3-D filter in Laplacian pyramid domain for speckle reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Donghai; Jiang, Yuesong; Zhang, Yanzhong; He, Yuntao; Hua, Houqiang; Yu, Rong; Wu, Xiaofang; Gao, Qian

    2014-07-01

    The Laplacian pyramid-based block-matching 3-D filtering (BM3D) is proposed (LPBM3D) for despeckling the speckle image. For BM3D in each pyramid layer, the criterion used to collect blocks in the 3-D groups to the actual data statistics is devised. An adaptive wavelet thresholding operator that depends on both noise level and signal characteristics is proposed. The performance of the proposed LPBM3D method has been compared with the state-of-the-art methods, including the recently proposed nonlocal mean (NLM) and BM3D method. Experimental results show that the visual quality and evaluation indexes outperform the other methods with no edge preservation. The proposed algorithm effectively realizes both despeckling and edge preservation.

  11. Improvements to the ICRH antenna time-domain 3D plasma simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithe, David N.; Jenkins, Thomas G.; King, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a summary of ongoing improvements to the 3D time-domain plasma modeling software that has been used to look at ICRH antennas on Alcator C-Mod, NSTX, and ITER [1]. Our past investigations have shown that in low density cases where the slow wave is propagating, strong amplitude lower hybrid resonant fields can occur. Such a scenario could result in significant parasitic power loss in the SOL. The primary resonance broadening in this case is likely collisions with neutral gas, and thus we are upgrading the model to include realistic neutral gas in the SOL, in order to provide a better understanding of energy balance in these situations. Related to this, we are adding a temporal variation capability to the local plasma density in front of the antenna in order to investigate whether the near fields of the antenna could modify the local density sufficiently to initiate a low density situation. We will start with a simple scalar ponderomotive potential density expulsion model [2] for the density evolution, but are also looking to eventually couple to a more complex fluid treatment that would include tensor pressures and convective physics and sources of neutrals and ionization. We also review continued benchmarking efforts, and ongoing and planned improvements to the computational algorithms, resulting from experience gained during our recent supercomputing runs on the Titan supercomputer, including GPU operations.

  12. Two-dimensional angular filter array for angular domain imaging with 3D printed angular filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eldon; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) is a technique that is capable of generating two dimensional shadowgrams of attenuating targets embedded in a scattering medium. In ADI, an angular filter array (AFA) is positioned between the sample and the detector to distinguish between quasi-ballistic photons and scattered photons. An AFA is a series of micro-channels with a high aspect ratio. Previous AFAs from our group were constructed by micro-machining the micro-channels into a silicon wafer, limiting the imaging area to a one dimensional line. Two dimensional images were acquired via scanning. The objective of this work was to extend the AFA design to two dimensions to allow for two dimensional imaging with minimal scanning. The second objective of this work was to perform an initial characterization of the imaging capabilities of the 2D AFA. Our approach was to use rapid 3D prototyping techniques to generate an array of micro-channels. The imaging capabilities were then evaluated by imaging a 0.9 mm graphite rod submerged in a scattering media. Contrast was observed to improve when a second angular filter array was placed in front of the sample to mask the incoming light.

  13. Real Time Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy for 3D Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Jannick P; Canavesi, Cristina; Tankam, Patrice; Cogliati, Andrea; Lanis, Mara; Santhanam, Anand P

    2016-01-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for the characterization of microscopic tissue structures across various clinical applications. A custom microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner was developed to achieve, together with a multi-level GPU architecture, 55 kHz fast-axis A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) custom instrument. GD-OCM yields high-definition micrometer-class volumetric images. A dynamic depth of focusing capability through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, as in whales' eyes, was developed to enable the high definition instrument throughout a large field of view of 1 mm3 volume of imaging. Developing this technology is prime to enable integration within the workflow of clinical environments. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm has been achieved throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. Volumetric scans of human skin in vivo and an excised human cornea are presented. PMID:27046601

  14. 3D imaging of dental hard tissues with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli L.; Yang, Yi; Ma, Jing; Yan, Jun; Shou, Yuanxin; Wang, Tianheng; Ramesh, Aruna; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    A fiber optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe is used for three dimensional dental imaging. The probe has a lightweight miniaturized design with a size of a pen to facilitate clinic in vivo diagnostics. The probe is interfaced with a swept-source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography at 20K axial scanning rate. The tooth samples were scanned from occlusal, buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal orientations. Three dimensional imaging covers tooth surface area up to 10 mm x 10 mm with a depth about 5 mm, where a majority of caries affection occurs. OCT image provides better resolution and contrast compared to gold standard dental radiography (X-ray). In particular, the technology is well suited for occlusal caries detection. This is complementary to X-ray as occlusal caries affection is difficult to be detected due to the X-ray projectile scan geometry. The 3D topology of occlusal surface as well as the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) surface inside the tooth can be visualized. The lesion area appears with much stronger back scattering signal intensity.

  15. Verification and validation of ShipMo3D ship motion predictions in the time and frequency domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTaggart, Kevin A.

    2011-03-01

    This paper compares frequency domain and time domain predictions from the ShipMo3D ship motion library with observed motions from model tests and sea trials. ShipMo3D evaluates hull radiation and diffraction forces using the frequency domain Green function for zero forward speed, which is a suitable approach for ships travelling at moderate speed (e.g., Froude numbers up to 0.4). Numerical predictions give generally good agreement with experiments. Frequency domain and linear time domain predictions are almost identical. Evaluation of nonlinear buoyancy and incident wave forces using the instantaneous wetted hull surface gives no improvement in numerical predictions. Consistent prediction of roll motions remains a challenge for seakeeping codes due to the associated viscous effects.

  16. Automated multimodality concurrent classification for segmenting vessels in 3D spectral OCT and color fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhihong; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-03-01

    Segmenting vessels in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes is particularly challenging in the region near and inside the neural canal opening (NCO). Furthermore, accurately segmenting them in color fundus photographs also presents a challenge near the projected NCO. However, both modalities also provide complementary information to help indicate vessels, such as a better NCO contrast from the NCO-aimed OCT projection image and a better vessel contrast inside the NCO from fundus photographs. We thus present a novel multimodal automated classification approach for simultaneously segmenting vessels in SD-OCT volumes and fundus photographs, with a particular focus on better segmenting vessels near and inside the NCO by using a combination of their complementary features. In particular, in each SD-OCT volume, the algorithm pre-segments the NCO using a graph-theoretic approach and then applies oriented Gabor wavelets with oriented NCO-based templates to generate OCT image features. After fundus-to-OCT registration, the fundus image features are computed using Gaussian filter banks and combined with OCT image features. A k-NN classifier is trained on 5 and tested on 10 randomly chosen independent image pairs of SD-OCT volumes and fundus images from 15 subjects with glaucoma. Using ROC analysis, we demonstrate an improvement over two closest previous works performed in single modal SD-OCT volumes with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.87 (0.81 for our and 0.72 for Niemeijer's single modal approach) in the region around the NCO and 0.90 outside the NCO (0.84 for our and 0.81 for Niemeijer's single modal approach).

  17. Spectral mapping of 3D multi-cellular tumor spheroids: time-resolved confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Nandi, Somen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Das, Gaurav; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-07-21

    A tumor-like multi-cellular spheroid (3D) differs from a 2D cell in a number of ways. This is demonstrated using time resolved confocal microscopy. Two different tumor spheroids - HeLa (cervical cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) - are studied using 3 different fluorescent dyes - C153 (non-covalent), CPM (covalent) and doxorubicin (non-covalent, anti-cancer drug). The pattern of localization of these three fluorescent probes in the 3D tumor cell exhibits significant differences from that in the conventional 2D cells. For both the cells (HeLa and A549), the total uptake of doxorubicin in the 3D cell is much lower than that in the 2D cell. The uptake of doxorubicin molecules in the A549 spheroid is significantly different compared to the HeLa spheroid. The local polarity (i.e. emission maxima) and solvation dynamics in the 3D tumor cell differ from those in 2D cells. The covalent probe CPM exhibits intermittent fluorescence oscillations in the 1-2 s time scale. This is attributed to redox processes. These results may provide new insights into 3D tumors. PMID:27336201

  18. Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment: Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The main theme for our research is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars, shortwave spectrometers, and microwave radiometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools developed by our group. In particular, we define first a large number of cloudy test cases spanning all 3D possibilities not just the customary uniform-overcast ones. Second, for each case, we define a "Best Estimate of Clouds That Affect Shortwave Radiation" using all relevant ARM instruments, notably the new scanning radars, and contribute this to the ARM Archive. Third, we test the ASR-signature radiative transfer model RRTMG_SW for those cases, focusing on the near-IR because of long-standing problems in this spectral region, and work with the developers to improve RRTMG_SW in order to increase its penetration into the modeling community.

  19. 3-D frequency-domain seismic wave modelling in heterogeneous, anisotropic media using a Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a modified version of the spectral element method (SEM), called the Gaussian Quadrature Grid (GQG) approach, for frequency domain 3D seismic modelling in arbitrary heterogeneous, anisotropic media. The model may incorporate an arbitrary free-surface topography and irregular subsurface interfaces. Unlike the SEM ,it does not require a powerful mesh generator such as the Delauney Triangular or TetGen. Rather, the GQG approach replaces the element mesh with Gaussian quadrature abscissae to directly sample the physical properties of the model parameters and compute the weighted residual or variational integral. This renders the model discretisation simple and easily matched to the model topography, as well as direct control of the model paramterisation for subsequent inversion. In addition, it offers high accuracy in numerical modelling provided that an appropriate density of the Gaussian quadrature abscissae is employed. The second innovation of the GQG is the incorporation of a new implementation of perfectly matched layers to suppress artificial reflections from the domain margins. We employ PML model parameters (specified complex valued density and elastic moduli) rather than explicitly solving the governing wave equation with a complex co-ordinate system as in conventional approaches. Such an implementation is simple, general, effective and easily extendable to any class of anisotropy and other numerical modelling methods. The accuracy of the GQG approach is controlled by the number of Gaussian quadrature points per minimum wavelength, the so-called sampling density. The optimal sampling density should be the one which enables high definition of geological characteristics and high precision of the variational integral evaluation and spatial differentiation. Our experiments show that satisfactory results can be obtained using sampling densities of 5 points per minimum wavelength. Efficiency of the GQG approach mainly depends on the linear

  20. Waveform prediction with travel time model LLNL-G3D assessed by Spectral-Element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic monitoring requires accurate prediction of travel times, amplitudes, and whole waveforms. As a first step towards developing a model that is suited to seismic monitoring, LLNL developed the LLNL-G3D P-wave travel time model (Simmons et al., 2012, JGR) to improve seismic event location accuracy. LLNL-G3D fulfills the need to predict travel times from events occurring anywhere in the globe to stations ranging from local to teleseismic distances. Prediction over this distance range requires explicit inclusion of detailed 3-dimensional structure from Earths surface to the core. An open question is how well a model optimized to fit P-wave travel time data can predict waveforms? We begin to address this question by using the P-wave velocities in LLNL-G3D as a proxy for S-wave velocity and density, then performing waveform simulations via the SPECFEM3D_GLOBE spectral-element code. We assess the ability of LLNL-G3D to predict waveforms and draw comparisons to other 3D models available in SPECFEM3D_GLOBE package and widely used in the scientific community. Although we do not expect the P-wave model to perform as well as waveform based models, we view our effort as a first step towards accurate prediction of time times, amplitudes and full waveforms based on a single model. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. An iterative KP1 method for solving the transport equation in 3D domains on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokonkov, N. I.; Nikolaeva, O. V.

    2015-10-01

    A two-step iterative KP1 method for solving systems of grid equations that approximate the integro-differential transport equation in 3D domains on unstructured grids using nodal SN methods is described. Results of testing the efficiency of the proposed method in solving benchmark problems of reactor protection on tetrahedral grids are presented.

  2. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the absolute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional `box-in-a-star' model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI 777 nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  3. Final Report – Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment. Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2015-09-14

    ARM set out 20 years ago to “close” the radiation problem, that is, to improve radiation models to the point where they could routinely predict the observed spectral radiation fluxes knowing the optical properties of the surface and of gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. Only then could such radiation models form a proper springboard for global climate model (GCM) parameterizations of spectral radiation. Sustained efforts have more or less achieved that goal with regard to longwave radiation; ASR models now routinely predict ARM spectral longwave radiances to 1–2%. Similar efforts in the shortwave have achieved far less; the successes are mainly for carefully selected 1D stratiform cloud cases. Such cases amount, even with the most optimistic interpretation, to no more than 30% of all cases at SGP. The problem has not been lack of effort but lack of appropriate instruments.The new ARM stimulus-funded instruments, with their new capabilities, will dramatically improve this situation and once again make progress possible on the shortwave problem. The new shortwave spectrometers will provide a reliable, calibrated record including the near infrared – and for other climatic regimes than SGP. The new scanning radars will provide the 3D cloud view, making it possible to tackle fully 3D situations. Thus, our main theme for the project is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars and shortwave spectrometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools.

  4. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range

    PubMed Central

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution. PMID:27345517

  5. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; de Angelis, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution.

  6. 3D coaxial out-of-plane metallic antennas for filtering and multi-spectral imaging in the infrared range.

    PubMed

    Jacassi, Andrea; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated and investigated a new configuration of 3D coaxial metallic antennas working in the infrared which combines the strong lateral light scattering of vertical plasmonic structures with the selective spectral transmission of 2D arrays of coaxial apertures. The coaxial structures are fabricated with a top-down method based on a template of hollow 3D antennas. Each antenna has a multilayer radial structure consisting of dielectric and metallic materials not achievable in a 2D configuration. A planar metallic layer is inserted normally to the antennas. The outer dielectric shell of the antenna defines a nanometric gap between the horizontal plane and the vertical walls. Thanks to this aperture, light can tunnel to the other side of the plane, and be transmitted to the far field in a set of resonances. These are investigated with finite-elements electromagnetic calculations and with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The spectral position of the resonances can be tuned by changing the lattice period and/or the antenna length. Thanks to the strong scattering provided by the 3D geometry, the transmission peaks possess a high signal-to-noise ratio even when the illuminated area is less than 2 × 2 times the operation wavelength. This opens new possibilities for multispectral imaging in the IR with wavelength-scale spatial resolution. PMID:27345517

  7. A 3-D spectral-element and frequency-wave number hybrid method for high-resolution seismic array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tseng, Tai-Lin; Hung, Shu-Huei; Chen, Chin-Wu; Basini, Piero; Liu, Qinya

    2014-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid method that interfaces the spectral-element method (SEM) with the frequency-wave number (FK) technique to model the propagation of teleseismic plane waves beneath seismic arrays. The accuracy of the resulting 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method is benchmarked against semianalytical FK solutions for 1-D models. The accuracy of 2.5-D modeling based on 2-D SEM-FK hybrid method is also investigated through comparisons to this 3-D hybrid method. Synthetic examples for structural models of the Alaska subduction zone and the central Tibet crust show that this method is capable of accurately capturing interactions between incident plane waves and local heterogeneities. This hybrid method presents an essential tool for the receiver function and scattering imaging community to verify and further improve their techniques. These numerical examples also show the promising future of the 3-D SEM-FK hybrid method in high-resolution regional seismic imaging based on waveform inversions of converted/scattered waves recorded by seismic array.

  8. On the construction of a new 3d atlas of stellar spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. V.; Zakharov, A. I.; Moshkalev, V. G.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, E. Yu.

    Modern spectrophotometric atlases are burdened with significant systematic errors. In particular, the problems of spectrum calibration in the ultraviolet region are not solved; different parts of the spectrum are not thoroughly fit to each other; spectra of (even bright) stars, obtained by different authors, display large discrepancies. Here we discuss a possibility to construct a new atlas of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for a large set of stars by comparison of empirical stellar spectra in dozens of modern spectrophotometric atlases, as well as the comparison of synthetic and observed color indices in different multicolor photometric systems. In this way we suppose to exclude most of systematic errors and construct a new three-dimensional (spectral class, luminosity class, metallicity) atlas of empirical stellar spectra for several thousand stars. After exclusion of interstellar reddenings, a semi-empirical atlas of average SEDs can be constructed for about 150--200 spectral subtypes. This would allow us to make calibrations of spectrophotometric and photometric parameters in terms of spectral types and physical parameters (Teff, log g, [m/H]) and to verify the accuracy of model stellar atmospheres.

  9. 3-D SPECTRAL IP IMAGING: NON-INVASIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to develop a noninvasive tomographic imaging technique,based on the spectral induced-polarization method, to characterize the in-situ distribution of organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants. Recent advances in tomographic imaging, applied to ...

  10. PGD and separated space variables representation for linear elasticity in 3D representation of plate domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognet, B.; Leygue, A.; Chinesta, F.; Poitou, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the simulation of linear elastic behaviour of plates using a 3D approach which numerical cost only scales like a 2D one. In the case of plates, the kinematic hypothesis introduced in plate theories to go from 3D to 2D is usually unsatisfactory where one cannot rely on St Venant's principle (usually close to the plate edges). We propose to apply the PGD (Proper Generalized Decomposition) method [1] to the simulation of the linear elastic behavior of plates. This method allows us to separately search for the in-plane and the out-of plane contributions to the 3D solution, yielding significant savings in computational cost. The method is validated on a simple case and its full potential is then presented for the simulation of the behavior of laminated composite plates.

  11. Three-dimensional tracker for spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Bigelow, Chad E.; Ustun, Teoman E.; Bloom, Benjamin; Ferguson, R. Daniel; Milner, Thomas E.

    2007-02-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) is a relatively new imaging technique that allows high-speed cross-sectional scanning of retinal structures with little motion artifact. However, instrumentation for these systems is not yet fast enough to collect high-density three-dimensional retinal maps free of the adverse effects of lateral eye movements. Low coherence interferometry instruments must also contend with axial motion primarily from head movements that shift the target tissue out of the coherence detection range. Traditional SDOCT instruments suffer from inherent deficiencies that exacerbate the effect of depth motion, including limited range, depth-dependent signal attenuation, and complex conjugate overlap. We present initial results on extension of our transverse retinal tracking system to three-dimensions especially for SDOCT imagers. The design and principle of operation of two depth tracking techniques, adaptive ranging (AR) and Doppler velocity (DV) tracking, are presented. We have integrated the threedimensional tracking hardware into a hybrid line scanning laser ophthalmoscope (LSLO)/SDOCT imaging system. Imaging and tracking performance was characterized by tests involving a limited number of human subjects. The hybrid imager could switch between wide-field en-face confocal LSLO images, high-resolution cross-sectional OCT images, and an interleaved mode of sequential LSLO and OCT images. With 3-D tracking, the RMS error for axial motion decreased to <50 µm and for lateral motion decreased to <10 µm. The development of real-time tracking and SDOCT image processing hardware is also discussed. Future implementation of 3-D tracking should increase the yield of usable images and decrease the patient measurement time for clinical SDOCT systems.

  12. Towards using spectral domain optical coherence tomography for dental wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mǎrcǎuteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that fast spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging systems have the potential to monitor the evolution of pathological dental wear. On 10 caries free teeth, four levels of artificially defects similar to those observed in the clinic were created. After every level of induced defect, OCT scanning was performed. B-scans were acquired and 3D reconstructions were generated.

  13. STEMS3D: An X-ray spectral model for magnetar persistent radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Weng, Shan-Shan

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters are recognized as the most promising magnetar candidates, as indicated by their energetic bursts and rapid spin-downs. It is expected that the strong magnetic field leaves distinctive imprints on the emergent radiation both by affecting the radiative processes in atmospheres of magnetars and by scattering in the upper magnetospheres. We construct a self-consistent physical model that incorporates emission from the magnetar surface and its reprocessing in the three-dimensional twisted magnetosphere using a Monte Carlo technique. The synthetic spectra are characterized by four parameters: surface temperature kT, surface magnetic field strength B, magnetospheric twist angle Δφ, and the normalized electron velocity β. We also create a tabular model (STEMS3D) and apply it to X-ray spectra of magnetars.

  14. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography with dual-balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, En; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Wang, Nanshuo; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    We developed a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system employing dual-balanced detection (DBD) for direct current term suppression and SNR enhancement, especially for auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction. The DBD was achieved by using a beam splitter to building a free-space Michelson interferometer, which generated two interferometric spectra with a phase difference of π. These two phase-opposed spectra were guided to the spectrometer through two single mode fibers of the 8 fiber v-groove array and acquired by ultizing the upper two lines of a three-line CCD camera. We rotated this fiber v-groove array by 1.35 degrees to focus two spectra onto the first and second line of the CCD camera. Two spectra were aligned by optimum spectrum matching algorithm. By subtracting one spectrum from the other, this dual-balanced detection system achieved a direct current term suppression of ~30 dB, SNR enhancement of ~3 dB, and auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction of ~10 dB experimentally. Finally we respectively validated the feasibility and performance of dual-balanced detection by imaging a glass plate and swine corneal tissue ex vivo. The quality of images obtained using dual-balanced detection was significantly improved with regard to the conventional single-detection (SD) images.

  15. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Chevé, Gwénaël; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site. PMID:26257525

  16. JP3D compressed-domain watermarking of volumetric medical data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouled Zaid, Azza; Makhloufi, Achraf; Olivier, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Increasing transmission of medical data across multiple user systems raises concerns for medical image watermarking. Additionaly, the use of volumetric images triggers the need for efficient compression techniques in picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), or telemedicine applications. This paper describes an hybrid data hiding/compression system, adapted to volumetric medical imaging. The central contribution is to integrate blind watermarking, based on turbo trellis-coded quantization (TCQ), to JP3D encoder. Results of our method applied to Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Computed Tomography (CT) medical images have shown that our watermarking scheme is robust to JP3D compression attacks and can provide relative high data embedding rate whereas keep a relative lower distortion.

  17. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  18. Calibration and optimization of 3D digital breast tomosynthesis guided near infrared spectral tomography

    PubMed Central

    Michaelsen, Kelly E.; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Poplack, Steven P.; Karellas, Andrew; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a three-dimensional multimodal digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) x-ray and non-fiber based near infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system is challenging but essential for clinical studies. Phantom imaging results yielded linear contrast recovery of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration for cylindrical inclusions of 15 mm, 10 mm and 7 mm with a 3.5% decrease in the HbT estimate for each 1 cm increase in inclusion depth. A clinical exam of a patient’s breast containing both benign and malignant lesions was successfully imaged, with greater HbT was found in the malignancy relative to the benign abnormality and fibroglandular regions (11 μM vs. 9.5 μM). Tools developed improved imaging system characterization and optimization of signal quality, which will ultimately improve patient selection and subsequent clinical trial results. PMID:26713210

  19. Calibration and optimization of 3D digital breast tomosynthesis guided near infrared spectral tomography.

    PubMed

    Michaelsen, Kelly E; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Poplack, Steven P; Karellas, Andrew; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2015-12-01

    Calibration of a three-dimensional multimodal digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) x-ray and non-fiber based near infrared spectral tomography (NIRST) system is challenging but essential for clinical studies. Phantom imaging results yielded linear contrast recovery of total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration for cylindrical inclusions of 15 mm, 10 mm and 7 mm with a 3.5% decrease in the HbT estimate for each 1 cm increase in inclusion depth. A clinical exam of a patient's breast containing both benign and malignant lesions was successfully imaged, with greater HbT was found in the malignancy relative to the benign abnormality and fibroglandular regions (11 μM vs. 9.5 μM). Tools developed improved imaging system characterization and optimization of signal quality, which will ultimately improve patient selection and subsequent clinical trial results. PMID:26713210

  20. Genome-Wide Prediction and Analysis of 3D-Domain Swapped Proteins in the Human Genome from Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Atul Kumar; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    3D-domain swapping is one of the mechanisms of protein oligomerization and the proteins exhibiting this phenomenon have many biological functions. These proteins, which undergo domain swapping, have acquired much attention owing to their involvement in human diseases, such as conformational diseases, amyloidosis, serpinopathies, proteionopathies etc. Early realisation of proteins in the whole human genome that retain tendency to domain swap will enable many aspects of disease control management. Predictive models were developed by using machine learning approaches with an average accuracy of 78% (85.6% of sensitivity, 87.5% of specificity and an MCC value of 0.72) to predict putative domain swapping in protein sequences. These models were applied to many complete genomes with special emphasis on the human genome. Nearly 44% of the protein sequences in the human genome were predicted positive for domain swapping. Enrichment analysis was performed on the positively predicted sequences from human genome for their domain distribution, disease association and functional importance based on Gene Ontology (GO). Enrichment analysis was also performed to infer a better understanding of the functional importance of these sequences. Finally, we developed hinge region prediction, in the given putative domain swapped sequence, by using important physicochemical properties of amino acids. PMID:27467780

  1. Propagation of 3D nonlinear waves over complex bathymetry using a High-Order Spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Maïté; Ducrozet, Guillaume; Ferrant, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Scattering of regular and irregular surface gravity waves propagating over a region of arbitrary three-dimensional varying bathymetry is considered here. The three-dimensional High-Order Spectral method (HOS) with an extension to account for a variable bathymetry is used. The efficiency of the model has been proved to be conserved even with this extension. The method is first applied to a bathymetry consisting of an elliptical lens, as used in the Vincent and Briggs (1989) experiment. Incident waves passing across the lens are transformed and a strong convergence region is observed after the elliptical mound. The wave amplification depends on the incident wave. Numerical results for regular and irregular waves are analysed and compared with other methods and experimental data demonstrating the efficiency and practical applicability of the present approach. Then the method is used to model waves propagating over a real bathymetry: the canyons of Scripps/La Jolla in California. The implementation of this complex bathymetry in the model is presented, as well as the first results achieved. They will be compared to the ones obtained with another numerical model.

  2. On domain decomposition preconditioner of BPS type for finite element discretizations of 3D elliptic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, V. G.

    2012-09-01

    BPS is a well known an efficient and rather general domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioner, suggested in the famous series of papers Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz (1986-1989). Since then, it has been serving as the origin for the whole family of domain decomposition Dirichlet-Dirichlet type preconditioners-solvers as for h so hp discretizations of elliptic problems. For its original version, designed for h discretizations, the named authors proved the bound O(1 + log2 H/ h) for the relative condition number under some restricting conditions on the domain decomposition and finite element discretization. Here H/ h is the maximal relation of the characteristic size H of a decomposition subdomain to the mesh parameter h of its discretization. It was assumed that subdomains are images of the reference unite cube by trilinear mappings. Later similar bounds related to h discretizations were proved for more general domain decompositions, defined by means of coarse tetrahedral meshes. These results, accompanied by the development of some special tools of analysis aimed at such type of decompositions, were summarized in the book of Toselli and Widlund (2005). This paper is also confined to h discretizations. We further expand the range of admissible domain decompositions for constructing BPS preconditioners, in which decomposition subdomains can be convex polyhedrons, satisfying some conditions of shape regularity. We prove the bound for the relative condition number with the same dependence on H/ h as in the bound given above. Along the way to this result, we simplify the proof of the so called abstract bound for the relative condition number of the domain decomposition preconditioner. In the part, related to the analysis of the interface sub-problem preconditioning, our technical tools are generalization of those used by Bramble, Pasciak and Schatz.

  3. Contribution of Topological Domains and Loop Formation to 3D Chromatin Organization

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Vuthy; Baudement, Marie-Odile; Lesne, Annick; Forné, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Recent investigations on 3D chromatin folding revealed that the eukaryote genomes are both highly compartmentalized and extremely dynamic. This review presents the most recent advances in topological domains’ organization of the eukaryote genomes and discusses the relationship to chromatin loop formation. CTCF protein appears as a central factor of these two organization levels having either a strong insulating role at TAD borders, or a weaker architectural role in chromatin loop formation. TAD borders directly impact on chromatin dynamics by restricting contacts within specific genomic portions thus confining chromatin loop formation within TADs. We discuss how sub-TAD chromatin dynamics, constrained into a recently described statistical helix conformation, can produce functional interactions by contact stabilization. PMID:26226004

  4. Restoration of 3D medical images with total variation scheme on wavelet domains (TVW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogier, Arnaud; Hellier, Pierre; Barillot, Christian

    2006-03-01

    The multiplicity of sensors used in medical imaging leads to different noises. Non informative noise can damage the image interpretation process and the performance of automatic analysis. The method proposed in this paper allows compensating highly noisy image data from non informative noise without sophisticated modeling of the noise statistics. This generic approach uses jointly a wavelet decomposition scheme and a non-isotropic Total Variation filtering of the transform coefficients. This framework benefits from both the hierarchical capabilities of the wavelet transform and the well-posed regularization scheme of the Total Variation. This algorithm has been tested and validated on test-bed data, as well as different clinical MR and 3D ultrasound images, enhancing the capabilities of the proposed method to cope with different noise models.

  5. Real-time 3D Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography guided microvascular anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Lee, W. P. A.; Brandacher, Gerald; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    Vascular and microvascular anastomosis is considered to be the foundation of plastic and reconstructive surgery, hand surgery, transplant surgery, vascular surgery and cardiac surgery. In the last two decades innovative techniques, such as vascular coupling devices, thermo-reversible poloxamers and suture-less cuff have been introduced. Intra-operative surgical guidance using a surgical imaging modality that provides in-depth view and 3D imaging can improve outcome following both conventional and innovative anastomosis techniques. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive high-resolution (micron level), high-speed, 3D imaging modality that has been adopted widely in biomedical and clinical applications. In this work we performed a proof-of-concept evaluation study of OCT as an assisted intraoperative and post-operative imaging modality for microvascular anastomosis of rodent femoral vessels. The OCT imaging modality provided lateral resolution of 12 μm and 3.0 μm axial resolution in air and 0.27 volume/s imaging speed, which could provide the surgeon with clearly visualized vessel lumen wall and suture needle position relative to the vessel during intraoperative imaging. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated phase-resolved Doppler OCT (PRDOCT) imaging of the surgical site was performed as a post-operative evaluation of the anastomosed vessels and to visualize the blood flow and thrombus formation. This information could help surgeons improve surgical precision in this highly challenging anastomosis of rodent vessels with diameter less than 0.5 mm. Our imaging modality could not only detect accidental suture through the back wall of lumen but also promptly diagnose and predict thrombosis immediately after reperfusion. Hence, real-time OCT can assist in decision-making process intra-operatively and avoid post-operative complications.

  6. Implicit scheme for Maxwell equations solution in case of flat 3D domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronina, Marina; Vshivkov, Vitaly

    2016-02-01

    We present a new finite-difference scheme for Maxwell's equations solution for three-dimensional domains with different scales in different directions. The stability condition of the standard leap-frog scheme requires decreasing of the time-step with decreasing of the minimal spatial step, which depends on the minimal domain size. We overcome the conditional stability by modifying the standard scheme adding implicitness in the direction of the smallest size. The new scheme satisfies the Gauss law for the electric and magnetic fields in the final- differences. The approximation order, the maintenance of the wave amplitude and propagation speed, the invariance of the wave propagation on angle with the coordinate axes are analyzed.

  7. High speed 3D endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging probe for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-06-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm. We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  8. Efficient spectral and pseudospectral algorithms for 3D simulations of whistler-mode waves in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Karavaev, Alexey V.; Surjalal Sharma, A.; Shao, Xi; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos D.

    2011-04-01

    Efficient spectral and pseudospectral algorithms for simulation of linear and nonlinear 3D whistler waves in a cold electron plasma are developed. These algorithms are applied to the simulation of whistler waves generated by loop antennas and spheromak-like stationary waves of considerable amplitude. The algorithms are linearly stable and show good stability properties for computations of nonlinear waves over tens of thousands of time steps. Additional speedups by factors of 10-20 (comparing single core CPU and one GPU) are achieved by using graphics processors (GPUs), which enable efficient numerical simulation of the wave propagation on relatively high resolution meshes (tens of millions nodes) in personal computing environment. Comparisons of the numerical results with analytical solutions and experiments show good agreement. The limitations of the codes and the performance of the GPU computing are discussed.

  9. Ultrahigh speed spectral/Fourier domain ophthalmic OCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potsaid, Benjamin; Gorczynska, Iwona; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Chen, Yueli; Liu, Jonathan; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using a CMOS line scan camera with acquisition rates of 70,000 - 312,500 axial scans per second is investigated. Several design configurations are presented to illustrate trade-offs between acquisition speed, sensitivity, resolution and sensitivity roll-off performance. We demonstrate: extended imaging range and improved sensitivity roll-off at 70,000 axial scans per second , high speed and ultrahigh resolution imaging at 106,382 axial scans per second, and ultrahigh speed imaging at 250,000-312,500 axial scans per second. Each configuration is characterized through optical testing and the trade-offs demonstrated with in vivo imaging of the fovea and optic disk in the human retina. OCT fundus images constructed from 3D-OCT data acquired at 250,000 axial scans per second have no noticeable discontinuity of retinal features and show that there are minimal motion artifacts. The fine structures of the lamina cribrosa can be seen. Long cross sectional scans are acquired at 70,000 axial scans per second for imaging large areas of the retina, including the fovea and optic disk. Rapid repeated imaging of a small volume (4D-OCT) enables time resolved visualization of the capillary network surrounding the INL and may show individual red blood cells. The results of this study suggest that high speed CMOS cameras can achieve a significant improvement in performance for ophthalmic imaging. This promises to have a powerful impact in clinical applications by improving early diagnosis, reproducibility of measurements and enabling more sensitive assessment of disease progression or response to therapy.

  10. Massive parallelization of a 3D finite difference electromagnetic forward solution using domain decomposition methods on multiple CUDA enabled GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.

    2010-12-01

    3D forward solvers lie at the core of inverse formulations used to image the variation of electrical conductivity within the Earth's interior. This property is associated with variations in temperature, composition, phase, presence of volatiles, and in specific settings, the presence of groundwater, geothermal resources, oil/gas or minerals. The high cost of 3D solutions has been a stumbling block to wider adoption of 3D methods. Parallel algorithms for modeling frequency domain 3D EM problems have not achieved wide scale adoption, with emphasis on fairly coarse grained parallelism using MPI and similar approaches. The communications bandwidth as well as the latency required to send and receive network communication packets is a limiting factor in implementing fine grained parallel strategies, inhibiting wide adoption of these algorithms. Leading Graphics Processor Unit (GPU) companies now produce GPUs with hundreds of GPU processor cores per die. The footprint, in silicon, of the GPU's restricted instruction set is much smaller than the general purpose instruction set required of a CPU. Consequently, the density of processor cores on a GPU can be much greater than on a CPU. GPUs also have local memory, registers and high speed communication with host CPUs, usually through PCIe type interconnects. The extremely low cost and high computational power of GPUs provides the EM geophysics community with an opportunity to achieve fine grained (i.e. massive) parallelization of codes on low cost hardware. The current generation of GPUs (e.g. NVidia Fermi) provides 3 billion transistors per chip die, with nearly 500 processor cores and up to 6 GB of fast (DDR5) GPU memory. This latest generation of GPU supports fast hardware double precision (64 bit) floating point operations of the type required for frequency domain EM forward solutions. Each Fermi GPU board can sustain nearly 1 TFLOP in double precision, and multiple boards can be installed in the host computer system. We

  11. Efficient 3D Acoustic Numerical modeling in the Logarithmic-grid using the Expanding Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, B. R.; Chung, W.; Ko, H.; Bae, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    In the numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation by the use of a discrete computing domain, dispersion analysis is preceded by the determination of the spatial grid spacings in order to ensure accurate modeling results. Grid spacing is a function of wavelength, and the wavelength depends on the minimum velocity and maximum source frequency. Therefore, as the frequency increases, the number of grids increase and this leads to computational overburden. In order to reduce the computing complexity, coordinate transformation techniques such as Riemannian coordinates and logarithmic grid sets are proposed. Riemannian wave-field extrapolation is a way to reformulate the wave-field by expressing it in Riemannian coordinates. In the logarithmic grid, grid spacing changes logarithmically, so this enables us to reduce the number of grids compared to a conventional grid set. Furthermore, this could completely remove boundary reflections by extending the model dimensions. However, numerical modeling in the logarithmic grid is still inefficient because it is performed for whole model at every individual time step. In this study we applied the expanding domain method to the logarithmic modeling in order to improve computational efficiency. This method, based on amplitude comparison, excludes computations for zero wave-fields by considering a non-zero domain boundary. Numerical examples demonstrated that our new modeling method enhances computational efficiency maintaining accuracy compared with conventional modeling methods. In wider and higher-order dimensions, particularly, the efficiency of our modeling method increased. Our new modeling technique could also be applied to the generation of underwater target echo signals requiring high frequency analysis.

  12. High speed miniature motorized endoscopic probe for 3D optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-03-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. This is the smallest motorized high speed OCT probe to our knowledge. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  13. 3D pseudospectral time domain for modeling second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate ridge-type waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, Fabrice; Lantz, Eric; Chauvet, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    We report an application of the tri-dimensional pseudo-spectral time domain algorithm, that solves with accuracy the nonlinear Maxwell's equations, to predict second harmonic generation in lithium niobate ridge-type waveguides with high index contrast. Characteristics of the nonlinear process such as conversion efficiency as well as impact of the multimode character of the waveguide are investigated as a function of the waveguide geometry in uniformly and periodically poled medium.

  14. Optical Coherence Tomography Noise Reduction Using Anisotropic Local Bivariate Gaussian Mixture Prior in 3D Complex Wavelet Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sonka, Milan; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, MMSE estimator is employed for noise-free 3D OCT data recovery in 3D complex wavelet domain. Since the proposed distribution for noise-free data plays a key role in the performance of MMSE estimator, a priori distribution for the pdf of noise-free 3D complex wavelet coefficients is proposed which is able to model the main statistical properties of wavelets. We model the coefficients with a mixture of two bivariate Gaussian pdfs with local parameters which are able to capture the heavy-tailed property and inter- and intrascale dependencies of coefficients. In addition, based on the special structure of OCT images, we use an anisotropic windowing procedure for local parameters estimation that results in visual quality improvement. On this base, several OCT despeckling algorithms are obtained based on using Gaussian/two-sided Rayleigh noise distribution and homomorphic/nonhomomorphic model. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we use 156 selected ROIs from 650 × 512 × 128 OCT dataset in the presence of wet AMD pathology. Our simulations show that the best MMSE estimator using local bivariate mixture prior is for the nonhomomorphic model in the presence of Gaussian noise which results in an improvement of 7.8 ± 1.7 in CNR. PMID:24222760

  15. A parallel 3-D staggered grid pseudospectral time domain method for ground-penetrating radar wave simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Li, Zhanhui; Wang, Yanbin

    2010-12-01

    We presented a parallel 3-D staggered grid pseudospectral time domain (PSTD) method for simulating ground-penetrating radar (GPR) wave propagation. We took the staggered grid method to weaken the global effect in PSTD and developed a modified fast Fourier transform (FFT) spatial derivative operator to eliminate the wraparound effect due to the implicit periodical boundary condition in FFT operator. After the above improvements, we achieved the parallel PSTD computation based on an overlap domain decomposition method without any absorbing condition for each subdomain, which can significantly reduce the required grids in each overlap subdomain comparing with other proposed algorithms. We test our parallel technique for some numerical models and obtained consistent results with the analytical ones and/or those of the nonparallel PSTD method. The above numerical tests showed that our parallel PSTD algorithm is effective in simulating 3-D GPR wave propagation, with merits of saving computation time, as well as more flexibility in dealing with complicated models without losing the accuracy. The application of our parallel PSTD method in applied geophysics and paleoseismology based on GPR data confirmed the efficiency of our algorithm and its potential applications in various subdisciplines of solid earth geophysics. This study would also provide a useful parallel PSTD approach to the simulation of other geophysical problems on distributed memory PC cluster.

  16. Controlling integrin specificity and stem cell differentiation in 2-D and 3-D environments through regulation of fibronectin domain stability

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Rothenfluh, Dominique A.; Rempel, Sandra A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Barker, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) exerts powerful control over many cellular phenomena, including stem cell differentiation. As such, design and modulation of ECM analogs to ligate specific integrin is a promising approach to control cellular processes in vitro and in vivo for regenerative medicine strategies. Although fibronectin (FN), a crucial ECM protein in tissue development and repair, and its RGD peptide are widely used for cell adhesion, the promiscuity with which they engage integrins leads to difficulty in control of receptor-specific interactions. Recent simulations of force-mediated unfolding of FN domains and sequences analysis of human versus mouse FN suggest that the structural stability of the FN’s central cell-binding domains (FN III9-10) affects its integrin specificity. Through production of FN III9-10 variants with variable stabilities, we obtained ligands that present different specificities for the integrin α5β1 and that can be covalently linked into fibrin matrices. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of α5β1 integrin-specific engagement to influence human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) behavior in 2D and 3D environments. Our data indicate that α5β1 has an important role in the control of MSC osteogenic differentiation. FN fragments with increased specificity for α5β1 versus αvβ3 results in significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in 2D and in a clinically relevant 3D fibrin matrix system, although attachment/spreading and proliferation were comparable with that on full-length FN. This work shows how integrin-dependant cellular interactions with the ECM can be engineered to control stem cell fate, within a system appropriate for both 3D cell culture and tissue engineering. PMID:19027948

  17. Integrated ray tracing simulation of annual variation of spectral bio-signatures from cloud free 3D optical Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Kim, Dae Wook; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Hanshin; Park, Won Hyun; Seong, Sehyun; Ham, Sun-Jeong

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the Earth spectral bio-signatures provides an important reference datum for accurate de-convolution of collapsed spectral signals from potential earth-like planets of other star systems. This study presents a new ray tracing computation method including an improved 3D optical earth model constructed with the coastal line and vegetation distribution data from the Global Ecological Zone (GEZ) map. Using non-Lambertian bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF) models, the input earth surface model is characterized with three different scattering properties and their annual variations depending on monthly changes in vegetation distribution, sea ice coverage and illumination angle. The input atmosphere model consists of one layer with Rayleigh scattering model from the sea level to 100 km in altitude and its radiative transfer characteristics is computed for four seasons using the SMART codes. The ocean scattering model is a combination of sun-glint scattering and Lambertian scattering models. The land surface scattering is defined with the semi empirical parametric kernel method used for MODIS and POLDER missions. These three component models were integrated into the final Earth model that was then incorporated into the in-house built integrated ray tracing (IRT) model capable of computing both spectral imaging and radiative transfer performance of a hypothetical space instrument as it observes the Earth from its designated orbit. The IRT model simulation inputs include variation in earth orientation, illuminated phases, and seasonal sea ice and vegetation distribution. The trial simulation runs result in the annual variations in phase dependent disk averaged spectra (DAS) and its associated bio-signatures such as NDVI. The full computational details are presented together with the resulting annual variation in DAS and its associated bio-signatures.

  18. Dialog-Based 3D-Image Recognition Using a Domain Ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hois, Joana; Wünstel, Michael; Bateman, John A.; Röfer, Thomas

    The combination of vision and speech, together with the resulting necessity for formal representations, builds a central component of an autonomous system. A robot that is supposed to navigate autonomously through space must be able to perceive its environment as automatically as possible. But each recognition system has its own inherent limits. Especially a robot whose task is to navigate through unknown terrain has to deal with unidentified or even unknown objects, thus compounding the recognition problem still further. The system described in this paper takes this into account by trying to identify objects based on their functionality where possible. To handle cases where recognition is insufficient, we examine here two further strategies: on the one hand, the linguistic reference and labeling of the unidentified objects and, on the other hand, ontological deduction. This approach then connects the probabilistic area of object recognition with the logical area of formal reasoning. In order to support formal reasoning, additional relational scene information has to be supplied by the recognition system. Moreover, for a sound ontological basis for these reasoning tasks, it is necessary to define a domain ontology that provides for the representation of real-world objects and their corresponding spatial relations in linguistic and physical respects. Physical spatial relations and objects are measured by the visual system, whereas linguistic spatial relations and objects are required for interactions with a user.

  19. 3D Polarized Radiative Transfer for Solar System Applications Using the public-domain HYPERION Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Robitaille, T.; Whitney, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a public-domain radiative transfer tool that will allow researchers to examine a wide-range of interesting solar system applications. Hyperion is a new three-dimensional continuum Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code that is designed to be as general as possible, allowing radiative transfer to be computed through a variety of three-dimensional grids (Robitaille, 2011, Astronomy & Astrophysics 536 A79). The main part of the code is problem-independent, and only requires the user to define the three-dimensional density structure, and the opacity and the illumination properties (as well as a few parameters that control execution and output of the code). Hyperion is written in Fortran 90 and parallelized using the MPI-2 standard. It is bundled with Python libraries that enable very flexible pre- and post-processing options (arbitrary shapes, multiple aerosol components, etc.). These routines are very amenable to user-extensibility. The package is currently distributed at www.hyperion-rt.org. Our presentation will feature 1) a brief overview of the code, including a description of the solar system-specific modifications that we have made beyond the capabilities in the original release; 2) Several solar system applications (i.e., Deep Impact Plume, Martian atmosphere, etc.); 3) discussion of availability and distribution of code components via www.hyperion-rt.org.

  20. Spectral-domain interferometry for quantitative DIC microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2014-03-01

    A spectral-domain differential interference contrast (SD-DIC) microscopy system is presented for quantitative imaging of both reflective and transparent samples. The spectral-domain interferometry, combined with the common-path DIC geometry, provides a shot noise-limited sensitivity of 14.3pm in optical pathlength gradient measurement. The optical resolution of the system was characterized using images of a USAF resolution target. Fused silica microspheres were imaged to demonstrate the reconstruction of two-dimensional optical pathlength topography from measured gradient fields. The exquisite sensitivity of the system showed potential in quantitative imaging of sub-diffraction limit objects such as gold nanoparticles.

  1. 3D shape tracking of minimally invasive medical instruments using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Francois; Kanti Mandal, Koushik; Loranger, Sebastien; Watanabe Fernandes, Eric Hideki; Kashyap, Raman; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    We propose here a new alternative to provide real-time device tracking during minimally invasive interventions using a truly-distributed strain sensor based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) in optical fibers. The guidance of minimally invasive medical instruments such as needles or catheters (ex. by adding a piezoelectric coating) has been the focus of extensive research in the past decades. Real-time tracking of instruments in medical interventions facilitates image guidance and helps the user to reach a pre-localized target more precisely. Image-guided systems using ultrasound imaging and shape sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-embedded optical fibers can provide retroactive feedback to the user in order to reach the targeted areas with even more precision. However, ultrasound imaging with electro-magnetic tracking cannot be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, while shape sensors based on FBG embedded in optical fibers provides discrete values of the instrument position, which requires approximations to be made to evaluate its global shape. This is why a truly-distributed strain sensor based on OFDR could enhance the tracking accuracy. In both cases, since the strain is proportional to the radius of curvature of the fiber, a strain sensor can provide the three-dimensional shape of medical instruments by simply inserting fibers inside the devices. To faithfully follow the shape of the needle in the tracking frame, 3 fibers glued in a specific geometry are used, providing 3 degrees of freedom along the fiber. Near real-time tracking of medical instruments is thus obtained offering clear advantages for clinical monitoring in remotely controlled catheter or needle guidance. We present results demonstrating the promising aspects of this approach as well the limitations of using the OFDR technique.

  2. The 3D structure of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA C-terminal domain bound to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hellert, Jan; Weidner-Glunde, Magdalena; Krausze, Joern; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Ritter, Christiane; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lührs, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) persists as a latent nuclear episome in dividing host cells. This episome is tethered to host chromatin to ensure proper segregation during mitosis. For duplication of the latent genome, the cellular replication machinery is recruited. Both of these functions rely on the constitutively expressed latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of the virus. Here, we report the crystal structure of the KSHV LANA DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with its high-affinity viral target DNA, LANA binding site 1 (LBS1), at 2.9 Å resolution. In contrast to homologous proteins such as Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) of the related γ-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus, specific DNA recognition by LANA is highly asymmetric. In addition to solving the crystal structure, we found that apart from the two known LANA binding sites, LBS1 and LBS2, LANA also binds to a novel site, denoted LBS3. All three sites are located in a region of the KSHV terminal repeat subunit previously recognized as a minimal replicator. Moreover, we show that the LANA DBD can coat DNA of arbitrary sequence by virtue of a characteristic lysine patch, which is absent in EBNA-1 of the Epstein-Barr virus. Likely, these higher-order assemblies involve the self-association of LANA into supermolecular spirals. One such spiral assembly was solved as a crystal structure of 3.7 Å resolution in the absence of DNA. On the basis of our data, we propose a model for the controlled nucleation of higher-order LANA oligomers that might contribute to the characteristic subnuclear KSHV microdomains (“LANA speckles”), a hallmark of KSHV latency. PMID:25947153

  3. Bi-planar 2D-to-3D registration in Fourier domain for stereoscopic x-ray motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosso, Dominique; Le Callennec, Benoît; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Aminian, Kamiar; Jolles, Brigitte M.; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a new method to track bone movements in stereoscopic X-ray image series of the knee joint. The method is based on two different X-ray image sets: a rotational series of acquisitions of the still subject knee that allows the tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional volume (model), and a stereoscopic image series of orthogonal projections as the subject performs movements. Tracking the movements of bones throughout the stereoscopic image series means to determine, for each frame, the best pose of every moving element (bone) previously identified in the 3D reconstructed model. The quality of a pose is reflected in the similarity between its theoretical projections and the actual radiographs. We use direct Fourier reconstruction to approximate the three-dimensional volume of the knee joint. Then, to avoid the expensive computation of digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) for pose recovery, we develop a corollary to the 3-dimensional central-slice theorem and reformulate the tracking problem in the Fourier domain. Under the hypothesis of parallel X-ray beams, the heavy 2D-to-3D registration of projections in the signal domain is replaced by efficient slice-to-volume registration in the Fourier domain. Focusing on rotational movements, the translation-relevant phase information can be discarded and we only consider scalar Fourier amplitudes. The core of our motion tracking algorithm can be implemented as a classical frame-wise slice-to-volume registration task. Results on both synthetic and real images confirm the validity of our approach.

  4. Dynamic rupture modeling of the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake with an unstructured 3D spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, P.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Nissen-Meyer, T.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11th 2011, a Mw 9 earthquake stroke Japan causing 28000 victims and triggering a devastating tsunami that caused severe damage along the Japanese coast. The exceptional amount of data recorded by this earthquake, with thousands of sensors located all over Japan, provides a great opportunity for seismologist and engineers to investigate in detail the rupture process in order to better understand the physics of this type of earthquakes and their associated effects, like tsunamis. Here we investigate, by means of dynamic rupture simulations, a plausible mechanism to explain key observations about the rupture process of the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake, including the spatial complementarity between high and low frequency aspects of slip (e.g, Simons et al, Science 2011, Meng et al, GRL 2011). To model the dynamic rupture of this event, we use a realistic non-planar fault geometry of the megathrust interface, using the unstructured 3D spectral element open source code SPECFEM3D-SESAME, in which we recently implemented the dynamic fault boundary conditions. This implementation follows the principles introduced by Ampuero (2002) and Kaneko et al. (2008) and involves encapsulated modules plugged into the code. Our current implementation provides the possibility of modeling dynamic rupture for multiple, non-planar faults governed by slip-weakening friction. We successfully verified the code in several SCEC benchmarks, including a 3D problem with branched faults, as well as modeling the rupture of subduction megathrust with a splay fault, finding results comparable to published results. Our first set of simulations is aimed at testing if the diversity of rupture phenomena during the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake (see Ampuero et al in this session) can be overall reproduced by assuming the most basic friction law, linear slip-weakening friction, but prescribing a spatially heterogeneous distribution of the critical slip weakening distance Dc and initial fault stresses. Our

  5. Separation Surfaces in the Spectral TV Domain for Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horesh, Dikla; Gilboa, Guy

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel notion of separation surfaces for image decomposition. A surface is embedded in the spectral total-variation (TV) three dimensional domain and encodes a spatially-varying separation scale. The method allows good separation of textures with gradually varying pattern-size, pattern-contrast or illumination. The recently proposed total variation spectral framework is used to decompose the image into a continuum of textural scales. A desired texture, within a scale range, is found by fitting a surface to the local maximal responses in the spectral domain. A band above and below the surface, referred to as the \\textit{Texture Stratum}, defines for each pixel the adaptive scale-range of the texture. Based on the decomposition an application is proposed which can attenuate or enhance textures in the image in a very natural and visually convincing manner.

  6. Spectral domain detection in low-coherence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2012-01-01

    Low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) offers the valuable possibility to measure quantitative and wavelength resolved optical property spectra within a tissue volume of choice that is controllable both in size and in depth. Until now, only time domain detection was investigated for LCS (tdLCS), but spectral domain detection offers a theoretical speed/sensitivity advantage over tdLCS. In this article, we introduce a method for spectral domain detection in LCS (sdLCS), with optimal sensitivity as a function of measurement depth. We validate our method computationally in a simulation and experimentally on a phantom with known optical properties. The attenuation, absorption and scattering coefficient spectra from the phantom that were measured by sdLCS agree well with the expected optical properties and the measured optical properties by tdLCS. PMID:23024918

  7. Development of quantitative diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration using Spectral Domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.; Chiu, Stephanie J.; Davies, Emily; Davis, Anjul M.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Wiley, David F.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2007-02-01

    We report on the development of quantitative, reproducible diagnostic observables for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). 3D SDOCT volumetric data sets (512 x 1000 x 100 voxels) were collected (5.7 seconds acquisition time) in over 50 patients with age-related macular degeneration and geographic atrophy using a state-of-the-art SDOCT scanner. Commercial and custom software utilities were used for manual and semi-automated segmentation of photoreceptor layer thickness, total drusen volume, and geographic atrophy cross-sectional area. In a preliminary test of reproducibility in segmentation of total drusen volume and geographic atrophy surface area, inter-observer error was less than 5%. Extracted volume and surface area of AMD-related drusen and geographic atrophy, respectively, may serve as useful observables for tracking disease state that were not accessible without the rapid 3D volumetric imaging capability unique to retinal SDOCT.

  8. Biofunctionalization of electrospun PCL-based scaffolds with perlecan domain IV peptide to create a 3-D pharmacokinetic cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Olga; Zhang, Chu; Adams, Elizabeth L.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Petrelli, Nicholas J.; Chase, Bruce D.; Rabolt, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Because prostate cancer cells metastasize to bone and exhibit osteoblastic features (osteomimicry), the interrelationships between bone-specific microenvironment and prostate cancer cells at sites of bone metastasis are critical to disease progression. In this work the bone marrow microenvironment in vitro was recreated both by tailoring scaffolds physical properties and by functionalizing electrospun polymer fibers with a bioactive peptide derived from domain IV of perlecan heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibers and PCL/gelatin composite scaffolds were modified covalently with perlecan domain IV (PlnDIV) peptide. The expression of tight junction protein (E-cadherin) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397 also were investigated. The described bioactive motif significantly enhanced adherence and infiltration of the metastatic prostate cancer cells on all modified electrospun substrates by day 5 post-seeding. Cells cultured on PlnDIV-modified matrices organized stress fibers and increased proliferation at statistically significant rates. Additional findings suggest that presence of PlnDIV peptide in the matrix reduced expression of tight junction protein and binding to PlnDIV peptide was accompanied by increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation on tyrosine 397. We conclude that PlnDIV peptide supports key signaling events leading to proliferation, survival, and migration of C4-2B cancer cells; hence its incorporation into electrospun matrix is a key improvement to create a successful three-dimensional (3-D) pharmacokinetic cancer model. PMID:20417554

  9. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  10. Hinge-loop mutation can be used to control 3D domain swapping and amyloidogenesis of human cystatin C.

    PubMed

    Orlikowska, Marta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Kołodziejczyk, Robert; Jaskólski, Mariusz; Szymańska, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Cystatins are natural inhibitors of cysteine proteases, enzymes that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Human cystatin C (hCC) has been also recognized as an aggregating protein directly involved in the formation of pathological amyloid fibrils, and these amyloidogenic properties greatly increase in a naturally occurring L68Q hCC variant. For a long time only dimeric structure of wild-type hCC has been known. The dimer is created through 3D domain swapping process, in which two parts of the cystatin structure become separated from each other and next exchanged between two molecules. Important role in the domain swapping plays the L1 loop, which connects the exchanging segments and, upon dimerization, transforms from a β-turn into a part of a long β-strand. In the very recently published first monomeric structure of human cystatin C (hCC-stab1), dimerization was abrogated due to clasping of the β-strands from the swapping domains by an engineered disulfide bridge. We have designed and constructed another mutated cystatin C with the smallest possible structural intervention, that is a single-point mutation replacing hydrophobic V57 from the L1 loop by polar asparagine, known as a stabilizer of a β-turn motif. V57N hCC mutant occurred to be stable in its monomeric form and crystallized as a monomer, revealing typical cystatin fold with a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet wrapped around an α-helix. Here we report a 2.04 Å resolution crystal structure of V57N hCC and discuss the architecture of the protein in comparison to chicken cystatin, hCC-stab1 and dimeric hCC. PMID:21074623

  11. Noninvasive Quantification of In Vitro Osteoblastic Differentiation in 3D Engineered Tissue Constructs Using Spectral Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alexis W.; Caldwell, David J.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive monitoring of engineered tissues is needed for translation of these products from the lab to the clinic. In this study, non-invasive, high resolution spectral ultrasound imaging (SUSI) was used to monitor the differentiation of MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts seeded within collagen hydrogels. SUSI was used to measure the diameter, concentration and acoustic attenuation of scatterers within such constructs cultured in either control or osteogenic medium over 21 days. Conventional biochemical assays were used on parallel samples to determine DNA content and calcium deposition. Construct volume and morphology were accurately imaged using ultrasound. Cell diameter was estimated to be approximately 12.5–15.5 µm using SUSI, which corresponded well to measurements of fluorescently stained cells. The total number of cells per construct assessed by quantitation of DNA content decreased from 5.6±2.4×104 at day 1 to 0.9±0.2×104 at day 21. SUSI estimation of the equivalent number of acoustic scatters showed a similar decreasing trend, except at day 21 in the osteogenic samples, which showed a marked increase in both scatterer number and acoustic impedance, suggestive of mineral deposition by the differentiating MC3T3 cells. Estimation of calcium content by SUSI was 41.7±11.4 µg/ml, which agreed well with the biochemical measurement of 38.7±16.7 µg/ml. Color coded maps of parameter values were overlaid on B-mode images to show spatiotemporal changes in cell diameter and calcium deposition. This study demonstrates the use of non-destructive ultrasound imaging to provide quantitative information on the number and differentiated state of cells embedded within 3D engineered constructs, and therefore presents a valuable tool for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissue development. PMID:24465680

  12. Spectral element modeling of 3D wave propagation in the Earth: the graver part of the spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaljub, E.; Valette, B.

    2003-04-01

    The Spectral Element Method (SEM) has been recently established as a new reference to compute synthetic seismograms in 3D models of the Earth. So far, all the studies involving the SEM have been performed within the Cowling approximation, i. e. neglecting the variations of the gravity field during wave propagation. For low-frequency studies (typically less than 5 mHz) the previous assumption fails and the complete treatment of self-gravitation has to be considered. This requires the introduction of the mass redistribution potential (MRP) which has to satisfy Poisson's equation everywhere in space. Unlike spherical harmonics approaches, the use of a grid based method does not provide a natural framework for the resolution of the exterior problem. However, we show that a Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator at the surface of the Earth provides a simple and efficient solution to this problem. A special attention is needed for the fluid parts to avoid spurious oscillations. To this end, we introduce a general two-potentials formulation which allows to take any density stratification into account. Contrary to other studies that considered the velocity potential, our decomposition is applied to the displacement field in order to obtain natural solid-fluid boundary conditions for the MRP. At each time step, the MRP is computed from the displacement field through a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. This procedure has to be accurate enough in order to ensure a stable calculation on long time series. Some examples of synthetic seismograms computed in spherical Earth models illustrate the accuracy of our approach.

  13. Noninvasive quantification of in vitro osteoblastic differentiation in 3D engineered tissue constructs using spectral ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Rao, Rameshwar R; Peterson, Alexis W; Caldwell, David J; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2014-01-01

    Non-destructive monitoring of engineered tissues is needed for translation of these products from the lab to the clinic. In this study, non-invasive, high resolution spectral ultrasound imaging (SUSI) was used to monitor the differentiation of MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts seeded within collagen hydrogels. SUSI was used to measure the diameter, concentration and acoustic attenuation of scatterers within such constructs cultured in either control or osteogenic medium over 21 days. Conventional biochemical assays were used on parallel samples to determine DNA content and calcium deposition. Construct volume and morphology were accurately imaged using ultrasound. Cell diameter was estimated to be approximately 12.5-15.5 µm using SUSI, which corresponded well to measurements of fluorescently stained cells. The total number of cells per construct assessed by quantitation of DNA content decreased from 5.6±2.4×10(4) at day 1 to 0.9±0.2×10(4) at day 21. SUSI estimation of the equivalent number of acoustic scatters showed a similar decreasing trend, except at day 21 in the osteogenic samples, which showed a marked increase in both scatterer number and acoustic impedance, suggestive of mineral deposition by the differentiating MC3T3 cells. Estimation of calcium content by SUSI was 41.7±11.4 µg/ml, which agreed well with the biochemical measurement of 38.7±16.7 µg/ml. Color coded maps of parameter values were overlaid on B-mode images to show spatiotemporal changes in cell diameter and calcium deposition. This study demonstrates the use of non-destructive ultrasound imaging to provide quantitative information on the number and differentiated state of cells embedded within 3D engineered constructs, and therefore presents a valuable tool for longitudinal monitoring of engineered tissue development. PMID:24465680

  14. GRID3D-v2: An updated version of the GRID2D/3D computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped three-dimensional spatial domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, E.; Shih, T. I-P.; Roelke, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    In order to generate good quality systems for complicated three-dimensional spatial domains, the grid-generation method used must be able to exert rather precise controls over grid-point distributions. Several techniques are presented that enhance control of grid-point distribution for a class of algebraic grid-generation methods known as the two-, four-, and six-boundary methods. These techniques include variable stretching functions from bilinear interpolation, interpolating functions based on tension splines, and normalized K-factors. The techniques developed in this study were incorporated into a new version of GRID3D called GRID3D-v2. The usefulness of GRID3D-v2 was demonstrated by using it to generate a three-dimensional grid system in the coolent passage of a radial turbine blade with serpentine channels and pin fins.

  15. Dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xing; Adie, Steven G; John, Renu; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-06-21

    A dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography (OCE) imaging technique is reported. In this technique, audio-frequency compressive vibrations are generated by a piezoelectric stack as external excitation, and strain rates in the sample are calculated and mapped quantitatively using phase-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. At different driving frequencies, this technique provides contrast between sample regions with different mechanical properties, and thus is used to mechanically characterize tissue. We present images of a three-layer silicone tissue phantom and rat tumor tissue ex vivo, based on quantitative strain rate. Both acquisition speed and processing speed are improved dramatically compared with previous OCE imaging techniques. With high resolution, high acquisition speed, and the ability to characterize the mechanical properties of tissue, this OCE technique has potential use in non-destructive volumetric imaging and clinical applications. PMID:20588552

  16. Dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography for tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing; Adie, Steven G.; John, Renu; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A dynamic spectral-domain optical coherence elastography (OCE) imaging technique is reported. In this technique, audio-frequency compressive vibrations are generated by a piezoelectric stack as external excitation, and strain rates in the sample are calculated and mapped quantitatively using phase-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. At different driving frequencies, this technique provides contrast between sample regions with different mechanical properties, and thus is used to mechanically characterize tissue. We present images of a three-layer silicone tissue phantom and rat tumor tissue ex vivo, based on quantitative strain rate. Both acquisition speed and processing speed are improved dramatically compared with previous OCE imaging techniques. With high resolution, high acquisition speed, and the ability to characterize the mechanical properties of tissue, this OCE technique has potential use in non-destructive volumetric imaging and clinical applications. PMID:20588552

  17. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 1: Theory and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Bailey, R. T.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  18. Imaging tamoxifen retinopathy using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Caramoy, Albert; Scholz, Paula; Fauser, Sascha; Kirchhof, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    A case of tamoxifen retinopathy examined with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is presented. The typical refractile deposits are located between ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer in SD-OCT. A defect on the outer retinal layer with disruption of the photoreceptor layer with sharp edges is seen. The still attached posterior hyaloids gives evidence of other pathomechanism involved in the outer retinal defect than that of macular hole, as suggested in the literature.

  19. 3D Non-destructive Imaging of Punctures in Polyethylene Composite Armor by THz Time Domain Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, N.; Panowicz, R.; Ospald, F.; Beigang, R.

    2015-08-01

    An ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene composite sample totally punctured by a projectile was examined by THz TDS raster scanning method in reflection configuration. The scanning results correctly match the distribution of delaminations inside the sample, which was proven with cross-sectional and frontal views after waterjet cutting. For further analysis, a signal-processing algorithm based on the deconvolution method was developed and the modified reference signal was used to reduce disturbances. The complex refractive index of the sample was determined by transmission TDS technique and was later used for the simulation of pulse propagation by the finite difference time domain method. These simulations verified the correctness of the proposed method and showed its constraints. Using the proposed algorithm, the ambiguous raw THz image was converted into a binary 3D image of the sample, which consists only of two areas: sample—polyethylene and delamination—air. As a result, a clear image of the distribution of delaminations with their spatial extent was obtained which can be used for further comparative analysis. The limitation of the proposed method is that parts of the central area of the puncture cannot be analyzed because tilted layers deflect the incident signal.

  20. Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy with integrated dual-axis MEMS scanner for fast 3D imaging and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavesi, Cristina; Cogliati, Andrea; Hayes, Adam; Santhanam, Anand P.; Tankam, Patrice; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2015-10-01

    Fast, robust, nondestructive 3D imaging is needed for characterization of microscopic structures in industrial and clinical applications. A custom micro-electromechanical system (MEMS)-based 2D scanner system was developed to achieve 55 kHz A-scan acquisition in a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy (GD-OCM) instrument with a novel multilevel GPU architecture for high-speed imaging. GD-OCM yields high-definition volumetric imaging with dynamic depth of focusing through a bio-inspired liquid lens-based microscope design, which has no moving parts and is suitable for use in a manufacturing setting or in a medical environment. A dual-axis MEMS mirror was chosen to replace two single-axis galvanometer mirrors; as a result, the astigmatism caused by the mismatch between the optical pupil and the scanning location was eliminated and a 12x reduction in volume of the scanning system was achieved. Imaging at an invariant resolution of 2 μm was demonstrated throughout a volume of 1 × 1 × 0.6 mm3, acquired in less than 2 minutes. The MEMS-based scanner resulted in improved image quality, increased robustness and lighter weight of the system - all factors that are critical for on-field deployment. A custom integrated feedback system consisting of a laser diode and a position-sensing detector was developed to investigate the impact of the resonant frequency of the MEMS and the driving signal of the scanner on the movement of the mirror. Results on the metrology of manufactured materials and characterization of tissue samples with GD-OCM are presented.

  1. A numerical method for solving the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier Stokes equations in curvilinear domains with complex immersed boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g. the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, A hybrid cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3d, geometrically complex, moving bodies, Journal of Computational Physics 207 (2005) 457-492.]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow

  2. Using 3D Simulation of Elastic Wave Propagation in Laplace Domain for Electromagnetic-Seismic Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P.; Newman, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    -Fourier domain we had developed 3D code for full-wave field simulation in the elastic media which take into account nonlinearity introduced by free-surface effects. Our approach is based on the velocity-stress formulation. In the contrast to conventional formulation we defined the material properties such as density and Lame constants not at nodal points but within cells. This second order finite differences method formulated in the cell-based grid, generate numerical solutions compatible with analytical ones within the range errors determinate by dispersion analysis. Our simulator will be embedded in an inversion scheme for joint seismic- electromagnetic imaging. It also offers possibilities for preconditioning the seismic wave propagation problems in the frequency domain. References. Shin, C. & Cha, Y. (2009), Waveform inversion in the Laplace-Fourier domain, Geophys. J. Int. 177(3), 1067- 1079. Shin, C. & Cha, Y. H. (2008), Waveform inversion in the Laplace domain, Geophys. J. Int. 173(3), 922-931. Commer, M. & Newman, G. (2008), New advances in three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic inversion, Geophys. J. Int. 172(2), 513-535. Newman, G. A., Commer, M. & Carazzone, J. J. (2010), Imaging CSEM data in the presence of electrical anisotropy, Geophysics, in press.

  3. Compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography with dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a novel CS method that incorporates dispersion compensation into the CS reconstruction of spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) signal. We show that A-scans with dispersion compensation can be obtained by multiplying the dispersion correcting term to the undersampled linear-in-wavenumber spectral data before the CS reconstruction. We also implemented fast CS reconstruction by taking the advantage of fast Fourier transform (FFT). The matrix-vector multiplication commonly used in the CS reconstruction is implemented by a two-step procedure. Compared to the CS reconstruction with matrix multiplication, our method can obtain dispersion compensated A-scan at least 5 times faster. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve high quality image with dispersion compensation.

  4. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  5. Independent and arbitrary generation of spots in the 3D space domain with computer generated holograms written on a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jian; Xia, Yang; Wang, Hao

    2012-10-01

    An improved multiple independent iterative plane algorithm, based on a projection optimization idea, is proposed for the independent and arbitrary generation of one spot or multiple spots in a speckle-suppressed 3D work-area. Details of the mathematical expressions of the algorithm are given to theoretically show how it is improved for 3D spot generation. Both simulations and experiments are conducted to investigate the performance of the algorithm for independent and arbitrary 3D spot generation in several different cases. Simulation results agree well with experimental results, which validates the effectiveness of the algorithm proposed. Several additional experiments are demonstrated for fast and independent generation of four or more spots in the 3D space domain, which confirms the capabilities and practicalities of the algorithm further.

  6. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  7. Automated method for RNFL segmentation in spectral domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Amit S.; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Dewelle, Jordan; Rylander, H. Grady; Milner, Thomas E.

    2008-02-01

    We introduce a method based on optical reflectivity changes to segment the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in images recorded using swept source spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The segmented image is used to determine the RNFL thickness. Simple filtering followed by edge detecting techniques can successfully be applied to segment the RNFL from recorded images and estimate RNFL thickness. The method is computationally more efficient than previously reported approaches. Higher computational efficiency allows faster segmentation and provides the ophthalmologist segmented retinal images that better utilize advantages of spectral domain OCT instrumentation. OCT B-scan and fundus images of the retina are recorded for 5 patients. The segmentation method is applied on B-scan images recorded from all patients. An expert ophthalmologist separately demarcates the RNFL layer in the OCT images from the same patients in each B-scan image. Results from automated image processing software are compared to the boundary demarcated by the expert ophthalmologist. The absolute error between the boundaries demarcated by the expert and the algorithm is expressed in terms of area and is used as an error metric. Ability of the algorithm to accurately segment the RNFL in comparison with an expert ophthalmologist is reported.

  8. CHOROIDAL IMAGING USING SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Regatieri, Caio V.; Branchini, Lauren; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2012-01-01

    Background A structurally and functionally normal choroidal vasculature is essential for retinal function. Therefore, a precise clinical understanding of choroidal morphology should be important for understanding many retinal and choroidal diseases. Methods PUBMED (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed) was used for most of the literature search for this article. The criterion for inclusion of an article in the references for this review was that it included materials about both the clinical and the basic properties of choroidal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Results Recent reports show successful examination and accurate measurement of choroidal thickness in normal and pathologic states using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography systems. This review focuses on the principles of the new technology that make choroidal imaging using optical coherence tomography possible and on the changes that subsequently have been documented to occur in the choroid in various diseases. Additionally, it outlines future directions in choroidal imaging. Conclusion Optical coherence tomography is now proven to be an effective noninvasive tool to evaluate the choroid and to detect choroidal changes in pathologic states. Additionally, choroidal evaluation using optical coherence tomography can be used as a parameter for diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:22487582

  9. Adaptive compressed sensing for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Ting; Li, Hongxiao; Yu, Daoyin

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-contact and non-invasive method for measuring the change of biological tissues caused by pathological changes of body. CCD with huge number of pixels is usually used in SD-OCT to increase the detecting depth, thus enhancing the hardness of data transmission and storage. The usage of compressed sensing (CS) in SD-OCT is able to reduce the trouble of large data transfer and storage, thus eliminating the complexity of processing system. The traditional CS uses the same sampling model for SD-OCT images of different tissue, leading to reconstruction images with different quality. We proposed a CS with adaptive sampling model. The new model is based on uniform sampling model, and the interference spectral of SD-OCT is considered to adjust the local sampling ratio. Compared with traditional CS, adaptive CS can modify the sampling model for images of different tissue according to different interference spectral, getting reconstruction images with high quality without changing sampling model.

  10. The Galactic chemical evolution of oxygen inferred from 3D non-LTE spectral-line-formation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarsi, A. M.; Asplund, M.; Collet, R.; Leenaarts, J.

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the Galactic chemical evolution of oxygen, addressing the systematic errors inherent in classical determinations of the oxygen abundance that arise from the use of one-dimensional (1D) hydrostatic model atmospheres and from the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We perform detailed 3D non-LTE radiative-transfer calculations for atomic oxygen lines across a grid of 3D hydrodynamic STAGGER model atmospheres for dwarfs and subgiants. We apply our grid of predicted line strengths of the [O I] 630 nm and O I 777 nm lines using accurate stellar parameters from the literature. We infer a steep decay in [O/Fe] for [Fe/H] ≳ -1.0, a plateau [O/Fe] ≈ 0.5 down to [Fe/H] ≈ -2.5, and an increasing trend for [Fe/H] ≲ -2.5. Our 3D non-LTE calculations yield overall concordant results from the two oxygen abundance diagnostics.

  11. Automated detection of Schlemm's canal in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Manu; Ramakrishnan, Vignesh; van Oterendorp, Christian; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology allow in vivo imaging of the complex network of intra-scleral aqueous veins in the anterior segment of the eye. Pathological changes in this network, draining the aqueous humor from the eye, are considered to play a role in intraocular pressure elevation, which can lead to glaucoma, one of the major causes of blindness in the world. Through acquisition of OCT volume scans of the anterior eye segment, we aim at reconstructing the three dimensional network of aqueous veins in healthy and glaucomatous subjects. A novel algorithm for segmentation of the three-dimensional (3D) vessel system in human Schlemms canal is presented analyzing frames of spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) of the eyes surface in either horizontal or vertical orientation. Distortions such as vertical stripes are caused by the superficial blood vessels in the conjunctiva and the episclera. They are removed in the discrete Fourier domain (DFT) masking particular frequencies. Feature-based rigid registration of these noise-filtered images is then performed using the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT). Segmentation of the vessels deep in the sclera originating at or in the vicinity of or having indirect connection to the Schlemm's canal is then performed with 3D region growing technique. The segmented vessels are visualized in 3D providing diagnostically relevant information to the physicians. A proof-of-concept study was performed on a healthy volunteer before and after a pharmaceutical narrowing of Schlemm's canal. A relative decreases 17% was measured based on manual ground truth and the image processing method.

  12. A New Method to Explore the Spectral Impact of the Piriform Fossae on the Singing Voice: Benchmarking Using MRI-Based 3D-Printed Vocal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Delvaux, Bertrand; Howard, David

    2014-01-01

    The piriform fossae are the 2 pear-shaped cavities lateral to the laryngeal vestibule at the lower end of the vocal tract. They act acoustically as side-branches to the main tract, resulting in a spectral zero in the output of the human voice. This study investigates their spectral role by comparing numerical and experimental results of MRI-based 3D printed Vocal Tracts, for which a new experimental method (based on room acoustics) is introduced. The findings support results in the literature: the piriform fossae create a spectral trough in the region 4–5 kHz and act as formants repellents. Moreover, this study extends those results by demonstrating numerically and perceptually the impact of having large piriform fossae on the sung output. PMID:25048199

  13. A new method to explore the spectral impact of the piriform fossae on the singing voice: benchmarking using MRI-based 3D-printed vocal tracts.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, Bertrand; Howard, David

    2014-01-01

    The piriform fossae are the 2 pear-shaped cavities lateral to the laryngeal vestibule at the lower end of the vocal tract. They act acoustically as side-branches to the main tract, resulting in a spectral zero in the output of the human voice. This study investigates their spectral role by comparing numerical and experimental results of MRI-based 3D printed Vocal Tracts, for which a new experimental method (based on room acoustics) is introduced. The findings support results in the literature: the piriform fossae create a spectral trough in the region 4-5 kHz and act as formants repellents. Moreover, this study extends those results by demonstrating numerically and perceptually the impact of having large piriform fossae on the sung output. PMID:25048199

  14. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  15. Spectrally balanced detection for optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueli; de Bruin, Daniel M; Kerbage, Charles; de Boer, Johannes F

    2007-12-10

    In optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) or swept-source optical coherence tomography, balanced detection is required to suppress relative intensity noise (RIN). A regular implementation of balanced detection by combining reference and sample arm signal in a 50/50 coupler and detecting the differential output with a balanced receiver is however, not perfect. Since the splitting ratio of the 50/50 coupler is wavelength dependent, RIN is not optimally canceled at the edges of the wavelength sweep. The splitting ratio has a nearly linear shift of 0.4% per nanometer. This brings as much as +/-12% deviation at the margins of wavelength-swept range centered at 1060nm. We demonstrate a RIN suppression of 33dB by spectrally corrected balanced detection, 11dB more that regular balanced detection. PMID:19550929

  16. iVirtualWorld: A Domain-Oriented End-User Development Environment for Building 3D Virtual Chemistry Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhong, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Virtual worlds are well-suited for building virtual laboratories for educational purposes to complement hands-on physical laboratories. However, educators may face technical challenges because developing virtual worlds requires skills in programming and 3D design. Current virtual world building tools are developed for users who have programming…

  17. Shift-multiplexing complex spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haochong; Jiang, Zhuqing; Wang, Dayong; Cai, Wenyuan; Man, Tianlong; Wang, Zhe; Panezai, Spozmai

    2014-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a shift-multiplexing complex spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (shift-multiplexing CSD-OCT) method, in which the maximum detection depth of SD-OCT can be greatly extended by incorporating the shift-multiplexing of detection positions with CSD-OCT. The tomographic imaging with twofold or threefold microscopic slides as the target sample is performed. The experimental results show that the tomographic imaging with more uniform brightness and clarity for the different depth regions in a thick sample can be achieved by the shift-multiplexing CSD-OCT system. In particular, even while the sample's depth is beyond the maximum imaging depth of CSD-OCT system, the tomographic imaging of this sample can still be realized by using the shift-multiplexing CSD-OCT method without the need for any replacement of the equipment, such as high spectral capacity grating or high resolution of CCD. The shift-multiplexing CSD-OCT system can perform the imaging with the optimization and less reduction of sensitivity for the deeper detection position in the sample.

  18. High-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging with spectral domain phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangzhi; Ding, Zhihua; Shen, Yi; Chen, Zhiyan; Zhao, Chen; Ni, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy for high-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging is presented. The phase retrieval is realized in the depth domain to maintain a high sensitivity, while the phase information obtained in the spectral domain is exploited to extend the dynamic range of optical path difference. Sensitivity advantage of phase retrieved in the depth domain over that in the spectral domain is thoroughly investigated. The performance of the proposed depth domain phase based approach is illustrated by phase imaging of a resolution target and an onion skin. PMID:24216799

  19. Spectral tomography with diffuse near-infrared light: inclusion of broadband frequency domain spectral data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Davis, Scott C; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2008-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) region-based spectroscopy is examined for accuracy with spectral recovery using frequency domain data at a discrete number of wavelengths, as compared to that with broadband continuous wave data. Data with more wavelengths in the frequency domain always produce superior quantitative spectroscopy results with reduced noise and error in the chromophore concentrations. Performance of the algorithm in the situation of doing region-guided spectroscopy within the MRI is also considered, and the issue of false positive prior regions being identified is examined to see the effect of added wavelengths. The results indicate that broadband frequency domain data are required for maximal accuracy. A broadband frequency domain experimental system was used to validate the predictions, using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser for the source between 690- and 850-nm wavelengths. The 80-MHz pulsed signal is heterodyned with photomultiplier tube detection, to lower frequency for data acquisition. Tissue-phantom experiments with known hemoglobin absorption and tissue-like scatter values are used to validate the system, using measurements every 10 nm. More wavelengths clearly provide superior quantification of total hemoglobin values. The system and algorithms developed here should provide an optimal way to quantify regions with the goal of image-guided breast tissue spectroscopy within the MRI. PMID:19021313

  20. 3-D spectral IP imaging: Non-invasive characterization of contaminant plumes. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, K.M.; Lesmes, D.P.; Morgan, F.D.; Rodi, W.; Shi, W.; Sturrock, J.

    1997-12-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop the scientific basis for characterizing contaminant plumes in the earth''s subsurface using field measurements of induced polarization (IP) effects. The first-year accomplishments are (1) laboratory experiments on fluid-saturated sandstones quantifying the dependence of spectral IP responses on solution chemistry and rock micro-geometry; (2) library research on the current understanding of electromagnetic coupling effects on IP data acquired in the field: and (3) development of prototype forward modeling and inversion algorithms for interpreting IP data in terms of 3-D models of complex resistivity.'

  1. Three-beam spectral-domain optical coherence tomography for retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suehira, Nobuhito; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tomatsu, Nobuhiro; Yuasa, Takashi; Yamada, Kazuro; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-10-01

    A three-beam spectral domain optical coherence tomography system (OCT) whose center wavelength is 840 nm was developed. The three beams focus on fundus 3.1 mm apart from each other and are detected by a single line sensor. The distance between the beams is fixed and the beams scan a total area of 10×10 mm2 while keeping this separation during three-dimensional (3-D) measurement. The line rate of the sensor is 70 kHz, therefore the total speed is equivalent to 210k A-scans per second in this system. A 1000(x)×500(z)×250(y) voxel volumetric 3D OCT data set can be acquired within 2 s. Images of a model eye, a healthy human eye and a diseased eye taken by this system are shown and evaluated. The image quality of one B-Scan is as good as an image from a single-beam OCT. Adjustment among the beams is solved by additional signal processing using a model eye. A multi-beam OCT has the potential not only for high speed imaging but also functional imaging although problems such as compensation among the beams and motion artifacts must be solved.

  2. Imaging patients with glaucoma using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auyeung, Kris; Auyeung, Kelsey; Kono, Rei; Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Qinqin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    In ophthalmology, a reliable means of diagnosing glaucoma in its early stages is still an open issue. Past efforts, including forays into fluorescent angiography (FA) and early optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems, to develop a potential biomarker for the disease have been explored. However, this development has been hindered by the inability of the current techniques to provide useful depth and microvasculature information of the optic nerve head (ONH), which have been debated as possible hallmarks of glaucoma progression. We reasoned that a system incorporating a spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) based Optical Microangiography (OMAG) system, could allow an effective, non-invasive methodology to evaluate effects on microvasculature by glaucoma. SD-OCT follows the principle of light reflection and interference to produce detailed cross-sectional and 3D images of the eye. OMAG produces imaging contrasts via endogenous light scattering from moving particles, allowing for 3D image productions of dynamic blood perfusion at capillary-level resolution. The purpose of this study was to investigate the optic cup perfusion (flow) differences in glaucomatous and normal eyes. Images from three normal and five glaucomatous subjects were analyzed our OCT based OMAG system for blood perfusion and structural images, allowing for comparisons. Preliminary results from blood flow analysis revealed reduced blood perfusion within the whole-depth region encompassing the Lamina Cribrosa in glaucomatous cases as compared to normal ones. We conclude that our OCT-OMAG system may provide promise and viability for glaucoma screening.

  3. Combining Public Domain and Professional Panoramic Imagery for the Accurate and Dense 3d Reconstruction of the Destroyed Bel Temple in Palmyra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahbeh, W.; Nebiker, S.; Fangi, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper exploits the potential of dense multi-image 3d reconstruction of destroyed cultural heritage monuments by either using public domain touristic imagery only or by combining the public domain imagery with professional panoramic imagery. The focus of our work is placed on the reconstruction of the temple of Bel, one of the Syrian heritage monuments, which was destroyed in September 2015 by the so called "Islamic State". The great temple of Bel is considered as one of the most important religious buildings of the 1st century AD in the East with a unique design. The investigations and the reconstruction were carried out using two types of imagery. The first are freely available generic touristic photos collected from the web. The second are panoramic images captured in 2010 for documenting those monuments. In the paper we present a 3d reconstruction workflow for both types of imagery using state-of-the art dense image matching software, addressing the non-trivial challenges of combining uncalibrated public domain imagery with panoramic images with very wide base-lines. We subsequently investigate the aspects of accuracy and completeness obtainable from the public domain touristic images alone and from the combination with spherical panoramas. We furthermore discuss the challenges of co-registering the weakly connected 3d point cloud fragments resulting from the limited coverage of the touristic photos. We then describe an approach using spherical photogrammetry as a virtual topographic survey allowing the co-registration of a detailed and accurate single 3d model of the temple interior and exterior.

  4. In vivo measurement of arterial and venous oxygenation in the rat using 3D spectral-spatial electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, P; Shankar, R A; Zweier, J L

    1998-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) instrumentation, enabling the performance of three-dimensional spectral-spatial images of free radicals, has been developed to study spatially defined differences in tissue metabolism and oxygenation. Using this instrumentation 3D images of nitroxides in rat tail were obtained. The images visualize the arterial and venous vasculature in the tail segment. Based on the exchange broadening influence of oxygen on the EPR linewidth of nitroxides, we performed localized oxygen measurements in the in vivo rat. An oxygen concentration of 300+/-30 microM was measured in the arteries and 50+/-20 microM in the veins. These results demonstrate the feasibility of performing in vivo, non-invasive measurements and mapping of localized oxygenation in small animals using spectral-spatial EPR imaging techniques. PMID:9703045

  5. Reconstruction for Time-Domain In Vivo EPR 3D Multigradient Oximetric Imaging—A Parallel Processing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dharmaraj, Christopher D.; Thadikonda, Kishan; Fletcher, Anthony R.; Doan, Phuc N.; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Matsumoto, Shingo; Johnson, Calvin A.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional Oximetric Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging using the Single Point Imaging modality generates unpaired spin density and oxygen images that can readily distinguish between normal and tumor tissues in small animals. It is also possible with fast imaging to track the changes in tissue oxygenation in response to the oxygen content in the breathing air. However, this involves dealing with gigabytes of data for each 3D oximetric imaging experiment involving digital band pass filtering and background noise subtraction, followed by 3D Fourier reconstruction. This process is rather slow in a conventional uniprocessor system. This paper presents a parallelization framework using OpenMP runtime support and parallel MATLAB to execute such computationally intensive programs. The Intel compiler is used to develop a parallel C++ code based on OpenMP. The code is executed on four Dual-Core AMD Opteron shared memory processors, to reduce the computational burden of the filtration task significantly. The results show that the parallel code for filtration has achieved a speed up factor of 46.66 as against the equivalent serial MATLAB code. In addition, a parallel MATLAB code has been developed to perform 3D Fourier reconstruction. Speedup factors of 4.57 and 4.25 have been achieved during the reconstruction process and oximetry computation, for a data set with 23 × 23 × 23 gradient steps. The execution time has been computed for both the serial and parallel implementations using different dimensions of the data and presented for comparison. The reported system has been designed to be easily accessible even from low-cost personal computers through local internet (NIHnet). The experimental results demonstrate that the parallel computing provides a source of high computational power to obtain biophysical parameters from 3D EPR oximetric imaging, almost in real-time. PMID:19672315

  6. Reconstruction for time-domain in vivo EPR 3D multigradient oximetric imaging--a parallel processing perspective.

    PubMed

    Dharmaraj, Christopher D; Thadikonda, Kishan; Fletcher, Anthony R; Doan, Phuc N; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Matsumoto, Shingo; Johnson, Calvin A; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B; Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional Oximetric Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging using the Single Point Imaging modality generates unpaired spin density and oxygen images that can readily distinguish between normal and tumor tissues in small animals. It is also possible with fast imaging to track the changes in tissue oxygenation in response to the oxygen content in the breathing air. However, this involves dealing with gigabytes of data for each 3D oximetric imaging experiment involving digital band pass filtering and background noise subtraction, followed by 3D Fourier reconstruction. This process is rather slow in a conventional uniprocessor system. This paper presents a parallelization framework using OpenMP runtime support and parallel MATLAB to execute such computationally intensive programs. The Intel compiler is used to develop a parallel C++ code based on OpenMP. The code is executed on four Dual-Core AMD Opteron shared memory processors, to reduce the computational burden of the filtration task significantly. The results show that the parallel code for filtration has achieved a speed up factor of 46.66 as against the equivalent serial MATLAB code. In addition, a parallel MATLAB code has been developed to perform 3D Fourier reconstruction. Speedup factors of 4.57 and 4.25 have been achieved during the reconstruction process and oximetry computation, for a data set with 23 x 23 x 23 gradient steps. The execution time has been computed for both the serial and parallel implementations using different dimensions of the data and presented for comparison. The reported system has been designed to be easily accessible even from low-cost personal computers through local internet (NIHnet). The experimental results demonstrate that the parallel computing provides a source of high computational power to obtain biophysical parameters from 3D EPR oximetric imaging, almost in real-time. PMID:19672315

  7. Tunable acousto-optic spectral imager for atmospheric composition measurements in the visible spectral domain.

    PubMed

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Loodts, Nicolas; Van Opstal, Bert; Maes, Jeroen; Vanhellemont, Filip; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Pieroux, Didier; Bingen, Christine; Robert, Charles; De Vos, Lieve; Aballea, Ludovic; Fussen, Didier

    2012-09-01

    We describe a new spectral imaging instrument using a TeO(2) acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF) operating in the visible domain (450-900 nm). It allows for fast (~1 second), monochromatic (FWHM ranges from 0.6 nm at 450 nm to 3.5 nm at 800 nm) picture acquisition with good spatial resolution. This instrument was designed as a breadboard of the visible channel of a new satellite-borne atmospheric limb spectral imager, named the Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere (ALTIUS), that is currently being developed. We tested its remote sensing capabilities by observing the dense, turbulent plume exhausted by a waste incinerator stack at two wavelengths sensitive to NO(2). An average value of 6.0±0.4×10(17) molecules cm(-2) has been obtained for the NO(2) slant column density within the plume, close to the stack outlet. Although this result was obtained with a rather low accuracy, it demonstrates the potential of spectral imaging by using AOTFs in remote sensing. PMID:22945175

  8. Retinal photoreceptor imaging with high-speed line-field parallel spectral domain OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechtig, Daniel J.; Ginner, Laurin; Kumar, Abhishek; Pircher, Michael; Schmoll, Tilman; Wurster, Lara M.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2016-03-01

    We present retinal photoreceptor imaging with a line-field parallel spectral domain OCT modality, utilizing a commercially available 2D CMOS detector array operating at and imaging speed of 500 B-scans/s. Our results demonstrate for the first time in vivo structural and functional retinal assessment with a line-field OCT setup providing sufficient sensitivity, lateral and axial resolution and 3D acquisition rates in order to resolve individual photoreceptor cells. The phase stability of the system is manifested by the high phase-correlation across the lateral FOV on the level of individual photoreceptors. The setup comprises a Michelson interferometer illuminated by a broadband light source, where a line-focus is formed via a cylindrical lens and the back-propagated light from sample and reference arm is detected by a 2D array after passing a diffraction grating. The spot size of the line-focus on the retina is 5μm, which corresponds to a PSF of 50μm and an oversampling factor of 3.6 at the detector plane, respectively. A full 3D stack was recorded in only 0.8 s. We show representative enface images, tomograms and phase-difference maps of cone photoreceptors with a lateral FOV close to 2°. The high-speed capability and the phase stability due to parallel illumination and detection may potentially lead to novel structural and functional diagnostic tools on a cellular and microvascular imaging level. Furthermore, the presented system enables competitive imaging results as compared to respective point scanning modalities and facilitates utilizing software based digital aberration correction algorithms for achieving 3D isotropic resolution across the full FOV.

  9. Retinal photoreceptor imaging with high-speed line-field parallel spectral domain OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginner, Laurin; Fechtig, Daniel J.; Schmoll, Tilman; Wurster, Lara M.; Pircher, Michael; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    We present retinal photoreceptor imaging with a line-field parallel spectral domain OCT modality, utilizing a commercially available 2D CMOS detector array operating at and imaging speed of 500 B-scans/s. Our results demonstrate for the first time in vivo structural and functional retinal assessment with a line-field OCT setup providing sufficient sensitivity, lateral and axial resolution and 3D acquisition rates in order to resolve individual photoreceptor cells. The setup comprises a Michelson interferometer illuminated by a broadband light source, where a line-focus is formed via a cylindrical lens and the back-propagated light from sample and reference arm is detected by a 2D array after passing a diffraction grating. The spot size of the line-focus on the retina is 5μm, which corresponds to a PSF of 50μm and an oversampling factor of 3.6 at the detector plane, respectively. A full 3D stack was recorded in only 0.8 s. We show representative enface images, tomograms and phase-difference maps of cone photoreceptors with a lateral FOV close to 2°. The high-speed capability and the phase stability due to parallel illumination and detection may potentially lead to novel structural and functional diagnostic tools on a cellular and microvascular imaging level. Furthermore, the presented system enables competitive imaging results as compared to respective point scanning modalities and facilitates utilizing software based digital aberration correction algorithms for achieving 3D isotropic resolution across the full FOV.

  10. Three-Dimensional Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Data Analysis for Glaucoma Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Folio, Lindsey S.; Nadler, Zach; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a new three-dimensional (3D) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) data analysis method using a machine learning technique based on variable-size super pixel segmentation that efficiently utilizes full 3D dataset to improve the discrimination between early glaucomatous and healthy eyes. Methods 192 eyes of 96 subjects (44 healthy, 59 glaucoma suspect and 89 glaucomatous eyes) were scanned with SD-OCT. Each SD-OCT cube dataset was first converted into 2D feature map based on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) segmentation and then divided into various number of super pixels. Unlike the conventional super pixel having a fixed number of points, this newly developed variable-size super pixel is defined as a cluster of homogeneous adjacent pixels with variable size, shape and number. Features of super pixel map were extracted and used as inputs to machine classifier (LogitBoost adaptive boosting) to automatically identify diseased eyes. For discriminating performance assessment, area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics of the machine classifier outputs were compared with the conventional circumpapillary RNFL (cpRNFL) thickness measurements. Results The super pixel analysis showed statistically significantly higher AUC than the cpRNFL (0.855 vs. 0.707, respectively, p = 0.031, Jackknife test) when glaucoma suspects were discriminated from healthy, while no significant difference was found when confirmed glaucoma eyes were discriminated from healthy eyes. Conclusions A novel 3D OCT analysis technique performed at least as well as the cpRNFL in glaucoma discrimination and even better at glaucoma suspect discrimination. This new method has the potential to improve early detection of glaucomatous damage. PMID:23408988

  11. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  12. Diffractive centrosymmetric 3D-transmission phase gratings positioned at the image plane of optical systems transform lightlike 4D-WORLD as tunable resonators into spectral metrics...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1999-08-01

    Diffractive 3D phase gratings of spherical scatterers dense in hexagonal packing geometry represent adaptively tunable 4D-spatiotemporal filters with trichromatic resonance in visible spectrum. They are described in the (lambda) - chromatic and the reciprocal (nu) -aspects by reciprocal geometric translations of the lightlike Pythagoras theorem, and by the direction cosine for double cones. The most elementary resonance condition in the lightlike Pythagoras theorem is given by the transformation of the grating constants gx, gy, gz of the hexagonal 3D grating to (lambda) h1h2h3 equals (lambda) 111 with cos (alpha) equals 0.5. Through normalization of the chromaticity in the von Laue-interferences to (lambda) 111, the (nu) (lambda) equals (lambda) h1h2h3/(lambda) 111-factor of phase velocity becomes the crucial resonance factor, the 'regulating device' of the spatiotemporal interaction between 3D grating and light, space and time. In the reciprocal space equal/unequal weights and times in spectral metrics result at positions of interference maxima defined by hyperbolas and circles. A database becomes built up by optical interference for trichromatic image preprocessing, motion detection in vector space, multiple range data analysis, patchwide multiple correlations in the spatial frequency spectrum, etc.

  13. Imaging the eye fundus with real-time en-face spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-04-01

    Real-time display of processed en-face spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images is important for diagnosis. However, due to many steps of data processing requirements, such as Fast Fourier transformation (FFT), data re-sampling, spectral shaping, apodization, zero padding, followed by software cut of the 3D volume acquired to produce an en-face slice, conventional high-speed SD-OCT cannot render an en-face OCT image in real time. Recently we demonstrated a Master/Slave (MS)-OCT method that is highly parallelizable, as it provides reflectivity values of points at depth within an A-scan in parallel. This allows direct production of en-face images. In addition, the MS-OCT method does not require data linearization, which further simplifies the processing. The computation in our previous paper was however time consuming. In this paper we present an optimized algorithm that can be used to provide en-face MS-OCT images much quicker. Using such an algorithm we demonstrate around 10 times faster production of sets of en-face OCT images than previously obtained as well as simultaneous real-time display of up to 4 en-face OCT images of 200 × 200 pixels(2) from the fovea and the optic nerve of a volunteer. We also demonstrate 3D and B-scan OCT images obtained from sets of MS-OCT C-scans, i.e. with no FFT and no intermediate step of generation of A-scans. PMID:24761303

  14. 3-D Quantum Transport Solver Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer and Spectral Element Methods for the Simulation of Semiconductor Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Candong; Lee, Joon-Ho; Lim, Kim Hwa; Massoud, Hisham Z.; Liu, Qing Huo

    2007-01-01

    A 3-D quantum transport solver based on the spectral element method (SEM) and perfectly matched layer (PML) is introduced to solve the 3-D Schrödinger equation with a tensor effective mass. In this solver, the influence of the environment is replaced with the artificial PML open boundary extended beyond the contact regions of the device. These contact regions are treated as waveguides with known incident waves from waveguide mode solutions. As the transmitted wave function is treated as a total wave, there is no need to decompose it into waveguide modes, thus significantly simplifying the problem in comparison with conventional open boundary conditions. The spectral element method leads to an exponentially improving accuracy with the increase in the polynomial order and sampling points. The PML region can be designed such that less than −100 dB outgoing waves are reflected by this artificial material. The computational efficiency of the SEM solver is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and analytical results from waveguide and plane-wave examples, and its utility is illustrated by multiple-terminal devices and semiconductor nanotube devices. PMID:18037971

  15. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Glaucoma (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a rapidly evolving, robust technology that has profoundly changed the practice of ophthalmology. Spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) increases axial resolution 2- to 3-fold and scan speed 60- to 110-fold vs time domain OCT (TD-OCT). SD-OCT enables novel scanning, denser sampling, and 3-dimensional imaging. This thesis tests my hypothesis that SD-OCT improves reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity for glaucoma detection. Methods OCT progress is reviewed from invention onward, and future development is discussed. To test the hypothesis, TD-OCT and SD-OCT reproducibility and glaucoma discrimination are evaluated. Forty-one eyes of 21 subjects (SD-OCT) and 21 eyes of 21 subjects (TD-OCT) are studied to test retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement reproducibility. Forty eyes of 20 subjects (SD-OCT) and 21 eyes of 21 subjects (TD-OCT) are investigated to test macular parameter reproducibility. For both TD-OCT and SD-OCT, 83 eyes of 83 subjects are assessed to evaluate RNFL thickness and 74 eyes of 74 subjects to evaluate macular glaucoma discrimination. Results Compared to conventional TD-OCT, SD-OCT had statistically significantly better reproducibility in most sectoral macular thickness and peripapillary RNFL sectoral measurements. There was no statistically significant difference in overall mean macular or RNFL reproducibility, or between TD-OCT and SD-OCT glaucoma discrimination. Surprisingly, TD-OCT macular RNFL thickness showed glaucoma discrimination superior to SD-OCT. Conclusions At its current development state, SD-OCT shows better reproducibility than TD-OCT, but glaucoma discrimination is similar for TD-OCT and SD-OCT. Technological improvements are likely to enhance SD-OCT reproducibility, sensitivity, specificity, and utility, but these will require additional development. PMID:19277249

  16. Quality assessment for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Paranjape, Amit S.; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Dewelle, Jordan; Rylander, H. Grady, III; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, a measure of glaucoma progression, can be measured in images acquired by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation, however, is affected by the quality of the OCT images. In this paper, a new parameter, signal deviation (SD), which is based on the standard deviation of the intensities in OCT images, is introduced for objective assessment of OCT image quality. Two other objective assessment parameters, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and signal strength (SS), are also calculated for each OCT image. The results of the objective assessment are compared with subjective assessment. In the subjective assessment, one OCT expert graded the image quality according to a three-level scale (good, fair, and poor). The OCT B-scan images of the retina from six subjects are evaluated by both objective and subjective assessment. From the comparison, we demonstrate that the objective assessment successfully differentiates between the acceptable quality images (good and fair images) and poor quality OCT images as graded by OCT experts. We evaluate the performance of the objective assessment under different quality assessment parameters and demonstrate that SD is the best at distinguishing between fair and good quality images. The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation is improved significantly after poor quality OCT images are rejected by automated objective assessment using the SD, SNR, and SS.

  17. Characterization of PET preforms using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Hamid; Ferreira, Manuel João.; Martins, Teresa; Carmelo Rosa, Carla

    2013-11-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) preforms are massively produced nowadays with the purpose of producing food and beverages packaging and liquid containers. Some varieties of these preforms are produced as multilayer structures, where very thin inner film(s) act as a barrier for nutrients leakage. The knowledge of the thickness of this thin inner layer is important in the production line. The quality control of preforms production requires a fast approach and normally the thickness control is performed by destructive means out of the production line. A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) method was proposed to examine the thin layers in real time. This paper describes a nondestructive approach and all required signal processing steps to characterize the thin inner layers and also to improve the imaging speed and the signal to noise ratio. The algorithm was developed by using graphics processing unit (GPU) with computer unified device architecture (CUDA). This GPU-accelerated white light interferometry technique nondestructively assesses the samples and has high imaging speed advantage, overcoming the bottlenecks in PET performs quality control.

  18. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings in Lipemia Retinalis.

    PubMed

    Özturk, Banu Turgut; Bozkurt, Banu; Meşen, Ali; Gonul, Saban; İpekci, Süleyman Hilmi

    2016-06-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia can give rise to a fundus appearance with whitish-colored retinal vessels called lipemia retinalis. A 52-year-old man with hypertriglyceridemia presented with a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 in both eyes and creamy-white retinal vessels on fundus. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) revealed hyperreflective and engorged retinal vessels and white dots mainly accumulated in the inner nuclear and ganglion cell layer. Follow-up fundus examination after plasmapheresis sessions revealed normal retinal vessels. The hyperreflective appearance of the retinal vessels in OCT reversed rapidly 5 days after the treatment, whereas hyperreflective dots in retina disappeared slowly in 3 months. OCT is useful in demonstrating inner retinal changes associated with lipemia retinalis at histopathological level. The hyperreflective dots in inner retina associated with leakage from superficial retinal capillaries attested the correlation of their location with their origin. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:589-592.]. PMID:27327291

  19. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vinekar, Anand; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Jayadev, Chaitra; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Bauer, Noel; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT) has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research. PMID:26221606

  20. Imaging of eye tumor in the mouse model of retinoblastoma with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Shuliang; Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan; Gregory, Giovanni; Jockovich, Maria E.; Hackam, Abigail; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive in vivo examination of the rodent retina without sacrificing the animal is the key to being able to perform longitudinal studies. This allows the monitoring of disease progression and the response to therapies through its entire course in individual animal. A high-speed high resolution three-dimensional spectral-domain OCT is built for non-contact in vivo imaging of rodent retina. The system is able to acquire high quality 3D images of the rodent retina in 2.7 seconds (total imaging time is ~5 minutes). The system was tested on mice with normal retina (B6/SJLF2), mouse model for photoreceptor degeneration (Rho -/-), and mouse model for retinoblastoma (LH BETAT AG). For the first time to our knowledge, 3D image of the tumor in retinoblastoma mouse model was successfully imaged in vivo. By segmenting the tumor boundaries in each frame of the OCT image the volume of the tumor was successfully calculated.

  1. Synthesis, Spectral Analysis and Preliminary in Vitro Evaluation of Some Tetrapyrrolic Complexes with 3d Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Socoteanu, Radu; Manda, Gina; Boscencu, Rica; Vasiliu, Georgiana; Oliveira, Anabela Sousa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two tetrapyrrolic complexes, Zn(II)-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin and Cu(II)-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris-(4-acetoxy-3-methoxyphenyl)porphyrin were synthesized, and characterized from a spectral and biological point of view. The study provided data concerning the behavior of identical external substituents vs. two different core insertions. Some of the properties of the proposed tetrapyrrolic structures were highlighted, having photodynamic therapy of cancer as a targeted biomedical application. Elemental analysis, NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis data in various solvents were provided. A preliminary in vitro study on normal and cancer cultured cells was carried out for biocompatibility assessment in dark conditions. The preliminary in vitro study performed on human peripheral mononuclear cells exposed to tetrapyrrolic compounds (2 µM) showed that the proposed compounds had a convenient cytotoxic profile on human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells under dark conditions. Meanwhile, the investigated compounds reduced the number of metabolically active breast tumor MCF-7 cells, with the exception of Zn(II) complex-containing a symmetrical ligand. Accordingly, preliminary in vitro data suggest that the proposed tetrapyrrolic compounds are good candidates for PDT, as they limit tumor expansion even under dark conditions, whilst sparing normal cells. PMID:26343614

  2. Measuring the 3D clustering of undetected galaxies through cross correlation of their cumulative flux fluctuations from multiple spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Visbal, Eli; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2010-11-01

    We discuss a method for detecting the emission from high redshift galaxies by cross correlating flux fluctuations from multiple spectral lines. If one can fit and subtract away the continuum emission with a smooth function of frequency, the remaining signal contains fluctuations of flux with frequency and angle from line emitting galaxies. Over a particular small range of observed frequencies, these fluctuations will originate from sources corresponding to a series of different redshifts, one for each emission line. It is possible to statistically isolate the fluctuations at a particular redshift by cross correlating emission originating from the same redshift, but in different emission lines. This technique will allow detection of clustering fluctuations from the faintest galaxies which individually cannot be detected, but which contribute substantially to the total signal due to their large numbers. We describe these fluctuations quantitatively through the line cross power spectrum. As an example of a particular application of this technique, we calculate the signal-to-noise ratio for a measurement of the cross power spectrum of the OI(63 μm) and OIII(52 μm) fine structure lines with the proposed Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). We find that the cross power spectrum can be measured beyond a redshift of z = 8. Such observations could constrain the evolution of the metallicity, bias, and duty cycle of faint galaxies at high redshifts and may also be sensitive to the reionization history through its effect on the minimum mass of galaxies. As another example of this technique, we calculate the signal-to-noise ratio for the cross power spectrum of CO line emission measured with a large ground based telescope like the Cornell Caltech Atacama Telescope (CCAT) and 21-cm radiation originating from hydrogen in galaxies after reionization with an interferometer similar in scale to the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), but optimized for post

  3. Crystal Structure of the Mycoplasma arthritidis-Derived Mitogen in Apo Form Reveals a 3D Domain-Swapped Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Li, Z; Guo, Y; VanVranken, S; Mourad, W; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing particular V{beta} elements of T cell receptor. Here, we report the crystal structure of a MAM mutant K201A in apo form (unliganded) at 2.8-{angstrom} resolutions. We also partially refined the crystal structures of the MAM wild type and another MAM mutant L50A in apo forms at low resolutions. Unexpectedly, the structures of these apo MAM molecules display a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimer. The entire C-terminal domains of these MAM molecules are involved in the domain swapping. Functional analyses demonstrated that the K201A and L50A mutants do not show altered ability to bind to their host receptors and that they stimulate the activation of T cells as efficiently as does the wild type. Structural comparisons indicated that the 'reconstituted' MAM monomer from the domain-swapped dimer displays large differences at the hinge regions from the MAM{sub wt} molecule in the receptor-bound form. Further comparison indicated that MAM has a flexible N-terminal loop, implying that conformational changes could occur upon receptor binding.

  4. A novel keratan sulphate domain preferentially expressed on the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 3D12/H7.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D C; Haubeck, H D; Eich, K; Kolbe-Busch, S; Stöcker, G; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared against aggrecan which has been isolated from human articular cartilage and purified by several chromatographic steps. One of these mAbs, the aggrecan-specific mAb 3D12/H7, was selected for further characterization. The data presented indicate that this mAb recognizes a novel domain of keratan sulphate chains from aggrecan: (1) immunochemical staining of aggrecan is abolished by treatment with keratanase/keratanase II, but not with keratanase or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC/ABC; (2) after chemical deglycosylation of aggrecan no staining of the core-protein was observed; (3) different immunochemical reactivity was observed against keratan sulphates from articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and cornea for the mAbs 3D12/H7 and 5D4. For further characterization of the epitope, reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were prepared. In an IEF-gel-shift assay it was shown that the 3H-labelled oligosaccharides obtained after keratanase digestion of reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were recognized by the mAb 3D12/H7. Thus it can be concluded that the mAb 3D12/H7 recognizes an epitope in the linkage region present in, at least some, keratan sulphate chains of the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage. Moreover, this domain seems to be expressed preferentially on those keratan sulphate chains which occur in the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of aggrecan, since the antibody does not recognize the keratan sulphate-rich region obtained after combined chondroitinase AC/ABC and trypsin digestion of aggrecan. PMID:8836155

  5. A novel keratan sulphate domain preferentially expressed on the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage is recognized by the monoclonal antibody 3D12/H7.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D C; Haubeck, H D; Eich, K; Kolbe-Busch, S; Stöcker, G; Stuhlsatz, H W; Greiling, H

    1996-09-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were prepared against aggrecan which has been isolated from human articular cartilage and purified by several chromatographic steps. One of these mAbs, the aggrecan-specific mAb 3D12/H7, was selected for further characterization. The data presented indicate that this mAb recognizes a novel domain of keratan sulphate chains from aggrecan: (1) immunochemical staining of aggrecan is abolished by treatment with keratanase/keratanase II, but not with keratanase or chondroitin sulphate lyase AC/ABC; (2) after chemical deglycosylation of aggrecan no staining of the core-protein was observed; (3) different immunochemical reactivity was observed against keratan sulphates from articular cartilage, intervertebral disc and cornea for the mAbs 3D12/H7 and 5D4. For further characterization of the epitope, reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were prepared. In an IEF-gel-shift assay it was shown that the 3H-labelled oligosaccharides obtained after keratanase digestion of reduced and 3H-labelled keratan sulphate chains were recognized by the mAb 3D12/H7. Thus it can be concluded that the mAb 3D12/H7 recognizes an epitope in the linkage region present in, at least some, keratan sulphate chains of the large aggregating proteoglycan from human articular cartilage. Moreover, this domain seems to be expressed preferentially on those keratan sulphate chains which occur in the chondroitin sulphate-rich region of aggrecan, since the antibody does not recognize the keratan sulphate-rich region obtained after combined chondroitinase AC/ABC and trypsin digestion of aggrecan. PMID:8836155

  6. Development of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for in vivo Functional Imaging of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin

    -OMAG). Unlike conventional OMAG, UHS-OMAG applied the OMAG algorithm onto the slow direction of FDOCT scan (Y-direction). Because the time interval between adjacent B-frames is much longer than that between adjacent A-lines, UHS-OMAG can achieve much higher flow sensitivity compared to the conventional OMAG. In addition, the UHS-OMAG usually employed high frame rate (typically 300 frames per second) to achieve 3D scan, it cost much less time to finish one 3D scan compared to the traditional OMAG. However, when it was applied to visualize vasculature map of human tissue, the motion artifacts caused by the inevitable movements is still the biggest challenge. Based on the phase difference calculated from two adjacent B-frames, a new phase compensation algorithm was developed. Aim 4: Developing ultrahigh speed Spectral Domain OCT system through sequentially controlling two high speed line scan CMOS cameras. Two identical high speed line cameras were employed to build two home build high speed spectrometers. Through sequentially controlling the reading time period of two cameras, the imaging speed of the whole system could reach twice higher than the single camera system. The newly built 800 nm SDOCT system which can work at 500, 000 Hz A-lines capturing speed was then used to achieve in vivo 3D imaging in both high speed and large field of view mode. In addition, through combining with the OMAG algorithm, the newly developed system is capable of providing detailed micro-vasculature imaging of human retina and optic nerve head. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  7. Assessment of Artifacts and Reproducibility across Spectral and Time Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joseph; Sull, Alan C.; Vuong, Laurel N.; Chen, Yueli; Liu, Jonathan; Fujimoto, James G.; Schuman, Joel S.; Duker, Jay S.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To report the frequency of optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan artifacts and compare macular thickness measurements, inter-scan reproducibility and inter-device agreeability across three spectral / Fourier domain (SD) OCTs (Cirrus HD-OCT, RTVue-100 and Topcon 3D-OCT 1000) and one time domain (TD) OCT (Stratus OCT). DESIGN Prospective, non-comparative, non-interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS 52 patients seen at New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center retina service between February and August 2008. METHODS Two scans were performed for each of the SD-OCT protocols: Cirrus macular cube 512×128, RTVue (E)MM5 and MM6, Topcon 3D macular and radial, in addition to one TD-OCT scan via Stratus macular thickness protocol. Scans were inspected for six types of OCT scan artifacts and analyzed. Inter-scan reproducibility and inter-device agreeability were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots, respectively. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE OCT image artifacts, Macular thickness, Reproducibility, Agreeability. RESULTS TD-OCT scans contained a significantly higher percentage of clinically significant improper central foveal thickness (IFT) post-manual correction (greater than or equal to 11 μm change) compared to SD-OCT scans. Cirrus HD-OCT had a significantly lower percentage of clinically significant IFT (11.1%) compared to the other SD-OCT devices (Topcon 3D: 20.4%, Topcon Radial: 29.6%, RTVue (E)MM5: 42.6%, RTVue MM6: 24.1%; p= 0.001). All three SD-OCT had central foveal subfield thicknesses significantly greater than TD-OCT post manual correction (p< 0.0001). All 3 SD-OCT demonstrated a high degree of reproducibility in the central foveal region (ICC= 0.92 to 0.97). Bland-Altman plots showed low agreeability between TD- and SD-OCT scans. CONCLUSIONS Cirrus HD-OCT scans exhibited the lowest occurrence of any artifacts (68.5%), IFT (40.7%) and clinically significant IFT (11.1%) compared to all other OCT devices examined

  8. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of macula in myopia.

    PubMed

    Choovuthayakorn, Janejit; Laowong, Taksaorn; Watanachai, Nawat; Patikulsila, Direk; Chaikitmongkol, Voraporn

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the associations between regional macular thickness and gender, age, axial length, and degree of myopia in young and middle-aged healthy myopic eyes. One hundred and seventy-one subjects with -0.5 diopters of myopia or worse underwent prospective macular thickness measurement by Spectralis spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Subjects' mean age was 32.40 ± 8.25 years (range 18 to 49 years), with 45 % being male. The mean degree of myopia was -4.57 ± 3.52 diopters, with a mean axial length of 25.09 ± 1.67 mm. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significantly thicker central (mean 9.13 µm thicker) and inner subfields (mean 8.55 µm thicker) in males (P values were <0.001 and 0.002, respectively). In addition, in both genders, for each millimeter of increased axial length, the central subfield thickness increased by 2.11 µm, the inner subfield decreased by 2.25 µm, and the outer subfield decreased by 3.62 µm (P values were 0.010, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). Factors including gender and axial length affect baseline regional macular thickness in young and middle-age myopic subjects. The central subfield and inner subfield were affected by both gender and axial length, while the outer subfield was affected only by axial length. The macular thickness of myopic subjects with macular disease should be interpreted in light of these factors. PMID:26290135

  9. Macular Surgery Using Intraoperative Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Khodabandeh, Alireza; Riazi-Esfahani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the use of intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for detecting anatomical changes during macular surgery. Methods: In a consecutive case series, 32 eyes of 32 patients undergoing concurrent pars plana vitrectomy and intraoperative SD-OCT for macular hole (MH), epiretinal membrane (ERM) and vitreomacular traction (VMT) were enrolled. Intraoperative changes in retinal thickness and dimensions of the macular hole were measured in patients with ERM and VMT following surgical manipulation using a hand-held SD-OCT device (iVue, Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA). Results: SD-OCT images of sixteen eyes with macular hole were subjected to quantitative and qualitative analysis. All MH dimensions remained stable during consecutive stages of surgery except for MH apex diameter, which showed a significant decrease after internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling (P=0.025). Quantitative analysis of ten patients with ERM showed a significant decrease in retinal thickness after membrane removal (P=0.018) which did not remain significant until the end of the procedure (P=0.8). In three cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Quantitative analysis of five patients with VMT showed a decrease in retinal thickness during consecutive steps of the surgery, although these changes were not significant. In two cases, subretinal fluid was formed after ILM peeling. Conclusion: Intraoperative SD-OCT is a useful imaging technique which provides vitreoretinal surgeons with rapid awareness of changes in macular anatomy during surgery and may therefore result in better anatomical and visual outcomes. PMID:26730318

  10. Comparison of spectral-domain and time-domain optical coherence tomography in solar retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han Joo; Yoo, Eun Seok; Kim, Chul Gu; Kim, Jong Woo

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare spectral-domain (SD) and time-domain (TD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in patients with solar retinopathy. Complete ocular examinations and OCT were performed in two patients presenting with acute solar retinopathy soon after observation of an eclipse. Both patients were evaluated with SD-OCT and TD-OCT at the same time. SD-OCT demonstrated characteristic defects at the level of the inner and outer segment junction of the photoreceptors in all the affected eyes and decreased reflectiveness of the retinal pigment epithelium layer. TD-OCT images showed unremarkable findings in two eyes with deteriorated visual acuity. SD-OCT improves diagnosis and assessment of the degree and nature of foveal damage in patients with solar retinopathy and may be an important tool for use in identifying foveal damage not detected by TD-OCT. SD-OCT may be preferable to TD-OCT for confirmation or assessment of the degree of foveal damage in patients with solar retinopathy. PMID:21860577

  11. Evaluation of natural and nitramine binding energies to 3-D models of the S1S2 domains in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Ford-Green, Jason; Isayev, Olexandr; Gorb, Leonid; Perkins, Edward J; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-04-01

    Overactivation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in postsynaptic neurons leads to glutamate-related excitotoxicity in the central nervous system of mammals. We have built 3-D models of each domain for the universal screening of potential toxicants and their binding mechanisms. Our docking results show that the calculated pK (i) values of glycine and L: -glutamate significantly increase (>1) when the NR1 and NR2A S1S2 domains are closing, respectively. Inversely, D: -cycloserine (DCS) and 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (5,7-DCKA) do not show such a dependence on domain closure. Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) confirmed 5 different conformational states of the S1S2 domain along the 308.2 K temperature trajectory. Analysis of residue fluctuations during this temperature trajectory showed that residues in loop 1, loop 2, the amino terminal domain (ATD), and the area linked to ion channel α-helices are involved in this movement. This further implicates the notion that efficacious ligands act through S1S2 lobe movement which can culminate in the opening or closing of the ion channel. We further tested this by docking hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) to the S1S2 domain. Our results predict that these nitramines are not efficacious and thus do not produce excitoxicity when they bind to the S1S2 domain of the NMDAR. PMID:21735122

  12. 3D acoustic wave modelling with time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite-difference schemes and hybrid absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2011-09-01

    Most conventional finite-difference methods adopt second-order temporal and (2M)th-order spatial finite-difference stencils to solve the 3D acoustic wave equation. When spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the time-space domain dispersion relation are used to replace these conventional spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the space domain dispersion relation, the accuracy of modelling can be increased from second-order along any directions to (2M)th-order along 48 directions. In addition, the conventional high-order spatial finite-difference modelling accuracy can be improved by using a truncated finite-difference scheme. In this paper, we combine the time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme and the truncated finite-difference scheme to obtain optimised spatial finite-difference coefficients and thus to significantly improve the modelling accuracy without increasing computational cost, compared with the conventional space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme. We developed absorbing boundary conditions for the 3D acoustic wave equation, based on predicting wavefield values in a transition area by weighing wavefield values from wave equations and one-way wave equations. Dispersion analyses demonstrate that high-order spatial finite-difference stencils have greater accuracy than low-order spatial finite-difference stencils for high frequency components of wavefields, and spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have greater precision than those devised in the space domain under the same discretisation. The modelling accuracy can be improved further by using the truncated spatial finite-difference stencils. Stability analyses show that spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have better stability condition. Numerical modelling experiments for homogeneous, horizontally layered and Society of Exploration Geophysicists/European Association of

  13. A Parallel 3D Spectral Difference Method for Solutions of Compressible Navier Stokes Equations on Deforming Grids and Simulations of Vortex Induced Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, Andrew

    Numerical models of fluid-structure interaction have grown in importance due to increasing interest in environmental energy harvesting, airfoil-gust interactions, and bio-inspired formation flying. Powered by increasingly powerful parallel computers, such models seek to explain the fundamental physics behind the complex, unsteady fluid-structure phenomena. To this end, a high-fidelity computational model based on the high-order spectral difference method on 3D unstructured, dynamic meshes has been developed. The spectral difference method constructs continuous solution fields within each element with a Riemann solver to compute the inviscid fluxes at the element interfaces and an averaging mechanism to compute the viscous fluxes. This method has shown promise in the past as a highly accurate, yet sufficiently fast method for solving unsteady viscous compressible flows. The solver is monolithically coupled to the equations of motion of an elastically mounted 3-degree of freedom rigid bluff body undergoing flow-induced lift, drag, and torque. The mesh is deformed using 4 methods: an analytic function, Laplace equation, biharmonic equation, and a bi-elliptic equation with variable diffusivity. This single system of equations -- fluid and structure -- is advanced through time using a 5-stage, 4th-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Message Passing Interface is used to run the coupled system in parallel on up to 240 processors. The solver is validated against previously published numerical and experimental data for an elastically mounted cylinder. The effect of adding an upstream body and inducing wake galloping is observed.

  14. High-order Boundary Behavior and the Incorporation of Spectral Hyperviscosity in Turbulence Models on General Bounded Regions in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrin, Joel

    2014-11-01

    In a bounded region in 3-D the velocity field u for the Navier-Stokes system satisfies in the no-slip case the familiar condition u = 0 on the boundary. We show further that if the boundary and the forcing data satisfy reasonably general smoothness assumptions then Au = 0 on the boundary as well where A is the Stokes operator (i.e. Au is the divergence-free part of -∇2 u). We apply this result to subgrid-scale modeling by noting that in a number of computational turbulence experiments hyperviscosity has been added to the NS system as an approximation to spectral eddy viscosity, but a rigorous definition of this technique and a qualitative theory for it has been restricted to the idealized case of box regions with periodic boundary conditions imposed on each face. But under the above smoothness assumptions the fact that Au = 0 on the boundary now allows us in the no-slip case to rigorously define adding hyperviscosity to the Navier-Stokes system on otherwise general bounded regions. We can also obtain a foundational qualitative theory for this system as well as for spectral hyperviscosity, which adds hyperviscosity only to the high frequencies past a cutoff wavenumber.

  15. 3D Lithospheric Imaging by Time-Domain Full-Waveform Inversion of Teleseismic Body-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Combe, L.; Metivier, L.; Virieux, J.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Paul, A.

    2014-12-01

    With the deployment of dense seismic arrays and the continuous growth of computing facilities, full-waveform inversion (FWI) of teleseismic data has become a method of choice for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. FWI can be recast as a local optimization problem that seeks to estimate Earth's elastic properties by iteratively minimizing the misfit function between observed and modeled seismograms.In passive teleseismic configurations, the seismic source no longer corresponds to a point source embedded in the targeted medium but rather corresponds to a wavefront incoming from the outside of the model. We develop a 3-dimensional time-domain full-waveform inversion program that is more designed for this configuration. The gradient of the misfit function is efficiently computed with the adjoint-state method. A velocity-stress finite-difference time-domain modeling engine, which is interfaced with the so-called total-field/scattered-field method, is used to propagate in the targeted medium the incident wavefield inferred from a global Earth simulation (AxiSEM). Such interfacing is required to account for the multiple arrivals in the incoming wavefield and the sphericity of the Earth. Despite the limited number of nearly plane-wave sources, the interaction of the incident wavefield with the topography (P-Sv conversions and P-P reflections acting as secondary sources) provides a suitable framework to record both transmitted wavefields and reflected wavefields from lithospheric reflectors. These recordings of both transmitted and reflected waves makes FWI amenable to a broadband-wavenumber (i.e., high resolution) reconstruction of the lithosphere.Feasibility of the method is assessed with a realistic synthetic model representative of the Western Alps. One key issue is the estimation of the temporal source excitation, as there might be some trade-off between the source estimation and the subsurface update. To avoid being trapped in a local minimum, we follow a

  16. In vivo volumetric imaging of the human corneo-scleral limbus with spectral domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Bizheva, Kostadinka; Hutchings, Natalie; Sorbara, Luigina; Moayed, Alireza A.; Simpson, Trefford

    2011-01-01

    The limbus is the structurally rich transitional region of tissue between the cornea on one side, and the sclera and conjunctiva on the other. This zone, among other things, contains nerves passing to the cornea, blood and lymph vasculature for oxygen and nutrient delivery and for waste, CO2 removal and drainage of the aqueous humour. In addition, the limbus contains stem cells responsible for the existence and healing of the corneal epithelium. Here we present 3D images of the healthy human limbus, acquired in vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system operating at 1060nm. Cross-sectional and volumetric images were acquired from temporal and nasal locations in the human limbus with ~3µm x 18µm (axial x lateral) resolution in biological tissue at the rate of 92,000 A-scans/s. The imaging enabled detailed mapping of the corneo-scleral tissue morphology, and visualization of structural details such as the Vogt palisades, the blood and lymph vasculature including the Schlemm’s canal and the trabecular meshwork, as well as corneal nerve fiber bundles. Non-invasive, volumetric, high resolution imaging reveals fine details of the normal human limbal structure, and promises to provide invaluable information about its changes in health and disease as well as during and after corneal surgery. PMID:21750758

  17. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for ex vivo brain tumor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Marcel; Krug, Robin; Jaedicke, Volker; Stroop, Ralf; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2015-07-01

    Non-contact imaging methods to distinguish between healthy tissue and brain tumor tissue during surgery would be highly desirable but are not yet available. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technology with a resolution around 1-15 μm and a penetration depth of 1-2 mm that may satisfy the demands. To analyze its potential, we measured ex vivo human brain tumor tissue samples from 10 patients with a Spectral Domain OCT system (Thorlabs Callisto: center wavelength of 930 nm) and compared the results with standard histology. In detail, three different measurements were made for each sample. First the sample was measured directly after surgery. Then it was embedded in paraffin (also H and E staining) and examined for the second time. At last, the slices of each paraffin block cut by the pathology were measured. Each time a B-scan was created and for a better comparison with the histology a 3D image was generated, in order to get the corresponding en face images. In both, histopathological diagnosis and the analysis of the OCT images, different types of brain tumor showed difference in structure. This has been affirmed by two blinded investigators. Nevertheless the difference between two images of samples taken directly after surgery is less distinct. To enhance the contrast in the images further, we employ Spectroscopic OCT and pattern recognition algorithms and compare these results to the histopathological standard.

  18. Automated segmentation of intraretinal layers from spectral-domain macular OCT: reproducibility of layer thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-03-01

    Changes in intraretinal layer thickness occur in a variety of diseases such as glaucoma, macular edema and diabetes. To segment the intraretinal layers from macular spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) scans, we previously introduced an automated multiscale 3-D graph search method and validated its performance by computing unsigned border positioning differences when compared with human expert tracings. However, it is also important to study the reproducibility of resulting layer thickness measurements, as layer thickness is a commonly used clinical parameter. In this work, twenty eight (14 x 2) repeated macular OCT volumes were acquired from the right eyes of 14 normal subjects using two Zeiss-Cirrus SD-OCT scanners. After segmentation of 10 intraretinal layers and rigid registration of layer thickness maps from the repeated OCT scans, the thickness difference of each layer was calculated. The overall mean global and regional thickness differences of 10 intraretinal layers were 0.46 +/- 0.25 μm (1.70 +/- 0.72 %) and 1.16 +/- 0.84 μm (4.03 +/- 2.05 %), respectively. No specific local region showed a consistent thickness difference across the layers.

  19. Design, implementation, and characterization of spectrometer-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palawong, Kunakorn; Pongchalee, Pornthep; Chuamchaitrakool, Porntip; Tachatraiphop, Sukanya; Widjaja, Joewono; Meemon, Panomsak

    2014-06-01

    We report the implementation of a high speed and high resolution spectrometer-based spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system. A high speed near-infrared spectrometer was designed and built, utilizing a high speed line-array CMOS detector and all off-the-shelf optical components. The acquisition speed of more than 100,000 spectra per second was achieved, enabling a high speed 3D imaging of the implemented SD-OCT system. Here, we report the performance characterization, i.e. resolution, imaging depth, and sensitivity of the implemented system. The penetration depth and depth resolution of the system are currently 2 mm and 14.1 μm, respectively. The lateral resolution of the system was quantified by the Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement to be about 15.5 μm. over the lateral field-of-view (x-y axes) of 30 mm × 30 mm. The acquisition speed of the system was 20 frames per second.

  20. Domain decomposition preconditioners for the spectral collocation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quarteroni, Alfio; Sacchilandriani, Giovanni

    1988-01-01

    Several block iteration preconditioners are proposed and analyzed for the solution of elliptic problems by spectral collocation methods in a region partitioned into several rectangles. It is shown that convergence is achieved with a rate which does not depend on the polynomial degree of the spectral solution. The iterative methods here presented can be effectively implemented on multiprocessor systems due to their high degree of parallelism.

  1. Detection and Alignment of 3D Domain Swapping Proteins Using Angle-Distance Image-Based Secondary Structural Matching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS), a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had “opened” their “closed” structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D) image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs), specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD) computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its hinge

  2. Spectral multi-domain for large-scale fluid dynamic simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Macaraeg, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    A number of successful applications of a spectral collocation method extended by a multi-domain patching technique are shown. The multi-domain technique can be used to improve resolution for problems with widely disparate scales, and to reduce the ill-conditioning of the spectral operators for problems in which a large number of points are required for distributed resolution. A new nonreflecting outflow boundary treatment for unsteady transition-to-turbulence simulations is also presented, which relies on the multi-domain technique. The role of multi-domain in improving the efficiency of such calculations is discussed.

  3. Switchable field-tuned control of magnetic domain wall pinning along Co microwires by 3D e-beam lithographed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Roldán, C.; Quirós, C.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G.; Vélez, M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional magnetic circuits composed of Co microwires crossed by elevated Co bridges have been patterned on Si substrate by e-beam lithography and lift-off process. The lithographic procedure includes a double resist procedure that optimizes the shape of the bridge, so that 200 nm air gaps can be routinely achieved in between the wire and bridge elements. Microwire magnetization reversal processes have been analyzed by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy with different remanent bridge configurations. When the Co bridge is magnetized along the in-plane direction parallel to the wire axis, its stray field induces a marked pinning effect on domain wall propagation along the wire below it, even without being in contact. Changing the sign of the remanent state of the bridge, domain wall pinning can be selected to occur in either the ascending or descending branches of the wire hysteresis loop. Thus, these wire-bridge 3D circuits provide a simple system for tunable domain wall pinning controllable through the pre-recorded bridge remanent state.

  4. Retinal Structure of Birds of Prey Revealed by Ultra-High Resolution Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Marco; Major, James C.; McKeown, Craig; Knighton, Robert W.; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To reveal three-dimensional (3-D) information about the retinal structures of birds of prey in vivo. Methods. An ultra-high resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system was built for in vivo imaging of retinas of birds of prey. The calibrated imaging depth and axial resolution of the system were 3.1 mm and 2.8 μm (in tissue), respectively. 3-D segmentation was performed for calculation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) map. Results. High-resolution OCT images were obtained of the retinas of four species of birds of prey: two diurnal hawks (Buteo platypterus and Buteo brachyurus) and two nocturnal owls (Bubo virginianus and Strix varia). These images showed the detailed retinal anatomy, including the retinal layers and the structure of the deep and shallow foveae. The calculated thickness map showed the RNFL distribution. Traumatic injury to one bird's retina was also successfully imaged. Conclusions. Ultra-high resolution SD-OCT provides unprecedented high-quality 2-D and 3-D in vivo visualization of the retinal structures of birds of prey. SD-OCT is a powerful imaging tool for vision research in birds of prey. PMID:20554605

  5. Volumetric in vivo imaging of intracochlear microstructures in mice by high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Davila, Viviana; Sun, Hai; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2010-05-01

    There is considerable interest in developing new methods for in vivo imaging of the complex anatomy of the mammalian cochlea for clinical as well as fundamental studies. In this study, we explored, the feasibility of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for 3-D in vivo imaging of the cochlea in mice. The SD-OCT system employed in this study used a broadband light source centered at 1300 nm, and the imaging speed of the system was 47,000 A-scans per second using the InGaAs camera. The system was capable of providing fully processed, high-resolution B-scan images [512 (axial)×128 (lateral) pixels] at 280 frames per sec. The 3-D imaging acquisition time for a whole cochlea was ~0.45 sec. The traditional SD-OCT structural imaging algorithm was used to reconstruct 3-D cochlear morphology. We demonstrated that SD-OCT can be successfully used for in vivo imaging of important morphological features within the mouse cochlea, such as the otic capsule and structures within, including Reissner's membrane, the basilar membrane, tectorial membrane, organ of Corti, and modiolus of the apical and middle turns.

  6. Efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks in the frequency domain for application to high-resolution 2D and 3D images.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Tom; Tam, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Deep learning has traditionally been computationally expensive, and advances in training methods have been the prerequisite for improving its efficiency in order to expand its application to a variety of image classification problems. In this letter, we address the problem of efficient training of convolutional deep belief networks by learning the weights in the frequency domain, which eliminates the time-consuming calculation of convolutions. An essential consideration in the design of the algorithm is to minimize the number of transformations to and from frequency space. We have evaluated the running time improvements using two standard benchmark data sets, showing a speed-up of up to 8 times on 2D images and up to 200 times on 3D volumes. Our training algorithm makes training of convolutional deep belief networks on 3D medical images with a resolution of up to 128×128×128 voxels practical, which opens new directions for using deep learning for medical image analysis. PMID:25380341

  7. Phenylalanine-508 mediates a cytoplasmic-membrane domain contact in the CFTR 3D structure crucial to assembly and channel function.

    PubMed

    Serohijos, Adrian W R; Hegedus, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; He, Lihua; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2008-03-01

    Deletion of phenylalanine-508 (Phe-508) from the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, disrupts both its folding and function and causes most cystic fibrosis. Most mutant nascent chains do not pass quality control in the ER, and those that do remain thermally unstable, only partially functional, and are rapidly endocytosed and degraded. Although the lack of the Phe-508 peptide backbone diminishes the NBD1 folding yield, the absence of the aromatic side chain is primarily responsible for defective CFTR assembly and channel gating. However, the site of interdomain contact by the side chain is unknown as is the high-resolution 3D structure of the complete protein. Here we present a 3D structure of CFTR, constructed by molecular modeling and supported biochemically, in which Phe-508 mediates a tertiary interaction between the surface of NBD1 and a cytoplasmic loop (CL4) in the C-terminal membrane-spanning domain (MSD2). This crucial cytoplasmic membrane interface, which is dynamically involved in regulation of channel gating, explains the known sensitivity of CFTR assembly to many disease-associated mutations in CL4 as well as NBD1 and provides a sharply focused target for small molecules to treat CF. In addition to identifying a key intramolecular site to be repaired therapeutically, our findings advance understanding of CFTR structure and function and provide a platform for focused biochemical studies of other features of this unique ABC ion channel. PMID:18305154

  8. Phenylalanine-508 mediates a cytoplasmic–membrane domain contact in the CFTR 3D structure crucial to assembly and channel function

    PubMed Central

    Serohijos, Adrian W. R.; Hegedűs, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; He, Lihua; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Riordan, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Deletion of phenylalanine-508 (Phe-508) from the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, disrupts both its folding and function and causes most cystic fibrosis. Most mutant nascent chains do not pass quality control in the ER, and those that do remain thermally unstable, only partially functional, and are rapidly endocytosed and degraded. Although the lack of the Phe-508 peptide backbone diminishes the NBD1 folding yield, the absence of the aromatic side chain is primarily responsible for defective CFTR assembly and channel gating. However, the site of interdomain contact by the side chain is unknown as is the high-resolution 3D structure of the complete protein. Here we present a 3D structure of CFTR, constructed by molecular modeling and supported biochemically, in which Phe-508 mediates a tertiary interaction between the surface of NBD1 and a cytoplasmic loop (CL4) in the C-terminal membrane-spanning domain (MSD2). This crucial cytoplasmic membrane interface, which is dynamically involved in regulation of channel gating, explains the known sensitivity of CFTR assembly to many disease-associated mutations in CL4 as well as NBD1 and provides a sharply focused target for small molecules to treat CF. In addition to identifying a key intramolecular site to be repaired therapeutically, our findings advance understanding of CFTR structure and function and provide a platform for focused biochemical studies of other features of this unique ABC ion channel. PMID:18305154

  9. Onset of Time-Dependent 3-D spherical Mantle Convection using a Radial Basis Function-Pseudospectral Method ; Spectral-Finite Volume ; Spectral Higher-Order Finite- Difference Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, G.; Flyer, N.; Yuen, D. A.; Monnereau, M.; Zhang, S.; Wang, S. M.

    2009-05-01

    Many numerical methods, such as finite-differences, finite-volume, their yin-yang variants, finite-elements and spectral methods have been employed to study 3-D mantle convection. All have their own strengths, but also serious weaknesses. Spectrally accurate methods do not practically allow for node refinement and often involve cumbersome algebra while finite difference, volume, or element methods are generally low-order, adding excessive numerical diffusion to the model. For the 3-D mantle convection problem, we have introduced a new mesh-free approach, using radial basis functions (RBF). This method has the advantage of being algorithmic simple, spectrally accurate for arbitrary node layouts in multi-dimensions and naturally allows for node-refinement. One virtue of the RBF scheme allows the user to use a simple Cartesian geometry, while implementing the required boundary conditions for the temperature, velocities and stress components on a spherical surface at both the planetary surface and the core-mantle boundary. We have studied time- dependent mantle convection, using both a RBF-pseudospectral code and a code which uses spherical- harmonics in the angular direction and second-order finite volume in the radial direction. We have employed a third code , which uses spherical harmonics and higher-order finite-difference method a la Fornberg in the radial coordinate.We first focus on the onset of time-dependence at Rayleigh number Ra of 70,000. We follow the development of stronger time-dependence to a Ra of one million, using high enough resolution with 120 to 200 points in the radial direction and 128 to 256 spherical harmonics.

  10. 3D Time-domain wave modeling in fluid-solid coupled media: a cell-based finite-difference method approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Min, D.; Lim, S.; Yang, J.; Kwon, B.; Yoo, H.

    2009-12-01

    In a conventional marine seismic data analysis, pressure data have been usually interpreted on the basis of acoustic wave equation. The acoustic wave equation, however, only deals with P-wave propagation, and it cannot correctly describe the wave propagation in acoustic-elastic (fluid-solid) coupled media. Recently, in 4C OBC survey (4-component ocean bottom cable), it is possible to acquire both pressure and 3-component displacements (measured at the sea-bottom). Combining pressure and displacement data allows us to interpret subsurface structures more accurately. In order to accurately simulate wave propagation in fluid-solid coupled media, we need an acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm, which deals with displacements in elastic region and pressure in acoustic region. For waveform inversion and reverse-time migration that require a great number of forward modeling, it is essential to develop an efficient scheme that reduces computing time and computer core memory. In this study, we present a 3D time-domain acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm on the basis of the cell-based finite difference method. The cell-based method has proven to properly describe the free-surface boundary, which indicates that it will also properly describe the fluid-solid interface boundaries. In the acoustic-elastic coupled modeling, we first compose cell-based finite differences individually for the 3D acoustic and elastic media, and then combine the differences using the fluid-solid interface boundary conditions. Considering that the 2D acoustic-elastic coupled modeling algorithm gives numerical solutions comparable to analytic solutions, we expect that the 3D acoustic-elastic coupled modeling will correctly describe wave propagation in the fluid-solid coupled media. We apply our algorithm to 3D horizontal two- and three-layer models. Numerical experiments show that the cell-based coupled modeling algorithm properly describes S- and converted waves as well as P-waves. The

  11. Solution of electromagnetic scattering and radiation problems using a spectral domain approach - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Ko, W. L.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of some recent developments on the use of the spectral-domain approach for deriving high-frequency solutions to electromagnetics scattering and radiation problems. The spectral approach is not only useful for interpreting the well-known Keller formulas based on the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD), it can also be employed for verifying the accuracy of GTD and other asymptotic solutions and systematically improving the results when such improvements are needed. The problem of plane wave diffraction by a finite screen or a strip is presented as an example of the application of the spectral-domain approach.

  12. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo Using Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lo, William C Y; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge because of the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and noninvasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4-10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to 1 month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation and degree of polarization provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared with normal skin with heterogeneous local retardation and low degree of polarization, HTS was characterized by an initially low local retardation, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high degree of polarization. This study demonstrates that polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  13. A 3D, fully Eulerian, VOF-based solver to study the interaction between two fluids and moving rigid bodies using the fictitious domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Raessi, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) and fully Eulerian approach to capturing the interaction between two fluids and moving rigid structures by using the fictitious domain and volume-of-fluid (VOF) methods. The solid bodies can have arbitrarily complex geometry and can pierce the fluid-fluid interface, forming contact lines. The three-phase interfaces are resolved and reconstructed by using a VOF-based methodology. Then, a consistent scheme is employed for transporting mass and momentum, allowing for simulations of three-phase flows of large density ratios. The Eulerian approach significantly simplifies numerical resolution of the kinematics of rigid bodies of complex geometry and with six degrees of freedom. The fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is computed using the fictitious domain method. The methodology was developed in a message passing interface (MPI) parallel framework accelerated with graphics processing units (GPUs). The computationally intensive solution of the pressure Poisson equation is ported to GPUs, while the remaining calculations are performed on CPUs. The performance and accuracy of the methodology are assessed using an array of test cases, focusing individually on the flow solver and the FSI in surface-piercing configurations. Finally, an application of the proposed methodology in simulations of the ocean wave energy converters is presented.

  14. Terahertz Detection Based on Spectral-Domain Interferometry Using Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Akram; Sharma, Gargi; Singh, Kanwarpal; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to improve the performance of terahertz electric field measurements based on spectral-domain interferometry. The interferometer is introduced into the probe beam line to improve the temporal overlap between the two probe pulses. The probe pulse in the sample arm of the interferometer passes through the detection crystal and overlaps with the terahertz pulse, while the probe pulse in the reference arm does not. We measure the phase change between spectral components of these two pulses using spectral-domain interferometry. Using this new technique, we enable an unlimited temporal scanning window without the loss in the signal-to-noise ratio, thus overcoming the major limitation of conventional spectral-domain interferometry techniques for terahertz electric field detection.

  15. Terahertz Detection Based on Spectral-Domain Interferometry Using Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Akram; Sharma, Gargi; Singh, Kanwarpal; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to improve the performance of terahertz electric field measurements based on spectral-domain interferometry. The interferometer is introduced into the probe beam line to improve the temporal overlap between the two probe pulses. The probe pulse in the sample arm of the interferometer passes through the detection crystal and overlaps with the terahertz pulse, while the probe pulse in the reference arm does not. We measure the phase change between spectral components of these two pulses using spectral-domain interferometry. Using this new technique, we enable an unlimited temporal scanning window without the loss in the signal-to-noise ratio, thus overcoming the major limitation of conventional spectral-domain interferometry techniques for terahertz electric field detection.

  16. Calibration and characterization protocol for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography using fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Eom, Tae Joong; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-03-01

    We present a calibration protocol to obtain the alignment factors of a custom-made spectrometer and the nonlinear fitting function between the measured CCD pixel domain and the wavelength domain to apply to the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) using fiber Bragg gratings. We have used five gratings with different center wavelengths covering the broadband source spectral range. All have a narrow spectral bandwidth (0.05 nm) and the same reflectivity (92%) to calibrate and align the custom-made spectrometer. The implemented SD-OCT system following the proposed protocol showed the alignment factors as 44.37 deg incident angle, 53.11 deg diffraction angle, and 70.0-mm focal length. The spectral resolution of 0.187 nm was recalculated from the alignment factors. PMID:21456856

  17. Time-domain calculation of spectral centroid from backscattered ultrasound signals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungsuk; Heo, Seo Weon

    2012-06-01

    Spectral centroid estimation from backscattered ultrasound RF signals is the preliminary step for quantitative ultrasound analysis in many medical applications. The traditional approach of estimating the spectral centroid in the frequency domain takes a long time because discrete Fourier transform (DFT) processing for each RF segment is required. To avoid this, we propose time-domain methods to estimate the spectral centroid in this paper. First, we derive the continuous-time-domain equations for the spectral centroid estimation using Parseval's theorem and Hilbert transform theory. Then, we extend the method to the discrete-time domain to ease the implementation while maintaining the same accuracy as the calculation in the frequency domain. From the result, we observe that it is not practical to apply the discrete-time equations directly, because a high sampling rate is needed to approximate the time derivative in the discrete-time domain. Therefore, we also derive the feasible version of the discrete-time equations using a circular autocorrelation function, which has no constraints on the sampling rate for real RF signals acquired from pulse-echo ultrasound systems. Simulation results using numerical phantoms show that the time-domain calculation is approximately 4.4 times faster on average than the frequency-domain method when the software's built-in functions were used. The average estimation error compared with that of the frequency-domain method using DFT is less than 0.2% for the entire propagation depths. The proposed time-domain approach to estimate the spectral centroid can be easily implemented in real-time ultrasound systems. PMID:22711414

  18. A fluid model simulation of a simplified plasma limiter based on spectral-element time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Cheng; Ding, Dazhi Fan, Zhenhong; Chen, Rushan

    2015-03-15

    A simplified plasma limiter prototype is proposed and the fluid model coupled with Maxwell's equations is established to describe the operating mechanism of plasma limiter. A three-dimensional (3-D) simplified sandwich structure plasma limiter model is analyzed with the spectral-element time-domain (SETD) method. The field breakdown threshold of air and argon at different frequency is predicted and compared with the experimental data and there is a good agreement between them for gas microwave breakdown discharge problems. Numerical results demonstrate that the two-layer plasma limiter (plasma-slab-plasma) has better protective characteristics than a one-layer plasma limiter (slab-plasma-slab) with the same length of gas chamber.

  19. High speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography for retinal imaging at 500,000 A‑lines per second.

    PubMed

    An, Lin; Li, Peng; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang

    2011-10-01

    We present a new development of ultrahigh speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) for human retinal imaging at 850 nm central wavelength by employing two high-speed line scan CMOS cameras, each running at 250 kHz. Through precisely controlling the recording and reading time periods of the two cameras, the SDOCT system realizes an imaging speed at 500,000 A-lines per second, while maintaining both high axial resolution (~8 μm) and acceptable depth ranging (~2.5 mm). With this system, we propose two scanning protocols for human retinal imaging. The first is aimed to achieve isotropic dense sampling and fast scanning speed, enabling a 3D imaging within 0.72 sec for a region covering 4x4 mm(2). In this case, the B-frame rate is 700 Hz and the isotropic dense sampling is 500 A-lines along both the fast and slow axes. This scanning protocol minimizes the motion artifacts, thus making it possible to perform two directional averaging so that the signal to noise ratio of the system is enhanced while the degradation of its resolution is minimized. The second protocol is designed to scan the retina in a large field of view, in which 1200 A-lines are captured along both the fast and slow axes, covering 10 mm(2), to provide overall information about the retinal status. Because of relatively long imaging time (4 seconds for a 3D scan), the motion artifact is inevitable, making it difficult to interpret the 3D data set, particularly in a way of depth-resolved en-face fundus images. To mitigate this difficulty, we propose to use the relatively high reflecting retinal pigmented epithelium layer as the reference to flatten the original 3D data set along both the fast and slow axes. We show that the proposed system delivers superb performance for human retina imaging. PMID:22025983

  20. Profile and Determinants of Retinal Optical Intensity in Normal Eyes with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyu; Yang, Jianling; Shi, Fei; Zheng, Ce; Zhu, Weifang; Xiang, Dehui; Chen, Xinjian; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the profile and determinants of retinal optical intensity in normal subjects using 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). Methods A total of 231 eyes from 231 healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 80 years were included and underwent a 3D OCT scan. Forty-four eyes were randomly chosen to be scanned by two operators for reproducibility analysis. Distribution of optical intensity of each layer and regions specified by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) were investigated by analyzing the OCT raw data with our automatic graph-based algorithm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed between retinal optical intensity and sex, age, height, weight, spherical equivalent (SE), axial length, image quality, disc area and rim/disc area ratio (R/D area ratio). Results For optical intensity measurements, the intraclass correlation coefficient of each layer ranged from 0.815 to 0.941, indicating good reproducibility. Optical intensity was lowest in the central area of retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer and photoreceptor layer, except for the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Optical intensity was positively correlated with image quality in all retinal layers (0.553<β<0.851, p<0.01), and negatively correlated with age in most retinal layers (-0.362<β<-0.179, p<0.01), except for the RPE (β = 0.456, p<0.01), outer nuclear layer and photoreceptor layer (p>0.05). There was no relationship between retinal optical intensity and sex, height, weight, SE, axial length, disc area and R/D area ratio. Conclusions There was a specific pattern of distribution of retinal optical intensity in different regions. The optical intensity was affected by image quality and age. Image quality can be used as a reference for normalization. The effect of age needs to be taken into consideration when using OCT for diagnosis. PMID:26863010

  1. Automatic online spectral calibration of Fourier-domain OCT for robotic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Balicki, Marcin; Taylor, Russell H.; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    We present a new automatic spectral calibration (ASC) method for spectral Domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Our ASC method calibrates the spectral mapping of the spectrometer in SD-OCT, and does not require external calibrating light source or a commercial spectral analyzer. The ASC method simultaneously calibrates the physical pixel spacing of the A-scan in static and dynamic environments. Experimental results show that the proposed ASC method can provide satisfactory calibration for SD-OCT to achieve high axial resolution and high ranging accuracy, without increasing hardware complexity.

  2. Spatial and Spectral Characterization, Mapping, and 3D Reconstructing of Ice-wedge Polygons Using High Resolution LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Painter, S. L.; Gable, C. W.; Bui, Q.; Short, L. S.; Liljedahl, A.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H. M.; Dafflon, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Kumar, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    . Finally, we show that the developed topographic template curves can be used to synthetically generate 3D model domain polygonal discretizations and characterizations and to predict ice wedge degradation levels - all using commonly available high resolution remotely sensed data where high-resolution LiDAR data is unavailable. Classification scheme for high centered and low centered polygons.

  3. Docking and 3D-QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationship) studies of flavones, the potent inhibitors of p-glycoprotein targeting the nucleotide binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kothandan, Gugan; Gadhe, Changdev G; Madhavan, Thirumurthy; Choi, Cheol Hee; Cho, Seung Joo

    2011-09-01

    In order to explore the interactions between flavones and P-gp, in silico methodologies such as docking and 3D-QSAR were performed. CoMFA and CoMSIA analyses were done using ligand based and receptor guided alignment schemes. Validation statistics include leave-one-out cross-validated R(2) (q(2)), internal prediction parameter by progressive scrambling (Q(*2)), external prediction with test set. They show that models derived from this study are quite robust. Ligand based CoMFA (q(2) = 0.747, Q(*2) = 0.639, r(pred)(2)=0.802) and CoMSIA model (q(2) = 0.810, Q(*2) = 0.676, r(pred)(2)=0.785) were developed using atom by atom matching. Receptor guided CoMFA (q(2) = 0.712, Q(*2) = 0.497, r(pred)(2) = 0.841) and for CoMSIA (q(2) = 0.805, Q(*2) = 0.589, r(pred)(2) = 0.937) models were developed by docking of highly active flavone into the proposed NBD (nucleotide binding domain) of P-gp. The 3D-QSAR models generated here predicted that hydrophobic and steric parameters are important for activity toward P-gp. Our studies indicate the important amino acid in NBD crucial for binding in accordance with the previous results. This site forms a hydrophobic site. Since flavonoids have potential without toxicity, we propose to inspect this hydrophobic site including Asn1043 and Asp1049 should be considered for future inhibitor design. PMID:21723648

  4. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  5. GRID2D/3D: A computer program for generating grid systems in complex-shaped two- and three-dimensional spatial domains. Part 2: User's manual and program listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. T.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Nguyen, H. L.; Roelke, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient computer program, called GRID2D/3D, was developed to generate single and composite grid systems within geometrically complex two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3-D) spatial domains that can deform with time. GRID2D/3D generates single grid systems by using algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation in which the distribution of grid points within the spatial domain is controlled by stretching functions. All single grid systems generated by GRID2D/3D can have grid lines that are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order. Also, grid lines can intersect boundaries of the spatial domain orthogonally. GRID2D/3D generates composite grid systems by patching together two or more single grid systems. The patching can be discontinuous or continuous. For continuous composite grid systems, the grid lines are continuous and differentiable everywhere up to the second-order except at interfaces where different single grid systems meet. At interfaces where different single grid systems meet, the grid lines are only differentiable up to the first-order. For 2-D spatial domains, the boundary curves are described by using either cubic or tension spline interpolation. For 3-D spatial domains, the boundary surfaces are described by using either linear Coon's interpolation, bi-hyperbolic spline interpolation, or a new technique referred to as 3-D bi-directional Hermite interpolation. Since grid systems generated by algebraic methods can have grid lines that overlap one another, GRID2D/3D contains a graphics package for evaluating the grid systems generated. With the graphics package, the user can generate grid systems in an interactive manner with the grid generation part of GRID2D/3D. GRID2D/3D is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be run on any IBM PC, XT, or AT compatible computer. In order to use GRID2D/3D on workstations or mainframe computers, some minor modifications must be made in the graphics part of the program; no

  6. Modular 3-D Transport model

    EPA Science Inventory

    MT3D was first developed by Chunmiao Zheng in 1990 at S.S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. with partial support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Starting in 1990, MT3D was released as a pubic domain code from the USEPA. Commercial versions with enhanced capab...

  7. Spatially-dense, multi-spectral, frequency-domain diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Han Yong

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) employs near-infrared light to image the concentration of chromophores and cell organelles in tissue and thereby providing access to functional parameters that can differentiate cancerous from normal tissues. This thesis describes research at the bench and in the clinic that explores and identifies the potential of DOT breast cancer imaging. The bench and clinic instrumentation differ but share important features: they utilize a very large, spatially dense, set of source-detector pairs (10 7) for imaging in the parallel-plate geometry. The bench experiments explored three-dimensional (3D) image resolution and fidelity as a function of numerous parameters and also ascertained the effects of a chest wall phantom. The chest wall is always present but is typically ignored in breast DOT. My experiments clarified chest wall influences and developed schemes to mitigate these effects. Mostly, these schemes involved selective data exclusion, but their efficacy also depended on reconstruction approach. Reconstruction algorithms based on analytic (fast) Fourier inversion and linear algebraic techniques were explored. The clinical experiments centered around a DOT instrument that I designed, constructed, and have begun to test (in-vitro and in-vivo). This instrumentation offers many features new to the field. Specifically, the imager employs spatially-dense, multi-spectral, frequency-domain data; it possesses the world's largest optical source-detector density yet reported, facilitated by highly-parallel CCD-based frequency-domain imaging based on gain-modulation heterodyne detection. The instrument thus measures both phase and amplitude of the diffusive light waves. Other features include both frontal and sagittal breast imaging capabilities, ancillary cameras for measurement of breast boundary profiles, real-time data normalization, and mechanical improvements for patient comfort. The instrument design and construction is my most significant

  8. Longitudinal, 3D Imaging of Collagen Remodeling in Murine Hypertrophic Scars In Vivo using Polarization-sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lo, William C. Y.; Villiger, Martin; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Lian, Christine G.; Austen, William G.; Yarmush, Martin; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS), frequently seen after traumatic injuries and surgery, remain a major clinical challenge due to the limited success of existing therapies. A significant obstacle to understanding HTS etiology is the lack of tools to monitor scar remodeling longitudinally and non-invasively. We present an in vivo, label-free technique using polarization-sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) for the 3D, longitudinal assessment of collagen remodeling in murine HTS. In this study, HTS was induced with a mechanical tension device for 4 to 10 days on incisional wounds and imaged up to one month after device removal; an excisional HTS model was also imaged at 6 months after injury to investigate deeper and more mature scars. We showed that local retardation (LR) and degree of polarization (DOP) provide a robust signature for HTS. Compared to normal skin with heterogeneous LR and low DOP, HTS was characterized by an initially low LR, which increased as collagen fibers remodeled, and a persistently high DOP. This study demonstrates that PS-OFDI offers a powerful tool to gain significant biological insights into HTS remodeling by enabling longitudinal assessment of collagen in vivo, which is critical to elucidating HTS etiology and developing more effective HTS therapies. PMID:26763427

  9. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography for in-vivo three-dimensional retinal imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan; Jiao, Shuliang; Gregori, Giovanni; Jockovich, Maria E.; Hackam, Abigail; Duan, Yuanli; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the application of ultrahigh-resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) for non contact in vivo imaging of the retina of small animals and quantitative retinal information extraction using 3D segmentation of the OCT images. An ultrahigh-resolution SD-OCT system was specifically designed for in vivo retinal imaging of small animal. En face fundus image was constructed from the measured OCT data, which enables precise registration of the OCT images on the fundus. 3D segmentation algorithms were developed for the calculation of retinal thickness map. High quality OCT images of the retina of mice (B6/SJLF2 for normal retina, Rho -/- for photoreceptor degeneration and LH BETAT AG for retinoblastoma) and rats (Wistar for normal retina) were acquired, where all the retinal layers can be clearly recognized. The calculated retinal thickness map makes successful quantitative comparison of the retinal thickness distribution between normal and degenerative mouse retina. The capabilities of the OCT system provide a valuable tool for longitudinal studies of small animal models of ocular diseases.

  10. Absolute velocity measurement using three-beam spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Verma, Y.; Kumar, S.; Gupta, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    We report the development of a three-beam spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography setup that allows single interferometer-based measurement of absolute flow velocity. The setup makes use of galvo-based phase shifting to remove complex conjugate mirror artifact and a beam displacer in the sample arm to avoid cross talk image. The results show that the developed approach allows efficient utilization of the imaging range of the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup for three-beam-based velocity measurement.

  11. Sparse OCT: optimizing compressed sensing in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Kang, Jin U.

    2011-03-01

    We applied compressed sensing (CS) to spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Namely, CS was applied to the spectral data in reconstructing A-mode images. This would eliminate the need for a large amount of spectral data for image reconstruction and processing. We tested the CS method by randomly undersampling k-space SD-OCT signal. OCT images are reconstructed by solving an optimization problem that minimizes the l1 norm to enforce sparsity, subject to data consistency constraints. Variable density random sampling and uniform density random sampling were studied and compared, which shows the former undersampling scheme can achieve accurate signal recovery using less data.

  12. Ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain OCT ophthalmic imaging at 70,000 to 312,500 axial scans per second.

    PubMed

    Potsaid, Benjamin; Gorczynska, Iwona; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Chen, Yueli; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Fujimoto, James G

    2008-09-15

    We demonstrate ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) using an ultrahigh speed CMOS line scan camera at rates of 70,000 - 312,500 axial scans per second. Several design configurations are characterized to illustrate trade-offs between acquisition speed, resolution, imaging range, sensitivity and sensitivity roll-off performance. Ultrahigh resolution OCT with 2.5 - 3.0 micron axial image resolution is demonstrated at approximately 100,000 axial scans per second. A high resolution spectrometer design improves sensitivity roll-off and imaging range performance, trading off imaging speed to 70,000 axial scans per second. Ultrahigh speed imaging at >300,000 axial scans per second with standard image resolution is also demonstrated. Ophthalmic OCT imaging of the normal human retina is investigated. The high acquisition speeds enable dense raster scanning to acquire densely sampled volumetric three dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) data sets of the macula and optic disc with minimal motion artifacts. Imaging with approximately 8 - 9 micron axial resolution at 250,000 axial scans per second, a 512 x 512 x 400 voxel volumetric 3D-OCT data set can be acquired in only approximately 1.3 seconds. Orthogonal registration scans are used to register OCT raster scans and remove residual axial eye motion, resulting in 3D-OCT data sets which preserve retinal topography. Rapid repetitive imaging over small volumes can visualize small retinal features without motion induced distortions and enables volume registration to remove eye motion. Cone photoreceptors in some regions of the retina can be visualized without adaptive optics or active eye tracking. Rapid repetitive imaging of 3D volumes also provides dynamic volumetric information (4D-OCT) which is shown to enhance visualization of retinal capillaries and should enable functional imaging. Improvements in the speed and performance of 3D-OCT volumetric imaging promise to enable earlier diagnosis and

  13. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of subretinal bands associated with chronic retinal detachments

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nikisha; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    We report three patients with subretinal bands associated with retinal detachment in chronic retinal detachments who underwent successful retinal reattachment. Subretinal bands before and after surgery can be identified on clinical examination and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Removal of subretinal bands is not mandatory to achieve retinal reattachment. PMID:27099457

  14. Bone Remodeling in Choroidal Osteoma Monitored by Fundus Photography and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamalden, Tengku Ain; Lingam, Gopal; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-01-01

    Choroidal osteoma is a benign ossifying tumor of the choroid, consisting of mature bone tissue. It has been described to enlarge and evolve at varying rates over time. Here, we report and quantify the progression of a unilateral choroidal osteoma in a 7-year-old boy by fundus photography, and document tumor remodeling by spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. PMID:27175357

  15. In-vivo full depth of eye imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing; Jiao, Shuliang; Xi, Peng; Ren, Qiushi

    2011-09-01

    It is necessary to apply the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to image the whole eye segment for practically iatrical application, but the imaging depth of SD-OCT is limited by the spectral resolution of the spectrometer. By now, no result about this research has been reported. In our study, a new dual channel dual focus OCT system is adopted to image the whole eye segment. The cornea and the crystalline lens are simultaneously imaged by using full range complex spectral-domain OCT in one channel, the retina is detected by the other. The new system was successfully tested in imaging of the volunteer' eye in vivo. The preliminary results presented in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of this approach.

  16. Numerical stability analysis of the pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain PIC algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2014-02-01

    The pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain (PSATD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm solves the vacuum Maxwell's equations exactly, has no Courant time-step limit (as conventionally defined), and offers substantial flexibility in plasma and particle beam simulations. It is, however, not free of the usual numerical instabilities, including the numerical Cherenkov instability, when applied to relativistic beam simulations. This paper derives and solves the numerical dispersion relation for the PSATD algorithm and compares the results with corresponding behavior of the more conventional pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) and finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms. In general, PSATD offers superior stability properties over a reasonable range of time steps. More importantly, one version of the PSATD algorithm, when combined with digital filtering, is almost completely free of the numerical Cherenkov instability for time steps (scaled to the speed of light) comparable to or smaller than the axial cell size.

  17. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Evans, T. M.

    2013-07-01

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear operator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approximation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage fraction of stochastic histories from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem to test the models for symmetric operators. In general, the derived approximations show good agreement with measured computational results. (authors)

  18. Spectral quantum beating in mixed frequency/time-domain coherent multidimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pakoulev, Andrei V; Rickard, Mark A; Mathew, Nathan A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2007-08-01

    Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy performed in the mixed frequency/time domain exhibits both temporal and spectral quantum beating when two quantum states are simultaneously excited. The excitation of both quantum states can occur because either the spectral width of the states or the excitation pulse exceeds the frequency separation of the quantum states. The quantum beating appears as a line that broadens and splits into two peaks and then recombines as the time delay between excitation pulses increases. The splitting depends on the spectral width of the excitation pulses. We observe the spectral quantum beating between the two nearly degenerate asymmetric carbonyl stretch modes in a nickel tricarbonyl chelate using the nonrephasing, ground state bleaching coherence pathway in triply vibrationally enhanced four-wave mixing as the time delay between the first two excitation pulses changes. PMID:17628051

  19. Technological aspects of frequency domain data storage using persistent spectral hole burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, F. M.; Lenth, W.; Bjorklund, G. C.

    1986-09-01

    Persistent spectral hole burning permits use of optical frequency for encoding digital information at cryogenic temperatures, with storage densities far beyond the limits of conventional laser-disk recording. In the work presented here, several key technological issues of such a storage system have been investigated. Data were encoded with high spatial and spectral resolution using a specially designed cryostat. The fast tuning characteristics of semiconductor diode lasers were studied to test the feasibility of fast data access in the frequency domain. Fast readout was investigated in a simulation experiment using heterodyne detection with frequency modulated diode lasers.

  20. Privacy protection in surveillance systems based on JPEG DCT baseline compression and spectral domain watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, Thomas; Velten, Jörg; Kummert, Anton

    2015-03-01

    An novel system for automatic privacy protection in digital media based on spectral domain watermarking and JPEG compression is described in the present paper. In a first step private areas are detected. Therefore a detection method is presented. The implemented method uses Haar cascades to detects faces. Integral images are used to speed up calculations and the detection. Multiple detections of one face are combined. Succeeding steps comprise embedding the data into the image as part of JPEG compression using spectral domain methods and protecting the area of privacy. The embedding process is integrated into and adapted to JPEG compression. A Spread Spectrum Watermarking method is used to embed the size and position of the private areas into the cover image. Different methods for embedding regarding their robustness are compared. Moreover the performance of the method concerning tampered images is presented.

  1. Time domain spectral phase encoding/DPSK data modulation using single phase modulator for OCDMA application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Gao, Zhensen; Kataoka, Nobuyuki; Wada, Naoya

    2010-05-10

    A novel scheme using single phase modulator for simultaneous time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) signal generation and DPSK data modulation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Array- Waveguide-Grating and Variable-Bandwidth-Spectrum-Shaper based devices can be used for decoding the signal directly in spectral domain. The effects of fiber dispersion, light pulse width and timing error on the coding performance have been investigated by simulation and verified in experiment. In the experiment, SPE signal with 8-chip, 20GHz/chip optical code patterns has been generated and modulated with 2.5 Gbps DPSK data using single modulator. Transmission of the 2.5 Gbps data over 34km fiber with BER<10(-9) has been demonstrated successfully. The proposed scheme has simple configuration and improved flexibility that can significantly improve the data confidentiality for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) and secure optical communication applications. PMID:20588838

  2. Source-domain spectral EEG analysis of sports-related concussion via Measure Projection Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Ozgur; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Makeig, Scott; Garudadri, Harinath

    2015-01-01

    Here, we investigated EEG-based source-level spectral differences between adolescents with sports-related concussions and healthy age matched controls. We transformed resting state EEG collected in both groups to the source domain using Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and computed the component process power spectra. For group-level analysis in the source domain, we used a probabilistic framework, Measure Projection Analysis (MPA), that has advantages over parametric k-means clustering of brain sources. MPA revealed that some frontal brain sources in the concussed group had significantly more power in the beta band (p<;0.005) and significantly less delta (p<;0.01) and theta band power (p<;0.05) than the healthy control group. These results suggest that a shift in spectral profile toward higher frequencies in some frontal brain regions might distinguish individuals with concussion from healthy controls. PMID:26737184

  3. Analysis of multimode fiber bundles for endoscopic spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Risi, Matthew D.; Makhlouf, Houssine; Rouse, Andrew R.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the use of a fiber bundle in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems is presented. The fiber bundle enables a flexible endoscopic design and provides fast, parallelized acquisition of the OCT data. However, the multimode characteristic of the fibers in the fiber bundle affects the depth sensitivity of the imaging system. A description of light interference in a multimode fiber is presented along with numerical simulations and experimental studies to illustrate the theoretical analysis. PMID:25967012

  4. Improving image quality in intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (I-SD-OCT), devised recently as a classical analog of quantum OCT, enables axially scanless cross-sectional imaging with an immunity to group-velocity dispersion and a factor-of-\\sqrt{2} resolution improvement. However, unwanted artifacts inevitably emerge in the resultant image. In this paper, it is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that such artifacts can be reduced without any difficulty by means of either a mechanical displacement of the detector for capturing spectral intensity patterns or a numerical displacement of the spectral intensity patterns stored in a computer. Furthermore, it is proved that the I-SD-OCT signal can be extracted from the conventional SD-OCT setup under a certain condition. These two features serve to improve the image quality in I-SD-OCT.

  5. Likelihood Ratios for Glaucoma Diagnosis Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lisboa, Renato; Mansouri, Kaweh; Zangwill, Linda M.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To present a methodology for calculating likelihood ratios for glaucoma diagnosis for continuous retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements from spectral domain optical coherence tomography (spectral-domain OCT). Design Observational cohort study. Methods 262 eyes of 187 patients with glaucoma and 190 eyes of 100 control subjects were included in the study. Subjects were recruited from the Diagnostic Innovations Glaucoma Study. Eyes with preperimetric and perimetric glaucomatous damage were included in the glaucoma group. The control group was composed of healthy eyes with normal visual fields from subjects recruited from the general population. All eyes underwent RNFL imaging with Spectralis spectral-domain OCT. Likelihood ratios for glaucoma diagnosis were estimated for specific global RNFL thickness measurements using a methodology based on estimating the tangents to the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results Likelihood ratios could be determined for continuous values of average RNFL thickness. Average RNFL thickness values lower than 86μm were associated with positive LRs, i.e., LRs greater than 1; whereas RNFL thickness values higher than 86μm were associated with negative LRs, i.e., LRs smaller than 1. A modified Fagan nomogram was provided to assist calculation of post-test probability of disease from the calculated likelihood ratios and pretest probability of disease. Conclusion The methodology allowed calculation of likelihood ratios for specific RNFL thickness values. By avoiding arbitrary categorization of test results, it potentially allows for an improved integration of test results into diagnostic clinical decision-making. PMID:23972303

  6. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.

  7. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  8. Spectral properties and chiral symmetry violations of (staggered) domain wall fermions in the Schwinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelbling, Christian; Zielinski, Christian

    2016-07-01

    We follow up on a suggestion by Adams and construct explicit domain wall fermion operators with staggered kernels. We compare different domain wall formulations, namely the standard construction as well as Boriçi's modified and Chiu's optimal construction, utilizing both Wilson and staggered kernels. In the process, we generalize the staggered kernels to arbitrary even dimensions and introduce both truncated and optimal staggered domain wall fermions. Some numerical investigations are carried out in the (1 +1 )-dimensional setting of the Schwinger model, where we explore spectral properties of the bulk, effective and overlap Dirac operators in the free-field case, on quenched thermalized gauge configurations and on smooth topological configurations. We compare different formulations using the effective mass, deviations from normality and violations of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation as measures of chirality.

  9. Spectral phase encoding of ultra-short optical pulse in time domain for OCDMA application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Wada, Naoya

    2007-06-11

    We propose a novel reconfigurable time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) scheme for coherent optical code-division-multiple-access application. In the proposed scheme, the ultra-short optical pulse is stretched by dispersive device and the SPE is done in time domain using high speed phase modulator. The time domain SPE scheme is robust to wavelength drift of the light source and is very flexible and compatible with the fiber optical system. Proof-of-principle experiments of encoding with 16-chip, 20 GHz/chip binary-phase-shift-keying codes and 1.25 Gbps data transmission have been successfully demonstrated together with an arrayed-wave-guide decoder. PMID:19547055

  10. Ultrahigh-speed imaging of the rat retina using ultrahigh-resolution spectral/Fourier domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Potsaid, Benjamin; Chen, Yueli; Gorczynska, Iwona; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-02-01

    We performed OCT imaging of the rat retina at 70,000 axial scans per second with ~3 μm axial resolution. Three-dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) data sets of the rat retina were acquired. The high speed and high density data sets enable improved en face visualization by reducing eye motion artifacts and improve Doppler OCT measurements. Minimal motion artifacts were visible and the OCT fundus images offer more precise registration of individual OCT images to retinal fundus features. Projection OCT fundus images show features such as the nerve fiber layer, retinal capillary networks and choroidal vasculature. Doppler OCT images and quantitative measurements show pulsatility in retinal blood vessels. Doppler OCT provides noninvasive in vivo quantitative measurements of retinal blood flow properties and may benefit studies of diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. Ultrahigh speed imaging using ultrahigh resolution spectral / Fourier domain OCT promises to enable novel protocols for measuring small animal retinal structure and retinal blood flow. This non-invasive imaging technology is a promising tool for monitoring disease progression in rat and mouse models to assess ocular disease pathogenesis and response to treatment.

  11. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  12. Numerical and Experimental Aspects of Data Acquisition and Processing in Application to Temperature Resolved 3-D Sub-Millimeter Spectroscopy for Astrophysics and Spectral Assignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Ivan R.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    Experimental determination of the lower state energy for every transition in molecular spectra, made possible by temperature resolved 3-D spectroscopy, opens new frontiers in our ability to predict molecular spectra over a wide range of temperatures and to assign rotational spectra in many vibrational states. Our improved collisional cooling cell design extends temperature coverage of this technique to 77 K. This enhances our ability to simulate molecular spectra at temperatures of astronomical relevance. We are reporting on experimental and numerical aspects of dealing with exceptionally high information content of these spectra. New data reduction algorithms allow us to process this data in timely fashion in an attempt to make them available to astronomical community.

  13. On the spectral accuracy of a fictitious domain method for elliptic operators in multi-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Penven, Lionel; Buffat, Marc

    2012-10-01

    This work is a continuation of the authors efforts to develop high-order numerical methods for solving elliptic problems with complex boundaries using a fictitious domain approach. In a previous paper, a new method was proposed, based on the use of smooth forcing functions with identical shapes, mutually disjoint supports inside the fictitious domain and whose amplitudes play the role of Lagrange multipliers in relation to a discrete set of boundary constraints. For one-dimensional elliptic problems, this method shows spectral accuracy but its implementation in two dimensions seems to be limited to a fourth-order algebraic convergence rate. In this paper, a spectrally accurate formulation is presented for multi-dimensional applications. Instead of being specified locally, the forcing function is defined as a convolution of a mollifier (smooth bump function) and a Lagrange multiplier function (the amplitude of the bump). The multiplier function is then approximated by Fourier series. Using a Fourier Galerkin approximation, the spectral accuracy is demonstrated on a two-dimensional Laplacian problem and on a Stokes flow around a periodic array of cylinders. In the latter, the numerical solution achieves the same high-order accuracy as a Stokes eigenfunction expansion and is much more accurate than the solution obtained with a classical third order finite element approximation using the same number of degrees of freedom.

  14. A modified and stable version of a perfectly matched layer technique for the 3-d second order wave equation in time domain with an application to aeroacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Sim, Imbo

    2013-01-01

    We consider the second order wave equation in an unbounded domain and propose an advanced perfectly matched layer (PML) technique for its efficient and reliable simulation. In doing so, we concentrate on the time domain case and use the finite-element (FE) method for the space discretization. Our un-split-PML formulation requires four auxiliary variables within the PML region in three space dimensions. For a reduced version (rPML), we present a long time stability proof based on an energy analysis. The numerical case studies and an application example demonstrate the good performance and long time stability of our formulation for treating open domain problems. PMID:23888085

  15. A modified and stable version of a perfectly matched layer technique for the 3-d second order wave equation in time domain with an application to aeroacoustics.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Sim, Imbo

    2013-02-15

    We consider the second order wave equation in an unbounded domain and propose an advanced perfectly matched layer (PML) technique for its efficient and reliable simulation. In doing so, we concentrate on the time domain case and use the finite-element (FE) method for the space discretization. Our un-split-PML formulation requires four auxiliary variables within the PML region in three space dimensions. For a reduced version (rPML), we present a long time stability proof based on an energy analysis. The numerical case studies and an application example demonstrate the good performance and long time stability of our formulation for treating open domain problems. PMID:23888085

  16. A modified and stable version of a perfectly matched layer technique for the 3-d second order wave equation in time domain with an application to aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenbacher, Barbara; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Sim, Imbo

    2013-02-01

    We consider the second order wave equation in an unbounded domain and propose an advanced perfectly matched layer (PML) technique for its efficient and reliable simulation. In doing so, we concentrate on the time domain case and use the finite-element (FE) method for the space discretization. Our un-split-PML formulation requires four auxiliary variables within the PML region in three space dimensions. For a reduced version (rPML), we present a long time stability proof based on an energy analysis. The numerical case studies and an application example demonstrate the good performance and long time stability of our formulation for treating open domain problems.

  17. Test target for characterizing 3D resolution of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Hao, Bingtao; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Li, Jiao

    2014-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive 3D imaging technology which has been applied or investigated in many diagnostic fields including ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, cardiovasology, endoscopy, brain imaging and so on. Optical resolution is an important characteristic that can describe the quality and utility of an image acquiring system. We employ 3D printing technology to design and fabricate a test target for characterizing 3D resolution of optical coherence tomography. The test target which mimics USAF 1951 test chart was produced with photopolymer. By measuring the 3D test target, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of a spectral domain OCT system was evaluated. For comparison, conventional microscope and surface profiler were employed to characterize the 3D test targets. The results demonstrate that the 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  18. Achromatic registration of quadrature components of the optical spectrum in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyagin, P A; Gelikonov, G V; Gelikonov, V M; Moiseev, A A; Terpelov, D A

    2014-07-31

    We have thoroughly investigated the method of simultaneous reception of spectral components with the achromatised quadrature phase shift between two portions of a reference wave, designed for the effective suppression of the 'mirror' artefact in the resulting image obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We have developed and experimentally tested a phase-shifting element consisting of a beam divider, which splits the reference optical beam into the two beams, and of delay lines being individual for each beam, which create a mutual phase difference of π/2 in the double pass of the reference beam. The phase shift achromatism over a wide spectral range is achieved by using in the delay lines the individual elements with different dispersion characteristics. The ranges of admissible adjustment parameters of the achromatised delay line are estimated for exact and inexact conformity of the geometric characteristics of its components to those calculated. A possibility of simultaneous recording of the close-to-quadrature spectral components with a single linear photodetector element is experimentally confirmed. The suppression of the artefact mirror peak in the OCT-signal by an additional 9 dB relative to the level of its suppression is experimentally achieved when the air delay line is used. Two-dimensional images of the surface positioned at an angle to the axis of the probe beam are obtained with the correction of the 'mirror' artefact while maintaining the dynamic range of the image. (laser biophotonics)

  19. Mono, bi- and trinuclear metal complexes derived from new benzene-1,4-bis(3-pyridin-2-ylurea) ligand. Spectral, magnetic, thermal and 3D molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-ghamry, Mosad A.; Saleh, Akila A.; Khalil, Saied M. E.; Mohammed, Amira A.

    2013-06-01

    New bis (pyridylurea) ligand, H2L, was synthesized by the reaction of ethylpyridine-2-carbamate (EPC) and p-phenylenediamine. The ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, electronic and mass spectra. Reaction of the prepared ligand with Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Fe3+, VO2+ and UO22+ ions afforded mono, bi- and trinuclear metal complexes. Also, new mixed ligand complexes of the ligand H2L and 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) with Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions were synthesized. The ligand behaves as bi- and tetradentate toward the transition metal ions, coordination via the pyridine sbnd N, the carbonyl sbnd O and/or the amidic sbnd N atoms in a non, mono- and bis-deprotonated form. The complexes were characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, IR, electronic and mass spectra as well as conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The results showed that the metal complexes exhibited different geometrical arrangements such as square planar, tetrahedral, octahedral and square pyramidal arrangements. The Coats-Redfern equation was used to calculate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different thermal decomposition steps of some complexes. 3D molecular modeling of the ligand, H2L and a representative complex were studied.

  20. [Synthesis, crystal structure and spectral properties study of a 3D netlike coordination polymer [Zn(HBIDC) x H2O]n].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Wei; Fan, Rui-Qing; Wang, Ping; Wang, Li-Yuan; Yang, Yu-Lin

    2013-02-01

    The 3D netlike coordination polymer of Zn II with benzimidazole-5,6-dicarboxylic acid (H3BIDC), [Zn(HBIDC) x H2O]n was synthesized by the hydrothermal method through self-assembling. The crystal structure of complex 1 was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis and IR spectra, and we also studied the fluorescence properties of complex 1 in DMSO and in the solid state with UV-Vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime. Complex 1 has blue luminescence in solutions of DMSO with emission band at 481 nm; and has blue luminescence in the solid state at room temperature with a strong emission band at 493 nm, and these all can be attributed to the pi* --> pi transition based on the benzimidazole-5,6-dicarboxy acid. The experimental results indicate that complex 1 displays higher fluorescence quantum efficiency and can be used as a potential blue luminescence material. PMID:23697137

  1. Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2010-10-19

    Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the "solar-background" mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM's zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS's 1 Hz sampling to study the "twilight zone" around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM's 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM's operational data processing.

  2. Three-dimensional Segmentation of Retinal Cysts from Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images by the Use of Three-dimensional Curvelet Based K-SVD.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Mahdad; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri; Rabbani, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Fedra

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional curvelet transform based dictionary learning for automatic segmentation of intraretinal cysts, most relevant prognostic biomarker in neovascular age-related macular degeneration, from 3D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images. In particular, we focus on the Spectralis SD-OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) system, and show the applicability of our algorithm in the segmentation of these features. For this purpose, we use recursive Gaussian filter and approximate the corrupted pixels from its surrounding, then in order to enhance the cystoid dark space regions and future noise suppression we introduce a new scheme in dictionary learning and take curvelet transform of filtered image then denoise and modify each noisy coefficients matrix in each scale with predefined initial 3D sparse dictionary. Dark pixels between retinal pigment epithelium and nerve fiber layer that were extracted with graph theory are considered as cystoid spaces. The average dice coefficient for the segmentation of cystoid regions in whole 3D volume and with-in central 3 mm diameter on the MICCAI 2015 OPTIMA Cyst Segmentation Challenge dataset were found to be 0.65 and 0.77, respectively. PMID:27563573

  3. Three-dimensional Segmentation of Retinal Cysts from Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images by the Use of Three-dimensional Curvelet Based K-SVD

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Mahdad; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri; Rabbani, Hossein; Hajizadeh, Fedra

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional curvelet transform based dictionary learning for automatic segmentation of intraretinal cysts, most relevant prognostic biomarker in neovascular age-related macular degeneration, from 3D spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images. In particular, we focus on the Spectralis SD-OCT (Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) system, and show the applicability of our algorithm in the segmentation of these features. For this purpose, we use recursive Gaussian filter and approximate the corrupted pixels from its surrounding, then in order to enhance the cystoid dark space regions and future noise suppression we introduce a new scheme in dictionary learning and take curvelet transform of filtered image then denoise and modify each noisy coefficients matrix in each scale with predefined initial 3D sparse dictionary. Dark pixels between retinal pigment epithelium and nerve fiber layer that were extracted with graph theory are considered as cystoid spaces. The average dice coefficient for the segmentation of cystoid regions in whole 3D volume and with-in central 3 mm diameter on the MICCAI 2015 OPTIMA Cyst Segmentation Challenge dataset were found to be 0.65 and 0.77, respectively. PMID:27563573

  4. Domain decomposition methods for systems of conservation laws: Spectral collocation approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quarteroni, Alfio

    1989-01-01

    Hyperbolic systems of conversation laws are considered which are discretized in space by spectral collocation methods and advanced in time by finite difference schemes. At any time-level a domain deposition method based on an iteration by subdomain procedure was introduced yielding at each step a sequence of independent subproblems (one for each subdomain) that can be solved simultaneously. The method is set for a general nonlinear problem in several space variables. The convergence analysis, however, is carried out only for a linear one-dimensional system with continuous solutions. A precise form of the error reduction factor at each iteration is derived. Although the method is applied here to the case of spectral collocation approximation only, the idea is fairly general and can be used in a different context as well. For instance, its application to space discretization by finite differences is straight forward.

  5. Design and optimization of a spectrometer for spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Hamid; Carmelo Rosa, Carla

    2014-08-01

    There are several factors such as the chosen optical source, central wavelength, spectral bandwidth, spectrometer optical components and the detector specifications that affect the overall performance of a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging system. Among these factors a good design and implementation of the spectrometer is of paramount importance as it directly affects the system resolution, sensitivity fall-off, maximum imaging depth, SNR and in general the system performance. This study demonstrates the design steps and some considerations during the design of a spectrometer. The imaging performance of this design is assessed. The obtained experimental results prove an improvement of the overall performance of the common path SD-OCT imaging system and agree with the expected outcome from the design stage.

  6. Coherent Combining of Optical Pulses in Spatial, Spectral and Time Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong

    Petawatt-level laser pulses have many potential applications in science and industry, but will require three orders of magnitude increase in pulse repetition rate from existing solid-state laser technology. Fiber lasers can operate at such repetition rates, but are limited in pulse energy. To overcome the gap between current achievable fiber-laser pulse energies (˜mJ) and required pulse energies for high-energy applications (up to 10J), this dissertation work explores four novel techniques: (1) Coherent beam combining in the spatial domain; (2) Coherent spectral combining in spatial and spectral domains; (3) Coherent pulse stacking amplification in the time domain; (4) N-squared coherent combining in spatial and time domains. (1) We demonstrate coherent femtosecond pulse beam combining of up to four chirped-pulse fiber amplifier channels. Theoretical and experimental analysis of combining efficiency dependence on amplitude/phase noise shows the scalability to a large number of channels. (2) We demonstrate coherent femtosecond pulse spectral synthesis by combining three parallel fiber chirped-pulse amplifiers, each amplifying different pulse spectra. This technique simultaneously overcomes individual-amplifier energy/power limitations, and spectral gain narrowing in a single fiber amplifier. (3) We propose and demonstrate a new technique of coherent pulse stacking (CPS) amplification, which uses reflecting resonators to transform a sequence of phase/amplitude modulated optical pulses into a single output pulse. Experimental validation with a single resonator is demonstrated. We show theoretically that the extension to stacking a large number of equal-amplitude pulses can be achieved using multiple reflecting resonators, which enables the extraction of all stored energy in large-core fiber amplifiers. (4) We propose and demonstrate N-squared coherent combining using resonant optical cavities, a novel pulse combining technique based on both spatial combining and

  7. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Documentation of Transsynaptic Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Pasol, Joshua; Lam, Byron L; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-08-01

    Patients with post-geniculate neurologic disease and corresponding visual field loss may have ophthalmologic abnormalities detectable by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), presumably by transsynaptic retrograde retinal degeneration. Here, three such patients (ages 13 years through 75 years) illustrate thinning of the macula and ganglion cell complex corresponding to zones of visual field loss. Thinning of the retinal nerve fiber layer is not notable in these patients. SD-OCT may be a useful technique in diagnosing and following patients with post-geniculate neurologic disease. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:768-772.]. PMID:27548455

  8. Spectral-domain and swept-source OCT imaging of asteroid hyalosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alasil, Tarek; Adhi, Mehreen; Liu, Jonathan J; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S; Baumal, Caroline R

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with diabetes was referred to the retina clinic for diabetic retinopathy. Detailed funduscopic examination of the left eye was limited by prominent asteroid hyalosis. Spectral-domain (SD) and swept-source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) were utilized to examine the vitreous, vitreoretinal interface, and the morphology of the retina. Asteroid hyalosis induced artifacts of the OCT images, which resolved when the appropriate imaging protocols were applied. SS-OCT may show superior diagnostic and preoperative capabilities when compared to SD-OCT in the settings of asteroid hyalosis-induced media opacity. PMID:25230400

  9. Spectral and time domain OCT: a tool for optimal imaging of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkulmowski, Maciej; Gorczynska, Iwona; Szlag, Daniel; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Spectral and Time domain OCT (STdOCT) is a data analysis scheme proposed for sensitive Doppler imaging. In this work we show that it has an additional feature: when compared to those created using complex or amplitude averaging, tomograms prepared using STdOCT have the highest contrast to noise ratio and preserve high signal to noise ratio and image dynamic range. Images of uniformly scattering phantom as well as images of human retina in vivo prepared with three different techniques are shown.

  10. Suppression of image autocorrelation artefacts in spectral domain optical coherence tomography and multiwave digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelikonov, V. M.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Terpelov, D. A.; Shabanov, D. V.; Shilyagin, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method for suppressing image artefacts in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and multiwave digital holography, caused by the influence of coherent noise in the course of successive registration of an autocorrelation component and informative signal is reported. The method allows complete suppression of all types of coherent noises, provided that the sample of values used to record the autocorrelation component satisfies the conditions of Kotelnikov's theorem: in SD OCT — for the transverse structure of the studied medium, in multiwave digital holography — for the envelop function of the radiation source frequency tuning spectrum.

  11. Extended depth of focus adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We present an adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography (AO-SDOCT) with a long focal range by active phase modulation of the pupil. A long focal range is achieved by introducing AO-controlled third-order spherical aberration (SA). The property of SA and its effects on focal range are investigated in detail using the Huygens-Fresnel principle, beam profile measurement and OCT imaging of a phantom. The results indicate that the focal range is extended by applying SA, and the direction of extension can be controlled by the sign of applied SA. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo human retinal imaging by altering the applied SA. PMID:23082278

  12. Suppression of image autocorrelation artefacts in spectral domain optical coherence tomography and multiwave digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Gelikonov, V M; Gelikonov, G V; Terpelov, D A; Shabanov, D V; Shilyagin, P A

    2012-05-31

    An improved method for suppressing image artefacts in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and multiwave digital holography, caused by the influence of coherent noise in the course of successive registration of an autocorrelation component and informative signal is reported. The method allows complete suppression of all types of coherent noises, provided that the sample of values used to record the autocorrelation component satisfies the conditions of Kotelnikov's theorem: in SD OCT - for the transverse structure of the studied medium, in multiwave digital holography - for the envelop function of the radiation source frequency tuning spectrum.

  13. Modifications of intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with dispersion cancellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-interferometric spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) developed recently enables axial-scan-free cross-sectional imaging with group-velocity dispersion cancellation and a factor-of-\\sqrt{2} resolution improvement. This paper is concerned with a simple and practical method of realizing OCT of this kind. Specifically, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that intensity-interferometric SD-OCT can be realized in a simple way by means of a slightly modified conventional SD-OCT setup.

  14. Spectral residual method of saliency detection based on the two-dimensional fractional Fourier transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiangxue; Qi, Lin; Wang, Yaxing

    2015-12-01

    As one of classic methods of frequency domain based saliency detection, Spectral residual (SR) method has shown several advantages. However, it usually produces higher saliency values at object edges instead of generating maps that uniformly cover the whole object, which results from failing to exploit all the spatial frequency content of the original image. The Two-Dimensional Fractional Fourier transform (2D-FRFT) is a generalized form of the traditional Fourier Transform (FT) which can abstract more meaningful information of the image under certain conditions. Based on this property, we propose a new method which detects the salient region based on 2D-FRFT domain. Moreover, we also use Hough transform detection and a band-pass filter to refine the saliency map. We conduct experiments on a common used dataset: MSRA. The proposed method is compared with several other saliency detection methods and shown to achieve superior result.

  15. Image reconstruction from nonuniformly spaced samples in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jun; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2012-01-01

    In spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), data samples are collected nonuniformly in the wavenumber domain, requiring a measurement re-sampling process before a conventional fast Fourier transform can be applied to reconstruct an image. This re-sampling necessitates extra computation and often introduces errors in the data. Instead, we develop an inverse imaging approach to reconstruct an SD-OCT image. We make use of total variation (TV) as a constraint to preserve the image edges, and estimate the two-dimensional cross-section of a sample directly from the SD-OCT measurements rather than processing for each A-line. Experimental results indicate that compared with the conventional method, our technique gives a smaller noise residual. The potential of using the TV constraint to suppress sensitivity falloff in SD-OCT is also demonstrated with experiment data. PMID:22574262

  16. Time domain spectral method and its application on antenna array and PCB trace with periodic roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minshen

    The primary interest of the electromagnetic behavior of a periodic structure is in its near field and far field. However, it is still numerically difficult to analyze either one in the time domain. The primary goal of this dissertation is to develop corresponding time domain technique to analyze two topics. The first one is to evaluate the far field of a realistic, large antenna array using an efficient method. The second one is to evaluate the propagation characteristic of a commercially available printed circuit board (PCB) with intentional roughness. Both of which are hot topics in the antenna and signal integrity (SI) society respectively; however, none of them have ever been solved in the time domain. To efficiently evaluate the far field pattern of a realistically large antenna array, the spectral domain method and the reciprocity theorem are implemented in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique to avoid the simulation of the near field. By taking advantage of the periodic boundary condition (PBC), the proposed method demonstrates its capability to speed up far field evaluation from hours to minutes. Good agreement of the results is provided for various cases: circular antenna array, arbitrary feeding array, and highly directional leaky wave antenna, etc. Periodic structure modeling with finite sized feedings is developed by the array scanning method (ASM) implemented in the FDTD technique. The minimally coupled electric and magnetic co-mingled antenna array is evaluated by the method. Moreover, a commercially available PCB with very small roughness is modeled by the ASM-FDTD and the propagation characteristic is evaluated. Both are evaluated by time domain method for the first time. Efficiency in terms of memory and computing time is shown for this method and parallelization in the future is proposed.

  17. Comment on '3-D frequency-domain seismic wave modelling in heterogeneous, anisotropic media using a Gaussian quadrature grid approach' by Bing Zhou and S. A. Greenhalgh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Basabe, Jonás D.

    2011-08-01

    Zhou & Greenhalgh have recently presented an application of the Gaussian quadrature grid to seismic modelling in which the authors propose a meshing scheme that partitions the domain independently of the discontinuities in the media parameters. This comment aims to clarify the implications that this strategy has on the accuracy.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Mouse Retinal Layers Using Automated Segmentation of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Dysli, Chantal; Enzmann, Volker; Sznitman, Raphael; Zinkernagel, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Quantification of retinal layers using automated segmentation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images allows for longitudinal studies of retinal and neurological disorders in mice. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of automated retinal layer segmentation algorithms with data from manual segmentation in mice using the Spectralis OCT. Methods Spectral domain OCT images from 55 mice from three different mouse strains were analyzed in total. The OCT scans from 22 C57Bl/6, 22 BALBc, and 11 C3A.Cg-Pde6b+Prph2Rd2/J mice were automatically segmented using three commercially available automated retinal segmentation algorithms and compared to manual segmentation. Results Fully automated segmentation performed well in mice and showed coefficients of variation (CV) of below 5% for the total retinal volume. However, all three automated segmentation algorithms yielded much thicker total retinal thickness values compared to manual segmentation data (P < 0.0001) due to segmentation errors in the basement membrane. Conclusions Whereas the automated retinal segmentation algorithms performed well for the inner layers, the retinal pigmentation epithelium (RPE) was delineated within the sclera, leading to consistently thicker measurements of the photoreceptor layer and the total retina. Translational Relevance The introduction of spectral domain OCT allows for accurate imaging of the mouse retina. Exact quantification of retinal layer thicknesses in mice is important to study layers of interest under various pathological conditions. PMID:26336634

  19. Anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of patients with anterior scleritis.

    PubMed

    Levison, Ashleigh L; Lowder, Careen Y; Baynes, Kimberly M; Kaiser, Peter K; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the findings seen on anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients with anterior scleritis and determine the feasibility of using SD-OCT to image and grade the degree of scleral inflammation and monitor response to treatment. All patients underwent slit lamp examination by a uveitis specialist, and the degree of scleral inflammation was recorded. Spectral domain OCT imaging was then performed of the conjunctiva and scleral tissue using a standardized acquisition protocol. The scans were graded and compared to clinical findings. Twenty-eight patients with anterior scleritis and ten patients without ocular disease were included in the study. Seventeen of the scleritis patients were followed longitudinally. Common findings on SD-OCT in patients with active scleritis included changes in hyporeflectivity within the sclera, nodules, and visible vessels within the sclera. There was significant variation in findings on SD-OCT within each clinical grade of active scleritis. These changes on SD-OCT improved with treatment and clinical improvement. SD-OCT imaging provided various objective measures that could be used in the future to grade inflammatory activity in patients with anterior scleritis. Longitudinal imaging of patients with active scleritis demonstrated that SD-OCT may have great utility in monitoring response to treatment. PMID:26597942

  20. Defining the spectral and amplitude domain of music---a window into audio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Myoung W.

    In terms of 'visualizing music', this thesis presents the first critical measurements for the selected musical instruments (piano, violin, cello, flute, piccolo, drums, double bass, electric bass, and electric guitar) seeking to describe their place in the spectral and amplitude domain. All data presented as a part of this research were measured with Z-weighting (un-weighted) from 12.5Hz to 20kHz along the frequency axis, in 1/3 octave bands, evaluated statistically and in equivalent sound level. Measuring musical performances can be a very subjective process. Therefore, this research proceeded under some strategically chosen conditions and limitations. The measurements were made with each musician playing at several different intensities of musical performance. Chosen musical genres were classical, pop and jazz for the selected musical instruments. To obtain data representative of real world conditions, musical instrument measurements were made mostly in professional recording studios by professional players. The results seek to define the spectral and amplitude domain occupied by these instruments when playing typical works.

  1. Hybrid Finite Element-Fast Spectral Domain Multilayer Boundary Integral Modeling of Doubly Periodic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Eibert; J.L. Volakis; Y.E. Erdemli

    2002-03-03

    Hybrid finite element (FE)--boundary integral (BI) analysis of infinite periodic arrays is extended to include planar multilayered Green's functions. In this manner, a portion of the volumetric dielectric region can be modeled via the finite element method whereas uniform multilayered regions can be modeled using a multilayered Green's function. As such, thick uniform substrates can be modeled without loss of efficiency and accuracy. The multilayered Green's function is analytically computed in the spectral domain and the resulting BI matrix-vector products are evaluated via the fast spectral domain algorithm (FSDA). As a result, the computational cost of the matrix-vector products is kept at O(N). Furthermore, the number of Floquet modes in the expansion are kept very few by placing the BI surfaces within the computational unit cell. Examples of frequency selective surface (FSS) arrays are analyzed with this method to demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the approach. One example involves complicated multilayered substrates above and below an inhomogeneous filter element and the other is an optical ring-slot array on a substrate several hundred wavelengths in thickness. Comparisons with measurements are included.

  2. RETINOCHOROIDAL MORPHOLOGY DESCRIBED BY WIDE-FIELD MONTAGE IMAGING OF SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Keisuke; Kanno, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present baseline images of the vitreous, retina, and choroid from the macula to the periphery in normal patients using a novel montaging technique of spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Methods: Twenty-six normal eyes of 22 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Montaged images of four radial optical coherence tomography scans through the fovea were obtained from each subject. Results: In the macula, there were six identifiable retinal layers as well as four bands in the outer retina. In the periphery, the ganglion cell layer was not identifiable. The external limiting membrane, the second band, and the retinal pigment epithelium were continuously delineated from the macula to the periphery. The third band was not visible in the periphery. Conclusion: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography montaged images provide wide-angle images of the vitreous, retina, and choroid, allowing for evaluation of peripheral findings and examination of relationships between peripheral and posterior disease. The maximum scan length achieved here was 36 mm. The scan length is approximately three times than that provided by conventional posterior scanning and is consistent with known dimensions of the eye. This method is achievable with current commercially available devices and may contribute to decision making in clinical practice. PMID:26241154

  3. Optic Disc Vascularization in Glaucoma: Value of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, Pierre-Maxime; Zéboulon, Pierre; Brasnu, Emmanuelle; Baudouin, Christophe; Labbé, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To detect changes in optic nerve head (ONH) vascularization in glaucoma patients using spectral-domain OCT angiography (OCT-A). Material and Method. Fifty glaucoma patients and 30 normal subjects were evaluated with OCT-A (AngioVue®, Optovue). The total ONH vessel density and temporal disc vessel density were measured. Clinical data, visual field (VF) parameters, and spectral-domain OCT evaluation (RNFL: retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, GCC: ganglion cell complex thickness, and rim area) were recorded for glaucoma patients. Correlations among total and temporal ONH vessel density and structural and VF parameters were analyzed. Results. In the glaucoma group, total and temporal ONH vessel density were reduced by 24.7% (0.412 versus 0.547; p < 0.0001) and 22.88% (0.364 versus 0.472; p = 0.001), respectively, as compared with the control group. Univariate analysis showed significant correlation between rim area (mm2) and temporal ONH vessel density (r = 0.623; p < 0.0001) and total ONH vessel density (r = 0.609; p < 0.0001). Significant correlations were found between temporal and total ONH vessel density and RNFL, GCC, VF mean deviation, and visual field index. Conclusion. In glaucoma patients OCT-A might detect reduced ONH blood vessel density that is associated with structural and functional glaucomatous damage. OCT-A might become a useful tool for the evaluation of ONH microcirculation changes in glaucoma. PMID:26998352

  4. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  5. Ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography using supercontinuum light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yiheng; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-01

    An ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was developed using a cost-effective supercontinuum laser. A spectral filter consists of a dispersive prism, a cylindrical lens and a right-angle prism was built to transmit the wavelengths in range 680-940 nm to the OCT system. The SD-OCT has achieved 1.9 μm axial resolution and the sensitivity was estimated to be 91.5 dB. A zero-crossing fringes matching method which maps the wavelengths to the pixel indices of the spectrometer was proposed for the OCT spectral calibration. A double sided foam tape as a static sample and the tip of a middle finger as a biological sample were measured by the OCT. The adhesive and the internal structure of the foam of the tape were successfully visualized in three dimensions. Sweat ducts was clearly observed in the OCT images at very high resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of ultra-high resolution visualization of sweat duct by OCT.

  6. In vitro and in vivo three-dimensional velocity vector measurement by three-beam spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Trasischker, Wolfgang; Werkmeister, René M; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Torzicky, Teresa; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2013-11-01

    We developed a three-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) system that enables measurement of the velocity vector of moving particles in three-dimensions (3-D). The spatial orientation as well as the magnitude of motion can be determined without prior knowledge of the geometry of motion. The system combines three spectral-domain OCT interferometers whose sample beams are focused at the sample by a common focusing lens at three different angles. This provides three spatially independent velocity components simultaneously from which the velocity vector can be reconstructed. We demonstrate the system in a simple test object (rotating disc), a flow phantom, and for blood flow measurements in the retina of a healthy human subject. Measurements of blood flow at a venous bifurcation achieve a good agreement between in- and outflow and demonstrate the reliability of the method. PMID:24247747

  7. Spectral and temporal phase measurement by optical frequency-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robillart, Bruno; Calò, Cosimo; Fall, Abdoulaye; Lamare, François; Gottesman, Yaneck; Benkelfat, Badr-Eddine

    2014-03-01

    The capability of measuring the spectral and temporal phase of an optical signal is of fundamental importance for the advanced characterization of photonic and optoelectronic components, biochemical sensors, structural monitoring sensors and distributed sensor networks. To address this problem, several techniques have been developed (frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER), stepped-heterodyne technique, laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) and Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT)). However, such techniques often lack of versatility for the mentioned applications. Swept-wavelength interferometric techniques and, among these, optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) are flexible and highly sensitive tools for complete characterization of amplitude and phase of target devices. In this work, we investigate the spectral and temporal phase measurement capabilities of OFDR. Precise characterization of spectral phase information is demonstrated by retrieving the phase response of a commercial optical filter, the Finisar Waveshaper 1000 S/X, programmable in attenuation and phase over C+L band (1530- 1625 nm). The presented results show accurate retrieval of group delay dispersion (GDD) and discrete phase shift as well as filter attenuation profile. Although some intrinsic accuracy limitations of OFDR phase measurements may be encountered (and herein specified), we show that information encoded in OFDR reflectogram data is very rich when adequately exploited. In addition to previously published results, we demonstrate the high sensitivity of the technique to Doppler effects. From practical point of view, such sensitivity can be beneficially exploited for the characterisation of dynamical aspects of samples under test. Unlike LDV, OFDR allows the simultaneous retrieval of the temporal position of several localised reflecting target along the beam path. All these aspects make OFDR a highly

  8. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  9. Spectral band difference effects on radiometric cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors in the Landsat solar-reflective spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of radiometric calibration errors due to differences in spectral response functions between satellite sensors when attempting cross-calibration based on near-simultaneous imaging of common ground targets in analogous spectral bands. Five Earth observation sensors on three satellite platforms were included on the basis of their overpass times being within 45 minutes of each other on the same day (Landsat-7 ETM+; EO-1 ALI; Terra MODIS; Terra ASTER; Terra MISR). The simulation study encompassed spectral band difference effects (SBDE) on cross-calibration between all combinations of the sensors considered, using the Landsat solar reflective spectral domain as a framework. Scene content was simulated using ground target spectra for the calibration test sites at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada and Niobrara Grassland, Nebraska. Results were obtained as a function of calibration test site, satellite sensor, and spectral region. Overall, in the absence of corrections for SBDE, the Railroad Valley Playa site is a "good" to "very good" ground target for cross-calibration between most but not all satellite sensors considered in most but not all spectral regions investigated. "Good" and "very good" are defined as SBDEs within +/- 3 % and +/- 1 %, respectively. Without SBDE corrections, the Niobrara test site is only "good" for cross-calibration between certain sensor combinations in some spectral regions. The paper includes recommendations for spectral data and tools that would facilitate cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors.

  10. The Coupled Spectral Element/Normal Mode Method: Application to the Testing of Several Approximations Based on Normal Mode Theory for the Computation of Seismograms in a Realistic 3D Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdeville, Y.; Gung, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2002-12-01

    The spectral element method (SEM) has recently been adapted successfully for global spherical earth wave propagation applications. Its advantage is that it provides a way to compute exact seismograms in a 3D earth, without restrictions on the size or wavelength of lateral heterogeneity at any depth, and can handle diffraction and other interactions with major structural boundaries. Its disadvantage is that it is computationally heavy. In order to partly address this drawback, a coupled SEM/normal mode method was developed (Capdeville et al., 2000). This enables us to more efficiently compute bodywave seismograms to realistically short periods (10s or less). In particular, the coupled SEM/normal mode method is a powerful tool to test the validity of some analytical approximations that are currently used in global waveform tomography, and that are considerably faster computationally. Here, we focus on several approximations based on normal mode perturbation theory: the classical "path-average approximation" (PAVA) introduced by Woodhouse and Dziewonski (1984) and well suited for fundamental mode surface waves (1D sensitivity kernels); the non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT), which introduces coupling between mode branches and 2D kernels in the vertical plane containing the source and the receiver (Li and Tanimoto, 1993; Li and Romanowicz, 1995); an extension of NACT which includes out of plane focusing terms computed asymptotically (e.g. Romanowicz, 1987) and introduces 3D kernels; we also consider first order perturbation theory without asymptotic approximations, such as developed for example by Dahlen et al. (2000). We present the results of comparisons of realistic seismograms for different models of heterogeneity, varying the strength and sharpness of the heterogeneity and its location in depth in the mantle. We discuss the consequences of different levels of approximations on our ability to resolve 3D heterogeneity in the earth's mantle.

  11. Fast retinal layer segmentation of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianqiao; Song, Zhangjun; Wang, Xiaogang; Zheng, Huimin; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-09-01

    An approach to segment macular layer thicknesses from spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been proposed. The main contribution is to decrease computational costs while maintaining high accuracy via exploring Kalman filtering, customized active contour, and curve smoothing. Validation on 21 normal volumes shows that 8 layer boundaries could be segmented within 5.8 s with an average layer boundary error <2.35 μm. It has been compared with state-of-the-art methods for both normal and age-related macular degeneration cases to yield similar or significantly better accuracy and is 37 times faster. The proposed method could be a potential tool to clinically quantify the retinal layer boundaries.

  12. Birefringence imaging of biological tissue by spectral domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhijun; Fan, Chuanmao; Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiang; Ma, Zhenhe; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan; Wang, R. K.

    2007-02-01

    A spectral domain Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (SDPS-OCT) system has been developed to acquire depth images of biological tissues such as porcine tendon, rabbit eye. The Stocks vectors (I, Q, U, and V) of the backscattered light from the biological tissues have been reconstructed. Further, the phase retardation and polarization degree between the two orthogonal polarizing states have been computed. Reconstructed images, i.e. birefringence images, from Stokes parameters, retardation and polarization degree of biological tissues show significant local variations in the polarization state. And the birefringence contrast of biological tissue possibly changes by some outside force. In addition, the local thickness of the birefringence layer determined with our system is significant. The results presented show SDPS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique to investigate tissue structural properties on the basis of the fact that any fibrous structure with biological tissues can influence the polarization state of light.

  13. Speckle noise reduction in high speed polarization sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götzinger, Erich; Pircher, Michael; Baumann, Bernhard; Schmoll, Tilman; Sattmann, Harald; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2011-07-01

    We present a high speed polarization sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system based on polarization maintaining fibers and two high speed CMOS line scan cameras capable of retinal imaging with up to 128 k A-lines/s. This high imaging speed strongly reduces motion artifacts and therefore averaging of several B-scans is possible, which strongly reduces speckle noise and improves image quality. We present several methods for averaging retardation and optic axis orientation, the best one providing a 5 fold noise reduction. Furthermore, a novel scheme of calculating images of degree of polarization uniformity is presented. We quantitatively compare the noise reduction depending on the number of averaged frames and discuss the limits of frame numbers that can usefully be averaged.

  14. Multichannel tunable imager architecture for hyperspectral imaging in relevant spectral domains.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Chhavi; Semeter, Joshua; Noto, John; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Riccobono, Juanita; Migliozzi, Mike; Dahlgren, Hanna; Marshall, Robert; Kapali, Sudha; Hirsch, Michael; Hampton, Donald; Akbari, Hassanali

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we present a technique for dimensionality reduction in hyperspectral imaging during the data collection process. A four-channel hyperspectral imager using liquid crystal Fabry-Perot etalons has been built and used to verify this method for four applications: auroral imaging, plant study, landscape classification, and anomaly detection. This imager is capable of making measurements simultaneously in four wavelength ranges while being tunable within those ranges, and thus can be used to measure narrow contiguous bands in four spectral domains. In this paper, we describe the design, concept of operation, and deployment of this instrument. The results from preliminary testing of this instrument are discussed and are promising and demonstrate this instrument as a good candidate for hyperspectral imaging. PMID:27140081

  15. Achromatopsia: case presentation and literature review emphasising the value of spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao Xi; Rego, Robert E; Shechtman, Diana

    2014-11-01

    A literature review and case presentation are used to discuss the diagnostic value of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in the assessment and management of congenital achromatopsia. A 24-year-old Hispanic man presented to the clinic with a longstanding history of decreased vision and associated possible recent progression. A comprehensive eye examination and a battery of tests including SD-OCT, fundus photography, electroretinogram (ERG) and Farnsworth D-15 were completed. SD-OCT and photopic ERG confirmed the clinical diagnosis of congenital achromatopsia. There was the classic subfoveal flattened hyporeflective 'punched out' zone, resulting from an absence of inner segment/outer segment junction. SD-OCT findings associated with congenital achromatopsia have been documented recently, helping in the diagnosis of the condition. The SD-OCT findings have further expanded our knowledge of congenital achromatopsia, while also aiding in the management of the disease. PMID:24995800

  16. Spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy for label-free multiplexed protein microarray assay

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chulmin; Özkumur, Emre; Ünlü, M. Selim; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of affinities and kinetics of various biomolecular interactions such as protein-protein, protein-DNA and receptor-ligand is central to our understanding of basic molecular and cellular functions and is useful for therapeutic evaluation. Here, we describe a laser-scanning quantitative imaging method, referred to as spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy, as an optical platform for label-free detection of biomolecular interactions. The instrument is based on a confocal interferometric microscope that enables depth-resolved quantitative phase measurements on sensor surface with high spatial resolution and phase stability. We demonstrate picogram per square millimeter surface mass sensitivity, and show its sensing capability by presenting static and dynamic detection of multiplexed protein microarray as immobilized antigens capture their corresponding antibodies. PMID:19674885

  17. Three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography in chronic exposure to welding arc

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sandeep; Mishra, Nibha; Meyer, Carsten H

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography was performed in a 26-year-old man with chronic exposure to welding arc. Advanced macular visualisation provided significant findings of inner segment-ellipsoid zone disruption with the presence of cystoid changes and hyper-reflective material in the area of disruption. The external limiting membrane was intact in both the eyes. C-scan retinal pigment epithelium fit map of the left eye revealed a well-delineated defect whereas the right eye showed a poorly delineated smaller defect. The hyper-reflective material can be hypothesised to originate from the disrupted photoreceptor layer. The hyper-reflective material was more evident in the left eye which could be correlated with more marked diminution of vision and a prominent yellow lesion at the fovea. PMID:24832707

  18. Fast retinal layer segmentation of spectral domain optical coherence tomography images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqiao; Song, Zhangjun; Wang, Xiaogang; Zheng, Huimin; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An approach to segment macular layer thicknesses from spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been proposed. The main contribution is to decrease computational costs while maintaining high accuracy via exploring Kalman filtering, customized active contour, and curve smoothing. Validation on 21 normal volumes shows that 8 layer boundaries could be segmented within 5.8 s with an average layer boundary error <2.35 μm. It has been compared with state-of-the-art methods for both normal and age-related macular degeneration cases to yield similar or significantly better accuracy and is 37 times faster. The proposed method could be a potential tool to clinically quantify the retinal layer boundaries. PMID:26385655

  19. Polarization-based balanced detection for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Black, Adam J; Akkin, Taner

    2015-08-20

    We present a new design for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography that allows balanced detection using a single camera. The design uses polarization optics to encode the light in reference and sample arms. Two parallel and highly aligned spectra, which carry out-of-phase interference signals, in-phase common noise, and auto-interference terms, are focused on the camera, which performs the digital balanced detection for each wavelength. The optical system is characterized and tested for tissue imaging. Results demonstrate consistent signal gains in depth and suppression of DC and sample auto-interference. The design could be further amended for polarization-sensitive imaging and might demonstrate a market for manufacturing dual-line cameras with analog-balanced detection capability. PMID:26368760

  20. An FC-based spectral solver for elastodynamic problems in general three-dimensional domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amlani, Faisal; Bruno, Oscar P.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a spectral numerical algorithm for the solution of elastodynamics problems in general three-dimensional domains. Based on a recently introduced "Fourier continuation" (FC) methodology for accurate Fourier expansion of non-periodic functions, the proposed approach possesses a number of appealing properties: it yields results that are essentially free of dispersion errors, it entails mild CFL constraints, it runs at a cost that scales linearly with the discretization sizes, and it lends itself easily to efficient parallelization in distributed-memory computing clusters. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated in this paper by means of a number of applications to problems of isotropic elastodynamics that arise in the fields of materials science and seismology. These examples suggest that the new approach can yield solutions within a prescribed error tolerance by means of significantly smaller discretizations and shorter computing times than those required by other methods.

  1. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of mild and severe acute solar retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad; Jabbarpoor Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Jabbarpour; Soheilian, Rasam; Soheilian, Masoud; Peyman, Gholam A

    2011-01-01

    Photochemical/thermal retinal damage that results from unprotected solar eclipse viewing has vague presentations and sometimes misleading diagnosis, especially in cases with unclear history. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique useful in differential diagnosis that can reveal characteristic foveal alterations in solar retinopathy to an unprecedented quasi histologic level. The authors present high-resolution SD-OCT findings correlated with clinical findings in three eyes of two cases with acute solar retinopathy. SD-OCT can precisely define the site and extent of damage in acute solar retinopathy. In mild forms, damage may be limited to the outer retina with inner segment/outer segment disruption. In severe forms, full thickness macular damage may be seen. Advances in retinal imaging have improved our ability to provide precise correlation with clinical presentation and prognosis. PMID:21899248

  2. Numerical simulation validation of nonuniform, nonharmonic analysis of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Tetsuya; Inuzuka, Yuya; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Misawa, Tadanobu

    2015-03-01

    In spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), the limited resolution of the spectrometer causes nonuniformity of the interference signal. The latter, in turn, causes the sensitivity of SD-OCT to decrease, thereby limiting the imaging range and decreasing the axial resolution. We addressed this problem by applying nonuniform, nonharmonic analysis (NUNHA) with software that features high-frequency resolution without interpolation. We demonstrate the application of NUNHA in SD-OCT and compare it with conventional frequency analysis methods by simulating nonuniform interference signals. The results suggest that application of NUNHA in SD-OCT can provide acquisition of a clearer tomographic image, accurate analysis of fine and complex structures, and preservation of resolution and sensitivity at regions deep within a sample. This is because it reduces the influence of nonuniformity caused by the spectrometer and is unaffected by distortion due to interpolation.

  3. Depth enhancement in spectral domain optical coherence tomography using bidirectional imaging modality with a single spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Park, Kibeom; Jeon, Mansik; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-07-01

    A method for depth enhancement is presented using a bidirectional imaging modality for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Two precisely aligned sample arms along with two reference arms were utilized in the optical configuration to scan the samples. Using exemplary images of the optical resolution target, Scotch tape, a silicon sheet with two needles, and a leaf, we demonstrated how the developed bidirectional SD-OCT imaging method increases the ability to characterize depth-enhanced images. The results of the developed system were validated by comparing the images with the standard OCT configuration (single-sample arm setup). Given the advantages of higher resolution and the ability to visualize deep morphological structures, this method can be utilized to increase the depth dependent fall-off in samples with limited thickness. Thus, the proposed bidirectional imaging modality is apt for cross-sectional imaging of entire samples, which has the potential capability to improve the diagnostic ability.

  4. Analysis of the signal fall-off in spectral domain optical coherence tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Eggert, M.; Koch, P.; Hüttmann, G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the individual spectrometer components on the depth dependent sensitivity fall-off (roll-off) in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is investigated. We present a method for the characterization of the roll-off in SD-OCT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. The MTF of different image sensors was measured in a newly developed setup, which uses the interference of two coherent light beams. Different contributions, i.e. diffraction, aberrations and sampling effects, to the MTF of a spectrometer of commercially available SD-OCT systems is calculated and is compared with roll-off measurements. The difference was below -2 dB at 90 % of the maximum measurement depth.

  5. Spectral analysis of GEOS-3 altimeter data and frequency domain collocation. [to estimate gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eren, K.

    1980-01-01

    The mathematical background in spectral analysis as applied to geodetic applications is summarized. The resolution (cut-off frequency) of the GEOS 3 altimeter data is examined by determining the shortest wavelength (corresponding to the cut-off frequency) recoverable. The data from some 18 profiles are used. The total power (variance) in the sea surface topography with respect to the reference ellipsoid as well as with respect to the GEM-9 surface is computed. A fast inversion algorithm for matrices of simple and block Toeplitz matrices and its application to least squares collocation is explained. This algorithm yields a considerable gain in computer time and storage in comparison with conventional least squares collocation. Frequency domain least squares collocation techniques are also introduced and applied to estimating gravity anomalies from GEOS 3 altimeter data. These techniques substantially reduce the computer time and requirements in storage associated with the conventional least squares collocation. Numerical examples given demonstrate the efficiency and speed of these techniques.

  6. Ultrahigh-resolution high-speed retinal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cense, Barry; Nassif, Nader; Chen, Teresa; Pierce, Mark; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Park, B; Bouma, Brett; Tearney, Guillermo; de Boer, Johannes

    2004-05-31

    We present the first ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) structural intensity images and movies of the human retina in vivo at 29.3 frames per second with 500 A-lines per frame. Data was acquired at a continuous rate of 29,300 spectra per second with a 98% duty cycle. Two consecutive spectra were coherently summed to improve sensitivity, resulting in an effective rate of 14,600 A-lines per second at an effective integration time of 68 micros. The turn-key source was a combination of two super luminescent diodes with a combined spectral width of more than 150 nm providing 4.5 mW of power. The spectrometer of the spectraldomain OCT (SD-OCT) setup was centered around 885 nm with a bandwidth of 145 nm. The effective bandwidth in the eye was limited to approximately 100 nm due to increased absorption of wavelengths above 920 nm in the vitreous. Comparing the performance of our ultrahighresolution SD-OCT system with a conventional high-resolution time domain OCT system, the A-line rate of the spectral-domain OCT system was 59 times higher at a 5.4 dB lower sensitivity. With use of a software based dispersion compensation scheme, coherence length broadening due to dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arms was minimized. The coherence length measured from a mirror in air was equal to 4.0 microm (n= 1). The coherence length determined from the specular reflection of the foveal umbo in vivo in a healthy human eye was equal to 3.5 microm (n = 1.38). With this new system, two layers at the location of the retinal pigmented epithelium seem to be present, as well as small features in the inner and outer plexiform layers, which are believed to be small blood vessels. ?2004 Optical Society of America. PMID:19475080

  7. Ultrahigh-resolution high-speed retinal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cense, Barry; Nassif, Nader A.; Chen, Teresa C.; Pierce, Mark C.; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Hyle Park, B.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2004-05-01

    We present the first ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) structural intensity images and movies of the human retina in vivo at 29.3 frames per second with 500 A-lines per frame. Data was acquired at a continuous rate of 29,300 spectra per second with a 98% duty cycle. Two consecutive spectra were coherently summed to improve sensitivity, resulting in an effective rate of 14,600 A-lines per second at an effective integration time of 68 μs. The turn-key source was a combination of two super luminescent diodes with a combined spectral width of more than 150 nm providing 4.5 mW of power. The spectrometer of the spectraldomain OCT (SD-OCT) setup was centered around 885 nm with a bandwidth of 145 nm. The effective bandwidth in the eye was limited to approximately 100 nm due to increased absorption of wavelengths above 920 nm in the vitreous. Comparing the performance of our ultrahighresolution SD-OCT system with a conventional high-resolution time domain OCT system, the A-line rate of the spectral-domain OCT system was 59 times higher at a 5.4 dB lower sensitivity. With use of a software based dispersion compensation scheme, coherence length broadening due to dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arms was minimized. The coherence length measured from a mirror in air was equal to 4.0 μm (n= 1). The coherence length determined from the specular reflection of the foveal umbo in vivo in a healthy human eye was equal to 3.5 μm (n = 1.38). With this new system, two layers at the location of the retinal pigmented epithelium seem to be present, as well as small features in the inner and outer plexiform layers, which are believed to be small blood vessels.

  8. Areas of activity in biofilms through the biospeckle and the spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. K.; Braga, R. A.; Pereira, J.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic laser speckle or biospeckle laser has been used to analyze the activity of biological and non-biological material by means of various statistical techniques and image processing. However, a challenge to adopt this technique is the ability to identify, in the same material, an area of low activity immersed in an environment of a higher activity. This work was carried out to evaluate the spectral approach associated to biospeckle laser technique as an alternative to identify distinct activities areas in the same material. Biofilm samples, which present well known protocols to be prepared, and a simpler structure than vegetal and animal tissues, were prepared with potato starch and corn starch with areas of different levels of moisture and were analyzed using the biospeckle laser associated with the wavelets transform in order to evaluate the data in the spectral domain. The effect of a black or white background below the samples was also tested. The image analysis was conducted using Generalized Difference and Fujii techniques before and after the implementation of the wavelets transform producing the filtration of the data. The results allowed the visualization of different activities areas in different frequency bands. The areas of activity were presented clearer than the traditional procedures without filtering. A new way to present the results of the biospeckle and the frequency domain information was proposed to enhance the visualization of a whole picture. It was also noted that the greatest contrast between areas of different activity were promoted by materials of different compositions. In some experimental configurations there were possible to tag the relationship between the frequency and depth of the active or inactive material. The influence of the color, black or white, of the background was also noticed in the results, but with white background better in some configurations and with the black better in others.

  9. CHOROIDAL THICKNESS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC RETINOPATHY ANALYZED BY SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    REGATIERI, CAIO V.; BRANCHINI, LAUREN; CARMODY, JILL; FUJIMOTO, JAMES G.; DUKER, JAY S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine choroidal thickness in patients with diabetes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Methods Forty-nine patients (49 eyes) with diabetes and 24 age-matched normal subjects underwent high-definition raster scanning using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with frame enhancement software. Patients with diabetes were classified into 3 groups: 11 patients with mild or moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and no macular edema, 18 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema, and 20 patients with treated proliferative diabetic retinopathy and no diabetic macular edema (treated proliferative diabetic retinopathy). Choroidal thickness was measured from the posterior edge of the retinal pigment epithelium to the choroid/sclera junction at 500-μm intervals up to 2,500 μm temporal and nasal to the fovea. Results Reliable measurements of choroidal thickness were obtainable in 75.3% of eyes examined. Mean choroidal thickness showed a pattern of thinnest choroid nasally, thickening in the subfoveal region, and thinning again temporally in normal subjects and patients with diabetes. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was thinner in patients with diabetic macular edema (63.3 μm, 27.2%, P < 0.05) or treated proliferative diabetic retinopathy (69.6 μm, 30.0%, P < 0.01), compared with normal subjects. There was no difference between nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and normal subjects. Conclusion Choroidal thickness is altered in diabetes and may be related to the severity of retinopathy. Presence of diabetic macular edema is associated with a significant decrease in the choroidal thickness. PMID:22374157

  10. Enhanced joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography for quantitative flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Julia; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a new method called joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography (STdOCT) for flow velocity measurement in spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) was presented. This method analyzes the detected timeresolved interference fringe spectra by using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) to determine directly the Doppler frequency shift instead of calculating the phase difference at each depth position of adjacent A-scans. There, it was found that STdOCT is more robust for measurements with low signal to noise ratio than the classic phase-resolved Doppler OCT (DOCT) making it attractive first for imaging fast flow velocities at which a strong Doppler angle dependent signal damping occurs due to interference fringe washout and second for investigating large blood vessels with a big diameter and a highly damped signal of blood with increasing depth due to strong scattering and absorption in the near-infrared wavelength range. In the present study, we would like to introduce an enhanced algorithm for STdOCT permitting a more precise flow velocity measurement in comparison to the conventional STdOCT. The new method determines the amplitude of the broadened Doppler frequency shift by calculating the center of gravity via the complex analytical signal as a result of the second FFT instead of detecting the maximum intensity signal. Furthermore, the comparison with phase-resolved DOCT was done experimentally by using a flow phantom consisting of a 1% Intralipid emulsion and a 320 μm glass capillary. As a result, the enhanced STdOCT and DOCT processed data are completely equivalent.

  11. Full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography without additional phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a new full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography (FRC SD-OCT) method. Other than FRC SD-OCT systems reported in literature, which employed devices such as electro-/acousto optic modulators or piezo-driven mirrors providing the phase modulations necessary for retrieval of the complex-valued signal, the system presented works without any additional phase shifting device. The required phase shift is introduced by the galvanometer scanner used for transversally scanning the sample beam. By means of a slight displacement of the probe beam with respect to the scanning mirror's pivot axis, the sample arm length and thus the phase is continuously modulated as the beam is scanned in lateral direction. From such modulated spectral data, the complex-valued data yielding a twofold increase of accessible depth range can be calculated using an algorithm based on the Hilbert transform. To demonstrate the performance of our method quantitative measurements of the suppression of mirror images as a function of induced phase shift were performed. In order to validate the FRC SD-OCT technique for high-speed imaging of biological tissue, we present full-range images of the human anterior chamber in vivo. PMID:19550607

  12. Numerical modeling of wave propagation in functionally graded materials using time-domain spectral Chebyshev elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Bui, Tinh Quoc; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Lim, Chee Wah

    2014-02-01

    Numerical modeling of the Lamb wave propagation in functionally graded materials (FGMs) by a two-dimensional time-domain spectral finite element method (SpFEM) is presented. The high-order Chebyshev polynomials as approximation functions are used in the present formulation, which provides the capability to take into account the through thickness variation of the material properties. The efficiency and accuracy of the present model with one and two layers of 5th order spectral elements in modeling wave propagation in FGM plates are analyzed. Different excitation frequencies in a wide range of 28-350 kHz are investigated, and the dispersion properties obtained by the present model are verified by reference results. The through thickness wave structure of two principal Lamb modes are extracted and analyzed by the symmetry and relative amplitude of the vertical and horizontal oscillations. The differences with respect to Lamb modes generated in homogeneous plates are explained. Zero-crossing and wavelet signal processing-spectrum decomposition procedures are implemented to obtain phase and group velocities and their dispersion properties. So it is attested how this approach can be practically employed for simulation, calibration and optimization of Lamb wave based nondestructive evaluation techniques for the FGMs. The capability of modeling stress wave propagation through the thickness of an FGM specimen subjected to impact load is also investigated, which shows that the present method is highly accurate as compared with other existing reference data.

  13. Spectral domain analysis of conducting patches of arbitrary geometry in multilayer media using the CG-FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catedra, Manuel F.; Gago, Emilio

    1990-10-01

    A conjugate-gradient fast-Fourier-transform (CG-FFT) scheme for analyzing finite flat metallic patches in multilayer structures is presented. Rooftop and razor-blade functions are considered as basis and testing functions, respectively. An equivalent periodic problem in both domains (real and spectral) is obtained and solved. Aliasing problems are avoided by performing a window on the Green's function. The spectral domain periodicity makes it feasible to take into account almost all the harmonics and to reduce the ripple in the computed current distributions. Nearly all the operations are performed in the spectral domain, including Green's function computations. Several results of convergence rates, current distributions and radar cross-section values are given and compare favorably with measurements or results obtained by other methods.

  14. Spectral discrimination of breast pathologies in situ using spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nationally, 25% to 50% of patients undergoing lumpectomy for local management of breast cancer require a secondary excision because of the persistence of residual tumor. Intraoperative assessment of specimen margins by frozen-section analysis is not widely adopted in breast-conserving surgery. Here, a new approach to wide-field optical imaging of breast pathology in situ was tested to determine whether the system could accurately discriminate cancer from benign tissues before routine pathological processing. Methods Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) was used to quantify near-infrared (NIR) optical parameters at the surface of 47 lumpectomy tissue specimens. Spatial frequency and wavelength-dependent reflectance spectra were parameterized with matched simulations of light transport. Spectral images were co-registered to histopathology in adjacent, stained sections of the tissue, cut in the geometry imaged in situ. A supervised classifier and feature-selection algorithm were implemented to automate discrimination of breast pathologies and to rank the contribution of each parameter to a diagnosis. Results Spectral parameters distinguished all pathology subtypes with 82% accuracy and benign (fibrocystic disease, fibroadenoma) from malignant (DCIS, invasive cancer, and partially treated invasive cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy) pathologies with 88% accuracy, high specificity (93%), and reasonable sensitivity (79%). Although spectral absorption and scattering features were essential components of the discriminant classifier, scattering exhibited lower variance and contributed most to tissue-type separation. The scattering slope was sensitive to stromal and epithelial distributions measured with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Conclusions SFDI is a new quantitative imaging technique that renders a specific tissue-type diagnosis. Its combination of planar sampling and frequency-dependent depth sensing is clinically pragmatic and appropriate for

  15. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  16. A parallel domain decomposition-based implicit method for the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook phase-field equation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiang; Yang, Chao; Cai, Xiao-Chuan; Keyes, David

    2015-03-01

    We present a numerical algorithm for simulating the spinodal decomposition described by the three dimensional Cahn-Hilliard-Cook (CHC) equation, which is a fourth-order stochastic partial differential equation with a noise term. The equation is discretized in space and time based on a fully implicit, cell-centered finite difference scheme, with an adaptive time-stepping strategy designed to accelerate the progress to equilibrium. At each time step, a parallel Newton-Krylov-Schwarz algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear system. We discuss various numerical and computational challenges associated with the method. The numerical scheme is validated by a comparison with an explicit scheme of high accuracy (and unreasonably high cost). We present steady state solutions of the CHC equation in two and three dimensions. The effect of the thermal fluctuation on the spinodal decomposition process is studied. We show that the existence of the thermal fluctuation accelerates the spinodal decomposition process and that the final steady morphology is sensitive to the stochastic noise. We also show the evolution of the energies and statistical moments. In terms of the parallel performance, it is found that the implicit domain decomposition approach scales well on supercomputers with a large number of processors.

  17. A parallel domain decomposition-based implicit method for the Cahn–Hilliard–Cook phase-field equation in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiang; Yang, Chao; Cai, Xiao-Chuan; Keyes, David

    2015-03-15

    We present a numerical algorithm for simulating the spinodal decomposition described by the three dimensional Cahn–Hilliard–Cook (CHC) equation, which is a fourth-order stochastic partial differential equation with a noise term. The equation is discretized in space and time based on a fully implicit, cell-centered finite difference scheme, with an adaptive time-stepping strategy designed to accelerate the progress to equilibrium. At each time step, a parallel Newton–Krylov–Schwarz algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear system. We discuss various numerical and computational challenges associated with the method. The numerical scheme is validated by a comparison with an explicit scheme of high accuracy (and unreasonably high cost). We present steady state solutions of the CHC equation in two and three dimensions. The effect of the thermal fluctuation on the spinodal decomposition process is studied. We show that the existence of the thermal fluctuation accelerates the spinodal decomposition process and that the final steady morphology is sensitive to the stochastic noise. We also show the evolution of the energies and statistical moments. In terms of the parallel performance, it is found that the implicit domain decomposition approach scales well on supercomputers with a large number of processors.

  18. Estimating the Temporal Domain when the Discount of the Net Evaporation Term Affects the Resulting Net Precipitation Pattern in the Moisture Budget Using a 3-D Lagrangian Approach

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Rodrigo; Nieto, Raquel; Drumond, Anita; Gimeno, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The Lagrangian FLEXPART model has been used during the last decade to detect moisture sources that affect the climate in different regions of the world. While most of these studies provided a climatological perspective on the atmospheric branch of the hydrological cycle in terms of precipitation, none assessed the minimum temporal domain for which the climatological approach is valid. The methodology identifies the contribution of humidity to the moisture budget in a region by computing the changes in specific humidity along backward (or forward) trajectories of air masses over a period of ten days beforehand (afterwards), thereby allowing the calculation of monthly, seasonal and annual averages. The current study calculates as an example the climatological seasonal mean and variance of the net precipitation for regions in which precipitation exceeds evaporation (E-P<0) for the North Atlantic moisture source region using different time periods, for winter and summer from 1980 to 2000. The results show that net evaporation (E-P>0) can be discounted after when the integration of E-P is done without affecting the general net precipitation patterns when it is discounted in a monthly or longer time scale. PMID:24893002

  19. Tumor-penetrating peptide fused EGFR single-domain antibody enhances cancer drug penetration into 3D multicellular spheroids and facilitates effective gastric cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huizi; Zou, Zhengyun; Xin, Kai; Bian, Xinyu; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Chen, Jiao; Chen, Gang; Huang, Leaf; Blair, Andrew M.; Cao, Peng; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors, including gastric cancer, frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), which are associated with a poor prognosis. Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancerous tissues shows potential in sparing unaffected tissues. However, it has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues due to the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have constructed a recombinant protein named anti-EGFR-iRGD consisting of an anti-EGFR VHH (the variable domain from the heavy chain of the antibody) fused to iRGD, a tumor-specific binding peptide with high permeability. Anti-EGFR-iRGD, which targets EGFR and αvβ3, spreads extensively throughout both the multicellular spheroids and the tumor mass. The recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD also exhibited antitumor activity in tumor cell lines, multicellular spheroids, and mice. Moreover, anti-EGFR-iRGD could improve anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), bevacizumab, nanoparticle permeability and efficacy in multicellular spheroids. This study draws attention to the importance of iRGD peptide in the therapeutic approach of anti-EGFR-iRGD. As a consequence, anti-EGFR-iRGD could be a drug candidate for cancer treatment and a useful adjunct of other anticancer drugs. PMID:25553823

  20. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-01-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus. PMID:19194533

  1. Higher-order in time "quasi-unconditionally stable" ADI solvers for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in 2D and 3D curvilinear domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Oscar P.; Cubillos, Max

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces alternating-direction implicit (ADI) solvers of higher order of time-accuracy (orders two to six) for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two- and three-dimensional curvilinear domains. The higher-order accuracy in time results from 1) An application of the backward differentiation formulae time-stepping algorithm (BDF) in conjunction with 2) A BDF-like extrapolation technique for certain components of the nonlinear terms (which makes use of nonlinear solves unnecessary), as well as 3) A novel application of the Douglas-Gunn splitting (which greatly facilitates handling of boundary conditions while preserving higher-order accuracy in time). As suggested by our theoretical analysis of the algorithms for a variety of special cases, an extensive set of numerical experiments clearly indicate that all of the BDF-based ADI algorithms proposed in this paper are "quasi-unconditionally stable" in the following sense: each algorithm is stable for all couples (h , Δt)of spatial and temporal mesh sizes in a problem-dependent rectangular neighborhood of the form (0 ,Mh) × (0 ,Mt). In other words, for each fixed value of Δt below a certain threshold, the Navier-Stokes solvers presented in this paper are stable for arbitrarily small spatial mesh-sizes. The second-order formulation has further been rigorously shown to be unconditionally stable for linear hyperbolic and parabolic equations in two-dimensional space. Although implicit ADI solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations with nominal second-order of temporal accuracy have been proposed in the past, the algorithms presented in this paper are the first ADI-based Navier-Stokes solvers for which second-order or better accuracy has been verified in practice under non-trivial (non-periodic) boundary conditions.

  2. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-01

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A. PMID:26393783

  3. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus. PMID:19194533

  4. Clay composition and swelling potential estimation of soils using depth of absorption bands in the SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufréchou, Grégory; Granjean, Gilles; Bourguignon, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Swelling soils contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage on infrastructures. Presence of clay minerals is traditionally a good estimator of soils swelling and shrinking behavior. Montmorillonite (i.e. smectite group), illite, kaolinite are the most common minerals in soils and are usually associated to high, moderate, and low swelling potential when they are present in significant amount. Characterization of swelling potential and identification of clay minerals of soils using conventional analysis are slow, expensive, and does not permit integrated measurements. SWIR (1100-2500 nm) spectral domain are characterized by significant spectral absorption bands related to clay content that can be used to recognize main clay minerals. Hyperspectral laboratory using an ASD Fieldspec Pro spectrometer provides thus a rapid and less expensive field surface sensing that permits to measure soil spectral properties. This study presents a new laboratory reflectance spectroscopy method that used depth of clay diagnostic absorption bands (1400 nm, 1900 nm, and 2200 nm) to compare natural soils to synthetic montmorillonite-illite-kaolinite mixtures. We observe in mixtures that illite, montmorillonite, and kaolinite content respectively strongly influence the depth of absorption bands at 1400 nm (D1400), 1900 nm (D1900), and 2200 nm (D2200). To attenuate or removed effects of abundance and grain size, depth of absorption bands ratios were thus used to performed (i) 3D (using D1900/D2200, D1400/D1900, and D2200/D1400 as axis), and (ii) 2D (using D1400/D1900 and D1900/D2200 as axis) diagrams of synthetic mixtures. In this case we supposed that the overall reduction or growth of depth absorption bands should be similarly affected by the abundance and grain size of materials in soil. In 3D and 2D diagrams, the mixtures define a triangular shape formed by two clay minerals as external envelop and the three clay minerals mixtures

  5. Imaging Nuclear Waste Plumes at the Hanford Site using Large Domain 3D High Resolution Resistivity Methods and the New Parallel-Processing EarthImager3DCL Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, J.; Rucker, D.; Levitt, M.; Yang, X.; Lagmanson, M.

    2007-12-01

    High Resolution Resistivity data is currently used by hydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc to detect and characterize the distribution of suspected contaminant plumes beneath leaking tanks and disposal sites within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, in Eastern Washington State. The success of the characterization effort has led to resistivity data acquisition in extremely large survey areas exceeding 0.6 km2 and containing over 6,000 electrodes. Optimal data processing results are achieved by utilizing 105 data points within a single finite difference or finite element model domain. The large number of measurements and electrodes and high resolution of the modeling domain requires a model mesh of over 106 nodes. Existing commercially available resistivity inversion software could not support the domain size due to software and hardware limitations. hydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc teamed with Advanced Geosciences, Inc to advance the existing EarthImager3D inversion software to allow for parallel-processing and large memory support under a 64 bit operating system. The basis for the selection of EarthImager3D is demonstrated with a series of verification tests and benchmark comparisons using synthetic test models, field scale experiments and 6 months of intensive modeling using an array of multi-processor servers. The results of benchmark testing show equivalence to other industry standard inversion codes that perform the same function on significantly smaller domain models. hydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc included the use of 214 steel-cased monitoring wells as "long electrodes", 6000 surface electrodes and 8 buried point source electrodes. Advanced Geosciences, Inc. implemented a long electrode modeling function to support the Hanford Site well casing data. This utility is unique to commercial resistivity inversion software, and was evaluated through a series of laboratory and field scale tests using engineered subsurface plumes. The Hanford site is an ideal proving ground for these methods due

  6. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  7. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  8. All-fiber spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with high resolution by using a PCF-based broadband coupler and a k-domain linearization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh-Jang; Kim, Sunduck; Yoon, Min-Seok; Han, Young-Geun

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with high axial resolution and high image acquisition speed, which is realized by using a broadband coupler based on a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The PCF-based coupler with broad bandwidth was fabricated by using a fused biconical tapered (FBT) method, and the axial resolution of the SD-OCT was improved to be 2 µm. The image acquisition speed of the SD-OCT was estimated to be 500 Hz. A k-domain linearization method was exploited to compensate for the mismatched spectral information between the wave-number and the pixel position at the CCD, which was induced by the nonlinearity of the diffraction grating plate.

  9. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  10. Real-time Functional Analysis of Inertial Microfluidic Devices via Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biqin; Chen, Siyu; Zhou, Fan; Chan, Christina H Y; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technology that enables real-time functional analysis of sorting microparticles and cells in an inertial microfluidic device. We demonstrated high-speed, high-resolution acquisition of cross-sectional images at a frame rate of 350 Hz, with a lateral resolution of 3 μm and an axial resolution of 1 μm within the microfluidic channel filled with water. We analyzed the temporal sequence of cross-sectional SD-OCT images to determine the position and diameter of microspheres in a spiral microfluidic channel under various flow rates. We used microspheres with known diameters to validate the sub-micrometer precision of the particle size analysis based on a scattering model of spherical microparticles. An additional investigation of sorting live HT-29 cells in the spiral microfluidic channel indicated that the distribution of cells within in the microchannel has a close correspondence with the cells' size distribution. The label-free real-time imaging and analysis of microscale particles in flow offers robustness for practical applications with live cells and allows us to better understand the mechanisms of particle separations in microfluidic sorting systems. PMID:27619202

  11. Study on spectral properties of difenoconazole by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qian; Liu, Ying; Kou, Kuan; Zhao, Guozhong

    2015-08-01

    The terahertz (THz) and infrared spectra of solid pesticide difenoconazole are studied. The absorption spectra of difenoconazole are obtained at room temperature in the frequency range of 0.2 THz - 2.6 THz by using of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and in the frequency range of 1.8 THz - 10 THz by the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental results show five significant absorption peaks in THz frequency range, respectively, 0.66 T, 0.80 T, 1.03 T, 1.31 T and 1.57 T, and those peaks corresponding to the abnormal dispersion. The spectral characteristics between 0.2 THz and 15 THz of difenoconazole are simulated by using of Gaussian03 software based on the single molecular model and the density functional theory (DFT). Both of simulation and experimental results fit well in the terahertz range. Moreover, the quantitative analysis of difenoconazole is studied based on the THz-TDS measurement. The absorption coefficient and refractive index spectra of difenoconazoles at different proportions doped with polyethylene (PE) are obtained. The partial least squares (PLS) model is built. It is possible to predict the concentration of difenoconazole in the mixtures by this method.

  12. Visualization and measurement of capillary-driven blood flow using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cito, Salvatore; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Pallares, Jordi; Duarte, Rodrigo Martinez; Chen, Zhongping; Madou, Marc; Katakis, Ioanis

    2013-01-01

    Capillary-driven flow (CD-flow) in microchannels plays an important role in many microfluidic devices. These devices, the most popular being those based in lateral flow, are becoming increasingly used in health care and diagnostic applications. CD-flow can passively pump biological fluids as blood, serum or plasma, in microchannels and it can enhance the wall mass transfer by exploiting the convective effects of the flow behind the meniscus. The flow behind the meniscus has not been experimentally identified up to now because of the lack of high-resolution, non-invasive, cross-sectional imaging means. In this study, spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography is used to visualize and measure the flow behind the meniscus in CD-flows of water and blood. Microchannels of polydimethylsiloxane and glass with different cross-sections are considered. The predictions of the flow behind the meniscus of numerical simulations using the power-law model for non-Newtonian fluids are in reasonable agreement with the measurements using blood as working fluid. The extension of the Lucas–Washburn equation to non-Newtonian power-law fluids predicts well the velocity of the meniscus of the experiments using blood. PMID:23795150

  13. Fiber spectral domain optical coherence tomography for in vivo rat brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Bonin, T.; Loeffler, S.; Huettmann, G.; Tronnier, V.; Hofmann, U. G.

    2010-04-01

    A well established navigation method is one of the key conditions for successful brain surgery: It should be accurate, safe and online operable. Recent research shows that Optical Coherence Tomography is a potential solution for this application by providing a high resolution and small probe dimension. In this study a fiber Spectral-Domain OCT system with a super luminescent diode with the center wavelength of 840 nm providing 13.6 μm axial resolution was used. A single mode fiber (Ø 125 μm) was employed as the detecting probe. The information acquired by OCT was reconstructed into grayscale images by vertically aligning several A-scans from the same trajectory with different depth, i.e. forward scanning. For scans of typical white matter, the images showed a higher reflection of light intensity with lower penetration depth as well as a steeper attenuation rate compared to the scans typical for grey matter. Since the axial resolution of this OCT system is very high, some microstructures lying on the striatum, hippocampus and thalamic nucleus were visible in these images. The research explored the potential of OCT to be integrated into a stereotactic surgical robot as a multi-modal navigation method.

  14. Separating Reflective and Fluorescent Components Using High Frequency Illumination in the Spectral Domain.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Lam, Antony; Sato, Imari; Okabe, Takahiro; Sato, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is beneficial to many applications but most traditional methods do not consider fluorescent effects which are present in everyday items ranging from paper to even our food. Furthermore, everyday fluorescent items exhibit a mix of reflection and fluorescence so proper separation of these components is necessary for analyzing them. In recent years, effective imaging methods have been proposed but most require capturing the scene under multiple illuminants. In this paper, we demonstrate efficient separation and recovery of reflectance and fluorescence emission spectra through the use of two high frequency illuminations in the spectral domain. With the obtained fluorescence emission spectra from our high frequency illuminants, we then describe how to estimate the fluorescence absorption spectrum of a material given its emission spectrum. In addition, we provide an in depth analysis of our method and also show that filters can be used in conjunction with standard light sources to generate the required high frequency illuminants. We also test our method under ambient light and demonstrate an application of our method to synthetic relighting of real scenes. PMID:26336113

  15. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Adaptive Optics: Imaging Photoreceptor Layer Morphology to Interpret Preclinical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Jungtae; Dubis, Adam M.; Wagner-Schuman, Melissa; Tait, Diane M.; Godara, Pooja; Schroeder, Brett; Stepien, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of advances in imaging technology that enable in vivo evaluation of the living retina. Two of the more promising techniques, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO) fundus imaging provide complementary views of the retinal tissue. SD-OCT devices have high axial resolution, allowing assessment of retinal lamination, while the high lateral resolution of AO allows visualization of individual cells. The potential exists to use one modality to interpret results from the other. As a proof of concept, we examined the retina of a 32 year-old male, previously diagnosed with a red-green color vision defect. Previous AO imaging revealed numerous gaps throughout his cone mosaic, indicating that the structure of a subset of cones had been compromised. Whether the affected cells had completely degenerated or were simply morphologically deviant was not clear. Here an AO fundus camera was used to re-examine the retina (~6 years after initial exam) and SD-OCT to examine retinal lamination. The static nature of the cone mosaic disruption combined with the normal lamination on SD-OCT suggests that the affected cones are likely still present. PMID:20238030

  16. Myocardial imaging using ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Marboe, Charles C.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-06-01

    We present an ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system in 800 nm with a low-noise supercontinuum source (SC) optimized for myocardial imaging. The system was demonstrated to have an axial resolution of 2.72 μm with a large imaging depth of 1.78 mm and a 6-dB falloff range of 0.89 mm. The lateral resolution (5.52 μm) was compromised to enhance the image penetration required for myocardial imaging. The noise of the SC source was analyzed extensively and an imaging protocol was proposed for SC-based OCT imaging with appreciable contrast. Three-dimensional datasets were acquired ex vivo on the endocardium side of tissue specimens from different chambers of fresh human and swine hearts. With the increased resolution and contrast, features such as elastic fibers, Purkinje fibers, and collagen fiber bundles were observed. The correlation between the structural information revealed in the OCT images and tissue pathology was discussed as well.

  17. Myopic Macular Retinoschisis in Teenagers: Clinical Characteristics and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuan-Bin; You, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Lin-Yan; Chen, Pei-Qing; Yao, Ke; Xue, An-Quan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of myopic macular retinoschisis (MRS) in teenagers with high myopia, six male (9 eyes) and 3 female (4 eyes) teenagers with typical MRS identified from chart review were evaluated. All cases underwent complete ophthalmic examinations including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), indirect ophthalmoscopy, colour fundus photography, B-type ultrasonography, axial length measurement, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The average age was 17.8 ± 1.5 years, average refractive error was -17.04 ± 3.04D, average BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.61, and average axial length was 30.42 ± 1.71 mm. Myopic macular degenerative changes (MDC) by colour fundus photographs revealed Ohno-Matsui Category 1 in 4 eyes, and Category 2 in 9 eyes. Posterior staphyloma was found in 9 eyes. SD-OCT showed outer MRS in all 13 eyes, internal limiting membrane detachment in 7 eyes, vascular microfolds in 2 eyes, and inner MRS in 1 eye. No premacular structures such as macular epiretinal membrane or partially detached posterior hyaloids were found. Our results showed that MRS rarely occurred in highly myopic teenagers, and was not accompanied by premacular structures, severe MDC, or even obvious posterior staphyloma. This finding indicates that posterior scleral expansion is probably the main cause of MRS. PMID:27294332

  18. Methodology for assessment of structural vibrations by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Simon S.; Raphael, Patrick; Xia, Anping; Park, Jesung; Carbajal, Esteban; Applegate, Brian E.; Oghalai, John S.

    2012-02-01

    Clinical diagnosis of cochlear dysfunction typically remains incomplete due to a lack of proper diagnostic methods. Medical imaging modalities can only detect gross changes in the cochlea, and non-invasive in vivo cochlear measurements are scarce. As a result, extensive efforts have been made to adapt optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques to analyze and study the cochlea. Herein, we detail the methods for measuring vibration using OCT. We used spectral domain OCT with ~950 nm as the center wavelength and a bandwidth of ~80 nm. The custom spectrometer used was based on a high speed line scan camera which is capable of line rates up to 28 kHz. The signal-to- noise ratio of the system was ~90 dB. The data collection and processing software was written in LabVIEW and MATLAB. We tested whether streaming directly from the camera, writing the data to multiple hard drives in the RAID- 0 configuration, and processing using the GPU shortened experiment times. We then analyzed the A-line phase noise over several hundred milliseconds and growth curves from a piezoelectric element. We believe this is the first step towards a diagnostic device which generates vibration information of cochlear structures.

  19. Prediction of spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Weiqi; Zheng, Kangken; Peng, Kun; Xia, Honghe; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that some traumatic macular holes can close spontaneously. However, knowledge about the types of macular hole that can close spontaneously is limited. In this retrospective study, we investigated patients with traumatic macular hole who were followed-up for at least 6 months without any surgical intervention. Clinical data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images were compared between groups with and without macular hole closure. Overall, 27 eyes were included. Spontaneous closure of macular hole was observed in 10 (37.0%) eyes. The holes with spontaneous closure had smaller minimum diameter (244.9 ± 114.4 vs. 523.9 ± 320.0 μm, p = 0.007) and less intraretinal cysts (10% vs. 76.5%, p = 0.001) compared to the holes that did not close spontaneously. The area under the curve of receiver operative characteristic was 0.812 and 0.832 for minimum diameter of macular hole and presence of intraretinal cysts respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that the presence of intraretinal cysts was an independent predictive factor for closure of macular holes. The group with spontaneous macular hole closure had a high chance of visual improvement. Our study suggests that the absence of intraretinal cysts on SD-OCT can predict spontaneous closure of traumatic macular hole. PMID:26196460

  20. Quantitative Diagnosis of Colorectal Polyps by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Qinqin; Wu, Xiaojing; Tang, Tao; Liu, Hong; Zhu, S. W.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The principal aim of this study is to investigate the scattering coefficient of colorectal polyp tissues using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. It combines the existing scattering coefficient model and spectral domain OCT to achieve method of early diagnosis of colorectal polyp in hospitals. Seventeen patients were studied, and a total of 1456 data points were extracted by curve-fitting the OCT signals into a confocal single-backscattering model. The results show that the mean scattering coefficient value for colorectal polyps is 1.91 mm−1 (std: ±0.54 mm−1), which is between the values for normal and malignant tissues. In addition, we studied the difference between adenomatous polyps (n = 15) and inflammatory polyps (n = 2) quantitatively and found that the adenomatous tissues had lower scattering coefficients than the inflammatory ones. The quantitative measurements confirmed that OCT can be used in primary diagnosis to compensate for the deficiencies in methods of pathological diagnosis, with a great potential for early diagnosis of tissues. PMID:24818145

  1. Extracting structural features of rat sciatic nerve using polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. Shahidul; Oliveira, Michael C.; Wang, Yan; Henry, Francis P.; Randolph, Mark A.; Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-05-01

    We present spectral domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (SD PS-OCT) imaging of peripheral nerves. Structural and polarization-sensitive OCT imaging of uninjured rat sciatic nerves was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. OCT and its functional extension, PS-OCT, were used to image sciatic nerve structure with clear delineation of the nerve boundaries to muscle and adipose tissues. A long-known optical effect, bands of Fontana, was also observed. Postprocessing analysis of these images provided significant quantitative information, such as epineurium thickness, estimates of extinction coefficient and birefringence of nerve and muscle tissue, frequency of bands of Fontana at different stretch levels of nerve, and change in average birefringence of nerve under stretched condition. We demonstrate that PS-OCT combined with regular-intensity OCT (compared with OCT alone) allows for a clearer determination of the inner and outer boundaries of the epineurium and distinction of nerve and muscle based on their birefringence pattern. PS-OCT measurements on normal nerves show that the technique is promising for studies on peripheral nerve injury.

  2. Identification of surface defects on glass by parallel spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyan; Shen, Yi; Bao, Wen; Li, Peng; Wang, Xiaoping; Ding, Zhihua

    2015-09-01

    Defects can dramatically degrade glass quality, and automatic inspection is a trend of quality control in modern industry. One challenge in inspection in an uncontrolled environment is the misjudgment of fake defects (such as dust particles) as surface defects. Fortunately, optical changes within the periphery of a surface defect are usually introduced while those of a fake defect are not. The existence of changes within the defect peripheries can be adopted as a criterion for defect identification. However, modifications within defect peripheries can be too small to be noticeable in intensity based optical image of the glass surface, and misjudgments of modifications may occur due to the incorrectness in defect demarcation. Thus, a sensitive and reliable method for surface defect identification is demanded. To this end, a nondestructive method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is proposed to precisely demarcate surface defects and sensitively measure surface deformations. Suspected surface defects are demarcated using the algorithm based on complex difference from expectation. Modifications within peripheries of suspected surface defects are mapped by phase information from complex interface signal. In this way, surface defects are discriminated from fake defects using a parallel spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) system. Both simulations and experiments are conducted, and these preliminary results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed method to identify glass surface defects. PMID:26368461

  3. Intraretinal Exudates in Coats' Disease as Demonstrated by Spectral-Domain OCT

    PubMed Central

    Kessner, Rivka; Barak, Adiel; Neudorfer, Meira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings in a case of Coats' disease, with emphasis on the intraretinal exudates. Methods Case report of a 4.5-year-old girl who presented with total exudative retinal detachment and organized exudates in a stellate configuration. SD-OCT was performed before and after treatment, which included surgical drainage of subretinal fluid and indirect laser application during the surgery. Results At presentation, the SD-OCT showed an elevation of the foveal contour, with thickening of the retina, many exudates and a large quantity of subretinal fluid. Two months after the surgical treatment, SD-OCT revealed a significant reduction in the amount of subretinal fluids, but with persistence of the exudates. Conclusion SD-OCT can be used as an important tool in order to describe the changes in each layer of the retina in Coats' disease. Considering the histopathological findings in Coats' disease, it is reasonable to assume that the exudates accumulate in the outer plexiform layer. PMID:22615695

  4. Macular thickness and macular volume measurements using spectral domain optical coherence tomography in normal Nepalese eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Amrit; Shrestha, Gauri Shankar; Shrestha, Jyoti Baba

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To record the normative values for macular thickness and macular volume in normal Nepalese eyes. Methods In all, 126 eyes of 63 emmetropic subjects (mean age: 21.17±6.76 years; range: 10–37 years) were assessed for macular thickness and macular volume, using spectral domain-optical coherence tomography over 6×6 mm2 in the posterior pole. A fast macular thickness protocol was employed. Statistics such as the mean, median, standard deviation, percentiles, and range were used, while a P-value was set at 0.05 to test significance. Results Average macular thickness and total macular volume were larger in males compared to females. With each year of increasing age, these variables decreased by 0.556 μm and 0.0156 mm3 for average macular thickness and total macular volume, respectively. The macular thickness was greatest in the inner superior section and lowest at the center of the fovea. The volume was greatest in the outer nasal section and thinnest in the fovea. The central subfield thickness (r=−0.243, P=0.055) and foveal volume (r=0.216, P=0.09) did not correlate with age. Conclusion Males and females differ significantly with regard to macular thickness and macular volume measurements. Reports by other studies that the increase in axial length reduced thickness and volume, were negated by this study which found a positive correlation among axial length, thickness, and volume. PMID:27041990

  5. Intraoperative Changes in Idiopathic Macular Holes by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Atsushi; Yagou, Takaaki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Fujita, Kazuya; Oka, Miyako; Fuchizawa, Chiharu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine anatomical changes in idiopathic macular holes during surgery using handheld spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods Five eyes of 5 patients who underwent surgery for the repair of idiopathic macular holes were examined. The surgery included standard 25-gauge, 3-port pars plana vitrectomy, removal of the internal limiting membrane (ILM), fluid-air exchange, and 20% sulfur hexafluoride tamponade. Intraoperative SD-OCT images of the macular holes were obtained after ILM removal and under fluid-air exchange using a handheld SD-OCT. From SD-OCT images, the macular hole base diameter (MHBD) was measured and compared. Results All macular holes were successfully closed after the primary surgery. The mean MHBD under fluid-air exchange was significantly smaller than the mean MHBD after ILM removal and the preoperative mean MHBD. In 1 eye with a stage 3 macular hole, SD-OCT images revealed that the inner edges of the macular hole touched each other under fluid-air exchange. Conclusion Fluid-air exchange significantly reduced MHBD during surgery to repair macular holes. Fluid-air exchange may be an important step for macular hole closure as it reduces the base diameter of the macular hole. PMID:21677882

  6. In vivo imaging of raptor retina with ultra high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Major, James C., Jr.; McKeown, Craig; Wehbe, Hassan; Jiao, Shuliang; Puliafito, Carmen A.

    2008-02-01

    Among birds, raptors are well known for their exceptional eyesight, which is partly due to the unique structure of their retina. Because the raptor retina is the most advanced of any animal species, in vivo examination of its structure would be remarkable. Furthermore, a noticeable percentage of traumatic ocular injuries are identified in birds of prey presented to rehabilitation facilities. Injuries affecting the posterior segment have been considered as a major impact on raptor vision. Hence, in vivo examination of the structure of the posterior segment of the raptors would be helpful for the diagnosis of traumatized birds. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the application of ultrahigh-resolution Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) for non contact in vivo imaging of the retina of birds of prey, which to the best of our knowledge has never been attempted. For the first time we present high quality OCT images of the retina of two species of bird of prey, one diurnal hawk and one nocturnal owl.

  7. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  8. Morphologic Changes in Acute Central Serous Chorioretinopathy Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Bin; Chung, Hyewon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate morphologic changes of acute central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Methods This retrospective study included 63 eyes of 63 patients with unilateral acute CSC. All patients underwent simultaneous SD-OCT and fluorescein angiography examination using Spectralis HRA+OCT. Results The external limiting membrane could be seen on SD-OCT, although the junction between photoreceptor inner and outer segments (IS/OS) was not detected in all eyes with retinal detachment (RD). However, IS/OS became visible after resolution of serous RD in 51 eyes (81.0%). SD-OCT images at the leakage sites showed a bump of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in in 47 cases (68.1%) and pigment epithelial detachment (PED) in 22 of 69 leakage sites (31.9%). In 14 of 69 leakage sites (20.3%), highly reflective areas suggesting fibrinous exudate were observed in the subretinal space. In nine leakage sites (13.0%), sagging or dipping of the posterior retinal layer was seen. Abnormal RPE changes such as RPE bump and PED were observed in 12 of 22 fellow eyes (54.5%). Conclusions A variety of morphologic changes could be identified on SD-OCT, and those findings may contribute more information to our understanding of the pathophysiology of CSC. PMID:23060721

  9. Signal Normalization Reduces Systematic Measurement Differences Between Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Ling, Yun; Wollstein, Gadi; Bilonick, Richard A.; Xu, Juan; Fujimoto, James G.; Sigal, Ian A.; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the effect of a novel signal normalization method for reducing systematic optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement differences among multiple spectral-domain (SD) OCT devices. Methods. A total of 109 eyes from 59 subjects were scanned with two SD-OCT devices (Cirrus and RTVue) at the same visit. Optical coherence tomography image data were normalized to match their signal characteristics between the devices. To compensate signal strength differences, custom high dynamic range (HDR) processing was also applied only to images with substantially lower signal strength. Global mean peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses were then measured automatically from all images using custom segmentation software and were compared to the original device outputs. Structural equation models were used to analyze the absolute RNFL thickness difference between original device outputs and our software outputs after signal normalization. Results. The device-measured RNFL thickness showed a statistically significant difference between the two devices (mean absolute difference 10.58 μm, P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference after normalization on eyes with 62.4-μm or thicker RNFL (mean absolute difference 2.95 μm, P < 0.05). Conclusions. The signal normalization method successfully reduces the systematic difference in RNFL thickness measurements between two SD-OCT devices. Enabling direct comparison of RNFL thickness obtained from multiple devices would broaden the use of OCT technology in both clinical and research applications. PMID:24114534

  10. Myocardial imaging using ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xinwen; Gan, Yu; Marboe, Charles C; Hendon, Christine P

    2016-06-01

    We present an ultrahigh-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system in 800 nm with a low-noise supercontinuum source (SC) optimized for myocardial imaging. The system was demonstrated to have an axial resolution of 2.72  μm with a large imaging depth of 1.78 mm and a 6-dB falloff range of 0.89 mm. The lateral resolution (5.52  μm) was compromised to enhance the image penetration required for myocardial imaging. The noise of the SC source was analyzed extensively and an imaging protocol was proposed for SC-based OCT imaging with appreciable contrast. Three-dimensional datasets were acquired ex vivo on the endocardium side of tissue specimens from different chambers of fresh human and swine hearts. With the increased resolution and contrast, features such as elastic fibers, Purkinje fibers, and collagen fiber bundles were observed. The correlation between the structural information revealed in the OCT images and tissue pathology was discussed as well. PMID:27001162

  11. Measurement of strain and strain rate in embryonic chick heart using spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shidan; Suo, Yanyan; Liang, Chengbo; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yuqian; Liu, Jian; Xu, Tao; Wang, Ruikang; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    It is important to measure embryonic heart myocardial wall strain and strain rate for understanding the mechanisms of embryonic heart development. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can provide depth resolved images with high spatial and temporal resolution, which makes it have the potential to reveal the complex myocardial activity in the early stage embryonic heart. We develop a novel method to measure strain in embryonic chick heart based on spectral domain OCT images and subsequent image processing. We perform 4D(x,y,z,t) scanning on the outflow tract (OFT) of chick embryonic hearts in HH18 stage (~3 days of incubation). Only one image sequence acquired at the special position is selected based on the Doppler blood flow information where the probe beam penetrates through the OFT perpendicularly. For each image of the selected sequence, the cross-section of the myocardial wall can be approximated as an annulus. The OFT is segmented with a semi-automatic boundary detection algorithm, thus the area and mean circumference of the annular myocardial wall can be achieved. The myocardial wall thickness was calculated using the area divided by the mean circumference, and then the strain was obtained. The results demonstrate that OCT can be a useful tool to describe the biomechanical characteristics of the embryonic heart.

  12. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography documented rapid resolution of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema with topical difluprednate

    PubMed Central

    Chalam, KV; Khetpal, Vijay; Patel, Chirag J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema is a common cause of poor vision after cataract surgery, and topical corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used for its treatment. We investigated the effectiveness of difluprednate (Durezol®, recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration) in the treatment of cystoid macular edema, assisted with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Case report A 63-year-old African-American woman presented 6 weeks after uneventful cataract surgery in her left eye with decreased vision and associated distortion of the central visual field. Fluorescein angiogram and SD-OCT confirmed pseudophakic cystoid macular edema. Difluprednate was topically administered twice daily and monitored with serial imaging. Resolution was noted after 1 month of topical therapy, with improvement in visual acuity and resolution of distortion. Conclusion Difluprednate is an effective treatment for patients with severe pseudophakic cystoid macular edema. SD-OCT allows the physician to monitor resolution of the macular edema easily. PMID:22291458

  13. Ultra-fast displaying Spectral Domain Optical Doppler Tomography system using a Graphics Processing Unit.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyosang; Cho, Nam Hyun; Jung, Unsang; Lee, Changho; Kim, Jeong-Yeon; Kim, Jeehyun

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultrafast displaying Spectral Domain Optical Doppler Tomography system using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing. The calculation of FFT and the Doppler frequency shift is accelerated by the GPU. Our system can display processed OCT and ODT images simultaneously in real time at 120 fps for 1,024 pixels × 512 lateral A-scans. The computing time for the Doppler information was dependent on the size of the moving average window, but with a window size of 32 pixels the ODT computation time is only 8.3 ms, which is comparable to the data acquisition time. Also the phase noise decreases significantly with the window size. Since the performance of a real-time display for OCT/ODT is very important for clinical applications that need immediate diagnosis for screening or biopsy. Intraoperative surgery can take much benefit from the real-time display flow rate information from the technology. Moreover, the GPU is an attractive tool for clinical and commercial systems for functional OCT features as well. PMID:22969328

  14. Improvement of axial resolution of spectral domain optical coherence tomography with wide band PLC splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Min, Eun Jung; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-06-01

    We report the development and performance of high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system based on 2×2 planar lightwave circuit (PLC) splitter that was designed as a single mode splitter at near infrared and used as the beam splitter for a SD-OCT system. The splitter has been made by coupling SMFs to a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) splitter chip. The PLC splitter chip was fabricated to have a single mode property with 740 nm cutoff wavelength and the SMFs, which have 730 nm cutoff wavelength, were securely connected to the PLC chip through fiber block arrays having lithographically fabricated V grooves. With the implemented PLC splitter, we have obtained a low excess loss of 0.4 dB at 840 nm with wide band coupling property. With the proposed 2×2 PLC splitter and fabricated WDM coupler, SD-OCT images of samples successfully obtained by using combined source with 840 nm and 880 nm SLDs.

  15. Myopic Macular Retinoschisis in Teenagers: Clinical Characteristics and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chuan-bin; You, Yong-sheng; Liu, Zhe; Zheng, Lin-yan; Chen, Pei-qing; Yao, Ke; Xue, An-quan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the morphological characteristics of myopic macular retinoschisis (MRS) in teenagers with high myopia, six male (9 eyes) and 3 female (4 eyes) teenagers with typical MRS identified from chart review were evaluated. All cases underwent complete ophthalmic examinations including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), indirect ophthalmoscopy, colour fundus photography, B-type ultrasonography, axial length measurement, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The average age was 17.8 ± 1.5 years, average refractive error was −17.04 ± 3.04D, average BCVA was 0.43 ± 0.61, and average axial length was 30.42 ± 1.71 mm. Myopic macular degenerative changes (MDC) by colour fundus photographs revealed Ohno-Matsui Category 1 in 4 eyes, and Category 2 in 9 eyes. Posterior staphyloma was found in 9 eyes. SD-OCT showed outer MRS in all 13 eyes, internal limiting membrane detachment in 7 eyes, vascular microfolds in 2 eyes, and inner MRS in 1 eye. No premacular structures such as macular epiretinal membrane or partially detached posterior hyaloids were found. Our results showed that MRS rarely occurred in highly myopic teenagers, and was not accompanied by premacular structures, severe MDC, or even obvious posterior staphyloma. This finding indicates that posterior scleral expansion is probably the main cause of MRS. PMID:27294332

  16. Visible and near infrared wavelength photonic crystal fiber splitter for multiwavelength spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Min, Eun Jung; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance of the 2×2 photonic crystal fiber (PCF) splitter that was designed as a single mode splitter at the visible and near infrared and used as the beam splitter for a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system. The PCF splitter has been made by coupling PCFs to a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) splitter chip. The PLC splitter chip was fabricated to have a single mode property with 630 nm cutoff wavelength and the PCFs were securely connected to the PLC chip through PCF block arrays having lithographically fabricated V grooves. The core width of the splitter chip was about 4 μm×4 μm and the core-cladding index difference was about 0.15%. With the implemented PCF PLC splitter, we have obtained a low excess loss of 1.2 dB and a low polarization-dependent loss of 0.19 dB at 680 nm with wide band coupling property. With the proposed 2×2 PCF splitter, SD-OCT images of human finger, nail, and tooth successfully obtained by using 680 nm, 840 nm, and 930 nm SLD source. This PCF PLC splitter is expected to have high resolution OCT.

  17. Automated detection of the retinal from OCT spectral domain images of healthy eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovinco, Gaspare; Savastano, Maria Cristina; Ventre, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Antonello

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the most relevant diagnostic tools for retinal diseases. Besides being a non-invasive technique, one distinguished feature is its unique capability of providing (in vivo) cross-sectional view of the retinal. Specifically, OCT images show the retinal layers. From the clinical point of view, the identification of the retinal layers opens new perspectives to study the correlation between morphological and functional aspects of the retinal tissue. The main contribution of this paper is a new method/algorithm for the automated segmentation of cross-sectional images of the retina of healthy eyes, obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Specifically, the proposed segmentation algorithm provides the automated detection of different retinal layers. Tests on experimental SD-OCT scans performed by three different instruments/manufacturers have been successfully carried out and compared to a manual segmentation made by an independent ophthalmologist, showing the generality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Automated detection of retinal layers from OCT spectral-domain images of healthy eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovinco, Gaspare; Savastano, Maria Cristina; Ventre, Salvatore; Tamburrino, Antonello

    2015-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the most relevant diagnostic tools for retinal diseases. Besides being a non-invasive technique, one distinguished feature is its unique capability of providing (in vivo) cross-sectional view of the retina. Specifically, OCT images show the retinal layers. From the clinical point of view, the identification of the retinal layers opens new perspectives to study the correlation between morphological and functional aspects of the retinal tissue. The main contribution of this paper is a new method/algorithm for the automated segmentation of cross-sectional images of the retina of healthy eyes, obtained by means of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Specifically, the proposed segmentation algorithm provides the automated detection of different retinal layers. Tests on experimental SD-OCT scans performed by three different instruments/manufacturers have been successfully carried out and compared to a manual segmentation made by an independent ophthalmologist, showing the generality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. In-line quality control of moving objects by means of spectral-domain OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Daniel; Hannesschläger, Günther; Buchsbaum, Andreas; Sacher, Stephan; Khinast, Johannes G.; Leitner, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In-line quality control of intermediate and final products is essential in various industries. This may imply determining the thickness of a foil or evaluating the homogeneity of coating applied to a pharmaceutical tablet. Such a qualitative and quantitative monitoring in a depth-resolved manner can be accomplished using optical coherence tomography (OCT). In-line quality control based on OCT requires additional consideration of motion effects for the system design as well as for data interpretation. This study focuses on transverse motion effects that can arise in spectral-domain (SD-) OCT systems. The impact of a transverse movement is analyzed for a constant relative speed difference up to 0.7 m/s between sample and sensor head. In particular, transverse motion is affecting OCT system properties such as the beam displacement (distance between adjacent A-scans) and transverse resolution. These properties were evaluated theoretically and experimentally for OCT images of a resolution target and pharmaceutical film-coated tablets. Both theoretical and experimental analyses highlight the shift of the transverse resolution limiting factor from the optics to the beam displacement above a relative speed difference between sensor head and sample of 0.42 m/s (for the presented SD-OCT setup). Speeds above 0.4 m/s are often demanded when monitoring industrial processes, such as a coating process when producing film-coated tablets. This emphasizes the importance of a fast data acquisition when using OCT as in-line quality control tool.

  20. Accommodation-induced variations in retinal thickness measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Sun, Yong; Dai, Cuixia; Zheng, Haihua; Ren, Qiushi; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-09-01

    To research retinal stretching or distortion with accommodation, accommodation-induced changes in retinal thickness (RT) in the macular area were investigated in a population of young adults (n=23) by using a dual-channel spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system manufactured in-house for this study. This dual-channel SD-OCT is capable of imaging the cornea and retina simultaneously with an imaging speed of 24 kHz A-line scan rate, which can provide the anatomical dimensions of the eye, including the RT and axial length. Thus, the modification of the RT with accommodation can be calculated. A significant decrease in the RT (13.50±1.25 μm) was observed during maximum accommodation. In the 4 mm×4 mm macular area centered at the fovea, we did not find a significant quadrant-dependent difference in retinal volume change, which indicates that neither retinal stretching nor distortion was quadrant-dependent during accommodation. We speculate that the changes in RT with maximum accommodation resulted from accommodation-induced ciliary muscle contractions.

  1. 3D Ion Temperature Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; You, Setthivoine; Balandin, Alexander; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2009-11-01

    The TS-4 experiment at the University of Tokyo collides two spheromaks to form a single high-beta compact toroid. Magnetic reconnection during the merging process heats and accelerates the plasma in toroidal and poloidal directions. The reconnection region has a complex 3D topology determined by the pitch of the spheromak magnetic fields at the merging plane. A pair of multichord passive spectroscopic diagnostics have been established to measure the ion temperature and velocity in the reconnection volume. One setup measures spectral lines across a poloidal plane, retrieving velocity and temperature from Abel inversion. The other, novel setup records spectral lines across another section of the plasma and reconstructs velocity and temperature from 3D vector and 2D scalar tomography techniques. The magnetic field linking both measurement planes is determined from in situ magnetic probe arrays. The ion temperature is then estimated within the volume between the two measurement planes and at the reconnection region. The measurement is followed over several repeatable discharges to follow the heating and acceleration process during the merging reconnection.

  2. Spectral Characterization and 3D Molecular Modeling Studies of Metal Complexes Involving the O, N-Donor Environment of Quinazoline-4(3H)-one Schiff Base and Their Biological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Kuruba; Mane, Sunilkumar B.

    2014-01-01

    A simple condensation of 3-amino-2-methylquinazoline-4-one with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde produced new tridentate ONO donor Schiff base ligand with efficient yield. The structural characterization of ligand and its Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II) complexes were achieved by the aid of elemental analysis, spectral characterization such as (UV-visible, IR, NMR, mass, and ESR), and magnetic data. The analytical and spectroscopic studies suggest the octahedral geometries of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Mn(II) complexes and tetrahedral geometry of Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with the tridentate ONO Schiff base ligand. Furthermore, the conclusions drawn from these studies afford further support to the mode of bonding discussed on the basis of their 3D molecular modeling studies by considering different bond lengths, bond angles, and bond distance. The ligand and its metal complexes evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC number 7443), Bacillus subtilis (MTCC number 9878), Escherichia coli (MTCC number 1698), Aspergillus niger (MTCC number 281), and Aspergillus flavus (MTCC number 277). The MIC of these compounds was found to be most active at 10 μg/mL concentration in inhibiting the growth of the tested organisms. The DNA cleavage activity of all the complexes was studied by gel electrophoresis method. PMID:24678278

  3. 3-D Terahertz Synthetic-Aperture Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Samuel C.

    Terahertz (THz) wavelengths have attracted recent interest in multiple disciplines within engineering and science. Situated between the infrared and the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, THz energy can propagate through non-polar materials such as clothing or packaging layers. Moreover, many chemical compounds, including explosives and many drugs, reveal strong absorption signatures in the THz range. For these reasons, THz wavelengths have great potential for non-destructive evaluation and explosive detection. Three-dimensional (3-D) reflection imaging with considerable depth resolution is also possible using pulsed THz systems. While THz imaging (especially 3-D) systems typically operate in transmission mode, reflection offers the most practical configuration for standoff detection, especially for objects with high water content (like human tissue) which are opaque at THz frequencies. In this research, reflection-based THz synthetic-aperture (SA) imaging is investigated as a potential imaging solution. THz SA imaging results presented in this dissertation are unique in that a 2-D planar synthetic array was used to generate a 3-D image without relying on a narrow time-window for depth isolation cite [Shen 2005]. Novel THz chemical detection techniques are developed and combined with broadband THz SA capabilities to provide concurrent 3-D spectral imaging. All algorithms are tested with various objects and pressed pellets using a pulsed THz time-domain system in the Northwest Electromagnetics and Acoustics Research Laboratory (NEAR-Lab).

  4. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  5. Electrostatic Effects in the Folding of the SH3 Domain of the c-Src Tyrosine Kinase: pH-Dependence in 3D-Domain Swapping and Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bacarizo, Julio; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel; Andujar-Sanchez, Montserrat; Ortiz-Salmeron, Emilia; Neira, Jose Luis; Camara-Artigas, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The SH3 domain of the c-Src tyrosine kinase (c-Src-SH3) aggregates to form intertwined dimers and amyloid fibrils at mild acid pHs. In this work, we show that a single mutation of residue Gln128 of this SH3 domain has a significant effect on: (i) its thermal stability; and (ii) its propensity to form amyloid fibrils. The Gln128Glu mutant forms amyloid fibrils at neutral pH but not at mild acid pH, while Gln128Lys and Gln128Arg mutants do not form these aggregates under any of the conditions assayed. We have also solved the crystallographic structures of the wild-type (WT) and Gln128Glu, Gln128Lys and Gln128Arg mutants from crystals obtained at different pHs. At pH 5.0, crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6522 and the asymmetric unit is formed by one chain of the protomer of the c-Src-SH3 domain in an open conformation. At pH 7.0, crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with two molecules at the asymmetric unit showing the characteristic fold of the SH3 domain. Analysis of these crystallographic structures shows that the residue at position 128 is connected to Glu106 at the diverging β-turn through a cluster of water molecules. Changes in this hydrogen-bond network lead to the displacement of the c-Src-SH3 distal loop, resulting also in conformational changes of Leu100 that might be related to the binding of proline rich motifs. Our findings show that electrostatic interactions and solvation of residues close to the folding nucleation site of the c-Src-SH3 domain might play an important role during the folding reaction and the amyloid fibril formation. PMID:25490095

  6. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  7. Efficient 3-D frequency-domain mono-parameter full-waveform inversion of ocean-bottom cable data: application to Valhall in the visco-acoustic vertical transverse isotropic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Miniussi, A.; Brossier, R.; Combe, L.; Métivier, L.; Monteiller, V.; Ribodetti, A.; Virieux, J.

    2015-08-01

    Computationally efficient 3-D frequency-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is applied to ocean-bottom cable data from the Valhall oil field in the visco-acoustic vertical transverse isotropic (VTI) approximation. Frequency-domain seismic modelling is performed with a parallel sparse direct solver on a limited number of computer nodes. A multiscale imaging is performed by successive inversions of single frequencies in the 3.5-10 Hz frequency band. The vertical wave speed is updated during FWI while density, quality factor QP and anisotropic Thomsen's parameters δ and ɛ are kept fixed to their initial values. The final FWI model shows the resolution improvement that was achieved compared to the initial model that was built by reflection traveltime tomography. This FWI model shows a glacial channel system at 175 m depth, the footprint of drifting icebergs on the palaeo-seafloor at 500 m depth, a detailed view of a gas cloud at 1 km depth and the base cretaceous reflector at 3.5 km depth. The relevance of the FWI model is assessed by frequency-domain and time-domain seismic modelling and source wavelet estimation. The agreement between the modelled and recorded data in the frequency domain is excellent up to 10 Hz although amplitudes of modelled wavefields propagating across the gas cloud are overestimated. This might highlight the footprint of attenuation, whose absorption effects are underestimated by the homogeneous background QP model (QP = 200). The match between recorded and modelled time-domain seismograms suggests that the inversion was not significantly hampered by cycle skipping. However, late arrivals in the synthetic seismograms, computed without attenuation and with a source wavelet estimated from short-offset early arrivals, arrive 40 ms earlier than the recorded seismograms. This might result from dispersion effects related to attenuation. The repeatability of the source wavelets inferred from data that are weighted by a linear gain with offset is

  8. Generation of nearly 3D-unpolarized evanescent optical near fields using total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Timo; Popov, Sergei; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the time-domain partial polarization of optical fields composed of two evanescent waves created in total internal reflection by random electromagnetic beams with orthogonal planes of incidence. We show that such a two-beam configuration enables to generate nearly unpolarized, genuine three-component (3D) near fields. This result complements earlier studies on spectral polarization, which state that at least three symmetrically propagating beams are required to produce a 3D-unpolarized near field. The degree of polarization of the near field can be controlled by adjusting the polarization states and mutual correlation of the incident beams. PMID:27367071

  9. Spectral-domain OCT imaging using a spectrally flexible wavelength-swept fiber laser based on dispersion tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takubo, Y.; Yamashita, S.

    2014-05-01

    The broadband source with the arbitrary spectrum based on dispersion tuning technique was demonstrated. While a dispersion-tuned wavelength-swept laser is capable of fast and widely wavelength sweep, it can also be used as a broadband spectrally-flexible source by controlling the sweep waveform. It is the first demonstration of spectrallytunable source to the best of our knowledge. We used the dispersion-tuned laser as a broadband source for SD-OCT system by synchronizing sweep rate of a laser and exposure time of a CCD camera in SD-OCT system. We successfully obtained the images of an adhesive tape and a human finger.

  10. Morphological patterns of indirect choroidal rupture on spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Unnikrishnan; Soman, Manoj; Ganekal, Sunil; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Nair, KGR

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the morphological types of indirect choroidal rupture (ICR) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods This was a prospective interventional study of 18 eyes of 18 patients who presented with a history of blunt ocular trauma resulting in choroidal rupture. All patients underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluation and SD-OCT examination. Results Mean age of the patients was 32±9.6 years. Morphologically, two types of choroidal rupture were seen on SD-OCT. The first type seen (Type 1 ICR) was a forward protrusion of the retinal pigment epithelium-choriocapillaris (RPE-CC) layer with an acutely angled pyramid or dome shape. This was associated with either a small loss of continuity of the retinal pigment epithelium layer or elevated RPE-CC projection accompanied by a significant quantity of subretinal hemorrhage. The second type observed (Type 2 ICR) was a larger area of disruption of the RPE-CC layer, photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction, and external limiting membrane, with a posteriorly directed concave contour depression at that area and downward sliding of tissues into the defect. At presentation, ten eyes were observed to have Type 1 ICR and eight to have Type 2 ICR. Of the 18 eyes, one with Type 1 ICR and two with Type 2 ICR developed choroidal neovascularization (16.6%). Conclusion Two distinct tomographic patterns of choroidal ruptures were identified on SD-OCT, which may allow ruptures to be classified into two morphological types. There are morphometric and clinical differences between the two types, which may help to prognosticate visual outcome and anticipate complications following choroidal ruptures. PMID:23901259

  11. Volume Averaging of Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Impacts Retinal Segmentation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Vogt, Kelly; Avery, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the influence of volume averaging on retinal layer thickness measures acquired with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in children. Methods Macular SD-OCT images were acquired using three different volume settings (i.e., 1, 3, and 9 volumes) in children enrolled in a prospective OCT study. Total retinal thickness and five inner layers were measured around an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Scale (ETDRS) grid using beta version automated segmentation software for the Spectralis. The magnitude of manual segmentation required to correct the automated segmentation was classified as either minor (<12 lines adjusted), moderate (>12 and <25 lines adjusted), severe (>26 and <48 lines adjusted), or fail (>48 lines adjusted or could not adjust due to poor image quality). The frequency of each edit classification was assessed for each volume setting. Thickness, paired difference, and 95% limits of agreement of each anatomic quadrant were compared across volume density. Results Seventy-five subjects (median age 11.8 years, range 4.3–18.5 years) contributed 75 eyes. Less than 5% of the 9- and 3-volume scans required more than minor manual segmentation corrections, compared with 71% of 1-volume scans. The inner (3 mm) region demonstrated similar measures across all layers, regardless of volume number. The 1-volume scans demonstrated greater variability of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNLF) thickness, compared with the other volumes in the outer (6 mm) region. Conclusions In children, volume averaging of SD-OCT acquisitions reduce retinal layer segmentation errors. Translational Relevance This study highlights the importance of volume averaging when acquiring macula volumes intended for multilayer segmentation. PMID:27570711

  12. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Alterations After Photocoagulation: A Prospective Spectral-Domain OCT Study

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Sıtkı; Ozturk, Taylan; Yaman, Aylin; Oner, Hakan; A. Osman, Saatci

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the effect of panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) in treatment-naive patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Methods : Fifty eight previously untreated eyes of 30 patients with PDR who underwent PRP treatment were enrolled prospectively. All patients had at least six months of follow-up. Detailed ophthalmologic examinations including macular thickness and RNFLT assessments with spectral-domain type optic coherence tomography were performed at baseline as well as the third and sixth posttreatment months. Initial RNFLT and macular thickness of laser administered patients were compared with two separate control groups that were consisted of either nondiabetic patients or diabetics without PDR. Results : The mean age of study patients was 52.4±7.1 years (Range, 32-66 years) and 16 of them (53.3%) were female. At the sixth post-PRP month, visual stabilization or improvement was achieved in 54 eyes (93.1%). No significant difference was demonstrated in initial RNFLT measurements between the study patients and two control groups (p=0.478). Mean RNFLT was measured as 108.5±17.5µm, 115.8±17.6µm, and 103.0±16.4µm at baseline, third and sixth months of the follow-up, respectively. Although RNFLT increase noted at the third post-laser month was statistically significant compared to its baseline values (p<0.001), there was a significant reduction in RNFLT at the sixth post-laser month compared to its baseline values (p<0.001). Conclusion : RNFLT increase in the third month of follow-up may be related to ensuing axonal edema. Significant RNLFT decrease at the sixth month of follow-up may be attributed to axonal loss secondary to the laser treatment. PMID:25493103

  13. Reflectivity and thickness analysis of epiretinal membranes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyan, Ajay E.; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Smiddy, William E.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare thickness and reflectivity spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) findings in patients with idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs), before and after ERM peeling surgery, with normal controls. METHODS A retrospective study analyzed SD-OCTs of eyes with ERMs undergoing ERM peeling surgery by one surgeon from 2008 to 2010 and normal control eyes. SD-OCTs were analyzed using a customized algorithm to measure reflectivity and thickness. The relationship between the SD-OCT findings and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) outcomes was also studied. RESULTS Thirty-four ERM eyes and 12 normal eyes were identified. Preoperative eyes had high reflectivity and thickness of the group of layers from the internal limiting membrane (ILM) to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the group of layers from the ILM to the external limiting membrane (ELM). The values of reflectivity of these two groups of layers decreased postoperatively, but were still higher than normal eyes. In contrast, preoperative eyes had lower reflectivity of two 10×15 pixel regions of interest (ROIs) incorporating: 1) ELM + outer nuclear layer (ONL) and 2) photoreceptor layer (PRL) + RPE, compared to controls. The values of reflectivity of these ROIs increased postoperatively, but were still lower than normal controls. A larger improvement in BCVA postoperatively was correlated with a greater degree of abnormal preoperative reflectivity and thickness findings. CONCLUSION Quantitative differences in reflectivity and thickness between preoperative, postoperative, and normal SD-OCTs allow assessment of changes in the retina secondary to ERM. Our study identified hyperreflective inner retina changes and hyporeflective outer retina changes in patients with ERMs. SD-OCT quantitative measures of reflectivity and/or thickness of specific groups of retinal layers and/or ROIs correlate with improvement in BCVA. PMID:26949617

  14. Subretinal Fluid in Eyes with Active Ocular Toxoplasmosis Observed Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qing; Heussen, Florian M.; Keane, Pearse A.; Stübiger, Nicole; Sadda, Srinivas R.; Pleyer, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical finding of subretinal fluid (SRF) in the posterior pole by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in eyes with active ocular toxoplasmosis (OT). Design Retrospective case series. Participants Thirty-eight eyes from 39 patients with active OT. Methods Eyes with active OT which underwent SD-OCT were reviewed. SRFs in the posterior pole were further analyzed. Main Outcome Measures Presence of SRF; its accompanying features, e.g. retinal necrosis, cystoid macular edema (CME), choroidal neovascularization (CNV); and longitudinal changes of SRF, including maximum height and total volume before and after treatment. Results SRF presented in 45.5% (or 15/33) of eyes with typical active OT and in 51.3% (or 20/39) of eyes with active OT. The mean maximum height and total volume of SRF were 161.0 (range: 23–478) µm and 0.47 (range: 0.005–4.12) mm3, respectively. For 12 eyes with SRF related to active retinal necrosis, SRF was observed with complete absorption after conventional anti-toxoplasmosis treatment. The mean duration for observation of SRF clearance was 33.8 (range: 7–84) days. The mean rate of SRF clearance was 0.0128 (range: 0.0002–0.0665) mm3/day. Conclusions SRF (i.e., serous retinal detachment) is a common feature in patients with active OT when SD-OCT is performed. The majority of SRF was associated with retinal necrosis and reacted well to conventional therapy, regardless of total fluid volume. However, SRF accompanying with CME or CNV responded less favorably or remained refractory to conventional or combined intravitreal treatment, even when the SRF was small in size. PMID:26010656

  15. Quantitative spectral domain optical coherence tomography thickness parameters in type II diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Raman, Rajiv; Sharma, Tarun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the changes in retinal thickness and individual layer thickness in subjects with diabetic retinopathy (DR) using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Materials and Methods: A total of 251 eyes from 170 subjects were included in this study. The study sample was subdivided into nondiabetic subjects; subjects with diabetes but no DR; subjects with mild, moderate, and severe nonproliferative DR (NPDR); and proliferative DR. Various retinal thickness parameters were assessed using SDOCT. Results: The mean age of the study population was 55.34 ± 9.02 years (range: 32–80 years) and 56.6% of the subjects were males. Men had significantly greater central foveal thickness, central subfield thickness, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and retinal thickness in all the quadrants of 3 mm and 6 mm zones compared to women (P < 0.001). Superior (293.11 ± 25.46 vs. 285.25 ± 19.17; P = 0.044) and temporal (282.10 ± 25.26 vs. 272.46 ± 16.21; P = 0.011) quadrants showed an increased retinal thickness in any DR group when compared with diabetic subjects without DR. Photoreceptor layer thickness was significantly reduced in diabetic subjects with no DR when compared with nondiabetic subjects and also in cases of severe NPDR when compared with mild and moderate NPDR. Conclusion: Here, we analyze the quantitative retinal thickness parameters in diabetic subjects using SDOCT. Neuronal degenerative changes such as photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelial thinning in case of DR are also reported. PMID:27013826

  16. Entire contact lens imaged in vivo and in vitro with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meixiao; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua; Yuan, Yimin; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the capability of directly visualizing the entire ocular surface and the entire contact lens on the eye using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods A custom built, high speed and high resolution SD-OCT was developed with extended scan depth and width. The eye was imaged before and after wearing a toric soft contact lens (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY). A lubricant eye drop (Soothe, Bausch & Lomb) was instilled in the eye to enhance the image contrast on the lens. The same toric soft contact lens immersed in the contact lens solution was also imaged with a contrast enhancement medium (0.5% Intralipid). Results Cross-sectional OCT images of the entire ocular surface were acquired with high resolution 2048×2048 pixels. Quantitative surface height map of the ocular surface was obtained from a radial scan dataset containing 32 B-scans. With the contrast enhancement agent, the entire toric soft contact lens was clearly visualized both in vitro and on the eye. The surfaces of the lens were detected and used to generate the thickness maps of the soft contact lens. Conclusions SD-OCT with extended scan depth and width is a promising tool for imaging the entire ocular surface shape and soft contact lenses. This successful demonstration suggests that the extended depth SD-OCT is effective in studying ocular surface shape and its interaction with a soft contact lens. The novel method is helpful for contact lens fitting evaluation and lens design. PMID:20093938

  17. Multimodal Retinal Vessel Segmentation from Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Fundus Photography

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhihong; Niemeijer, Meindert; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2014-01-01

    Segmenting retinal vessels in optic nerve head (ONH) centered spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes is particularly challenging due to the projected neural canal opening (NCO) and relatively low visibility in the ONH center. Color fundus photographs provide a relatively high vessel contrast in the region inside the NCO, but have not been previously used to aid the SD-OCT vessel segmentation process. Thus, in this paper, we present two approaches for the segmentation of retinal vessels in SD-OCT volumes that each take advantage of complimentary information from fundus photographs. In the first approach (referred to as the registered-fundus vessel segmentation approach), vessels are first segmented on the fundus photograph directly (using a k-NN pixel classifier) and this vessel segmentation result is mapped to the SD-OCT volume through the registration of the fundus photograph to the SD-OCT volume. In the second approach (referred to as the multimodal vessel segmentation approach), after fundus-to-SD-OCT registration, vessels are simultaneously segmented with a k-NN classifier using features from both modalities. Three-dimensional structural information from the intraretinal layers and neural canal opening obtained through graph-theoretic segmentation approaches of the SD-OCT volume are used in combination with Gaussian filter banks and Gabor wavelets to generate the features. The approach is trained on 15 and tested on 19 randomly chosen independent image pairs of SD-OCT volumes and fundus images from 34 subjects with glaucoma. Based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the present registered-fundus and multimodal vessel segmentation approaches [area under the curve (AUC) of 0.85 and 0.89, respectively] both perform significantly better than the two previous OCT-based approaches (AUC of 0.78 and 0.83, p < 0.05). The multimodal approach overall performs significantly better than the other three approaches (p < 0

  18. Spectral-Domain Measurements of Birefringence and Sensing Characteristics of a Side-Hole Microstructured Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Hlubina, Petr; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Olszewski, Jacek; Mergo, Pawel; Makara, Mariusz; Poturaj, Krzysztof; Urbańczyk, Waclaw

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally characterized a birefringent side-hole microstructured fiber in the visible wavelength region. The spectral dependence of the group and phase modal birefringence was measured using the methods of spectral interferometry. The phase modal birefringence of the investigated fiber increases with wavelength, but its positive sign is opposite to the sign of the group modal birefringence. We also measured the sensing characteristics of the fiber using a method of tandem spectral interferometry. Spectral interferograms corresponding to different values of a physical parameter were processed to retrieve the spectral phase functions and to determine the spectral dependence of polarimetric sensitivity to strain, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. A negative sign of the polarimetric sensitivity was deduced from the simulation results utilizing the known modal birefringence dispersion of the fiber. Our experimental results show that the investigated fiber has a very high polarimetric sensitivity to hydrostatic pressure, reaching −200 rad × MPa−1× m−1 at 750 nm. PMID:23989824

  19. Determining the von Mises stress power spectral density for frequency domain fatigue analysis including out-of-phase stress components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, M. H. A.; de Boer, A.; Liebregts, R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides a new formula to take into account phase differences in the determination of an equivalent von Mises stress power spectral density (PSD) from multiple random inputs. The obtained von Mises PSD can subsequently be used for fatigue analysis. The formula was derived for use in the commercial vehicle business and was implemented in combination with Finite Element software to predict and analyse fatigue failure in the frequency domain.

  20. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  1. INTRAOPERATIVE SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING AFTER INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING IN IDIOPATHIC EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE WITH CONNECTING STRANDS

    PubMed Central

    NAM, DONG HEUN; DESOUZA, PHILIP J.; HAHN, PAUL; TAI, VINCENT; SEVILLA, MONICA B.; TRAN-VIET, DU; CUNEFARE, DAVID; FARSIU, SINA; IZATT, JOSEPH A.; TOTH, CYNTHIA A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the intraoperative optical coherence tomography findings in idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) with connecting strands and to describe the postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective, case series study within a prospective observational intraoperative optical coherence tomography imaging study was performed. Epiretinal membranes with connecting strands were characterized on preoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography images and assessed against corresponding intraoperative (after internal limiting membrane [ILM] peeling) and postoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. Results Eleven locations of the connecting strands in 7 eyes were studied. The connecting strands had visible connections from the inner retinal surface to the ERM in all locations, and the reflectivity was moderate in 8 locations and high in 3 locations. After ERM and ILM peeling, disconnected strands were identified in all of the intraoperative optical coherence tomography images. The reflectivity of the remaining intraoperative strands was higher than that of the preoperative lesions and appeared as “finger-like” and branching projections. The remaining disconnected lesions were contiguous with the inner retinal layers. Postoperatively, the intraoperative lesions disappeared completely in all locations, and recurrent formation of ERM was not identified in any eyes. Conclusion In ERM eyes with connecting strands, intraoperative spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging showed moderately to highly reflective sub-ILM finger-like lesions that persist immediately after membrane and ILM peeling. Postoperatively, the hyperreflective lesions disappeared spontaneously without localized nerve fiber layer loss. The sub-ILM connecting strands may represent glial retinal attachments. PMID:25829349

  2. Optimal Spectral Domain Selection for Maximizing Archaeological Signatures: Italy Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cavalli, Rosa Maria; Pascucci, Simone; Pignatti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Different landscape elements, including archaeological remains, can be automatically classified when their spectral characteristics are different, but major difficulties occur when extracting and classifying archaeological spectral features, as archaeological remains do not have unique shape or spectral characteristics. The spectral anomaly characteristics due to buried remains depend strongly on vegetation cover and/or soil types, which can make feature extraction more complicated. For crop areas, such as the test sites selected for this study, soil and moisture changes within near-surface archaeological deposits can influence surface vegetation patterns creating spectral anomalies of various kinds. In this context, this paper analyzes the usefulness of hyperspectral imagery, in the 0.4 to 12.8 μm spectral region, to identify the optimal spectral range for archaeological prospection as a function of the dominant land cover. MIVIS airborne hyperspectral imagery acquired in five different archaeological areas located in Italy has been used. Within these archaeological areas, 97 test sites with homogenous land cover and characterized by a statistically significant number of pixels related to the buried remains have been selected. The archaeological detection potential for all MIVIS bands has been assessed by applying a Separability Index on each spectral anomaly-background system of the test sites. A scatterplot analysis of the SI values vs. the dominant land cover fractional abundances, as retrieved by spectral mixture analysis, was performed to derive the optimal spectral ranges maximizing the archaeological detection. This work demonstrates that whenever we know the dominant land cover fractional abundances in archaeological sites, we can a priori select the optimal spectral range to improve the efficiency of archaeological observations performed by remote sensing data. PMID:22573985

  3. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  4. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  5. Coseismic slip distribution of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake from joint inversion of GPS and InSAR data for slip within a 3-D heterogeneous Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Sui; Masterlark, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    We derive a coseismic slip model of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake on the basis of GPS and line-of-sight displacements from ALOS-2 descending interferograms, using Green's functions calculated with a 3-D finite element model (FEM). The FEM simulates a nonuniform distribution of elastic material properties and a precise geometric configuration of the irregular topographical surface. The rupturing fault is modeled as a low-angle and north dipping surface within the Main Frontal Thrust along the convergent margin of the Himalayas. The optimal model that inherits heterogeneous material properties provides a significantly better solution than that in a homogenous domain at the 95% confidence interval. The best fit solution for the domain having a nonuniform distribution of material properties reveals a rhombus-shaped slip zone of three composite asperities. Slip is primarily concentrated at a depth of 15 km with both dip-slip (maximum 6.54 m) and strike-slip (maximum 2.0 m) components, giving rise to a geodetic-based moment of 1.09 × 1021 Nm in general agreement with the seismological estimate. The optimal relative weights among GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) are deduced from a new method, MC-HVCE which combines a Monte Carlo search and a Helmert Method of Variance Components Estimation. This method determines the relative weights in a systemic approach which preserves the intrinsic solution smoothness. The joint solution is significantly better than those inverted from each individual data set. This methodology allows us to integrate multiple data sets of geodetic observations with seismic tomography, in an effort to achieve a better understanding of seismic ruptures within crustal heterogeneity.

  6. Reproducibility and Agreement Between 2 Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices for Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Kenneth M.; Maram, Jyotsna; Pan, Xiaojing; Dastiridou, Anna; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Ho, Alex; Francis, Brian A.; Sadda, Srinivas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare anterior chamber angle parameters based on the location of Schwalbe line (SL) from 2 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) instruments and to measure their reproducibility. Methods: Forty-two eyes from 21 normal, healthy participants underwent imaging of the inferior irido-corneal angle with the Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCT under tightly controlled low-light conditions. SL-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular iris space area (SL-TISA) were measured by masked, certified graders at the Doheny Imaging Reading Center using customized grading software. Interinstrument and intrainstrument, as well as interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of SL-AOD and SL-TISA measurements were evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement (LoA). Results: The mean SL-AOD was 0.662±0.191 mm in Spectralis and 0.677±0.213 mm in Cirrus. The mean SL-TISA was 0.250±0.073 mm2 in Spectralis and 0.256±0.082 mm2 in Cirrus. The agreement for intrainstrument (ICCs>0.979), intragrader (ICCs>0.992), and intergrader (ICCs>0.929) was excellent. Excellent agreement between the 2 devices was also documented with a mean difference of −0.016 (LoA −0.125 to 0.092) mm for SL-AOD and −0.007 (LoA −0.056 to 0.043) mm2 in SL-TISA. Conclusions: Both SD-OCTs provided comparable measurements and permitted calculation of SL-based angle metrics. There was excellent interinstrument and intrainstrument and intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility for Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCTs, suggesting true interchangeability between SD-OCT devices. This has the potential to lead to development of standardized grading assessments and quantification of angle parameters that would be valid across various SD-OCT devices. PMID:26200742

  7. Anatomic vs. Acquired Image Frame Discordance in Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Minimum Rim Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Hardin, Christy; Reyes, Luke; Reynaud, Juan; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Fortune, Brad; Demirel, Shaban; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the effects of using the fovea to Bruch's membrane opening (FoBMO) axis as the nasal-temporal midline for 30° sectoral (clock-hour) spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) optic nerve head (ONH) minimum rim width (MRW) and area (MRA) calculations. Methods The internal limiting membrane and BMO were delineated within 24 radial ONH B-scans in 222 eyes of 222 participants with ocular hypertension and glaucoma. For each eye the fovea was marked within the infrared reflectance image, the FoBMO angle (θ) relative to the acquired image frame (AIF) horizontal was calculated, the ONH was divided into 30°sectors using a FoBMO or AIF nasal/temporal axis, and SDOCT MRW and MRA were quantified within each FoBMO vs. AIF sector. For each sector, focal rim loss was calculated as the MRW and MRA gradients (i.e. the difference between the value for that sector and the one clockwise to it divided by 30°). Sectoral FoBMO vs. AIF discordance was calculated as the difference between the FoBMO and AIF values for each sector. Generalized estimating equations were used to predict the eyes and sectors of maximum FoBMO vs. AIF discordance. Results The mean FoBMO angle was −6.6±4.2° (range: −17° to +7°). FoBMO vs. AIF discordance in sectoral mean MRW and MRA was significant for 7 of 12 and 6 of 12 sectors, respectively (p<0.05, Wilcoxon test, Bonferroni correction). Eye-specific, FoBMO vs. AIF sectoral discordance was predicted by sectoral rim gradient (p<0.001) and FoBMO angle (p<0.001) and achieved maximum values of 83% for MRW and 101% for MRA. Conclusions Using the FoBMO axis as the nasal-temporal axis to regionalize the ONH rather than a line parallel to the AIF horizontal axis significantly influences clock-hour SDOCT rim values. This effect is greatest in eyes with large FoBMO angles and sectors with focal rim loss. PMID:24643069

  8. Comparison of Drusen Area Detected by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and Color Fundus Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yehoshua, Zohar; Gregori, Giovanni; Sadda, SriniVas R.; Penha, Fernando M.; Goldhardt, Raquel; Nittala, Muneeswar G.; Konduru, Ranjith K.; Feuer, William J.; Gupta, Pooja; Li, Ying; Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the measurements of drusen area from manual segmentation of color fundus photographs with those generated by an automated algorithm designed to detect elevations of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images. Methods. Fifty eyes with drusen secondary to nonexudative age-related macular degeneration were enrolled. All eyes were imaged with a high-definition OCT instrument using a 200 × 200 A-scan raster pattern covering a 6 mm × 6 mm area centered on the fovea. Digital color fundus images were taken on the same day. Drusen were traced manually on the fundus photos by graders at the Doheny Image Reading Center, whereas quantitative OCT measurements of drusen were obtained by using a fully automated algorithm. The color fundus images were registered to the OCT data set and measurements within corresponding 3- and 5-mm circles centered at the fovea were compared. Results. The mean areas (±SD [range]) for the 3-mm circles were SD-OCT = 1.57 (±1.08 [0.03–4.44]); 3-mm color fundus = 1.92 (±1.08 [0.20–3.95]); 5-mm SD-OCT = 2.12 (±1.55 [0.03–5.40]); and 5-mm color fundus = 3.38 (±1.90 [0.39–7.49]). The mean differences between color images and the SD-OCT (color − SD-OCT) were 0.36 (±0.93) (P = 0.008) for the 3-mm circle and 1.26 (±1.38) (P < 0.001) for the 5-mm circle measurements. Intraclass correlation coefficients of agreements for 3- and 5-mm measurements were 0.599 and 0.540, respectively. Conclusions. There was only fair agreement between drusen area measurements obtained from SD-OCT images and color fundus photos. Drusen area measurements on color fundus images were larger than those with SD-OCT scans. This difference can be attributed to the fact that the OCT algorithm defines drusen in terms of RPE deformations above a certain threshold, and will not include small, flat drusen and subretinal drusenoid deposits. The two approaches provide complementary information about

  9. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurement Comparison Using Spectral Domain and Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ahnul; Lee, Seung Hyen; Lee, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness concordance when measured by spectral domain (SD) and swept source (SS) optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to compare glaucoma-discriminating capability. Methods RNFL thicknesses were measured with the scan circle, centered on the optic nerve head, in 55 healthy, 41 glaucoma suspected, and 87 glaucomatous eyes. The RNFL thickness measured by the SD-OCT (sdRNFL thickness) and SS-OCT (ssRNFL thickness) were compared using the t-test. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to examine their agreement. We compared areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve and examined sdRNFL and ssRNFL thickness for discriminating glaucomatous eyes from healthy eyes, and from glaucoma suspect eyes. Results The average ssRNFL thickness was significantly greater than sdRNFL thickness in healthy (110.0 ± 7.9 vs. 100.1 ± 6.8 µm, p < 0.001), glaucoma suspect (96.8 ± 9.3 vs. 89.6 ± 7.9 µm, p < 0.001), and glaucomatous eyes (74.3 ± 14.2 vs. 69.1 ± 12.4 µm, p = 0.011). Bland-Altman analysis showed that there was a tendency for the difference between ssRNFL and sdRNFL to increase in eyes with thicker RNFL. The area under the curves of the average sdRNFL and ssRNFL thickness for discriminating glaucomatous eyes from healthy eyes (0.984 vs. 0.986, p = 0.491) and glaucoma suspect eyes (0.936 vs. 0.918, p = 0.132) were comparable. Conclusions There was a tendency for ssRNFL thickness to increase, compared with sdRNFL thickness, in eyes with thicker RNFL. The ssRNFL thickness had comparable diagnostic capability compared with sdRNFL thickness for discriminating glaucomatous eyes from healthy eyes and glaucoma suspect eyes. PMID:27051263

  10. Analysis of Normal Peripapillary Choroidal Thickness via Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joseph; Branchini, Lauren; Regatieri, Caio; Krishnan, Chandrasekharan; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To analyze the normal peripapillary choroidal thickness utilizing a commercial spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) device and determine the inter-grader reproducibility of this method. DESIGN Retrospective, non-comparative, non-interventional case series. PARTICIPANTS Thirty-six eyes of 36 normal patients seen at the New England Eye Center between April and September 2010. METHODS All patients underwent high-definition scanning with the Cirrus HD-OCT. Two raster scans were obtained per eye, a horizontal and a vertical scan, both of which were centered at the optic nerve. Two independent graders individually measured the choroidal thickness. Choroidal thickness was measured from the posterior edge of the retinal pigment epithelium to the choroid-scleral junction at 500 μm intervals away from the optic nerve in the superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants. Statistical analysis was conducted to compare mean choroidal thicknesses. Inter-grader reproducibility was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Average choroidal thickness in each quadrant was compared to retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in their respective quadrants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Peripapillary choroidal thickness, intraclass coefficient, Pearson’s correlation coefficient. RESULTS The peripapillary choroid in the inferior quadrant was significantly thinner compared to all other quadrants (p< 0.001). None of the other quadrants were significantly different from each other in terms of thickness. The inferior peripapillary choroid was significantly thinner compared to all other quadrants at all distances measured away from the optic nerve (p< 0.001). Generally, the peripapillary choroid increases in thickness the farther it was away from the optic nerve and eventually approaching a plateau. Intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.62 to 0.93 and Pearson’s correlation coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.95 (p

  11. Analysis of Choroidal Morphology and Vasculature in Healthy Eyes Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Branchini, Lauren A; Adhi, Mehreen; Regatieri, Caio V; Nandakumar, Namrata; Liu, Jonathan J; Laver, Nora; Fujimoto, James G; Duker, Jay S

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the morphology and vasculature of the choroid in healthy eyes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Design Cross-sectional retrospective review. Participants Forty-two healthy subjects (42 eyes), with no ocular disease who underwent high-definition scanning with Cirrus HD-OCT at the New England Eye Center, Boston, Massachusetts between November 2009 and September 2010. Methods The SD-OCT images were evaluated for morphological features of the choroid, including the shape of the choroid-scleral border, location of the thickest point of choroid and regions of focal choroidal thinning. Total choroidal thickness and large choroidal vessel layer thickness were measured by two independent observers experienced in analyzing OCT images using the Cirrus linear measurement tool at the fovea, 750μm nasal and temporal to the fovea. Custom software was used to calculate the ratio of choroidal stroma to the choroidal vessel lumen. Main Outcome Measures Qualitative assessment of the choroidal morphology, quantitative analysis of choroidal vasculature and use of a novel automated software to determine the ratio of choroidal stromal area to the area of choroidal vessel lumen. Results The 42 subjects had a mean age of 51.6 years. All subjects (100%) had a “bowl” or convex shape to the choroid-sclera junction and the thickest point of the choroid was under the fovea in 88.0% of the subjects. The mean choroidal thickness was 256.8±75.8μm, thickness of the large choroidal vessel layer was 204.3±65.9μm and that of medium choroidal vessel layer/choriocapillaris layer was 52.9±20.6μm beneath the fovea. The ratio of large choroidal vessel layer thickness to the total choroidal thickness beneath the fovea was 0.7±0.06. The software generated ratio of choroidal stromal area to the choroidal vessel lumen area to be 0.27±0.08, suggesting that choroidal vessel lumen forms a greater proportion of the choroid than choroidal stroma in

  12. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  13. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman's rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D surface

  14. The role of 3-D interactive visualization in blind surveys of H I in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.

    2015-09-01

    Upcoming H I surveys will deliver large datasets, and automated processing using the full 3-D information (two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension) to find and characterize H I objects is imperative. In this context, visualization is an essential tool for enabling qualitative and quantitative human control on an automated source finding and analysis pipeline. We discuss how Visual Analytics, the combination of automated data processing and human reasoning, creativity and intuition, supported by interactive visualization, enables flexible and fast interaction with the 3-D data, helping the astronomer to deal with the analysis of complex sources. 3-D visualization, coupled to modeling, provides additional capabilities helping the discovery and analysis of subtle structures in the 3-D domain. The requirements for a fully interactive visualization tool are: coupled 1-D/2-D/3-D visualization, quantitative and comparative capabilities, combined with supervised semi-automated analysis. Moreover, the source code must have the following characteristics for enabling collaborative work: open, modular, well documented, and well maintained. We review four state of-the-art, 3-D visualization packages assessing their capabilities and feasibility for use in the case of 3-D astronomical data.

  15. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need to wear special VR goggles. The new system is based on direct viewing of an interactive environment. This innovative holographic multiplexed screen technology makes it unnecessary for the viewer to wear special goggles.

  16. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  17. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  18. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  19. Radiosity diffusion model in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jason D.; Arridge, Simon R.; Chrysanthou, Yiorgos; Dehghani, Hamid; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Schweiger, Martin

    2001-11-01

    We present the Radiosity-Diffusion model in three dimensions(3D), as an extension to previous work in 2D. It is a method for handling non-scattering spaces in optically participating media. We present the extension of the model to 3D including an extension to the model to cope with increased complexity of the 3D domain. We show that in 3D more careful consideration must be given to the issues of meshing and visibility to model the transport of light within reasonable computational bounds. We demonstrate the model to be comparable to Monte-Carlo simulations for selected geometries, and show preliminary results of comparisons to measured time-resolved data acquired on resin phantoms.

  20. Optically rewritable 3D liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Srivastava, A K; Zhang, W; Wang, L; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H S

    2014-11-01

    Optically rewritable liquid crystal display (ORWLCD) is a concept based on the optically addressed bi-stable display that does not need any power to hold the image after being uploaded. Recently, the demand for the 3D image display has increased enormously. Several attempts have been made to achieve 3D image on the ORWLCD, but all of them involve high complexity for image processing on both hardware and software levels. In this Letter, we disclose a concept for the 3D-ORWLCD by dividing the given image in three parts with different optic axis. A quarter-wave plate is placed on the top of the ORWLCD to modify the emerging light from different domains of the image in different manner. Thereafter, Polaroid glasses can be used to visualize the 3D image. The 3D image can be refreshed, on the 3D-ORWLCD, in one-step with proper ORWLCD printer and image processing, and therefore, with easy image refreshing and good image quality, such displays can be applied for many applications viz. 3D bi-stable display, security elements, etc. PMID:25361316

  1. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  2. 3D polarimetric purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.; San José, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    From our previous definition of the indices of polarimetric purity for 3D light beams [J.J. Gil, J.M. Correas, P.A. Melero and C. Ferreira, Monogr. Semin. Mat. G. de Galdeano 31, 161 (2004)], an analysis of their geometric and physical interpretation is presented. It is found that, in agreement with previous results, the first parameter is a measure of the degree of polarization, whereas the second parameter (called the degree of directionality) is a measure of the mean angular aperture of the direction of propagation of the corresponding light beam. This pair of invariant, non-dimensional, indices of polarimetric purity contains complete information about the polarimetric purity of a light beam. The overall degree of polarimetric purity is obtained as a weighted quadratic average of the degree of polarization and the degree of directionality.

  3. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  4. 'Bonneville' in 3-D!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this 3-D navigation camera mosaic of the crater called 'Bonneville' after driving approximately 13 meters (42.7 feet) to get a better vantage point. Spirit's current position is close enough to the edge to see the interior of the crater, but high enough and far enough back to get a view of all of the walls. Because scientists and rover controllers are so pleased with this location, they will stay here for at least two more martian days, or sols, to take high resolution panoramic camera images of 'Bonneville' in its entirety. Just above the far crater rim, on the left side, is the rover's heatshield, which is visible as a tiny reflective speck.

  5. Lossy compression of hyperspectral images using shearlet transform and 3D SPECK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a new lossy compression method for hyperspectral images (HSI) is introduced. HSI are considered as a 3D dataset with two dimensions in the spatial and one dimension in the spectral domain. In the proposed method, first 3D multidirectional anisotropic shearlet transform is applied to the HSI. Because, unlike traditional wavelets, shearlets are theoretically optimal in representing images with edges and other geometrical features. Second, soft thresholding method is applied to the shearlet transform coefficients and finally the modified coefficients are encoded using Three Dimensional- Set Partitioned Embedded bloCK (3D SPECK). Our simulation results show that the proposed method, in comparison with well-known approaches such as 3D SPECK (using 3D wavelet) and combined PCA and JPEG2000 algorithms, provides a higher SNR (signal to noise ratio) for any given compression ratio (CR). It is noteworthy to mention that the superiority of proposed method is distinguishable as the value of CR grows. In addition, the effect of proposed method on the spectral unmixing analysis is also evaluated.

  6. Development of a non-uniform discrete Fourier transform based high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Ding, Zhihua; Wu, Tong; Wang, Chuan; Meng, Jie; Chen, Minghui; Xu, Lei

    2009-07-01

    We develop a high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system based on a custom-built spectrometer and non-uniform discrete Fourier transform (NDFT) to realize minimized depth dependent sensitivity fall-off. After precise spectral calibration of the spectrometer, NDFT of the acquired spectral data is adopted for image reconstruction. The spectrometer is able to measure a wavelength range of about 138 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.0674 nm at central wavelength of 835 nm, corresponding to an axial imaging range of 2.56 mm in air. Zemax simulations and sensitivity fall-off measurements under two alignment states of the spectrometer are given. Both theoretical simulations and experiments are done to study the depth dependent sensitivity of the developed system based on NDFT in contrast to those based on conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) with and without interpolation. In vivo imaging on human finger from volunteer is conducted at A-scan rate of 29 kHz and reconstruction is done based on different methods. The comparing results confirm that reconstruction method based on NDFT indeed improves sensitivity especially at large depth while maintaining the coherence-function-limited depth resolution. PMID:19582127

  7. Accelerating a 3D finite-difference wave propagation code by a factor of 50 and a spectral-element code by a factor of 25 using a cluster of GPU graphics cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Michéa, David; Erlebacher, Gordon; Göddeke, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    We first accelerate a three-dimensional finite-difference in the time domain (FDTD) wave propagation code by a factor of about 50 using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) computing on a cheap NVIDIA graphics card with the CUDA programming language. We implement the code in CUDA in the case of the fully heterogeneous elastic wave equation. We also implement Convolution Perfectly Matched Layers (CPMLs) on the graphics card to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid. We show that the code that runs on the graphics card gives the expected results by comparing our results to those obtained by running the same simulation on a classical processor core. The methodology that we present can be used for Maxwell's equations as well because their form is similar to that of the seismic wave equation written in velocity vector and stress tensor. We then implement a high-order finite-element (spectral-element) application, which performs the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation resulting for instance from earthquakes at the scale of a continent or from active seismic acquisition experiments in the oil industry, on a cluster of NVIDIA Tesla graphics cards using the CUDA programming language and non blocking message passing based on MPI. We compare it to the implementation in C language and MPI on a classical cluster of CPU nodes. We use mesh coloring to efficiently handle summation operations over degrees of freedom on an unstructured mesh, and we exchange information between nodes using non blocking MPI messages. Using non-blocking communications allows us to overlap the communications across the network and the data transfer between the GPU card and the CPU node on which it is installed with calculations on that GPU card. We perform a number of numerical tests to validate the single-precision CUDA and MPI implementation and assess its accuracy. We then analyze performance measurements and in average we obtain a speedup of 20x to 25x.

  8. Sub-micron resolution high-speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography in quality inspection for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fält, P.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.; Cense, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) in quality inspection for printed electronics. The device used in the study is based on a supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer and high-speed spectrometer. The spectrometer in the presented spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup (SD-OCT) is centered at 600 nm and covers a 400 nm wide spectral region ranging from 400 nm to 800 nm. Spectra were acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. The full width at half maximum of the point spread function obtained from a Parylene C sample was 0:98 m. In addition to Parylene C layers, the applicability of sub-micron SD-OCT in printed electronics was studied using PET and epoxy covered solar cell, a printed RFID antenna and a screen-printed battery electrode. A commercial SD-OCT system was used for reference measurements.

  9. Application of the maximum entropy method to spectral-domain optical coherence tomography for enhancing axial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yuuki; Sato, Manabu

    2007-08-01

    For the first time we applied the maximum entropy method (MEM) to spectral domain optical coherence tomography to enhance axial resolution (AR). The MEM estimates the power spectrum by fitting. For an onion with optimization of M = 70, the AR of 18.8 μm by discrete Fourier transform (DFT) was improved three times compared with peak widths. The calculation time by the MEM with M = 70 was 20 times longer than that of DFT. However, further studies are needed for practical applications, because the validity of the MEM depends on the sample structures.

  10. Temporal coherence shaping based on spectral-domain destructive interference of pulses with different self-phase modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D.; Takamasu, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2013-03-01

    We show via a numerical simulation that the temporal coherence function (TCF) can be shaped by the destructive interference of pulses characterized by different amounts of self-phase modulation (SPM) in the spectral domain. We find that pulse spectra destructively interfering with one another can yield a TCF with distinct peaks. Numerical investigation demonstrates that the shape of the TCF is changeable not only by broadening the spectrum but also by overlapping spectra of the pulses that have experienced different amounts of SPM.

  11. Blood flow imaging at deep posterior human eye using 1 μm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Fabritius, Tapio; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2009-02-01

    Blood flow imaging of deep posterior eye has been demonstrated by using 1-μm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. The high contrast imaging of deep posterior eye, such as the choroid and the sclera, enables blood flow imaging of choroidal vessels and short posterior ciliary arteries. Optical coherence angiography (OCA) images of outer part from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) reveal the vasculature of the choroid and the particular vasculature of short posterior ciliary arteries so-called the circle of Zinn-Haller. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration for flow imaging the circle of Zinn-Haller with optical coherence tomography.

  12. ATTENUATION OF THE GANGLION CELL LAYER IN A PREMATURE INFANT REVEALED WITH HANDHELD SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Mara R.; Zakka, Fouad R.; Carroll, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report on subclinical retinal abnormalities shown through handheld spectral domain optical coherence tomography on a premature infant. Methods: Case report. Results: The initial and follow-up exams on a premature infant revealed severely attenuated ganglion cell and nerve fiber layers. There was cystoid macular edema in both eyes at the initial visits, which resolved by the 1-year follow-up. Discussion: Optical coherence tomography can reveal significant retinal abnormalities in premature infants which are not detectable through funduscopic exam. Documenting such findings may be useful for the comprehensive management of vision problems in children with a history of premature birth. PMID:26529438

  13. Automatic retinal vessel segmentation based on active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenzhong; Liu, Tan; Song, Wei; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-01-01

    We achieved fast and automatic retinal vessel segmentation by employing the active contours method in Doppler spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In a typical OCT B-scan image, we first extracted the phase variations between adjacent A-lines and removed bulk motion. Then we set the initial contour as the boundary of the whole image and iterated until all of the segmented vessel contours became stabilized. Using a typical office computer, the whole segmentation took no more than 50 s, making real-time retinal vessel segmentation possible. We tested the active contours method segmentation in both controlled phantom and in vivo rodent eye images.

  14. Design and experimental investigation of highly efficient resonance-domain diffraction gratings in the visible spectral region.

    PubMed

    Barlev, Omri; Golub, Michael A; Friesem, Asher A; Nathan, Menachem

    2012-12-01

    Surface-relief resonance-domain diffraction gratings with deep and dense grooves provide considerable changes in light propagation direction, wavefront curvature, and nearly 100% Bragg diffraction efficiency usually attributed only to volume optical holograms. In this paper, we present design, computer simulation, fabrication, and experimental results of binary resonance-domain diffraction gratings in the visible spectral region. Performance of imperfectly fabricated diffraction groove profiles was optimized by controlling the DC and the depth of the grooves. Indeed, more than 97% absolute Bragg diffraction efficiency was measured at the 635 nm wavelength with binary gratings having periods of 520 nm and groove depths of about 1000 nm, fabricated by direct electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. PMID:23207376

  15. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  16. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  17. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  18. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  19. 3D steerable wavelets in practice.

    PubMed

    Chenouard, Nicolas; Unser, Michael

    2012-11-01

    We introduce a systematic and practical design for steerable wavelet frames in 3D. Our steerable wavelets are obtained by applying a 3D version of the generalized Riesz transform to a primary isotropic wavelet frame. The novel transform is self-reversible (tight frame) and its elementary constituents (Riesz wavelets) can be efficiently rotated in any 3D direction by forming appropriate linear combinations. Moreover, the basis functions at a given location can be linearly combined to design custom (and adaptive) steerable wavelets. The features of the proposed method are illustrated with the processing and analysis of 3D biomedical data. In particular, we show how those wavelets can be used to characterize directional patterns and to detect edges by means of a 3D monogenic analysis. We also propose a new inverse-problem formalism along with an optimization algorithm for reconstructing 3D images from a sparse set of wavelet-domain edges. The scheme results in high-quality image reconstructions which demonstrate the feature-reduction ability of the steerable wavelets as well as their potential for solving inverse problems. PMID:22752138

  20. Graphics processing unit-accelerated real-time compressive sensing spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daguang; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we systematically demonstrate two real-time CS SD OCT systems based on a conventional desktop having three GPUs. The first one takes fast Fourier transform (FFT) as the sensing technique and under-sampled linear wavenumber spectral sampling as input data, while the second one uses non-uniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) and under-sampled nonlinear wavenumber spectral sampling, respectively. The maximum reconstruction speed of 72k and 33.5k A-line/s were achieved for these two systems, respectively, with A-scan size 2048. It is >100 times faster than the C++ implementation and >400 times faster than the MATLAB implementation. Finally, we present real-time dispersion compensated image reconstruction for both systems.

  1. Spatial routing of optical beams through time-domain spatial-spectral filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbitt, W. R.; Mossberg, T. W.

    1995-04-01

    We propose a novel new method of temporal-waveform-controlled high-speed passive spatial routing of optical beams. The method provides for the redirection of optical signals contained within a single input beam into output directions that are specified entirely by temporal information encoded on the waveform of each incident signal. The routing is effected by means of deflection from spectrally structured spatial gratings that may be optically programmed into materials with or without intrinsic frequency selectivity.

  2. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  3. A 3D radiative transfer framework. VI. PHOENIX/3D example applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, P. H.; Baron, E.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We demonstrate the application of our 3D radiative transfer framework in the model atmosphere code PHOENIX for a number of spectrum synthesis calculations for very different conditions. Methods: The 3DRT framework discussed in the previous papers of this series was added to our general-purpose model atmosphere code PHOENIX/1D and an extended 3D version PHOENIX/3D was created. The PHOENIX/3D code is parallelized via the MPI library using a hierarchical domain decomposition and displays very good strong scaling. Results: We present the results of several test cases for widely different atmosphere conditions and compare the 3D calculations with equivalent 1D models to assess the internal accuracy of the 3D modeling. In addition, we show the results for a number of parameterized 3D structures. Conclusions: With presently available computational resources it is possible to solve the full 3D radiative transfer (including scattering) problem with the same micro-physics as included in 1D modeling.

  4. Fourier domain optical coherence tomography artifact and speckle reduction by autoregressive spectral estimation without a loss of resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousi, Evgenia; Pitris, Costas

    2015-03-01

    Fourier Domain (FD) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) interferograms require a Fourier transformation in order to be converted to A-Scans representing the backscattering intensity from the different depths of the tissue microstructure. Most often, this transformation is performed using a discrete Fourier transform, i.e. the well-known Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). However, there are many alternatives for performing the necessary spectral conversion. Autoregressive (AR) spectral estimation techniques are one such example. The parametric nature of AR techniques offers several advantages, compared to the commonly-used FFT, including better convergence and less susceptibility to noise. They can also be adjusted to represent more or less of the signal detail depending on the order of the autoregression. These features make them uniquely suited for processing the FD OCT data. The advantages of the proposed methodology are illustrated on in vivo skin imaging data and the resolution is verified on single back-reflections from a glass surface. AR spectral estimation can be used to convert the interferograms to A-Scans while at the same time reducing the artifacts caused by high intensity back-reflections (by -20 dB) and diminishing the speckle (by -12 dB) all without the degradation in the resolution associated with other techniques.

  5. 3D face analysis for demographic biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tokola, Ryan A; Mikkilineni, Aravind K; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2015-01-01

    Despite being increasingly easy to acquire, 3D data is rarely used for face-based biometrics applications beyond identification. Recent work in image-based demographic biometrics has enjoyed much success, but these approaches suffer from the well-known limitations of 2D representations, particularly variations in illumination, texture, and pose, as well as a fundamental inability to describe 3D shape. This paper shows that simple 3D shape features in a face-based coordinate system are capable of representing many biometric attributes without problem-specific models or specialized domain knowledge. The same feature vector achieves impressive results for problems as diverse as age estimation, gender classification, and race classification.

  6. Power spectral density estimation by spline smoothing in the frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, R. J. P.; Thompson, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach, based on a global averaging procedure, is presented for estimating the power spectrum of a second order stationary zero-mean ergodic stochastic process from a finite length record. This estimate is derived by smoothing, with a cubic smoothing spline, the naive estimate of the spectrum obtained by applying FFT techniques to the raw data. By means of digital computer simulated results, a comparison is made between the features of the present approach and those of more classical techniques of spectral estimation.

  7. Power spectral density estimation by spline smoothing in the frequency domain.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Figueiredo, R. J. P.; Thompson, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    An approach, based on a global averaging procedure, is presented for estimating the power spectrum of a second order stationary zero-mean ergodic stochastic process from a finite length record. This estimate is derived by smoothing, with a cubic smoothing spline, the naive estimate of the spectrum obtained by applying Fast Fourier Transform techniques to the raw data. By means of digital computer simulated results, a comparison is made between the features of the present approach and those of more classical techniques of spectral estimation.-

  8. Immersed boundary smooth extension: A high-order method for solving PDE on arbitrary smooth domains using Fourier spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, David B.; Guy, Robert D.; Thomases, Becca

    2016-01-01

    The Immersed Boundary method is a simple, efficient, and robust numerical scheme for solving PDE in general domains, yet it only achieves first-order spatial accuracy near embedded boundaries. In this paper, we introduce a new high-order numerical method which we call the Immersed Boundary Smooth Extension (IBSE) method. The IBSE method achieves high-order accuracy by smoothly extending the unknown solution of the PDE from a given smooth domain to a larger computational domain, enabling the use of simple Cartesian-grid discretizations (e.g. Fourier spectral methods). The method preserves much of the flexibility and robustness of the original IB method. In particular, it requires minimal geometric information to describe the boundary and relies only on convolution with regularized delta-functions to communicate information between the computational grid and the boundary. We present a fast algorithm for solving elliptic equations, which forms the basis for simple, high-order implicit-time methods for parabolic PDE and implicit-explicit methods for related nonlinear PDE. We apply the IBSE method to solve the Poisson, heat, Burgers', and Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations, and demonstrate fourth-order pointwise convergence for Dirichlet problems and third-order pointwise convergence for Neumann problems.

  9. Time-domain and spectral properties of pulsars at 154 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. E.; Murphy, Tara; Johnston, S.; Kaplan, D. L.; Croft, S.; Hancock, P.; Callingham, J. R.; Zic, A.; Dobie, D.; Swiggum, J. K.; Rowlinson, A.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    We present 154 MHz Murchison Widefield Array imaging observations and variability information for a sample of pulsars. Over the declination range -80° < δ < 10°, we detect 17 known pulsars with mean flux density greater than 0.3 Jy. We explore the variability properties of this sample on time-scales of minutes to years. For three of these pulsars, PSR J0953+0755, PSR J0437-4715, and PSR J0630-2834, we observe interstellar scintillation and variability on time-scales of greater than 2 min. One further pulsar, PSR J0034-0721, showed significant variability, the physical origins of which are difficult to determine. The dynamic spectra for PSR J0953+0755 and PSR J0437-4715 show discrete time and frequency structure consistent with diffractive interstellar scintillation and we present the scintillation bandwidth and time-scales from these observations. The remaining pulsars within our sample were statistically non-variable. We also explore the spectral properties of this sample and find spectral curvature in pulsars PSR J0835-4510, PSR J1752-2806, and PSR J0437-4715.

  10. Pre-existing sensory biases in the spectral domain in frogs: empirical results and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, H C; Humfeld, Sarah C

    2013-02-01

    In many species of anurans, advertisement calls excite only one of the two inner-ear organs. One prediction of the pre-existing bias hypothesis is that signal innovations that additionally excite the "untapped" organ will be more behaviorally effective than normal calls. However, recent studies have shown that females of three species with single-peaked calls that stimulate only the basilar papilla (BP) preferred single-peaked synthetic calls with a frequency typical of conspecific calls to two-peaked calls that also stimulated the amphibian papilla (AP). We report that in spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer) that also produce single-peaked calls, females did not show a preference in choices between single-peaked and two-peaked synthetic calls. Thus, the addition of energy exciting the AP had a neutral effect on signal attractiveness. Together, these results are unsupportive of the pre-existing bias hypothesis. An alternative hypothesis is that positive fitness consequences of responding to sounds providing extraordinary spectral stimulation are required for a novel call to become established as a mate-attracting signal. Testing these ideas requires a taxonomically broader examination of responses to sounds with novel spectral complexity, and attention to some methodological details will improve the comparability of such studies. PMID:23160797

  11. Time-domain and spectral properties of pulsars at 154 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, M. E.; Murphy, Tara; Johnston, S.; Kaplan, D. L.; Croft, S.; Hancock, P.; Callingham, J. R.; Zic, A.; Dobie, D.; Swiggum, J. K.; Rowlinson, A.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present 154 MHz Murchison Widefield Array imaging observations and variability information for a sample of pulsars. Over the declination range -80° < δ < 10° we detect 17 known pulsars with mean flux density greater than 0.3 Jy. We explore the variability properties of this sample on timescales of minutes to years. For three of these pulsars, PSR J0953+0755, PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J0630-2834 we observe interstellar scintillation and variability on timescales of greater than 2 minutes. One further pulsar, PSR J0034-0721, showed significant variability, the physical origins of which are difficult to determine. The dynamic spectra for PSR J0953+0755 and PSR J0437-4715 show discrete time and frequency structure consistent with diffractive interstellar scintillation and we present the scintillation bandwidth and timescales from these observations. The remaining pulsars within our sample were statistically non-variable. We also explore the spectral properties of this sample and find spectral curvature in pulsars PSR J0835-4510, PSR J1752-2806 and PSR J0437-4715.

  12. Ultrawide-field parallel spectral domain optical coherence tomography for nondestructive inspection of glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyan; Zhao, Chen; Shen, Yi; Li, Peng; Wang, Xiaoping; Ding, Zhihua

    2015-04-01

    Aiming at the requirements of real-time inspection in material industry, an ultrawide-field parallel SD-OCT system capable of visualizing cross-sectional image of internal structures by a single shot of a 2-D CMOS camera is developed. To achieve ultrawide-field parallel detection, one meniscus lens with negative dioptric is introduced as an additional relay lens and imaging optics including sample arm, relay lenses and spectrometer are optimized as a whole for desirable imaging quality. The developed system has an ultrawide-field of 35 mm and an axial range of 8 mm in air. The maximum on-axis sensitivity and the axial resolution are experimentally determined to be 65 dB and 17.7 μm, respectively. The on-axis lateral resolution is measured to be 44 μm in parallel direction and 22 μm in scanning direction. The system is applied to obtain 3-D volume images of a set of glass-samples covering an area of about 28 mm by 15 mm with thicknesses ranging between 2.1 mm and 4 mm, from which defects such as solid inclusion, micro-deformation and bubble are identified either on the surfaces or inside the samples.

  13. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  14. An analysis of artificial viscosity effects on reacting flows using a spectral multi-domain technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, Michele G.; Streett, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    Analytical and experimental techniques for modeling the aerothermodynamics of hypersonic flight are assessed, together with the problems which will be encountered in developing reusable hypersonic vehicles. Emphasis is placed on a numerical coupling between a nonequilibrium chemistry model and hypersonic flow kinematics. Finite difference and finite element descriptions of flow fields in which molecules encounter a shock wave and undergo various motion (and thereby energy) transformations are discussed. The effects of artificial smearing of the shock wave are considered in terms of the resulting effects on the distribution of the energies and chemical composition of the transition region. Results are provided from schlieren photographs of shock-tube experiments, Navier-Stokes calculations of axisymmetric flow over a conical body, and calculations using a spectral multidomain approach for chemically reacting flows.

  15. Characterization of ink-jet printed RGB color filters with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Vilmi, P.; Lauri, J.; Sliz, R.; Fabritius, T.; Myllylä, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the use of sub-micron resolution optical coherence tomography (SMR SD-OCT) in volumetric characterization of ink- jet printed color filters, aimed for electronic paper display (EPD). The device used in the study is based on supercontinuum light source, Michelson interferometer centered at 600 nm and employs 400-800 nm spectral region. Spectra are acquired at a continuous rate of 140,000 per second. Color filter array of 143 μm x 141 μm sized and 6 rtm deep ink pools was studied. The volumetric OCT reconstruction was done using the experimental SMR SD-OCT device and a commercial SD-OCT imaging system. The ink layer in the pools was estimated to be 2μm thin. The optical profilometer was used for reference measurements.

  16. Spectral filtering of gradient for l2-norm frequency-domain elastic waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Min, Dong-Joo

    2013-05-01

    To enhance the robustness of the l2-norm elastic full-waveform inversion (FWI), we propose a denoise function that is incorporated into single-frequency gradients. Because field data are noisy and modelled data are noise-free, the denoise function is designed based on the ratio of modelled data to field data summed over shots and receivers. We first take the sums of the modelled data and field data over shots, then take the sums of the absolute values of the resultant modelled data and field data over the receivers. Due to the monochromatic property of wavefields at each frequency, signals in both modelled and field data tend to be cancelled out or maintained, whereas certain types of noise, particularly random noise, can be amplified in field data. As a result, the spectral distribution of the denoise function is inversely proportional to the ratio of noise to signal at each frequency, which helps prevent the noise-dominant gradients from contributing to model parameter updates. Numerical examples show that the spectral distribution of the denoise function resembles a frequency filter that is determined by the spectrum of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio during the inversion process, with little human intervention. The denoise function is applied to the elastic FWI of synthetic data, with three types of random noise generated by the modified version of the Marmousi-2 model: white, low-frequency and high-frequency random noises. Based on the spectrum of S/N ratios at each frequency, the denoise function mainly suppresses noise-dominant single-frequency gradients, which improves the inversion results at the cost of spatial resolution.

  17. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  18. In vivo early retinal structural alterations following laser photocoagulation using three-dimensional spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep; Mishra, Nibha; Ruia, Surabhi; Akduman, Levent

    2016-01-01

    To study the retinal structural alterations and surface topography of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) immediately following laser photocoagulation up to day 7. Cross-sectional retinal imaging and RPE segmentation maps on spectral domain optical coherence tomography were obtained immediately at hour 1, day 1, day 4 and day 7 following 532 nm neodymium:YAG laser photocoagulation in a 56-year-old male patient for branch retinal vein occlusion. Immediately postlaser, loss of reflectivity of all the retinal layers was observed. At hour 1, hyper-reflectivity of outer retinal layers was observed with increase in hyporeflective spaces by day 1. Immediately postlaser, pitting of the RPE was observed on surface topography which regressed at day 1. On day 4, smooth RPE surface topography was observed with the occurrence of small elevated areas on day 7. The present report provides an insight into the in vivo changes in the retinal structure and RPE surface topography after laser photocoagulation. PMID:27402655

  19. Noninvasive in vivo structural and vascular imaging of human oral tissues with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Bahar; Lindenmaier, Andras; Standish, Beau A.; Allo, Ghassan; Bizheva, Kostadinka; Vitkin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    A spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system and an oral imaging probe have been developed to visualize the microstructural morphology and microvasculature in the human oral cavity. Structural OCT images of ex vivo pig oral tissues with the histology of the same sites were acquired and compared for correlations. Structural in vivo OCT images of healthy human tissue as well as a pathologic site (ulcer) were obtained and analyzed based on the results of the ex vivo pig study, drawing on the similarity between human and swine oral tissues. In vivo Doppler and speckle variance OCT images of the oral cavity in human volunteers were also acquired, to demonstrate the feasibility of microvascular imaging of healthy and pathologic (scar) oral tissue. PMID:22567578

  20. Finite difference/spectral approximations for the distributed order time fractional reaction-diffusion equation on an unbounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hu; Lü, Shujuan; Chen, Wenping

    2016-06-01

    The numerical approximation of the distributed order time fractional reaction-diffusion equation on a semi-infinite spatial domain is discussed in this paper. A fully discrete scheme based on finite difference method in time and spectral approximation using Laguerre functions in space is proposed. The scheme is unconditionally stable and convergent with order O (τ2 + Δα2 +N (1 - m) / 2), where τ, Δα, N, and m are the time-step size, step size in distributed-order variable, polynomial degree, and regularity in the space variable of the exact solution, respectively. A pseudospectral scheme is also proposed and analyzed. Some numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme.

  1. In vivo tear film thickness measurement and tear film dynamics visualization using spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Aranha Dos Santos, Valentin; Schmetterer, Leopold; Gröschl, Martin; Garhofer, Gerhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Kucera, Martin; Unterhuber, Angelika; Hermand, Jean-Pierre; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-08-10

    Dry eye syndrome is a highly prevalent disease of the ocular surface characterized by an instability of the tear film. Traditional methods used for the evaluation of tear film stability are invasive or show limited repeatability. Here we propose a new non-invasive fully automated approach to measure tear film thickness based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography and on an efficient delay estimator. Silicon wafer phantom were used to validate the thickness measurement. The technique was applied in vivo in healthy subjects. Series of tear film thickness maps were generated, allowing for the visualization of tear film dynamics. Our results show that the in vivo central tear film thickness measurements are precise and repeatable with a coefficient of variation of about 0.65% and that repeatable tear film dynamics can be observed. The presented approach could be used in clinical setting to study patients with dry eye disease and monitor their treatments. PMID:26367956

  2. Three-dimensional segmentation and reconstruction of the retinal vasculature from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Pedro; Rodrigues, Pedro; Celorico, Dirce; Serranho, Pedro; Bernardes, Rui

    2015-01-01

    We reconstruct the three-dimensional shape and location of the retinal vascular network from commercial spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) data. The two-dimensional location of retinal vascular network on the eye fundus is obtained through support vector machines classification of properly defined fundus images from OCT data, taking advantage of the fact that on standard SD-OCT, the incident light beam is absorbed by hemoglobin, creating a shadow on the OCT signal below each perfused vessel. The depth-wise location of the vessel is obtained as the beginning of the shadow. The classification of crossovers and bifurcations within the vascular network is also addressed. We illustrate the feasibility of the method in terms of vessel caliber estimation and the accuracy of bifurcations and crossovers classification.

  3. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography, Wide-Field Photography, and Fundus Autofluorescence Correlation of Posterior Ophthalmomyiasis Interna.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Yannis M; Butler, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Posterior ophthalmomyiasis interna is a rare, potentially devastating infestation of the posterior segment by fly larvae. The authors report the first demonstration of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) (Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany), wide-field angiography (Optos, Dunfermline, Scotland) and photography, and fundus autofluorescence with temporal progression during a period of 6 months. A 12-year-old white female presented with acute, painless vision loss with hand motions visual acuity. No larva was visible, so she was treated with oral ivermectin. Visual acuity improved to 20/80. OCT demonstrated hyporeflective spaces of the outer retina and retinal pigment epithelium, which resolved during 1-month period with improved ellipsoid layer by 6 months. Fundus autofluorescence demonstrated linear hypoautofluorescent tracks. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:682-685.]. PMID:27434903

  4. Broadband frequency-domain near-infrared spectral tomography using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-domain near-infrared (NIR) diffuse spectral tomography with a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is presented, providing tunable multiwavelength quantitative spectroscopy with maximal power for thick tissue imaging. The system was developed to show that intrinsically high stability can be achieved with many wavelengths in the NIR range, using a mode-locked signal of 80 MHz with heterodyned lock-in detection. The effect of cumulative noise from multiple wavelengths of data on the reconstruction process was studied, and it was shown that inclusion of more wavelengths can reduce skew in the noise distribution. This normalization of the data variance then minimizes errors in estimation of chromophore concentrations. Simulations and tissue phantom experiments were used to quantify this improvement in image accuracy for recovery of tissue hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. PMID:19340109

  5. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  6. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Comişel, H.; Verscharen, D.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U.

    2013-09-15

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  7. Three-dimensional density interface inversion of gravity anomalies in the spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Juan; Meng, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhaoxi; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    Based on the Fourier transform, the Parker-Oldenburg algorithm in the frequency domain was extended for the three-dimensional case where the density changes with depth. From this, a gravity interface inversion formula was derived in which the assumed density can be varied laterally and vertically. Iterative convergence is assured by fixing a particular depth as the datum plane below the surface to reduce the interface fluctuation. The results of an example set of synthetic gravity data indicate that the proposed method gives high precision and rapid convergence, with high practical value for the inversion of density interfaces. This method was also used to determine the Moho depth beneath northern China. The results were confirmed by seismic sounding data. Differences between seismic sounding data and inverted depth were insignificant and were in the range of -0.92-1.67 km.

  8. Fast parameter and state estimation with the Spectral Kalman Filter: an application for CO2 injection in heterogeneous domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanidehno, H.; Kokkinaki, A.; Darve, E. F.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    The Kalman Filter has been widely used for dynamic monitoring in reservoir engineering, and has recently gained popularity in hydrogeologic applications. A common characteristic of such applications is that the physical processes of interest are greatly affected by preferential flow (e.g., contaminant spreading, CO2 leakage), which can only be delineated if the problem is finely discretized into a large number of unknowns. However, for problems with large numbers of unknowns (e.g., larger than 10,000), the Kalman Filter has prohibitively expensive computation and storage costs. The EnKF, which is typically used to reduce the cost of computing the covariance in such cases converges slowly to the best estimate, and for a reasonable number of realizations, the estimate may not be accurate, especially for strongly heterogeneous systems. We present the Spectral Kalman Filter, a new Kalman Filter implementation that has a dramatically reduced computational cost compared to the full Kalman Filter, with comparable or higher accuracy than the EnKF for the same computational cost. Our algorithm's computational efficiency is achieved by a recurrence that updates small cross-covariance matrices instead of large covariance matrices, in combination with a low-rank approximation of the noise covariance matrix. In addition, instead of computing the expensive Jacobian matrix, a matrix-free method is used to obtain sensitivities. Finally, the error of our method can be explicitly controlled by reducing the time between matrix updates. The frequency of these updates is controlled independently from the data assimilation steps. We demonstrate the performance of the Spectral Kalman Filter for the joint estimation of domain properties and state evolution by assimilation of quasi-continuous data during a hypothetical CO2 injection in a heterogeneous domain.

  9. Intrasurgical Human Retinal Imaging With Manual Instrument Tracking Using a Microscope-Integrated Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Paul; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar; Cunefare, David; Migacz, Justin; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the first in-human intraoperative imaging using a custom prototype spectral-domain microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography (MIOCT) device during vitreoretinal surgery with instruments in the eye. Methods: Under institutional review board approval for a prospective intraoperative study, MIOCT images were obtained at surgical pauses with instruments held static in the vitreous cavity and then concurrently with surgical maneuvers. Postoperatively, MIOCT images obtained at surgical pauses were compared with images obtained with a high-resolution handheld spectral-domain OCT (HHOCT) system with objective endpoints, including acquisition of images acceptable for analysis and identification of predefined macular morphologic or pathologic features. Results: Human MIOCT images were successfully obtained before incision and during pauses in surgical maneuvers. MIOCT imaging confirmed preoperative diagnoses, such as epiretinal membrane, full-thickness macular hole, and vitreomacular traction and demonstrated successful achievement of surgical goals. MIOCT and HHOCT images obtained at surgical pauses in two cohorts of five patients were comparable with greater than or equal to 80% correlation in 80% of patients. Real-time video-imaging concurrent with surgical manipulations enabled, for the first time using this device, visualization of dynamic instrument-retina interaction with targeted OCT tracking. Conclusion: MIOCT is successful for imaging at surgical pauses and for real-time image guidance with implementation of targeted OCT tracking. Even faster acquisition speeds are currently being developed with incorporation of a swept-source MIOCT engine. Further refinements and investigations will be directed toward continued integration for real-time volumetric imaging of surgical maneuvers. Translational Relevance: Ongoing development of seamless MIOCT systems will likely transform surgical visualization, approaches, and decision-making. PMID

  10. Full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography for volumetric imaging at 47 000 A-scans per second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lin; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system capable of achieving full range complex imaging at a line scan rate of 47 kHz. By applying a beam-offset method, a constant modulation frequency is introduced into each B-scan that enables reconstruction of the full range complex SDOCT images of in vivo tissue samples. To make use of the full capacity of the detection camera used in the system, system control software is developed that streams the raw spectral fringe data directly into the computer memory. In order to assess performance of the high speed full range SDOCT system for imaging biological specimen, we present results imaged from the cuticle of the fingernail of a human volunteer in vivo and from chick embryos ex vivo. We also show the high sensitivity advantages of full range complex imaging as compared to conventional SDOCT. To the best of our knowledge, an imaging rate of 47 000 A-scans per second is the highest imaging rate that has ever been reported for full range complex imaging. Notwithstanding, the method reported here has no limitations on the imaging speed and thus offers a useful tool to achieve volumetric imaging of living samples where the high sensitivity region around zero delay line in the system can be utilized for imaging.

  11. A method of studying spectral optical characteristics of a homogeneous medium by means of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, K. I.; Gavdush, A. A.; Lebedev, S. P.; Karasik, V. E.; Yurchenko, S. O.

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an algorithm for solving an inverse problem related to the reconstruction of spectral dependences of terahertz (THz) optical characteristics of a homogeneous medium in the form of a plane-parallel plate, which is based on processing signals obtained by a THz time-domain spectrometer. In contrast to existing methods, the developed algorithm allows studying the optical properties of dielectric samples that have a small thickness (down to 0.1 mm) and low index of refraction. Optical characteristics in the THz spectral range are determined by minimization of the error functional constructed based on experimental and theoretical complex transfer functions of the sample, wherein the theoretical transfer function is obtained by using a model of a Fabry-Perot quasi-resonator. The proposed method is experimentally verified by studying optical properties of test samples. The reconstructed THz optical characteristics are compared with the characteristics of the same test media obtained by means of the THz backward-wave oscillator spectroscopy, which allowed estimating the accuracy of the proposed method.

  12. Full Range Complex Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for Volumetric Imaging at 47, 000 A Scans per Second

    PubMed Central

    An, Lin; Hrebesh, Molly; Wang, Ruikang K

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system capable of achieving full range complex imaging at 47 kHz line scan rate. By applying beam-offset method, a constant modulation frequency is introduced into each B-scan that enables reconstruction of the full range complex SDOCT images of in vivo tissue samples. To make use of the full capacity of detection camera used in the system, system control software is developed that streams the raw spectral fringe data directly into the computer memory. In order to assess performance of the high speed full range SDOCT system for imaging biological specimen, we present results imaged from the cuticle of fingernail of a human volunteer in vivo, and from the chicken embryos ex vivo. We also show the high sensitivity advantages of full range complex imaging as compared to the conventional SDOCT. To the best of our knowledge, 47,000 A-scan imaging rate is the highest imaging rate ever been reported for full range complex imaging. Notwithstanding, the method reported here has no limitations on the imaging speed, thus offers a useful tool to achieve volumetric imaging of living samples where the high sensitivity region around zero-delay line in the system can be utilized for imaging. PMID:21643509

  13. Spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry for phase-sensitive measurement of Faraday rotation at multiple depths

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Jou; Black, Adam J.; Akkin, Taner

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for differential phase measurement of Faraday rotation from multiple depth locations simultaneously. A polarization-maintaining fiber-based spectral-domain interferometer which utilizes a low-coherent light source and a single camera is developed. Light decorrelated by the orthogonal channels of the fiber is launched on a sample as two oppositely polarized circular states. These states reflect from sample surfaces and interfere with the corresponding states of the reference arm. A custom spectrometer, which is designed to simplify camera alignment, separates the orthogonal channels and records the interference related oscillations on both spectra. Inverse Fourier transform of the spectral oscillations in k-space yields complex depth profiles, whose amplitudes and phase difference are related to reflectivity and Faraday rotation within the sample, respectively. Information along a full depth profile is produced at the camera speed without performing an axial scan for a multi-surface sample. System sensitivity for the Faraday rotation measurement is 0.86 minutes of arc. Verdet constants of clear liquids and turbid media are measured at 687 nm. PMID:24217734

  14. High-resolution coherence domain reflectometry using 1.55 μm supercontinuum source and quadrature spectral detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elwyn; Wada, Naoya; Chujo, Wataru; Sampson, David D.

    2002-06-01

    High-power ultra-broadband sources such as a supercontinuum are very attractive in optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence-domain reflectometry (OCDR) due to their very high resolution potential. However, the large and extensive coherence-function sidelobes typical of such sources preclude their use in conventional OCDR and OCT systems. In addition, device or sample dispersion over such broad bandwidths may also significantly limit the achievable performance. Here we describe a novel experiment using a supercontinuum source with a static Michelson interferometer to perform OCDR at 1.55micrometers . Quadrature spectral detection is used to maximize the scanning range and to allow direct compensation for both the undesirable spectral shape of the source and for the dispersion in the system. Such a non-scanning-interferometer approach is an interesting possible alternative for very broadband, ultra-high resolution OCT systems. We demonstrate that an otherwise obscured small reflection next to a large reflection can be revealed by appropriately weighting the data to reshape the supercontinuum spectrum and compensate for dispersion. Significant reduction of the supercontinuum coherence function sidelobes is achieved, and a resolution in air of 7micrometers (FWHM) is obtained, or less than 5micrometers in media of refractive index 1.45.

  15. Standard resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography in clinical ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkulmowska, Anna; Cyganek, Marta; Targowski, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Kaluzny, Jakub J.; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-04-01

    In this study we show clinical application of Spectral Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT), which enables operation with 40 times higher speed than commercial Stratus OCT instrument. Using high speed SOCT instrument it is possible to collect more information and increase the quality of reconstructed cross-sectional retinal images. Two generations of compact and portable clinical SOCT instruments were constructed in Medical Physics Group at Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland. The first SOCT instrument is a low-cost system operating with standard, 12 micrometer axial resolution and the second is high resolution system using combined superluminescent diodes light source, which enables imaging with 4.8 micrometer axial resolution. Both instruments have worked in Ophthalmology Clinic of Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz. During the study we have examined 44 patients with different pathologies of the retina including: Central Serous Chorioretinopathy (CSC), Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV), Pigment Epithelial Detachment (PED), Macular Hole, Epiretinal Membrane, Outer Retinal Infarction etc. All these pathologies were first diagnosed by classical methods (like fundus camera imaging and angiography) and then examined with the aid of SOCT system. In this contribution we present examples of SOCT cross-sectional retinal imaging of pathologic eyes measured with standard resolution. We also compare cross-sectional images of pathology obtained by standard and high resolution systems.

  16. High precision computing with charge domain devices and a pseudo-spectral method therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Zak, Michail (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention enhances the bit resolution of a CCD/CID MVM processor by storing each bit of each matrix element as a separate CCD charge packet. The bits of each input vector are separately multiplied by each bit of each matrix element in massive parallelism and the resulting products are combined appropriately to synthesize the correct product. In another aspect of the invention, such arrays are employed in a pseudo-spectral method of the invention, in which partial differential equations are solved by expressing each derivative analytically as matrices, and the state function is updated at each computation cycle by multiplying it by the matrices. The matrices are treated as synaptic arrays of a neural network and the state function vector elements are treated as neurons. In a further aspect of the invention, moving target detection is performed by driving the soliton equation with a vector of detector outputs. The neural architecture consists of two synaptic arrays corresponding to the two differential terms of the soliton-equation and an adder connected to the output thereof and to the output of the detector array to drive the soliton equation.

  17. An analysis of artificial viscosity effects on reacting flows using a spectral multi-domain technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.; Streett, C. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Standard techniques used to model chemically-reacting flows require an artificial viscosity for stability in the presence of strong shocks. The resulting shock is smeared over at least three computational cells, so that the thickness of the shock is dictated by the structure of the overall mesh and not the shock physics. A gas passing through a strong shock is thrown into a nonequilibrium state and subsequently relaxes down over some finite distance to an equilibrium end state. The artificial smearing of the shock envelops this relaxation zone which causes the chemical kinetics of the flow to be altered. A method is presented which can investigate these issues by following the chemical kinetics and flow kinetics of a gas passing through a fully resolved shock wave at hypersonic Mach numbers. A nonequilibrium chemistry model for air is incorporated into a spectral multidomain Navier-Stokes solution method. Since no artificial viscosity is needed for stability of the multidomain technique, the precise effect of this artifice on the chemical kinetics and relevant flow features can be determined.

  18. Optical characterization of agricultural pest insects: a methodological study in the spectral and time domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Y.; Zhang, H.; Duan, Z.; Lian, M.; Zhao, G. Y.; Sun, X. H.; Hu, J. D.; Gao, L. N.; Feng, H. Q.; Svanberg, S.

    2016-08-01

    Identification of agricultural pest insects is an important aspect in insect research and agricultural monitoring. We have performed a methodological study of how spectroscopic techniques and wing-beat frequency analysis might provide relevant information. An optical system based on the combination of close-range remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy was developed to study the optical characteristics of different flying insects, collected in Southern China. The results demonstrate that the combination of wing-beat frequency assessment and reflectance spectral analysis has the potential to successfully differentiate between insect species. Further, studies of spectroscopic characteristics of fixed specimen of insects, also from Central China, showed the possibility of refined agricultural pest identification. Here, in addition to reflectance recordings also laser-induced fluorescence spectra were investigated for all the species of insects under study and found to provide complementary information to optically distinguish insects. In order to prove the practicality of the techniques explored, clearly fieldwork aiming at elucidating the variability of parameters, even within species, must be performed.

  19. A physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Hao, Bingtao; Wang, Lele; Li, Jiao

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely employed as non-invasive 3D imaging diagnostic instrument, particularly in the field of ophthalmology. Although OCT has been approved for use in clinic in USA, Europe and Asia, international standardization of this technology is still in progress. Validation of OCT imaging capabilities is considered extremely important to ensure its effective use in clinical diagnoses. Phantom with appropriate test targets can assist evaluate and calibrate imaging performance of OCT at both installation and throughout lifetime of the instrument. In this paper, we design and fabricate a physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets to characterize OCT imaging performance. The model eye was fabricated with transparent resin to simulate realistic ophthalmic testing environment, and most key optical elements including cornea, lens and vitreous body were realized. The test targets which mimic USAF 1951 test chart were fabricated on the fundus of the model eye by 3D printing technology. Differing from traditional two dimensional USAF 1951 test chart, a group of patterns which have different thickness in depth were fabricated. By measuring the 3D test targets, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of an OCT system can be evaluated at the same time with this model eye. To investigate this specialized model eye, it was measured by a scientific spectral domain OCT instrument and a clinical OCT system respectively. The results demonstrate that the model eye with 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  20. Spectral and spatial nondestructive examination of dielectric materials with THz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, J.; von Chrzanowski, L. S.; Fratzscher, D.; Ewert, U.

    2012-05-01

    A time domain spectrometer T-ray 2000® operating in the range of 0.2-2 THz was used for Time of Flight measurements. A series of ethanol water mixtures from 10% to 90% were produced subsequently filled in polystyrene cells and analyzed in the T-ray 2000 TDS system in the reflection mode. The reflectivity of the material liquid interface is strongly influenced by the ethanol concentration in water. The reciprocal reflection coefficient of the material liquid interface was found to be a useful discriminating feature for further Probably of Detection calculations which can be used for the performance evaluation of potential THz bottle scanners. THz pulse echo (PE) measurements were performed in comparison to the established ultra sound PE technique for flaw detection of plastics. Synthetic aperture reconstructions were applied for simulated data to reconstruct the flaw shape. The results were compared with B-scan images of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) test cylinder. Existing restrictions on the quality of the back projected images and limits of the existing model are discussed in detail.

  1. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  2. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  3. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible. PMID:7919882

  4. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  5. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-02-26

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  6. 3D Radiative Transfer Effects in Multi-Angle/Multi-Spectral Radio-Polarimetric Signals from a Mixture of Clouds and Aerosols Viewed by a Non-Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Garay, Michael J.; Xu, Feng; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    When observing a spatially complex mix of aerosols and clouds in a single relatively large field-of-view, nature entangles their signals non-linearly through polarized radiation transport processes that unfold in the 3D position and direction spaces. In contrast, any practical forward model in a retrieval algorithm will use only 1D vector radiative transfer (vRT) in a linear mixing technique. We assess the difference between the observed and predicted signals using synthetic data from a high-fidelity 3D vRT model with clouds generated using a Large Eddy Simulation model and an aerosol climatology. We find that this difference is signal--not noise--for the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), an instrument developed by NASA. Moreover, the worst case scenario is also the most interesting case, namely, when the aerosol burden is large, hence hase the most impact on the cloud microphysics and dynamics. Based on our findings, we formulate a mitigation strategy for these unresolved cloud adjacency effects assuming that some spatial information is available about the structure of the clouds at higher resolution from "context" cameras, as was planned for NASA's ill-fated Glory mission that was to carry the APS but failed to reach orbit. Application to POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) data from the period when PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) was in the A-train is briefly discussed.

  7. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  8. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  12. 3D puzzle reconstruction for archeological fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jampy, F.; Hostein, A.; Fauvet, E.; Laligant, O.; Truchetet, F.

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of broken artifacts is a common task in archeology domain; it can be supported now by 3D data acquisition device and computer processing. Many works have been dedicated in the past to reconstructing 2D puzzles but very few propose a true 3D approach. We present here a complete solution including a dedicated transportable 3D acquisition set-up and a virtual tool with a graphic interface allowing the archeologists to manipulate the fragments and to, interactively, reconstruct the puzzle. The whole lateral part is acquired by rotating the fragment around an axis chosen within a light sheet thanks to a step-motor synchronized with the camera frame clock. Another camera provides a top view of the fragment under scanning. A scanning accuracy of 100μm is attained. The iterative automatic processing algorithm is based on segmentation into facets of the lateral part of the fragments followed by a 3D matching providing the user with a ranked short list of possible assemblies. The device has been applied to the reconstruction of a set of 1200 fragments from broken tablets supporting a Latin inscription dating from the first century AD.

  13. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models. PMID:26066320

  14. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  15. Arena3D: visualization of biological networks in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; O'Donoghue, Seán I; Satagopam, Venkata P; Soldatos, Theodoros G; Pafilis, Evangelos; Schneider, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Background Complexity is a key problem when visualizing biological networks; as the number of entities increases, most graphical views become incomprehensible. Our goal is to enable many thousands of entities to be visualized meaningfully and with high performance. Results We present a new visualization tool, Arena3D, which introduces a new concept of staggered layers in 3D space. Related data – such as proteins, chemicals, or pathways – can be grouped onto separate layers and arranged via layout algorithms, such as Fruchterman-Reingold, distance geometry, and a novel hierarchical layout. Data on a layer can be clustered via k-means, affinity propagation, Markov clustering, neighbor joining, tree clustering, or UPGMA ('unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean'). A simple input format defines the name and URL for each node, and defines connections or similarity scores between pairs of nodes. The use of Arena3D is illustrated with datasets related to Huntington's disease. Conclusion Arena3D is a user friendly visualization tool that is able to visualize biological or any other network in 3D space. It is free for academic use and runs on any platform. It can be downloaded or lunched directly from . Java3D library and Java 1.5 need to be pre-installed for the software to run. PMID:19040715

  16. Fdf in US3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otis, Collin; Ferrero, Pietro; Candler, Graham; Givi, Peyman

    2013-11-01

    The scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) methodology is implemented into the computer code US3D. This is an unstructured Eulerian finite volume hydrodynamic solver and has proven very effective for simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The resulting SFMDF-US3D code is employed for large eddy simulation (LES) on unstructured meshes. Simulations are conducted of subsonic and supersonic flows under non-reacting and reacting conditions. The consistency and the accuracy of the simulated results are assessed along with appraisal of the overall performance of the methodology. The SFMDF-US3D is now capable of simulating high speed flows in complex configurations.

  17. Anisotropy effects on 3D waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stekl, I.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2010-12-01

    misinterpretation of results. However if correct physics is used results agree with correct model. Our algorithm is relatively affordable and runs on standard pc clusters in acceptable time. Refferences: H. Ben Hadj Ali, S. Operto and J. Virieux. Velocity model building by 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-aperture seismic data, Geophysics (Special issue: Velocity Model Building), 73(6), P. VE101-VE117 (2008). L. Sirgue, O.I. Barkved, J. Dellinger, J. Etgen, U. Albertin, J.H. Kommedal, Full waveform inversion: the next leap forward in imaging at Valhall, First Brake April 2010 - Issue 4 - Volume 28 M. Warner, I. Stekl, A. Umpleby, Efficient and Effective 3D Wavefield Tomography, 70th EAGE Conference & Exhibition (2008)

  18. Reproducibility of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Retinal Thickness Measurements and Conversion to Equivalent Time Domain Metrics in Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Susan B.; Edwards, Allison R.; Chalam, Kakarla V.; Bressler, Neil M.; Glassman, Adam R.; Jaffe, Glenn J.; Melia, Michele; Saggau, David D.; Plous, Oren Z.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Advances in retinal imaging have led to the development of optical coherence tomography (OCT) instruments that incorporate spectral domain (SD) technology. Understanding measurement variability and relationships between retinal thickness measurements obtained on different machines is critical for proper use in clinical trials and clinical settings. Objectives Evaluate reproducibility of retinal thickness measurements from OCT images obtained by time domain (TD) (Zeiss Stratus) and SD (Zeiss Cirrus and Heidelberg Spectralis) instruments and formulate equations to convert retinal thickness measurements from SD-OCT to equivalent values on TD-OCT. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Each study eye underwent two replicate Stratus scans followed by two replicate Cirrus or Spectralis (real time image registration utilized) scans centered on the fovea. Setting Private and institutional practices Participants Diabetic persons with at least one eye with central-involved diabetic macular edema (DME), defined as Stratus central subfield thickness (CST)≥250μm. An additional normative cohort, individuals with diabetes but without DME, was enrolled. Main Outcome Measure(s) OCT CST and macular volume Results The Bland-Altman coefficient of repeatability for relative change in CST (the degree of change that could be expected from measurement variability) was lower on Spectralis compared with Stratus and Cirrus scans (7%, 12–15%, and 14%, respectively). For each cohort, the initial Stratus CST was within 10% of the replicate Stratus measurement 92% of the time; the conversion equations predicted a Stratus CST within 10% of the observed thickness 86% and 89% of the time for Stratus/Cirrus and Stratus/Spectralis groups, respectively. The Bland-Altman limits of agreement for relative change in CST between machines (the degree of change that could be expected from measurement variability, combined within and between instrument variability) were 21% for Cirrus and

  19. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  20. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with dual-balanced detection for auto-correlation artifacts reduction.

    PubMed

    Bo, En; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Yu, Xiaojun; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2015-10-19

    We developed a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to reduce auto-correlation artifacts (AC) using dual-balanced detection (DBD). AC were composed of the interference signals between different sample tissue depths, and shown up as artifacts in OCT images. This system employed a free-space Michelson interferometer, at the refraction plane of whose beam splitter, the light reflected experienced a π/2 phase shift with respect to the light transmitted. Then two phase-opposed interferometric spectra sharing the same spectrometer optics were obtained simultaneously using two lines of a three-line CCD. This new design was of lower cost compared to the dual spectrometer design reported previously. DBD enabled this SD-OCT to achieve two-fold increase in the interested signal amplitude inherently, and obtain a SNR increase of ~2.9 dB experimentally. To demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this SD-OCT system with DBD, we conducted an imaging experiment using a glass plate to obtain the optimal spectral matching between dual-balanced spectrometer channels. As a result, this SD-OCT achieved AC reduction up to about 9 dB and direct current (DC) term suppression up to about 30 dB by cancelling the identical components between dual-balanced spectrometer channels. The efficacy of AC reduction and DC suppression was validated by imaging the polymer coating of a drug-eluting stent and fresh swine corneal tissue ex vivo. The quality of DBD optimized images was significantly improved with regard to the single-channel images. PMID:26480462

  1. Workflow strategies and application to large-scale 3-D full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemenz, A.; Igel, H.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of 3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) utilizing a Python-driven workflow which incorporates the SPECFEM3D solver, a time-domain spectral element method, and the Obpsy software, a toolbox for computational seismology. We examine source encoding strategies, where multiple seismic sources are simultaneously excited, reducing in the number of required simulations per FWI iteration. Applications to synthetic case studies are presented which demonstrate a sensitivity of source encoding to source-receiver offset and number of encoded supershots. We detail workflow methodologies suitable for large-scale (i.e. many sources and receivers) FWI applications, as encountered in exploration geophysics problems in the marine environment.

  2. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore » the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  3. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  4. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  5. 2D time domain spectral phase encoding/wavelength hopping coherent DPSK-OCDMA system using fiber Bragg gratings and phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhensen; Dai, Bo; Wang, Xu; Kataoka, Nobuyuki; Wada, Naoya

    2010-12-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a reconfigurable two-dimensional (temporal-spectral) time domain spectral phase encoding (SPE) scheme for coherent optical code-division-multiple-access (OCDMA) application. The time-domain SPE scheme is robust to wavelength drift of the light source and is very flexible and compatible with the fiber optical system. In the proposed scheme, the ultra-short optical pulse is stretched by dispersive device and the SPE is done in time domain using high speed phase modulator. A Fiber Bragg Gratings array is used for generating the two-dimensional wavelength hopping pattern while the high speed phase modulator is used for generating the spectral phase pattern. The proposed scheme can enable simultaneous generation of the time domain spectral phase encoding and DPSK data modulation using only a single phase modulator. In the experiment, the two-dimensional SPE codes have been generated and modulated with 2.5-Gb/s DPSK data using a single phase modulator. Transmission of the 2.5-Gb/s DPSK data over 49km fiber with BER<10-9 has been demonstrated successfully. The proposed scheme exhibits the potential to simplify the architecture and improve the security of the OCDMA system.

  6. Double-difference relocations and spectral ratio analysis of volcanic seismic events in the Mount St. Helens crater using a 3D velocity model suggest slip events under the new dome with constant stress-drop scaling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, R. M.; Kwiatek, G.; Moran, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow low frequency seismic events are common features associated with restless and erupting volcanoes. The physical mechanisms generating their characteristic low frequency, and often extended duration signals remain poorly understood. Here we present new double-difference relocations and spectral scaling of a group of ~400 shallow low-frequency seismic events occurring within the Mount St. Helens edifice during its 2004-2008 dome-building eruption, as recorded by a temporary seismic array for a month within the crater in 2006. Relocation results suggest that the majority of earthquakes occurred in the center of the crater close to the vent at depths < 500 m, with some events potentially locating under the new dome but ~200-300m southwest of the vent. Low-frequency events exhibit moment-corner frequency scaling roughly consistent with a constant static stress-drop, similar to tectonic earthquakes occurring elsewhere in shallow crustal faults. The scaling suggests that the ~400 events result from stick-slip behavior, and that the low frequency character of the waveforms may result from a combination of path effects and slow rupture speeds. For relocation, we divide the 400 events into eight families based on waveform similarity, and use a subset of nearly 40 earthquakes with clear first arrivals ranging in moment magnitude from 0.4 - 1.8 to calculate hypocenters. We then relocate these events using a double-difference method with a three-dimensional velocity model of the edifice from Waite and Moran (2009). The relocated events are then used to estimate source parameters of the remaining earthquakes via a spectral ratio technique. Spectral corner frequency estimations based on this spectral ratio approach produce stress-drop values of ~1 MPa assuming a shear-wave velocity of 1500 m/s. The estimations also indicate a constant stress-drop scaling for all events, with two event families having lower estimated stress drops of ~0.1 MPa. While localized lithological

  7. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  8. Fusing Passive and Active Sensed Images to Gain Infrared-Textured 3d Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Hoegner, L.; Leitloff, J.; Stilla, U.; Hinz, S.; Jutzi, B.

    2012-07-01

    Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision, Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. New active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique, image-based active ranging is possible which allows for capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. with moving pedestrians or moving vehicles. The currently available range imaging devices usually operate within the close-infrared domain to capture range and furthermore active and passive intensity images. Depending on the application, a 3D description with additional spectral information such as thermal-infrared data can be helpful and offers new opportunities for the detection and interpretation of human subjects and interactions. Therefore, thermal-infrared data combined with range information is promising. In this paper, an approach for mapping thermal-infrared data on range data is proposed. First, a camera calibration is carried out for the range imaging system (PMD[vision] CamCube 2.0) and the thermal-infrared system (InfraTec VarioCAM hr). Subsequently, a registration of close-infrared and thermal infrared intensity images derived from different sensor devices is performed. In this context, wavelength independent properties are selected in order to derive point correspondences between the different spectral domains. Finally, the thermal infrared images are enhanced with information derived from data acquired with the range imaging device and the enhanced IR texture is projected onto the respective 3D point cloud data for gaining appropriate infrared-textured 3D models. The feasibility of the proposed methodology is demonstrated for an experimental setup which is well-suited for investigating these proposed possibilities. Hence, the presented work is a first step towards the development of methods for combined thermal-infrared and range representation.