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Sample records for 3d spheroid culture

  1. 3D spheroid cultures improve the metabolic gene expression profiles of HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Hori, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Urashima, Toshiki; Ohara, Yasunori; Tanaka, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    3D (three-dimensional) cultures are considered to be an effective method for toxicological studies; however, little evidence has been reported whether 3D cultures have an impact on hepatocellular physiology regarding lipid or glucose metabolism. In the present study, we conducted physiological characterization of hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and HepaRG cells cultured in 3D conditions using a hanging drop method to verify the effect of culture environment on cellular responses. Apo (Apolipoprotein)B as well as albumin secretion was augmented by 3D cultures. Expression of genes related to not only drug, but also glucose and lipid metabolism were significantly enhanced in 3D cultured HepaRG spheroids. Furthermore, mRNA levels of CYP (cytochrome P450) enzymes following exposure to corresponding inducers increased under the 3D condition. These data suggest that this simple 3D culture system without any special biomaterials can improve liver-specific characteristics including lipid metabolism. Considering that the system enables high-throughput assay, it may become a powerful tool for compound screening concerning hepatocellular responses in order to identify potential drugs. PMID:26182370

  2. Nonlinear 3D projection printing of concave hydrogel microstructures for long-term multicellular spheroid and embryoid body culture.

    PubMed

    Hribar, K C; Finlay, D; Ma, X; Qu, X; Ondeck, M G; Chung, P H; Zanella, F; Engler, A J; Sheikh, F; Vuori, K; Chen, S C

    2015-06-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propagation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach - with an important modification of nonlinear exposure - to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  3. Nonlinear 3D Projection Printing of Concave Hydrogel Microstructures for Long-Term Multicellular Spheroid and Embryoid Body Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, K.C; Finlay, D.; Ma, X.; Qu, X.; Ondeck, M. G.; Chung, P. H.; Zanella, F.; Engler, A. J.; Sheikh, F.; Vuori, K.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propogation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach – with an important modification of nonlinear exposure — to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  4. A Simple Hanging Drop Cell Culture Protocol for Generation of 3D Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Foty, Ramsey

    2011-01-01

    Studies of cell-cell cohesion and cell-substratum adhesion have historically been performed on monolayer cultures adherent to rigid substrates. Cells within a tissue, however, are typically encased within a closely packed tissue mass in which cells establish intimate connections with many near-neighbors and with extracellular matrix components. Accordingly, the chemical milieu and physical forces experienced by cells within a 3D tissue are fundamentally different than those experienced by cells grown in monolayer culture. This has been shown to markedly impact cellular morphology and signaling. Several methods have been devised to generate 3D cell cultures including encapsulation of cells in collagen gels1or in biomaterial scaffolds2. Such methods, while useful, do not recapitulate the intimate direct cell-cell adhesion architecture found in normal tissues. Rather, they more closely approximate culture systems in which single cells are loosely dispersed within a 3D meshwork of ECM products. Here, we describe a simple method in which cells are placed in hanging drop culture and incubated under physiological conditions until they form true 3D spheroids in which cells are in direct contact with each other and with extracellular matrix components. The method requires no specialized equipment and can be adapted to include addition of any biological agent in very small quantities that may be of interest in elucidating effects on cell-cell or cell-ECM interaction. The method can also be used to co-culture two (or more) different cell populations so as to elucidate the role of cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions in specifying spatial relationships between cells. Cell-cell cohesion and cell-ECM adhesion are the cornerstones of studies of embryonic development, tumor-stromal cell interaction in malignant invasion, wound healing, and for applications to tissue engineering. This simple method will provide a means of generating tissue-like cellular aggregates for measurement of

  5. Optimization of Aqueous Biphasic Tumor Spheroid Microtechnology for Anti-Cancer Drug Testing in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Atefi, Ehsan; Luker, Gary D.; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are three-dimensional clusters of cancer cells that exhibit characteristics of poorly perfused tumors and hence present a relevant model for testing the efficacy of anti-cancer compounds. The use of spheroids for drug screening is hindered by technological complexities for high throughput generation of consistent size spheroids individually addressable by drug compounds. Here we present and optimize a simple spheroid technology based on the use of an aqueous two-phase system. Cancer cells confined in a drop of the denser aqueous dextran phase are robotically dispensed into a microwell containing the immersion aqueous polyethylene glycol phase. Cells remain within the drop and form a viable spheroid, without a need for any external stimuli. The size of resulting spheroids is sensitive to volume variations of dispensed drops from the air displacement pipetting head of a commercial liquid handling robot. Therefore, we parametrically optimize the process of dispensing of dextran phase drops. For a given cell density, this optimization reproducibly generates consistent size spheroids in standard 96-well plates. In addition, we evaluate the use of a commercial biochemical assay to examine cellular viability of cancer cell spheroids. Spheroids show a dose-dependent response to cisplatin similar to a monolayer culture. However unlike their two-dimensional counterpart, spheroids exhibit resistance to paclitaxel treatment. This technology, which uses only commercially-available reagents and equipment, can potentially expedite anti-cancer drug discovery. Although the use of robotics makes the ATPS spheroid technology particularly useful for drug screening applications, this approach is compatible with simpler liquid handling techniques such as manual micropipetting and offers a straightforward method of 3D cell culture in research laboratories. PMID:25221631

  6. Controllable Production of Transplantable Adult Human High-Passage Dermal Papilla Spheroids Using 3D Matrigel Culture

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Ya Bin; Liu, Bing Cheng; Jiang, Jin Dou

    2014-01-01

    We have succeeded in culturing human dermal papilla (DP) cell spheroids and developed a three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel (basement membrane matrix) culture technique that can enhance and restore DP cells unique characteristics in vitro. When 1×104 DP cells were cultured on the 96-well plates precoated with Matrigel for 5 days, both passage 2 and passage 8 DP cells formed spheroidal microtissues with a diameter of 150–250 μm in an aggregative and proliferative manner. We transferred and recultured these DP spheroids onto commercial plates. Cells within DP spheres could disaggregate and migrate out, which was similar to primary DP. Moreover, we examined the expression of several genes and proteins associated with hair follicle inductivity of DP cells, such as NCAM, Versican, and α-smooth muscle actin, and confirmed that their expression level was elevated in the spheres compared with the dissociated DP cells. To examine the hair-inducing ability of DP spheres, hair germinal matrix cells (HGMCs) and DP spheres were mixed and cultured on Matrigel. Unlike the dissociated DP cells and HGMCs cocultured in two dimensions, HGMCs can differentiate into hair-like fibers under the induction of the DP spheres made from the high-passage cells (passage 8) in vitro. We are the first to show that passage 3 human HGMCs differentiate into hair-like fibers in the presence of human DP spheroids. These results suggest that the 3D Matrigel culture technique is an ideal culture model for forming DP spheroids and that sphere formation partially models the intact DP, resulting in hair induction, even by high-passage DP cells. PMID:24528213

  7. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  8. Development of transferrin targeted NCL-240 micelles and their evaluation using in-vitro 3D cancer cell culture (spheroid) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagelli, Srikar Goud

    The main objective of this project was to develop targeted micellar delivery systems of a novel cytotoxic drug (NCL-240; a second generation DM-PIT-1 analog) and to evaluate their efficacy using optimized 3D cell culture spheroid models. Spheroids were optimized for several cancer cell lines using a range of techniques such as non-adhesive liquid overlay method, hanging drop method, and co-culturing. Transferrin (Tf)-conjugated NCL-240 micelles were prepared with varying Tf amounts and their cytotoxicities were evaluated using the optimized spheroid models. The uptake and penetration of the formulations were also studied using confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the concentration of NCL-240 micelles required to achieve the same cytotoxicity was relatively higher in spheroids compared to the monolayers. Also, In NCI-ADR-RES, Tf-targeted NCL-240 micelles were shown to have a significant increase in cytotoxicity compared to untargeted NCL-240 micelles. Even the penetration and uptake studies indicated that targeting improves the uptake and penetration of formulations. However, in U87-MG spheroids, there was a significant difference in cell viability among micelles compared to free drug but no significant benefit due to targeting was observed. The same formulations penetrated lesser in U87-MG spheroids compared to NCI-ADR-RES spheroids. This study thereby emphasizes the importance of drug screening in spheroid models as the penetration dynamics are varying from cell line to cell line because of the 3D structure.

  9. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  10. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  11. Mini-pillar array for hydrogel-supported 3D culture and high-content histologic analysis of human tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihoon; Lee, Dong Woo; Hwang, Hyun Ju; Yeon, Sang-Eun; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-06-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell culture models mimic the complex 3D organization and microenvironment of human solid tumor tissue and are thus considered as highly predictive models representing avascular tumor regions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for monitoring drug penetration and therapeutic responses in 3D tumor models; however, photonic attenuation at increasing imaging depths and limited penetration of common fluorescence tracers are significant technical challenges to imaging. Immunohistological staining would be a good alternative, but the preparation of tissue sections from rather fragile spheroids through fixing and embedding procedures is challenging. Here we introduce a novel 3 × 3 mini-pillar array chip that can be utilized for 3D cell culturing and sectioning for high-content histologic analysis. The mini-pillar array chip facilitated the generation of 3D spheroids of human cancer cells within hydrogels such as alginate, collagen, and Matrigel. As expected, visualization of the 3D distribution of calcein AM and doxorubicin by optical sectioning was limited by photonic attenuation and dye penetration. The integrity of the 3D microtissue section was confirmed by immunostaining on paraffin sections and cryo-sections. The applicability of the mini-pillar array for drug activity evaluation was tested by measuring viability changes in spheroids exposed to anti-cancer agents, 5-fluorouracil and tirapazamine. Thus, our novel mini-pillar array platform can potentially promote high-content histologic analysis of 3D cultures and can be further optimized for field-specific needs. PMID:27194205

  12. Functional 3D human primary hepatocyte spheroids made by co-culturing hepatocytes from partial hepatectomy specimens and human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    No, Da Yoon; Lee, Seung-A; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, DoYeun; Jang, Ju Yun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    We have generated human hepatocyte spheroids with uniform size and shape by co-culturing 1∶1 mixtures of primary human hepatocytes (hHeps) from partial hepatectomy specimens and human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in concave microwells. The hADSCs in spheroids could compensate for the low viability and improve the functional maintenance of hHeps. Co-cultured spheroids aggregated and formed compact spheroidal shapes more rapidly, and with a significantly higher viability than mono-cultured spheroids. The liver-specific functions of co-cultured spheroids were greater, although they contained half the number of hepatocytes as mono-cultured spheroids. Albumin secretion by co-cultured spheroids was 10% higher on day 7, whereas urea secretion was similar, compared with mono-cultured spheroids. A quantitative cytochrome P450 assay showed that the enzymatic activity of co-cultured spheroids cultured for 9 days was 28% higher than that of mono-cultured spheroids. These effects may be due to the transdifferentiation potential and paracrine healing effects of hADSCs on hHeps. These co-cultured spheroids may be useful for creating artificial three-dimensional hepatic tissue constructs and for cell therapy with limited numbers of human hepatocytes. PMID:23236387

  13. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  14. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-01

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development. PMID:27327102

  15. Arginine–glycine–aspartic acid–polyethylene glycol–polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD–polyethylene glycol (PEG)–PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT–MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  16. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  17. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  18. Generation and functional assessment of 3D multicellular spheroids in droplet based microfluidics platform.

    PubMed

    Sabhachandani, P; Motwani, V; Cohen, N; Sarkar, S; Torchilin, V; Konry, T

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe a robust, microfluidic technique to generate and analyze 3D tumor spheroids, which resembles tumor microenvironment and can be used as a more effective preclinical drug testing and screening model. Monodisperse cell-laden alginate droplets were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices that combine T-junction droplet generation and external gelation for spheroid formation. The proposed approach has the capability to incorporate multiple cell types. For the purposes of our study, we generated spheroids with breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 drug sensitive and resistant) and co-culture spheroids of MCF-7 together with a fibroblast cell line (HS-5). The device has the capability to house 1000 spheroids on chip for drug screening and other functional analysis. Cellular viability of spheroids in the array part of the device was maintained for two weeks by continuous perfusion of complete media into the device. The functional performance of our 3D tumor models and a dose dependent response of standard chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (Dox) and standard drug combination Dox and paclitaxel (PCT) was analyzed on our chip-based platform. Altogether, our work provides a simple and novel, in vitro platform to generate, image and analyze uniform, 3D monodisperse alginate hydrogel tumors for various omic studies and therapeutic efficiency screening, an important translational step before in vivo studies. PMID:26686985

  19. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M; Becker, Jeanne L; Souza, Glauco R

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5'-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (-control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z' = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  20. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K.; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M.; Becker, Jeanne L.; Souza, Glauco R.

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5′-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (−control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z’ = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  1. Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid invasion assay.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of surrounding normal tissues is generally considered to be a key hallmark of malignant (as opposed to benign) tumors. For some cancers in particular (e.g., brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck - SCCHN) it is a cause of severe morbidity and can be life-threatening even in the absence of distant metastases. In addition, cancers which have relapsed following treatment unfortunately often present with a more aggressive phenotype. Therefore, there is an opportunity to target the process of invasion to provide novel therapies that could be complementary to standard anti-proliferative agents. Until now, this strategy has been hampered by the lack of robust, reproducible assays suitable for a detailed analysis of invasion and for drug screening. Here we provide a simple micro-plate method (based on uniform, self-assembling 3D tumor spheroids) which has great potential for such studies. We exemplify the assay platform using a human glioblastoma cell line and also an SCCHN model where the development of resistance against targeted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors is associated with enhanced matrix-invasive potential. We also provide two alternative methods of semi-automated quantification: one using an imaging cytometer and a second which simply requires standard microscopy and image capture with digital image analysis. PMID:25993495

  2. Three-Dimensional (3D) Tumor Spheroid Invasion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of surrounding normal tissues is generally considered to be a key hallmark of malignant (as opposed to benign) tumors. For some cancers in particular (e.g., brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck – SCCHN) it is a cause of severe morbidity and can be life-threatening even in the absence of distant metastases. In addition, cancers which have relapsed following treatment unfortunately often present with a more aggressive phenotype. Therefore, there is an opportunity to target the process of invasion to provide novel therapies that could be complementary to standard anti-proliferative agents. Until now, this strategy has been hampered by the lack of robust, reproducible assays suitable for a detailed analysis of invasion and for drug screening. Here we provide a simple micro-plate method (based on uniform, self-assembling 3D tumor spheroids) which has great potential for such studies. We exemplify the assay platform using a human glioblastoma cell line and also an SCCHN model where the development of resistance against targeted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors is associated with enhanced matrix-invasive potential. We also provide two alternative methods of semi-automated quantification: one using an imaging cytometer and a second which simply requires standard microscopy and image capture with digital image analysis. PMID:25993495

  3. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T.

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  4. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  5. Patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix - a promising method for anti-tumor drug screening.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyun; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yang; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lianqing; Shi, Yang; Li, Yanfeng; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    3D multicellular spheroid models are of great value in the investigation of tumor biology and tumor responses to chemotherapy and radiation. To establish a mimicking tumor microenvironment in vitro, we developed a straightforward method by patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix. The efficacy of this approach was evaluated by characterizing spheroid formation, invasive capability and phenotypic transition in aggressive human glioma cells. We observed enhanced cell proliferation, spheroid formation and invasive capability in U87 glioma cells transfected with hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) compared with non-treated cells. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of HIFs in hypoxic glioma cells may promote cell migration by epithelial-mesenchymal transition within the 3D matrix. Compared with conventional 3D culturing techniques, the simple operation, rapid prototyping, low cost and high throughput format of the micro-patterning method facilitates the characterization of cell proliferation, migration, phenotypic function and drug evaluation in physiologically relevant 3D microenvironments. This in vitro 3D system can recapitulate the physiologically relevant tumor microenvironment and is a promising method for 3D anti-tumor drug screening and the identification of novel targets for tumor invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:26647062

  6. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  7. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  8. Biomimicry 3D gastrointestinal spheroid platform for the assessment of toxicity and inflammatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chia, Sing Ling; Tay, Chor Yong; Setyawati, Magdiel I; Leong, David T

    2015-02-11

    Our current mechanistic understanding on the effects of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) on cellular physiology is derived mainly from 2D cell culture studies. However, conventional monolayer cell culture may not accurately model the mass transfer gradient that is expected in 3D tissue physiology and thus may lead to artifactual experimental conclusions. Herein, using a micropatterned agarose hydrogel platform, the effects of ZnO NPs (25 nm) on 3D colon cell spheroids of well-defined sizes are examined. The findings show that cell dimensionality plays a critical role in governing the spatiotemporal cellular outcomes like inflammatory response and cytotoxicity in response to ZnO NPs treatment. More importantly, ZnO NPs can induce different modes of cell death in 2D and 3D cell culture systems. Interestingly, the outer few layers of cells in 3D model could only protect the inner core of cells for a limited time and periodically slough off from the spheroids surface. These findings suggest that toxicological conclusions made from 2D cell models might overestimate the toxicity of ZnO NPs. This 3D cell spheroid model can serve as a reproducible platform to better reflect the actual cell response to NPs and to study a more realistic mechanism of nanoparticle-induced toxicity. PMID:25331163

  9. Tissue reconstruction in 3D-spheroids from rodent retina in a motion-free, bioreactor-based microstructure.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Weibezahn, Karl-Friedrich; Layer, Paul Gottlob

    2008-12-01

    While conventional rotation culture-based retinal spheroids are most useful to study basic processes of retinogenesis and tissue regeneration, they are less appropriate for an easy and inexpensive mass production of histotypic 3-dimensional tissue spheroids, which will be of utmost importance for future bioengineering, e.g. for replacement of animal experimentation. Here we compared conventionally reaggregated spheroids derived from dissociated retinal cells from neonatal gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) with spheroids cultured on a novel microscaffold cell chip (called cf-chip) in a motion-free bioreactor. Reaggregation and developmental processes leading to tissue formation, e.g. proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation were observed during the first 10 days in vitro (div). Remarkably, in each cf-chip micro-chamber, only one spheroid developed. In both culture systems, sphere sizes and proliferation rates were almost identical. However, apoptosis was only comparably high up to 5 div, but then became negligible in the cf-chip, while it up-rose again in the conventional culture. In both systems, immunohistochemical characterisation revealed the presence of Müller glia cells, of ganglion, amacrine, bipolar and horizontal cells at a highly comparable arrangement. In both systems, photoreceptors were detected only in spheroids from P3 retinae. Benefits of the chip-based 3D cell culture were a reliable sphere production at enhanced viability, the feasibility of single sphere observation during cultivation time, a high reproducibility and easy control of culture conditions. Further development of this approach should allow high-throughput systems not only for retinal but also other types of histotypic spheroids, to become suitable for environmental monitoring and biomedical diagnostics. PMID:19023488

  10. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Moinecha; Gehl, Julie; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy–and normal cell sensitivity. Methods Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). Results The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or electrochemotherapy using bleomycin (p<0.0001). Strikingly, the size of normal fibroblast spheroids was neither affected after calcium electroporation nor electrochemotherapy using bleomycin, indicating that calcium electroporation, like electrochemotherapy, will have limited adverse effects on the surrounding normal tissue when treating with calcium electroporation. The intracellular ATP level, which has previously been shown to be depleted after calcium electroporation, was measured in the spheroids after treatment. The results showed a dramatic decrease in the intracellular ATP level (p<0.01) in all four spheroid types—malignant as well as normal. Conclusion In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate an important therapeutic window for this therapy; although further studies are needed in vivo and in patients to investigate the effect of calcium electroporation on

  11. Generation of a tumor spheroid in a microgravity environment as a 3D model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Bernadette; Messina, Jane L; Heller, Richard

    2009-10-01

    An in vitro 3D model was developed utilizing a synthetic microgravity environment to facilitate studying the cell interactions. 2D monolayer cell culture models have been successfully used to understand various cellular reactions that occur in vivo. There are some limitations to the 2D model that are apparent when compared to cells grown in a 3D matrix. For example, some proteins that are not expressed in a 2D model are found up-regulated in the 3D matrix. In this paper, we discuss techniques used to develop the first known large, free-floating 3D tissue model used to establish tumor spheroids. The bioreactor system known as the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARVs) was used to provide a microgravity environment. The HARVs promoted aggregation of keratinocytes (HaCaT) that formed a construct that served as scaffolding for the growth of mouse melanoma. Although there is an emphasis on building a 3D model with the proper extracellular matrix and stroma, we were able to develop a model that excluded the use of matrigel. Immunohistochemistry and apoptosis assays provided evidence that this 3D model supports B16.F10 cell growth, proliferation, and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Immunofluorescence showed that melanoma cells interact with one another displaying observable cellular morphological changes. The goal of engineering a 3D tissue model is to collect new information about cancer development and develop new potential treatment regimens that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals. PMID:19533253

  12. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems. PMID:26708088

  13. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Carsten; Riefke, Björn; Gründemann, Stephan; Krebs, Alice; Christian, Sven; Prinz, Florian; Osterland, Marc; Golfier, Sven; Räse, Sebastian; Ansari, Nariman; Esner, Milan; Bickle, Marc; Pampaloni, Francesco; Mattheyer, Christian; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Parczyk, Karsten; Prechtl, Stefan; Steigemann, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  14. Spectral mapping of 3D multi-cellular tumor spheroids: time-resolved confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Nandi, Somen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Das, Gaurav; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-07-21

    A tumor-like multi-cellular spheroid (3D) differs from a 2D cell in a number of ways. This is demonstrated using time resolved confocal microscopy. Two different tumor spheroids - HeLa (cervical cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) - are studied using 3 different fluorescent dyes - C153 (non-covalent), CPM (covalent) and doxorubicin (non-covalent, anti-cancer drug). The pattern of localization of these three fluorescent probes in the 3D tumor cell exhibits significant differences from that in the conventional 2D cells. For both the cells (HeLa and A549), the total uptake of doxorubicin in the 3D cell is much lower than that in the 2D cell. The uptake of doxorubicin molecules in the A549 spheroid is significantly different compared to the HeLa spheroid. The local polarity (i.e. emission maxima) and solvation dynamics in the 3D tumor cell differ from those in 2D cells. The covalent probe CPM exhibits intermittent fluorescence oscillations in the 1-2 s time scale. This is attributed to redox processes. These results may provide new insights into 3D tumors. PMID:27336201

  15. Increasing 3D Matrix Rigidity Strengthens Proliferation and Spheroid Development of Human Liver Cells in a Constant Growth Factor Environment.

    PubMed

    Bomo, Jérémy; Ezan, Frédéric; Tiaho, François; Bellamri, Medjda; Langouët, Sophie; Theret, Nathalie; Baffet, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of virtually all tissues and organs. Recent studies show that increased cell contractibility, growth and differentiation might be normalized by modulating cell tensions. Particularly, the role of these tensions applied by the extracellular matrix during liver fibrosis could influence the hepatocarcinogenesis process. The objective of this study is to determine if 3D stiffness could influence growth and phenotype of normal and transformed hepatocytes and to integrate extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness to tensional homeostasis. We have developed an appropriate 3D culture model: hepatic cells within three-dimensional collagen matrices with varying rigidity. Our results demonstrate that the rigidity influenced the cell phenotype and induced spheroid clusters development whereas in soft matrices, Huh7 transformed cells were less proliferative, well-spread and flattened. We confirmed that ERK1 played a predominant role over ERK2 in cisplatin-induced death, whereas ERK2 mainly controlled proliferation. As compared to 2D culture, 3D cultures are associated with epithelial markers expression. Interestingly, proliferation of normal hepatocytes was also induced in rigid gels. Furthermore, biotransformation activities are increased in 3D gels, where CYP1A2 enzyme can be highly induced/activated in primary culture of human hepatocytes embedded in the matrix. In conclusion, we demonstrated that increasing 3D rigidity could promote proliferation and spheroid developments of liver cells demonstrating that 3D collagen gels are an attractive tool for studying rigidity-dependent homeostasis of the liver cells embedded in the matrix and should be privileged for both chronic toxicological and pharmacological drug screening. PMID:26331987

  16. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Langan, Laura M; Dodd, Nicholas J F; Owen, Stewart F; Purcell, Wendy M; Jackson, Simon K; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  17. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Laura M.; Dodd, Nicholas J. F.; Owen, Stewart F.; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  18. Multilayer Spheroids To Quantify Drug Uptake and Diffusion in 3D

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for new quantitative in vitro models of drug uptake and diffusion to help assess drug toxicity/efficacy as well as new more predictive models for drug discovery. We report a three-dimensional (3D) multilayer spheroid model and a new algorithm to quantitatively study uptake and inward diffusion of fluorescent calcein via gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). When incubated with calcein-AM, a substrate of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp), spheroids from a variety of cell types accumulated calcein over time. Accumulation decreased in spheroids overexpressing Pgp (HEK-MDR) and was increased in the presence of Pgp inhibitors (verapamil, loperamide, cyclosporin A). Inward diffusion of calcein was negligible in spheroids that lacked GJIC (OVCAR-3, SK-OV-3) and was reduced in the presence of an inhibitor of GJIC (carbenoxolone). In addition to inhibiting Pgp, verapamil and loperamide, but not cyclosporin A, inhibited inward diffusion of calcein, suggesting that they also inhibit GJIC. The dose response curves of verapamil’s inhibition of Pgp and GJIC were similar (IC50: 8 μM). The method is amenable to many different cell types and may serve as a quantitative 3D model that more accurately replicates in vivo barriers to drug uptake and diffusion. PMID:24641346

  19. Evaluation of anti-HER2 scFv-conjugated PLGA-PEG nanoparticles on 3D tumor spheroids of BT474 and HCT116 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Duong Le, Thi; Pham, Thu Hong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Giang Ngo, Thi Hong; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional culture cells (spheroids) are one of the multicellular culture models that can be applied to anticancer chemotherapeutic development. Multicellular spheroids more closely mimic in vivo tumor-like patterns of physiologic environment and morphology. In previous research, we designed docetaxel-loaded pegylated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with anti-HER2 single chain antibodies (scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG) and evaluated them in 2D cell culture. In this study, we continuously evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG on a 3D tumor spheroid model of BT474 (HER2-overexpressing) and HCT116 (HER2-underexpressing) cancer cells. The results showed that the nanoparticle formulation conjugated with scFv had a significant internalization effect on the spheroids of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells as compared to the spheroids of HER2-underexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, cytotoxic effects of targeted nanoparticles decreased the size and increased necrotic score of HER2-overexpressing tumor spheroids. Thus, these scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles have potential for active targeting for HER2-overexpressing cancer therapy. In addition, BT474 and HCT116 spheroids can be used as a tumor model for evaluation of targeting therapies.

  20. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) <5%). Biphoton imaging confirmed that micropatterned spheroids exhibit characteristic cell heterogeneity with distinct microregions. Furthermore, central necrosis appears at a consistent spheroid size, suggesting standardized growth.Using three reference compounds (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and staurosporine), we validated HT-29 micropatterned spheroids on an HCS platform, benchmarking against hanging-drop spheroids. Spheroid formation and imaging in a single plate accelerate assay workflow, and fixed positioning prevents structures from overlapping or sticking to the well wall, augmenting image processing reliability. Furthermore, multiple spheroids per well increase the statistical confidence sufficiently to discriminate compound mechanisms of action and generate EC50 values for endpoints of cell death, architectural change, and size within a single-pass read. Higher quality data and a more efficient HCS work chain should encourage integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications. PMID:26385905

  1. Burr-like, laser-made 3D microscaffolds for tissue spheroid encagement.

    PubMed

    Danilevicius, Paulius; Rezende, Rodrigo A; Pereira, Frederico D A S; Selimis, Alexandros; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Noritomi, Pedro Y; da Silva, Jorge V L; Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Farsari, Maria; Mironov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The modeling, fabrication, cell loading, and mechanical and in vitro biological testing of biomimetic, interlockable, laser-made, concentric 3D scaffolds are presented. The scaffolds are made by multiphoton polymerization of an organic-inorganic zirconium silicate. Their mechanical properties are theoretically modeled using finite elements analysis and experimentally measured using a Microsquisher(®). They are subsequently loaded with preosteoblastic cells, which remain live after 24 and 72 h. The interlockable scaffolds have maintained their ability to fuse with tissue spheroids. This work represents a novel technological platform, enabling the rapid, laser-based, in situ 3D tissue biofabrication. PMID:26104190

  2. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  3. Three-Dimensional Neural Spheroid Culture: An In Vitro Model for Cortical Studies.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Yu-Ting L; Boutin, Molly E; Chirila, Anda M; Livi, Liane L; Labriola, Nicholas R; Jakubek, Lorin M; Morgan, Jeffrey R; Darling, Eric M; Kauer, Julie A; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2015-12-01

    There is a high demand for in vitro models of the central nervous system (CNS) to study neurological disorders, injuries, toxicity, and drug efficacy. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models can bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional culture and animal models because they present an in vivo-like microenvironment in a tailorable experimental platform. Within the expanding variety of sophisticated 3D cultures, scaffold-free, self-assembled spheroid culture avoids the introduction of foreign materials and preserves the native cell populations and extracellular matrix types. In this study, we generated 3D spheroids with primary postnatal rat cortical cells using an accessible, size-controlled, reproducible, and cost-effective method. Neurons and glia formed laminin-containing 3D networks within the spheroids. The neurons were electrically active and formed circuitry through both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. The mechanical properties of the spheroids were in the range of brain tissue. These in vivo-like features of 3D cortical spheroids provide the potential for relevant and translatable investigations of the CNS in vitro. PMID:26414693

  4. On-chip clearing of arrays of 3-D cell cultures and micro-tissues.

    PubMed

    Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Poon, T; Roskelley, C; Cheung, K C

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures are beneficial models for mimicking the complexities of in vivo tissues, especially in tumour studies where transport limitations can complicate response to cancer drugs. 3-D optical microscopy techniques are less involved than traditional embedding and sectioning, but are impeded by optical scattering properties of the tissues. Confocal and even two-photon microscopy limit sample imaging to approximately 100-200 μm depth, which is insufficient to image hypoxic spheroid cores. Optical clearing methods have permitted high-depth imaging of tissues without physical sectioning, but they are difficult to implement for smaller 3-D cultures due to sample loss in solution exchange. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for high-throughput on-chip optical clearing of breast cancer spheroids using the SeeDB, Clear(T2), and ScaleSQ clearing methods. Although all three methods are able to effectively clear the spheroids, we find that SeeDB and ScaleSQ more effectively clear the sample than Clear(T2); however, SeeDB induces green autofluorescence while ScaleS causes sample expansion. Our unique on-chip implementation permits clearing arrays of 3-D cultures using perfusion while monitoring the 3-D cultures throughout the process, enabling visualization of the clearing endpoint as well as monitoring of transient changes that could induce image artefacts. Our microfluidic device is compatible with on-chip 3-D cell culture, permitting the use of on-chip clearing at the endpoint after monitoring the same spheroids during their culture. This on-chip method has the potential to improve readout from 3-D cultures, facilitating their use in cell-based assays for high-content drug screening and other applications. PMID:27493703

  5. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26287450

  6. Colorectal cancer derived organotypic spheroids maintain essential tissue characteristics but adapt their metabolism in culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Organotypic tumor spheroids, a 3D in vitro model derived from patient tumor material, preserve tissue heterogeneity and retain structural tissue elements, thus replicating the in vivo tumor more closely than commonly used 2D and 3D cell line models. Such structures harbour tumorigenic cells, as revealed by xenograft implantation studies in animal models and maintain the genetic makeup of the original tumor material. The aim of our work was a morphological and proteomic characterization of organotypic spheroids derived from colorectal cancer tissue in order to get insight into their composition and associated biology. Results Morphological analysis showed that spheroids were of about 250 μm in size and varied in structure, while the spheroid cells differed in shape and size and were tightly packed together by desmosomes and tight junctions. Our proteomic data revealed significant alterations in protein expression in organotypic tumor spheroids cultured as primary explants compared to primary colorectal cancer tissue. Components underlying cellular and tissue architecture were changed; nuclear DNA/ chromatin maintenance systems were up-regulated, whereas various mitochondrial components were down-regulated in spheroids. Most interestingly, the mesenchymal cells appear to be substantial component in such cellular assemblies. Thus the observed changes may partly occur in this cellular compartment. Finally, in the proteomics analysis stem cell-like characteristics were observed within the spheroid cellular assembly, reflected by accumulation of Alcam, Ctnnb1, Aldh1, Gpx2, and CD166. These findings were underlined by IHC analysis of Ctnnb1, CD24 and CD44, therefore warranting closer investigation of the tumorigenic compartment in this 3D culture model for tumor tissue. Conclusions Our analysis of organotypic CRC tumor spheroids has identified biological processes associated with a mixture of cell types and states, including protein markers for mesenchymal

  7. Imaging of Metabolic Status in 3D Cultures with an Improved AMPK FRET Biosensor for FLIM.

    PubMed

    Chennell, George; Willows, Robin J W; Warren, Sean C; Carling, David; French, Paul M W; Dunsby, Chris; Sardini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We describe an approach to non-invasively map spatiotemporal biochemical and physiological changes in 3D cell culture using Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) biosensors expressed in tumour spheroids. In particular, we present an improved Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP) Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) FRET biosensor, mTurquoise2 AMPK Activity Reporter (T2AMPKAR), for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) readouts that we have evaluated in 2D and 3D cultures. Our results in 2D cell culture indicate that replacing the FRET donor, enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), in the original FRET biosensor, AMPK activity reporter (AMPKAR), with mTurquoise2 (mTq2FP), increases the dynamic range of the response to activation of AMPK, as demonstrated using the direct AMPK activator, 991. We demonstrated 3D FLIM of this T2AMPKAR FRET biosensor expressed in tumour spheroids using two-photon excitation. PMID:27548185

  8. Surface modified alginate microcapsules for 3D cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-06-01

    Culture as three dimensional cell aggregates or spheroids can offer an ideal platform for tissue engineering applications and for pharmaceutical screening. Such 3D culture models, however, may suffer from the problems such as immune response and ineffective and cumbersome culture. This paper describes a simple method for producing microcapsules with alginate cores and a thin shell of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) to encapsulate mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells, generating a non-fouling surface as an effective immunoisolation barrier. We demonstrated the trapping of the alginate microcapsules in a microwell array for the continuous observation and culture of a large number of encapsulated miPS cells in parallel. miPS cells cultured in the microcapsules survived well and proliferated to form a single cell aggregate. Droplet formation of monodisperse microcapsules with controlled size combined with flow cytometry provided an efficient way to quantitatively analyze the growth of encapsulated cells in a high-throughput manner. The simple and cost-effective coating technique employed to produce the core-shell microcapsules could be used in the emerging field of cell therapy. The microwell array would provide a convenient, user friendly and high-throughput platform for long-term cell culture and monitoring.

  9. Scalable Differentiation of Human iPSCs in a Multicellular Spheroid-based 3D Culture into Hepatocyte-like Cells through Direct Wnt/β-catenin Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Fisher, Robert A; Mangino, Martin J; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute liver failure by cell transplantation is hindered by a shortage of human hepatocytes. Current protocols for hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) result in low yields, cellular heterogeneity, and limited scalability. In the present study, we have developed a novel multicellular spheroid-based hepatic differentiation protocol starting from embryoid bodies of hiPSCs (hiPSC-EBs) for robust mass production of human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using two novel inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. The resultant hiPSC-EB-HLCs expressed liver-specific genes, secreted hepatic proteins such as Albumin, Alpha Fetoprotein, and Fibrinogen, metabolized ammonia, and displayed cytochrome P450 activities and functional activities typical of mature primary hepatocytes, such as LDL storage and uptake, ICG uptake and release, and glycogen storage. Cell transplantation of hiPSC-EB-HLC in a rat model of acute liver failure significantly prolonged the mean survival time and resolved the liver injury when compared to the no-transplantation control animals. The transplanted hiPSC-EB-HLCs secreted human albumin into the host plasma throughout the examination period (2 weeks). Transplantation successfully bridged the animals through the critical period for survival after acute liver failure, providing promising clues of integration and full in vivo functionality of these cells after treatment with WIF-1 and DKK-1. PMID:27616299

  10. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with Transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  11. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing. PMID:26858908

  12. Spheroid Formation and Evaluation of Hepatic Cells in a Three-Dimensional Culture Device.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ikeuchi, Masashi; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Yagi, Tohru; Hayashi, Shuji

    2015-12-17

    In drug discovery, it is very important to evaluate liver cells within an organism. Compared to 2D culture methods, the development of 3D culture techniques for liver cells has been successful in maintaining long-term liver functionality with the formation of a hepatic-specific structure. The key to performing drug testing is the establishment of a stable in vitro evaluation system. In this article, we report a Tapered Stencil for Cluster Culture (TASCL) device developed to create liver spheroids in vitro. The TASCL device will be applied as a toxicity evaluation system for drug discovery. The TASCL device was created with an overall size of 10 mm × 10 mm, containing 400 microwells with a top aperture (500 µm × 500 µm) and a bottom aperture (300 µm diameter circular) per microwell. We evaluated the formation, recovery, and size of HepG2 spheroids in the TASCL device. The formation and recovery were both nearly 100%, and the size of the HepG2 spheroids increased with an increase in the initial cell seeding density. There were no significant differences in the sizes of the spheroids among the microwells. In addition, the HepG2 spheroids obtained using the TASCL device were alive and produced albumin. The morphology of the HepG2 spheroids was investigated using FE-SEM. The spheroids in the microwells exhibited perfectly spherical aggregation. In this report, by adjusting the size of the microwells of the TASCL device, uniform HepG2 spheroids were created, and the device facilitated more precise measurements of the liver function per HepG2 spheroid. Our TASCL device will be useful for application as a toxicity evaluation system for drug testing. PMID:26858908

  13. Spheroid-based 3-dimensional culture models: Gene expression and functionality in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marianne; Scholz, Claus-Juergen; Polednik, Christine; Roller, Jeanette

    2016-04-01

    In the present study a panel of 12 head and neck cancer (HNSCC) cell lines were tested for spheroid formation. Since the size and morphology of spheroids is dependent on both cell adhesion and proliferation in the 3-dimensional (3D) context, morphology of HNSCC spheroids was related to expression of E-cadherin and the proliferation marker Ki67. In HNSCC cell lines the formation of tight regular spheroids was dependent on distinct E-cadherin expression levels in monolayer cultures, usually resulting in upregulation following aggregation into 3D structures. Cell lines expressing only low levels of E-cadherin in monolayers produced only loose cell clusters, frequently decreasing E-cadherin expression further upon aggregation. In these cell lines no epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) upregulation occurred and proliferation generally decreased in spheroids/aggregates independent of E-cadherin expression. In a second approach a global gene expression analysis of the larynx carcinoma cell line HLaC78 monolayer and the corresponding spheroids was performed. A global upregulation of gene expression in HLaC78 spheroids was related to genes involved in cell adhesion, cell junctions and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics. Downregulation was associated with genes controlling cell cycle, DNA-replication and DNA mismatch repair. Analyzing the expression of selected genes of each functional group in monolayer and spheroid cultures of all 12 cell lines revealed evidence for common gene expression shifts in genes controlling cell junctions, cell adhesion, cell cycle and DNA replication as well as genes involved in the cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics. PMID:26797047

  14. [Structural and functional polarity of porcine hepatocyte cultured spheroids].

    PubMed

    Lorenti, Alicia S; Hidalgo, Alejandra M; Barbich, Mariana R; Torres, José; Batalle, Juan; Izaguirre, María F; Fiorucci, María Paula; Casco, Víctor; Gadano, Adrián; Argibay, Pablo F

    2006-06-01

    Hepatocytes are epithelial cells that show a complex polarity in vivo. However, hepatocytes isolated and cultured in vitro normally lose both their differentiated properties and polarity. Culturing hepatocyte spheroids seems to be the accurate approach to maintain tissue level of organization. The structural and functionalpolarities of pig liver spheroids were analyzed in this work. Swine liver cells were isolated and cultured as spheroids. Their metabolic activity was proved through the metabolism of diazepam, ammonium and synthesis of albumin. Several structural features show the presence of polarity in the cells inside the spheroids. Reticular and collagen fibers, as well as Ck19(+) cells forming duct-like structures were found. _eta and _-catenins and pancadherins were positive in different regions of the spheroids, mainly in the outer cell layers, which have cuboidal epithelia features. The scanning electron microscopy showed a tightly compacted architecture, with smooth surface. The transmission electron microscopy analysis showed bile canaliculi with microvilli, tight junctions, zonula adherens and desmosome-like junctions. Well-maintained cellular organelles, as mitochondria, nucleus, nucleolus, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, were seen in the spheroids. A complex inner bile canaliculi network was shown by using a fluorescent bile acid analogue incorporated and excreted by the spheroids. Furthermore, excretion of a normal pattern of bile acids was demonstrated. The morphology and functionality of the spheroids may provide an appropriate model for applications where the maintenance of liver-specific functions is crucial, as a bioartificial liver device. PMID:16859079

  15. Three-dimensional culture systems in cancer research: Focus on tumor spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sritama; Devi, Gayathri R

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells propagated in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems exhibit physiologically relevant cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, gene expression and signaling pathway profiles, heterogeneity and structural complexity that reflect in vivo tumors. In recent years, development of various 3D models has improved the study of host-tumor interaction and use of high-throughput screening platforms for anti-cancer drug discovery and development. This review attempts to summarize the various 3D culture systems, with an emphasis on the most well characterized and widely applied model - multicellular tumor spheroids. This review also highlights the various techniques to generate tumor spheroids, methods to characterize them, and its applicability in cancer research. PMID:27063403

  16. Analysis of Gene Expression in 3D Spheroids Highlights a Survival Role for ASS1 in Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Barbone, Dario; Van Dam, Loes; Follo, Carlo; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; Fennell, Dean A.; Broaddus, V. Courtney

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying causes of chemoresistance in malignant pleural mesothelioma, we have studied mesothelioma cell lines as 3D spheroids, which acquire increased chemoresistance compared to 2D monolayers. We asked whether the gene expression of 3D spheroids would reveal mechanisms of resistance. To address this, we measured gene expression of three mesothelioma cell lines, M28, REN and VAMT, grown as 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids. A total of 209 genes were differentially expressed in common by the three cell lines in 3D (138 upregulated and 71 downregulated), although a clear resistance pathway was not apparent. We then compared the list of 3D genes with two publicly available datasets of gene expression of 56 pleural mesotheliomas compared to normal tissues. Interestingly, only three genes were increased in both 3D spheroids and human tumors: argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1), annexin A4 (ANXA4) and major vault protein (MVP); of these, ASS1 was the only consistently upregulated of the three genes by qRT-PCR. To measure ASS1 protein expression, we stained 2 sets of tissue microarrays (TMA): one with 88 pleural mesothelioma samples and the other with additional 88 pleural mesotheliomas paired with matched normal tissues. Of the 176 tumors represented on the two TMAs, ASS1 was expressed in 87 (50%; staining greater than 1 up to 3+). For the paired samples, ASS1 expression in mesothelioma was significantly greater than in the normal tissues. Reduction of ASS1 expression by siRNA significantly sensitized mesothelioma spheroids to the pro-apoptotic effects of bortezomib and of cisplatin plus pemetrexed. Although mesothelioma is considered by many to be an ASS1-deficient tumor, our results show that ASS1 is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in mesothelioma 3D spheroids and in human pleural mesotheliomas. We also have uncovered a survival role for ASS1, which may be amenable to targeting to undermine mesothelioma multicellular resistance. PMID:26982031

  17. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor. PMID:26386332

  18. Coculture system with an organotypic brain slice and 3D spheroid of carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Han-Ning; Lohaus, Raphaela; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Dehghani, Faramarz; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    the brain slice edge in order to investigate the invasion of the neighboring brain tissue. This enables us to visualize morphological changes and interactions between the glial cells and carcinoma cells by fluorescence and even by bright field microscopy. After the coculture experiment, the brain tissue or the 3D cell spheroids can be collected and used for further molecular analyses (e.g. qRT-PCR, IHC, or immunoblot) as well as for investigations by confocal microscopy. This method can be applied to monitor the events within a living brain tissue for days without deleterious effects to the brain slices. The model also allows selective suppression and replacement of resident cells by cells from a donor tissue to determine the distinct impact of a given genotype. Finally, the coculture model is a practicable alternative to in vivo approaches when testing targeted pharmacological manipulations. PMID:24145580

  19. Coculture System with an Organotypic Brain Slice and 3D Spheroid of Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Han-Ning; Lohaus, Raphaela; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    slice edge in order to investigate the invasion of the neighboring brain tissue. This enables us to visualize morphological changes and interactions between the glial cells and carcinoma cells by fluorescence and even by bright field microscopy. After the coculture experiment, the brain tissue or the 3D cell spheroids can be collected and used for further molecular analyses (e.g. qRT-PCR, IHC, or immunoblot) as well as for investigations by confocal microscopy. This method can be applied to monitor the events within a living brain tissue for days without deleterious effects to the brain slices. The model also allows selective suppression and replacement of resident cells by cells from a donor tissue to determine the distinct impact of a given genotype. Finally, the coculture model is a practicable alternative to in vivo approaches when testing targeted pharmacological manipulations. PMID:24145580

  20. Advanced micromachining of concave microwells for long term on-chip culture of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqing; Chien, Chia-Chi; Parkinson, Luke; Thierry, Benjamin

    2014-06-11

    A novel approach based on advanced micromachining is demonstrated to fabricate concave microwell arrays for the formation of high quality multicellular tumor spheroids. Microfabricated molds were prepared using a state-of-the-art CNC machining center, containing arrays of 3D convex micropillars with size ranging from 150 μm to 600 μm. Microscopic imaging of the micropillars machined on the mold showed smooth, curved microfeatures of a dramatic 3D shape. Agarose microwells could be easily replicated from the metallic molds. EMT-6 tumor cells seeded in the primary macrowell sedimented efficiently to the bottom of the concave microwells and formed multicellular spheroids within 48 h. Dense and homogeneous multicellular spheroids were obtained after 10 days of culture, confirming the suitability of the proposed approach. To facilitate long term spheroid culture and reliable on-chip drug assay, polydimethylsiloxane microwells were also replicated from the metallic molds. A solvent swelling method was adapted and optimized to Pluronic F127 towards physically entrapping the block copolymer molecules within the polydimethylsiloxane network and in turn to improve long term cell-binding resistance. Homogeneous multicellular spheroids were efficiently formed in the concave microwells and on-chip drug assays could be reliably carried out using curcumin as a model anti-cancer drug. Advanced micromachining provides an excellent technological solution to the fabrication of high quality concave microwells. PMID:24773458

  1. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  2. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characterization in a 3D-cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Celesti, Giuseppe; Tacchini, Lorenza; Pluchino, Stefano; Sforza, Chiarella; Rasile, Marco; Valerio, Vincenza; Laghi, Luigi; Conte, Vincenzo; Procacci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of three-dimensional (3D)-arrangement on the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. METHODS: HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 PDAC cells were cultured in either 2D-monolayers or 3D-spheroids. Ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, N-cadherin, collagen type I (COL-I), vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and podoplanin was assayed by confocal microscopy in cells cultured on 12-mm diameter round coverslips and in 3D-spheroids. Gene expression for E-cadherin, Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb1, and Zeb2 was quantified by real-time PCR. E-cadherin protein level and its electrophoretic pattern were studied by Western blot in cell lysates obtained from cells grown in 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. RESULTS: The E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was expressed in a similar way in plasma membrane cell boundaries in both 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. E-cadherin increased in lysates obtained from 3D-spheroids, while cleavage fragments were more evident in 2D-monolayers. N-cadherin expression was observed in very few PDAC cells grown in 2D-monolayers, but was more evident in 3D-spheroids. Some cells expressing COL-I were observed in 3D-spheroids. Podoplanin, expressed in collectively migrating cells, and αSMA were similarly expressed in both experimental conditions. The concomitant maintenance of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex at cell boundaries supports the hypothesis of a collective migration for these cells, which is consistent with podoplanin expression. CONCLUSION: We show that a 3D-cell culture model could provide deeper insight into understanding the biology of PDAC and allow for the detection of marked differences in the phenotype of PDAC cells grown in 3D-spheroids. PMID:27182158

  3. Sliced Magnetic Polyacrylamide Hydrogel with Cell-Adhesive Microarray Interface: A Novel Multicellular Spheroid Culturing Platform.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Zhou, Naizhen; Li, Yang; Ma, Siyu; Guo, Zhaobin; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qiying; Sun, Jianfei; Zhang, Tianzhu; Gu, Ning

    2016-06-22

    Cell-adhesive properties are of great significance to materials serving as extracellular matrix mimics. Appropriate cell-adhesive property of material interface can balance the cell-matrix interaction and cell-cell interaction and can promote cells to form 3D structures. Herein, a novel magnetic polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fabricated via combining magnetostatic field induced magnetic nanoparticles assembly and hydrogel gelation was applied as a multicellular spheroids culturing platform. When cultured on the cell-adhesive microarray interface of sliced magnetic hydrogel, normal and tumor cells from different cell lines could rapidly form multicellular spheroids spontaneously. Furthermore, cells which could only form loose cell aggregates in a classic 3D cell culture model (such as hanging drop system) were able to be promoted to form multicellular spheroids on this platform. In the light of its simplicity in fabricating as well as its effectiveness in promoting formation of multicellular spheroids which was considered as a prevailing tool in the study of the microenvironmental regulation of tumor cell physiology and therapeutic problems, this composite material holds promise in anticancer drugs or hyperthermia therapy evaluation in vitro in the future. PMID:27258682

  4. Drug penetration and metabolism in 3D cell cultures treated in a 3D printed fluidic device: assessment of irinotecan via MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    LaBonia, Gabriel J; Lockwood, Sarah Y; Heller, Andrew A; Spence, Dana M; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    Realistic in vitro models are critical in the drug development process. In this study, a novel in vitro platform is employed to assess drug penetration and metabolism. This platform, which utilizes a 3D printed fluidic device, allows for dynamic dosing of three dimensional cell cultures, also known as spheroids. The penetration of the chemotherapeutic irinotecan into HCT 116 colon cancer spheroids was examined with MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). The active metabolite of irinotecan, SN-38, was also detected. After twenty-four hours of treatment, SN-38 was concentrated to the outside of the spheroid, a region of actively dividing cells. The irinotecan prodrug localization contrasted with SN-38 and was concentrated to the necrotic core of the spheroids, a region containing mostly dead and dying cells. These results demonstrate that this unique in vitro platform is an effective means to assess drug penetration and metabolism in 3D cell cultures. This innovative system can have a transformative impact on the preclinical evaluation of drug candidates due to its cost effectiveness and high throughput. PMID:27198560

  5. Three-Dimensional Spheroid Cell Culture Model for Target Identification Utilizing High-Throughput RNAi Screens.

    PubMed

    Iles, LaKesla R; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic limitations of 2D monolayer cell culture models have prompted the development of 3D cell culture model systems for in vitro studies. Multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) models closely simulate the pathophysiological milieu of solid tumors and are providing new insights into tumor biology as well as differentiation, tissue organization, and homeostasis. They are straightforward to apply in high-throughput screens and there is a great need for the development of reliable and robust 3D spheroid-based assays for high-throughput RNAi screening for target identification and cell signaling studies highlighting their potential in cancer research and treatment. In this chapter we describe a stringent standard operating procedure for the use of MCTS for high-throughput RNAi screens. PMID:27581289

  6. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids. PMID:26423609

  7. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  8. Quantification of Dynamic Morphological Drug Responses in 3D Organotypic Cell Cultures by Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Härmä, Ville; Schukov, Hannu-Pekka; Happonen, Antti; Ahonen, Ilmari; Virtanen, Johannes; Siitari, Harri; Åkerfelt, Malin; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Nees, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Glandular epithelial cells differentiate into complex multicellular or acinar structures, when embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix. The spectrum of different multicellular morphologies formed in 3D is a sensitive indicator for the differentiation potential of normal, non-transformed cells compared to different stages of malignant progression. In addition, single cells or cell aggregates may actively invade the matrix, utilizing epithelial, mesenchymal or mixed modes of motility. Dynamic phenotypic changes involved in 3D tumor cell invasion are sensitive to specific small-molecule inhibitors that target the actin cytoskeleton. We have used a panel of inhibitors to demonstrate the power of automated image analysis as a phenotypic or morphometric readout in cell-based assays. We introduce a streamlined stand-alone software solution that supports large-scale high-content screens, based on complex and organotypic cultures. AMIDA (Automated Morphometric Image Data Analysis) allows quantitative measurements of large numbers of images and structures, with a multitude of different spheroid shapes, sizes, and textures. AMIDA supports an automated workflow, and can be combined with quality control and statistical tools for data interpretation and visualization. We have used a representative panel of 12 prostate and breast cancer lines that display a broad spectrum of different spheroid morphologies and modes of invasion, challenged by a library of 19 direct or indirect modulators of the actin cytoskeleton which induce systematic changes in spheroid morphology and differentiation versus invasion. These results were independently validated by 2D proliferation, apoptosis and cell motility assays. We identified three drugs that primarily attenuated the invasion and formation of invasive processes in 3D, without affecting proliferation or apoptosis. Two of these compounds block Rac signalling, one affects cellular cAMP/cGMP accumulation. Our approach supports

  9. Efficient and Controlled Generation of 2D and 3D Bile Duct Tissue from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Ye, Zhaohui; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-08-01

    While in vitro liver tissue engineering has been increasingly studied during the last several years, presently engineered liver tissues lack the bile duct system. The lack of bile drainage not only hinders essential digestive functions of the liver, but also leads to accumulation of bile that is toxic to hepatocytes and known to cause liver cirrhosis. Clearly, generation of bile duct tissue is essential for engineering functional and healthy liver. Differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to bile duct tissue requires long and/or complex culture conditions, and has been inefficient so far. Towards generating a fully functional liver containing biliary system, we have developed defined and controlled conditions for efficient 2D and 3D bile duct epithelial tissue generation. A marker for multipotent liver progenitor in both adult human liver and ductal plate in human fetal liver, EpCAM, is highly expressed in hepatic spheroids generated from human iPSCs. The EpCAM high hepatic spheroids can, not only efficiently generate a monolayer of biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes), in a 2D differentiation condition, but also form functional ductal structures in a 3D condition. Importantly, this EpCAM high spheroid based biliary tissue generation is significantly faster than other existing methods and does not require cell sorting. In addition, we show that a knock-in CK7 reporter human iPSC line generated by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology greatly facilitates the analysis of biliary differentiation. This new ductal differentiation method will provide a more efficient method of obtaining bile duct cells and tissues, which may facilitate engineering of complete and functional liver tissue in the future. PMID:27138846

  10. Surface Tension Guided Hanging-Drop: Producing Controllable 3D Spheroid of High-Passaged Human Dermal Papilla Cells and Forming Inductive Microtissues for Hair-Follicle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bojie; Miao, Yong; Wang, Jin; Fan, Zhexiang; Du, Lijuan; Su, Yongsheng; Liu, Bingcheng; Hu, Zhiqi; Xing, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Human dermal papilla (DP) cells have been studied extensively when grown in the conventional monolayer. However, because of great deviation from the real in vivo three-dimensional (3D) environment, these two-dimensional (2D) grown cells tend to lose the hair-inducible capability during passaging. Hence, these 2D caused concerns have motivated the development of novel 3D culture techniques to produce cellular microtissues with suitable mimics. The hanging-drop approach is based on surface tension-based technique and the interaction between surface tension and gravity field that makes a convergence of liquid drops. This study used this technique in a converged drop to form cellular spheroids of dermal papilla cells. It leads to a controllable 3Dspheroid model for scalable fabrication of inductive DP microtissues. The optimal conditions for culturing high-passaged (P8) DP spheroids were determined first. Then, the morphological, histological and functional studies were performed. In addition, expressions of hair-inductive markers including alkaline phosphatase, α-smooth muscle actin and neural cell adhesion molecule were also analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunostaining and immunoblotting. Finally, P8-DP microtissues were coimplanted with newborn mouse epidermal cells (EPCs) into nude mice. Our results indicated that the formation of 3D microtissues not only endowed P8-DP microtissues many similarities to primary DP, but also confer these microtissues an enhanced ability to induce hair-follicle (HF) neogenesis in vivo. This model provides a potential to elucidate the native biology of human DP, and also shows the promising for the controllable and scalable production of inductive DP cells applied in future follicle regeneration. PMID:26886167

  11. Thermo-responsive polymer aided spheroid culture in cryogel based platform for high throughput drug screening.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, J; Kumar, A

    2016-04-21

    In high throughput cell culture, the paradigm is now shifting from 2D to 3D systems. However, in 3D cell culture systems, it is important that the cells form spheroids with robust cell-cell interactions. We fabricated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-gelatin) cryogel scaffolds for cell culture and inserted them into open-ended 96-well plates that formed a drainage and leakage protected, easy to handle high throughput platform. This platform was used to screen for the optimal concentration of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) as an external aid to the formation of cellular spheroids. It was found that hepatic cells (Hep G2) seeded in the presence of 0.03% pNIPAAm formed better hepatic spheroids in terms of morphology (as assessed by microscopic analysis and formation of bile canaliculi-like structures) and functionality by day 5 of culture. An increase of 44.22%, 15.75%, 36.44%, 32.05% and 27.02% was observed in glucose consumption (1.925 mM per day per 10(4) cells), albumin synthesis (164.18 ng per day per 10(4) cells), CYP1A1 (304.92 pg per min per 10(4) cells), CYP2A6 (441.23 nM per min per 10(4) cells) and phase II metabolic activity (386.18 nM per min(-1) per 10(4) cells), respectively, upon using 0.03% pNIPAAm, as compared to the 3D control. The platform was tested with other cells such as breast and lung cancer cells and found to be compatible. The cell spheroids were subjected to drug toxicity screening in cryogel based open-ended platforms. It was observed that the spheroids were more resistant to anticancer drugs, as compared to 2D and 3D controls, with approximately 11%-67% increase in the IC50 values of tamoxifen and paclitaxel. The platform also showed dose dependent and reproducible responses to drugs. PMID:27027476

  12. Development and Characterization of a Scaffold-Free 3D Spheroid Model of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Philippe; Moritz, Wolfgang; Kelm, Jens M; Ullrich, Nina D; Agarkova, Irina; Anson, Blake D; Suter, Thomas M; Zuppinger, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) are terminally differentiated cells in the adult heart, and ischemia and cardiotoxic compounds can lead to cell death and irreversible decline of cardiac function. As testing platforms, isolated organs and primary cells from rodents have been the standard in research and toxicology, but there is a need for better models that more faithfully recapitulate native human biology. Hence, a new in vitro model comprising the advantages of 3D cell culture and the availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of human origin was developed and characterized. Human CMs derived from iPSCs were studied in standard 2D culture and as cardiac microtissues (MTs) formed in hanging drops. Two-dimensional cultures were examined using immunofluorescence microscopy and western blotting, while the cardiac MTs were subjected to immunofluorescence, contractility, and pharmacological investigations. iPSC-derived CMs in 2D culture showed well-formed myofibrils, cell-cell contacts positive for connexin-43, and other typical cardiac proteins. The cells reacted to prohypertrophic growth factors with a substantial increase in myofibrils and sarcomeric proteins. In hanging drop cultures, iPSC-derived CMs formed spheroidal MTs within 4 days, showing a homogeneous tissue structure with well-developed myofibrils extending throughout the whole spheroid without a necrotic core. MTs showed spontaneous contractions for more than 4 weeks that were recorded by optical motion tracking, sensitive to temperature and responsive to electrical pacing. Contractile pharmacology was tested with several agents known to modulate cardiac rate and viability. Calcium transients underlay the contractile activity and were also responsive to electrical stimulation, caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release, and extracellular calcium levels. A three-dimensional culture using iPSC-derived human CMs provides an organoid human-based cellular platform that is free of necrosis and recapitulates vital cardiac

  13. Adaptable stirred-tank culture strategies for large scale production of multicellular spheroid-based tumor cell models.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Estrada, Marta F; Rebelo, Sofia P; Abreu, Sofia; Silva, Inês; Pinto, Catarina; Veloso, Susana C; Serra, Ana Teresa; Boghaert, Erwin; Alves, Paula M; Brito, Catarina

    2016-03-10

    Currently there is an effort toward the development of in vitro cancer models more predictive of clinical efficacy. The onset of advanced analytical tools and imaging technologies has increased the utilization of spheroids in the implementation of high throughput approaches in drug discovery. Agitation-based culture systems are commonly proposed as an alternative method for the production of tumor spheroids, despite the scarce experimental evidence found in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the robustness and reliability of stirred-tank cultures for the scalable generation of 3D cancer models. We developed standardized protocols to a panel of tumor cell lines from different pathologies and attained efficient tumor cell aggregation by tuning hydrodynamic parameters. Large numbers of spheroids were obtained (typically 1000-1500 spheroids/mL) presenting features of native tumors, namely morphology, proliferation and hypoxia gradients, in a cell line-dependent mode. Heterotypic 3D cancer models, based on co-cultures of tumor cells and fibroblasts, were also established in the absence or presence of additional physical support from an alginate matrix, with maintenance of high cell viability. Altogether, we demonstrate that 3D tumor cell model production in stirred-tank culture systems is a robust and versatile approach, providing reproducible tools for drug screening and target verification in pre-clinical oncology research. PMID:26815388

  14. 3D Cell Culture Imaging with Digital Holographic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiduk, Thomas; Nyberg, Kendra; Almeda, Dariela; Koshelva, Ekaterina; McGorty, Ryan; Kaz, David; Gardel, Emily; Auguste, Debra; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2011-03-01

    Cells in higher organisms naturally exist in a three dimensional (3D) structure, a fact sometimes ignored by in vitro biological research. Confinement to a two dimensional culture imposes significant deviations from the native 3D state. One of the biggest obstacles to wider use of 3D cultures is the difficulty of 3D imaging. The confocal microscope, the dominant 3D imaging instrument, is expensive, bulky, and light-intensive; live cells can be observed for only a short time before they suffer photodamage. We present an alternative 3D imaging techinque, digital holographic microscopy, which can capture 3D information with axial resolution better than 2 μm in a 100 μm deep volume. Capturing a 3D image requires only a single camera exposure with a sub-millisecond laser pulse, allowing us to image cell cultures using five orders of magnitude less light energy than with confocal. This can be done with hardware costing ~ 1000. We use the instrument to image growth of MCF7 breast cancer cells and p. pastoras yeast. We acknowledge support from NSF GRFP.

  15. Fluorometric assessment of acetaminophen-induced toxicity in rat hepatocyte spheroids seeded on micro-space cell culture plates.

    PubMed

    Sanoh, Seigo; Santoh, Masataka; Takagi, Masashi; Kanayama, Tatsuya; Sugihara, Kazumi; Kotake, Yaichiro; Ejiri, Yoko; Horie, Toru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    Hepatotoxicity induced by the metabolic activation of drugs is a major concern in drug discovery and development. Three-dimensional (3-D) cultures of hepatocyte spheroids may be superior to monolayer cultures for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity because hepatocytes in spheroids maintain the expression of various metabolizing enzymes and transporters, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP). In this study, we examined the hepatotoxicity due to metabolic activation of acetaminophen (APAP) using fluorescent indicators of cell viability and intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH) in rat hepatocyte spheroids grown on micro-space cell culture plates. The mRNA expression levels of some drug-metabolizing enzymes were maintained during culture. Additionally, this culture system was compatible with microfluorometric imaging under confocal laser scanning microscopy. APAP induced a decrease in intracellular ATP at 10mM, which was blocked by the CYP inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT). APAP (10mM, 24h) decreased the levels of both intracellular ATP and GSH, and GSH-conjugated APAP (APAP-GSH) were formed. All three effects were blocked by ABT, confirming a contribution of APAP metabolic activation by CYP to spheroid toxicity. Fluorometric imaging of hepatocyte spheroids on micro-space cell culture plates may allow the screening of drug-induced hepatotoxicity during pharmaceutical development. PMID:24878114

  16. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution promotes 3D photography as an important tool to obtain objective object information. Keeping mainly in mind World Heritage documentation as well as Heritage protection, it is another intention of this paper, to stimulate the interest in applications of 3D photography for professionals as well as for amateurs. In addition this is also an activity report of the international CIPA task group 3. The main part of this paper starts with "Digging the treasure of existing international 3D photography". This does not only belong to tangible but also to intangible Cultural Heritage. 3D photography clearly supports the recording, the visualization, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. Therefore the use of 3D photography in C.H. should increase on an international level. The presented samples in 3D represent a voluminous, almost partly "forgotten treasure" of international archives for 3D photography. The next chapter is on "Promoting new 3D photography in Cultural Heritage". Though 3D photographs are a well-established basic photographic and photogrammetric tool, even suited to provide "near real" documentation, they are still a matter of research and improvement. Beside the use of 3D cameras even single lenses cameras are very much suited for photographic 3D documentation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Currently at the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, low altitude aerial photography is exposed from a maximum height of 13m, using a hand hold carbon telescope rod. The use of this "huge selfie stick" is also an (international) recommendation, to expose high resolution 3D photography of monuments under expedition conditions. In addition to the carbon rod recently a captive balloon and a hexacopter UAV- platform is in use, mainly to take better synoptically (extremely low altitude, ground truth) aerial photography. Additional experiments with respect to "easy

  17. HepaRG microencapsulated spheroids in DMSO-free culture: novel culturing approaches for enhanced xenobiotic and biosynthetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rebelo, Sofia P; Costa, Rita; Estrada, Marta; Shevchenko, Valery; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2015-08-01

    The need for models that recapitulate liver physiology is perceived for drug development, study of liver disease and bioartificial liver support. The bipotent cell line HepaRG constitutes an efficient surrogate of liver function, yet its differentiated status relies on high concentrations of DMSO, which may compromise the study of drug metabolism and limit the applicability of this hepatic model. Herein, we present a three-dimensional (3D) strategy for the differentiation of HepaRG based on alginate microencapsulation of cell spheroids and culture in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-free conditions. A ratio of 2.9:1 hepatocyte-like to biliary-like cells was obtained in the 3D culture, with an improvement of 35.9 % in the hepatocyte differentiation when compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultures. The expression of the hepatic identity genes HNF4α and PXR in 3D cultures was comparable to 2D differentiated cultures, while the expression of homeostatic-associated genes albumin and carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 was higher in 3D. Moreover, the spheroids presented a polarized organization, exhibiting an interconnected bile canalicular network and excretory functionality, assessed by specific activity of MRP2. Importantly, despite variability in basal gene expression levels, the activity of the phase I enzymes cytochrome P450 family 3, subfamily A, polypeptide 4 and cytochrome P450 family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 2 upon induction was comparable to differentiated 2D cultures and albumin production and ammonia detoxification were enhanced in 3D. The presented model is suitable for toxicological applications, as it allows high throughput analysis of multiple compounds in a DMSO-free setting. Due to the high xenobiotic metabolism and maintenance of biosynthetic functions, the applicability of this model might be broadened to understand liver physiology and for bioartificial liver applications. PMID:25107451

  18. Evaluation of human hepatocytes cultured by three-dimensional spheroid systems for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Takako; Ohta, Kunihiro; Nagao, Takuya; Kusumoto, Kumiko; Koeda, Akiko; Ueda, Tadayoshi; Jomura, Tomoko; Ikeya, Takeshi; Ozeki, Emiko; Wada, Kazuki; Naitoh, Kazushi; Inoue, Yukiko; Takahashi, Naoki; Iwai, Hisakazu; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the utility of three-dimensional (3D) spheroid cultures of human hepatocytes in discovering drug metabolites. Metabolites of acetaminophen, diclofenac, lamotrigine, midazolam, propranolol and salbutamol were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to measure enzyme activities in this system cultured for 2 and 7 days. Sequential metabolic reactions by Phase I and then Phase II enzymes were found in diclofenac [CYP2C9 and UDP-glucuronyltransferases (UGTs)], midazolam (CYP3A4 and UGTs) and propranolol (CYP1A2/2D6 and UGTs). Moreover, lamotrigine and salbutamol were metabolized to lamotrigine-N-glucuronide and salbutamol 4-O-sulfate, respectively. These metabolites, which are human specific, could be observed in clinical studies, but not in conventional hepatic culture systems as in previous reports. Acetaminophen was metabolized to glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, and N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinoneimine (NAPQI) and its metabolites were not observed. In addition, mRNA of drug-metabolism enzymes [CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, UGT2B7, sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1)], which were measured by qRT-PCR, were expressed in the human hepatocyte spheroids. In conclusion, these results suggest that human hepatocyte spheroids are useful in discovering drug metabolites. PMID:24695277

  19. Rigorous 3-D vectorial complex ray model applied to light scattering by an arbitrary spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingqiang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang, Ping; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2016-08-01

    After a ray bundle passes a curved surface, the equal-phase wavefront associated with the refracted rays will be distorted. Consequently, the cross-section of a ray bundle with a curved wavefront during propagation in a homogeneous medium will vary with the ray-bundle propagation distance. Moreover, the phase of a ray bundle with convergent wavefront will undergo a phase shift of π/2 with each passage of a focal line. The contribution to the scattering amplitude by a ray bundle after passing a scatterer is determined by three elements: the cross-section variation of its wavefront, the total phase, and the refraction coefficients determined by Fresnel equations. In the geometric optics regime, the aforesaid three elements caused by a curved surface can be systematically quantified in terms of the vectorial complex ray-tracing technique. In this study, rigorous vectorial complex ray-tracing calculations are conducted for light scattering by a general spheroid and the results are validated in comparison with the benchmarks provided by the rigorous T-matrix method.

  20. Microfluidic 3D cell culture: from tools to tissue models.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Vincent; Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Joore, Jos; Vulto, Paul; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The transition from 2D to 3D cell culture techniques is an important step in a trend towards better biomimetic tissue models. Microfluidics allows spatial control over fluids in micrometer-sized channels has become a valuable tool to further increase the physiological relevance of 3D cell culture by enabling spatially controlled co-cultures, perfusion flow and spatial control over of signaling gradients. This paper reviews most important developments in microfluidic 3D culture since 2012. Most efforts were exerted in the field of vasculature, both as a tissue on its own and as part of cancer models. We observe that the focus is shifting from tool building to implementation of specific tissue models. The next big challenge for the field is the full validation of these models and subsequently the implementation of these models in drug development pipelines of the pharmaceutical industry and ultimately in personalized medicine applications. PMID:26094109

  1. Nanomagnetic Levitation 3-D Cultures of Breast and Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bumpers, Harvey L.; Janagama, Dasharatham G.; Manne, Upender; Basson, Marc D.; Katkoori, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Background Innovative technologies for drug discovery and development, cancer models, stem cell research, tissue engineering, and drug testing in various cell-based platforms require an application similar to the in vivo system. Materials and Methods We developed for the first time nanomagnetically levitated three dimensional (3-D) cultures of breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells using carbon encapsulated cobalt magnetic nanoparticles. BC and CRC xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were evaluated for N-cadherin and Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressions. These phenotypes were compared with 2-D cultures and 3-D cultures grown in a gel matrix. Results The BC and CRC cells grown by magnetic levitation formed microtissues. The levitated cultures had high viability and were maintained in culture for long periods of time. It has been observed that N-cadherin and EGFR activities were highly expressed in the levitated 3-D tumor spheres and xenografts of CRC and BC cells. Conclusions Nanomagnetically levitated 3-D cultures tend to form stable microtissues of BC and CRC and may be more feasible for a range of applications in drug discovery or regenerative medicine. PMID:25617973

  2. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  3. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  4. An Optically Controlled 3D Cell Culturing System

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kelly S.; Hu, Wenqi; Namekar, Swapnil A.; Ohta, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    A novel 3D cell culture system was developed and tested. The cell culture device consists of a microfluidic chamber on an optically absorbing substrate. Cells are suspended in a thermoresponsive hydrogel solution, and optical patterns are utilized to heat the solution, producing localized hydrogel formation around cells of interest. The hydrogel traps only the desired cells in place while also serving as a biocompatible scaffold for supporting the cultivation of cells in 3D. This is demonstrated with the trapping of MDCK II and HeLa cells. The light intensity from the optically induced hydrogel formation does not significantly affect cell viability. PMID:22701475

  5. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Expansion in Contact with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Hanging Drop Model Uncovers Disadvantages of 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Schmal, Olga; Seifert, Jan; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Walter, Christina B.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Efficient ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells with a concomitant preservation of stemness and self-renewal potential is still an unresolved ambition. Increased numbers of methods approaching this issue using three-dimensional (3D) cultures were reported. Here, we describe a simplified 3D hanging drop model for the coculture of cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). When seeded as a mixed cell suspension, MSCs segregated into tight spheroids. Despite the high expression of niche-specific extracellular matrix components by spheroid-forming MSCs, HSPCs did not migrate into the spheroids in the initial phase of coculture, indicating strong homotypic interactions of MSCs. After one week, however, HSPC attachment increased considerably, leading to spheroid collapse as demonstrated by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence staining. In terms of HSPC proliferation, the conventional 2D coculture system was superior to the hanging drop model. Furthermore, expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitors was more favored in 2D than in 3D, as analyzed in colony-forming assays. Conclusively, our data demonstrate that MSCs, when arranged with a spread (monolayer) shape, exhibit better HSPC supportive qualities than spheroid-forming MSCs. Therefore, 3D systems are not necessarily superior to traditional 2D culture in this regard. PMID:26839560

  6. ASC Spheroid Geometry and Culture Oxygenation Differentially Impact Induction of Preangiogenic Behaviors in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Hanna, Brandon; Rucker, Lindsay; Tipton, Allison; Brougham-Cook, Aidan; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Blanchette, James O.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based angiogenic therapies offer potential for the repair of ischemic injuries, while avoiding several of the limitations associated with material-based growth factor delivery strategies. Evidence supports that applying MSCs as spheroids rather than dispersed cells can improve retention and enhance therapeutic effect through increased secretion of angiogenic factors due to hypoxia. However, while spheroid culture appears to modulate MSC behavior, there has been little investigation of how major culture parameters that affect cellular oxygen tension, such as external oxygenation and culture size, impact the angiogenic potential of spheroids. We cultured equal numbers of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) as spheroids containing 10,000 (10k) or 60,000 (60k) cells each, in 20% and 2% oxygen. VEGF secretion varied among the sample groups, with 10k, 2% O2 spheroids exhibiting the highest production. Spheroid-conditioned media was applied to HUVEC monolayers, and proliferation was assessed. Spheroids of either size in 2% oxygen induced comparable proliferation compared to a 2 ng/ml VEGF control sample, while spheroids in 20% oxygen induced less proliferation. Spheroids were also applied in coculture with HUVEC monolayers, and induction of migration through a Transwell membrane was evaluated. Sixty thousand, 2% O2 spheroids induced similar levels of migration as VEGF controls, while 10k, 2% O2 spheroids induced significantly more. Ten thousand, 20% spheroids performed no better than VEGF-free controls. We conclude that the therapeutic ability of ASC spheroids to stimulate angiogenesis in endothelial cells is affected by both culture size and oxygenation parameters, suggesting that, while ASC spheroids offer potential in the treatment of injured and ischemic tissues, careful consideration of culture size in respect to in vivo local oxygen tension will be necessary for optimal results. PMID:25197983

  7. Exploring Cultural Heritage Resources in a 3d Collaborative Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaldiza, A.; Wachowicz, M.; Vázquez Hoehne, A.

    2012-06-01

    Cultural heritage is a complex and diverse concept, which brings together a wide domain of information. Resources linked to a cultural heritage site may consist of physical artefacts, books, works of art, pictures, historical maps, aerial photographs, archaeological surveys and 3D models. Moreover, all these resources are listed and described by a set of a variety of metadata specifications that allow their online search and consultation on the most basic characteristics of them. Some examples include Norma ISO 19115, Dublin Core, AAT, CDWA, CCO, DACS, MARC, MoReq, MODS, MuseumDat, TGN, SPECTRUM, VRA Core and Z39.50. Gateways are in place to fit in these metadata standards into those used in a SDI (ISO 19115 or INSPIRE), but substantial work still remains to be done for the complete incorporation of cultural heritage information. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the complexity of cultural heritage resources can be dealt with by a visual exploration of their metadata within a 3D collaborative environment. The 3D collaborative environments are promising tools that represent the new frontier of our capacity of learning, understanding, communicating and transmitting culture.

  8. Alzheimer’s in 3D culture: Challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    D'Avanzo, Carla; Aronson, Jenna; Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, and there is currently no cure. The “β-amyloid cascade hypothesis” of AD is the basis of current understanding of AD pathogenesis and drug discovery. However, no AD models have fully validated this hypothesis. We recently developed a human stem cell culture model of AD by cultivating genetically modified human neural stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture system. These cells were able to recapitulate key events of AD pathology including β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this review, we will discuss the progress and current limitations of AD mouse models and human stem cell models as well as explore the breakthroughs of 3D cell culture systems. We will also share our perspective on the potential of dish models of neurodegenerative diseases for studying pathogenic cascades and therapeutic drug discovery. PMID:26252541

  9. Alzheimer's in 3D culture: challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    D'Avanzo, Carla; Aronson, Jenna; Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, and there is currently no cure. The "β-amyloid cascade hypothesis" of AD is the basis of current understanding of AD pathogenesis and drug discovery. However, no AD models have fully validated this hypothesis. We recently developed a human stem cell culture model of AD by cultivating genetically modified human neural stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture system. These cells were able to recapitulate key events of AD pathology including β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In this review, we will discuss the progress and current limitations of AD mouse models and human stem cell models as well as explore the breakthroughs of 3D cell culture systems. We will also share our perspective on the potential of dish models of neurodegenerative diseases for studying pathogenic cascades and therapeutic drug discovery. PMID:26252541

  10. Assessing the immunomodulatory role of heteroglycan in a tumor spheroid and macrophage co-culture model system.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Sanjana P; Mishra, Debasish; Roy, Bibhas; Ghosh, Sudip K; Maiti, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic benefits of glycans have garnered much attention over the last few decades with most studies being reported in 2D cultures or in animal models. The present work is therefore aimed to assess the effects of an immunomodulatory heteroglycan in a 3D milieu. Briefly, HT29 tumor spheroids were incubated with THP-1 macrophages at 1:1 ratio in a culture medium supplemented with immune stimulants such as heteroglycans or LPS. Spheroidal distortion, migration of tumor cells from the periphery of the spheroids and 46% of higher macrophage invasiveness was noted in heteroglycan-treated co-cultures with respect to control cultures. Histological sections of the treated co-cultures revealed the presence of high apoptotic tumor cells in the spheroidal periphery. CD11c and CD68 staining further suggested the predominance of macrophages in the vicinity of the apoptotic tumor cells. Such an in vitro created tissue system may thereby confirm the effectiveness of heteroglycan in activating the immune cells to exhibit tumor cytotoxic properties. PMID:25965450

  11. Effect of shape, size, and aspect ratio on nanoparticle penetration and distribution inside solid tissues using 3D spheroid models.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rachit; Jurney, Patrick; Raythatha, Mansi; Singh, Vikramjit; Sreenivasan, Sidlgata V; Shi, Li; Roy, Krishnendu

    2015-10-28

    Efficient penetration and uniform distribution of nanoparticles (NPs) inside solid tissues and tumors is paramount to their therapeutic and diagnostic success. While many studies have reported the effect of NP size and charge on intratissue distribution, role of shape, and aspect ratio on NP transport inside solid tissues remain unclear. Here experimental and theoretical studies are reported on how nanoscale geometry of Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography-fabricated, polyethylene-glycol-based anionic nanohydrogels affect their penetration and distribution inside 3D spheroids, a model representing the intervascular region of solid, tumor-like tissues. Unexpectedly, low aspect ratio cylindrical NPs (H/D ≈0.3; disk-like particles, 100 nm height, and 325 nm diameter) show maximal intratissue delivery (>50% increase in total cargo delivered) and more uniform penetration compared to nanorods or smaller NPs of the same shape. This is in contrast to spherical NPs where smaller NP size resulted in deeper, more uniform penetration. Our results provide fundamental new knowledge on NP transport inside solid tissues and further establish shape and aspect ratio as important design parameters in developing more efficient, better penetrating, nanocarriers for drug, or contrast-agent delivery. PMID:26376024

  12. The influence of NIR femtosecond laser radiation on the viability of 3D stem cell clusters and tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Gorjup, Erwin; LeHarzic, Ronan; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Adult human and rat pancreas stem cells as well as tumor spheroids were irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range at high transient GW/cm2 and TW/cm2 intensities. The cellular response to the laser exposure was probed by the detection of modifications of NAD(P)H autofluorescence, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA strand breaks (TUNEL-assay), and viability (live/dead test). The results confirm that long-term scanning of stem cells can be performed at appropriate laser exposure parameters without a measurable impact on the cellular metabolism and vitality. In addition, it was proven that a targeted inactivation of a particular single stem cells or a single tumour cell inside a 3D cell cluster using single point illumination at TW/cm2 laser intensities can be performed without affecting neighbouring cells. Therefore multiphoton microscopes can be considered as biosafe tools for long-term analysis of stem cells as well as highly precise optical knocking out of single cells within cell clusters and tissues.

  13. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  14. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  15. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that O(2)(-)* and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  16. Interactions of Pluronic nanocarriers with 2D and 3D cell cultures: Effects of PEO block length and aggregation state.

    PubMed

    Arranja, Alexandra; Denkova, Antonia G; Morawska, Karolina; Waton, Gilles; van Vlierberghe, Sandra; Dubruel, Peter; Schosseler, François; Mendes, Eduardo

    2016-02-28

    This work reveals how the physicochemical properties of Pluronic block copolymers influence significantly their interactions with cancer cells, whether in monolayer or spheroid cultures, and how different clinical applications can be foreseen. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models were used to investigate the interactions of Pluronic carriers with different PEO block length and aggregation state (unimers versus cross-linked micelles) in HeLa and U87 cancer cells. Stabilized micelles of Pluronic P94 or F127 were obtained by polymerization of a crosslinking agent in the micelles hydrophobic core. Nanocarriers were functionalized with a fluorescent probe for visualization, and with a chelator for radiolabeling with Indium-111 and gamma-quantification. The 2D cell models revealed that the internalization pathways and ultimate cellular localization of the Pluronic nanocarriers depended largely on both the PEO block size and aggregation state of the copolymers. The smaller P94 unimers with an average radius of 2.1nm and the shortest PEO block mass (1100gmol(-1)) displayed the highest cellular uptake and retention. 3D tumor spheroids were used to assess the penetration capacity and toxicity potential of the nanocarriers. Results showed that cross-linked F127 micelles were more efficiently delivered across the tumor spheroids, and the penetration depth depends mostly on the transcellular transport of the carriers. The Pluronic P94-based carriers with the shortest PEO block length induced spheroid toxicity, which was significantly influenced by the spheroid cellular type. PMID:26792572

  17. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  18. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  19. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. PMID:26358782

  20. Monitoring of Apoptosis in 3D Cell Cultures by FRET and Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Petra; Schickinger, Sarah; Wagner, Michael; Angres, Brigitte; Bruns, Thomas; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Non-radiative cell membrane associated Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) from an enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) to an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) is used for detection of apoptosis in 3-dimensional cell cultures. FRET is visualized in multi-cellular tumor spheroids by light sheet based fluorescence microscopy in combination with microspectral analysis and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Upon application of staurosporine and to some extent after treatment with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a specific activator of protein kinase c, the caspase-3 sensitive peptide linker DEVD is cleaved. This results in a reduction of acceptor (EYFP) fluorescence as well as a prolongation of the fluorescence lifetime of the donor (ECFP). Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes may, therefore, be used for monitoring of apoptosis in a realistic 3-dimensional system, while light sheet based microscopy appears appropriate for 3D imaging at low light exposure. PMID:25761242

  1. Culturing Cells in 3D Ordered Cellular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Hui; Lin, Wang-Jung; Lin, Jing-Ying

    2011-03-01

    Constructing a well-defined 3D microenvironment for cell growth is a key step for tissue engineering and mechanobiology. We demonstrate high-throughput fabrication of gelatin-based ordered cellular solids with tunable pore size and solid fraction. This process involves generating monodisperse liquid foam with a cross-flow microfluidic device. The monodisperse liquid foam was further processed into open-cell solid foam, which was used as scaffolds for 3D cell culture. Three distinct cell types were cultured under these conditions and displayed appropriate physiological, morphological, and functional characteristics. Epithelial cells formed cyst-like structures and were polarized inside pores, myoblasts adopted a tubular structure and fused into myotubes, and fibroblasts exhibited wide varieties of morphologies depending on their location inside the scaffolds. These ordered cellular solids therefore make possible the study of pore-size effects on cells.

  2. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. PMID:24636868

  3. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. PMID:25453259

  4. 3D Tissue Culturing: Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 13/2016).

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented by M. Hagiwara and co-workers on page 1566. 3D recognition of a sample structure can be achieved by facilitating multi-directional views using a standard microscope without a laser system. The cubic platform has the potential to promote 3D culture studies, offering easy handling and compatibility with commercial culture plates at a low price tag. PMID:27384934

  5. Lycopene's Effects on Cancer Cell Functions within Monolayer and Spheroid Cultures.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Nina Pauline; Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Rausch, Tamara; Feldthusen, Jesper; Champ, Simon; Clements, Judith Ann; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner; Loessner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene, a compound that blocks the action of free radicals and oxygen molecules, is found in tomatoes and tomato-based products and linked to a reduced incidence of cancer. Increasing willingness of patients to maintain a healthy lifestyle by supplemental intake of nutrients and acceptance of alternative therapeutics has boosted research into nutraceuticals. The potential of lycopene to prevent or treat cancer has been investigated, but outcomes are inconsistent and its mode of action is still unknown. Further studies are needed to understand the role of lycopene in cancer prevention and treatment. The impact of lycopene on viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of five different cancer cell lines was determined using monolayer and spheroid cultures. Cell viability was significantly reduced upon lycopene treatment at physiologically attainable concentrations. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion did not change upon lycopene treatment. Ovarian cancer spheroids initially showed a decreased proliferation and after 14 days increased cell viability upon lycopene treatment, confirming the potential of lycopene to reduce cancer cell growth in short-term cultures and also indicate enhanced cell viability over prolonged exposure. This study cannot substantiate that lycopene inhibits cell functions associated with tumor growth, even in a 3D cancer model that mimics the natural tumor microenvironment. PMID:27015041

  6. Molecular Predictors of 3D Morphogenesis by Breast Cancer Cell Lines in 3D Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Giricz, Orsi; Lee, Genee; Baehner, Frederick; Gray, Joe; Bissell, Mina; Kenny, Paraic; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Correlative analysis of molecular markers with phenotypic signatures is the simplest model for hypothesis generation. In this paper, a panel of 24 breast cell lines was grown in 3D culture, their morphology was imaged through phase contrast microscopy, and computational methods were developed to segment and represent each colony at multiple dimensions. Subsequently, subpopulations from these morphological responses were identified through consensus clustering to reveal three clusters of round, grape-like, and stellate phenotypes. In some cases, cell lines with particular pathobiological phenotypes clustered together (e.g., ERBB2 amplified cell lines sharing the same morphometric properties as the grape-like phenotype). Next, associations with molecular features were realized through (i) differential analysis within each morphological cluster, and (ii) regression analysis across the entire panel of cell lines. In both cases, the dominant genes that are predictive of the morphological signatures were identified. Specifically, PPAR? has been associated with the invasive stellate morphological phenotype, which corresponds to triple-negative pathobiology. PPAR? has been validated through two supporting biological assays.

  7. Ideal Positions: 3D Sonography, Medical Visuality, Popular Culture.

    PubMed

    Seiber, Tim

    2016-03-01

    As digital technologies are integrated into medical environments, they continue to transform the experience of contemporary health care. Importantly, medicine is increasingly visual. In the history of sonography, visibility has played an important role in accessing fetal bodies for diagnostic and entertainment purposes. With the advent of three-dimensional (3D) rendering, sonography presents the fetus visually as already a child. The aesthetics of this process and the resulting imagery, made possible in digital networks, discloses important changes in the relationship between technology and biology, reproductive health and political debates, and biotechnology and culture. PMID:26164291

  8. Microfabricated polymeric vessel mimetics for 3-D cancer cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Ashley A.; Das, Chandan K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pursley, Randall H.; McQueen, Philip G.; Hall, Matthew D.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling tumor growth in vitro is essential for cost-effective testing of hypotheses in preclinical cancer research. 3-D cell culture offers an improvement over monolayer culture for studying cellular processes in cancer biology because of the preservation of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. Oxygen transport poses a major barrier to mimicking in vivo environments and is not replicated in conventional cell culture systems. We hypothesized that we can better mimic the tumor microenvironment using a bioreactor system for controlling gas exchange in cancer cell cultures with silicone hydrogel synthetic vessels. Soft-lithography techniques were used to fabricate oxygen-permeable silicone hydrogel membranes containing arrays of micropillars. These membranes were inserted into a bioreactor and surrounded by basement membrane extract (BME) within which fluorescent ovarian cancer (OVCAR8) cells were cultured. Cell clusters oxygenated by synthetic vessels showed a ∼100um drop-off to anoxia, consistent with in vivo studies of tumor nodules fed by the microvasculature. We showed oxygen tension gradients inside the clusters oxygenated by synthetic vessels had a ∼100 µm drop-off to anoxia, which is consistent with in vivo studies. Oxygen transport in the bioreactor system was characterized by experimental testing with a dissolved oxygen probe and finite element modeling of convective flow. Our study demonstrates differing growth patterns associated with controlling gas distributions to better mimic in vivo conditions. PMID:23911071

  9. Noncanonical roles of membranous lysyl-tRNA synthetase in transducing cell-substrate signaling for invasive dissemination of colon cancer spheroids in 3D collagen I gels

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seo Hee; Kim, Doyeun; Lee, Mi-Sook; Lee, Doohyung; Kwak, Tae Kyoung; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Kim, Hye-Jin; Song, Haeng Eun; Choi, Jungeun; Lee, Gyu-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Park, Song Hwa; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Tai Young; Thiery, Jean Paul; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jung Weon

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion properties of cells are involved in tumor metastasis. Although KRS at the plasma membrane is shown important for cancer metastasis, additionally to canonical roles of cytosolic KRS in protein translation, how KRS and its downstream effectors promote the metastatic migration remains unexplored. Disseminative behaviors (an earlier metastatic process) of colon cancer cell spheroids embedded in 3D collagen gels were studied with regards to cell adhesion properties, and relevance in KRS−/+ knocked-down animal and clinical colon cancer tissues. Time-lapse imaging revealed KRS-dependent cell dissemination from the spheroids, whereas KRS-suppressed spheroids remained static due to the absence of outbound movements supported by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. While keeping E-cadherin at the outward disseminative cells, KRS caused integrin-involved intracellular signaling for ERK/c-Jun, paxillin, and cell-ECM adhesion-mediated signaling to modulate traction force for crawling movement. KRS-suppressed spheroids became disseminative following ERK or paxillin re-expression. The KRS-dependent intracellular signaling activities correlated with the invasiveness in clinical colon tumor tissues and in KRS−/+ knocked-down mice tissues. Collectively, these observations indicate that KRS at the plasma membrane plays new roles in metastatic migration as a signaling inducer, and causes intracellular signaling for cancer dissemination, involving cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, during KRS-mediated metastasis. PMID:26091349

  10. EMBEDDED MULTICELLULAR SPHEROIDS AS A BIOMIMETIC 3D CANCER MODEL FOR EVALUATING DRUG AND DRUG-DEVICE COMBINATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Charoen, Kristie M.; Fallica, Brian; Colson, Yolonda L.; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular aggregates of cells, termed spheroids, are of interest for studying tumor behavior and for evaluating the response of pharmacologically active agents. Spheroids more faithfully reproduce the tumor macrostructure found in vivo compared to classical 2D monolayers. We present a method for embedding spheroids within collagen gels followed by quantitative and qualitative whole spheroid and single cell analyses enabling characterization over the length scales from molecular to macroscopic. Spheroid producing and embedding capabilities are demonstrated for U2OS and MDAMB 231 cell lines, of osteosarcoma and breast adenocarncinoma origin, respectively. Finally, using the MDA-MB-231 tumor model, the chemotherapeutic response between paclitaxel delivery as a bolus dose, as practiced in the clinic, is compared to delivery within an expansile nanoparticle. The expansile nanoparticle delivery route provides a superior outcome and the results mirror those observed in a murine xenograft model. These findings highlight the synergistic beneficial results that may arise from the use of a drug delivery system, and the need to evaluate both drug candidates and delivery systems in the research and pre-clinical screening phases of a new cancer therapy development program. PMID:24360576

  11. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Modify the Response of Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen and Anti-Androgens in Three-Dimensional Spheroid Culture.

    PubMed

    Eder, Theresa; Weber, Anja; Neuwirt, Hannes; Grünbacher, Georg; Ploner, Christian; Klocker, Helmut; Sampson, Natalie; Eder, Iris E

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) targeting remains the gold standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa); however, treatment resistance remains a major clinical problem. To study the therapeutic effects of clinically used anti-androgens we characterized herein a tissue-mimetic three-dimensional (3D) in vitro model whereby PCa cells were cultured alone or with PCa-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Notably, the ratio of PCa cells to CAFs significantly increased in time in favor of the tumor cells within the spheroids strongly mimicking PCa in vivo. Despite this loss of CAFs, the stromal cells, which were not sensitive to androgen and even stimulated by the anti-androgens, significantly influenced the sensitivity of PCa cells to androgen and to the anti-androgens bicalutamide and enzalutamide. In particular, DuCaP cells lost sensitivity to enzalutamide when co-cultured with CAFs. In LAPC4/CAF and LNCaP/CAF co-culture spheroids the impact of the CAFs was less pronounced. In addition, 3D spheroids exhibited a significant increase in E-cadherin and substantial expression of vimentin in co-culture spheroids, whereas AR levels remained unchanged or even decreased. In LNCaP/CAF spheroids we further found increased Akt signaling that could be inhibited by the phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, thereby overcoming the anti-androgen resistance of the spheroids. Our data show that CAFs influence drug response of PCa cells with varying impact and further suggest this spheroid model is a valuable in vitro drug testing tool. PMID:27598125

  12. Transitioning from multi-phase to single-phase microfluidics for long-term culture and treatment of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-09-21

    When compared to methodologies based on low adhesion or hanging drop plates, droplet microfluidics offers several advantages for the formation and culture of multicellular spheroids, such as the potential for higher throughput screening and the use of reduced cell numbers, whilst providing increased stability for plate handling. However, a drawback of the technology is its characteristic compartmentalisation which limits the nutrients available to cells within an emulsion and poses challenges to the exchange of the encapsulated solution, often resulting in short-term cell culture and/or viability issues. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-purpose microfluidic platform that combines the high-throughput characteristics of multi-phase flows with that of ease of perfusion typical of single-phase microfluidics. We developed a versatile system to upscale the formation and long-term culture of multicellular spheroids for testing anticancer treatments, creating an array of fluidically addressable, compact spheroids that could be cultured in either medium or within a gel scaffold. The work provides proof-of-concept results for using this system to test both chemo- and radio-therapeutic protocols using in vitro 3D cancer models. PMID:27477673

  13. Embedding Knowledge in 3D Data Frameworks in Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughenour, C. M.; Vincent, M. L.; de Kramer, M.; Senecal, S.; Fritsch, D.; Flores Gutirrez, M.; Lopez-Menchero Bendicho, V. M.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    At present, where 3D modeling and visualisation in cultural heritage are concerned, an object's documentation lacks its interconnected memory provided by multidisciplinary examination and linked data. As the layers of paint, wood, and brick recount a structure's physical properties, the intangible, such as the forms of worship through song, dance, burning incense, and oral traditions, contributes to the greater story of its cultural heritage import. Furthermore, as an object or structure evolves through time, external political, religious, or environmental forces can affect it as well. As tangible and intangible entities associated with the structure transform, its narrative becomes dynamic and difficult to easily record. The Initial Training Network for Digital Cultural Heritage (ITN-DCH), a Marie Curie Actions project under the EU 7th Framework Programme, seeks to challenge this complexity by developing a novel methodology capable of offering such a holistic framework. With the integration of digitisation, conservation, linked data, and retrieval systems for DCH, the nature of investigation and dissemination will be augmented significantly. Examples of utilisating and evaluating this framework will range from a UNESCOWorld Heritage site, the Byzantine church of Panagia Forviotissa Asinou in the Troodos Mountains of Cyprus, to various religious icons and a monument located at the Monastery of Saint Neophytos. The application of this effort to the Asinou church, representing the first case study of the ITN-DCH project, is used as a template example in order to assess the technical challenges involved in the creation of such a framework.

  14. Automated full-3D shape measurement of cultural heritage objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnik, Robert; Karaszewski, Maciej; Zaluski, Wojciech; Bolewicki, Pawel

    2009-07-01

    In this paper a fully automated 3D shape measurement system is presented. It consists of rotary stage for cultural heritage objects placement, vertical linear stage with mounted robot arm (with six degrees of freedom) and structured light measurement set-up mounted to its head. All these manipulation devices are automatically controlled by collision detection and next-best-view calculation modules. The goal of whole system is to automatically (without any user attention) and rapidly (from days and weeks to hours) measure whole object. Measurement head is automatically calibrated by the system and its possible working volume starts from centimeters and ends up to one meter. We present some measurement results with different working scenarios along with discussion about its possible applications.

  15. Diachronic 3d Reconstruction for Lost Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, G.; Russo, M.

    2011-09-01

    Cultural Heritage artifacts can often be underestimated for their hidden presence in the landscape. Such problem is particularly large in countries like Italy, where the massive amount of "famous" artifacts tends to neglect other presences unless properly exposed, or when the remains are dramatically damaged leaving very few interpretation clues to the visitor. In such cases a virtual presentation of the Cultural Heritage site can be of great help, specially for explaining the evolution of its status, giving sometimes sense to few spare stones. The definition of these digital representations deal with two crucial aspects: on the one hand the possibility of 3D surveying the relics in order to have an accurate geometrical image of the current status of the artifact; on the other hand the presence of historical sources both in form of written text or images, that once properly matched with the current geometrical data, may help to recreate digitally a set of 3D models representing visually the various historical phases (diachronic model), up to the current one. The core of this article is the definition of an integrated methodology that starts from an high-resolution digital survey of the remains of an ancient building and develops a coherent virtual reconstruction from different historical sources, suggesting a scalable method suitable to be re-used for generating a 4D (geometry + time) model of the artifact. This approach has been experimented on the "Basilica di San Giovanni in Conca" in Milan, a very significant example for its complex historic evolution that combines evident historic values with an invisible presence inside the city.

  16. Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented. The 3D structure of biosamples can be recognized without fluorescence. The cubic platform employs two types of hydrogels that are compatible with conventional culture dishes or well plates, facilitating growth in culture, ease of handling, and viewing at multiple angles. PMID:27128576

  17. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression levels are differentially regulated in three-dimensional spheroids of liver cancer cells compared to two-dimensional monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Jun; Goto, Shinpei; Hattori, Hiroki; Hoshi, Sawaka; Ushirokawa, Midori; Kudo, Kenzo; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2015-12-01

    Compared to two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell culture models are thought to be structurally more similar to the in vivo tumor microenvironment. We investigated the regulation of the expression of genes encoding the drug-metabolizing enzymes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in 3D spheroids comprised of cells of the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell JHH1, Huh7, and HepG2. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in the spheroids was higher than that in 2D cultured cells. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in 2D cultured cells. Knockdown of AhR in spheroids suppressed CYP1A1 expression; however, CYP1A2 expression levels remained unchanged. Moreover, we found that pregnane X receptor (PXR) likely regulated CYP1A2 expression in JHH1, HepG2, and Huh7 spheroids and that CYP1A1 expression in JHH1 and Huh7 3D spheroids is regulated not only by AhR but also by PXR. It is well known that gene expression levels are different between 3D spheroids and 2D monolayer cultured cells, and our results indicate that the regulation of gene expression also varies between the two culture conditions. Taken together, these results underlie a novel finding regarding the regulation of drug-metabolizing enzyme expression in liver cancer cells growing as 3D spheroids. PMID:26643992

  18. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  19. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  20. Effect of particle size in a colloidal hydrogel scaffold for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yening; Guan, Ying; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-12-01

    The in situ-forming colloidal hydrogels from the thermal gelation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel dispersions have been exploited for 3D cell culture. The properties of the hydrogel scaffold need to be tuned to further improve its performance. In addition, cellular uptake of the microgel particles need to be reduced to avoid their potential undesired influence. For these purposes we systematically examined the effect of microgel particle size on the hydrogel scaffold. It was found that gel properties could be tuned via changing particle size. Increasing particle size reduces the gel strength and its syneresis degree, both of which are favorable for cell growth. Meanwhile increasing particle size could also reduce significantly the cellular uptake of the microgel particles. Microgel with a size of ~162 nm shows the highest cellular uptake, beyond which cellular uptake decreases with increasing particle size. Hydrogel scaffold from 300 nm microgel, with suitable physical properties and reduced cellular uptake, were successfully used for multicellular spheroid generation. PMID:26613865

  1. Capture and 3D culture of colonic crypts and colonoids in a microarray platform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Ahmad, Asad A.; Shah, Pavak K.; Sims, Christopher E.; Magness, Scott T.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Crypts are the basic structural and functional units of colonic epithelium and can be isolated from the colon and cultured in vitro into multi-cell spheroids termed “colonoids”. Both crypts and colonoids are ideal building blocks for construction of an in vitro tissue model of the colon. Here we proposed and tested a microengineered platform for capture and in vitro 3D culture of colonic crypts and colonoids. An integrated platform was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane which contained two fluidic layers separated by an array of cylindrical microwells (150-μm diameter, 150-μm depth) with perforated bottoms (30-μm opening, 10-μm depth) termed “microstrainers”. As fluid moved through the array, crypts or colonoids were retained in the microstrainers with a >90% array-filling efficiency. Matrigel as an extracellular matrix was then applied to the microstrainers to generate isolated Matrigel pockets encapsulating the crypts or colonoids. After supplying the essential growth factors, epidermal growth factor, Wnt-3A, R-spondin 2 and noggin, 63±13% of the crypts and 77±8% of the colonoids cultured in the microstrainers over a 48–72 h period formed viable 3D colonoids. Thus colonoid growth on the array was similar to that under standard culture conditions (78±5%). Additionally the colonoids displayed the same morphology and similar numbers of stem and progenitor cells as those under standard culture conditions. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed that the differentiated cell-types of the colon, goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells and absorptive enterocytes, formed on the array. To demonstrating the utility of the array in tracking the colonoid fate, quantitative fluorescence analysis was performed on the arrayed colonoids exposed to reagents such as Wnt-3A and the γ-secretase inhibitor LY-411575. The successful formation of viable, multi-cell type colonic tissue on the microengineered platform represents a first step in the building of a

  2. Development of three-dimensional lung multicellular spheroids in air- and liquid-interface culture for the evaluation of anticancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    MEENACH, SAMANTHA A.; TSORAS, ALEXANDRA N.; McGARRY, RONALD C.; MANSOUR, HEIDI M.; HILT, J. ZACH; ANDERSON, KIMBERLY W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) lung multicellular spheroids (MCS) in liquid-covered culture (LCC) and air-interface culture (AIC) conditions have both been developed for the evaluation of aerosol anticancer therapeutics in solution and aerosols, respectively. The MCS were formed by seeding lung cancer cells on top of collagen where they formed spheroids due to the prevalence of cell-to-cell interactions. LCC MCS were exposed to paclitaxel (PTX) in media whereas AIC MCS were exposed to dry powder PEGylated phospholipid aerosol microparticles containing paclitaxel. The difference in viability for 2D versus 3D culture for both LCC and AIC was evaluated along with the effects of the particles on lung epithelium via transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. For LCC and AIC conditions, the 3D spheroids were more resistant to treatment with higher IC50 values for A549 and H358 cell lines. TEER results initially indicated a decrease in resistance upon drug or particle exposure, however, these values increased over the course of several days indicating the ability of the cells to recover. Overall, these studies offer a comprehensive in vitro evaluation of aerosol particles used in the treatment of lung cancer while introducing a new method for culturing lung cancer MCS in both LCC and AIC conditions. PMID:26846376

  3. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  4. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  5. Unique characteristics of human mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSC) pre-activated in 3D cultures under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.; Bartosh, Thomas J.; Tiblow, April; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being employed in clinical trials, but the best protocol to prepare the cells for administration to patients remains unclear. We previously demonstrated that MSCs could be pre-activated to express therapeutic factors by culturing the cells in 3D. Here we compared the activation of MSCs in 3D in fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing medium and in multiple xeno-free media formulations. Methods MSC aggregation and sphere formation was studied using hanging drop cultures with medium containing FBS or with various commercially available stem cell media with or without human serum albumin (HSA). Activation of MSCs was studied with gene expression and protein secretion measurements and with functional studies using macrophages and cancer cells. Results MSCs did not condense into tight spheroids and express a full complement of therapeutic genes in MEMα or several commercial stem-cell media. However, we identified a chemically-defined xeno-free media that when supplemented with HSA from blood or recombinant HSA, resulted in compact spheres with high cell viability, together with high expression of anti-inflammatory (PGE2, TSG-6) and anti-cancer molecules (TRAIL, IL-24). Furthermore, spheres cultured in this medium showed potent anti-inflammatory effects in an LPS-stimulated macrophage system, and suppressed the growth of prostate cancer cells by promoting cell-cycle arrest and cell death. Discussion We demonstrated that cell activation in 3D depends critically on the culture medium. The conditions developed here for 3D culture of MSCs should be useful in further research on MSCs and their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25231893

  6. 3D Microperiodic Hydrogel Scaffolds for Robust Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hanson Shepherd, Jennifer N.; Parker, Sara T.; Shepherd, Robert F.; Gillette, Martha U.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microperiodic scaffolds of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) have been fabricated by direct-write assembly of a photopolymerizable hydrogel ink. The ink is initially composed of physically entangled pHEMA chains dissolved in a solution of HEMA monomer, comonomer, photoinitiator and water. Upon printing 3D scaffolds of varying architecture, the ink filaments are exposed to UV light, where they are transformed into an interpenetrating hydrogel network of chemically cross-linked and physically entangled pHEMA chains. These 3D microperiodic scaffolds are rendered growth compliant for primary rat hippocampal neurons by absorption of polylysine. Neuronal cells thrive on these scaffolds, forming differentiated, intricately branched networks. Confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that both cell distribution and extent of neuronal process alignment depend upon scaffold architecture. This work provides an important step forward in the creation of suitable platforms for in vitro study of sensitive cell types. PMID:21709750

  7. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Momey, F.; Berdeu, A.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Marcel, F. Kermarrec; Picollet-D’hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Allier, C.

    2016-01-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm3 of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  8. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Momey, F; Berdeu, A; Bordy, T; Dinten, J-M; Marcel, F Kermarrec; Picollet-D'hahan, N; Gidrol, X; Allier, C

    2016-03-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm (3) of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  9. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  10. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a 'more clinically relevant' tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  11. A tumor-penetrating recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD enhance efficacy of paclitaxel in 3D multicellular spheroids and gastric cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sha, Huizi; Li, Rutian; Bian, Xinyu; Liu, Qin; Xie, Chen; Xin, Xiaoyan; Kong, Weiwei; Qian, Xiaoping; Jiang, Xiqun; Hu, Wenjing; Liu, Baorui

    2015-09-18

    It has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues because of the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have previously constructed a protein of bispecific targets and high permeability named anti-EGFR-iRGD and investigated its inhibiting cell proliferation of gastric cancer. Paclitaxel (PTX) is widely used for treating various kinds of cancer. In this paper, we investigated the effects of anti-EGFR-iRGD in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs including PTX in epidermal growth factor receptor highly expressing gastric cancer. We demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of PTX combined with anti-EGFR-iRGD on monolayer cells (2D), multicellular spheroids (3D) and tumor-bearing mice for the first time and investigated the mechanism of this synergy effect. Our results provide impetus for further studies to use anti-EGFR-iRGD with standard cytotoxic treatment regimens for enhancing therapy of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25998561

  12. Long-Duration Three-Dimensional Spheroid Culture Promotes Angiogenic Activities of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer significant therapeutic promise for various regenerative therapies. However, MSC-based therapy for injury exhibits low efficacy due to the pathological environment in target tissues and the differences between in vitro and in vivo conditions. To address this issue, we developed adipose-derived MSC spheroids as a novel delivery method to preserve the stem cell microenvironment. MSC spheroids were generated by suspension culture for 3 days, and their sizes increased in a time-dependent manner. After re-attachment of MSC spheroids to the plastic dish, their adhesion capacity and morphology were not altered. MSC spheroids showed enhanced production of hypoxia-induced angiogenic cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell derived factor (SDF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, spheroid culture promoted the preservation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as laminin and fibronectin, in a culture time- and spheroid size-dependent manner. Furthermore, phosphorylation of AKT, a cell survival signal, was significantly higher and the expression of pro-apoptotic molecules, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and cleaved caspase-3, was markedly lower in the spheroids than in MSCs in monolayers. In the murine hindlimb ischemia model, transplanted MSC spheroids showed better proliferation than MSCs in monolayer. These findings suggest that MSC spheroids promote MSC bioactivities via secretion of angiogenic cytokines, preservation of ECM components, and regulation of apoptotic signals. Therefore, MSC spheroid-based cell therapy may serve as a simple and effective strategy for regenerative medicine. PMID:26869524

  13. Long-Duration Three-Dimensional Spheroid Culture Promotes Angiogenic Activities of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hee; Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer significant therapeutic promise for various regenerative therapies. However, MSC-based therapy for injury exhibits low efficacy due to the pathological environment in target tissues and the differences between in vitro and in vivo conditions. To address this issue, we developed adipose-derived MSC spheroids as a novel delivery method to preserve the stem cell microenvironment. MSC spheroids were generated by suspension culture for 3 days, and their sizes increased in a time-dependent manner. After re-attachment of MSC spheroids to the plastic dish, their adhesion capacity and morphology were not altered. MSC spheroids showed enhanced production of hypoxia-induced angiogenic cytokines such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell derived factor (SDF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). In addition, spheroid culture promoted the preservation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, such as laminin and fibronectin, in a culture time- and spheroid size-dependent manner. Furthermore, phosphorylation of AKT, a cell survival signal, was significantly higher and the expression of pro-apoptotic molecules, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and cleaved caspase-3, was markedly lower in the spheroids than in MSCs in monolayers. In the murine hindlimb ischemia model, transplanted MSC spheroids showed better proliferation than MSCs in monolayer. These findings suggest that MSC spheroids promote MSC bioactivities via secretion of angiogenic cytokines, preservation of ECM components, and regulation of apoptotic signals. Therefore, MSC spheroid-based cell therapy may serve as a simple and effective strategy for regenerative medicine. PMID:26869524

  14. Inhibition of Crotalidae venom hemorrhagic activities by Didelphis marsupialis liver spheroids culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, L M; Rodríguez-Acosta, A; Rivas-Vetencourt, P; Zerpa, M; Carillo, G; Aguilar, I; Girón, M E; Acevedo, C E; Gendzekhadze, K

    2001-05-01

    The main aim of this work was the development of a primary hepatocyte culture from Didelphis marsupialis, to determine the possible use of culture medium supernatants as a source of inhibitors of the Bothrops lanceolatus venom hemorrhagic activity. The cellular culture was carried out from isolated hepatocytes by the double perfusion technique, and digestion of the liver with collagenase and culturing the hepatocytes in a liquid media under continuous agitation at 37 degrees C in 5% CO2. The hemorrhagic activity inhibition assays were performed inoculating intradermically, a mixture of Bothrops lanceolatus venom plus a pool of liver spheroids culture supernatants, in mice. These liver Didelphis marsupialis spheroid cultures were adequate to obtain large supernatant volumes with inhibitors of hemorrhagic activity. PMID:11405280

  15. Enhanced hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in spheroidal aggregate culture on a decellularized liver scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xie, Mingjun; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the combination of aggregate culture and decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) promoted the hepatic differentiation of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) into high yields of mature hepatocytes in vitro. Four culturing methods for differentiation [single cell (2D), spheroids (3D), 2D + DLS and 3D + DLS] were studied. To determine the differentiation stages of the MSCs, RT-qPCR of the hepatocyte genes, immunostaining of hepatocyte markers, and functional analyses were all performed. Compared with the other groups, hepatocyte-like cells which differentiated from BM-MSC spheroids on extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited more intensive staining of stored glycogen, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis and albumin secretion as well as the higher expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Our results indicated that DLSs combined with spheroidal aggregate culture may be used as an effective method to facilitate the hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and may have future applications in stem cell-based liver regenerative medicine. PMID:27314916

  16. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte–tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  17. Maintenance of liver functions in rat hepatocytes cultured as spheroids in a rotating wall vessel.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lanika A; Arterburn, Linda M; Miller, Ana P; Cowger, Nancy L; Hartley, Sonya M; Andrews, Annette; Silber, Paul M; Li, Albert P

    2003-01-01

    Rat hepatocytes were cultured initially as spheroids on culture plates and then transferred into a rotating wall vessel (high-aspect ratio vessel [HARV]) for further culturing. Morphological evaluation based on electron microscopy showed that hepatocyte spheroids cultured for 30 d in the HARV had a compact structure with tight cell-cell junctions, numerous smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, intact mitochondria, and bile canaliculi lined with microvilli. The viability and differentiated properties of the hepatocytes cultured in the HARV were further substantiated by the presence of both phase I oxidation and phase II conjugation drug-metabolizing enzyme activities, as well as albumin synthesis. Homogenates prepared from freshly isolated hepatocytes and hepatocytes cultured in the HARV showed similar cytochrome P450 2B activities measured as pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and testosterone 16beta-hydroxylase. Further, intact hepatocytes cultured in the HARV were found to metabolize chlorzoxazone to 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone; dextromethorphan to dextrorphan, 3-methoxymorphinan, and 3-hydroxymorphinan; midazolam to 1-hydroxymidazolam and 4-hydroxymidazolam; and 7-hydroxycoumarin to its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. In conclusion, we found that hepatocyte spheroids could be cultured in a HARV to retain cellular and physiological properties of the intact liver, including drug-metabolizing enzyme activities, plasma protein production, and long-term (1 mo) maintenance of viability and cellular function. PMID:12892522

  18. Polymeric nanofibrous substrates stimulate pluripotent stem cells to form three-dimensional multilayered patty-like spheroids in feeder-free culture and maintain their pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Alamein, Mohammad A; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Stephens, Sebastien; Sanders, Katherine; Warnke, Patrick H

    2015-09-01

    Expansion of pluripotent stem cells in defined media devoid of animal-derived feeder cells to generate multilayered three-dimensional (3D) bulk preparations or spheroids, rather than two-dimensional (2D) monolayers, is advantageous for many regenerative, biological or disease-modelling studies. Here we show that electrospun polymer matrices comprised of nanofibres that mimic the architecture of the natural fibrous extracellular matrix allow for feeder-free expansion of pluripotent human induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) into multilayered 3D 'patty-like' spheroid structures in defined xeno-free culture medium. The observation that IPSCs and HESCs readily revert to 2D growth in the absence of the synthetic nanofibre membranes suggests that this 3D expansion behaviour is mediated by the physical microenvironment and artificial niche provided by the nanofibres only. Importantly, we could show that such 3D growth as patties maintained the pluripotency of cells as long as they were kept on nanofibres. The generation of complex multilayered 3D structures consisting of only pluripotent cells on biodegradable nanofibre matrices of the desired shape and size will enable both industrial-scale expansion and intricate organ-tissue engineering applications with human pluripotent stem cells, where simultaneous coupling of differentiation pathways of all germ layers from one stem cell source may be required for organ formation. PMID:25423911

  19. Effects of 3-D microwell culture on growth kinetics and metabolism of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Larson, Elise A.; Almodóvar-Cruz, Janice M; de Pablo, Juan J.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold potential in the field of tissue engineering given their capacity for both limitless self-renewal and differentiation to any adult cell type. However, several limitations, including the ability to expand undifferentiated cells and efficiently direct differentiation at scales needed for commercial cell production, prevent realizing the potential of hESCs in tissue engineering. Numerous studies have illustrated that 3-D culture systems provide microenvironmental cues that affect hESC pluripotency and differentiation fates, but little is known about how 3-D culture affects cell expansion. Here we have used a 3-D microwell array to model the differences in hESC growth kinetics and metabolism in 2-D vs. 3-D cultures. Our results demonstrated that 3-D microwell culture reduced hESC size and proliferative capacity, and impacted cell cycle dynamics, lengthening the G1 phase and shortening the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. However, glucose and lactate metabolism were similar in 2-D and 3-D cultures. Elucidating the effects of 3-D culture on growth and metabolism of hESCs may facilitate efforts for developing integrated, scalable cell expansion and differentiation processes with these cells. PMID:23586789

  20. Hydrogels for 3D mammalian cell culture: a starting guide for laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Ruedinger, Ferdinand; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Blume, Cornelia; Pepelanova, Iliyana; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels have become one of the most popular platforms for three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of mammalian cells. The enormous versatility of hydrogel materials makes it possible to design scaffolds with predefined mechanical properties, as well as with desired biofunctionality. 3D hydrogel constructs have been used for a variety of applications, including tissue engineering of microorgan systems, drug delivery, cytotoxicity testing, and drug screening. Moreover, 3D culture is applied for investigating cellular physiology, stem cell differentiation, and tumor models and for studying interaction mechanisms between the extracellular matrix and cells. In this paper, we review current examples of performance-based hydrogel design for 3D cell culture applications. A major emphasis is placed on a description of how standard analytical protocols and imaging techniques are being adapted to analysis of 3D cell culture in hydrogel systems. PMID:25432676

  1. Enhanced Metabolizing Activity of Human ES Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Using a 3D Culture System with Repeated Exposures to Xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jang, Yu Jin; An, Su Yeon; Son, Jeongsang; Lee, Jaehun; Lee, Gyunggyu; Park, Ji Young; Park, Han-Jin; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Han, Jiyou

    2015-09-01

    Highly homogeneous and functional stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are considered a promising option in the cell-based therapy of liver disease and the development of effective in vitro toxicity screening tools. However, the purity of cells and expression and/or activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in stem cell-derived HLCs are usually too low to be useful for clinical or in vitro applications. Here, we describe a highly optimized hepatic differentiation protocol, which produces >90% (BGO1 and CHA15) albumin-positive HLCs with no purification process from human embryonic stem cell lines. In addition, we show that hepatic enzyme gene expressions and activities were significantly improved by generating 3D spheroidal aggregate of HLCs, compared with 2D HLCs. The 3D differentiation method increased expression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that regulate the proper expression of key hepatic enzymes. Furthermore, significantly increased hepatic functions such as albumin and urea secretion were observed in 3D hepatic spheroids, compared with 2D HLCs. HLCs in the spheroid exhibited morphological and ultrastructural features of normal hepatocytes. Importantly, we show that repeated exposures to xenobiotics facilitated further functional maturation of HLC, as confirmed by increased expression of genes for drug metabolizing enzymes and transcription factors. In conclusion, the 3D culture system with repeated exposures to xenobiotics may be a new strategy for enhancing hepatic metabolizing ability of stem cell-derived HLCs as a cell source for in vitro high-throughput hepatotoxicity models. PMID:26089346

  2. Biocompatible nanoparticles sensing the matrix metallo-proteinase 2 for the on-demand release of anticancer drugs in 3D tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Belli, Valentina; Profeta, Martina; Raiola, Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-11-01

    The balance between dose-dependent tolerability, effectiveness and toxicity of systemically administered antitumor drugs is extremely delicate. This issue highlights the striking need for targeted release of chemotherapeutic drugs within tumors. In this work, a smart strategy of drug targeting to tumors relying upon biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles releasing cytotoxic drugs after sensing physiological variations intrinsic to the very nature of tumor tissues is exploited. Here, the well-known over-expression of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP2) enzyme in tumors has been chosen as a trigger for the release of a cytotoxic drug. Nanoparticles made up of a biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)--block--polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer (namely PELGA), blended with a tumor-activated prodrug (TAP) composed of a MMP2-sensitive peptide bound to doxorubicin (Dox) and to PLGA chain have been produced. The obtained devices are able to release Dox specifically upon MMP2 cleavage of the TAP. More interestingly, they can sense the differences in the expression levels of endogenous MMP2 protein, thus modulating drug penetration within a three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid matrix, accordingly. Therefore, the proposed nanoparticles hold promise as a useful tool for in vivo investigations aimed at an improved therapeutic efficacy of the conjugated drug payload. PMID:26340360

  3. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering. PMID:25058941

  4. Microcavity substrates casted from self-assembled microsphere monolayers for spheroid cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Lee, Jungwoo; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are an important 3-dimensional cell culture model that reflects many key aspects of in vivo microenvironments. This paper presents a scalable, self-assembly based approach for fabricating microcavity substrates for multicellular spheroid cell culture. Hydrophobic glass microbeads were self-assembled into a tightly packed monolayer through the combined actions of surface tension, gravity, and lateral capillary forces at the water-air interface of a polymer solution. The packed bead monolayer was subsequently embedded in the dried polymer layer. The surface was used as a template for replicating microcavity substrates with perfect spherical shapes. We demonstrated the use of the substrate in monitoring the formation process of tumor spheroids, a proof-of-concept scale-up fabrication procedure into standard microplate formats, and its application in testing cancer drug responses in the context of bone marrow stromal cells. The presented technique offers a simple and effective way of forming high-density uniformlysized spheroids without microfabrication equipment for biological and drug screening applications. PMID:24781882

  5. Photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic culture device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youlee; Lee, Jong Min; Bae, Pan-Kee; Chung, Il Yup; Chung, Bong Hyun; Chung, Bong Geun

    2015-04-01

    We developed the photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic device to culture neural stem cells (NSCs) and tumors. The photo-crosslinkable gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) polymer was used as a physical barrier in the microfluidic device and collagen type I gel was employed to culture NSCs in a 3D manner. We demonstrated that the pore size was inversely proportional to concentrations of GelMA hydrogels, showing the pore sizes of 5 and 25 w/v% GelMA hydrogels were 34 and 4 μm, respectively. It also revealed that the morphology of pores in 5 w/v% GelMA hydrogels was elliptical shape, whereas we observed circular-shaped pores in 25 w/v% GelMA hydrogels. To culture NSCs and tumors in the 3D microfluidic device, we investigated the molecular diffusion properties across GelMA hydrogels, indicating that 25 w/v% GelMA hydrogels inhibited the molecular diffusion for 6 days in the 3D microfluidic device. In contrast, the chemicals were diffused in 5 w/v% GelMA hydrogels. Finally, we cultured NSCs and tumors in the hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic device, showing that 53-75% NSCs differentiated into neurons, while tumors were cultured in the collagen gels. Therefore, this photo-crosslinkable hydrogel-based 3D microfluidic culture device could be a potentially powerful tool for regenerative tissue engineering applications. PMID:25641332

  6. Microscale 3D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates.

    PubMed

    Leung, Brendan M; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen P; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption into high-throughput screening (HTS) has been lagging, in part because of the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden prepolymer solutions into 2D well plates is a potential solution but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which (1) increases costs, (2) makes drug penetration variable and (3) complicates imaging. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3D microgels using automated liquid-handling systems and standard, nonpatterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of a ~2.5 mm diameter microwell with no concerns about evaporation or meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. The cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics was monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrated that 3D cultures confer chemoresistance as compared with similar 2D cultures. Hence, these data demonstrate the importance of culturing cells in 3D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provides a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  7. Deconstructing the third dimension – how 3D culture microenvironments alter cellular cues

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Much of our understanding of the biological mechanisms that underlie cellular functions, such as migration, differentiation and force-sensing has been garnered from studying cells cultured on two-dimensional (2D) glass or plastic surfaces. However, more recently the cell biology field has come to appreciate the dissimilarity between these flat surfaces and the topographically complex, three-dimensional (3D) extracellular environments in which cells routinely operate in vivo. This has spurred substantial efforts towards the development of in vitro 3D biomimetic environments and has encouraged much cross-disciplinary work among biologists, material scientists and tissue engineers. As we move towards more-physiological culture systems for studying fundamental cellular processes, it is crucial to define exactly which factors are operative in 3D microenvironments. Thus, the focus of this Commentary will be on identifying and describing the fundamental features of 3D cell culture systems that influence cell structure, adhesion, mechanotransduction and signaling in response to soluble factors, which – in turn – regulate overall cellular function in ways that depart dramatically from traditional 2D culture formats. Additionally, we will describe experimental scenarios in which 3D culture is particularly relevant, highlight recent advances in materials engineering for studying cell biology, and discuss examples where studying cells in a 3D context provided insights that would not have been observed in traditional 2D systems. PMID:22797912

  8. Enhanced hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in spheroidal aggregate culture on a decellularized liver scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xie, Mingjun; Bu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the combination of aggregate culture and decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) promoted the hepatic differentiation of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) into high yields of mature hepatocytes in vitro. Four culturing methods for differentiation [single cell (2D), spheroids (3D), 2D + DLS and 3D + DLS] were studied. To determine the differentiation stages of the MSCs, RT-qPCR of the hepatocyte genes, immunostaining of hepatocyte markers, and functional analyses were all performed. Compared with the other groups, hepatocyte-like cells which differentiated from BM‑MSC spheroids on extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited more intensive staining of stored glycogen, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis and albumin secretion as well as the higher expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Our results indicated that DLSs combined with spheroidal aggregate culture may be used as an effective method to facilitate the hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and may have future applications in stem cell-based liver regenerative medicine. PMID:27314916

  9. Peptide Hydrogels – Versatile Matrices for 3D Cell Culture in Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Peter; Pochan, Darrin J.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems have contributed tremendously to our understanding of cancer biology but have significant limitations in mimicking in vivo conditions such as the tumor microenvironment. In vitro, three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models represent a more accurate, intermediate platform between simplified 2D culture models and complex and expensive in vivo models. 3D in vitro models can overcome 2D in vitro limitations caused by the oversupply of nutrients, and unphysiological cell–cell and cell–material interactions, and allow for dynamic interactions between cells, stroma, and extracellular matrix. In addition, 3D cultures allow for the development of concentration gradients, including oxygen, metabolites, and growth factors, with chemical gradients playing an integral role in many cellular functions ranging from development to signaling in normal epithelia and cancer environments in vivo. Currently, the most common matrices used for 3D culture are biologically derived materials such as matrigel and collagen. However, in recent years, more defined, synthetic materials have become available as scaffolds for 3D culture with the advantage of forming well-defined, designed, tunable materials to control matrix charge, stiffness, porosity, nanostructure, degradability, and adhesion properties, in addition to other material and biological properties. One important area of synthetic materials currently available for 3D cell culture is short sequence, self-assembling peptide hydrogels. In addition to the review of recent work toward the control of material, structure, and mechanical properties, we will also discuss the biochemical functionalization of peptide hydrogels and how this functionalization, coupled with desired hydrogel material characteristics, affects tumor cell behavior in 3D culture. PMID:25941663

  10. Peptide Hydrogelation and Cell Encapsulation for 3D Culture of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuzhi S.; Nguyen, Thu A.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing. PMID:23527204

  11. A Hormone-responsive 3D Culture Model of the Human Mammary Gland Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Lucia; Sweeney, Michael F; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The process of mammary epithelial morphogenesis is influenced by hormones. The study of hormone action on the breast epithelium using 2D cultures is limited to cell proliferation and gene expression endpoints. However, in the organism, mammary morphogenesis occurs in a 3D environment. 3D culture systems help bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture (2D) and the complexity of the organism. Herein, we describe a 3D culture model of the human breast epithelium that is suitable to study hormone action. It uses the commercially available hormone-responsive human breast epithelial cell line, T47D, and rat tail collagen type 1 as a matrix. This 3D culture model responds to the main mammotropic hormones: estradiol, progestins and prolactin. The influence of these hormones on epithelial morphogenesis can be observed after 1- or 2-week treatment according to the endpoint. The 3D cultures can be harvested for analysis of epithelial morphogenesis, cell proliferation and gene expression. PMID:26891095

  12. Genotoxic Effects of Low- and High-LET Radiation on Human Epithelial Cells Grown in 2-D Versus 3-D Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Huff, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk estimation for radiation-induced cancer relies heavily on human epidemiology data obtained from terrestrial irradiation incidents from sources such as medical and occupational exposures as well as from the atomic bomb survivors. No such data exists for exposures to the types and doses of high-LET radiation that will be encountered during space travel; therefore, risk assessment for space radiation requires the use of data derived from cell culture and animal models. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. This work compares the genotoxic effects of radiation on normal human epithelial cells grown in standard 2-D monolayer culture compared to 3-D organotypic co-culture conditions. These 3-D organotypic models mimic the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics of fully-differentiated normal human tissue and are reproducible using defined components. Cultures were irradiated with 2 Gy low-LET gamma rays or varying doses of high-LET particle radiation and genotoxic damage was measured using a modified cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. Our results revealed a 2-fold increase in residual damage in 2 Gy gamma irradiated cells grown under organotypic culture conditions compared to monolayer culture. Irradiation with high-LET particle radiation gave similar results, while background levels of damage were comparable under both scenarios. These observations may be related to the phenomenon of "multicellular resistance" where cancer cells grown as 3-D spheroids or in vivo exhibit an increased resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic agents compared to the same cells grown in 2-D culture. A variety of factors are likely involved in mediating this process, including increased cell-cell communication, microenvironment influences, and changes in cell cycle kinetics that may promote survival of damaged cells in 3-D culture that would

  13. Microfluidic 3D cell culture: potential application for tissue-based bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Li, XiuJun (James); Valadez, Alejandra V.; Zuo, Peng; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-01-01

    Current fundamental investigations of human biology and the development of therapeutic drugs, commonly rely on two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture systems. However, 2D cell culture systems do not accurately recapitulate the structure, function, physiology of living tissues, as well as highly complex and dynamic three-dimensional (3D) environments in vivo. The microfluidic technology can provide micro-scale complex structures and well-controlled parameters to mimic the in vivo environment of cells. The combination of microfluidic technology with 3D cell culture offers great potential for in vivo-like tissue-based applications, such as the emerging organ-on-a-chip system. This article will review recent advances in microfluidic technology for 3D cell culture and their biological applications. PMID:22793034

  14. 3D Culture Assays of Murine Mammary Branching Morphogenesis and Epithelial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Ngoc, Kim-Vy; Shamir, Eliah R.; Huebner, Robert J.; Beck, Jennifer N.; Cheung, Kevin J.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelia are fundamental tissues that line cavities, glands, and outer body surfaces. We use three-dimensional (3D) embedded culture of primary murine mammary epithelial ducts, called “organoids,” to recapitulate in days in culture epithelial programs that occur over weeks deep within the body. Modulating the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) allows us to model cell- and tissue-level behaviors observed in normal development, such as branching morphogenesis, and in cancer, such as invasion and dissemination. Here, we describe a collection of protocols for 3D culture of mammary organoids in different ECMs and for immunofluorescence staining of 3D culture samples and mammary gland tissue sections. We illustrate expected phenotypic outcomes of each assay and provide troubleshooting tips for commonly encountered technical problems. PMID:25245692

  15. 3D culture assays of murine mammary branching morphogenesis and epithelial invasion.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Ngoc, Kim-Vy; Shamir, Eliah R; Huebner, Robert J; Beck, Jennifer N; Cheung, Kevin J; Ewald, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Epithelia are fundamental tissues that line cavities, glands, and outer body surfaces. We use three-dimensional (3D) embedded culture of primary murine mammary epithelial ducts, called "organoids," to recapitulate in days in culture epithelial programs that occur over weeks deep within the body. Modulating the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) allows us to model cell- and tissue-level behaviors observed in normal development, such as branching morphogenesis, and in cancer, such as invasion and dissemination. Here, we describe a collection of protocols for 3D culture of mammary organoids in different ECMs and for immunofluorescence staining of 3D culture samples and mammary gland tissue sections. We illustrate expected phenotypic outcomes of each assay and provide troubleshooting tips for commonly encountered technical problems. PMID:25245692

  16. In vivo biomarker expression patterns are preserved in 3D cultures of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Windus, Louisa C.E.; Kiss, Debra L.; Glover, Tristan; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-11-15

    Here we report that Prostate Cancer (PCa) cell-lines DU145, PC3, LNCaP and RWPE-1 grown in 3D matrices in contrast to conventional 2D monolayers, display distinct differences in cell morphology, proliferation and expression of important biomarker proteins associated with cancer progression. Consistent with in vivo growth rates, in 3D cultures, all PCa cell-lines were found to proliferate at significantly lower rates in comparison to their 2D counterparts. Moreover, when grown in a 3D matrix, metastatic PC3 cell-lines were found to mimic more precisely protein expression patterns of metastatic tumour formation as found in vivo. In comparison to the prostate epithelial cell-line RWPE-1, metastatic PC3 cell-lines exhibited a down-regulation of E-cadherin and {alpha}6 integrin expression and an up-regulation of N-cadherin, Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin expression and re-expressed non-transcriptionally active AR. In comparison to the non-invasive LNCaP cell-lines, PC3 cells were found to have an up-regulation of chemokine receptor CXCR4, consistent with a metastatic phenotype. In 2D cultures, there was little distinction in protein expression between metastatic, non-invasive and epithelial cells. These results suggest that 3D cultures are more representative of in vivo morphology and may serve as a more biologically relevant model in the drug discovery pipeline. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed and optimised 3D culturing techniques for Prostate Cancer cell-lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated biomarker expression in 2D versus 3D culture techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PC3 cells re-expressed non-transcriptionally active androgen receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PCa cell lines retain in vivo-like antigenic profiles in 3D cultures.

  17. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26873136

  18. Microscale 3-D collagen cell culture assays in conventional flat-bottom 384-well plates

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Brendan M.; Moraes, Christopher; Cavnar, Stephen; Luker, Kathryn E.; Luker, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional culture systems such as cell-laden hydrogels are superior to standard 2-D monolayer cultures for many drug-screening applications. However, their adoption in high throughput screening (HTS) have been lagging, in part due to the difficulty of incorporating these culture formats into existing robotic liquid handling and imaging infrastructures. Dispensing cell-laden pre-polymer solutions into 2-D well-plates is a potential solution, but typically requires large volumes of reagents to avoid evaporation during polymerization, which increases cost, makes drug penetration variable and imaging complex. Here we describe a technique to efficiently produce 3-D ‘microgels’ using automated liquid handling systems and standard, non-patterned, flat-bottomed, 384-well plates. Sub-millimeter-diameter, cell-laden collagen gels are deposited on the bottom of ~2.5 mm-diameter microwell with no concerns over evaporation and meniscus effects at the edges of wells, using aqueous two-phase system patterning. The microscale cell-laden collagen-gel constructs are readily imaged and readily penetrated by drugs. Cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutics were monitored by bioluminescence and demonstrates that 3-D cultures confer chemoresistance, as compared to similar 2-D culture. This data hence, demonstrates the importance of culturing cells in 3-D to obtain realistic cellular responses. Overall, this system provided a simple and inexpensive method for integrating 3-D culture capability into existing HTS infrastructure. PMID:25510473

  19. AlgiMatrix™-Based 3D Cell Culture System as an In Vitro Tumor Model: An Important Tool in Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Godugu, Chandraiah; Singh, Mandip

    2016-01-01

    Routinely used two-dimensional cell culture-based models often fail while translating the observations into in vivo models. This setback is more common in cancer research, due to several reasons. The extracellular matrix and cell-to-cell interactions are not present in two-dimensional (2D) cell culture models. Diffusion of drug molecules into cancer cells is hindered by barriers of extracellular components in in vivo conditions, these barriers are absent in 2D cell culture models. To better mimic or simulate the in vivo conditions present in tumors, the current study used the alginate based three-dimensional cell culture (AlgiMatrix™) model, which resembles close to the in vivo tumor models. The current study explains the detailed protocols involved in AlgiMatrix™ based in vitro non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) models. The suitability of this model was studied by evaluating, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and penetration of nanoparticles into the in vitro tumor spheroids. This study also demonstrated the effect of EphA2 receptor targeted docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles on MDA-MB-468 TNBC cell lines. The methods section is subdivided into three subsections such as (1) preparation of AlgiMatrix™-based 3D in vitro tumor models and cytotoxicity assays, (2) free drug and nanoparticle uptake into spheroid studies, and (3) western blot, IHC, and RT-PCR studies. PMID:26608295

  20. 3D Modeling from Multi-views Images for Cultural Heritage in Wat-Pho, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontranon, N.; Srestasathiern, P.; Lawawirojwong, S.

    2015-08-01

    In Thailand, there are several types of (tangible) cultural heritages. This work focuses on 3D modeling of the heritage objects from multi-views images. The images are acquired by using a DSLR camera which costs around 1,500 (camera and lens). Comparing with a 3D laser scanner, the camera is cheaper and lighter than the 3D scanner. Hence, the camera is available for public users and convenient for accessing narrow areas. The acquired images consist of various sculptures and architectures in Wat-Pho which is a Buddhist temple located behind the Grand Palace (Bangkok, Thailand). Wat-Pho is known as temple of the reclining Buddha and the birthplace of traditional Thai massage. To compute the 3D models, a diagram is separated into following steps; Data acquisition, Image matching, Image calibration and orientation, Dense matching and Point cloud processing. For the initial work, small heritages less than 3 meters height are considered for the experimental results. A set of multi-views images of an interested object is used as input data for 3D modeling. In our experiments, 3D models are obtained from MICMAC (open source) software developed by IGN, France. The output of 3D models will be represented by using standard formats of 3D point clouds and triangulated surfaces such as .ply, .off, .obj, etc. To compute for the efficient 3D models, post-processing techniques are required for the final results e.g. noise reduction, surface simplification and reconstruction. The reconstructed 3D models can be provided for public access such as website, DVD, printed materials. The high accurate 3D models can also be used as reference data of the heritage objects that must be restored due to deterioration of a lifetime, natural disasters, etc.

  1. Using a 3D Culture System to Differentiate Visceral Adipocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Emont, Margo P; Yu, Hui; Jun, Heejin; Hong, Xiaowei; Maganti, Nenita; Stegemann, Jan P; Wu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    It has long been recognized that body fat distribution and regional adiposity play a major role in the control of metabolic homeostasis. However, the ability to study and compare the cell autonomous regulation and response of adipocytes from different fat depots has been hampered by the difficulty of inducing preadipocytes isolated from the visceral depot to differentiate into mature adipocytes in culture. Here, we present an easily created 3-dimensional (3D) culture system that can be used to differentiate preadipocytes from the visceral depot as robustly as those from the sc depot. The cells differentiated in these 3D collagen gels are mature adipocytes that retain depot-specific characteristics, as determined by imaging, gene expression, and functional assays. This 3D culture system therefore allows for study of the development and function of adipocytes from both depots in vitro and may ultimately lead to a greater understanding of site-specific functional differences of adipose tissues to metabolic dysregulation. PMID:26425808

  2. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-12-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  3. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  4. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  5. Protein-Engineered Hydrogel Encapsulation for 3-D Culture of Murine Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David T.; Chai, Renjie; DiMarco, Rebecca; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Cheng, Alan G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis Elastin-like protein (ELP) hydrogel helps maintain the three-dimensional (3-D) cochlear structure in culture. Background Whole-organ culture of the cochlea is a useful model system facilitating manipulation and analysis of live sensory cells and surrounding nonsensory cells. The precisely organized 3-D cochlear structure demands a culture method that preserves this delicate architecture; however, current methods have not been optimized to serve such a purpose. Methods A protein-engineered ELP hydrogel was used to encapsulate organ of Corti isolated from neonatal mice. Cultured cochleae were immunostained for markers of hair cells and supporting cells. Organ of Corti hair cell and supporting cell density and organ dimensions were compared between the ELP and nonencapsulated systems. These culture systems were then compared with noncultured cochlea. Results After 3 days in vitro, vital dye uptake and immunostaining for sensory and nonsensory cells show that encapsulated cochlea contain viable cells with an organized architecture. In comparison with nonencapsulated cultured cochlea, ELP-encapsulated cochleae exhibit higher densities of hair cells and supporting cells and taller and narrower organ of Corti dimensions that more closely resemble those of noncultured cochleae. However, we found compromised cell viability when the culture period extended beyond 3 days. Conclusion We conclude that the ELP hydrogel can help preserve the 3-D architecture of neonatal cochlea in short-term culture, which may be applicable to in vitro study of the physiology and pathophysiology of the inner ear. PMID:25111520

  6. Development of 3D hydrogel culture systems with on-demand cell separation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sharon K; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C; Massad, Christopher S; Hammoudi, Taymour M; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2013-04-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate two cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3D hydrogel co-culture system that allows us to culture different cell types for up to 7 days and subsequently separate and isolate the different cell populations using enzyme-sensitive glues. Separable 3D co-culture laminates were prepared by laminating PEG-based hydrogels with enzyme-degradable hydrogel adhesives. Encapsulated cell populations exhibited good segregation with well-defined interfaces. Furthermore, constructs can be separated on-demand upon addition of the appropriate enzyme, while cell viability remains high throughout the culture period, even after laminate separation. This platform offers great potential for a variety of basic cell signaling studies as the incorporation of an enzyme-sensitive adhesive interface allows the on-demand separation of individual cell populations for immediate analysis or further culture to examine persistence of co-culture effects and paracrine signaling on cell populations. PMID:23447378

  7. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture platform

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; Charest, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying the known commercially-viable manufacturing methods to a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) material resulted in a microfluidic device with enhanced 3D gel capabilities, controlled surface properties, and improved potential to serve high-volume applications. Hot embossing and roller lamination molded and sealed the microfluidic device. A combination of oxygen plasma and thermal treatments enhanced the sealing, ensured proper placement of the 3D gel, and created controlled and stable surface properties within the device. Culture of cells in the new device indicated no adverse effects of the COC material or processing as compared to previous PDMS devices. The results demonstrate a methodology to transition microfludic devices for 3D cell culture from scientific research to high-volume applications with broad clinical impact. PMID:21113663

  8. Phenotypic analysis of bovine chondrocytes cultured in 3D collagen sponges: effect of serum substitutes.

    PubMed

    Yates, Karen E; Allemann, Florin; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Repair of damaged cartilage usually requires replacement tissue or substitute material. Tissue engineering is a promising means to produce replacement cartilage from autologous or allogeneic cell sources. Scaffolds provide a three-dimensional (3D) structure that is essential for chondrocyte function and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins (collagen type II, aggrecan) and sulfated proteoglycans. In this study, we assessed porous, 3D collagen sponges for in vitro engineering of cartilage in both standard and serum-free culture conditions. Bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) cultured in 3D sponges accumulated and maintained cartilage matrix over 4 weeks, as assessed by quantitative measures of matrix content, synthesis, and gene expression. Chondrogenesis by bACs cultured with Nutridoma as a serum replacement was equivalent or better than control cultures in serum. In contrast, chondrogenesis in insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS(+3)) serum replacement cultures was poor, apparently due to decreased cell survival. These data indicate that porous 3D collagen sponges maintain chondrocyte viability, shape, and synthetic activity by providing an environment favorable for high-density chondrogenesis. With quantitative assays for cartilage-specific gene expression and biochemical measures of chondrogenesis in these studies, we conclude that the collagen sponges have potential as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:15735900

  9. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fontenay, Gerald; Cheng, Qingsu; Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i) morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC), and (ii) heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation. PMID:26978075

  10. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fontenay, Gerald; Cheng, Qingsu; Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i) morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC), and (ii) heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation. PMID:26978075

  11. Dynamic 3D micropatterned cell co-cultures within photocurable and chemically degradable hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Shinji; Cha, Jae Min; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report on the development of dynamically controlled 3D micropatterned cellular co-cultures within photocurable and chemically degradable hydrogels. Specifically, we generated dynamic co-cultures of micropatterned murine embryonic stem (mES) cells with human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells within 3D hydrogels. HepG2 cells were used due to their ability to direct the differentiation of mES cells through secreted paracrine factors. To generate dynamic co-cultures, mES cells were first encapsulated within micropatterned photocurable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. These micropatterned cell-laden PEG hydrogels were subsequently surrounded by calcium alginate (Ca-Alg) hydrogels containing HepG2 cells. After 4 days, the co-culture step was halted by exposing the system to sodium citrate solution, which removed the alginate gels and the encapsulated HepG2 cells. The encapsulated mES cells were then maintained in the resulting cultures for 16 days and cardiac differentiation was analyzed. We observed that the mES cells that were exposed to HepG2 cells in the co-cultures, generated cells with higher expression of cardiac genes and proteins as well as increased spontaneous beating. Due to its ability to control the 3D microenvironment of cells in a spatially and temporally regulated manner the method presented in this study is useful for a range of cell culture applications related to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24170301

  12. Digital microfluidics for spheroid-based invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Bender, Brian F; Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2016-04-21

    Cell invasion is a key process in tissue growth, wound healing, and tumor progression. Most invasion assays examine cells cultured in adherent monolayers, which fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional nuances of the tissue microenvironment. Multicellular cell spheroids have a three-dimensional (3D) morphology and mimic the intercellular interactions found in tissues in vivo, thus providing a more physiologically relevant model for studying the tissue microenvironment and processes such as cell invasion. Spheroid-based invasion assays often require tedious, manually intensive handling protocols or the use of robotic liquid handling systems, which can be expensive to acquire, operate, and maintain. Here we describe a digital microfluidic (DμF) platform that enables formation of spheroids by the hanging drop method, encapsulation of the spheroids in collagen, and the exposure of spheroids to migration-modulating agents. Collagen sol-gel solutions up to 4 mg mL(-1), which form gels with elastic moduli up to ∼50 kPa, can be manipulated on the device. In situ spheroid migration assays show that cells from human fibroblast spheroids exhibit invasion into collagen gels, which can be either enhanced or inhibited by the delivery of exogenous migration modulating agents. Exposing fibroblast spheroids to spheroid secretions from colon cancer spheroids resulted in a >100% increase in fibroblast invasion into the collagen gel, consistent with the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. These data show that DμF can be used to automate the liquid handling protocols for spheroid-based invasion assays and create a cell invasion model that mimics the tissue microenvironment more closely than two-dimensional culturing techniques do. A DμF platform that facilitates the creation and assaying of 3D in vitro tissue models has the potential to make automated 3D cell-based assays more accessible to researchers in the life sciences. PMID:27020962

  13. Functional 3-D cardiac co-culture model using bioactive chitosan nanofiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ali; Collins, George; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H

    2013-02-01

    The in vitro generation of a three-dimensional (3-D) myocardial tissue-like construct employing cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules is a promising strategy in cardiac tissue regeneration, drug testing, and tissue engineering applications. Despite significant progress in this field, current cardiac tissue models are not yet able to stably maintain functional characteristics of cardiomyocytes for long-term culture and therapeutic purposes. The objective of this study was to fabricate bioactive 3-D chitosan nanofiber scaffolds using an electrospinning technique and exploring its potential for long-term cardiac function in the 3-D co-culture model. Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide biomaterial that is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and cost effective. Electrospun chitosan was utilized to provide structural scaffolding characterized by scale and architectural resemblance to the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo. The chitosan fibers were coated with fibronectin via adsorption in order to enhance cellular adhesion to the fibers and migration into the interfibrous milieu. Ventricular cardiomyocytes were harvested from neonatal rats and studied in various culture conditions (i.e., mono- and co-cultures) for their viability and function. Cellular morphology and functionality were examined using immunofluorescent staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin (SM-actin) and gap junction protein, Connexin-43 (Cx43). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy were used to investigate cellular morphology, spatial organization, and contractions. Calcium indicator was used to monitor calcium ion flux of beating cardiomyocytes. The results demonstrate that the chitosan nanofibers retained their cylindrical morphology in long-term cell cultures and exhibited good cellular attachment and spreading in the presence of adhesion molecule, fibronectin. Cardiomyocyte mono-cultures resulted in loss of cardiomyocyte polarity and islands of non-coherent contractions. However

  14. Changes in global gene expression associated with 3D structure of tumors: an ex vivo matrix-free mesothelioma spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heungnam; Phung, Yen; Ho, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to anti-tumor agents. Molecules involved in multicellular tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study ex vivo. Here, we generated a matrix-free tumor spheroid model using the NCI-H226 mesothelioma cell line and compared the gene expression profiles of spheroids and monolayers using microarray analysis. Microarray analysis revealed that 142 probe sets were differentially expressed between tumor spheroids and monolayers. Gene ontology analysis revealed that upregulated genes were primarily related to immune response, wound response, lymphocyte stimulation and response to cytokine stimulation, whereas downregulated genes were primarily associated with apoptosis. Among the 142 genes, 27 are located in the membrane and related to biologic processes of cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation and morphology. Western blot analysis validated elevation of MMP2, BAFF/BLyS/TNFSF13B, RANTES/CCL5 and TNFAIP6/TSG-6 protein expression in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Thus, we have reported the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles using an ex vivo matrix-free spheroid model to identify genes specific to the three-dimensional biological structure of tumors. The method described here can be used for gene expression profiling of tumors other than mesothelioma. PMID:22737246

  15. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  16. Drug screening and grouping by sensitivity with a panel of primary cultured cancer spheroids derived from endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Yumiko; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Satoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Hiroko; Ueda, Yutaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tadashi; Kamiura, Shoji; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Several molecular targeting drugs are being evaluated for endometrial cancer; selecting patients whose cancers are sensitive to these agents is of paramount importance. Previously, we developed the cancer tissue-originated spheroid method for primary cancer cells taken from patients' tumors as well as patient-derived xenografts. In this study, we successfully prepared and cultured cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers. Characteristics of the original tumors were well retained in cancer tissue-originated spheroids including morphology and expression of p53 or neuroendocrine markers. We screened 79 molecular targeting drugs using two cancer tissue-originated spheroid lines derived from endometrioid adenocarcinoma grade 3 and serous adenocarcinoma. Among several hits, we focused on everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, and YM155, a survivin inhibitor. When sensitivity to everolimus or YM155 was assessed in 12 or 11 cancer tissue-originated spheroids, respectively, from different endometrial cancer patients, the sensitivity varied substantially. The cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to everolimus showed remarkable suppression of proliferation. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 downstream molecules before and after everolimus treatment did not predict the effect of the drug. In contrast, the cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to YM155 showed remarkable cell death. The effect of YM155 was also confirmed in vivo. The histological type correlated with YM155 sensitivity; non-endometrioid adenocarcinomas were sensitive and endometrioid adenocarcinomas were resistant. Non-canonical autophagic cell death was the most likely cause of cell death in a sensitive cancer tissue-originated spheroid. Thus, sensitivity assays using cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers may be useful for screening drugs and finding biomarkers. PMID:26825848

  17. Self-assembling Fmoc dipeptide hydrogel for in situ 3D cell culturing

    PubMed Central

    Liebmann, Thomas; Rydholm, Susanna; Akpe, Victor; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional cell culture studies have been performed on 2D surfaces, resulting in flat, extended cell growth. More relevant studies are desired to better mimic 3D in vivo tissue growth. Such realistic environments should be the aim of any cell growth study, requiring new methods for culturing cells in vitro. Cell biology is also tending toward miniaturization for increased efficiency and specificity. This paper discusses the application of a self-assembling peptide-derived hydrogel for use as a 3D cell culture scaffold at the microscale. Results Phenylalanine derivative hydrogel formation was seen to occur in multiple dispersion media. Cells were immobilized in situ within microchambers designed for cell analysis. Use of the highly biocompatible hydrogel components and simplistic procedures significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects seen with alternate 3D culture materials and microstructure loading methods. Cells were easily immobilized, sustained and removed from microchambers. Differences in growth morphology were seen in the cultured cells, owing to the 3-dimentional character of the gel structure. Degradation improved the removal of hydrogel from the microstructures, permitting reuse of the analysis platforms. Conclusion Self-assembling diphenylalanine derivative hydrogel provided a method to dramatically reduce the typical difficulties of microculture formation. Effective generation of patterned 3D cultures will lead to improved cell study results by better modeling in vivo growth environments and increasing efficiency and specificity of cell studies. Use of simplified growth scaffolds such as peptide-derived hydrogel should be seen as highly advantageous and will likely become more commonplace in cell culture methodology. PMID:18070345

  18. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D’Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Klee, Justin B.; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of β-amyloid and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix, and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1–2 days. The aggregation of β-amyloid is observed after 6-weeks of differentiation followed by robust tau pathology after 10–14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  19. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D'Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J; Klee, Justin B; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel 3D culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1-2 d. The aggregation of Aβ is observed after 6 weeks of differentiation, followed by robust tau pathology after 10-14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  20. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  1. Registration of 3D and multispectral data for the study of cultural heritage surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chane, Camille Simon; Schütze, Rainer; Boochs, Frank; Marzani, Franck S

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for the multi-sensor registration of featureless datasets based on the photogrammetric tracking of the acquisition systems in use. This method is developed for the in situ study of cultural heritage objects and is tested by digitizing a small canvas successively with a 3D digitization system and a multispectral camera while simultaneously tracking the acquisition systems with four cameras and using a cubic target frame with a side length of 500 mm. The achieved tracking accuracy is better than 0.03 mm spatially and 0.150 mrad angularly. This allows us to seamlessly register the 3D acquisitions and to project the multispectral acquisitions on the 3D model. PMID:23322103

  2. Primary-like human hepatocytes genetically engineered to obtain proliferation competence display hepatic differentiation characteristics in monolayer and organotypical spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Natalie; Hansen, Max; Miethbauer, Sebastian; Schmidtke, Kai-Uwe; Anderer, Ursula; Lupp, Amelie; Sperling, Sebastian; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg; Scheibner, Katrin; Küpper, Jan-Heiner

    2016-03-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are in great demand during drug development and in hepatology. However, both scarcity of tissue supply and donor variability of primary cells create a need for the development of alternative hepatocyte systems. By using a lentivirus vector system to transfer coding sequences of Upcyte® proliferation genes, we generated non-transformed stable hepatocyte cultures from human liver tissue samples. Here, we show data on newly generated proliferation-competent HepaFH3 cells investigated as conventional two-dimensional monolayer and as organotypical three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture. In monolayer culture, HepaFH3 cells show typical cobblestone-like hepatocyte morphology and anchorage-dependent growth for at least 20 passages. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that characteristic hepatocyte marker proteins cytokeratin 8, human serum albumin, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were expressed. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that expression levels of analyzed phase I CYP enzymes were at similar levels compared to those of cultured primary human hepatocytes and considerably higher than in the liver carcinoma cell line HepG2. Additionally, transcripts for phase II liver enzymes and transporter proteins OATP-C, MRP2, Oct1, and BSEP were present in HepaFH3. The cells produced urea and converted model compounds such as testosterone, diclofenac, and 7-OH-coumarin into phases I and II metabolites. Interestingly, phases I and II enzymes were expressed at about the same levels in convenient monolayer cultures and complex 3D spheroids. In conclusion, HepaFH3 cells and related primary-like hepatocyte lines seem to be promising tools for in vitro research of liver functions and as test system in drug development and toxicology analysis. PMID:26715207

  3. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  4. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  5. 3D cultured immortalized human hepatocytes useful to develop drugs for blood-borne HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Hussein Hassan; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Hijikata, Makoto

    2009-02-06

    Due to the high polymorphism of natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) variants, existing recombinant HCV replication models have failed to be effective in developing effective anti-HCV agents. In the current study, we describe an in vitro system that supports the infection and replication of natural HCV from patient blood using an immortalized primary human hepatocyte cell line cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. Comparison of the gene expression profile of cells cultured in the 3D system to those cultured in the existing 2D system demonstrated an up-regulation of several genes activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) signaling. Furthermore, using PPAR{alpha} agonists and antagonists, we also analyzed the effect of PPAR{alpha} signaling on the modulation of HCV replication using this system. The 3D in vitro system described in this study provides significant insight into the search for novel anti-HCV strategies that are specific to various strains of HCV.

  6. 3D Cultures of prostate cancer cells cultured in a novel high-throughput culture platform are more resistant to chemotherapeutics compared to cells cultured in monolayer.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Karen F; Mosaad, Eman M O; Russell, Pamela J; Clements, Judith A; Doran, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Despite monolayer cultures being widely used for cancer drug development and testing, 2D cultures tend to be hypersensitive to chemotherapy and are relatively poor predictors of whether a drug will provide clinical benefit. Whilst generally more complicated, three dimensional (3D) culture systems often better recapitulate true cancer architecture and provide a more accurate drug response. As a step towards making 3D cancer cultures more accessible, we have developed a microwell platform and surface modification protocol to enable high throughput manufacture of 3D cancer aggregates. Herein we use this novel system to characterize prostate cancer cell microaggregates, including growth kinetics and drug sensitivity. Our results indicate that prostate cancer cells are viable in this system, however some non-cancerous prostate cell lines are not. This system allows us to consistently control for the presence or absence of an apoptotic core in the 3D cancer microaggregates. Similar to tumor tissues, the 3D microaggregates display poor polarity. Critically the response of 3D microaggregates to the chemotherapeutic drug, docetaxel, is more consistent with in vivo results than the equivalent 2D controls. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that these prostate cancer microaggregates better recapitulate the morphology of prostate tumors compared to 2D and can be used for high-throughput drug testing. PMID:25380249

  7. Preclinical validation and imaging of Wnt-induced repair in human 3D lung tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Franziska E; Vierkotten, Sarah; Wagner, Darcy E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Costa, Rita; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by a progressive loss of lung tissue. Inducing repair processes within the adult diseased lung is of major interest and Wnt/β-catenin signalling represents a promising target for lung repair. However, the translation of novel therapeutic targets from model systems into clinical use remains a major challenge.We generated murine and patient-derived three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo lung tissue cultures (LTCs), which closely mimic the 3D lung microenvironment in vivo. Using two well-known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and CHIR 99021 (CT), we determined Wnt/β-catenin-driven lung repair processes in high spatiotemporal resolution using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, (immuno)histological assessment, and four-dimensional confocal live tissue imaging.Viable 3D-LTCs exhibited preserved lung structure and function for up to 5 days. We demonstrate successful Wnt/β-catenin signal activation in murine and patient-derived 3D-LTCs from COPD patients. Wnt/β-catenin signalling led to increased alveolar epithelial cell marker expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression, as well as altered macrophage activity and elastin remodelling. Importantly, induction of surfactant protein C significantly correlated with disease stage (per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) in patient-derived 3D-LTCs.Patient-derived 3D-LTCs represent a valuable tool to analyse potential targets and drugs for lung repair. Enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signalling attenuated pathological features of patient-derived COPD 3D-LTCs. PMID:25929950

  8. Bridging the Gap: From 2D Cell Culture to 3D Microengineered Extracellular Matrices.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfen; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2015-12-30

    Historically the culture of mammalian cells in the laboratory has been performed on planar substrates with media cocktails that are optimized to maintain phenotype. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that much of biology discerned from 2D studies does not translate well to the 3D microenvironment. Over the last several decades, 2D and 3D microengineering approaches have been developed that better recapitulate the complex architecture and properties of in vivo tissue. Inspired by the infrastructure of the microelectronics industry, lithographic patterning approaches have taken center stage because of the ease in which cell-sized features can be engineered on surfaces and within a broad range of biocompatible materials. Patterning and templating techniques enable precise control over extracellular matrix properties including: composition, mechanics, geometry, cell-cell contact, and diffusion. In this review article we explore how the field of engineered extracellular matrices has evolved with the development of new hydrogel chemistry and the maturation of micro- and nano- fabrication. Guided by the spatiotemporal regulation of cell state in developing tissues, techniques for micropatterning in 2D, pseudo-3D systems, and patterning within 3D hydrogels will be discussed in the context of translating the information gained from 2D systems to synthetic engineered 3D tissues. PMID:26592366

  9. A 3D aligned microfibrous myocardial tissue construct cultured under transient perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Halime; Kose, Gamze T; Toner, Mehmet; Kaplan, David L; Hasirci, Vasif

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this study was to design and develop a myocardial patch to use in the repair of myocardial infarctions or to slow down tissue damage and improve long-term heart function. The basic 3D construct design involved two biodegradable macroporous tubes, to allow transport of growth media to the cells within the construct, and cell seeded, aligned fiber mats wrapped around them. The microfibrous mat housed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from human umbilical cord matrix (Wharton's Jelly) aligned in parallel to each other in a similar way to cell organization in native myocardium. Aligned micron-sized fiber mats were obtained by electrospinning a polyester blend (PHBV (5% HV), P(L-D,L)LA (70:30) and poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS)). The micron-sized electrospun parallel fibers were effective in Wharton's Jelly (WJ) MSCs alignment and the cells were able to retract the mat. The 3D construct was cultured in a microbioreactor by perfusing the growth media transiently through the macroporous tubing for two weeks and examined by fluorescence microscopy for cell distribution and preservation of alignment. The fluorescence images of thin sections of 3D constructs from static and perfused cultures confirmed enhanced cell viability, uniform cell distribution and alignment due to nutrient provision from inside the 3D structure. PMID:21570112

  10. Mackay campus of environmental education and digital cultural construction: the application of 3D virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Shao-Chi; Chung, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Jun-Yi; Chang, Jhih-Ting; He, Cai-Ying; Cheng, Yi-Wen

    2012-04-01

    This study uses 3D virtual reality technology to create the "Mackay campus of the environmental education and digital cultural 3D navigation system" for local historical sites in the Tamsui (Hoba) area, in hopes of providing tourism information and navigation through historical sites using a 3D navigation system. We used Auto CAD, Sketch Up, and SpaceEyes 3D software to construct the virtual reality scenes and create the school's historical sites, such as the House of Reverends, the House of Maidens, the Residence of Mackay, and the Education Hall. We used this technology to complete the environmental education and digital cultural Mackay campus . The platform we established can indeed achieve the desired function of providing tourism information and historical site navigation. The interactive multimedia style and the presentation of the information will allow users to obtain a direct information response. In addition to showing the external appearances of buildings, the navigation platform can also allow users to enter the buildings to view lifelike scenes and textual information related to the historical sites. The historical sites are designed according to their actual size, which gives users a more realistic feel. In terms of the navigation route, the navigation system does not force users along a fixed route, but instead allows users to freely control the route they would like to take to view the historical sites on the platform.

  11. Genetically Encoded Sender–Receiver System in 3D Mammalian Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Engineering spatial patterning in mammalian cells, employing entirely genetically encoded components, requires solving several problems. These include how to code secreted activator or inhibitor molecules and how to send concentration-dependent signals to neighboring cells, to control gene expression. The Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line is a potential engineering scaffold as it forms hollow spheres (cysts) in 3D culture and tubulates in response to extracellular hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We first aimed to graft a synthetic patterning system onto single developing MDCK cysts. We therefore developed a new localized transfection method to engineer distinct sender and receiver regions. A stable reporter line enabled reversible EGFP activation by HGF and modulation by a secreted repressor (a truncated HGF variant, NK4). By expanding the scale to wide fields of cysts, we generated morphogen diffusion gradients, controlling reporter gene expression. Together, these components provide a toolkit for engineering cell–cell communication networks in 3D cell culture. PMID:24313393

  12. Microfluidic Generation of Monodisperse, Structurally Homogeneous Alginate Microgels for Cell Encapsulation and 3D Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Utech, Stefanie; Prodanovic, Radivoje; Mao, Angelo S; Ostafe, Raluca; Mooney, David J; Weitz, David A

    2015-08-01

    Monodisperse alginate microgels (10-50 μm) are created via droplet-based microfluidics by a novel crosslinking procedure. Ionic crosslinking of alginate is induced by release of chelated calcium ions. The process separates droplet formation and gelation reaction enabling excellent control over size and homogeneity under mild reaction conditions. Living mesenchymal stem cells are encapsulated and cultured in the generated 3D microenvironments. PMID:26039892

  13. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  14. Preparation of 3D fibrin scaffolds for stem cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Willerth, Stephanie M

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are found in naturally occurring 3D microenvironments in vivo, which are often referred to as the stem cell niche. Culturing stem cells inside of 3D biomaterial scaffolds provides a way to accurately mimic these microenvironments, providing an advantage over traditional 2D culture methods using polystyrene as well as a method for engineering replacement tissues. While 2D tissue culture polystrene has been used for the majority of cell culture experiments, 3D biomaterial scaffolds can more closely replicate the microenvironments found in vivo by enabling more accurate establishment of cell polarity in the environment and possessing biochemical and mechanical properties similar to soft tissue. A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial scaffolds have been investigated as 3D environments for supporting stem cell growth. While synthetic scaffolds can be synthesized to have a greater range of mechanical and chemical properties and often have greater reproducibility, natural biomaterials are often composed of proteins and polysaccharides found in the extracelluar matrix and as a result contain binding sites for cell adhesion and readily support cell culture. Fibrin scaffolds, produced by polymerizing the protein fibrinogen obtained from plasma, have been widely investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications both in vitro and in vivo. Such scaffolds can be modified using a variety of methods to incorporate controlled release systems for delivering therapeutic factors. Previous work has shown that such scaffolds can be used to successfully culture embryonic stem cells and this scaffold-based culture system can be used to screen the effects of various growth factors on the differentiation of the stem cells seeded inside. This protocol details the process of polymerizing fibrin scaffolds from fibrinogen solutions using the enzymatic activity of thrombin. The process takes 2 days to complete, including an overnight dialysis step for the

  15. Preparation of 3D Fibrin Scaffolds for Stem Cell Culture Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kolehmainen, Kathleen; Willerth, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are found in naturally occurring 3D microenvironments in vivo, which are often referred to as the stem cell niche 1. Culturing stem cells inside of 3D biomaterial scaffolds provides a way to accurately mimic these microenvironments, providing an advantage over traditional 2D culture methods using polystyrene as well as a method for engineering replacement tissues 2. While 2D tissue culture polystrene has been used for the majority of cell culture experiments, 3D biomaterial scaffolds can more closely replicate the microenvironments found in vivo by enabling more accurate establishment of cell polarity in the environment and possessing biochemical and mechanical properties similar to soft tissue.3 A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial scaffolds have been investigated as 3D environments for supporting stem cell growth. While synthetic scaffolds can be synthesized to have a greater range of mechanical and chemical properties and often have greater reproducibility, natural biomaterials are often composed of proteins and polysaccharides found in the extracelluar matrix and as a result contain binding sites for cell adhesion and readily support cell culture. Fibrin scaffolds, produced by polymerizing the protein fibrinogen obtained from plasma, have been widely investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications both in vitro and in vivo4. Such scaffolds can be modified using a variety of methods to incorporate controlled release systems for delivering therapeutic factors 5. Previous work has shown that such scaffolds can be used to successfully culture embryonic stem cells and this scaffold-based culture system can be used to screen the effects of various growth factors on the differentiation of the stem cells seeded inside 6,7. This protocol details the process of polymerizing fibrin scaffolds from fibrinogen solutions using the enzymatic activity of thrombin. The process takes 2 days to complete, including an overnight dialysis

  16. Tumor-penetrating peptide fused EGFR single-domain antibody enhances cancer drug penetration into 3D multicellular spheroids and facilitates effective gastric cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huizi; Zou, Zhengyun; Xin, Kai; Bian, Xinyu; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Chen, Jiao; Chen, Gang; Huang, Leaf; Blair, Andrew M.; Cao, Peng; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors, including gastric cancer, frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), which are associated with a poor prognosis. Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancerous tissues shows potential in sparing unaffected tissues. However, it has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues due to the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have constructed a recombinant protein named anti-EGFR-iRGD consisting of an anti-EGFR VHH (the variable domain from the heavy chain of the antibody) fused to iRGD, a tumor-specific binding peptide with high permeability. Anti-EGFR-iRGD, which targets EGFR and αvβ3, spreads extensively throughout both the multicellular spheroids and the tumor mass. The recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD also exhibited antitumor activity in tumor cell lines, multicellular spheroids, and mice. Moreover, anti-EGFR-iRGD could improve anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), bevacizumab, nanoparticle permeability and efficacy in multicellular spheroids. This study draws attention to the importance of iRGD peptide in the therapeutic approach of anti-EGFR-iRGD. As a consequence, anti-EGFR-iRGD could be a drug candidate for cancer treatment and a useful adjunct of other anticancer drugs. PMID:25553823

  17. MAPLE deposition of 3D micropatterned polymeric substrates for cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Mihailescu, Mona; Calenic, Bogdan; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Greabu, Maria; Dinescu, Maria

    2013-08-01

    3D micropatterned poly(lactide-co-glycolide)/polyurethane (PLGA/PU) substrates were produced by MAPLE deposition through masks and used for regulating the behavior of oral keratinocyte stem cells in response to topography. Flat PLGA/PU substrates were produced for comparison. 3D imaging of the PLGA/PU substrates and of the cultured cells was performed by Digital Holographic Microscopy. The micropatterns were in the shape of squares of 50 × 50 and 80 × 80 μm2 areas, ~1.8 μm in height and separated by 20 μm wide channels. It was found that substrate topography guided the adhesion of the cultured cells: on the smooth substrates the cells adhered randomly and showed no preferred orientation; in contrast, on the micropatterned substrates the cells adhered preferentially onto the squares and not in the separating channels. Furthermore, key properties of the cells (size, viability, proliferation rate and stem cell marker expression) did not show any dependence on substrate topography. The size of the cultured cells, their viability, the proportions of actively/slow proliferating cells, as well as the stem cell markers expressions, were similar for both flat and micropatterned substrates. Finally, it was found that the cells cultured on the PLGA/PU substrates deposited by MAPLE exhibited similar properties as the controls (i.e. cells cultured on glass slides), indicating the capability of the former to preserve the properties of the keratinocyte stem cells.

  18. Encapsulated multicellular spheroids of rat hepatocytes produce albumin and urea in a spouted bed circulating culture system.

    PubMed

    Takabatake, H; Koide, N; Tsuji, T

    1991-12-01

    Multicellular spheroids are spherical cell-aggregates that retain tridimensional architecture and tissue-specific functions. For use of multicellular spheroids of hepatocytes in a bioreactor for hybrid artificial liver support, we studied the effect of encapsulation and circulating culture on their integrity and tissue-specific functions. Multicellular spheroids of rat hepatocytes were encapsulated into microdroplets of calcium alginate gel and were used as a bioreactor in medium circulating in a spouted bed chamber. Approximately 10% of the hepatocytes of an adult rat were entrapped in a bioreactor chamber, connected to a gas exchanger and a medium reservoir. The total bed volume of the system was 250 ml. The pH and DO2 of the hormonally defined circulating medium was maintained constantly. Albumin and urea were produced in a linear fashion for 64 h at the rates of 0.02 micrograms/microgram cell protein/day and 0.15-0.2 ng/micrograms cell protein/day, respectively. Viability and structural stability of the spheroids were well preserved after the culture period. These results indicate that these encapsulated multicellular hepatocyte spheroids will provide a useful bioreactor for the continuous production of albumin, in vitro and also a prototype hybrid artificial liver support. PMID:1763969

  19. Human adipose stem cells maintain proliferative, synthetic and multipotential properties when suspension cultured as self-assembling spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, S K; Wang, X; Shang, H; Yun, S; Li, X; Feng, G; Khurgel, M; Katz, A J

    2012-01-01

    Adipose Derived Stromal/Stem Cells (ASCs) have been gaining recognition as extremely versatile cell source in tissue engineering. The usefulness of ASCs in biofabrication is further enhanced by our demonstration of unique properties of these cells when they are cultured as three dimensional cellular aggregates or spheroids. As described herein, three-dimensional formulations or self-assembling ASC spheroids develop their own extracellular matrix that serves to increase the robustness of the cells to mechanical stresses. The composition of the extracellular matrix can be altered based on the external environment of the spheroids and these constructs can be grown in a reproducible manner and to a consistent size. The spheroid formulation helps preserve the viability and developmental plasticity of ASCs even in defined, serum-free media conditions. For the first time, we show that multiple generations of adherent ASCs produced from these spheroids retain their developmental plasticity and their ability to differentiate into multiple cell/tissue types. These demonstrated properties support the fact that culture expanded ASCs are an excellent candidate cellular material for “organ printing” – the approach of developing complex tissue structures from a standardized cell “ink” or cell formulation. PMID:22522924

  20. Video lensfree microscopy of 2D and 3D culture of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allier, C. P.; Vinjimore Kesavan, S.; Coutard, J.-G.; Cioni, O.; Momey, F.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Chalmond, B.; Obeid, P.; Haguet, V.; David-Watine, B.; Dubrulle, N.; Shorte, S.; van der Sanden, B.; Di Natale, C.; Hamard, L.; Wion, D.; Dolega, M. E.; Picollet-D'hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    Innovative imaging methods are continuously developed to investigate the function of biological systems at the microscopic scale. As an alternative to advanced cell microscopy techniques, we are developing lensfree video microscopy that opens new ranges of capabilities, in particular at the mesoscopic level. Lensfree video microscopy allows the observation of a cell culture in an incubator over a very large field of view (24 mm2) for extended periods of time. As a result, a large set of comprehensive data can be gathered with strong statistics, both in space and time. Video lensfree microscopy can capture images of cells cultured in various physical environments. We emphasize on two different case studies: the quantitative analysis of the spontaneous network formation of HUVEC endothelial cells, and by coupling lensfree microscopy with 3D cell culture in the study of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that lensfree video microscopy is a powerful tool to conduct cell assays in 2D and 3D culture experiments. The applications are in the realms of fundamental biology, tissue regeneration, drug development and toxicology studies.

  1. Minimal camera networks for 3D image based modeling of cultural heritage objects.

    PubMed

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue "Lamassu". Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  2. Minimal Camera Networks for 3D Image Based Modeling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    PubMed Central

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue “Lamassu”. Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883–859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  3. Towards a 3d Based Platform for Cultural Heritage Site Survey and Virtual Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinturier, J.; Riedinger, C.; Mahiddine, A.; Peloso, D.; Boï, J.-M.; Merad, D.; Drap, P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper present a 3D platform that enables to make both cultural heritage site survey and its virtual exploration. It provides a single and easy way to use framework for merging multi scaled 3D measurements based on photogrammetry, documentation produced by experts and the knowledge of involved domains leaving the experts able to extract and choose the relevant information to produce the final survey. Taking into account the interpretation of the real world during the process of archaeological surveys is in fact the main goal of a survey. New advances in photogrammetry and the capability to produce dense 3D point clouds do not solve the problem of surveys. New opportunities for 3D representation are now available and we must to use them and find new ways to link geometry and knowledge. The new platform is able to efficiently manage and process large 3D data (points set, meshes) thanks to the implementation of space partition methods coming from the state of the art such as octrees and kd-trees and thus can interact with dense point clouds (thousands to millions of points) in real time. The semantisation of raw 3D data relies on geometric algorithms such as geodetic path computation, surface extraction from dense points cloud and geometrical primitive optimization. The platform provide an interface that enables expert to describe geometric representations of interesting objects like ashlar blocs, stratigraphic units or generic items (contour, lines, … ) directly onto the 3D representation of the site and without explicit links to underlying algorithms. The platform provide two ways for describing geometric representation. If oriented photographs are available, the expert can draw geometry on a photograph and the system computes its 3D representation by projection on the underlying mesh or the points cloud. If photographs are not available or if the expert wants to only use the 3D representation then he can simply draw objects shape on it. When 3D

  4. 3D culture of ovarian follicles: a system towards their engineering?

    PubMed

    Zuccotti, Maurizio; Merico, Valeria; Rebuzzini, Paola; Belli, Martina; Vigone, Giulia; Mulas, Francesca; Fassina, Lorenzo; Wruck, Wasco; Adjaye, James; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Infertility in women is a health priority. Designing a robust culture protocol capable of attaining complete follicle growth is an exciting challenge, for its potential clinical applications, but also as a model to observe and closely study the sequence of molecular events that lie behind the intricate relationship existing between the oocyte and surrounding follicle cells. Here, we describe the procedures used to maintain the ovarian follicle 3D architecture employing a variety of in vitro systems and several types of matrices. Collagen and alginate are the matrices that led to better results, including proof-of-concept of full-term development. Pioneer in its kind, these studies underlie the drawbacks encountered and the need for a culture system that allows more quantitative analyses and predictions, projecting the culture of the ovarian follicle into the realm of tissue engineering. PMID:26505254

  5. Transcriptional profiles of valvular interstitial cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene, on 2D hydrogels, or within 3D hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Mabry, Kelly M.; Payne, Samuel Z.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Valvular interstitial cells (VICs) actively maintain and repair heart valve tissue; however, persistent activation of VICs to a myofibroblast phenotype can lead to aortic stenosis (Chen and Simmons, 2011) [1]. To better understand and quantify how microenvironmental cues influence VIC phenotype, we compared expression profiles of VICs cultured on/in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gels to those cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), as well as fresh isolates. Here, we present both the raw and processed microarray data from these culture conditions. Interpretation of this data can be found in a research article entitled “Microarray analyses to quantify advantages of 2D and 3D hydrogel culture systems in maintaining the native valvular interstitial cell phenotype” (Mabry et al., 2015) [2]. PMID:26702427

  6. Development and characterization of a 3D multicell microtissue culture model of airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Nishat; Cole, Darren J.; Walker, Matthew J.; Legant, Wesley R.; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher S.; Favreau, John T.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Cowley, Elizabeth A.; Maksym, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cellular and molecular biology is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on flat 2D substrates. However, cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures, and it is well established in other cell types that altering substrate geometry exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall, and highlights a need for more physiologically relevant models of ASM function. We utilized a tissue engineering platform known as microfabricated tissue gauges to develop a 3D culture model of ASM featuring arrays of ∼0.4 mm long, ∼350 cell “microtissues” capable of simultaneous contractile force measurement and cell-level microscopy. ASM-only microtissues generated baseline tension, exhibited strong cellular organization, and developed actin stress fibers, but lost structural integrity and dissociated from the cantilevers within 3 days. Addition of 3T3-fibroblasts dramatically improved survival times without affecting tension development or morphology. ASM-3T3 microtissues contracted similarly to ex vivo ASM, exhibiting reproducible responses to a range of contractile and relaxant agents. Compared with 2D cultures, microtissues demonstrated identical responses to acetylcholine and KCl, but not histamine, forskolin, or cytochalasin D, suggesting that contractility is regulated by substrate geometry. Microtissues represent a novel model for studying ASM, incorporating a physiological 3D structure, realistic mechanical environment, coculture of multiple cells types, and comparable contractile properties to existing models. This new model allows for rapid screening of biochemical and mechanical factors to provide insight into ASM dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23125251

  7. An appropriate selection of a 3D alginate culture model for hepatic Huh-7 cell line encapsulation intended for viral studies.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhu Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine; Défarge, Christian; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been introduced to provide cells with a biomimetic environment that is similar to in vivo conditions. Among the polymeric molecules available, sodium-alginate (Na-alg) salt is a material that is currently employed in different areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering, because it offers biocompatibility and optimal chemical properties, and its gelation with calcium chloride provides calcium-alginate (Ca-alg) scaffolds with mechanical stability and relative permeability. In this work, four different preparations of Ca-alg beads with varying Na-alg viscosity and concentration were used for a human hepatoma cell line (Huh-7) encapsulation. The effects of Ca-alg bead preparation on structural cell organization, liver-specific functions, and the expression of specific receptors implicated in hepatotropic virus permissivity were evaluated. Hepatic cells were cultured in 500 μm diameter Ca-alg beads for 7 days under dynamic conditions. For all culture systems, cell viability reached almost 100% at day 7. Cell proliferation was concomitantly followed by hepatocyte organization in aggregates, which adopted two different morphologies (spheroid aggregates or multicellular channel-like structures), depending on Ca-alg bead preparation. These cellular organizations established a real 3D hepatocyte architecture with cell polarity, cell junctions, and abundant bile canaliculi possessing microvillus-lined channels. The functionality of these 3D cultures was confirmed by the production of albumin and the exhibition of CYP1A activity over culture time, which were variable, according to Ca-alg bead condition. The expression of specific receptors of hepatitis C virus by Huh-7 cells suggests encouraging data for the further development of a new viral culture system in Ca-alg beads. In summary, this 3D hepatic cell culture represents a promising physiologically relevant system for further in vitro studies and demonstrates that an

  8. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  9. A versatile 3D culture model facilitates monitoring of astrocytes undergoing reactive gliosis

    PubMed Central

    East, Emma; Golding, Jonathan P; Phillips, James B

    2009-01-01

    A major impediment to CNS repair is the glial scar, which forms following damage and is composed mainly of ramified, ‘reactive’ astrocytes that inhibit neuronal regrowth. The transition of astrocytes into this reactive phenotype (reactive gliosis) is a potential therapeutic target, but glial scar formation has proved difficult to study in monolayer cultures because they induce constitutive astrocyte activation. Here we demonstrate a 3D collagen gel system in which primary rat astrocytes were maintained in a persistently less reactive state than comparable cells in monolayer, resembling their status in the undamaged CNS. Reactivity, proliferation and viability were monitored and quantified using confocal, fluorescence and time-lapse microscopy, 3D image analysis, RT–PCR and ELISA. To assess the potential of this system as a model of reactive gliosis, astrocytes in 3D were activated with TGFβ1 to a ramified, reactive phenotype (elevated GFAP, Aquaporin 4, CSPG, Vimentin and IL-6 secretion). This provides a versatile system in which astrocytes can be maintained in a resting state, then be triggered to undergo reactive gliosis, enabling real-time monitoring and quantitative analysis throughout and providing a powerful new tool for research into CNS damage and repair. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19813215

  10. Acrylic-acid-functionalized PolyHIPE scaffolds for use in 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Adam S; Sano, Naoko; Przyborski, Stefan A; Cameron, Neil R

    2013-12-01

    This study describes the development of a functional porous polymer for use as a scaffold to support 3D hepatocyte culture. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) is prepared containing the monomers styrene (STY), divinylbenzene (DVB), and 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (EHA) in the external oil phase and the monomer acrylic acid (Aa) in the internal aqueous phase. Upon thermal polymerization with azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN), the resulting porous polymer (polyHIPE) is found to have an open-cell morphology and a porosity of 89%, both suitable characteristics for 3D cell scaffold applications. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy reveals that the polyHIPE surface contained 7.5% carboxylic acid functionality, providing a useful substrate for subsequent surface modifications and bio-conjugations. Initial bio-compatibility assessments with human hepatocytes show that the acid functionality does not have any detrimental effect on cell adhesion. It is therefore believed that this material can be a useful precursor scaffold towards 3D substrates that offer tailored surface functionality for enhanced cell adhesion. PMID:24243821

  11. Hepatocyte-derived cultured cells with unusual cytoplasmic keratin-rich spheroid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Alsaleh, Khaled; Pillez, Andre; Cocquerel, Laurence; Allet, Cecile; Dumont, Patrick; Loyens, Anne; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Omary, M. Bishr; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouille, Yves; Wychowski, Czeslaw

    2011-11-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in a variety of diseases that are characteristic morphological features of several hepatic, muscular and neurodegenerative disorders. They display a predominantly filamentous ultrastructure that is also observed in malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). A cellular clone containing an intracytoplasmic body was isolated from hepatocyte cell culture, and in the present study we examined whether this body might be related or not to Mallory-Denk body (MDB), a well characterized intracytoplasmic inclusion, or whether this cellular clone was constituted by malignant rhabdoid tumor cells. The intracytoplasmic body was observed in electron microscopy (EM), confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and several proteins involved in the formation of its structure were identified. Using light microscopy, a spheroid body (SB) described as a single regular-shaped cytoplasmic body was observed in cells. During cytokinesis, the SB was disassembled and reassembled in a way to reconstitute a unique SB in each progeny cell. EM examination revealed that the SB was not surrounded by a limiting membrane. However, cytoplasmic filaments were concentrated in a whorled array. These proteins were identified as keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18), which formed the central core of the SB surrounded by a vimentin cage-like structure. This structure was not related to Mallory-Denk body or aggresome since no aggregated proteins were located in SB. Moreover, the structure of SB was not due to mutations in the primary sequence of K8/K18 and vimentin since no difference was observed in the mRNA sequence of their genes, isolated from Huh-7 and Huh-7w7.3 cells. These data suggested that cellular factor(s) could be responsible for the SB formation process. Aggregates of K18 were relocated in the SB when a mutant of K18 inducing disruption of K8/K18 IF network was expressed in the cellular clone. Furthermore, the INI1 protein, a remodeling-chromatin factor deficient in rhabdoid cells, which

  12. Self-organization of neural patterns and structures in 3D culture of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasai, Yoshiki

    2013-05-01

    Over the last several years, much progress has been made for in vitro culture of mouse and human ES cells. Our laboratory focuses on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neural differentiation from pluripotent cells. Pluripotent cells first become committed to the ectodermal fate and subsequently differentiate into uncommitted neuroectodermal cells. Both previous mammalian and amphibian studies on pluripotent cells have indicated that the neural fate is a sort of the basal direction of the differentiation of these cells while mesoendodermal differentiation requires extrinsic inductive signals. ES cells differentiate into neuroectodermal cells with a rostral-most character (telencephalon and hypothalamus) when they are cultured in the absence of strong patterning signals. In this talk, I first discuss this issue by referring to our recent data on the mechanism of spontaneous neural differentiation in serum-free culture of mouse ES cells. Then, I will talk about self-organization phenomena observed in 3D culture of ES cells, which lead to tissue-autonomous formation of regional structures such as layered cortical tissues. I also discuss our new attempt to monitor these in vitro morphogenetic processes by live imaging, in particular, self-organizing morphogenesis of the optic cup in three-dimensional cultures.

  13. Shift of microRNA profile upon orthotopic xenografting of glioblastoma spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Halle, Bo; Thomassen, Mads; Venkatesan, Ranga; Kaimal, Vivek; Marcusson, Eric G; Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Jensen, Stine S; Meyer, Morten; Kruse, Torben A; Christiansen, Helle; Schmidt, Steffen; Mollenhauer, Jan; Schulz, Mette K; Andersen, Claus; Kristensen, Bjarne W

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastomas always recur despite surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A key player in the therapeutic resistance may be immature tumor cells with stem-like properties (TSCs) escaping conventional treatment. A group of promising molecular targets are microRNAs (miRs). miRs are small non-coding RNAs exerting post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In this study we aimed to identify over-expressed TSC-related miRs potentially amenable for therapeutic targeting. We used non-differentiated glioblastoma spheroid cultures (GSCs) containing TSCs and compared these to xenografts using a NanoString nCounter platform. This revealed 19 over-expressed miRs in the non-differentiated GSCs. Additionally, non-differentiated GSCs were compared to neural stem cells (NSCs) using a microarray platform. This revealed four significantly over-expressed miRs in the non-differentiated GSCs in comparison to the NSCs. The three most over-expressed miRs in the non-differentiated GSCs compared to xenografts were miR-126, -137 and -128. KEGG pathway analysis suggested the main biological function of these over-expressed miRs to be cell-cycle arrest and diminished proliferation. To functionally validate the profiling results suggesting association of these miRs with stem-like properties, experimental over-expression of miR-128 was performed. A consecutive limiting dilution assay confirmed a significantly elevated spheroid formation in the miR-128 over-expressing cells. This may provide potential therapeutic targets for anti-miRs to identify novel treatment options for GBM patients. PMID:27063952

  14. The passive electrical properties of spheroidal aggregates cultured from neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bruijne, J; Jongsma, H J; van Ginneken, A C

    1984-01-01

    Membrane specific resistance and capacitance of non-spontaneously active spheroidal aggregates, cultured from collagenase-dissociated neonatal rat heart cells, were calculated from changes in membrane potential due to intracellularly injected rectangular hyper- and depolarizing current pulses during diastole. The relation between steady-state membrane voltage displacement and injected current is linear for current pulses between +10 and -10 nA. No significant fall-off of electrotonic potential is measured in an aggregate at increasing distances from the site of current injection. The aggregate membrane resistance (input resistance) was best fitted by an inverse square function of the aggregate radius. This suggests selective current flow through the outer membranes of the spheroidal aggregate. Taking this into account the membrane specific resistance was calculated to be 753 +/- 38 omega cm2 (S.E. of mean; n = 39). The time course of the change in membrane potential is exponential with a time constant ranging from 5 to 26 ms, depending on the aggregate radius. The aggregate membrane capacitance is calculated from the exponential transients for each aggregate and appears to be a cubic function of the radius, indicating that the membrane area of all cells in the preparation equally contributes to the input capacitance. The membrane specific capacitance is calculated to be 0.97 +/- 0.02 microF/cm2 (S.E. of mean; n = 100). It is concluded that myocytes in aggregates are electrically well coupled and that a resistance in series with the inner membranes, if present, is negligible compared to the membrane resistance of the internal cells. In order to explain the finding that the membrane resistance was not inversely related to the cube of the aggregate radius, it is postulated that the membrane specific resistance might be a function of aggregate radius. PMID:6491992

  15. Individual versus Collective Fibroblast Spreading and Migration: Regulation by Matrix Composition in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Lin, Xihui; Ma, Lisha; Ririe, Peter; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) supplies both physical and chemical signals to cells and provides a substrate through which fibroblasts migrate during wound repair. To directly assess how ECM composition regulates this process, we used a nested 3D matrix model in which cell-populated collagen buttons were embedded in cell-free collagen or fibrin matrices. Time-lapse microscopy was used to record the dynamic pattern of cell migration into the outer matrices, and 3-D confocal imaging was used to assess cell connectivity and cytoskeletal organization. Corneal fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF migrated more rapidly into collagen as compared to fibrin. In addition, the pattern of fibroblast migration into fibrin and collagen ECMs was strikingly different. Corneal fibroblasts migrating into collagen matrices developed dendritic processes and moved independently, whereas cells migrating into fibrin matrices had a more fusiform morphology and formed an interconnected meshwork. A similar pattern was observed when using dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that this response in not unique to corneal cells. We next cultured corneal fibroblasts within and on top of standard collagen and fibrin matrices to assess the impact of ECM composition on the cell spreading response. Similar differences in cell morphology and connectivity were observed – cells remained separated on collagen but coalesced into clusters on fibrin. Cadherin was localized to junctions between interconnected cells, whereas fibronectin was present both between cells and at the tips of extending cell processes. Cells on fibrin matrices also developed more prominent stress fibers than those on collagen matrices. Importantly, these spreading and migration patterns were consistently observed on both rigid and compliant substrates, thus differences in ECM mechanical stiffness were not the underlying cause. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that ECM protein composition alone (collagen vs. fibrin) can

  16. Efficient Use of Video for 3d Modelling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsadik, B.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2015-03-01

    Currently, there is a rapid development in the techniques of the automated image based modelling (IBM), especially in advanced structure-from-motion (SFM) and dense image matching methods, and camera technology. One possibility is to use video imaging to create 3D reality based models of cultural heritage architectures and monuments. Practically, video imaging is much easier to apply when compared to still image shooting in IBM techniques because the latter needs a thorough planning and proficiency. However, one is faced with mainly three problems when video image sequences are used for highly detailed modelling and dimensional survey of cultural heritage objects. These problems are: the low resolution of video images, the need to process a large number of short baseline video images and blur effects due to camera shake on a significant number of images. In this research, the feasibility of using video images for efficient 3D modelling is investigated. A method is developed to find the minimal significant number of video images in terms of object coverage and blur effect. This reduction in video images is convenient to decrease the processing time and to create a reliable textured 3D model compared with models produced by still imaging. Two experiments for modelling a building and a monument are tested using a video image resolution of 1920×1080 pixels. Internal and external validations of the produced models are applied to find out the final predicted accuracy and the model level of details. Related to the object complexity and video imaging resolution, the tests show an achievable average accuracy between 1 - 5 cm when using video imaging, which is suitable for visualization, virtual museums and low detailed documentation.

  17. A biotherapy based on PSCs-in-3D spheroid-ameliorated biologics depletes in vivo cancer-sustaining stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianlin; Li, Meng; Wen, Yanjun; Lin, Xiaojuan; Xiang, Rong; Chen, Xiancheng

    2015-01-01

    CSCs are able to survive routine anticancer procedures and peripheral-immune attack. Here we develop and detail a framework of CSC elimination governed by 3D-biologics. Pluripotent cells-engineered 3D-biologics (PMSB) and control non-3D-biologics were prepared from placenta-based somatic stem cells (PSCs) and inoculated respectively into senile hosts bearing progressive mammary, lung, colon carcinomas and melanoma. We demonstrate that PMSB evokes in vivo central-immune microenvironment with subsequent re-expression of thymosin-α1 ~ β4 in thymic cortex-medulla borderline for rapid MHC-unrestricted renewal of γδT-dominated immunocompetence. The post-renewal γδT-subsets could accurately bind and drive CSCs into apoptosis. Finally, with central/peripheral integral microenvironment renewal and TERT/Wnt/β-catenin pathway blockade, the CSC-subsets are fully depleted, leading to substantial cure of diverse tumors by PMSB inoculation (P < 0.01), yet not by non-3D-biologics. Thus, our study may contribute to open up a new avenue for tumor remission via pluripotent cells-engineered 3D-biologics addressing quick renewal of central-thymus and peripheral immune-microenvironment. PMID:26512920

  18. Low-level laser therapy in 3D cell culture model using gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Basso, Fernanda G; Soares, Diana G; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-07-01

    Besides extensive data about the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on different cell types, so far, these results were obtained from monolayer cell culture models, which have limitations in terms of cell morphology and phenotype expression. Therefore, for better in vitro evaluation of the effects of LLLT, this study was performed with a 3D cell culture model, where gingival fibroblasts were seeded in collagen matrix. Cells isolated from a healthy patient were seeded in wells of 24-well plates with culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum and collagen type I solution. After 5 days, a serum-free DMEM was added to the matrices with cells that were subjected or not to three consecutive irradiations of LLLT by means of the LaserTABLE diode device (780 nm, 25 mW) at 0.5, 1.5, and 3 J/cm(2). Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell viability and morphology as well as gene expression of growth factors were assessed. Histological evaluation of matrices demonstrated uniform distribution and morphology of gingival fibroblasts within the collagen matrix. LLLT at 3 J/cm(2) increased gingival fibroblast viability. Enhanced gene expression of hCOL-I and hEGF was observed for 0.5 J/cm(2), while no significant changes were detected for the other irradiation densities tested. In conclusion, LLLT promoted biostimulation of gingival fibroblasts seeded in a 3D cell culture model, demonstrating that this model can be applied for phototherapy studies and that LLLT could penetrate the collagen matrix to increase cell functions related to tissue repair. PMID:27126408

  19. The Niha Sites (lebanon) Cultural Landscape: a 3d Model of Sanctuaries and Their Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasmine, J.

    2013-07-01

    The paper aims at presenting the historical sites of Niha (Beqaa valley, Lebanon), their cultural values, and the methodology applied in the assessment of these values through the use of 3D modelling. The whole cultural landscape comprises the current village of Niha (altitude 1100 m), the archaeological site of Hosn-Niha (altitude 1350m), and the area located between these two sites. Two rural sanctuaries constitute the major archaeological remains present in the landscape: the first, located in the village of Niha, is composed of two roman temples with various archaeological structures; the second is located at the top of an antique settlement 2,5 km above the village of Niha. This second sanctuary Hosn-Niha, includes two temples, one church, remnants of numerous structures, and remains of an antique village. The cultural and religious values of both these sites are clear. However, questions arise regarding the choice for establishing the sanctuaries in these locations. The aim of the research is to try to understand the reasons for the various settlements in relationship with the topography and the landscape. The methodology applied in the research addresses two levels: a - The landscape level, and b - the built-up archaeology level. The global 3D models of both the landscape and the sanctuaries allow us to understand the various relations between the landscape, the sanctuaries and the various archaeological structures. An assessment of the various cultural resources found around the sanctuaries, while considering the reasons for their specific placement in the landscape can shed light on the reasons of these choices.

  20. Bioactive fish collagen/polycaprolactone composite nanofibrous scaffolds fabricated by electrospinning for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Da Jeong; Choi, Seung Mi; Kang, Hae Yeong; Min, Hye-Jin; Lee, Rira; Ikram, Muhammad; Subhan, Fazli; Jin, Song Wan; Jeong, Young Hun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Yoon, Sik

    2015-07-10

    One of the most challenging objectives of 3D cell culture is the development of scaffolding materials with outstanding biocompatibility and favorable mechanical strength. In this study, we fabricated a novel nanofibrous scaffold composed of fish collagen (FC) and polycaprolactone (PCL) blends by using the electrospinning method. Nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and it was revealed that the diameter of nanofibers decreased as FC content was increased in the FC/PCL composite nanofibers. The cytocompatibility of the FC/PCL scaffolds was evaluated by SEM, WST-1 assay, confocal microscopy, western blot, and RT-PCR. It was found that the scaffolds not only facilitated the adhesion, spreading, protrusions, and proliferation of thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but also stimulated the expression of genes and proteins involved in cell adhesion and T-cell development. Thus, these results suggest that the FC/PCL composite nanofibrous scaffolds will be a useful model of 3D cell culture for TECs and may have wide applicability in the future for engineering tissues or organs. PMID:25617682

  1. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  2. Intracellular ROS mediates gas plasma-facilitated cellular transfection in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Wang, Biqing; Xu, Yujing; Chen, Zeyu; Cui, Qinjie; Yang, Yanjie; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as a versatile tool for delivering oligonucleotides into mammalian cells. Compared to lipofection and electroporation methods, plasma transfection showed a better uptake efficiency and less cell death in the transfection of oligonucleotides. We demonstrated that the level of extracellular aqueous reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by gas plasma is correlated with the uptake efficiency and that this is achieved through an increase of intracellular ROS levels and the resulting increase in cell membrane permeability. This finding was supported by the use of ROS scavengers, which reduced CAP-based uptake efficiency. In addition, we found that cold atmospheric plasma could transfer oligonucleotides such as siRNA and miRNA into cells even in 3D cultures, thus suggesting the potential for unique applications of CAP beyond those provided by standard transfection techniques. Together, our results suggest that cold plasma might provide an efficient technique for the delivery of siRNA and miRNA in 2D and 3D culture models. PMID:27296089

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Local Collagen Matrix Remodeling in 3-D Culture: The Role of Rho Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W.Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the role of Rho kinase in modulating the pattern and amount of local cell-induced collagen matrix remodeling. Human corneal fibroblasts were plated inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 24 hours in media with or without the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then fixed and stained with phalloidin. Fluorescent (for f-actin) and reflected light (for collagen fibrils) 3-D optical section images were acquired using laser confocal microscopy. Fourier transform analysis was used to assess collagen fibril alignment, and 3-D cell morphology and local collagen density were measured using MetaMorph. Culture in serum-containing media induced significant global matrix contraction, which was inhibited by blocking Rho kinase (p < 0.001). Fibroblasts generally had a bipolar morphology and intracellular stress fibers. Collagen fibrils were compacted and aligned parallel to stress fibers and pseudopodia. When Rho kinase was inhibited, cells had a more cortical f-actin distribution and dendritic morphology. Both local collagen fibril density and alignment were significantly reduced (p<0.01). Overall, the data suggests that Rho kinase dependent contractile force generation leads to co-alignment of cells and collagen fibrils along the plane of greatest resistance, and that this process contributes to global matrix contraction. PMID:16978606

  4. a Semi-Automated Point Cloud Processing Methodology for 3d Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıvılcım, C. Ö.; Duran, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The preliminary phase in any architectural heritage project is to obtain metric measurements and documentation of the building and its individual elements. On the other hand, conventional measurement techniques require tremendous resources and lengthy project completion times for architectural surveys and 3D model production. Over the past two decades, the widespread use of laser scanning and digital photogrammetry have significantly altered the heritage documentation process. Furthermore, advances in these technologies have enabled robust data collection and reduced user workload for generating various levels of products, from single buildings to expansive cityscapes. More recently, the use of procedural modelling methods and BIM relevant applications for historic building documentation purposes has become an active area of research, however fully automated systems in cultural heritage documentation still remains open. In this paper, we present a semi-automated methodology, for 3D façade modelling of cultural heritage assets based on parametric and procedural modelling techniques and using airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. We present the contribution of our methodology, which we implemented in an open source software environment using the example project of a 16th century early classical era Ottoman structure, Sinan the Architect's Şehzade Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey.

  5. Simulated Microgravity and 3D Culture Enhance Induction, Viability, Proliferation and Differentiation of Cardiac Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jha, Rajneesh; Wu, Qingling; Singh, Monalisa; Preininger, Marcela K; Han, Pengcheng; Ding, Gouliang; Cho, Hee Cheol; Jo, Hanjoong; Maher, Kevin O; Wagner, Mary B; Xu, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Efficient generation of cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells is critical for their regenerative applications. Microgravity and 3D culture can profoundly modulate cell proliferation and survival. Here, we engineered microscale progenitor cardiac spheres from human pluripotent stem cells and exposed the spheres to simulated microgravity using a random positioning machine for 3 days during their differentiation to cardiomyocytes. This process resulted in the production of highly enriched cardiomyocytes (99% purity) with high viability (90%) and expected functional properties, with a 1.5 to 4-fold higher yield of cardiomyocytes from each undifferentiated stem cell as compared with 3D-standard gravity culture. Increased induction, proliferation and viability of cardiac progenitors as well as up-regulation of genes associated with proliferation and survival at the early stage of differentiation were observed in the 3D culture under simulated microgravity. Therefore, a combination of 3D culture and simulated microgravity can be used to efficiently generate highly enriched cardiomyocytes. PMID:27492371

  6. Simulated Microgravity and 3D Culture Enhance Induction, Viability, Proliferation and Differentiation of Cardiac Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajneesh; Wu, Qingling; Singh, Monalisa; Preininger, Marcela K.; Han, Pengcheng; Ding, Gouliang; Cho, Hee Cheol; Jo, Hanjoong; Maher, Kevin O.; Wagner, Mary B.; Xu, Chunhui

    2016-01-01

    Efficient generation of cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells is critical for their regenerative applications. Microgravity and 3D culture can profoundly modulate cell proliferation and survival. Here, we engineered microscale progenitor cardiac spheres from human pluripotent stem cells and exposed the spheres to simulated microgravity using a random positioning machine for 3 days during their differentiation to cardiomyocytes. This process resulted in the production of highly enriched cardiomyocytes (99% purity) with high viability (90%) and expected functional properties, with a 1.5 to 4-fold higher yield of cardiomyocytes from each undifferentiated stem cell as compared with 3D-standard gravity culture. Increased induction, proliferation and viability of cardiac progenitors as well as up-regulation of genes associated with proliferation and survival at the early stage of differentiation were observed in the 3D culture under simulated microgravity. Therefore, a combination of 3D culture and simulated microgravity can be used to efficiently generate highly enriched cardiomyocytes. PMID:27492371

  7. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  8. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  9. Defining an optimal surface chemistry for pluripotent stem cell culture in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Michael R., Jr.

    Surface chemistry is critical for growing pluripotent stem cells in an undifferentiated state. There is great potential to engineer the surface chemistry at the nanoscale level to regulate stem cell adhesion. However, the challenge is to identify the optimal surface chemistry of the substrata for ES cell attachment and maintenance. Using a high-throughput polymerization and screening platform, a chemically defined, synthetic polymer grafted coating that supports strong attachment and high expansion capacity of pluripotent stem cells has been discovered using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system. This optimal substrate, N-[3-(Dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide (DMAPMA) that is grafted on 2D synthetic poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membrane, sustains the self-renewal of ES cells (up to 7 passages). DMAPMA supports cell attachment of ES cells through integrin beta1 in a RGD-independent manner and is similar to another recently reported polymer surface. Next, DMAPMA has been able to be transferred to 3D by grafting to synthetic, polymeric, PES fibrous matrices through both photo-induced and plasma-induced polymerization. These 3D modified fibers exhibited higher cell proliferation and greater expression of pluripotency markers of mouse ES cells than 2D PES membranes. Our results indicated that desirable surfaces in 2D can be scaled to 3D and that both surface chemistry and structural dimension strongly influence the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Lastly, the feasibility of incorporating DMAPMA into a widely used natural polymer, alginate, has been tested. Novel adhesive alginate hydrogels have been successfully synthesized by either direct polymerization of DMAPMA and methacrylic acid blended with alginate, or photo-induced DMAPMA polymerization on alginate nanofibrous hydrogels. In particular, DMAPMA-coated alginate hydrogels support strong ES cell attachment, exhibiting a concentration dependency of DMAPMA. This research provides a

  10. Microtubule regulation of corneal fibroblast morphology and mechanical activity in 3-D culture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of microtubules in regulating corneal fibroblast structure and mechanical behavior using static (3-D) and dynamic (4-D) imaging of both cells and their surrounding matrix. Human corneal fibroblasts transfected to express GFP-zyxin (to label focal adhesions) or GFP-tubulin (to label microtubules) were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick type I collagen matrices. After 24 hours, the effects of nocodazole (to depolymerize microtubules), cytochalasin D (to disrupt f-actin), and/or Y-27632 (to block Rho-kinase) were evaluated using 3-D and 4-D imaging of both cells and ECM. After 24 hours of incubation, cells had well organized microtubules and prominent focal adhesions, and significant cell-induced matrix compaction was observed. Addition of nocodazole induced rapid microtubule disruption which resulted in Rho activation and additional cellular contraction. The matrix was pulled inward by retracting pseudopodial processes, and focal adhesions appeared to mediate this process, when present. Following 24 hour exposure to nocodazole, there was an even greater increase in both the number of stress fibers and the amount of matrix compaction and alignment at the ends of cells. When Rho-kinase was inhibited, disruption of microtubules resulted in retraction of dendritic cell processes, and rapid formation and extension of lamellipodial processes at random locations along the cell body, eventually leading to a convoluted, disorganized cell shape. These data suggest that microtubules modulate both cellular contractility and local collagen matrix reorganization via regulation of Rho/Rho kinase activity. In addition, microtubules appear to play a central role in dynamic regulation of cell spreading mechanics, morphology and polarity in 3-D culture. PMID:17716657

  11. Dynamic Assessment of Fibroblast Mechanical Activity during Rac-induced Cell Spreading in 3-D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Petroll, W. Matthew; Ma, Lisha; Kim, Areum; Ly, Linda; Vishwanath, Mridula

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the morphological and sub-cellular mechanical effects of Rac activation on fibroblasts within 3-D collagen matrices. Corneal fibroblasts were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 1 to 2 days in serum-free media. Time-lapse imaging was then performed using Nomarski DIC. After an acclimation period, perfusion was switched to media containing PDGF. In some experiments, Y-27632 or blebbistatin were used to inhibit Rho-kinase (ROCK) or myosin II, respectively. PDGF activated Rac and induced cell spreading, which resulted in an increase in cell length, cell area, and the number of pseudopodial processes. Tractional forces were generated by extending pseudopodia, as indicated by centripetal displacement and realignment of collagen fibrils. Interestingly, the pattern of pseudopodial extension and local collagen fibril realignment was highly dependent upon the initial orientation of fibrils at the leading edge. Following ROCK or myosin II inhibition, significant ECM relaxation was observed, but small displacements of collagen fibrils continued to be detected at the tips of pseudopodia. Taken together, the data suggests that during Rac-induced cell spreading within 3-D matrices, there is a shift in the distribution of forces from the center to the periphery of corneal fibroblasts. ROCK mediates the generation of large myosin II-based tractional forces during cell spreading within 3-D collagen matrices, however residual forces can be generated at the tips of extending pseudopodia that are both ROCK and myosin II-independent. PMID:18452153

  12. A biofidelic 3D culture model to study the development of brain cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Ren, M; Du, C; Herrero Acero, E; Tang-Schomer, M D; Özkucur, N

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells assemble as systems during corticogenesis to generate collective functions. We built a neurobiology platform that consists of fetal rat cerebral cortical cells grown within 3D silk scaffolds (SF). Ivermectin (Ivm), a glycine receptor (GLR) agonist, was used to modulate cell resting membrane potential (Vmem) according to methods described in a previous work that implicated Ivm in the arrangement and connectivity of cortical cell assemblies. The cells developed into distinct populations of neuroglial stem/progenitor cells, mature neurons or epithelial-mesenchymal cells. Importantly, the synchronized electrical activity in the newly developed cortical assemblies could be recorded as local field potential (LFP) measurements. This study therefore describes the first example of the development of a biologically relevant cortical plate assembly outside of the body. This model provides i) a preclinical basis for engineering cerebral cortex tissue autografts and ii) a biofidelic 3D culture model for investigating biologically relevant processes during the functional development of cerebral cortical cellular systems. PMID:27112667

  13. Primary human osteoblast culture on 3D porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gemma L; Walton, Robin; Czernuszka, Jan; Griffiths, Sarah L; El Haj, Alicia J; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2010-09-15

    There is a need in tissue-engineering for 3D scaffolds that mimic the natural extracellular matrix of bone to enhance cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The scaffold is also required to be degradable. A highly porous scaffold has been developed to incorporate two of the extracellular components found in bone-collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA). The scaffold's collagen component is an afibrillar monomeric type I atelocollagen extracted from foetal calf's skin. This provided a novel environment for the inclusion of HA powder. Five hundred thousand primary human osteoblasts were seeded onto 4 mm cubed scaffolds that varied in ratio of HA to collagen. Weight ratios of 1:99, 25:75, 50:50, and 75:25 hydroxyapatite:collagen (HA:Collagen) were analysed. The scaffolds plus cells were cultured for 21 days. DNA assays and live/dead viability staining demonstrated that all of the scaffolds supported cell proliferation and viability. An alkaline phosphatase assay showed similar osteoblast phenotype maintenance on all of the 3D scaffolds analysed at 21 days. MicroCT analysis demonstrated an increase in total sample volume (correlating to increase in unmineralised matrix production). An even distribution of HA throughout the collagen matrix was observed using this technique. Also at 3 weeks, reductions in the percentage of the mineralised phase of the constructs were seen. These results indicate that each of the ratios of HA/collagen scaffolds have great potential for bone tissue engineering. PMID:20694991

  14. A biofidelic 3D culture model to study the development of brain cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Ren, M.; Du, C.; Herrero Acero, E.; Tang-Schomer, M. D.; Özkucur, N.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how cells assemble as systems during corticogenesis to generate collective functions. We built a neurobiology platform that consists of fetal rat cerebral cortical cells grown within 3D silk scaffolds (SF). Ivermectin (Ivm), a glycine receptor (GLR) agonist, was used to modulate cell resting membrane potential (Vmem) according to methods described in a previous work that implicated Ivm in the arrangement and connectivity of cortical cell assemblies. The cells developed into distinct populations of neuroglial stem/progenitor cells, mature neurons or epithelial-mesenchymal cells. Importantly, the synchronized electrical activity in the newly developed cortical assemblies could be recorded as local field potential (LFP) measurements. This study therefore describes the first example of the development of a biologically relevant cortical plate assembly outside of the body. This model provides i) a preclinical basis for engineering cerebral cortex tissue autografts and ii) a biofidelic 3D culture model for investigating biologically relevant processes during the functional development of cerebral cortical cellular systems. PMID:27112667

  15. Accuracy of typical photogrammetric networks in cultural heritage 3D modeling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocerino, E.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.

    2014-06-01

    The easy generation of 3D geometries (point clouds or polygonal models) with fully automated image-based methods poses nontrivial problems on how to check a posteriori the quality of the achieved results. Clear statements and procedures on how to plan the camera network, execute the survey and use automatic tools to achieve the prefixed requirements are still an open issue. Although such issues had been discussed and solved some years ago, the importance of camera network geometry is today often underestimated or neglected in the cultural heritage field. In this paper different camera network geometries, with normal and convergent images, are analyzed and the accuracy of the produced results are compared to ground truth measurements.

  16. Multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo-like tumor model for three-dimensional imaging of chemotherapeutic and nano material cellular penetration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-li; Jiang, Qiao; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Yan; Cui Tomshine, Jin; Wang, Dongliang; Gan, Yaling; Zou, Guozhang; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    We present a flexible and highly reproducible method using three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids to quantify chemotherapeutic and nanoparticle penetration properties in vitro. We generated HeLa cell-derived spheroids using the liquid overlay method. To properly characterize HeLa spheroids, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and multiphoton microscopy were used to obtain high-resolution 3D images of HeLa spheroids. Next, pairing high-resolution optical characterization techniques with flow cytometry, we quantitatively compared the penetration of doxorubicin, quantum dots, and synthetic micelles into 3D HeLa spheroid versus HeLa cells grown in a traditional two-dimensional culturing system. Our data revealed that 3D cultured HeLa cells acquired several clinically relevant morphologic and cellular characteristics (such as resistance to chemotherapeutics) often found in human solid tumors. These characteristic, however, could not be captured using conventional two-dimensional cell culture techniques. This study demonstrated the remarkable versatility of HeLa spheroid 3D imaging. In addition, our results revealed the capability of HeLa spheroids to function as a screening tool for nanoparticles or synthetic micelles that, due to their inherent size, charge, and hydrophobicity, can penetrate into solid tumors and act as delivery vehicles for chemotherapeutics. The development of this image-based, reproducible, and quantifiable in vitro HeLa spheroid screening tool will greatly aid future exploration of chemotherapeutics and nanoparticle delivery into solid tumors. PMID:23084249

  17. Challenge for 3D culture technology: Application in carcinogenesis studies with human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Emura, M; Aufderheide, M

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major intractable diseases and we urgently need more efficient preventive and curative measures. Recent molecular studies have provided strong evidence that allows us to believe that classically well-known early airway lesions such as hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ are really precancerous lesions progressing toward cancer but not necessarily transient and reversible alteration. This suggests that adequate early control of the precancerous lesions may lead to improved prevention of lung cancer. This knowledge is encouraging in view of the imminent necessity for additional experimental systems to investigate the causal mechanisms of cancers directly in human cells and tissues. There are many questions with regard to various precancerous lesions of the airways. For example, should cells, before reaching a stage of invasive carcinoma, undergo all precancerous stages such as hyperplasia or metaplasia and dysplasia, or is there any shortcut to bypass one or more of the precancerous stages? For the study of such questions, the emerging 3-dimensional (3D) cell culture technology appears to provide an effective and valuable tool. Though a great challenge, it is expected that this in vitro technology will be rapidly and reliably improved to enable the cultures to be maintained in an in vivo-mimicking state of differentiation for much longer than a period of at best a few months, as is currently the case. With the help of a "causes recombination-Lox" (Cre-lox) technology, it has been possible to trace cells giving rise to specific lung tumor types. In this short review we have attempted to assess the future role of 3D technology in the study of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26951634

  18. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

    PubMed

    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay. PMID:27552143

  19. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  20. Modulation of Wnt Signaling Enhances Inner Ear Organoid Development in 3D Culture.

    PubMed

    DeJonge, Rachel E; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Deig, Christopher R; Heller, Stefan; Koehler, Karl R; Hashino, Eri

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-derived inner ear sensory epithelia are a promising source of tissues for treating patients with hearing loss and dizziness. We recently demonstrated how to generate inner ear sensory epithelia, designated as inner ear organoids, from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in a self-organizing 3D culture. Here we improve the efficiency of this culture system by elucidating how Wnt signaling activity can drive the induction of otic tissue. We found that a carefully timed treatment with the potent Wnt agonist CHIR99021 promotes induction of otic vesicles-a process that was previously self-organized by unknown mechanisms. The resulting otic-like vesicles have a larger lumen size and contain a greater number of Pax8/Pax2-positive otic progenitor cells than organoids derived without the Wnt agonist. Additionally, these otic-like vesicles give rise to large inner ear organoids with hair cells whose morphological, biochemical and functional properties are indistinguishable from those of vestibular hair cells in the postnatal mouse inner ear. We conclude that Wnt signaling plays a similar role during inner ear organoid formation as it does during inner ear development in the embryo. PMID:27607106

  1. Additively Manufactured Device for Dynamic Culture of Large Arrays of 3D Tissue Engineered Constructs.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Vaquette, Cédryck

    2015-04-22

    The ability to test large arrays of cell and biomaterial combinations in 3D environments is still rather limited in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This limitation can be generally addressed by employing highly automated and reproducible methodologies. This study reports on the development of a highly versatile and upscalable method based on additive manufacturing for the fabrication of arrays of scaffolds, which are enclosed into individualized perfusion chambers. Devices containing eight scaffolds and their corresponding bioreactor chambers are simultaneously fabricated utilizing a dual extrusion additive manufacturing system. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, the scaffolds, while enclosed into the device, are subsequently surface-coated with a biomimetic calcium phosphate layer by perfusion with simulated body fluid solution. 96 scaffolds are simultaneously seeded and cultured with human osteoblasts under highly controlled bidirectional perfusion dynamic conditions over 4 weeks. Both coated and noncoated resulting scaffolds show homogeneous cell distribution and high cell viability throughout the 4 weeks culture period and CaP-coated scaffolds result in a significantly increased cell number. The methodology developed in this work exemplifies the applicability of additive manufacturing as a tool for further automation of studies in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25721231

  2. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  3. The Cultural Divide: Exponential Growth in Classical 2D and Metabolic Equilibrium in 3D Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Borkowski, Kamil; Schwämmle, Veit; Dai, Jie; Joensen, Kira Eyd; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Carvalho, Vasco Botelho; Fey, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dramatically different. Results Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved in cholesterol and urea synthesis are increased consistent with the attainment of cholesterol and urea production rates seen in vivo. DNA repair enzymes are increased even though cells are predominantly in Go. Transport around the cell – along the microtubules, through the nuclear pore and in various types of vesicles has been prioritized. There are numerous coherent changes in transcription, splicing, translation, protein folding and degradation. The amount of individual proteins within complexes is shown to be highly coordinated. Typically subunits which initiate a particular function are present in increased amounts compared to other subunits of the same complex. Summary We have previously demonstrated that cells at dynamic equilibrium can match the physiological performance of cells in tissues in vivo. Here we describe the multitude of protein changes necessary to achieve this performance. PMID:25222612

  4. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-05-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy.

  5. Spheroid-based three-dimensional liver-on-a-chip to investigate hepatocyte-hepatic stellate cell interactions and flow effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-A; No, Da Yoon; Kang, Edward; Ju, Jongil; Kim, Dong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2013-09-21

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) liver-on-a-chip to investigate the interaction of hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in which primary 3D hepatocyte spheroids and HSCs are co-cultured without direct cell-cell contact. Here, we show that the 3D liver chip offers substantial advantages for the formation and harvesting of spheroids. The most important feature of this liver chip is that it enables continuous flow of medium to the cells through osmotic pumping, and thus requires only minimal handling and no external power source. We also demonstrate that flow assists the formation and long-term maintenance of spheroids. Additionally, we quantitatively and qualitatively investigated the paracrine effects of HSCs, demonstrating that HSCs assist in the maintenance of hepatocyte spheroids and play an important role in the formation of tight cell-cell contacts, thereby improving liver-specific function. Spheroids derived from co-cultures exhibited improved albumin and urea secretion rates compared to mono-cultured spheroids after 9 days. Immunostaining for cytochrome P450 revealed that the enzymatic activity of spheroids co-cultured for 8 days was greater than that of mono-cultured spheroids. These results indicate that this system has the potential for further development as a unique model for studying cellular interactions or as a tool that can be incorporated into other models aimed at creating hepatic structure and prolonging hepatocyte function in culture. PMID:23657720

  6. Bronchial epithelial spheroids: an alternative culture model to investigate epithelium inflammation-mediated COPD

    PubMed Central

    Deslee, Gaetan; Dury, Sandra; Perotin, Jeanne M; Al Alam, Denise; Vitry, Fabien; Boxio, Rachel; Gangloff, Sophie C; Guenounou, Moncef; Lebargy, François; Belaaouaj, Abderrazzaq

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by abnormal lung inflammation that exceeds the protective response. Various culture models using epithelial cell lines or primary cells have been used to investigate the contribution of bronchial epithelium in the exaggerated inflammation of COPD. However, these models do not mimic in vivo situations for several reasons (e.g, transformed epithelial cells, protease-mediated dissociation of primary cells, etc.). To circumvent these concerns, we developed a new epithelial cell culture model. Methods Using non transformed non dissociated bronchial epithelium obtained by bronchial brushings from COPD and non-COPD smokers, we developed a 3-dimensional culture model, bronchial epithelial spheroids (BES). BES were analyzed by videomicroscopy, light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. We also compared the inflammatory responses of COPD and non-COPD BES. In our study, we chose to stimulate BES with lipopolycaccharide (LPS) and measured the release of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and the anti-inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Results BES obtained from both COPD and non-COPD patients were characterized by a polarized bronchial epithelium with tight junctions and ciliary beating, composed of basal cells, secretory cells and ciliated cells. The ciliary beat frequency of ciliated cells was not significantly different between the two groups. Of interest, BES retained their characteristic features in culture up to 8 days. BES released the inflammatory mediators IL-8, PGE2 and LTB4 constitutively and following exposure to LPS. Interestingly, LPS induced a higher release of IL-8, but not PGE2 and LTB4 in COPD BES (p < 0.001) which correlated with lung function changes. Conclusion This study provides for the first time a compelling evidence that the BES model provides an unaltered bronchial surface epithelium. More

  7. Formation and manipulation of cell spheroids using a density adjusted PEG/DEX aqueous two phase system

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chungmin; Takayama, Shuichi; Park, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Various spheroid formation techniques have been widely developed for efficient and reliable 3-D cell culture research. Although those efforts improved many aspects of spheroid generation, the procedures became complex and also required unusual laboratory equipment. Many recent techniques still involve laborious pipetting steps for spheroid manipulation such as collection, distribution and reseeding. In this report, we used a density-controlled polyethylene glycol and dextran aqueous two phase system to generate spheroids that are both consistent in size and precisely size-controllable. Moreover, by adding a few drops of fresh medium to the wells the contain spheroids, they can be simply settled and attached to the culture surface due to reduced densities of the phases. This unique attribute of the technique significantly reduces the numerous pipetting steps of spheroid manipulation to a single pipetting; therefore, the errors from those steps are eliminated and the reliability and efficiency of a research can be maximized. PMID:26144552

  8. Application of 3D hydrodynamic and particle tracking models for better environmental management of finfish culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Navas, Juan; Telfer, Trevor C.; Ross, Lindsay G.

    2011-04-01

    Hydrographic conditions, and particularly current speeds, have a strong influence on the management of fish cage culture. These hydrodynamic conditions can be used to predict particle movement within the water column and the results used to optimise environmental conditions for effective site selection, setting of environmental quality standards, waste dispersion, and potential disease transfer. To this end, a 3D hydrodynamic model, MOHID, has been coupled to a particle tracking model to study the effects of mean current speed, quiescent water periods and bulk water circulation in Mulroy Bay, Co. Donegal Ireland, an Irish fjard (shallow fjordic system) important to the aquaculture industry. A Lagangrian method simulated the instantaneous release of "particles" emulating discharge from finfish cages to show the behaviour of waste in terms of water circulation and water exchange. The 3D spatial models were used to identify areas of mixed and stratified water using a version of the Simpson-Hunter criteria, and to use this in conjunction with models of current flow for appropriate site selection for salmon aquaculture. The modelled outcomes for stratification were in good agreement with the direct measurements of water column stratification based on observed density profiles. Calculations of the Simpson-Hunter tidal parameter indicated that most of Mulroy Bay was potentially stratified with a well mixed region over the shallow channels where the water is faster flowing. The fjard was characterised by areas of both very low and high mean current speeds, with some areas having long periods of quiescent water. The residual current and the particle tracking animations created through the models revealed an anticlockwise eddy that may influence waste dispersion and potential for disease transfer, among salmon cages and which ensures that the retention time of waste substances from cages is extended. The hydrodynamic model results were incorporated into the ArcView TM GIS

  9. Development of multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture from breast cancer cell and a high throughput screening method using the MTT assay.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    In comparison to monolayer cells, MCTS has been claimed as more suitable candidate for studying drug penetration due to the high resemblance to solid tumors. However, the cultivation of MCTS is cumbersome, time consuming, and most technique fail to generate spheroids with uniform sizes. Therefore, the application of spheroid cultures in high throughput screening has been rather limiting. Besides, the lack of a well established screening protocol method that is applicable to spheroid could also be attributed to this limitation. Here we report a simple way of cultivating homogenous MCTS cultures with compact and rigid structure from the MCF-7 cells. Besides, we had also made some modifications to the standard MTT assay to realize high throughput screening of these spheroids. Using the modified protocol, tamoxifen showed cytotoxicity effect towards MCTS cultures from MCF-7 with high consistency. The results correlated well with the cultures' response assessed by LDH release assay but the latter assay was not ideal for detecting a wide range of cytotoxicity due to high basal background reading. The MTT assay emerged as a better indicator to apoptosis event in comparison to the LDH release assay. Therefore, the method for spheroid generation and the modified MTT assay we reported here could be potentially applied to high throughput screening for response of spheroid cultures generated from MCF-7 as well as other cancer cell lines towards cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:22970274

  10. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Asselin, Eric; Parent, Sophie; Sykes, Peter H.; Evans, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  11. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theumer, Anja; Gräfe, Christine; Bähring, Franziska; Bergemann, Christian; Hochhaus, Andreas; Clement, Joachim H.

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood-brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 μg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles.

  12. Understanding the Impact of 2D and 3D Fibroblast Cultures on In Vitro Breast Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Su, Xiaojing; Berthier, Erwin; Pehlke, Carolyn; Friedl, Andreas; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The utilization of 3D, physiologically relevant in vitro cancer models to investigate complex interactions between tumor and stroma has been increasing. Prior work has generally focused on the cancer cells and, the role of fibroblast culture conditions on tumor-stromal cell interactions is still largely unknown. Here, we focus on the stroma by comparing functional behaviors of human mammary fibroblasts (HMFs) cultured in 2D and 3D and their effects on the invasive progression of breast cancer cells (MCF10DCIS.com). We identified increased levels of several paracrine factors from HMFs cultured in 3D conditions that drive the invasive transition. Using a microscale co-culture model with improved compartmentalization and sensitivity, we demonstrated that HMFs cultured in 3D intensify the promotion of the invasive progression through the HGF/c-Met interaction. This study highlights the importance of the 3D stromal microenvironment in the development of multiple cell type in vitro cancer models. PMID:24124550

  13. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  14. Critical analysis of 3-D organoid in vitro cell culture models for high-throughput drug candidate toxicity assessments.

    PubMed

    Astashkina, Anna; Grainger, David W

    2014-04-01

    Drug failure due to toxicity indicators remains among the primary reasons for staggering drug attrition rates during clinical studies and post-marketing surveillance. Broader validation and use of next-generation 3-D improved cell culture models are expected to improve predictive power and effectiveness of drug toxicological predictions. However, after decades of promising research significant gaps remain in our collective ability to extract quality human toxicity information from in vitro data using 3-D cell and tissue models. Issues, challenges and future directions for the field to improve drug assay predictive power and reliability of 3-D models are reviewed. PMID:24613390

  15. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    PubMed

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  16. Expression pattern of Dkk-3, a secreted Wnt pathway inhibitor, in mouse intestinal tissue and three-dimensional cultured Caco-2 spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Ken; Rikitake, Yuji; Ayabe, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression pattern of Dkk-3, a secreted Wnt pathway inhibitor, in mouse intestinal tissue and three-dimensional cultured Caco-2 spheroids. Dkk-3 was expressed at the bottom of crypts from the mouse small intestine. Human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells expressed Dkk-3 under a semi-confluent condition, but Dkk-3 expression was seen in only some of the Caco-2 cells when the cells were sparse. Caco-2 cells formed hollow spheroids in Matrigel, and the layer-forming cells in the hollow spheroids expressed Dkk-3. Our results demonstrated that Dkk-3 might affect intestinal cells when the fate of stem cells changes.

  17. Bioinspired Tuning of Hydrogel Permeability-Rigidity Dependency for 3D Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Rich, Max H.; Baek, Kwanghyun; Lee, Jonghwi; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogels are being extensively used for three-dimensional immobilization and culture of cells in fundamental biological studies, biochemical processes, and clinical treatments. However, it is still a challenge to support viability and regulate phenotypic activities of cells in a structurally stable gel, because the gel becomes less permeable with increasing rigidity. To resolve this challenge, this study demonstrates a unique method to enhance the permeability of a cell-laden hydrogel while avoiding a significant change in rigidity of the gel. Inspired by the grooved skin textures of marine organisms, a hydrogel is assembled to present computationally optimized micro-sized grooves on the surface. Separately, a gel is engineered to preset aligned microchannels similar to a plant's vascular bundles through a uniaxial freeze-drying process. The resulting gel displays significantly increased water diffusivity with reduced changes of gel stiffness, exclusively when the microgrooves and microchannels are aligned together. No significant enhancement of rehydration is achieved when the microgrooves and microchannels are not aligned. Such material design greatly enhances viability and neural differentiation of stem cells and 3D neural network formation within the gel.

  18. Curved and folded micropatterns in 3D cell culture and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem Onat; Xu, Zinnia S; Gracias, David H

    2014-01-01

    Cells live in a highly curved and folded micropatterned environment within the human body. Hence, there is a need to develop engineering paradigms to replicate these microenvironments in order to investigate the behavior of cells in vitro, as well as to develop bioartificial organs for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this chapter, we first motivate the need for such micropatterns based on anatomical considerations and then survey methods that can be utilized to generate curved and folded micropatterns of relevance to 3D cell culture and tissue engineering. The methods surveyed can broadly be divided into two classes: top-down approaches inspired by conventional 2D microfabrication and bottom-up approaches most notably in the self-assembly of thin patterned films. These methods provide proof of concept that the high resolution, precise and reproducible patterning of cell and matrix microenvironments in anatomically relevant curved and folded geometries is possible. A specific protocol is presented to create curved and folded hydrogel micropatterns. PMID:24560507

  19. Accuracy of cultural heritage 3D models by RPAS and terrestrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, M.; Furini, A.; Russo, V.; Pellegrinelli, A.; Russo, P.

    2014-06-01

    The combined use of high-resolution digital images taken from ground as well as from RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) have significantly increased the potential of close range digital photogrammetry applications in Cultural Heritage surveying and modeling. It is in fact possible, thanks to SfM (Structure from Motion), to simultaneously process great numbers of aerial and terrestrial images for the production of a dense point cloud of an object. In order to analyze the accuracy of results, we started numerous tests based on the comparison between 3D digital models of a monumental complex realized by the integration of aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry and an accurate TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) reference model of the same object. A lot of digital images of a renaissance castle, assumed as test site, have been taken both by ground level and by RPAS at different distances and flight altitudes and with different flight patterns. As first step of the experimentation, the images were previously processed with Agisoft PhotoScan, one of the most popular photogrammetric software. The comparison between the photogrammetric DSM of the monument and a TLS reference one was carried out by evaluating the average deviation between the points belonging to the two entities, both globally and locally, on individual façades and architectural elements (sections and particular). In this paper the results of the first test are presented. A good agreement between photogrammetric and TLS digital models of the castle is pointed out.

  20. Bioinspired Tuning of Hydrogel Permeability-Rigidity Dependency for 3D Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Kyung; Rich, Max H.; Baek, Kwanghyun; Lee, Jonghwi; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogels are being extensively used for three-dimensional immobilization and culture of cells in fundamental biological studies, biochemical processes, and clinical treatments. However, it is still a challenge to support viability and regulate phenotypic activities of cells in a structurally stable gel, because the gel becomes less permeable with increasing rigidity. To resolve this challenge, this study demonstrates a unique method to enhance the permeability of a cell-laden hydrogel while avoiding a significant change in rigidity of the gel. Inspired by the grooved skin textures of marine organisms, a hydrogel is assembled to present computationally optimized micro-sized grooves on the surface. Separately, a gel is engineered to preset aligned microchannels similar to a plant's vascular bundles through a uniaxial freeze-drying process. The resulting gel displays significantly increased water diffusivity with reduced changes of gel stiffness, exclusively when the microgrooves and microchannels are aligned together. No significant enhancement of rehydration is achieved when the microgrooves and microchannels are not aligned. Such material design greatly enhances viability and neural differentiation of stem cells and 3D neural network formation within the gel. PMID:25752700

  1. Potential and limitations of microscopy and Raman spectroscopy for live-cell analysis of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Charwat, Verena; Schütze, Karin; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Gangnus, Rainer; Hofbauer, Pablo; Hoffmann, Claudia; Angres, Brigitte; Kasper, Cornelia

    2015-07-10

    Today highly complex 3D cell culture formats that closely mimic the in vivo situation are increasingly available. Despite their wide use, the development of analytical methods and tools that can work within the depth of 3D-tissue constructs lags behind. In order to get the most information from a 3D cell sample, adequate and reliable assays are required. However, the majority of tools and methods used today have been originally designed for 2D cell cultures and translation to a 3D environment is in general not trivial. Ideally, an analytical method should be non-invasive and allow for repeated observation of living cells in order to detect dynamic changes in individual cells within the 3D cell culture. Although well-established laser confocal microscopy can be used for these purposes, this technique has serious limitations including penetration depth and availability. Focusing on two relevant analytical methods for live-cell monitoring, we discuss the current challenges of analyzing living 3D samples: microscopy, which is the most widely used technology to observe and examine cell cultures, has been successfully adapted for 3D samples by recording of so-called "z-stacks". However the required equipment is generally very expensive and therefore access is often limited. Consequently alternative and less advanced approaches are often applied that cannot capture the full structural complexity of a 3D sample. Similarly, image analysis tools for quantification of microscopic images range from highly specialized and costly to simplified and inexpensive. Depending on the actual sample composition and scientific question the best approach needs to be assessed individually. Another more recently introduced technology for non-invasive cell analysis is Raman micro-spectroscopy. It enables label-free identification of cellular metabolic changes with high sensitivity and has already been successful applied to 2D and 3D cell cultures. However, its future significance for cell

  2. Disulfide-Based Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels: A Wholly-Synthetic Thermoreversible 3D Matrix for Sheet-Based Cultures.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Warren, Nicholas J; Mosadegh, Bobak; Mohammady, Marym R; Whitesides, George M; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-14

    It is well-known that 3D in vitro cell cultures provide a much better model than 2D cell cultures for understanding the in vivo microenvironment of cells. However, significant technical challenges in handling and analyzing 3D cell cultures remain, which currently limits their widespread application. Herein, we demonstrate the application of wholly synthetic thermoresponsive block copolymer worms in sheet-based 3D cell culture. These worms form a soft, free-standing gel reversibly at 20-37 °C, which can be rapidly converted into a free-flowing dispersion of spheres on cooling to 5 °C. Functionalization of the worms with disulfide groups was found to be essential for ensuring sufficient mechanical stability of these hydrogels to enable long-term cell culture. These disulfide groups are conveniently introduced via statistical copolymerization of a disulfide-based dimethacrylate under conditions that favor intramolecular cyclization and subsequent thiol/disulfide exchange leads to the formation of reversible covalent bonds between adjacent worms within the gel. This new approach enables cells to be embedded within micrometer-thick slabs of gel with good viability, permits cell culture for at least 12 days, and facilitates recovery of viable cells from the gel simply by incubating the culture in buffer at 4 °C (thus, avoiding the enzymatic degradation required for cell harvesting when using commercial protein-based gels, such as Matrigel). PMID:26509930

  3. A 3D sphere culture system containing functional polymers for large-scale human pluripotent stem cell production.

    PubMed

    Otsuji, Tomomi G; Bin, Jiang; Yoshimura, Azumi; Tomura, Misayo; Tateyama, Daiki; Minami, Itsunari; Yoshikawa, Yoshihiro; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Heuser, John E; Nishino, Taito; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakatsuji, Norio

    2014-05-01

    Utilizing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in cell-based therapy and drug discovery requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up conventional adherent cultures presents challenges of maintaining a uniform high quality at low cost. In this regard, suspension cultures are a viable alternative, because they are scalable and do not require adhesion surfaces. 3D culture systems such as bioreactors can be exploited for large-scale production. However, the limitations of current suspension culture methods include spontaneous fusion between cell aggregates and suboptimal passaging methods by dissociation and reaggregation. 3D culture systems that dynamically stir carrier beads or cell aggregates should be refined to reduce shearing forces that damage hPSCs. Here, we report a simple 3D sphere culture system that incorporates mechanical passaging and functional polymers. This setup resolves major problems associated with suspension culture methods and dynamic stirring systems and may be optimal for applications involving large-scale hPSC production. PMID:24936458

  4. Comparison of 3d Reconstruction Services and Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasztovits, S.; Dorninger, P.

    2013-07-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is an established method to reconstruct the geometrical surface of given objects. Current systems allow for fast and efficient determination of 3D models with high accuracy and richness in detail. Alternatively, 3D reconstruction services are using images to reconstruct the surface of an object. While the instrumental expenses for laser scanning systems are high, upcoming free software services as well as open source software packages enable the generation of 3D models using digital consumer cameras. In addition, processing TLS data still requires an experienced user while recent web-services operate completely automatically. An indisputable advantage of image based 3D modeling is its implicit capability for model texturing. However, the achievable accuracy and resolution of the 3D models is lower than those of laser scanning data. Within this contribution, we investigate the results of automated web-services for image based 3D model generation with respect to a TLS reference model. For this, a copper sculpture was acquired using a laser scanner and using image series of different digital cameras. Two different webservices, namely Arc3D and AutoDesk 123D Catch were used to process the image data. The geometric accuracy was compared for the entire model and for some highly structured details. The results are presented and interpreted based on difference models. Finally, an economical comparison of the generation of the models is given considering the interactive and processing time costs.

  5. What Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue.

    PubMed

    Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit; Rodriguez, Fabien; Frasquilho, Sónia; Nazarov, Petr V; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. PMID:26745821

  6. What Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit; Rodriguez, Fabien; Frasquilho, Sónia; Nazarov, Petr V.; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. PMID:26745821

  7. Effect of Circulation Parameters on Functional Status of HepaRG Spheroids Cultured in Microbioreactor.

    PubMed

    Semenova, O V; Petrov, V A; Gerasimenko, T N; Aleksandrova, A V; Burmistrova, O A; Khutornenko, A A; Osipyants, A I; Poloznikov, A A; Sakharov, D A

    2016-07-01

    We studied the relationship between microcirculation parameters and functional status of HepaRG cells in spheroids and chose an optimal regimen within the physiologically permissible limits of mechanical impact for the cells that maintains the expression of functional genes of the liver. PMID:27496037

  8. 5D Modelling: An Efficient Approach for Creating Spatiotemporal Predictive 3D Maps of Large-Scale Cultural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulamis, A.; Doulamis, N.; Ioannidis, C.; Chrysouli, C.; Grammalidis, N.; Dimitropoulos, K.; Potsiou, C.; Stathopoulou, E.-K.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    Outdoor large-scale cultural sites are mostly sensitive to environmental, natural and human made factors, implying an imminent need for a spatio-temporal assessment to identify regions of potential cultural interest (material degradation, structuring, conservation). On the other hand, in Cultural Heritage research quite different actors are involved (archaeologists, curators, conservators, simple users) each of diverse needs. All these statements advocate that a 5D modelling (3D geometry plus time plus levels of details) is ideally required for preservation and assessment of outdoor large scale cultural sites, which is currently implemented as a simple aggregation of 3D digital models at different time and levels of details. The main bottleneck of such an approach is its complexity, making 5D modelling impossible to be validated in real life conditions. In this paper, a cost effective and affordable framework for 5D modelling is proposed based on a spatial-temporal dependent aggregation of 3D digital models, by incorporating a predictive assessment procedure to indicate which regions (surfaces) of an object should be reconstructed at higher levels of details at next time instances and which at lower ones. In this way, dynamic change history maps are created, indicating spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Using these maps, predictive assessment can be made, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 5D Digital Cultural Heritage Model (5D-DCHM) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework, which also allows the description of additional semantic metadata information. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 5D-DCHM geometry and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCity

  9. Infrared imaging of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line phenotypes in 2D and 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Smolina, Margarita; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One current challenge in the field of breast cancer infrared imaging is the identification of carcinoma cell subtypes in the tissue. Neither sequencing nor immunochemistry is currently able to provide a cell by cell thorough classification. The latter is needed to build accurate statistical models capable of recognizing the diversity of breast cancer cell lines that may be present in a tissue section. One possible approach for overcoming this problem is to obtain the IR spectral signature of well-characterized tumor cell lines in culture. Cultures in three-dimensional matrices appear to generate an environment that mimics better the in vivo environment. There are, at present, series of breast cancer cell lines that have been thoroughly characterized in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) cultures by full transcriptomics analyses. In this work, we describe the methods used to grow, to process, and to characterize a triple-negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, in 3D laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) culture and compare it with traditional monolayer cultures and tissue sections. While unsupervised analyses did not completely separate spectra of cells grown in 2D from 3D lrECM cultures, a supervised statistical analysis resulted in an almost perfect separation. When IR spectral responses of epithelial tumor cells from clinical triple-negative breast carcinoma samples were added to these data, a principal component analysis indicated that they cluster closer to the spectra of 3D culture cells than to the spectra of cells grown on a flat plastic substrata. This result is encouraging because of correlating well-characterized cell line features with clinical biopsies. PMID:25568895

  10. Stiffening of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroid Microenvironments Induced by Incorporation of Gelatin Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Cooke, Marissa T.; Saeed, Rabbia; Kinney, Melissa A.; Fridley, Krista M.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    Culturing multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells as 3D aggregates augments their differentiation potential and paracrine activity. One caveat of stem cell spheroids, though, can be the limited diffusional transport barriers posed by the inherent 3D structure of the multicellular aggregates. In order to circumvent such limitations, polymeric microparticles have been incorporated into stem cell aggregates as a means to locally control the biochemical and physical properties of the 3D microenvironment. However, the introduction of biomaterials to the 3D stem cell microenvironment could alter the mechanical forces sensed by cells within aggregates, which in turn could impact various cell behaviors and overall spheroid mechanics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of biomaterial incorporation within mesenchymal stem cell spheroids on aggregate structure and mechanical properties. The results of this study demonstrate that although gelatin microparticle incorporation results in similar multi-cellular organization within human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids, the introduction of gelatin materials significantly impacts spheroid mechanical properties. The marked differences in spheroid mechanics induced by microparticle incorporation may hold major implications for in vitro directed differentiation strategies and offer a novel route to engineer the mechanical properties of tissue constructs ex vivo. PMID:22658155

  11. Polyurethane foam/spheroid culture system using human hepatoblastoma cell line (Hep G2) as a possible new hybrid artificial liver.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Shimada, M; Tsujita, E; Tanaka, S; Ijima, H; Nakazawa, K; Sakiyama, R; Fukuda, J; Ueda, T; Funatsu, K; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    The risk of xenozoonosis infections poses the greatest obstacle against the clinical application of hybrid artificial liver support system (HALSS). Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source for HALSS, but the shortage of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation limits this modality. To resolve this issue, we used human hepatocytes with replication capacity (fetal hepatocytes, Hep G2, and Huh 7) in a polyurethane foam (PUF)/spheroid culture system in vitro, and analyzed liver functions such as ammonia removal and albumin synthesis capacity; results were compared to those of porcine hepatocytes. Human fetal hepatocytes, Hep G2, and Huh 7 formed spheroids spontaneously within 24 h in a PUF/spheroid culture system; ammonia removal activity (micromol/10(6) nuclei/h) was upregulated, as was albumin synthesis activity (microg/10(6) nuclei/day). In particular, Hep G2 spheroids demonstrated high ammonia removal and albumin synthesis activities: 85% of the ammonia removal activity and 171.7% of the albumin synthesis activity of porcine hepatocytes in the monolayer culture. These results indicate the possibility of the development of a multicapillary PUF (MC-PUF) packed-bed culture system of hepatocyte spheroids as a HALSS using Hep G2. PMID:11814114

  12. Biologic variability of human foreskin fibroblasts in 2D and 3D culture: implications for a wound healing model

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fibroblast-populated 3D collagen matrix is a model of tissue and healing which has been used since the 1980's. It was hypothesized that anchorage disruption of the collagen matrix would produce p53-dependent apoptosis in the embedded fibroblasts, but results of hypothesis testing were variant. Findings The response of p53 to anchorage disruption in 3D culture or to UV irradiation in 2D culture was influenced both by fibroblast strain and culture conditions. It also was determined that data scatter in a collagen matrix contraction assay was related to fibroblast strain and possibly to technical factors, such as cell culture technician and/or number of matrices utilized. Subsequent analysis suggested that phenotypic drift and/or inter-strain genetic variability may have been responsible for the data scatter. In addition, several technical factors were identified that may have contributed to the scatter. Conclusion Experimentation with human foreskin fibroblasts in both 2D and 3D culture can produce variant data. The underlying cause of the data scatter appears to be partially due to the biologic variability of the fibroblast. PMID:19922655

  13. State-of-the-art of 3D cultures (organs-on-a-chip) in safety testing and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Alépée, Natalie; Bahinski, Anthony; Daneshian, Mardas; De Wever, Bart; Fritsche, Ellen; Goldberg, Alan; Hansmann, Jan; Hartung, Thomas; Haycock, John; Hogberg, Helena; Hoelting, Lisa; Kelm, Jens M; Kadereit, Suzanne; McVey, Emily; Landsiedel, Robert; Leist, Marcel; Lübberstedt, Marc; Noor, Fozia; Pellevoisin, Christian; Petersohn, Dirk; Pfannenbecker, Uwe; Reisinger, Kerstin; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Zeilinger, Katrin; Zurich, Marie-Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Integrated approaches using different in vitro methods in combination with bioinformatics can (i) increase the success rate and speed of drug development; (ii) improve the accuracy of toxicological risk assessment; and (iii) increase our understanding of disease. Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models are important building blocks of this strategy which has emerged during the last years. The majority of these models are organotypic, i.e., they aim to reproduce major functions of an organ or organ system. This implies in many cases that more than one cell type forms the 3D structure, and often matrix elements play an important role. This review summarizes the state of the art concerning commonalities of the different models. For instance, the theory of mass transport/metabolite exchange in 3D systems and the special analytical requirements for test endpoints in organotypic cultures are discussed in detail. In the next part, 3D model systems for selected organs--liver, lung, skin, brain--are presented and characterized in dedicated chapters. Also, 3D approaches to the modeling of tumors are presented and discussed. All chapters give a historical background, illustrate the large variety of approaches, and highlight up- and downsides as well as specific requirements. Moreover, they refer to the application in disease modeling, drug discovery and safety assessment. Finally, consensus recommendations indicate a roadmap for the successful implementation of 3D models in routine screening. It is expected that the use of such models will accelerate progress by reducing error rates and wrong predictions from compound testing. PMID:25027500

  14. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer's disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may be

  15. 3D Visualization of Cultural Heritage Artefacts with Virtual Reality devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Caruso, G.; Micoli, L. L.; Covarrubias Rodriguez, M.; Guidi, G.

    2015-08-01

    Although 3D models are useful to preserve the information about historical artefacts, the potential of these digital contents are not fully accomplished until they are not used to interactively communicate their significance to non-specialists. Starting from this consideration, a new way to provide museum visitors with more information was investigated. The research is aimed at valorising and making more accessible the Egyptian funeral objects exhibited in the Sforza Castle in Milan. The results of the research will be used for the renewal of the current exhibition, at the Archaeological Museum in Milan, by making it more attractive. A 3D virtual interactive scenario regarding the "path of the dead", an important ritual in ancient Egypt, was realized to augment the experience and the comprehension of the public through interactivity. Four important artefacts were considered for this scope: two ushabty, a wooden sarcophagus and a heart scarab. The scenario was realized by integrating low-cost Virtual Reality technologies, as the Oculus Rift DK2 and the Leap Motion controller, and implementing a specific software by using Unity. The 3D models were implemented by adding responsive points of interest in relation to important symbols or features of the artefact. This allows highlighting single parts of the artefact in order to better identify the hieroglyphs and provide their translation. The paper describes the process for optimizing the 3D models, the implementation of the interactive scenario and the results of some test that have been carried out in the lab.

  16. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  17. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  18. Cancer multicellular spheroids: volume assessment from a single 2D projection.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo; Tesei, Anna; Arienti, Chiara; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    Volume is one of the most important features for the characterization of a tumour on a macroscopic scale. It is often used to assess the effectiveness of care treatments, thus making its correct evaluation a crucial issue for patient care. Similarly, volume is a key feature on a microscopic scale. Multicellular cancer spheroids are 3D tumour models widely employed in pre-clinical studies to test the effects of drugs and radiotherapy treatments. Very few methods have been proposed to estimate the tumour volume arising from a 2D projection of multicellular spheroids, and even fewer have been designed to provide a 3D reconstruction of the tumour shape. In this work, we propose Reconstruction and Visualization from a Single Projection (ReViSP), an automatic method conceived to reconstruct the 3D surface and estimate the volume of single cancer multicellular spheroids, or even of spheroid cultures. As the input parameter ReViSP requires only one 2D projection, which could be a widefield microscope image. We assessed the effectiveness of our method by comparing it with other approaches. To this purpose, we used a new strategy that allowed us to achieve accurate volume measurements based on the analysis of home-made 3D objects, built by mimicking the spheroid morphology. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our method for both 3D reconstruction and volume assessment. ReViSP software is distributed as an open source tool. PMID:25561413

  19. Optimal 3-D culture of primary articular chondrocytes for use in the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Baker, Travis L.; Brown, Raquel J.; Catlin, Lindsey W.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reliable culturing methods for primary articular chondrocytes are essential to study the effects of loading and unloading on joint tissue at the cellular level. Due to the limited proliferation capacity of primary chondrocytes and their tendency to dedifferentiate in conventional culture conditions, long-term culturing conditions of primary chondrocytes can be challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a suspension culturing technique that not only would retain the cellular morphology but also maintain gene expression characteristics of primary articular chondrocytes. METHODS Three-dimensional culturing methods were compared and optimized for primary articular chondrocytes in the rotating wall vessel bioreactor, which changes the mechanical culture conditions to provide a form of suspension culture optimized for low shear and turbulence. We performed gene expression analysis and morphological characterization of cells cultured in alginate beads, Cytopore-2 microcarriers, primary monolayer culture, and passaged monolayer cultures using reverse transcription-PCR and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS Primary chondrocytes grown on Cytopore-2 microcarriers maintained the phenotypical morphology and gene expression pattern observed in primary bovine articular chondrocytes, and retained these characteristics for up to 9 days. DISCUSSION Our results provide a novel and alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes suitable for studies that require suspension such as those using the rotating wall vessel bioreactor. In addition, we provide an alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes that can impact future mechanistic studies of osteoarthritis progression, treatments for cartilage damage and repair, and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25199120

  20. Electrosensitization assists cell ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field in 3D cultures

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Claudia; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported a delayed increase of sensitivity to electroporation (termed “electrosensitization”) in mammalian cells that had been subjected to electroporation. Electrosensitization facilitated membrane permeabilization and reduced survival in cell suspensions when the electric pulse treatments were split in fractions. The present study was aimed to visualize the effect of sensitization and establish its utility for cell ablation. We used KLN 205 squamous carcinoma cells embedded in an agarose gel and cell spheroids in Matrigel. A local ablation was created by a train of 200 to 600 of 300-ns pulses (50 Hz, 300–600 V) delivered by a two-needle probe with 1-mm inter-electrode distance. In order to facilitate ablation by engaging electrosensitization, the train was split in two identical fractions applied with a 2- to 480-s interval. At 400–600 V (2.9–4.3 kV/cm), the split-dose treatments increased the ablation volume and cell death up to 2–3-fold compared to single-train treatments. Under the conditions tested, the maximum enhancement of ablation was achieved when two fractions were separated by 100 s. The results suggest that engaging electrosensitization may assist in vivo cancer ablation by reducing the voltage or number of pulses required, or by enabling larger inter-electrode distances without losing the ablation efficiency. PMID:26987779

  1. Assessments for 3d Reconstructions of Cultural Heritage Using Digital Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manferdini, A. M.; Galassi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this contribution is to show the results of evaluations on 3D digitizations performed using different methodologies and technologies. In particular, for surveys conducted at the architectural and urban scale, the recent reduction of costs related to Time of Flight and phase shift laser scanners is actually enhancing the replacement of traditional topographic instruments (i.e. total stations) with range-based technologies for the acquisition of 3D data related to built heritage. If compared to surveys performed using traditional topographic technologies, range-based ones offer a wide range of advantages, but they also require different skills, procedures and times. The present contribution shows the results of a practical application of both approaches on the same case study. Another application was suggested by the recent developments in the photogrammetric field that enhance the improvement of software able to automatically orient uncalibrated cameras and derive dense and accurate 3D point clouds, with evident benefits in reduction of costs required for survey equipment. Therefore, the presented case study constituted the occasion to compare a rangebased survey with a fast 3D acquisition and modelling using a Structure from Motion solution. These survey procedures were adopted at an architectural scale, on a single building, that was surveyed both on the outside and on the inside. Assessments on the quality of the rebuilt information is reported, as far as metric accuracy and reliability is concerned, as well as on time consuming and on skills required during each step of the adopted pipelines. For all approaches, these analysis highlighted advantages and disadvantages that allow to conduct evaluations on the possible convenience of adopting range-based technologies instead of a traditional topographic approach or a photogrammetric one instead of a range based one in case of surveys conducted at an architectural/urban scale.

  2. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  3. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  4. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  5. High-Throughput Cancer Cell Sphere Formation for Characterizing the Efficacy of Photo Dynamic Therapy in 3D Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Lou, Xia; Zhang, Zhixiong; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), wherein light sensitive non-toxic agents are locally and selectively activated using light, has emerged as an appealing alternative to traditional cancer chemotherapy. Yet to date, PDT efficacy has been mostly characterized using 2D cultures. Compared to 2D cultures, 3D sphere culture generates unique spatial distributions of nutrients and oxygen for the cells that better mimics the in-vivo conditions. Using a novel polyHEMA (non-adherent polymer) fabrication process, we developed a microfluidic sphere formation platform that can (1) generate 1,024 uniform (size variation <10%) cancer spheres within a 2 cm by 2 cm core area, (2) culture spheres for more than 2 weeks, and (3) allow the retrieval of spheres. Using the presented platform, we have successfully characterized the different responses in 2D and 3D cell culture to PDT. Furthermore, we investigated the treatment resistance effect in cancer cells induced by tumor associated fibroblasts (CAF). Although the CAFs can enhance the resistance to traditional chemotherapy agents, no significant difference in PDT was observed. The preliminary results suggest that the PDT can be an attractive alternative cancer therapy, which is less affected by the therapeutic resistance induced by cancer associated cells.

  6. High-Throughput Cancer Cell Sphere Formation for Characterizing the Efficacy of Photo Dynamic Therapy in 3D Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Lou, Xia; Zhang, Zhixiong; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), wherein light sensitive non-toxic agents are locally and selectively activated using light, has emerged as an appealing alternative to traditional cancer chemotherapy. Yet to date, PDT efficacy has been mostly characterized using 2D cultures. Compared to 2D cultures, 3D sphere culture generates unique spatial distributions of nutrients and oxygen for the cells that better mimics the in-vivo conditions. Using a novel polyHEMA (non-adherent polymer) fabrication process, we developed a microfluidic sphere formation platform that can (1) generate 1,024 uniform (size variation <10%) cancer spheres within a 2 cm by 2 cm core area, (2) culture spheres for more than 2 weeks, and (3) allow the retrieval of spheres. Using the presented platform, we have successfully characterized the different responses in 2D and 3D cell culture to PDT. Furthermore, we investigated the treatment resistance effect in cancer cells induced by tumor associated fibroblasts (CAF). Although the CAFs can enhance the resistance to traditional chemotherapy agents, no significant difference in PDT was observed. The preliminary results suggest that the PDT can be an attractive alternative cancer therapy, which is less affected by the therapeutic resistance induced by cancer associated cells. PMID:26153550

  7. High-Throughput Cancer Cell Sphere Formation for Characterizing the Efficacy of Photo Dynamic Therapy in 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Lou, Xia; Zhang, Zhixiong; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), wherein light sensitive non-toxic agents are locally and selectively activated using light, has emerged as an appealing alternative to traditional cancer chemotherapy. Yet to date, PDT efficacy has been mostly characterized using 2D cultures. Compared to 2D cultures, 3D sphere culture generates unique spatial distributions of nutrients and oxygen for the cells that better mimics the in-vivo conditions. Using a novel polyHEMA (non-adherent polymer) fabrication process, we developed a microfluidic sphere formation platform that can (1) generate 1,024 uniform (size variation <10%) cancer spheres within a 2 cm by 2 cm core area, (2) culture spheres for more than 2 weeks, and (3) allow the retrieval of spheres. Using the presented platform, we have successfully characterized the different responses in 2D and 3D cell culture to PDT. Furthermore, we investigated the treatment resistance effect in cancer cells induced by tumor associated fibroblasts (CAF). Although the CAFs can enhance the resistance to traditional chemotherapy agents, no significant difference in PDT was observed. The preliminary results suggest that the PDT can be an attractive alternative cancer therapy, which is less affected by the therapeutic resistance induced by cancer associated cells. PMID:26153550

  8. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  9. Advances in 3D cell culture technologies enabling tissue-like structures to be created in vitro.

    PubMed

    Knight, Eleanor; Przyborski, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Research in mammalian cell biology often relies on developing in vitro models to enable the growth of cells in the laboratory to investigate a specific biological mechanism or process under different test conditions. The quality of such models and how they represent the behavior of cells in real tissues plays a critical role in the value of the data produced and how it is used. It is particularly important to recognize how the structure of a cell influences its function and how co-culture models can be used to more closely represent the structure of real tissue. In recent years, technologies have been developed to enhance the way in which researchers can grow cells and more readily create tissue-like structures. Here we identify the limitations of culturing mammalian cells by conventional methods on two-dimensional (2D) substrates and review the popular approaches currently available that enable the development of three-dimensional (3D) tissue models in vitro. There are now many ways in which the growth environment for cultured cells can be altered to encourage 3D cell growth. Approaches to 3D culture can be broadly categorized into scaffold-free or scaffold-based culture systems, with scaffolds made from either natural or synthetic materials. There is no one particular solution that currently satisfies all requirements and researchers must select the appropriate method in line with their needs. Using such technology in conjunction with other modern resources in cell biology (e.g. human stem cells) will provide new opportunities to create robust human tissue mimetics for use in basic research and drug discovery. Application of such models will contribute to advancing basic research, increasing the predictive accuracy of compounds, and reducing animal usage in biomedical science. PMID:25411113

  10. Establishment of 3D Co-Culture Models from Different Stages of Human Tongue Tumorigenesis: Utility in Understanding Neoplastic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Sharada; Dongre, Harsh; Singh, Archana Kumari; Joshi, Shriya; Costea, Daniela Elena; Mahadik, Snehal; Ahire, Chetan; Makani, Vidhi; Dange, Prerana; Sharma, Shilpi; Chaukar, Devendra; Vaidya, Milind

    2016-01-01

    To study multistep tumorigenesis process, there is a need of in-vitro 3D model simulating in-vivo tissue. Present study aimed to reconstitute in-vitro tissue models comprising various stages of neoplastic progression of tongue tumorigenesis and to evaluate the utility of these models to investigate the role of stromal fibroblasts in maintenance of desmosomal anchoring junctions using transmission electron microscopy. We reconstituted in-vitro models representing normal, dysplastic, and malignant tissues by seeding primary keratinocytes on either fibroblast embedded in collagen matrix or plain collagen matrix in growth factor-free medium. The findings of histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses of the three types of 3D cultures showed that the stratified growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation were comparable between co-cultures and their respective native tissues; however, they largely differed in cultures grown without fibroblasts. The immunostaining intensity of proteins, viz., desmoplakin, desmoglein, and plakoglobin, was reduced as the disease stage increased in all co-cultures as observed in respective native tissues. Desmosome-like structures were identified using immunogold labeling in these cultures. Moreover, electron microscopic observations revealed that the desmosome number and their length were significantly reduced and intercellular spaces were increased in cultures grown without fibroblasts when compared with their co-culture counterparts. Our results showed that the major steps of tongue tumorigenesis can be reproduced in-vitro. Stromal fibroblasts play a role in regulation of epithelial thickness, cell proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of desmosomalanchoring junctions in in-vitro grown tissues. The reconstituted co-culture models could help to answer various biological questions especially related to tongue tumorigenesis. PMID:27501241

  11. Ionic osmolytes and intracellular calcium regulate tissue production in chondrocytes cultured in a 3D charged hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Farnsworth, Nikki L; Mead, Benjamin E; Antunez, Lorena R; Palmer, Amy E; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of fixed negative charges in regulating cartilage-like tissue production by chondrocytes under static and dynamic three-dimensional culture, and to determine whether intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) is involved in mediating this response. Initial experiments using the 3D neutral hydrogel were conducted in static isotonic culture with ionic and non-ionic osmolytes added to the culture medium. Tissue production by bovine chondrocytes with non-ionic osmolytes was 1.9-fold greater than with ionic osmolytes, suggesting that the ionic nature of the osmolyte is an important regulator of tissue production. To investigate fixed negative charges, a 3D culture system containing encapsulated chondrocytes was employed based on a synthetic and neutral hydrogel platform within which negatively charged chondroitin sulfate was incorporated in a controlled manner. Incorporation of negative charges did not affect the mechanical properties of the hydrogel; however, intracellular ion concentration was elevated from the culture medium (330 mOsm) and estimated to be similar to that in ~400 mOsm culture medium. With dynamic loading, GAG synthesis decreased by 26% in neutral hydrogels cultured in 400mOsm medium, and increased by 26% in charged gels cultured in 330 mOsm. Treatment of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM decreased GAG synthesis by 32-46% and was similar among all conditions, suggesting multiple roles for Ca(2+) mediated tissue production including with ionic osmolytes. In conclusion, findings from this study suggest that a dynamic ionic environment regulates tissue synthesis and points to [Ca(2+)]i signaling as a potential mediator. PMID:25128592

  12. Recapitulating the Tumor Ecosystem Along the Metastatic Cascade Using 3D Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyun; Tanner, Kandice

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cancer research have shown that a tumor can be likened to a foreign species that disrupts delicately balanced ecological interactions, compromising the survival of normal tissue ecosystems. In efforts to mitigate tumor expansion and metastasis, experimental approaches from ecology are becoming more frequently and successfully applied by researchers from diverse disciplines to reverse engineer and re-engineer biological systems in order to normalize the tumor ecosystem. We present a review on the use of 3D biomimetic platforms to recapitulate biotic and abiotic components of the tumor ecosystem, in efforts to delineate the underlying mechanisms that drive evolution of tumor heterogeneity, tumor dissemination, and acquisition of drug resistance. PMID:26284194

  13. Ultrafast holographic technique for 3D in situ documentation of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Susanne; Bongartz, Jens; Giel, Dominik M.; Thelen, Andrea; Hering, Peter

    2003-10-01

    A novel 3d reconstruction method for medical application has been applied for the examination and documentation of a 2000-year-old bog body. An ultra-fast pulsed holographic camera has been modified to allow imaging of the bog body from different views. Full-scale daylight copies of the master holograms give a detailed impressive three-dimensional view of the mummy and can be exhibited instead of the object. In combination with a rapid prototyping model (built by the Rapid Prototyping group of the Stiftung caesar, Bonn, Germany) derived from computer tomography (CT) data our results are an ideal basis for a future facial reconstruction.

  14. Digital Inventory and Documentation of Korea's Important Cultural Properties Using 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongseok, K.; Gyesoo, K.; Siro, K.; Eunhwa, K.

    2015-08-01

    As a country with 11 properties included on the World Heritage List and approximately 12,000 important cultural properties, Korea has been continuously carrying out the inventory and documentation of cultural properties to conserve and manage them since the 1960s. The inventory of cultural properties had been carried out by making and managing a register which recorded basic information mainly on state-designated cultural properties such as their size, quantity, and location. The documentation of cultural properties was also carried out by making measured drawings. However, the inventory and documentation done under the previous analog method had a limit to the information it could provide for the effective conservation and management of cultural properties. Moreover, in recent times important cultural properties have frequently been damaged by man-made and natural disasters such as arson, forest fires, and floods, so an alternative was required. Accordingly, Korea actively introduced digital techniques led by the government for the inventory and documentation of important cultural properties. In this process, the government established the concept of a digital set, built a more efficie nt integrated data management system, and created standardized guidelines to maximize the effectiveness of data acquisition, management, and utilization that greatly increased the level of digital inventory, documentation, and archiving.

  15. Comparison of the Expression of Hepatic Genes by Human Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured in 2D and 3D Collagen Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandeh, Zahra; Vojdani, Zahra; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Jaberipour, Mansoureh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Bahmanpour, Soghra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (HWJMSCs) express liver-specific markers such as albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, cytokeratin-19, cytokeratin-18, and glucose-6-phosphatase. Therefore, they can be considered as a good source for cell replacement therapy for liver diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of various culture systems on the hepatocyte-specific gene expression pattern of naïve HWJMSCs. Methods: HWJMSCs were characterized as MSCs by detecting the surface CD markers and capability to differentiate toward osteoblast and adipocyte. HWJMSCs were cultured in 2D collagen films and 3D collagen scaffolds for 21 days and were compared to control cultures. Real time RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of liver-specific genes. Results: The HWJMSCs which were grown on non-coated culture plates expressed cytokeratin-18 and -19, alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, glucose-6-phosphatase, and claudin. The expression of the hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) was very low. The cells showed a significant increase in caludin expression when they cultured in 3D collagen scaffolds compared to the conventional monolayer culture and 2D collagen scaffold. Conclusion: Various culture systems did not influence on hepatocyte specific marker expression by HWJMSCs, except for claudin. The expression of claudin showed that 3D collagen scaffold provided the extracellular matrix for induction of the cells to interconnect with each other. PMID:26722142

  16. Flexible simulation strategy for modeling 3D cultural objects based on multisource remotely sensed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guienko, Guennadi; Levin, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    New ideas and solutions never come alone. Although automated feature extraction is not sufficiently mature to move from the realm of scientific investigation into the category of production technology, a new goal has arisen: 3D simulation of real-world objects, extracted from images. This task, which evolved from feature extraction and is not an easy task itself, becomes even more complex, multi-leveled, and often uncertain and fuzzy when one exploits time-sequenced multi-source remotely sensed visual data. The basic components of the process are familiar image processing tasks: fusion of various types of imagery, automatic recognition of objects, removng those objects from the source images, and replacing them in the images with their realistic simulated "twin" object rendering. This paper discusses how to aggregate the most appropriate approach to each task into one technological process in order to develop a Manipulator for Visual Simulation of 3D objects (ManVIS) that is independent or imagery/format/media. The technology could be made general by combining a number of competent special purpose algorithms under appropriate contextual, geometric, spatial, and temporal constraints derived from a-priori knowledge. This could be achieved by planning the simulation in an Open Structure Simulation Strategy Manager (O3SM) a distinct component of ManVIS building the simulation strategy before beginning actual image manipulation.

  17. Recording, Visualization and Documentation of 3D Spatial Data for Monitoring Topography in Areas of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelakis, Emmanouel; Konstantaras, Antonios; Axaridou, Anastasia; Chrysakis, Ioannis; Xinogalos, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    This research investigates the application of new system for 3D documentation of land degradation and its effect [1,2] on areas of cultural heritage via complete 3D data acquisition, 3D modeling and metadata recording using terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) [3,4,5]. As land degradation progresses through time it is important to be able to map and exactly replicate with great precision the entire 3D shape of the physical objects of interest, such as landslides, ground erosion, river boundaries, mad accumulation, etc. [1,2] TLS enables the extraction and recording of a very large number of points in space with great precision and without the need for any physical contact with the object of interest. Field specialists can then examine the produced models and comment on them both on the overall object of interest and on specific features of it by inserting annotations on certain parts of the model [6]. This process could be proven to be very cost effective as it can be repeated as often as necessary and produce a well catalogued documentation of the progress of land degradation at particular areas. The problem with repeating TLS models lies on the various types of hardware equipment and software systems that might be used for the extraction of point clouds, and the different people that might be called to analyze the findings. These often result in a large volume of interim and final products with little if no standardization, multiple different metadata and vague documentation [7], which makes metadata recordings [8] crucial both for one scientist to be able to follow upon the work of the other as well as being able to repeat the same work when deemed necessary. This makes the need for a repository tool proposed by the authors essential in order to record all work that is done in every TLS scanning, and makes the technology accessible to scientists of various different fields [9,10], eg. geologists, physicists, topographers, remote sensing engineers, archaeologists etc

  18. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on Growth of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D and Monolayer Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Forouharmehr, Ali; Harkinezhad, Taher; Qasemi-Panahi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many studies have been showed transfer of aflatoxins, toxins produced by Aspergillus flvaus and Aspergillus parasiticus fungi, into milk. These toxins are transferred into the milk through digestive system by eating contaminated food. Due to the toxicity of these materials, it seems that it has side effects on the growth of mammary cells. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigate possible toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on bovine mammary epithelial cells in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Methods: Specimens of the mammary tissue of bovine were sized out in size 2×2 cm in slaughterhouse. After disinfection and washing in sterile PBS, primary cell culture was performed by enzymatic digestion of tissue with collagenase. When proper numbers of cells were achieved in monolayer culture, cells were seeded in a 24-well culture plate for three-dimensional (3D) culture in Matrigel matrix. After 21 days of 3D culture and reaching the required number of cells, the concentrations of 15, 25 and 35 µL of AFB1 were added to the culture in quadruplicate and incubated for 8 hours. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay and finally, any change in the morphology of the cells was studied by microscopic technique. Results: Microscopic investigations showed necrosis of the AFB1-exposed cells compared to the control cells. Also, bovine mammary epithelial cells were significantly affected by AFB1 in dose and time dependent manner in cell viability assays. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that AFB1 can induce cytotoxicity and necrosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:24312827

  19. A simple, low-cost staining method for rapid-throughput analysis of tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Eckerdt, Frank; Alvarez, Angel; Bell, Jonathan; Arvanitis, Constadina; Iqbal, Asneha; Arslan, Ahmet D.; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Goldman, Stewart; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are becoming an important tool for the investigation of cancer stem cell (CSC) function in tumors; thus, low-cost and high-throughput methods for drug screening of tumor spheroids are needed. Using neurospheres as non-adherent three-dimensional (3-D) cultures, we developed a simple, low-cost acridine orange (AO)–based method that allows for rapid analysis of live neurospheres by fluorescence microscopy in a 96-well format. This assay measures the cross-section area of a spheroid, which corresponds to cell viability. Our novel method allows rapid screening of a panel of anti-proliferative drugs to assess inhibitory effects on the growth of cancer stem cells in 3-D cultures. PMID:26757811

  20. Culturing thick brain slices: An interstitial 3D microperfusion system for enhanced viability

    PubMed Central

    Rambani, Komal; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; Potter, Steve M.

    2009-01-01

    Brain slice preparations are well-established models for a wide spectrum of in vitro investigations in the neuroscience discipline. However, these investigations are limited to acute preparations or thin organotypic culture preparations due to the lack of a successful method that allows culturing of thick organotypic brain slices. Thick brain slice cultures suffer necrosis due to ischemia deep in the tissue resulting from a destroyed circulatory system and subsequent diffusion-limited supply of nutrients and oxygen. Although thin organotypic brain slice cultures can be successfully cultured using a well established roller tube method (a monolayer organotypic culture) (Gahwiler B H, 1981) or a membrane insert method (up to 1–4 cell layers, <150μm)(Stoppini L et al., 1991), these methods fail to support thick tissue preparations. A few perfusion methods (using submerged or interface/microfluidic chambers) have been reported to enhance the longevity (up to few hours) of acute slice preparations (up to 600μm thick) (Hass H L et al., 1979; Nicoll R A and Alger B E, 1981; Passeraub P A et al., 2003). Here, we report a unique interstitial microfluidic perfusion technique to culture thick (700μm) organotypic brain slices. The design of the custom-made micro-perfusion chamber facilitates laminar, interstitial perfusion of oxygenated nutrient medium throughout the tissue thickness with concomitant removal of depleted medium and catabolites. We examined the utility of this perfusion method to enhance the viability of the thick organotypic brain slice cultures after 2 days and 5 days in vitro (DIV). We investigated the range of amenable flow rates that enhance the viability of 700μm thick organotypic brain slices compared to the unperfused control cultures. Our perfusion method allows up to 84.6% viability (P<0.01) and up to 700μm thickness, even after 5 DIV. Our results also confirm that these cultures are functionally active and have their in vivo cytoarchitecture

  1. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  2. Advances in the formation, use and understanding of multi-cellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Toni-Marie; Meyer, Julia; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Developing in vitro models for studying cell biology and cell physiology is of great importance to the fields of biotechnology, cancer research, drug discovery, toxicity testing, as well as the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Traditional two dimensional (2D) methods of mammalian cell culture have several limitations and it is increasingly recognized that cells grown in a three dimensional (3D) environment more closely represent normal cellular function due to the increased cell-to-cell interactions, and by mimicking the in vivo architecture of natural organs and tissues. Areas Covered In this review, we discuss the methods to form 3D multi-cellular spheroids, the advantages and limitations of these methods, and assays used to characterize the function of spheroids. The use of spheroids has led to many advances in basic cell sciences, including understanding cancer cell interactions, creating models for drug discovery and cancer metastasis, and they are being investigated as basic units for engineering tissue constructs. As so, this review will focus on contributions made to each of these fields using spheroid models. Expert Opinion Multi-cellular spheroids are rich in biological content and mimic better the in vivo environment than 2D cell culture. New technologies to form and analyze spheroids are rapidly increasing their adoption and expanding their applications. PMID:22784238

  3. Web-based Visualization and Query of semantically segmented multiresolution 3D Models in the Field of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, M.; Agugiaro, G.; Billen, N.; Loos, L.; Zipf, A.

    2014-05-01

    Many important Cultural Heritage sites have been studied over long periods of time by different means of technical equipment, methods and intentions by different researchers. This has led to huge amounts of heterogeneous "traditional" datasets and formats. The rising popularity of 3D models in the field of Cultural Heritage in recent years has brought additional data formats and makes it even more necessary to find solutions to manage, publish and study these data in an integrated way. The MayaArch3D project aims to realize such an integrative approach by establishing a web-based research platform bringing spatial and non-spatial databases together and providing visualization and analysis tools. Especially the 3D components of the platform use hierarchical segmentation concepts to structure the data and to perform queries on semantic entities. This paper presents a database schema to organize not only segmented models but also different Levels-of-Details and other representations of the same entity. It is further implemented in a spatial database which allows the storing of georeferenced 3D data. This enables organization and queries by semantic, geometric and spatial properties. As service for the delivery of the segmented models a standardization candidate of the OpenGeospatialConsortium (OGC), the Web3DService (W3DS) has been extended to cope with the new database schema and deliver a web friendly format for WebGL rendering. Finally a generic user interface is presented which uses the segments as navigation metaphor to browse and query the semantic segmentation levels and retrieve information from an external database of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI).

  4. An Interdisciplinary Conservation Module for Condition Survey on Cultural Heritages with a 3d Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedelì, C.

    2013-07-01

    In order to make the most of the digital outsourced documents, based on new technologies (e.g.: 3D LASER scanners, photogrammetry, etc.), a new approach was followed and a new ad hoc information system was implemented. The obtained product allow to the final user to reuse and manage the digital documents providing graphic tools and an integrated specific database to manage the entire documentation and conservation process, starting from the condition assessment until the conservation / restoration work. The system is organised on two main modules: Archaeology and Conservation. This paper focus on the features and the advantages of the second one. In particular it is emphasized its logical organisation, the possibility to easily mapping by using a very precise 3D metric platform, to benefit of the integrated relational database which allows to well organise, compare, keep and manage different kind of information at different level. Conservation module can manage along the time the conservation process of a site, monuments, object or excavation and conservation work in progress. An alternative approach called OVO by the author of this paper, force the surveyor to observe and describe the entity decomposing it on functional components, materials and construction techniques. Some integrated tools as the "ICOMOS-ISCS Illustrated glossary … " help the user to describe pathologies with a unified approach and terminology. Also the conservation project phase is strongly supported to envision future intervention and cost. A final section is devoted to record the conservation/restoration work already done or in progress. All information areas of the conservation module are interconnected to each other to allows to the system a complete interchange of graphic and alphanumeric data. The conservation module it self is connected to the archaeological one to create an interdisciplinary daily tool.

  5. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  6. High-Throughput Microfluidic Platform for 3D Cultures of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Towards Engineering Developmental Processes.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, Paola; Centola, Matteo; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Redaelli, Alberto; Martin, Ivan; Rasponi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The development of in vitro models to screen the effect of different concentrations, combinations and temporal sequences of morpho-regulatory factors on stem/progenitor cells is crucial to investigate and possibly recapitulate developmental processes with adult cells. Here, we designed and validated a microfluidic platform to (i) allow cellular condensation, (ii) culture 3D micromasses of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSCs) under continuous flow perfusion, and (ii) deliver defined concentrations of morphogens to specific culture units. Condensation of hBM-MSCs was obtained within 3 hours, generating micromasses in uniform sizes (56.2 ± 3.9 μm). As compared to traditional macromass pellet cultures, exposure to morphogens involved in the first phases of embryonic limb development (i.e. Wnt and FGF pathways) yielded more uniform cell response throughout the 3D structures of perfused micromasses (PMMs), and a 34-fold higher percentage of proliferating cells at day 7. The use of a logarithmic serial dilution generator allowed to identify an unexpected concentration of TGFβ3 (0.1 ng/ml) permissive to hBM-MSCs proliferation and inductive to chondrogenesis. This proof-of-principle study supports the described microfluidic system as a tool to investigate processes involved in mesenchymal progenitor cells differentiation, towards a 'developmental engineering' approach for skeletal tissue regeneration. PMID:25983217

  7. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  8. In vitro 3-D model based on extending time of culture for studying chronological epidermis aging.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Metral, Elodie; Boher, Aurélie; Rousselle, Patricia; Thepot, Amélie; Damour, Odile

    2015-09-01

    Skin aging is a complex phenomenon in which several mechanisms operate simultaneously. Among them, intrinsic aging is a time-dependent process, which leads to gradual skin changes affecting its structure and function such as thinning down of both epidermal and dermal compartments and a flattening and fragility of the dermo-epidermal junction. Today, several approaches have been proposed for the generation of aged skin in vitro, including skin explants from aged donors and three-dimensional skin equivalent treated by aging-inducing chemical compounds or engineered with human cells isolated from aged donors. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new in vitro model of aging based on skin equivalent demonstrating the same phenotypic changes that were observed in chronological aging. By using prolonged culture as a proxy for cellular aging, we extended to 120 days the culture time of a skin equivalent model based on collagen-glycosaminoglycan-chitosan porous polymer and engineered with human skin cells from photo-protected sites of young donors. Morphological, immunohistological and ultrastructural analysis at different time points of the culture allowed characterizing the phenotypic changes observed in our model in comparison to samples of non photo-exposed normal human skin from different ages. We firstly confirmed that long-term cultured skin equivalents are still morphologically consistent and functionally active even after 120 days of culture. However, similar to in vivo chronological skin aging a significant decrease of the epidermis thickness as well as the number of keratinocyte expressing proliferation marker Ki67 are observed in extended culture time skin equivalent. Epidermal differentiation markers loricrin, filaggrin, involucrin and transglutaminase, also strongly decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of basement membrane showed typical features of aged skin such as duplication of lamina densa and alterations of hemidesmosomes. Moreover, the

  9. Responsive culture platform to examine the influence of microenvironmental geometry on cell function in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Kloxin, April M.; Lewis, Katherine J. R.; DeForest, Cole A.; Seedorf, Gregory; Tibbitt, Mark W.; Balasubramaniam, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development of a well-based cell culture platform that enables experimenters to control the geometry and connectivity of cellular microenvironments spatiotemporally. The base material is a hydrogel comprised of photolabile and enzyme-labile crosslinks and pendant cell adhesion sequences, enabling spatially-specific, in situ patterning with light and cell-dictated microenvironment remodeling through enzyme secretion. Arrays of culture wells of varying shape and size were patterned into the hydrogel surface using photolithography, where well depth was correlated with irradiation dose. The geometry of these devices can be subsequently modified through sequential patterning, while simultaneously monitoring changes in cell geometry and connectivity. Towards establishing the utility of these devices for dynamic evaluation of the influence of physical cues on tissue morphogenesis, the effect of well shape on lung epithelial cell differentiation (i.e., primary mouse alveolar type II cells, ATII cells) was assessed. Shapes inspired by alveoli were degraded into hydrogel surfaces. ATII cells were seeded within the well-based arrays and encapsulated by the addition of a top hydrogel layer. Cell differentiation in response to these geometries was characterized over 7 days of culture with immunocytochemistry (surfactant protein C, ATII; T1α protein, alveolar type I (ATI) differentiated epithelial cells) and confocal image analysis. Individual cell clusters were further connected by eroding channels between wells during culture via controlled two-photon irradiation. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the development and utility of responsive hydrogel culture devices to study how a range of microenvironment geometries of evolving shape and connectivity might influence or direct cell function. PMID:23138879

  10. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses. PMID:26562056

  11. The Representation of Cultural Heritage from Traditional Drawing to 3d Survey: the Case Study of Casamary's Abbey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canciani, M.; Saccone, M.

    2016-06-01

    In 3D survey the aspects most discussed in the scientific community are those related to the acquisition of data from integrated survey (laser scanner, photogrammetric, topographic and traditional direct), rather than those relating to the interpretation of the data. Yet in the methods of traditional representation, the data interpretation, such as that of the philological reconstruction, constitutes the most important aspect. It is therefore essential in modern systems of survey and representation, filter the information acquired. In the system, based on the integrated survey that we have adopted, the 3D object, characterized by a cloud of georeferenced points, defined but their color values, defines the core of the elaboration. It allows to carry out targeted analysis, using section planes as a tool of selection and filtering data, comparable with those of traditional drawings. In the case study of the Abbey of Casamari (Veroli), one of the most important Cistercian Settlement in Italy, the survey made for an Agreement with the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism (MiBACT) and University of RomaTre, within the project "Accessment of the sismic safety of the state museum", the reference 3D model, consisting of the superposition and geo-references data from various surveys, is the tool with which yo develop representative models comparable to traditional ones. It provides the necessary spatial environment for drawing up plans and sections with a definition such as to develop thematic analysis related to phases of construction, state of deterioration and structural features.

  12. Recording, Visualization and Documentation of 3D Spatial Data for Monitoring Topography in Areas of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelakis, Emmanouel; Konstantaras, Antonios; Axaridou, Anastasia; Chrysakis, Ioannis; Xinogalos, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    This research investigates the application of new system for 3D documentation of land degradation and its effect [1,2] on areas of cultural heritage via complete 3D data acquisition, 3D modeling and metadata recording using terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) [3,4,5]. As land degradation progresses through time it is important to be able to map and exactly replicate with great precision the entire 3D shape of the physical objects of interest, such as landslides, ground erosion, river boundaries, mad accumulation, etc. [1,2] TLS enables the extraction and recording of a very large number of points in space with great precision and without the need for any physical contact with the object of interest. Field specialists can then examine the produced models and comment on them both on the overall object of interest and on specific features of it by inserting annotations on certain parts of the model [6]. This process could be proven to be very cost effective as it can be repeated as often as necessary and produce a well catalogued documentation of the progress of land degradation at particular areas. The problem with repeating TLS models lies on the various types of hardware equipment and software systems that might be used for the extraction of point clouds, and the different people that might be called to analyze the findings. These often result in a large volume of interim and final products with little if no standardization, multiple different metadata and vague documentation [7], which makes metadata recordings [8] crucial both for one scientist to be able to follow upon the work of the other as well as being able to repeat the same work when deemed necessary. This makes the need for a repository tool proposed by the authors essential in order to record all work that is done in every TLS scanning, and makes the technology accessible to scientists of various different fields [9,10], eg. geologists, physicists, topographers, remote sensing engineers, archaeologists etc

  13. Role of differential physical properties in emergent behavior of 3D cell co-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbman, Dan; Das, Moumita

    2015-03-01

    The biophysics of binary cell populations is of great interest in many biological processes, whether the formation of embryos or the initiation of tumors. During these processes, cells are surrounded by other cell types with different physical properties, often with important consequences. For example, recent experiments on a co-culture of breast cancer cells and healthy breast epithelial cells suggest that the mechanical mismatch between the two cell types may contribute to enhanced migration of the cancer cells. Here we explore how the differential physical properties of different cell types may influence cell-cell interaction, aggregation, and migration. To this end, we study a proof of concept model- a three-dimensional binary system of interacting, active, and deformable particles with different physical properties such as elastic stiffness, contractility, and particle-particle adhesion, using Langevin Dynamics simulations. Our results may provide insights into emergent behavior such as segregation and differential migration in cell co-cultures in three dimensions.

  14. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  15. Assessment of different 3D culture systems to study tumor phenotype and chemosensitivity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zeeberg, Katrine; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Greco, Maria Raffaella; Saccomano, Mara; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Alves, Frauke; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly malignant disease with a very poor prognosis, due to the influence of the tumor stroma, which promotes tumor growth, early invasion and chemoradiation resistance. Efforts to develop models for identifying novel anticancer therapeutic compounds have been hampered by the limited ability of in vitro models to mimic these in vivo tumor-stroma interactions. This has led to the development of various three-dimensional (3D) culture platforms recapitulating the in vivo tumor-stroma crosstalk and designed to better understand basic cancer processes and screen drug action. However, a consensus for different experimental 3D platforms is still missing in PDAC. We compared four PDAC cell lines of different malignancy grown in 2D monolayers to three of the more commonly used 3D techniques (ultralow adhesion concave microwells, Matrigel inclusion and organotypic systems) and to tumors derived from their orthotopic implantation in mice. In these 3D platforms, we observed that cells grow with very different tumor morphologies and the organotypic setting most closely resembles the tumor cytoarchitecture obtained by orthotopically implanting the four cell lines in mice. We then analyzed the molecular and cellular responses of one of these cell lines to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) stimulation with EGF and inhibition with erlotinib and found that only in the 3D platforms, and especially the organotypic, cells: i) responded to EGF by changing the expression of signalling components underlying cell-stroma crosstalk and tissue architecture, growth, invasion and drug resistance (E-cadherin, EGFR, ezrin, β1 integrin, NHERF1 and HIF-1α) similar to those reported in vivo; ii) had stimulated growth and increased erlotinib sensitivity in response to EGF, more faithfully mimicking their known in vivo behaviour. Altogether, these results, indicate the organotypic as the most relevant physiological 3D system to study the

  16. Engineering a High-Throughput 3-D In Vitro Glioblastoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yantao; Avci, Naze G.; Nguyen, Duong T.; Dragomir, Andrei; Xu, Feng; Akay, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumor in adults because of its highly invasive behavior. The existing treatment for GBM, which involves a combination of resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, has a very limited success rate with a median survival rate of <1 year. This is mainly because of the failure of early detection and effective treatment. We designed a novel 3-D GBM cell culture model based on microwells that could mimic in vitro environment and help to bypass the lack of suitable animal models for preclinical toxicity tests. Microwells were fabricated from simple and inexpensive polyethylene glycol material for the control of in vitro 3-D culture. We applied the 3-D micropatterning system to GBM (U-87) cells using the photolithography technique to control the cell spheroids’ shape, size, and thickness. Our preliminary results suggested that uniform GBM spheroids can be formed in 3-D, and the size of these GBM spheroids depends on the size of microwells. The viability of the spheroids generated in this manner was quantitatively evaluated using live/dead assay and shown to improve over 21 days. We believe that in vitro 3-D cell culture model could help to reduce the time of the preclinical brain tumor growth studies. The proposed novel platform could be useful and cost-effective for high-throughput screening of cancer drugs and assessment of treatment responses. PMID:27170911

  17. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.

  18. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than thosemore » in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.« less

  19. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. These findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures. PMID:26323570

  20. Low cost production of 3D-printed devices and electrostimulation chambers for the culture of primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Wardyn, Joanna D; Sanderson, Chris; Swan, Laura E; Stagi, Massimiliano

    2015-08-15

    The analysis of primary neurons is a basic requirement for many areas of neurobiology. However, the range of commercial systems available for culturing primary neurons is functionally limiting, and the expense of these devices is a barrier to both exploratory and large-scale studies. This is especially relevant as primary neurons often require unusual geometries and specialised coatings for optimum growth. Fortunately, the recent revolution in 3D printing offers the possibility to generate customised devices, which can support neuronal growth and constrain neurons in defined paths, thereby enabling many aspects of neuronal physiology to be studied with relative ease. In this article, we provide a detailed description of the system hardware and software required to produce affordable 3D-printed culture devices, which are also compatible with live-cell imaging. In addition, we also describe how to use these devices to grow and stimulate neurons within geometrically constrained compartments and provide examples to illustrate the practical utility and potential that these protocols offer for many aspects of experimental neurobiology. PMID:25962333

  1. Low cost production of 3D-printed devices and electrostimulation chambers for the culture of primary neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wardyn, Joanna D.; Sanderson, Chris; Swan, Laura E.; Stagi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of primary neurons is a basic requirement for many areas of neurobiology. However, the range of commercial systems available for culturing primary neurons is functionally limiting, and the expense of these devices is a barrier to both exploratory and large-scale studies. This is especially relevant as primary neurons often require unusual geometries and specialised coatings for optimum growth. Fortunately, the recent revolution in 3D printing offers the possibility to generate customised devices, which can support neuronal growth and constrain neurons in defined paths, thereby enabling many aspects of neuronal physiology to be studied with relative ease. In this article, we provide a detailed description of the system hardware and software required to produce affordable 3D-printed culture devices, which are also compatible with live-cell imaging. In addition, we also describe how to use these devices to grow and stimulate neurons within geometrically constrained compartments and provide examples to illustrate the practical utility and potential that these protocols offer for many aspects of experimental neurobiology. PMID:25962333

  2. Coaxial electrospray of liquid core-hydrogel shell microcapsules for encapsulation and miniaturized 3D culture of pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuting; Agarwal, Pranay; Rao, Wei; Huang, Haishui; Zhang, Renliang; Liu, Zhenguo; Yu, Jianhua; Weisleder, Noah; Zhang, Wujie; He, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    A novel coaxial electrospray technology is developed to generate microcapsules with a hydrogel shell of alginate and an aqueous liquid core of living cells using two aqueous fluids in one step. Approximately 50 murine embryonic stem (ES) cells encapsulated in the core with high viability (92.3 ± 2.9%) can proliferate to form a single ES cell aggregate of 128.9 ± 17.4 μm in each microcapsule within 7 days. Quantitative analyses of gene and protein expression indicate that ES cells cultured in the miniaturized 3D liquid core of the core-shell microcapsules have significantly higher pluripotency on average than the cells cultured on 2D substrate or in the conventional 3D alginate hydrogel microbeads without a core-shell architecture. The higher pluripotency is further suggested by their significantly higher capability of differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes and higher expression of cardiomyocyte specific gene markers on average after directed differentiation under the same conditions. Considering its wide availability, easiness to set up and operate, reusability, and high production rate, the novel coaxial electrospray technology together with the microcapsule system is of importance for mass production of ES cells with high pluripotency to facilitate translation of the emerging pluripotent stem cell-based regenerative medicine into the clinic. PMID:25036382

  3. Influence of electrical stimulation on 3D-cultures of adipose tissue derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs) behavior.

    PubMed

    Castells-Sala, C; Sanchez, B; Recha-Sancho, L; Puig, V; Bragos, R; Semino, C E

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has a fundamental role in regenerative medicine. Still today, the major motivation for cardiac regeneration is to design a platform that enables the complete tissue structure and physiological function regeneration of injured myocardium areas. Although tissue engineering approaches have been generally developed for two-dimensional (2D) culture systems, three-dimensional (3D) systems are being spotlighted as the means to mimic better in vivo cellular conditions. This manuscript examines the influence of electrical stimulation on 3D cultures of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs). ATDPCs cells were encapsulated into a self-assembling peptide nanoscaffold (RAD16-I) and continuously electro stimulated during 14-20 days with 2-ms pulses of 50mV/cm at a frequency of 1 Hz. Good cellular network formation and construct diameter reduction was observed in electro stimulated samples. Importantly, the process of electro stimulation does not disrupt cell viability or connectivity. As a future outlook, differentiation studies to cardiomyocytes-like cells will be performed analyzing gene profile and protein expression. PMID:23367213

  4. [Novel methods for studies of testicular development and spermatogenesis: From 2D to 3D culture].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-dong; Li, He-cheng; Zhang, Tong-dian; Wang, Zi-ming

    2016-03-01

    The two-dimensional model of cell culture is an important method in the study of testicular development and spermatogenesis but can not effectively mimic and regulate the testicular microenvironment and the whole process of spermatogenesis due to the lack of relevant cell factors and the disruption of a three-dimensional spatial structure. In the past 20 years, the development and optimization of the in vitro model such as testis organotypic culture and in vivo model such as testis transplantation achieved a transformation from two- to three-dimension. The maintenance and optimization of the testicular niche structure could mimic the testicular microenvironment and cell types including Leydig, Sertoli and germ cells, which showed similar biological behaviors to those in vivo. Besides, the cell suspension or tissue fragment floats in the gas-liquid interface so that the development of somatic and germ cells is well maintained in vitro whilst the feedback linkage between grafted testis tissue and hypothalamus-pituitary of the host rebuilt in the in vitro model provides an endocrinological basis for spermatogenesis, which serves as an effective methodology to better understand the organogenesis and development of the testis as well as testicular function regulation, advancing the concept of treatment of male infertility. Al- though each of the methods may have its limitations, the progress in the processing, freezing, thawing, and transplantation of cells and tissues will surely promote their clinical application and present their value in translational medicine. PMID:27172668

  5. Testing the Low-Cost Rpas Potential in 3d Cultural Heritage Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, M.; Furini, A.; Russo, V.; Pellegrinelli, A.; Russo, P.

    2015-02-01

    In order to analyze the potential as well as the limitations of low-cost RPAS photogrammetric systems for architectural cultural heritage reconstruction, some tests were performed by a small RPAS equipped with an ultralight camera. The tests were carried out in a site of remarkable historical interest. A great amount of images were taken with camera's optical axis in vertical and oblique position. Images were processed by the commercial software PhotoScan of Agisoft and numerous models were realized, each of them was compared with an accurate TLS model used as a reference. The test, despite some problems found, has provided good results in terms of accuracy (average error <2cm) and reliability.

  6. Impact assessment of repeated exposure of organotypic 3D bronchial and nasal tissue culture models to whole cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Diana; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Dulize, Remi; Baumer, Karine; Iskandar, Anita; Boue, Stephanie; Martin, Florian; Kostadinova, Radina; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Frentzel, Stefan; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has a major impact on lung biology and may result in the development of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms of disease development, it would be important to examine the impact of CS exposure directly on lung tissues. However, this approach is difficult to implement in epidemiological studies because lung tissue sampling is complex and invasive. Alternatively, tissue culture models can facilitate the assessment of exposure impacts on the lung tissue. Submerged 2D cell cultures, such as normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell cultures, have traditionally been used for this purpose. However, they cannot be exposed directly to smoke in a similar manner to the in vivo exposure situation. Recently developed 3D tissue culture models better reflect the in vivo situation because they can be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Their basal sides are immersed in the culture medium; whereas, their apical sides are exposed to air. Moreover, organotypic tissue cultures that contain different type of cells, better represent the physiology of the tissue in vivo. In this work, the utilization of an in vitro exposure system to expose human organotypic bronchial and nasal tissue models to mainstream CS is demonstrated. Ciliary beating frequency and the activity of cytochrome P450s (CYP) 1A1/1B1 were measured to assess functional impacts of CS on the tissues. Furthermore, to examine CS-induced alterations at the molecular level, gene expression profiles were generated from the tissues following exposure. A slight increase in CYP1A1/1B1 activity was observed in CS-exposed tissues compared with air-exposed tissues. A network-and transcriptomics-based systems biology approach was sufficiently robust to demonstrate CS-induced alterations of xenobiotic metabolism that were similar to those observed in the bronchial and nasal epithelial cells obtained from smokers. PMID:25741927

  7. Impact Assessment of Repeated Exposure of Organotypic 3D Bronchial and Nasal Tissue Culture Models to Whole Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Diana; Majeed, Shoaib; Guedj, Emmanuel; Dulize, Remi; Baumer, Karine; Iskandar, Anita; Boue, Stephanie; Martin, Florian; Kostadinova, Radina; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Frentzel, Stefan; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) has a major impact on lung biology and may result in the development of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer. To understand the underlying mechanisms of disease development, it would be important to examine the impact of CS exposure directly on lung tissues. However, this approach is difficult to implement in epidemiological studies because lung tissue sampling is complex and invasive. Alternatively, tissue culture models can facilitate the assessment of exposure impacts on the lung tissue. Submerged 2D cell cultures, such as normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell cultures, have traditionally been used for this purpose. However, they cannot be exposed directly to smoke in a similar manner to the in vivo exposure situation. Recently developed 3D tissue culture models better reflect the in vivo situation because they can be cultured at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Their basal sides are immersed in the culture medium; whereas, their apical sides are exposed to air. Moreover, organotypic tissue cultures that contain different type of cells, better represent the physiology of the tissue in vivo. In this work, the utilization of an in vitro exposure system to expose human organotypic bronchial and nasal tissue models to mainstream CS is demonstrated. Ciliary beating frequency and the activity of cytochrome P450s (CYP) 1A1/1B1 were measured to assess functional impacts of CS on the tissues. Furthermore, to examine CS-induced alterations at the molecular level, gene expression profiles were generated from the tissues following exposure. A slight increase in CYP1A1/1B1 activity was observed in CS-exposed tissues compared with air-exposed tissues. A network-and transcriptomics-based systems biology approach was sufficiently robust to demonstrate CS-induced alterations of xenobiotic metabolism that were similar to those observed in the bronchial and nasal epithelial cells obtained from smokers. PMID:25741927

  8. High-throughput imaging: Focusing in on drug discovery in 3D.

    PubMed

    Li, Linfeng; Zhou, Qiong; Voss, Ty C; Quick, Kevin L; LaBarbera, Daniel V

    2016-03-01

    3D organotypic culture models such as organoids and multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are becoming more widely used for drug discovery and toxicology screening. As a result, 3D culture technologies adapted for high-throughput screening formats are prevalent. While a multitude of assays have been reported and validated for high-throughput imaging (HTI) and high-content screening (HCS) for novel drug discovery and toxicology, limited HTI/HCS with large compound libraries have been reported. Nonetheless, 3D HTI instrumentation technology is advancing and this technology is now on the verge of allowing for 3D HCS of thousands of samples. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art high-throughput imaging systems, including hardware and software, and recent literature examples of 3D organotypic culture models employing this technology for drug discovery and toxicology screening. PMID:26608110

  9. AnaSP: a software suite for automatic image analysis of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Today, more and more biological laboratories use 3D cell cultures and tissues grown in vitro as a 3D model of in vivo tumours and metastases. In the last decades, it has been extensively established that multicellular spheroids represent an efficient model to validate effects of drugs and treatments for human care applications. However, a lack of methods for quantitative analysis limits the usage of spheroids as models for routine experiments. Several methods have been proposed in literature to perform high throughput experiments employing spheroids by automatically computing different morphological parameters, such as diameter, volume and sphericity. Nevertheless, these systems are typically grounded on expensive automated technologies, that make the suggested solutions affordable only for a limited subset of laboratories, frequently performing high content screening analysis. In this work we propose AnaSP, an open source software suitable for automatically estimating several morphological parameters of spheroids, by simply analyzing brightfield images acquired with a standard widefield microscope, also not endowed with a motorized stage. The experiments performed proved sensitivity and precision of the segmentation method proposed, and excellent reliability of AnaSP to compute several morphological parameters of spheroids imaged in different conditions. AnaSP is distributed as an open source software tool. Its modular architecture and graphical user interface make it attractive also for researchers who do not work in areas of computer vision and suitable for both high content screenings and occasional spheroid-based experiments. PMID:25737369

  10. Novel Morphologic and Genetic Analysis of Cancer Cells in a 3D Microenvironment Identifies STAT3 as a Regulator of Tumor Permeability Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Chul; Jeong, Hyobin; Son, Sung Hwa; Kim, YounHa; Han, Daeyoung; Goughnour, Peter C; Kang, Taehee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Moon, Hyo Eun; Paek, Sun Ha; Hwang, Daehee; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-03-01

    Tumor permeability is a critical determinant of drug delivery and sensitivity, but systematic methods to identify factors that perform permeability barrier functions in the tumor microenvironment are not yet available. Multicellular tumor spheroids have become tractable in vitro models to study the impact of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on cellular behavior. In this study, we characterized the spheroid-forming potential of cancer cells and correlated the resulting spheroid morphologies with genetic information to identify conserved cellular processes associated with spheroid structure. Spheroids generated from 100 different cancer cell lines were classified into four distinct groups based on morphology. In particular, round and compact spheroids exhibited highly hypoxic inner cores and permeability barriers against anticancer drugs. Through systematic and correlative analysis, we reveal JAK-STAT signaling as one of the signature pathways activated in round spheroids. Accordingly, STAT3 inhibition in spheroids generated from the established cancer cells and primary glioblastoma patient-derived cells altered the rounded morphology and increased drug sensitivity. Furthermore, combined administration of the STAT3 inhibitor and 5-fluorouracil to a mouse xenograft model markedly reduced tumor growth compared with monotherapy. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the ability to integrate 3D culture and genetic profiling to determine the factors underlying the integrity of the permeability barrier in the tumor microenvironment, and may help to identify and exploit novel mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26676754

  11. Photopatterning of hydrogel scaffolds coupled to filter materials using stereolithography for perfused 3D culture of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Jaclyn A Shepard; Raman, Ritu; Chan, Vincent; Rhoads, Mary G; Raredon, Micha Sam B; Velazquez, Jeremy J; Dyer, Rachel L; Bashir, Rashid; Hammond, Paula T; Griffith, Linda G

    2015-04-01

    In vitro models that recapitulate the liver's structural and functional complexity could prolong hepatocellular viability and function to improve platforms for drug toxicity studies and understanding liver pathophysiology. Here, stereolithography (SLA) was employed to fabricate hydrogel scaffolds with open channels designed for post-seeding and perfused culture of primary hepatocytes that form 3D structures in a bioreactor. Photopolymerizable polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels were fabricated coupled to chemically activated, commercially available filters (polycarbonate and polyvinylidene fluoride) using a chemistry that permitted cell viability, and was robust enough to withstand perfused culture of up to 1 µL/s for at least 7 days. SLA energy dose, photoinitiator concentrations, and pretreatment conditions were screened to determine conditions that maximized cell viability and hydrogel bonding to the filter. Multiple open channel geometries were readily achieved, and included ellipses and rectangles. Rectangular open channels employed for subsequent studies had final dimensions on the order of 350 µm by 850 µm. Cell seeding densities and flow rates that promoted cell viability were determined. Perfused culture of primary hepatocytes in hydrogel scaffolds in the presence of soluble epidermal growth factor (EGF) prolonged the maintenance of albumin production throughout the 7-day culture relative to 2D controls. This technique of bonding hydrogel scaffolds can be employed to fabricate soft scaffolds for a number of bioreactor configurations and applications. PMID:25384798

  12. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  13. Multiplex profiling of cellular invasion in 3D cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  14. How linguistic and cultural forces shape conceptions of time: English and Mandarin time in 3D.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Orly; McCormick, Kelly; Chen, Eva; Jiang, Heidi; Shu, Dingfang; Mao, Shuaimei; Boroditsky, Lera

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine how English and Mandarin speakers think about time, and we test how the patterns of thinking in the two groups relate to patterns in linguistic and cultural experience. In Mandarin, vertical spatial metaphors are used more frequently to talk about time than they are in English; English relies primarily on horizontal terms. We present results from two tasks comparing English and Mandarin speakers' temporal reasoning. The tasks measure how people spatialize time in three-dimensional space, including the sagittal (front/back), transverse (left/right), and vertical (up/down) axes. Results of Experiment 1 show that people automatically create spatial representations in the course of temporal reasoning, and these implicit spatializations differ in accordance with patterns in language, even in a non-linguistic task. Both groups showed evidence of a left-to-right representation of time, in accordance with writing direction, but only Mandarin speakers showed a vertical top-to-bottom pattern for time (congruent with vertical spatiotemporal metaphors in Mandarin). Results of Experiment 2 confirm and extend these findings, showing that bilinguals' representations of time depend on both long-term and proximal aspects of language experience. Participants who were more proficient in Mandarin were more likely to arrange time vertically (an effect of previous language experience). Further, bilinguals were more likely to arrange time vertically when they were tested in Mandarin than when they were tested in English (an effect of immediate linguistic context). PMID:21884222

  15. Multiplex Profiling of Cellular Invasion in 3D Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  16. Establishment of 3D organotypic cultures using human neonatal epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Li, Amy; Rossi, Ralph; Kaur, Pritinder

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes an ex vivo three-dimensional coculture system optimized to study the skin regenerative ability of primary human keratinocytes grown at the air-liquid interface on collagen matrices embedded with human dermal fibroblasts. An option for enrichment of keratinocyte stem cells and their progeny using fluorescence-activated cell sorting is also provided. Initially, dermal equivalents, comprising human passaged fibroblasts seeded in a collagen matrix, are grown on porous filters (3 mum) placed in transwells. After 1 week, primary human keratinocytes are seeded on this base. One week later, an air-lift transition is performed, leading to the differentiation of the keratinocytes, which are macroscopically visible as artificial skin after a couple of days. The cultures can be harvested 1 week after the air-lift and processed for immunohistochemistry or gene expression analysis. The overall procedure can be completed in 3 weeks, including the preparation of the dermal equivalent and the seeding of the primary keratinocytes. PMID:17401352

  17. Genotoxicity assessment of reactive and disperse textile dyes using human dermal equivalent (3D cell culture system).

    PubMed

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Primo, Fernando Lucas; Gobo, Graciely Gomides; da Costa, Cleber Rafael Vieira; Tedesco, Antonio Claudio; de Oliveira, Danielle Palma

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of dyes are marketed daily for different purposes, including textile dyeing. However, there are several studies reporting attributing to dyes deleterious human effects such as DNA damage. Humans may be exposed to toxic dyes through either ingestion of contaminated waters or dermal contact with colored garments. With respect to dermal exposure, human skin equivalents are promising tools to assess in vitro genotoxicity of dermally applied chemicals using a three-dimensional (3D) model to mimic tissue behavior. This study investigated the sensitivity of an in-house human dermal equivalent (DE) for detecting genotoxicity of textile dyes. Two azo (reactive green 19 [RG19] and disperse red 1[DR1]) dyes and one anthraquinone (reactive blue 2 [RB2]) dye were analyzed. RG19 was genotoxic for DE in a dose-responsive manner, whereas RB2 and DR1 were nongenotoxic under the conditions tested. These findings are not in agreement with previous genotoxicological assessment of these dyes carried out using two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, which showed that DR1 was genotoxic in human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and RG19 was nongenotoxic for normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). These discrepant results probably may be due to differences between metabolic activities of each cell type (organ-specific genotoxicity, HepG2 and fibroblasts) and the test setup systems used in each study (fibroblasts cultured at 2D and three-dimensional [3D] culture systems). Genotoxicological assessment of textile dyes in context of organ-specific genotoxicity and using in vitro models that more closely resemble in vivo tissue architecture and physiology may provide more reliable estimates of genotoxic potential of these chemicals. PMID:25785560

  18. Assessment of the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles in an ex vivo 3D model, the murine limb bud culture system.

    PubMed

    Bigaeva, Emilia; Paradis, France-Hélène; Moquin, Alexandre; Hales, Barbara F; Maysinger, Dusica

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of nanotechnological products for biomedical applications has exacerbated the need for suitable biological tests to evaluate the potential toxic effects of nanomaterials. The possible consequences of exposure during embryo and fetal development are of particular concern. The limb bud culture is an ex vivo 3D model in which growth, cell differentiation, and tissue organization occur and both molecular and functional endpoints can be quantitatively assessed. We employed this model to assess biochemical and morphological changes induced during organogenesis by two classes of nanostructured materials: quantum dot nanocrystals and organic polyglycerol sulfate dendrimers (dPGS). We show that quantum dots carrying mercaptopropionic acid (QD-MPA) on the surface, commonly used in biological studies, inhibit the development of limb buds from CD1 wildtype and Col2a1; Col10a1; Col1a1 triple transgenic fluorescent reporter mice, as revealed by changes in several morphological and biochemical markers. QD-MPA interfere with chondrogenesis and osteogenesis and disrupt the expression of COL10A1 and COL1A1, key markers of differentiation. In contrast, equivalent (3-100 nM) concentrations of dPGS do not adversely affect limb development. Neither QD-MPA nor dPGS-Cy5 alters the expression of several markers of cell proliferation or apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that murine limb buds in culture constitute a convenient, inexpensive and reliable developmental model for the assessment of the nanotoxicological effects of nanocrystals and polymers. In these 3D cultures, any effect that is observed can be directly ascribed to the nanostructures per se or a degradation component released from the complex nanostructure. PMID:25387253

  19. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    SciTech Connect

    Foroni, Laura; Vasuri, Francesco; Valente, Sabrina; Gualandi, Chiara; Focarete, Maria Letizia; Caprara, Giacomo; Scandola, Mariastella; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea

    2013-06-10

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  20. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Theodoraki, Maria A.; Rezende, Celso O.; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.; Alpaugh, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroidsMARY-X, that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroidsMARY-X model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/−0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/−0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroidsMARY-X with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/−3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroidsMARY-X model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  1. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Rezende, Celso O; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Alpaugh, Mary L

    2015-08-28

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroids(MARY-X), that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroids(MARY-X) model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/-0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/-0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroids(MARY-X) with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/-3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroids(MARY-X) model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  2. A fully defined and scalable 3D culture system for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuguo; Schaffer, David V.

    2013-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are promising for numerous biomedical applications, such as cell replacement therapies, tissue and whole-organ engineering, and high-throughput pharmacology and toxicology screening. Each of these applications requires large numbers of cells of high quality; however, the scalable expansion and differentiation of hPSCs, especially for clinical utilization, remains a challenge. We report a simple, defined, efficient, scalable, and good manufacturing practice-compatible 3D culture system for hPSC expansion and differentiation. It employs a thermoresponsive hydrogel that combines easy manipulation and completely defined conditions, free of any human- or animal-derived factors, and entailing only recombinant protein factors. Under an optimized protocol, the 3D system enables long-term, serial expansion of multiple hPSCs lines with a high expansion rate (∼20-fold per 5-d passage, for a 1072-fold expansion over 280 d), yield (∼2.0 × 107 cells per mL of hydrogel), and purity (∼95% Oct4+), even with single-cell inoculation, all of which offer considerable advantages relative to current approaches. Moreover, the system enabled 3D directed differentiation of hPSCs into multiple lineages, including dopaminergic neuron progenitors with a yield of ∼8 × 107 dopaminergic progenitors per mL of hydrogel and ∼80-fold expansion by the end of a 15-d derivation. This versatile system may be useful at numerous scales, from basic biological investigation to clinical development.

  3. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  4. A 3D ex vivo mandible slice system for longitudinal culturing of transplanted dental pulp progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, John S.; Young, Fraser I.; Waddington, Rachel J.; Errington, Rachel J.; Sloan, Alastair J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Harnessing mesenchymal stem cells for tissue repair underpins regenerative medicine. However, how the 3D tissue matrix maintains such cells in a quiescent state whilst at the same time primed to respond to tissue damage remains relatively unknown. Developing more physiologically relevant 3D models would allow us to better understand the matrix drivers and influence on cell‐lineage differentiation in situ. In this study, we have developed an ex vivo organotypic rat mandible slice model; a technically defined platform for the culture and characterization of dental pulp progenitor cells expressing GFP driven by the β‐actin promoter (cGFP DPPCs). Using confocal microscopy we have characterized how the native environment influences the progenitor cells transplanted into the dental pulp. Injected cGFP‐DPPCs were highly viable and furthermore differentially proliferated in unique regions of the mandible slice; in the dentine region, cGFP‐DPPCs showed a columnar morphology indicative of expansion and lineage differentiation. Hence, we demonstrated the systematic capacity for establishing a dental pulp cell‐micro‐community, phenotypically modified in the tooth (the “biology”); and at the same time addressed technical challenges enabling the mandible slice to be accessible on platforms for high‐content imaging (the biology in a “multiplex” format). © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25963448

  5. Metabolic response of lung cancer cells to radiation in a paper-based 3D cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Mosadegh, Bobak; Minn, Kyaw Thu; Lockett, Matthew R; Mohammady, Marym R; Boucher, Diane M; Hall, Amy B; Hillier, Shawn M; Udagawa, Taturo; Eustace, Brenda K; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Paper (CiGiP)-in evaluating the metabolic response of lung cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The 3D tissue-like construct-prepared by stacking multiple sheets of paper containing cell-embedded hydrogels-generates a gradient of oxygen and nutrients that decreases monotonically in the stack. Separating the layers of the stack after exposure enabled analysis of the cellular response to radiation as a function of oxygen and nutrient availability; this availability is dictated by the distance between the cells and the source of oxygenated medium. As the distance between the cells and source of oxygenated media increased, cells show increased levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, decreased proliferation, and reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Each of these cellular responses are characteristic of cancer cells observed in solid tumors. With this setup we were able to differentiate three isogenic variants of A549 cells based on their metabolic radiosensitivity; these three variants have known differences in their metastatic behavior in vivo. This system can, therefore, capture some aspects of radiosensitivity of populations of cancer cells related to mass-transport phenomenon, carry out systematic studies of radiation response in vitro that decouple effects from migration and proliferation of cells, and regulate the exposure of oxygen to subpopulations of cells in a tissue-like construct either before or after irradiation. PMID:27116031

  6. A 3D ex vivo mandible slice system for longitudinal culturing of transplanted dental pulp progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Colombo, John S; Howard-Jones, Rachel A; Young, Fraser I; Waddington, Rachel J; Errington, Rachel J; Sloan, Alastair J

    2015-10-01

    Harnessing mesenchymal stem cells for tissue repair underpins regenerative medicine. However, how the 3D tissue matrix maintains such cells in a quiescent state whilst at the same time primed to respond to tissue damage remains relatively unknown. Developing more physiologically relevant 3D models would allow us to better understand the matrix drivers and influence on cell-lineage differentiation in situ. In this study, we have developed an ex vivo organotypic rat mandible slice model; a technically defined platform for the culture and characterization of dental pulp progenitor cells expressing GFP driven by the β-actin promoter (cGFP DPPCs). Using confocal microscopy we have characterized how the native environment influences the progenitor cells transplanted into the dental pulp. Injected cGFP-DPPCs were highly viable and furthermore differentially proliferated in unique regions of the mandible slice; in the dentine region, cGFP-DPPCs showed a columnar morphology indicative of expansion and lineage differentiation. Hence, we demonstrated the systematic capacity for establishing a dental pulp cell-micro-community, phenotypically modified in the tooth (the "biology"); and at the same time addressed technical challenges enabling the mandible slice to be accessible on platforms for high-content imaging (the biology in a "multiplex" format). PMID:25963448

  7. Optimization and comparison of two different 3D culture methods to prepare cell aggregates as a bioink for organ printing.

    PubMed

    Imani, Rana; Hojjati Emami, Shahriar; Fakhrzadeh, Hossein; Baheiraei, Nafiseh; Sharifi, Ali M

    2012-04-01

    The ultimate goal of tissue engineering is to design and fabricate functional human tissues that are similar to natural cells and are capable of regeneration. Preparation of cell aggregates is one of the important steps in 3D tissue engineering technology, particularly in organ printing. Two simple methods, hanging drop (HD) and conical tube (CT) were utilized to prepare cell aggregates. The size and viability of the aggregates obtained at different initial cell densities and pre-culture duration were compared. The proliferative ability of the cell aggregates and their ability to spread in culture plates were also investigated. In both methods, the optimum average size of the aggregates was less than 500 microm. CT aggregates were smaller than HD aggregates. 5,000 cells per drop HD aggregates showed a marked ability to attach and spread on the culture surface. The proliferative ability reduced when the initial cell density was increased. Comparing these methods, we found that the HD method having better size controlling ability as well as enhanced ability to maintain higher rates of viability, spreading, and proliferation. In conclusion, smaller HD aggregates might be a suitable choice as building blocks for making bioink particles in bioprinting technique. PMID:23173303

  8. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27116668

  9. Effect of Factors Secreted by the Placenta on Phenotype of THP-1 Cells Cultured on a 3D Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Lvova, T Yu; Stepanova, O I; Viazmina, L P; Okorokova, L S; Belyakova, K L; Belikova, M E; Selkov, S A; Sokolov, D I

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effects of secretory products of the placenta obtained from women with normal pregnancy and preeclampsia on the expression of surface markers by THP-1 cells cultured on a 3D Matrigel scaffold. Secretory products of third trimester placentas obtained from women with normal pregnancy reduced the relative number of THP-1 cells expressing CD54 and CD14 molecules and expression of CD14 and CD95 molecules by THP-1 cells in comparison with the effect of secretory products first trimester placentas. In parallel, the intensity of CD49d expression by THP-1 cells increased in the presence of secretory products of third trimester placentas in comparison with the first trimester. No differences in the expression of the studied molecules by THP-1 cells under the effect of placentas from women with physiological pregnancy and patients with preeclampsia were found. PMID:27259498

  10. Composite Scaffolds Containing Silk Fibroin, Gelatin, and Hydroxyapatite for Bone Tissue Regeneration and 3D Cell Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Moisenovich, M. M.; Arkhipova, A. Yu.; Orlova, A. A.; Drutskaya, M. S; Volkova, S. V.; Zacharov, S. E.; Agapov, I. I.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) silk fibroin scaffolds were modified with one of the major bone tissue derivatives (nano-hydroxyapatite) and/or a collagen derivative (gelatin). Adhesion and proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) within the scaffold were increased after modification with either nano-hydroxyapatite or gelatin. However, a significant increase in MEF adhesion and proliferation was observed when both additives were introduced into the scaffold. Such modified composite scaffolds provide a new and better platform to study wound healing, bone and other tissue regeneration, as well as artificial organ bioengineering. This system can further be applied to establish experimental models to study cell-substrate interactions, cell migration and other complex processes, which may be difficult to address using the conventional two-dimensional culture systems. PMID:24772332

  11. 3D Organotypic Co-culture Model Supporting Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cell Proliferation, Differentiation and Promiscuous Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sheena; Stark, Hans-Jürgen; Martin, Iris; Boukamp, Petra; Kyewski, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Intra-thymic T cell development requires an intricate three-dimensional meshwork composed of various stromal cells, i.e., non-T cells. Thymocytes traverse this scaffold in a highly coordinated temporal and spatial order while sequentially passing obligatory check points, i.e., T cell lineage commitment, followed by T cell receptor repertoire generation and selection prior to their export into the periphery. The two major resident cell types forming this scaffold are cortical (cTECs) and medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). A key feature of mTECs is the so-called promiscuous expression of numerous tissue-restricted antigens. These tissue-restricted antigens are presented to immature thymocytes directly or indirectly by mTECs or thymic dendritic cells, respectively resulting in self-tolerance. Suitable in vitro models emulating the developmental pathways and functions of cTECs and mTECs are currently lacking. This lack of adequate experimental models has for instance hampered the analysis of promiscuous gene expression, which is still poorly understood at the cellular and molecular level. We adapted a 3D organotypic co-culture model to culture ex vivo isolated mTECs. This model was originally devised to cultivate keratinocytes in such a way as to generate a skin equivalent in vitro. The 3D model preserved key functional features of mTEC biology: (i) proliferation and terminal differentiation of CD80(lo), Aire-negative into CD80(hi), Aire-positive mTECs, (ii) responsiveness to RANKL, and (iii) sustained expression of FoxN1, Aire and tissue-restricted genes in CD80(hi) mTECs. PMID:26275017

  12. The methodology of documenting cultural heritage sites using photogrammetry, UAV, and 3D printing techniques: the case study of Asinou Church in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Ioannides, M.; Agapiou, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    As the affordability, reliability and ease-of-use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) advances, the use of aerial surveying for cultural heritage purposes becomes a popular choice, yielding an unprecedented volume of high-resolution, geo-tagged image-sets of historical sites from above. As well, recent developments in photogrammetry technology provide a simple and cost-effective method of generating relatively accurate 3D models from 2D images. These techniques provide a set of new tools for archaeologists and cultural heritage experts to capture, store, process, share, visualise and annotate 3D models in the field. This paper focuses on the methodology used to document the cultural heritage site of Asinou Church in Cyprus using various state of the art techniques, such as UAV, photogrammetry and 3D printing. Hundreds of images of the Asinou Church were taken by a UAV with an attached high resolution, low cost camera. These photographic images were then used to create a digital 3D model and a 3D printer was used to create a physical model of the church. Such a methodology provides archaeologists and cultural heritage experts a simple and cost-effective method of generating relatively accurate 3D models from 2D images of cultural heritage sites.

  13. Life in 3D is never flat: 3D models to optimise drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Curtin, Caroline M; O' Brien, Fergal J; O' Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-10

    The development of safe, effective and patient-acceptable drug products is an expensive and lengthy process and the risk of failure at different stages of the development life-cycle is high. Improved biopharmaceutical tools which are robust, easy to use and accurately predict the in vivo response are urgently required to help address these issues. In this review the advantages and challenges of in vitro 3D versus 2D cell culture models will be discussed in terms of evaluating new drug products at the pre-clinical development stage. Examples of models with a 3D architecture including scaffolds, cell-derived matrices, multicellular spheroids and biochips will be described. The ability to simulate the microenvironment of tumours and vital organs including the liver, kidney, heart and intestine which have major impact on drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and toxicity will be evaluated. Examples of the application of 3D models including a role in formulation development, pharmacokinetic profiling and toxicity testing will be critically assessed. Although utilisation of 3D cell culture models in the field of drug delivery is still in its infancy, the area is attracting high levels of interest and is likely to become a significant in vitro tool to assist in drug product development thus reducing the requirement for unnecessary animal studies. PMID:26220617

  14. Influence of Matrices on 3D-Cultured Prostate Cancer Cells' Drug Response and Expression of Drug-Action Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Rasheena; Adcock, Audrey F.; Yang, Liju

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of matrix on the behaviors of 3D-cultured cells of two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and DU145. Two biologically-derived matrices, Matrigel and Cultrex BME, and one synthetic matrix, the Alvetex scaffold, were used to culture the cells. The cell proliferation rate, cellular response to anti-cancer drugs, and expression levels of proteins associated with drug sensitivity/resistance were examined and compared amongst the 3D-cultured cells on the three matrices and 2D-cultured cells. The cellular responses upon treatment with two common anti-cancer drugs, Docetaxel and Rapamycin, were examined. The expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-III tubulin in DU145 cells and p53 in LNCaP cells were examined. The results showed that the proliferation rates of cells cultured on the three matrices varied, especially between the synthetic matrix and the biologically-derived matrices. The drug responses and the expressions of drug sensitivity-associated proteins differed between cells on various matrices as well. Among the 3D cultures on the three matrices, increased expression of β-III tubulin in DU145 cells was correlated with increased resistance to Docetaxel, and decreased expression of EGFR in DU145 cells was correlated with increased sensitivity to Rapamycin. Increased expression of a p53 dimer in 3D-cultured LNCaP cells was correlated with increased resistance to Docetaxel. Collectively, the results showed that the matrix of 3D cell culture models strongly influences cellular behaviors, which highlights the imperative need to achieve standardization of 3D cell culture technology in order to be used in drug screening and cell biology studies. PMID:27352049

  15. Cleavage of E-cadherin and β-catenin by calpain affects Wnt signaling and spheroid formation in suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Konze, Sarah A; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F R

    2014-04-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell-cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that pharmacological

  16. Cleavage of E-Cadherin and β-Catenin by Calpain Affects Wnt Signaling and Spheroid Formation in Suspension Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Konze, Sarah A.; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell–cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that

  17. Brain damage in methylmalonic aciduria: 2-methylcitrate induces cerebral ammonium accumulation and apoptosis in 3D organotypic brain cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methylmalonic aciduria is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA), propionate and 2-methylcitrate (2-MCA) in body fluids. Early diagnosis and current treatment strategies aimed at limiting the production of these metabolites are only partially effective in preventing neurological damage. Methods To explore the metabolic consequences of methylmalonic aciduria on the brain, we used 3D organotypic brain cell cultures from rat embryos. We challenged the cultures at two different developmental stages with 1 mM MMA, propionate or 2-MCA applied 6 times every 12 h. In a dose–response experiment cultures were challenged with 0.01, 0.1, 0.33 and 1 mM 2-MCA. Immunohistochemical staining for different brain cell markers were used to assess cell viability, morphology and differentiation. Significant changes were validated by western blot analysis. Biochemical markers were analyzed in culture media. Apoptosis was studied by immunofluorescence staining and western blots for activated caspase-3. Results Among the three metabolites tested, 2-MCA consistently produced the most pronounced effects. Exposure to 2-MCA caused morphological changes in neuronal and glial cells already at 0.01 mM. At the biochemical level the most striking result was a significant ammonium increase in culture media with a concomitant glutamine decrease. Dose–response studies showed significant and parallel changes of ammonium and glutamine starting from 0.1 mM 2-MCA. An increased apoptosis rate was observed by activation of caspase-3 after exposure to at least 0.1 mM 2-MCA. Conclusion Surprisingly, 2-MCA, and not MMA, seems to be the most toxic metabolite in our in vitro model leading to delayed axonal growth, apoptosis of glial cells and to unexpected ammonium increase. Morphological changes were already observed at 2-MCA concentrations as low as 0.01 mM. Increased apoptosis and ammonium accumulation started at 0.1 mM thus suggesting that ammonium

  18. A Simplified Method for Three-Dimensional (3-D) Ovarian Tissue Culture Yielding Oocytes Competent to Produce Full-Term Offspring in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Carolyn M.; Maeda, Yuuki; Horiuchi, Toshitaka; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    In vitro growth of follicles is a promising technology to generate large quantities of competent oocytes from immature follicles and could expand the potential of assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Isolated follicle culture is currently the primary method used to develop and mature follicles in vitro. However, this procedure typically requires complicated, time-consuming procedures, as well as destruction of the normal ovarian microenvironment. Here we describe a simplified 3-D ovarian culture system that can be used to mature multilayered secondary follicles into antral follicles, generating developmentally competent oocytes in vitro. Ovaries recovered from mice at 14 days of age were cut into 8 pieces and placed onto a thick Matrigel drop (3-D culture) for 10 days of culture. As a control, ovarian pieces were cultured on a membrane filter without any Matrigel drop (Membrane culture). We also evaluated the effect of activin A treatment on follicle growth within the ovarian pieces with or without Matrigel support. Thus we tested four different culture conditions: C (Membrane/activin-), A (Membrane/activin+), M (Matrigel/activin-), and M+A (Matrigel/activin+). We found that the cultured follicles and oocytes steadily increased in size regardless of the culture condition used. However, antral cavity formation occurred only in the follicles grown in the 3-D culture system (M, M+A). Following ovarian tissue culture, full-grown GV oocytes were isolated from the larger follicles to evaluate their developmental competence by subjecting them to in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Maturation and fertilization rates were higher using oocytes grown in 3-D culture (M, M+A) than with those grown in membrane culture (C, A). In particular, activin A treatment further improved 3-D culture (M+A) success. Following IVF, two-cell embryos were transferred to recipients to generate full-term offspring. In summary, this simple and easy 3-D ovarian culture

  19. 3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use. PMID:26472048

  20. A surface-tethered spheroid model for functional evaluation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul A; Harris, Lacey M; Purser, Christine A; Baker, Rodney C; Janorkar, Amol V

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively treat obesity, it must be better understood at the cellular level with respect to metabolic state and environmental stress. However, current two-dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culture methods do not represent the in vivo adipose tissue appropriately due to the absence of complex architecture and cellular signaling. Conversely, 3D in vitro cultures have been reported to have optimal results mimicking the adipose tissue in vivo. The main aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of a novel conjugate of a genetically engineered polymer, elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) and a synthetic polymer, polyethyleneimine (PEI), toward creating a 3D preadipocyte culture system. We then used this 3D culture model to study the preadipocyte differentiation and adipocyte maintenance processes when subjected to various dosages of nutritionally relevant free fatty acids with respect to total DNA and protein content, cell viability, and intracellular triglyceride accumulation. Our results showed that 3T3-L1 preadipocytes cultured on the ELP-PEI surface formed 3D spheroids within 72 h, whereas the cells cultured on unmodified tissue culture polystyrene surfaces remained in monolayer configuration. Significant statistical differences were discovered between the 3D spheroid and 2D monolayer culture with respect to the DNA and protein content, fatty acid consumption, and triglyceride accumulation, indicating differences in cellular response. Results indicated that the 3D culture may be a more sensitive modeling technique for in vitro adipocyte culture and provides a platform for future evaluation of 3D in vitro adipocyte function. PMID:24038000

  1. 3D co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes and cytoprotective effects on keratinocytes against reactive oxygen species by insect virus-derived protein microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Junji; Yamaoka, Ayako; Murata, Ken-Ichi; Kotani, Eiji; Hirano, Tomoko; Nakajima, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Goichi; Mori, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Stable protein microcrystals called polyhedra are produced by certain insect viruses. Cytokines, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), can be immobilized within polyhedra. Here, we investigated three-dimensional (3D) co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes on collagen gel containing FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra. Melanocytes were observed to reside at the base of the 3D cell culture and melanin was also typically observed in the lower layer. The 3D cell culture model with FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra was a useful in vitro model of the epidermis due to effective melanogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. FGF-7 polyhedra showed a potent cytoprotective effect when keratinocytes were treated with menadione, which is a generator of reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effect was activated by the inositol triphosphate kinase-Akt pathway leading to upregulation of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 6. PMID:25063093

  2. Investigating the neuroglial differentiation effect of neuroblastoma conditioned medium in human endometrial stem cells cultured on 3D nanofibrous scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Hoveizi, Elham; Norouzi Javidan, Abbas; Ai, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    Neural tissue engineering is an important area of research in the field of tissue-engineering especially for neurodegenerative disease such as spinal cord injury. The differentiation capacity of human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) into neuronal cells has yet to be elucidated. Here, the major aim of the present study was to investigate the differentiation ability of hEnSCs cultured on polylactic acid/chitosan (PLA/CS) nanofibrous scaffold into neuroglial cells in response to conditioned medium of BE(2)-C human neuroblastoma cells and growth factors. Here we investigated the use PLA/CS scaffold as a three dimensional (3D) system that increased neuro-glial cells differentiation. Human EnSCs after three passages were differentiated in neuro-glial like cells under neuroblastoma conditioned medium with FGF2/PDGF-AA on PLA/CS scaffold. By day 18, differentiated cells were analyzed for expression of neuroglial markers by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The results revealed that hEnSCs attach, grow and differentiation on the nanofibrous PLA/CS scaffold. Additionally, our study showed the expression of neural and glial lineage markers such as Nestin, NF-L, MAP2, PDGFRa, CNP, Olig2, MBP, and GFAP in the level of mRNA and MAP2, Tuj-1, and NF-L in the protein level after 18 days. Our results demonstrate that hEnSCs cultured on PLA/CS nanofibrous scaffold have the potential to differentiate in neuronal and glial cells in presence of neuroblastoma conditioned medium on PLA/CS scaffold. The result of this study may have impact in tissue engineering and cells-base therapy of neurodegenerative diseases and have a great potential for wide application. PMID:25611196

  3. 3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, K; Sneve, M K; Szőke, I; Mazur, I; Mark, N K; Kudrin, I; Shandala, N; Simakov, A; Smith, G M; Krasnoschekov, A; Kosnikov, A; Kemsky, I; Kryuchkov, V

    2014-12-01

    Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators. PMID:25254659

  4. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Juliany C.F.; Viana, Nathan B.; Pontes, Bruno; Pereira, Camila F.A.; Silva-Filho, Fernando C.

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D) environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I). This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model. PMID:24765565

  5. Droplet-based microfluidic system to form and separate multicellular spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Minsoo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-04-21

    The importance of creating a three-dimensional (3-D) multicellular spheroid has recently been gaining attention due to the limitations of monolayer cell culture to precisely mimic in vivo structure and cellular interactions. Due to this emerging interest, researchers have utilized new tools, such as microfluidic devices, that allow high-throughput and precise size control to produce multicellular spheroids. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic system that can encapsulate both cells and magnetic nanoparticles within alginate beads to mimic the function of a multicellular tumor spheroid. Cells were entrapped within the alginate beads along with magnetic nanoparticles, and the beads of a relatively uniform size (diameters of 85% of the beads were 170-190 μm) were formed in the oil phase. These beads were passed through parallel streamlines of oil and culture medium, where the beads were magnetically transferred into the medium phase from the oil phase using an external magnetic force. This microfluidic chip eliminates additional steps for collecting the spheroids from the oil phase and transferring them to culture medium. Ultimately, the overall spheroid formation process can be achieved on a single microchip. PMID:23426090

  6. An Application for Cultural Heritage in Erasmus Placement. Surveys and 3d Cataloging Archaeological Finds in MÉRIDA (spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, S.; Fiorillo, F.; Ortiz Coder, P.; D'Auria, S.; De Feo, E.

    2011-09-01

    Man has always had the need to live with his past, with its places and its artefacts. The reconstructions, the economical changes, the urbanization and its speculations have devastated whole cities, changed the faces of their historical centers, changed the relationship between the new and the old. Also the millenarian 'rest' of the archaeological findings, and therefore the respect towards those ancient civilizations, has been troubled. Our continent is rich in masterpieces that the modern man are not able to protect and pass on to the future, it is commonplace to observe that the modern `civilization' has cemented and suffocated the ancient city of Pompeii, or even worse, failed to protected it. Walking in the archaeological area of Paestum it can be noticed how just sixty years ago, no one had the slightest concern of fencing the amphitheatre and the Roman forum, or entire houses and shops, to lay a carpet of tar or simple to build constructions completely inferior compared to those majestic Greek temples. The engineers and the architects should be held responsible for this as based on their scientific and humanistic sensibility; they should bring together the man with his surroundings in the complete respects of the historical heritage. The interest in ancient began to change nearly three decades ago since it was realized that the "Cultural Heritage" is a major tourist attraction and, if properly managed and used, it can be an economical cornerstone. Today, thanks to survey and the 3D graphics, which provide powerful new tools, we are witnessing a new and real need for the conservation, cataloguing and enhancement as a way to revive our archaeological sites. As part of a major laboratory project, artefacts from the Roman period (I and II century b.C.), found in the Spanish city of Mérida, declared World Heritage by UNESCO in 1993, were acquired with a 3D laser scanner VIVID 910, and then catalogued. Based on these brief comments we wanted to direct the work

  7. Interactions among Lung Cancer Cells, Fibroblasts, and Macrophages in 3D Co-Cultures and the Impact on MMP-1 and VEGF Expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-qing; Kiefl, Rosemarie; Roskopf, Claudia; Tian, Fei; Huber, Rudolf M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro cell-based models of lung cancer are frequently employed to study invasion and the mechanisms behind metastasis. However, these models often study only one cell type with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell cultures, which do not accurately reflect the complexity of inflammation in vivo. Here, a three-dimensional (3D) cell co-culture collagen gel model was employed, containing human lung adenocarcinoma cells (HCC), human lung fibroblast cells (MRC-5), and macrophages. Cell culture media and cell images were collected, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production was monitored under different cell culture conditions. We found that simulating hypoxia and/or serum starvation conditions induced elevated secretion of VEGF in the 3D co-culture model in vitro, but not MMP-1; the morphology of HCC in the 2D versus the 3D co-culture system was extremely different. MMP-1 and VEGF were secreted at higher levels in mixed cell groups rather than mono-culture groups. Therefore, incorporating lung cancer cells, fibroblasts, and macrophages may better reflect physiological metastasis mechanisms compared to mono-culture systems. Tumour stromal cells, macrophages, and fibroblast cells may promote invasion and metastasis, which also provides a new direction for the design of therapies targeted at destroying the stroma of tumor tissues. PMID:27232698

  8. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Wehland, Markus; Slumstrup, Lasse; Kopp, Sascha; Warnke, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Anita; Magnusson, Nils E.; Pietsch, Jessica; Corydon, Thomas J.; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D) growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS) and spheroid non-forming (AD) thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line) after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis) and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation. PMID:27070589

  9. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaohui; You, Minli; Ren, Hui; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO) and rutaecarpine (RUT) are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs' IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4-44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8-138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds. PMID:27455219

  10. Dynamic perfusion bioreactor system for 3D culture of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 scaffold in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xu; Yuan, Fang; Zhimin, Zhu; Anchun, Mo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the biocompatibility and osteogenic effectiveness of the porous nanohydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) scaffold material that was cultured with the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs), under the static culture condition and the dynamic perfusion culture condition in vitro, and to investigate whether the 3D perfusion culture condition was better in provoking proliferation of rBMSCs than the 3D static culture condition. The Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, Osteocalcin (OCN) assay and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to observe the proliferation and differentiation of rBMSCs. The samples were respectively harvested at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 14th, and 21st days and effect comparisons were made between the two of the culture conditions. The results showed that values of MTT, ALP, and OCN were increased continuously and revealed a significant difference between the two culture conditions (p < 0.05). On the 14th day, SEM revealed calcified nodules 2-8 μm in diameter in the lamellar structure. Under the static culture condition, the pores were covered with the cells looking like a piece of blanket, but under the perfusion culture condition the cells were observed to have a 3D lamellar structure. In conclusion, the porous n-HA/PA66 scaffold material can be used as a good candidate material for the bone scaffold construction in the tissue engineering because of its excellent 3D structure, which can greatly improve the proliferation and differentiation of rBMSCs and make them proliferate and osteogenesis even better under the perfusion culture condition. PMID:23362119

  11. Nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery assessed in a 3D co-culture model simulating prostate cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Guo, Jianfeng; Raftery, Rosanne M; Castaño, Irene Mencía; Curtin, Caroline M; Gooding, Matt; Darcy, Raphael; O' Brien, Fergal J; O' Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2016-09-25

    siRNA has emerged as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of prostate cancer but effective delivery remains a major barrier to its clinical application. This study aimed to develop and characterise a 3D in vitro co-culture model to simulate prostate cancer bone metastasis and to assess the ability of the model to investigate nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery and gene knockdown. PC3 or LNCaP prostate cancer cells were co-cultured with hFOB 1.19 osteoblast cells in 2D on plastic tissue culture plates and in 3D on collagen scaffolds mimicking the bone microenvironment. To characterise the co-culture model, cell proliferation, enzyme secretion and the utility of two different gene delivery vectors to mediate siRNA uptake and gene knockdown were assessed. Cell proliferation was reduced by∼50% by day 7 in the co-culture system relative to monoculture (PC3 and LNCaP co-cultures, in 2D and 3D) and an enhanced level of MMP9 (a marker of bone metastasis) was secreted into the media (1.2-4-fold increase depending on the co-culture system). A cationic cyclodextrin gene delivery vector proved significantly less toxic in the co-culture system relative to the commercially available vector Lipofectamine 2000(®). In addition, knockdown of both the GAPDH gene (minimum 15%) and RelA subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor (minimum 20%) was achieved in 2D and 3D cell co-cultures. Results indicate that the prostate cancer-osteoblast in vitro co-culture model was more physiologically relevant vs the monoculture. This model has the potential to help improve the design and efficacy of gene delivery formulations, to more accurately predict in vivo performance and, therefore, to reduce the risk of product failure in late-stage clinical development. PMID:27492023

  12. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method. PMID:27619092

  13. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Hendriks, Delilah F G; Moro, Sabrina M L; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C A; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Christopher E P; Lauschke, Volker M; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  14. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  15. The promotion of hepatic maturation of human pluripotent stem cells in 3D co-culture using type I collagen and Swiss 3T3 cell sheets.

    PubMed

    Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Takayama, Kazuo; Ohashi, Kazuo; Kawabata, Kenji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Hayakawa, Takao; Furue, Miho Kusuda; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-06-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are known to be a useful cell source for drug screening. We recently developed an efficient hepatic differentiation method from hESCs and hiPSCs by sequential transduction of FOXA2 and HNF1α. It is known that the combination of three-dimensional (3D) culture and co-culture, namely 3D co-culture, can maintain the functions of primary hepatocytes. However, hepatic maturation of hESC- or hiPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hEHs or hiPHs, respectively) by 3D co-culture systems has not been examined. Therefore, we utilized a cell sheet engineering technology to promote hepatic maturation. The gene expression levels of hepatocyte-related markers (such as cytochrome P450 enzymes and conjugating enzymes) and the amount of albumin secretion in the hEHs or hiPHs, which were 3D co-cultured with the Swiss 3T3 cell sheet, were significantly up-regulated in comparison with those in the hEHs or hiPHs cultured in a monolayer. Furthermore, we found that type I collagen synthesized in Swiss 3T3 cells plays an important role in hepatic maturation. The hEHs or hiPHs that were 3D co-cultured with the Swiss 3T3 cell sheet would be powerful tools for medical applications, such as drug screening. PMID:22445253

  16. Engineering EMT using 3D micro-scaffold to promote hepatic functions for drug hepatotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyu; Chen, Fengling; Liu, Longwei; Qi, Chunxiao; Wang, Bingjie; Yan, Xiaojun; Huang, Chenyu; Hou, Wei; Zhang, Michael Q; Chen, Yang; Du, Yanan

    2016-06-01

    Accompanied by decreased hepatic functions, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was observed in two dimensional (2D) cultured hepatocytes with elongated morphology, loss of polarity and weakened cell-cell interaction, while upgrading to 3D culture has been considered as significant improvement of its 2D counterpart for hepatocyte maintenance. Here we hypothesize that 3D culture enhances hepatic functions through regulating the EMT status. Biomaterial-engineered EMT was achieved by culturing HepaRG as 3D spheroids (SP-3D) or 3D stretched cells (ST-3D) in non-adherent and adherent micro-scaffold respectively. In SP-3D, constrained EMT of HepaRG, a hepatic stem cell line, as represented by increased epithelial markers and decreased mesenchymal markers, was echoed by improved hepatic functions. To investigate the relationship between EMT status and hepatic functions, time-series RNA-Seq and gene network analysis were used for comparing different cell culture models, which identified histone deacetylases (HDACs) as key mediating factors. Protein analysis confirmed that high HDAC activity was correlated with high expression of Cadherin-1 (CDH1) and hepatic function genes, which were decreased upon HDAC inhibitor treatment in SP-3D, suggesting HDACs may play positive role in regulating EMT and hepatic functions. To illustrate the application of 3D micro-scaffold culture in drug safety evaluation, hepatotoxicity and metabolism assays of two hepatotoxins (i.e. N-acetyl-p-aminophenol and Doxorubicin) were performed and SP-3D showed more biomimetic toxicity response, indicating regulation of EMT as a vital consideration in designing 3D hepatocyte culture configuration. PMID:26994875

  17. Tumor spheroid assembly on hyaluronic acid-based structures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marco P; Costa, Elisabete C; Miguel, Sónia P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell culture is the main methodology used for screening anticancer therapeutics. However, these 2D cellular models misrepresent the architecture of native tumors, leading, in some cases, to unsuccessful prediction of cancer cell response to drugs. To overcome such limitations, cell growth in three dimensions (3D) arises as an alternative to reproduce in vitro the cellular arrangement found in tumors. Among the 3D cancer models developed so far, spheroids are the most attractive since these are cellular aggregates that broadly mimic many features of solid tumors affecting humans, like cell-cell interactions. One of the most applied techniques for producing spheroids is the liquid overlay technique, in which cells aggregate due to their limited adhesion to certain biomaterials, usually agarose or agar. Recently, the suitability of hyaluronic acid (HA) for spheroids assembly and HA-cell surface receptor interactions has been investigated. Ergo, this review gathers a summary of different studies where HA-based structures were developed and used for tumor spheroids production in order to be used in vitro as reliable 3D tumor models for therapeutic screening purposes. PMID:27312623

  18. Effect of Lyso-phosphatidylcholine and Schnurri-3 on Osteogenic Transdifferentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Calcifying Vascular Cells in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavez, Fernando; Vickers, Kasey C.; Sam Lee, Jae; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Morrisett, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background In vitro cell culture is a widely used technique for investigating a range of processes such as stem cell behavior, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and drug discovery. Conventional cell culture is performed in Petri dishes or flasks where cells typically attach to a flat glass or plastic surface as a cell monolayer. However, 2D cell mono-layers do not provide a satisfactory representation of in vivo conditions. A 3D culture could be a much better system for representing the conditions that prevail in vivo. Methods and results To simulate 3D conditions, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were loaded with gold–polyvmer–iron oxide hydrogel, enabling levitation of the cells by using spatially varying magnetic fields. These magnetically levitated 3D cultures appeared as freely suspended, clustered cells which proliferated 3–4 times faster than cells in conventional 2D cultures. When the levitated cells were treated with 10 nM lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), for 3 days, cell clusters exhibited translucent extensions/rods 60–80 µm wide and 200–250 µm long. When 0.5 µg/µl Schnurri-3 was added to the culture containing LPC, these extensions were smaller or absent. When excited with 590–650 nm light, these extensions emitted intrinsic fluorescence at >667 nm. When the 3D cultures were treated with a fluorescent probe specific for calcium hydroxyapatite (FITC-HABP-19), the cell extensions/rods emitted intensely at 518 nm, the λmax for FITC emission. Pellets of cells treated with LPC were more enriched in calcium, phosphate, and glycosaminogly-cans than cells treated with LPC and Schnurri-3. Conclusions In 3D cultures, VSMCs grow more rapidly and form larger calcification clusters than cells in 2D cultures. Transdifferentiation of VSMC into calcifying vascular cells is enhanced by LPC and attenuated by Schnurri-3. General significance The formation of calcified structures in 3D VSMC cultures suggests that similar structures may be formed

  19. A 3D co-culture of three human cell lines to model the inflamed intestinal mucosa for safety testing of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Susewind, Julia; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Griffiths, Gareth Wyn; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Oral exposure to nanomaterials is a current concern, asking for innovative biological test systems to assess their safety, especially also in conditions of inflammatory disorders. Aim of this study was to develop a 3D intestinal model, consisting of Caco-2 cells and two human immune cell lines, suitable to assess nanomaterial toxicity, in either healthy or diseased conditions. Human macrophages (THP-1) and human dendritic cells (MUTZ-3) were embedded in a collagen scaffold and seeded on the apical side of transwell inserts. Caco-2 cells were seeded on top of this layer, forming a 3D model of the intestinal mucosa. Toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NM101 TiO2, NM300 Ag, Au) was evaluated in non-inflamed and inflamed co-cultures, and also compared to non-inflamed Caco-2 monocultures. Inflammation was elicited by IL-1β, and interactions with engineered NPs were addressed by different endpoints. The 3D co-culture showed well preserved ultrastructure and significant barrier properties. Ag NPs were found to be more toxic than TiO2 or Au NPs. But once inflamed with IL-1β, the co-cultures released higher amounts of IL-8 compared to Caco-2 monocultures. However, the cytotoxicity of Ag NPs was higher in Caco-2 monocultures than in 3D co-cultures. The naturally higher IL-8 production in the co-cultures was enhanced even further by the Ag NPs. This study shows that it is possible to mimic inflamed conditions in a 3D co-culture model of the intestinal mucosa. The fact that it is based on three easily available human cell lines makes this model valuable to study the safety of nanomaterials in the context of inflammation. PMID:25738417

  20. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  1. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Docchio, Franco

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D) shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a “sensor fusion” approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications. PMID:22389618

  2. State-of-The-Art and Applications of 3D Imaging Sensors in Industry, Cultural Heritage, Medicine, and Criminal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Sansoni, Giovanna; Trebeschi, Marco; Docchio, Franco

    2009-01-01

    3D imaging sensors for the acquisition of three dimensional (3D) shapes have created, in recent years, a considerable degree of interest for a number of applications. The miniaturization and integration of the optical and electronic components used to build them have played a crucial role in the achievement of compactness, robustness and flexibility of the sensors. Today, several 3D sensors are available on the market, even in combination with other sensors in a "sensor fusion" approach. An importance equal to that of physical miniaturization has the portability of the measurements, via suitable interfaces, into software environments designed for their elaboration, e.g., CAD-CAM systems, virtual renders, and rapid prototyping tools. In this paper, following an overview of the state-of-art of 3D imaging sensors, a number of significant examples of their use are presented, with particular reference to industry, heritage, medicine, and criminal investigation applications. PMID:22389618

  3. Hepatocyte spheroid culture on fibrous scaffolds with grafted functional ligands as an in vitro model for predicting drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shili; Wei, Jiaojun; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Jianmei; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    The identification of a biologic substrate for maintaining hepatocyte functions is essential to provide reliable and predictable models for in vitro drug screening. In the current study, a three-dimensional culture of hepatocytes was established on highly porous fibrous scaffolds with grafted galactose and RGD to afford extensive cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions spatially. The pore size and ligand densities indicated significant effects on the formation of hepatocyte spheroids in balancing the cell retention, adhesion, and migration on fibrous scaffolds. Fibrous scaffolds with an average pore size of 60 μm and surface grafting densities of galactose at 5.9 nmol/cm(2) and RGD at 6.9 pmol/cm(2) provided optimal microenvironments for hepatocyte infiltration and multicellular spheroid formation. Significant promotions were also demonstrated in the syntheses of albumin and urea and the activities of phase I (CYP 3A11 and CYP 2C9) and phase II enzymes. The in vitro metabolism tests on testosterone and acetaminophen by hepatocytes on the optimal scaffolds indicated the predicated clearance rates of 50.7 and 22.6 ml/min/kg, respectively, which were comparable to the in vivo values of rats. The in vitro hepatotoxicity tests on amiodarone hydrochloride and acetaminophen predicted the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) to reflect the in vivo toxic plasma concentrations in human. In addition, the enzyme activities, predicted clearance rates and hepatotoxicity values of hepatocytes on the optimal scaffolds experienced sensitive responsiveness to specific inducers or inhibitors of CYP 3A11 and phase II enzymes, exhibiting in vivo-in vitro correlations to a certain extent. These results demonstrate the feasibility of hepatocyte spheroid culture on fibrous scaffolds as an potential in vitro testing model to predict the in vivo drug metabolism, hepatotoxicity, and drug-drug interactions. PMID:26409440

  4. Cytochrome P450 induction response in tethered spheroids as a three-dimensional human hepatocyte in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Hong, Xin; Sakban, Rashidah Binte; Qu, Yinghua; Singh, Nisha Hari; McMillian, Michael; Dallas, Shannon; Silva, Jose; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Zhao, Sylvia; Lim, Heng Keang; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction is a key risk factor of clinical drug-drug interactions that has to be mitigated in the early phases of drug discovery. Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of hepatocytes in vitro have recently emerged as a potentially better platform to recapitulate the in vivo liver structure and to maintain long-term hepatic functions as compared with conventional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. However, the majority of published studies on 3D hepatocyte models use rat hepatocytes and the response to CYP inducers between rodents and humans is distinct. In the present study, we constructed tethered spheroids on RGD/galactose-conjugated membranes as an in vitro 3D model using cryopreserved human hepatocytes. CYP3A4 mRNA expression in the tethered spheroids was induced to a significantly greater extent than those in the collagen sandwich cultures, indicating the transcriptional regulation was more sensitive to the CYP inducers in the 3D model. Induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 activities in the tethered spheroids were comparable to, if not higher than that observed in the collagen sandwich cultures. The membrane-based model is readily integrated into multi-well plates for higher-throughput drug testing applications, which might be an alternative model to screen the CYP induction potential in vitro with more physiological relevance. PMID:26201057

  5. Towards non-invasive 3D hepatotoxicity assays with optical coherence phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard J.; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Treskes, Philipp; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional tissue-engineered models are increasingly recognised as more physiologically-relevant than standard 2D cell culture for pre-clinical drug toxicity testing. However, many types of conventional toxicity assays are incompatible with dense 3D tissues. This study investigated the use of optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) as a novel approach to assess cell death in 3D tissue culture. For 3D micro-spheroid formation Human hepatic C3A cells were encapsulated in hyaluronic acid gels and cultured in 100μl MEME/10%FBS in 96-well plates. After spheroid formation the 3D liver constructs were exposed to acetaminophen on culture day 8. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in 3D cultures was evaluated using standard biochemical assays. An inverted OCPM in common path configuration was developed with a Callisto OCT engine (Thorlabs), centred at 930nm and a custom scanning head. Intensity data were used to perform in-depth microstructural imaging. In addition, phase fluctuations were measured by collecting several successive B scans at the same location, and statistics on the first time derivative of the phase, i.e. time fluctuations, were analysed over the acquisition time interval to retrieve overall cell viability. OCPM intensity (cell cluster size) and phase fluctuation statistics were directly compared with biochemical assays. In this study, we investigated optical coherence phase tomography to assess cell death in a 3d liver model after exposure to a prototypical hepatotoxin, acetaminophen. We showed that OCPM has the potential to assess noninvasively and label-free drug toxicity in 3D tissue models.

  6. Alginate based 3D hydrogels as an in vitro co-culture model platform for the toxicity screening of new chemical entities

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Shih-Feng; Starly, Binil

    2011-10-01

    Prediction of human response to potential therapeutic drugs is through conventional methods of in vitro cell culture assays and expensive in vivo animal testing. Alternatives to animal testing require sophisticated in vitro model systems that must replicate in vivo like function for reliable testing applications. Advancements in biomaterials have enabled the development of three-dimensional (3D) cell encapsulated hydrogels as in vitro drug screening tissue model systems. In this study, we have developed an in vitro platform to enable high density 3D culture of liver cells combined with a monolayer growth of target breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in a static environment as a representative example of screening drug compounds for hepatotoxicity and drug efficacy. Alginate hydrogels encapsulated with serial cell densities of HepG2 cells (10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} cells/ml) are supported by a porous poly-carbonate disc platform and co-cultured with MCF-7 cells within standard cell culture plates during a 3 day study period. The clearance rates of drug transformation by HepG2 cells are measured using a coumarin based pro-drug. The platform was used to test for HepG2 cytotoxicity 50% (CT{sub 50}) using commercially available drugs which further correlated well with published in vivo LD{sub 50} values. The developed test platform allowed us to evaluate drug dose concentrations to predict hepatotoxicity and its effect on the target cells. The in vitro 3D co-culture platform provides a scalable and flexible approach to test multiple-cell types in a hybrid setting within standard cell culture plates which may open up novel 3D in vitro culture techniques to screen new chemical entity compounds. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > A porous support disc design to support the culture of desired cells in 3D hydrogels. > Demonstrated the co-culture of two cell types within standard cell-culture plates. > A scalable, low cost approach to toxicity screening involving

  7. Printing thermoresponsive reverse molds for the creation of patterned two-component hydrogels for 3D cell culture.

    PubMed

    Müller, Michael; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technology that has its origins in the rapid prototyping industry. The different printing processes can be divided into contact bioprinting(1-4) (extrusion, dip pen and soft lithography), contactless bioprinting(5-7) (laser forward transfer, ink-jet deposition) and laser based techniques such as two photon photopolymerization(8). It can be used for many applications such as tissue engineering(9-13), biosensor microfabrication(14-16) and as a tool to answer basic biological questions such as influences of co-culturing of different cell types(17). Unlike common photolithographic or soft-lithographic methods, extrusion bioprinting has the advantage that it does not require a separate mask or stamp. Using CAD software, the design of the structure can quickly be changed and adjusted according to the requirements of the operator. This makes bioprinting more flexible than lithography-based approaches. Here we demonstrate the printing of a sacrificial mold to create a multi-material 3D structure using an array of pillars within a hydrogel as an example. These pillars could represent hollow structures for a vascular network or the tubes within a nerve guide conduit. The material chosen for the sacrificial mold was poloxamer 407, a thermoresponsive polymer with excellent printing properties which is liquid at 4 °C and a solid above its gelation temperature ~20 °C for 24.5% w/v solutions(18). This property allows the poloxamer-based sacrificial mold to be eluted on demand and has advantages over the slow dissolution of a solid material especially for narrow geometries. Poloxamer was printed on microscope glass slides to create the sacrificial mold. Agarose was pipetted into the mold and cooled until gelation. After elution of the poloxamer in ice cold water, the voids in the agarose mold were filled with alginate methacrylate spiked with FITC labeled fibrinogen. The filled voids were then cross-linked with UV and the construct was imaged with an

  8. Printing Thermoresponsive Reverse Molds for the Creation of Patterned Two-component Hydrogels for 3D Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Michael; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technology that has its origins in the rapid prototyping industry. The different printing processes can be divided into contact bioprinting1-4 (extrusion, dip pen and soft lithography), contactless bioprinting5-7 (laser forward transfer, ink-jet deposition) and laser based techniques such as two photon photopolymerization8. It can be used for many applications such as tissue engineering9-13, biosensor microfabrication14-16 and as a tool to answer basic biological questions such as influences of co-culturing of different cell types17. Unlike common photolithographic or soft-lithographic methods, extrusion bioprinting has the advantage that it does not require a separate mask or stamp. Using CAD software, the design of the structure can quickly be changed and adjusted according to the requirements of the operator. This makes bioprinting more flexible than lithography-based approaches. Here we demonstrate the printing of a sacrificial mold to create a multi-material 3D structure using an array of pillars within a hydrogel as an example. These pillars could represent hollow structures for a vascular network or the tubes within a nerve guide conduit. The material chosen for the sacrificial mold was poloxamer 407, a thermoresponsive polymer with excellent printing properties which is liquid at 4 °C and a solid above its gelation temperature ~20 °C for 24.5% w/v solutions18. This property allows the poloxamer-based sacrificial mold to be eluted on demand and has advantages over the slow dissolution of a solid material especially for narrow geometries. Poloxamer was printed on microscope glass slides to create the sacrificial mold. Agarose was pipetted into the mold and cooled until gelation. After elution of the poloxamer in ice cold water, the voids in the agarose mold were filled with alginate methacrylate spiked with FITC labeled fibrinogen. The filled voids were then cross-linked with UV and the construct was imaged with an epi

  9. Differential effects of MAPK pathway inhibitors on migration and invasiveness of BRAF(V600E) mutant thyroid cancer cells in 2D and 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Ingeson-Carlsson, Camilla; Martinez-Monleon, Angela; Nilsson, Mikael

    2015-11-01

    Tumor microenvironment influences targeted drug therapy. In this study we compared drug responses to RAF and MEK inhibitors on tumor cell migration in 2D and 3D culture of BRAF(V600E) mutant cell lines derived from human papillary (BCPAP) and anaplastic (SW1736) thyroid carcinomas. Scratch wounding was compared to a double-layered collagen gel model developed for analysis of directed tumor cell invasion during prolonged culture. In BCPAP both PLX4720 and U0126 inhibited growth and migration in 2D and decreased tumor cell survival in 3D. In SW1736 drugs had no effect on migration in 2D but decreased invasion in 3D, however this related to reduced growth. Dual inhibition of BRAF(V600E) and MEK reduced but did not prevent SW1736 invasion although rebound phosphorylation of ERK in response to PLX4720 was blocked by U0126. These findings indicate that anti-tumor drug effects in vitro differ depending on culture conditions (2D vs. 3D) and that the invasive features of anaplastic thyroid cancer depend on non-MEK mechanism(s). PMID:26384551

  10. Ex-Vivo Dynamic 3-D Culture of Human Tissues in the RCCS™ Bioreactor Allows the Study of Multiple Myeloma Biology and Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belloni, Daniela; Berenzi, Angiola; Girlanda, Stefania; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) culture models are emerging as invaluable tools in tumor biology, since they reproduce tissue-specific structural features and cell-cell interactions more accurately than conventional 2-D cultures. Multiple Myeloma, which depends on myeloma cell-Bone Marrow microenvironment interactions for development and response to drugs, may particularly benefit from such an approach. An innovative 3-D dynamic culture model based on the use of the RCCS™ Bioreactor was developed to allow long-term culture of myeloma tissue explants. This model was first validated with normal and pathological explants, then applied to tissues from myeloma patients. In all cases, histological examination demonstrated maintenance of viable myeloma cells inside their native microenvironment, with an overall well preserved histo-architecture including bone lamellae and vessels. This system was then successfully applied to evaluate the cytotoxic effects exerted by the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib not only on myeloma cells but also on angiogenic vessels. Moreover, as surrogate markers of specialized functions expressed by myeloma cells and microenvironment, β2 microglobulin, VEGF and Angiopoietin-2 levels, as well as Matrix Metalloproteases activity, were evaluated in supernatants from 3D cultures and their levels reflected the effects of Bortezomib treatment. Notably, determination of β2 microglobulin levels in supernatants from Bortezomib-treated samples and in patients'sera following Bortezomib-based therapies disclosed an overall concordance in the response to the drug ex vivo and in vivo. Our findings indicate, as a proof of principle, that 3-D, RCCS™ bioreactor-based culture of tissue explants can be exploited for studying myeloma biology and for a pre-clinical approach to patient-targeted therapy. PMID:23990965

  11. Long-Term Cultures of Human Cornea Limbal Explants Form 3D Structures Ex Vivo – Implications for Tissue Engineering and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nagymihály, Richárd; Josifovska, Natasha; Andjelic, Sofija; Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Moe, Morten C.; Petrovski, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cultures of cornea limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) were developed and characterized for future tissue engineering and clinical applications. The limbal tissue explants were cultivated and expanded for more than 3 months in medium containing serum as the only growth supplement and without use of scaffolds. Viable 3D cell outgrowth from the explants was observed within 4 weeks of cultivation. The outgrowing cells were examined by immunofluorescent staining for putative markers of stemness (ABCG2, CK15, CK19 and Vimentin), proliferation (p63α, Ki-67), limbal basal epithelial cells (CK8/18) and differentiated cornea epithelial cells (CK3 and CK12). Morphological and immunostaining analyses revealed that long-term culturing can form stratified 3D tissue layers with a clear extracellular matrix deposition and organization (collagen I, IV and V). The LESCs showed robust expression of p63α, ABCG2, and their surface marker fingerprint (CD117/c-kit, CXCR4, CD146/MCAM, CD166/ALCAM) changed over time compared to short-term LESC cultures. Overall, we provide a model for generating stem cell-rich, long-standing 3D cultures from LESCs which can be used for further research purposes and clinical transplantation. PMID:26580800

  12. Long-Term Cultures of Human Cornea Limbal Explants Form 3D Structures Ex Vivo - Implications for Tissue Engineering and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Dóra Júlia; Noer, Agate; Nagymihály, Richárd; Josifovska, Natasha; Andjelic, Sofija; Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Moe, Morten C; Petrovski, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cultures of cornea limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) were developed and characterized for future tissue engineering and clinical applications. The limbal tissue explants were cultivated and expanded for more than 3 months in medium containing serum as the only growth supplement and without use of scaffolds. Viable 3D cell outgrowth from the explants was observed within 4 weeks of cultivation. The outgrowing cells were examined by immunofluorescent staining for putative markers of stemness (ABCG2, CK15, CK19 and Vimentin), proliferation (p63α, Ki-67), limbal basal epithelial cells (CK8/18) and differentiated cornea epithelial cells (CK3 and CK12). Morphological and immunostaining analyses revealed that long-term culturing can form stratified 3D tissue layers with a clear extracellular matrix deposition and organization (collagen I, IV and V). The LESCs showed robust expression of p63α, ABCG2, and their surface marker fingerprint (CD117/c-kit, CXCR4, CD146/MCAM, CD166/ALCAM) changed over time compared to short-term LESC cultures. Overall, we provide a model for generating stem cell-rich, long-standing 3D cultures from LESCs which can be used for further research purposes and clinical transplantation. PMID:26580800

  13. Correlation between lack of norovirus replication and histo-blood group antigen expression in 3D-intestinal epithelial cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Noroviruses (NoV) are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. An in vitro model for NoV replication remains elusive, making study of the virus difficult. One publication utilizing a 3-dimensional (3D) intestinal model derived from Int407 cells reported NoV replication and extensive cytopathi...

  14. Poly(vinyl alcohol)/gelatin Hydrogels Cultured with HepG2 Cells as a 3D Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Morphological Study

    PubMed Central

    Moscato, Stefania; Ronca, Francesca; Campani, Daniela; Danti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models represent fundamental tools for the comprehension of cellular phenomena both for normal and cancerous tissues. Indeed, the microenvironment affects the cellular behavior as well as the response to drugs. In this study, we performed a morphological analysis on a hepatocarcinoma cell line, HepG2, grown for 24 days inside a bioartificial hydrogel composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and gelatin (G) to model a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3D. Morphological features of PVA/G hydrogels were investigated, resulting to mimic the trabecular structure of liver parenchyma. A histologic analysis comparing the 3D models with HepG2 cell monolayers and tumor specimens was performed. In the 3D setting, HepG2 cells were viable and formed large cellular aggregates showing different morphotypes with zonal distribution. Furthermore, β-actin and α5β1 integrin revealed a morphotype-related expression; in particular, the frontline cells were characterized by a strong immunopositivity on a side border of their membrane, thus suggesting the formation of lamellipodia-like structures apt for migration. Based on these results, we propose PVA/G hydrogels as valuable substrates to develop a long term 3D HCC model that can be used to investigate important aspects of tumor biology related to migration phenomena. PMID:25590431

  15. Three-dimensional spheroid cell model of in vitro adipocyte inflammation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul A; Tang, Yi; Weiss, Stephen J; Janorkar, Amol V

    2015-06-01

    To improve treatment of obesity, a contributing factor to multiple systemic and metabolic diseases, a better understanding of metabolic state and environmental stress at the cellular level is essential. This work presents development of a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro model of adipose tissue displaying induced lipid accumulation as a function of fatty acid supplementation that, subsequently, investigates cellular responses to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, thereby recapitulating key stages of obesity progression. Three-dimensional spheroid organization of adipose cells was induced by culturing 3T3-L1 mouse preadipocytes on an elastin-like polypeptide-polyethyleneimine (ELP-PEI)-coated surface. Results indicate a more differentiated phenotype in 3D spheroid cultures relative to two-dimensional (2D) monolayer analogues based on triglyceride accumulation, CD36 and CD40 protein expression, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and adiponectin mRNA expression. The 3T3-L1 adipocyte spheroid model was then used to test the effects of a pro-inflammatory microenvironment, namely maturation in the presence of elevated fatty acid levels followed by acute exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Under these conditions, we demonstrate that metabolic function was reduced across all cultures exposed to TNF-α, especially so when pre-exposed to linoleic acid. Further, in response to TNF-α, enhanced lipolysis, monitored as increased extracellular glycerol and fatty acids levels, was observed in adipocytes cultured in the presence of exogenous fatty acids. Taken together, our 3D spheroid model showed enhanced adipogenic differentiation and presents a platform for elucidating the key phenotypic responses that occur in pro-inflammatory microenvironments that characterize obesogenic states. PMID:25781458

  16. 3D micro-XRF for cultural heritage objects: new analysis strategies for the investigation of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

    PubMed

    Mantouvalou, Ioanna; Wolff, Timo; Hahn, Oliver; Rabin, Ira; Lühl, Lars; Pagels, Marcel; Malzer, Wolfgang; Kanngiesser, Birgit

    2011-08-15

    A combination of 3D micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (3D micro-XRF) and micro-XRF was utilized for the investigation of a small collection of highly heterogeneous, partly degraded Dead Sea Scroll parchment samples from known excavation sites. The quantitative combination of the two techniques proves to be suitable for the identification of reliable marker elements which may be used for classification and provenance studies. With 3D micro-XRF, the three-dimensional nature, i.e. the depth-resolved elemental composition as well as density variations, of the samples was investigated and bromine could be identified as a suitable marker element. It is shown through a comparison of quantitative and semiquantitative values for the bromine content derived using both techniques that, for elements which are homogeneously distributed in the sample matrix, quantification with micro-XRF using a one-layer model is feasible. Thus, the possibility for routine provenance studies using portable micro-XRF instrumentation on a vast amount of samples, even on site, is obtained through this work. PMID:21711051

  17. Smad signal pathway regulates angiogenesis via endothelial cell in an adipose-derived stromal cell/endothelial cell co-culture, 3D gel model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiyu; Xie, Jing; Gong, Tao; Shi, Sirong; Zhang, Tao; Fu, Na; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Co-implantation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) can markedly expedite the formation of functional microvascular beds and provides possible methods for cell-based revascularization therapies to treat various diseases. Furthermore, we investigated the role of TGFβ/Smad signaling pathway for angiogenesis in a three-dimensional (3D) collagen gel model established in vitro with co-culture between ASCs and ECs. We found that angiogenesis was attenuated in the co-culture gels after inhibition of ALK5/Smad2/3 with SB431542. Genes coding for VEGF-A, VEGF-B, VE-ca, FGF-1, PDGF, BMP-4, and BMP-7 were significantly reduced in both mono-cultured and co-cultured ECs. Furthermore, the decrease in co-cultured ECs was prominent relative to mono-cultured ECs. Taken together, these findings suggest that in the co-culture between ASCs and ECs, TGFβ/Smad signal pathway regulates angiogenesis via ECs; moreover, the findings that the co-cultured ECs were regulated more significantly than mono-cultured ECs suggest that suppression of Smad signal pathway may regulate the paracrine secretion of ASCs to further modulate angiogenesis of ECs. PMID:26694166

  18. Biomek Cell Workstation: A Flexible System for Automated 3D Cell Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, R; Gallert, C; Roddelkopf, T; Junginger, S; Thurow, K

    2016-08-01

    The shift from 2D cultures to 3D cultures enables improvement in cell culture research due to better mimicking of in vivo cell behavior and environmental conditions. Different cell lines and applications require altered 3D constructs. The automation of the manufacturing and screening processes can advance the charge stability, quality, repeatability, and precision. In this study we integrated the automated production of three 3D cell constructs (alginate beads, spheroid cultures, pellet cultures) using the Biomek Cell Workstation and compared them with the traditional manual methods and their consequent bioscreening processes (proliferation, toxicity; days 14 and 35) using a high-throughput screening system. Moreover, the possible influence of antibiotics (penicillin/streptomycin) on the production and screening processes was investigated. The cytotoxicity of automatically produced 3D cell cultures (with and without antibiotics) was mainly decreased. The proliferation showed mainly similar or increased results for the automatically produced 3D constructs. We concluded that the traditional manual methods can be replaced by the automated processes. Furthermore, the formation, cultivation, and screenings can be performed without antibiotics to prevent possible effects. PMID:26203054

  19. Sub-100 nm biodegradable nanoparticles: in vitro release features and toxicity testing in 2D and 3D cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Yu, Hui; Belli, Valentina; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2013-02-01

    A big challenge in tumor targeting by nanoparticles (NPs), taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, is the fabrication of small size devices for enhanced tumor penetration, which is considered fundamental to improve chemotherapy efficacy. The purposes of this study are (i) to engineer the formulation of doxorubicin-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) NPs to obtain <100 nm devices and (ii) to translate standard 2D cytotoxicity studies to 3D collagen systems in which an initial step gradient of the NPs is present. Doxorubicin release can be prolonged for days to weeks depending on the NP formulation and the pH of the release medium. Sub-100 nm NPs are effectively internalized by HeLa cells in 2D and are less cytotoxic than free doxorubicin. In 3D, <100 nm NPs are significantly more toxic than larger ones towards HeLa cells, and the cell death rate is affected by the contributions of drug release and device transport through collagen. Thus, the reduction of NP size is a fundamental feature from both a technological and a biological point of view and must be properly engineered to optimize the tumor response to the NPs.

  20. Formulation and stability evaluation of 3D alginate beads potentially useful for cumulus-oocyte complexes culture.

    PubMed

    Dorati, Rossella; Genta, Ida; Ferrari, Michela; Vigone, Giulia; Merico, Valeria; Garagna, Silvia; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Conti, Bice

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian follicle encapsulation in synthetic or natural matrixes based on biopolymers is potentially a promising approach to in vitro maturation (IVM) process, since it maintains follicle 3D organisation by preventing its flattening and consequent disruption of gap junctions, preserving the functional relationship between oocyte and companion follicle cells. The aim of the work was to optimise physico-chemical parameters of alginate microcapsules for perspective IVM under 3D environments. On this purpose alginate and cross-linking agent concentrations were investigated. Alginate concentration between 0.75% and 0.125% w/w and Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Ca(2+ )at concentration between 100 and 20 mM were tested. Follicle encapsulation was obtained by on purpose modified diffusion setting gelation technique, and evaluated together with beads, chemical and mechanical stability in standard and stressing conditions. Beads permeability was tested towards albumin, fetuin, pyruvate, glucose, pullulan. Results demonstrated that 0.25% alginate cross-linked in 100 mM CaCl2 beads is suitable to follicle encapsulation. PMID:26791322

  1. 3D cell culture and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells plated onto jet-sprayed or electrospun micro-fiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meadhbh Á; Renaud, Audrey; Gamblin, Anne-Laure; D'Arros, Cyril; Nedellec, Steven; Trichet, Valerie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    A major limitation of the 2D culture systems is that they fail to recapitulate the in vivo 3D cellular microenvironment whereby cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions occur. In this paper, a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the structure of collagen fibers was produced by jet-spraying. This micro-fiber polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold was evaluated for 3D culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in comparison with a commercially available electrospun scaffold. The jet-sprayed scaffolds had larger pore diameters, greater porosity, smaller diameter fibers, and more heterogeneous fiber diameter size distribution compared to the electrospun scaffolds. Cells on jet-sprayed constructs exhibited spread morphology with abundant cytoskeleton staining, whereas MSCs on electrospun scaffolds appeared less extended with fewer actin filaments. MSC proliferation and cell infiltration occurred at a faster rate on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. Osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and ECM production as measured by ALP, collagen and calcium deposition was superior on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. The jet-sprayed scaffold which mimics the native ECM and permits homogeneous cell infiltration is important for 3D in vitro applications such as bone cellular interaction studies or drug testing, as well as bone tissue engineering strategies. PMID:26238732

  2. One-Step Microfluidic Generation of Pre-Hatching Embryo-Like Core-Shell Microcapsules for Miniaturized 3D Culture of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Pranay; Zhao, Shuting; Bielecki, Peter; Rao, Wei; Choi, Jung K.; Zhao, Yi; Yu, Jianhua; Zhang, Wujie; He, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    A novel core-shell microcapsule system is developed in this study to mimic the miniaturized 3D architecture of pre-hatching embryos with an aqueous liquid core of embryonic cells and a hydrogel-shell of zona pellucida. This is done by microfabricating a non-planar microfluidic flow-focusing device that enables one-step generation of microcapsules with an alginate hydrogel shell and an aqueous liquid core of cells from two aqueous fluids. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells encapsulated in the liquid core are found to survive well (> 92 %). Moreover, ~ 20 ES cells in the core can proliferate to form a single ES cell aggregate in each microcapsule within 7 days while at least a few hundred cells are usually needed by the commonly used hanging-drop method to form an embryoid body (EB) in each hanging drop. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses show significantly higher expression of pluripotency marker genes in the 3D aggregated ES cells compared to the cells under 2D culture. The aggregated ES cells can be efficiently differentiated into beating cardiomyocytes using a small molecule (cardiogenol C) without complex combination of multiple growth factors. Taken together, the novel 3D microfluidic and pre-hatching embryo-like microcapsule systems are of importance to facilitate in vitro culture of pluripotent stem cells for their ever-increasing use in modern cell-based medicine. PMID:24113543

  3. Phenotypic Characterization of Toxic Compound Effects on Liver Spheroids Derived from iPSC Using Confocal Imaging and Three-Dimensional Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Michael K.; Hesley, Jayne; Hong, Dihui; Cohen, Avrum; Gentry, Jason; Carlson, Coby B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cell models are becoming more complex to better mimic the in vivo environment and provide greater predictivity for compound efficacy and toxicity. There is an increasing interest in exploring the use of three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling developmental and tissue biology with the goal of accelerating translational research in these areas. Accordingly, the development of high-throughput quantitative assays using 3D cultures is an active area of investigation. In this study, we have developed and optimized methods for the formation of 3D liver spheroids derived from human iPS cells and used those for toxicity assessment. We used confocal imaging and 3D image analysis to characterize cellular information from a 3D matrix to enable a multi-parametric comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. The assay enables characterization of compound toxicities by spheroid size (volume) and shape, cell number and spatial distribution, nuclear characterization, number and distribution of cells expressing viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial potential, and viability marker intensities. In addition, changes in the content of live, dead, and apoptotic cells as a consequence of compound exposure were characterized. We tested 48 compounds and compared induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocytes and HepG2 cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D cultures. We observed significant differences in the pharmacological effects of compounds across the two cell types and between the different culture conditions. Our results indicate that a phenotypic assay using 3D model systems formed with human iPSC-derived hepatocytes is suitable for high-throughput screening and can be used for hepatotoxicity assessment in vitro. PMID:27494736

  4. Phenotypic Characterization of Toxic Compound Effects on Liver Spheroids Derived from iPSC Using Confocal Imaging and Three-Dimensional Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sirenko, Oksana; Hancock, Michael K; Hesley, Jayne; Hong, Dihui; Cohen, Avrum; Gentry, Jason; Carlson, Coby B; Mann, David A

    2016-09-01

    Cell models are becoming more complex to better mimic the in vivo environment and provide greater predictivity for compound efficacy and toxicity. There is an increasing interest in exploring the use of three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling developmental and tissue biology with the goal of accelerating translational research in these areas. Accordingly, the development of high-throughput quantitative assays using 3D cultures is an active area of investigation. In this study, we have developed and optimized methods for the formation of 3D liver spheroids derived from human iPS cells and used those for toxicity assessment. We used confocal imaging and 3D image analysis to characterize cellular information from a 3D matrix to enable a multi-parametric comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. The assay enables characterization of compound toxicities by spheroid size (volume) and shape, cell number and spatial distribution, nuclear characterization, number and distribution of cells expressing viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial potential, and viability marker intensities. In addition, changes in the content of live, dead, and apoptotic cells as a consequence of compound exposure were characterized. We tested 48 compounds and compared induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocytes and HepG2 cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D cultures. We observed significant differences in the pharmacological effects of compounds across the two cell types and between the different culture conditions. Our results indicate that a phenotypic assay using 3D model systems formed with human iPSC-derived hepatocytes is suitable for high-throughput screening and can be used for hepatotoxicity assessment in vitro. PMID:27494736

  5. Formation of multicellular tumor spheroids induced by cyclic RGD-peptides and use for anticancer drug testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akasov, Roman; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria; Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dontenwill, Monique; Chiper, Manuela; Vandamme, Thierry; Markvicheva, Elena

    2016-06-15

    Development of novel anticancer formulations is a priority challenge in biomedicine. However, in vitro models based on monolayer cultures (2D) which are currently used for cytotoxicity tests leave much to be desired. More and more attention is focusing on 3D in vitro systems which can better mimic solid tumors. The aim of the study was to develop a novel one-step highly reproducible technique for multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) formation using synthetic cyclic RGD-peptides, and to demonstrate availability of the spheroids as 3D in vitro model for antitumor drug testing. Cell self-assembly effect induced by addition of both linear and cyclic RGD-peptides directly to monolayer cultures was studied for 12 cell lines of various origins, including tumor cells (e.i. U-87 MG, MCF-7, M-3, HCT-116) and normal cells, in particular L-929, BNL.CL2, HepG2. Cyclo-RGDfK and its modification with triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), namely cyclo-RGDfK(TPP) in a range of 10-100μM were found to induce spheroid formation. The obtained spheroids were unimodal with mean sizes in a range of 60-120μm depending on cell line and serum content in culture medium. The spheroids were used as 3D in vitro model, in order to evaluate cytotoxicity effects of antitumor drugs (doxorubicin, curcumin, temozolomide). The developed technique could be proposed as a promising tool for in vitro test of novel antitumor drugs. PMID:27107900

  6. Drug-releasing nano-engineered titanium implants: therapeutic efficacy in 3D cell culture model, controlled release and stability.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Kogawa, Masakazu; Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J; Losic, Dusan

    2016-12-01

    There is an ongoing demand for new approaches for treating localized bone pathologies. Here we propose a new strategy for treatment of such conditions, via local delivery of hormones/drugs to the trauma site using drug releasing nano-engineered implants. The proposed implants were prepared in the form of small Ti wires/needles with a nano-engineered oxide layer composed of array of titania nanotubes (TNTs). TNTs implants were inserted into a 3D collagen gel matrix containing human osteoblast-like, and the results confirmed cell migration onto the implants and their attachment and spread. To investigate therapeutic efficacy, TNTs/Ti wires loaded with parathyroid hormone (PTH), an approved anabolic therapeutic for the treatment of severe bone fractures, were inserted into 3D gels containing osteoblast-like cells. Gene expression studies revealed a suppression of SOST (sclerostin) and an increase in RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) mRNA expression, confirming the release of PTH from TNTs at concentrations sufficient to alter cell function. The performance of the TNTs wire implants using an example of a drug needed at relatively higher concentrations, the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin, is also demonstrated. Finally, the mechanical stability of the prepared implants was tested by their insertion into bovine trabecular bone cores ex vivo followed by retrieval, which confirmed the robustness of the TNT structures. This study provides proof of principle for the suitability of the TNT/Ti wire implants for localized bone therapy, which can be customized to cater for specific therapeutic requirements. PMID:27612777

  7. Evaluation of Consistency in Spheroid Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids embedded in a matrix represent invaluable tools to analyze cell invasion. Spheroid sizes and invasiveness are the main observables easily measurable to evaluate effects of biological or pharmaceutical manipulations on invasion. They largely account for these 3-D platforms variability, leading to flaws in data interpretation. No method has been established yet that characterizes this variability and guarantees a reliable use of 3-D platforms. Spheroid initial/end sizes and invasiveness were systematically analyzed and compared in spheroids of U87MG cells generated by three different methods and embedded at different times in a collagen matrix. A normality test was used to characterize size distribution. We introduced the linearity-over-yield analysis as a novel mathematical tool to assess end sizes and invasion reproducibility. We further provide a proof of concept by applying these tools to the analysis of a treatment known to be effective beforehand. We demonstrate that implementation of these statistical and mathematical tools warranted a confident quantification and interpretation of in 3-D conducted assays. We propose these tools could be incorporated in a guideline for generation and use of 3-D platforms. PMID:27334575

  8. Wnt5a-mediating neurogenesis of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a 3D microfluidic cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeein; Kim, Sohyeun; Jung, Jinsun; Lim, Youngbin; Kang, Kyungsun; Park, Seungsu; Kang, Sookyung

    2011-10-01

    In stem cell biology, cell plasticity refers to the ability of stem cells to differentiate into a variety of cell lineages. Recently, cell plasticity has been used to refer to the ability of a given cell type to reversibly de-differentiate, re-differentiate, or transdifferentiate in response to specific stimuli. These processes are regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular growth and differentiation factors, including low oxygen. Our recent study showed that 3D microfluidic cell culture induces activation of the Wnt5A/β-catenin signaling pathway in hATSCs (human Adipose Tissue-derived Stem Cells). This resulted in self renewal and transdifferentiation of hATSCs into neurons. To improve neurogenic potency of hATSCs in response to low oxygen and other unknown physical factors, we developed a gel-free 3D microfluidic cell culture system (3D-μFCCS). The functional structure was developed for the immobilization of 3D multi-cellular aggregates in a microfluidic channel without the use of a matrix on the chip. Growth of hATSCs neurosphere grown on a chip was higher than the growth of control cells grown in a culture dish. Induction of differentiation in the Chip system resulted in a significant increase in the induction of neuronal-like cell structures and the presentation of TuJ or NF160 positive long neuritis compared to control cells after active migration from the center of the microfluidic channel layer to the outside of the microfluidic channel layer. We also observed that the chip neurogenesis system induced a significantly higher level of GABA secreting neurons and, in addition, almost 60% of cells were GABA + cells. Finally, we observed that 1 month of after the transplantation of each cell type in a mouse SCI lesion, chip cultured and neuronal differentiated hATSCs exhibited the ability to effectively transdifferentiate into NF160 + motor neurons at a high ratio. Interestingly, our CHIP/PCR analysis revealed that HIF1α-induced hATSCs neurogenesis

  9. High-Throughput 3D Screening Reveals Differences in Drug Sensitivities between Culture Models of JIMT1 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Vidal; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kleivi Sahlberg, Kristine; Kallioniemi, Olli; Perälä, Merja

    2013-01-01

    The traditional method for studying cancer in vitro is to grow immortalized cancer cells in two-dimensional monolayers on plastic. However, many cellular features are impaired in these artificial conditions, and large changes in gene expression compared to tumors have been reported. Three-dimensional cell culture models have become increasingly popular and are suggested to be better models than two-dimensional monolayers due to improved cell-to-cell contact and structures that resemble in vivo architecture. The aim of this study was to develop a simple high-throughput three-dimensional drug screening method and to compare drug responses in JIMT1 breast cancer cells when grown in two dimensions, in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced anchorage-independent three-dimensional models, and in Matrigel three-dimensional cell culture models. We screened 102 compounds with multiple concentrations and biological replicates for their effects on cell proliferation. The cells were either treated immediately upon plating, or they were allowed to grow in three-dimensional cultures for 4 days before the drug treatment. Large variations in drug responses were observed between the models indicating that comparisons of culture model-influenced drug sensitivities cannot be made based on the effects of a single drug. However, we show with the 63 most prominent drugs that, in general, JIMT1 cells grown on Matrigel were significantly more sensitive to drugs than cells grown in two-dimensional cultures, while the responses of cells grown in poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) resembled those of the two-dimensional cultures. Furthermore, comparing the gene expression profiles of the cell culture models to xenograft tumors indicated that cells cultured in Matrigel and as xenografts most closely resembled each other. In this study, we also suggest that three-dimensional cultures can provide a platform for systematic experimentation of larger compound collections in a high-throughput mode

  10. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines. PMID:26215372

  11. RCCS bioreactor-based modelled microgravity induces significant changes on in vitro 3D neuroglial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Caterina; Steimberg, Nathalie; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Guarnieri, Simone; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Mariggiò, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a human-derived neuro-/glial cell three-dimensional in vitro model to investigate the effects of microgravity on cell-cell interactions. A rotary cell-culture system (RCCS) bioreactor was used to generate a modelled microgravity environment, and morphofunctional features of glial-like GL15 and neuronal-like SH-SY5Y cells in three-dimensional individual cultures (monotypic aggregates) and cocultures (heterotypic aggregates) were analysed. Cell survival was maintained within all cell aggregates over 2 weeks of culture. Moreover, compared to cells as traditional static monolayers, cell aggregates cultured under modelled microgravity showed increased expression of specific differentiation markers (e.g., GL15 cells: GFAP, S100B; SH-SY5Y cells: GAP43) and modulation of functional cell-cell interactions (e.g., N-CAM and Cx43 expression and localisation). In conclusion, this culture model opens a wide range of specific investigations at the molecular, biochemical, and morphological levels, and it represents an important tool for in vitro studies into dynamic interactions and responses of nervous system cell components to microgravity environmental conditions. PMID:25654124

  12. RCCS Bioreactor-Based Modelled Microgravity Induces Significant Changes on In Vitro 3D Neuroglial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Fanò-Illic, Giorgio; Mariggiò, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a human-derived neuro-/glial cell three-dimensional in vitro model to investigate the effects of microgravity on cell-cell interactions. A rotary cell-culture system (RCCS) bioreactor was used to generate a modelled microgravity environment, and morphofunctional features of glial-like GL15 and neuronal-like SH-SY5Y cells in three-dimensional individual cultures (monotypic aggregates) and cocultures (heterotypic aggregates) were analysed. Cell survival was maintained within all cell aggregates over 2 weeks of culture. Moreover, compared to cells as traditional static monolayers, cell aggregates cultured under modelled microgravity showed increased expression of specific differentiation markers (e.g., GL15 cells: GFAP, S100B; SH-SY5Y cells: GAP43) and modulation of functional cell-cell interactions (e.g., N-CAM and Cx43 expression and localisation). In conclusion, this culture model opens a wide range of specific investigations at the molecular, biochemical, and morphological levels, and it represents an important tool for in vitro studies into dynamic interactions and responses of nervous system cell components to microgravity environmental conditions. PMID:25654124

  13. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Michael G.; Yeung, Bertrand Z.; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; Au, Jessie L.S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity.Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30 mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine,1-20 mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44 mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30 mol% DOTAP and ≤10 mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposomesize increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomessuggestsconcentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135 nm diameter, -49 to +44 mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10 mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoralsubcompartments within spheroids. PMID:24995948

  14. In situ-forming click-crosslinked gelatin based hydrogels for 3D culture of thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Truong, Vinh X; Hun, Michael L; Li, Fanyi; Chidgey, Ann P; Forsythe, John S

    2016-07-21

    Hydrogels prepared from naturally derived gelatin can provide a suitable environment for cell attachment and growth, making them favourable materials in tissue engineering. However, physically crosslinked gelatin hydrogels are not stable under physiological conditions while chemical crosslinking of gelatin by radical polymerization may be harmful to cells. In this study, we attached the norbornene functional group to gelatin, which was subsequently crosslinked with