Science.gov

Sample records for 3d structure analysis

  1. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

    2013-06-23

    Robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin, USA is a product of both anomalously high regional heat flow and active fault-controlled extension. Elevated permeability associated with some fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Constraining the local-scale 3D geometry of these structures and their roles as fluid flow conduits is crucial in order to mitigate both the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and to identify blind (no surface expression) geothermal resources. Ongoing studies have indicated that much of the robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin is associated with high density faulting at structurally complex fault intersection/interaction areas, such as accommodation/transfer zones between discrete fault systems, step-overs or relay ramps in fault systems, intersection zones between faults with different strikes or different senses of slip, and horse-tailing fault terminations. These conceptualized models are crucial for locating and characterizing geothermal systems in a regional context. At the local scale, however, pinpointing drilling targets and characterizing resource potential within known or probable geothermal areas requires precise 3D characterization of the system. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we have conducted detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems. Using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics Inc., Alameda, CA) we constructed 3D geologic models of both the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These 3D models allow spatial comparison of disparate data sets in 3D and are the basis for quantitative structural analyses that can aid geothermal resource assessment and be used to pinpoint discrete drilling targets. The relatively abundant data set at Brady’s, ~80 km NE of Reno, NV, includes 24 wells with lithologies interpreted from careful analysis of cuttings and core, a 1

  2. Structural analysis of tropical cyclone using INSAT-3D observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Neeru; Kishtawal, C. M.

    2016-05-01

    The continuous observations from visible and thermal infrared (TIR) channels of geostationary satellites are highly useful for obtaining the features associated with the shape and dynamics of cloud structures within the tropical cyclones (TCs). As TC develops from an unstructured cloud cluster and intensifies, the cloud structures become more axisymmetric around the centre of the TC. To better understand the structure of TC during different stages of its evolution i.e. from its cyclogenesis to maturity and dissipation, the continuous satellite observations plays a key role. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations from geostationary satellites are very useful in order to analyze the cloud organization during the cyclogenesis. The gradient of the brightness temperatures measures the level of symmetry of each structure, which characterizes the degree of cloud organization of the TC. In the present work, the structural analysis of TC during its life period using the observations from Indian geostationary satellite INSAT-3D has been discussed. The visible and TIR observations from INSAT-3D satellite were used to fix the center position of the cyclone which is an input for the cyclone track and intensity prediction models. This data is also used to estimate the intensity of cyclone in the advanced Dvorak technique (ADT), and in the estimation of radius of maximum winds (Rmax) of TC which is an essential input parameter for the prediction of storm surge associated to the cyclones. The different patterns of cloud structure during the intensification stage, eye-wall formation and dissipation have been discussed. The early identification of these features helps in predicting the rapid intensification of TC which in turn improves the intensity predictions.

  3. Parameterization of 3D brain structures for statistical shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Litao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2004-05-01

    Statistical Shape Analysis (SSA) is a powerful tool for noninvasive studies of pathophysiology and diagnosis of brain diseases. It also provides a shape constraint for the segmentation of brain structures. There are two key problems in SSA: the representation of shapes and their alignments. The widely used parameterized representations are obtained by preserving angles or areas and the alignments of shapes are achieved by rotating parameter net. However, representations preserving angles or areas do not really guarantee the anatomical correspondence of brain structures. In this paper, we incorporate shape-based landmarks into parameterization of banana-like 3D brain structures to address this problem. Firstly, we get the triangulated surface of the object and extract two landmarks from the mesh, i.e. the ends of the banana-like object. Then the surface is parameterized by creating a continuous and bijective mapping from the surface to a spherical surface based on a heat conduction model. The correspondence of shapes is achieved by mapping the two landmarks to the north and south poles of the sphere and using an extracted origin orientation to select the dateline during parameterization. We apply our approach to the parameterization of lateral ventricle and a multi-resolution shape representation is obtained by using the Discrete Fourier Transform.

  4. Code System for Analysis of 3-D Reinforced Concrete Structures.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, C. A.

    1999-11-22

    Version 00 NONSAP-C is a finite element program for determining the static and dynamic response of three-dimensional reinforced concrete structures. Long-term, or creep, behavior of concrete structures can also be analyzed. Nonlinear constitutive relations for concrete under short-term loads are incorporated in two time-independent models, a variable-modulus approach with orthotropic behavior induced in the concrete due to the development of different tangent moduli in different directions and an elastic-plastic model in which the concrete is assumed to be a continuous, isotropic, and linearly elastic-plastic strain-hardening-fracture material. A viscoelastic constitutive model for long-term thermal creep of concrete is included. Three-dimensional finite elements available in NONSAP-C include a truss element, a multinode tendon element for prestressed and post tensioned concrete structures, an elastic-plastic membrane element to represent the behavior of cavity liners, and a general isoparametric element with a variable number of nodes for analysis of solids and thick shells.

  5. 3D shape measurement of shoeprint impression with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing

    2002-06-01

    The shoeprint impressions of suspect left at the crime scene can sometimes tell investigators what type of shoes to be looked for. These shoeprint impressions as one of the important evidence are useful in the detection of criminals. In this paper we propose a novel technique for identifying and analyzing the 3D characteristics of shoeprint impressions. We also design 3D shoeprint impression analysis system based on the combination the 3D shape measurement with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis. We give a detail discussion on the principle and configuration of the system. Laboratory experiments show the technique is efficient in the detection of shoeprint and in the offering the reference for judicial evidence.

  6. 3D structure tensor analysis of light microscopy data for validating diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Cornea, Anda; Leigland, Lindsey A.; Kohama, Steven G.; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (d-MRI) is a powerful non-invasive and non-destructive technique for characterizing brain tissue on the microscopic scale. However, the lack of validation of d-MRI by independent experimental means poses an obstacle to accurate interpretation of data acquired using this method. Recently, structure tensor analysis has been applied to light microscopy images, and this technique holds promise to be a powerful validation strategy for d-MRI. Advantages of this approach include its similarity to d-MRI in terms of averaging the effects of a large number of cellular structures, and its simplicity, which enables it to be implemented in a high-throughput manner. However, a drawback of previous implementations of this technique arises from it being restricted to 2D. As a result, structure tensor analyses have been limited to tissue sectioned in a direction orthogonal to the direction of interest. Here we describe the analytical framework for extending structure tensor analysis to 3D, and utilize the results to analyze serial image “stacks” acquired with confocal microscopy of rhesus macaque hippocampal tissue. Implementation of 3D structure tensor procedures requires removal of sources of anisotropy introduced in tissue preparation and confocal imaging. This is accomplished with image processing steps to mitigate the effects of anisotropic tissue shrinkage, and the effects of anisotropy in the point spread function (PSF). In order to address the latter confound, we describe procedures for measuring the dependence of PSF anisotropy on distance from the microscope objective within tissue. Prior to microscopy, ex vivo d-MRI measurements performed on the hippocampal tissue revealed three regions of tissue with mutually orthogonal directions of least restricted diffusion that correspond to CA1, alveus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We demonstrate the ability of 3D structure tensor analysis to identify structure tensor orientations

  7. Analysis and 3D visualization of structures of animal brains obtained from histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero-Vargas, Manuel G.; Fuentes, Veronica; Lopez, D.; Moscoso, A.; Merchan, Miguel A.

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents a new application for the analysis of histological sections and their 3D visualization. The process is performed in few steps. First, a manual process is necessary to determine the regions of interest, including image digitalization, drawing of borders and alignment between all images. Then, a reconstruction process is made. After sampling the contour, the structure of interest is displayed. The application is experimentally validated and some results on histological sections of a rodent's brain (hamster and rat) are shown.

  8. Analysis of the 3D Structure and Velocity of a CME on 2 January 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F. M.; Cremades, H.

    We perform an analysis of the 3D structure and velocity of a CME (coronal mass ejection) ejected on 2 January 2008. The event was imaged by both STEREO A and B spacecraft (mutual separation of ˜44°), providing polarized images of the event from two different points of view. To obtain information on the 3D structure of the CME from polarized images, a polarization technique (Moran & Davila, Science 305, 66, 2003) is applied. Aided by this method, we have constructed topographical maps which show the height of the various event features from the plane of the sky (i.e. toward or away from the observer) and have dinamically analyzed and compared the real and projected on the plane of the sky velocities.

  9. 3D analysis of vortical structures in an abdominal aortic aneurysm by stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplano, Valérie; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Bertrand, Eric

    2016-11-01

    The present work presents an experimental in vitro three-dimensional analysis of the flow dynamics in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) through stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. The experimental set-up mimics the pathophysiological context involving a shear thinning blood analogue fluid, compliant AAA and aorto-iliac bifurcation walls and controlled inlet and outlet flow rate and pressure waveforms as well as working fluid temperature. SPIV was carefully calibrated and conducted to assess the three velocity components in the AAA volume. For the first time in the literature, the 3D vortex ring genesis, propagation, and vanishing in the AAA bulge are experimentally described and quantified. In comparison with classical 2-component PIV measurements (2C PIV), the third component of the velocity vector was shown to be of importance in such a geometry, especially, during the deceleration phase of the flow rate. The 3D velocity magnitude reached up more than 20 % of the 2D one showing that 2C PIV are definitively not accurate enough to provide a complete description of flow behaviour in an AAA. In addition to potential clinical implications of a full 3D vortex ring description in AAA evolution, the 3D in vitro experimental quantification of the flow dynamics carried out in the present study offers an interesting tool for the validation of fluid-structure interaction numerical studies dealing with AAA.

  10. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  11. Comparative 3D genome structure analysis of the fission and the budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ke; Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Alber, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We studied the 3D structural organization of the fission yeast genome, which emerges from the tethering of heterochromatic regions in otherwise randomly configured chromosomes represented as flexible polymer chains in an nuclear environment. This model is sufficient to explain in a statistical manner many experimentally determined distinctive features of the fission yeast genome, including chromatin interaction patterns from Hi-C experiments and the co-locations of functionally related and co-expressed genes, such as genes expressed by Pol-III. Our findings demonstrate that some previously described structure-function correlations can be explained as a consequence of random chromatin collisions driven by a few geometric constraints (mainly due to centromere-SPB and telomere-NE tethering) combined with the specific gene locations in the chromosome sequence. We also performed a comparative analysis between the fission and budding yeast genome structures, for which we previously detected a similar organizing principle. However, due to the different chromosome sizes and numbers, substantial differences are observed in the 3D structural genome organization between the two species, most notably in the nuclear locations of orthologous genes, and the extent of nuclear territories for genes and chromosomes. However, despite those differences, remarkably, functional similarities are maintained, which is evident when comparing spatial clustering of functionally related genes in both yeasts. Functionally related genes show a similar spatial clustering behavior in both yeasts, even though their nuclear locations are largely different between the yeast species.

  12. Analysis of simple 2-D and 3-D metal structures subjected to fragment impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witmer, E. A.; Stagliano, T. R.; Spilker, R. L.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical methods were developed for predicting the large-deflection elastic-plastic transient structural responses of metal containment or deflector (C/D) structures to cope with rotor burst fragment impact attack. For two-dimensional C/D structures both, finite element and finite difference analysis methods were employed to analyze structural response produced by either prescribed transient loads or fragment impact. For the latter category, two time-wise step-by-step analysis procedures were devised to predict the structural responses resulting from a succession of fragment impacts: the collision force method (CFM) which utilizes an approximate prediction of the force applied to the attacked structure during fragment impact, and the collision imparted velocity method (CIVM) in which the impact-induced velocity increment acquired by a region of the impacted structure near the impact point is computed. The merits and limitations of these approaches are discussed. For the analysis of 3-d responses of C/D structures, only the CIVM approach was investigated.

  13. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  14. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  15. Population-based 3D genome structure analysis reveals driving forces in spatial genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Kalhor, Reza; Dai, Chao; Hao, Shengli; Gong, Ke; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Haochen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Chen, Lin; Alber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Conformation capture technologies (e.g., Hi-C) chart physical interactions between chromatin regions on a genome-wide scale. However, the structural variability of the genome between cells poses a great challenge to interpreting ensemble-averaged Hi-C data, particularly for long-range and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we present a probabilistic approach for deconvoluting Hi-C data into a model population of distinct diploid 3D genome structures, which facilitates the detection of chromatin interactions likely to co-occur in individual cells. Our approach incorporates the stochastic nature of chromosome conformations and allows a detailed analysis of alternative chromatin structure states. For example, we predict and experimentally confirm the presence of large centromere clusters with distinct chromosome compositions varying between individual cells. The stability of these clusters varies greatly with their chromosome identities. We show that these chromosome-specific clusters can play a key role in the overall chromosome positioning in the nucleus and stabilizing specific chromatin interactions. By explicitly considering genome structural variability, our population-based method provides an important tool for revealing novel insights into the key factors shaping the spatial genome organization. PMID:26951677

  16. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  17. Error analysis and system implementation for structured light stereo vision 3D geometric detection in large scale condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Stereo vision based 3D metrology technique is an effective approach for relatively large scale object's 3D geometric detection. In this paper, we present a specified image capture system, which implements LVDS interface embedded CMOS sensor and CAN bus to ensure synchronous trigger and exposure. We made an error analysis for structured light vision measurement in large scale condition, based on which we built and tested the system prototype both indoor and outfield. The result shows that the system is very suitable for large scale metrology applications.

  18. Cycle graph analysis for 3D roof structure modelling: Concepts and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Gamage Sanka Nirodha; Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents a cycle graph analysis approach to the automatic reconstruction of 3D roof models from airborne laser scanner data. The nature of convergences of topological relations of plane adjacencies, allowing for the reconstruction of roof corner geometries with preserved topology, can be derived from cycles in roof topology graphs. The topology between roof adjacencies is defined in terms of ridge-lines and step-edges. In the proposed method, the input point cloud is first segmented and roof topology is derived while extracting roof planes from identified non-terrain segments. Orientation and placement regularities are applied on weakly defined edges using a piecewise regularization approach prior to the reconstruction, which assists in preserving symmetries in building geometry. Roof corners are geometrically modelled using the shortest closed cycles and the outermost cycle derived from roof topology graph in which external target graphs are no longer required. Based on test results, we show that the proposed approach can handle complexities with nearly 90% of the detected roof faces reconstructed correctly. The approach allows complex height jumps and various types of building roofs to be firmly reconstructed without prior knowledge of primitive building types.

  19. A Lidar Point Cloud Based Procedure for Vertical Canopy Structure Analysis And 3D Single Tree Modelling in Forest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunsheng; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree modelling based on Lidar point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole area of research is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the original Lidar raw point cloud. The main tree canopy layers and the height ranges of the layers are detected according to a statistical analysis of the height distribution probability of the normalized raw points. For the 3D modelling of individual trees, individual trees are detected and delineated not only from the top canopy layer but also from the sub canopy layer. The normalized points are resampled into a local voxel space. A series of horizontal 2D projection images at the different height levels are then generated respect to the voxel space. Tree crown regions are detected from the projection images. Individual trees are then extracted by means of a pre-order forest traversal process through all the tree crown regions at the different height levels. Finally, 3D tree crown models of the extracted individual trees are reconstructed. With further analyses on the 3D models of individual tree crowns, important parameters such as crown height range, crown volume and crown contours at the different height levels can be derived. PMID:27879916

  20. A Lidar Point Cloud Based Procedure for Vertical Canopy Structure Analysis And 3D Single Tree Modelling in Forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunsheng; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2008-06-12

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree modelling based on Lidar point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole area of research is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the original Lidar raw point cloud. The main tree canopy layers and the height ranges of the layers are detected according to a statistical analysis of the height distribution probability of the normalized raw points. For the 3D modelling of individual trees, individual trees are detected and delineated not only from the top canopy layer but also from the sub canopy layer. The normalized points are resampled into a local voxel space. A series of horizontal 2D projection images at the different height levels are then generated respect to the voxel space. Tree crown regions are detected from the projection images. Individual trees are then extracted by means of a pre-order forest traversal process through all the tree crown regions at the different height levels. Finally, 3D tree crown models of the extracted individual trees are reconstructed. With further analyses on the 3D models of individual tree crowns, important parameters such as crown height range, crown volume and crown contours at the different height levels can be derived.

  1. PRONTO3D users` instructions: A transient dynamic code for nonlinear structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Attaway, S.W.; Mello, F.J.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.; Ratner, J.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-06-01

    This report provides an updated set of users` instructions for PRONTO3D. PRONTO3D is a three-dimensional, transient, solid dynamics code for analyzing large deformations of highly nonlinear materials subjected to extremely high strain rates. This Lagrangian finite element program uses an explicit time integration operator to integrate the equations of motion. Eight-node, uniform strain, hexahedral elements and four-node, quadrilateral, uniform strain shells are used in the finite element formulation. An adaptive time step control algorithm is used to improve stability and performance in plasticity problems. Hourglass distortions can be eliminated without disturbing the finite element solution using either the Flanagan-Belytschko hourglass control scheme or an assumed strain hourglass control scheme. All constitutive models in PRONTO3D are cast in an unrotated configuration defined using the rotation determined from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. A robust contact algorithm allows for the impact and interaction of deforming contact surfaces of quite general geometry. The Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics method has been embedded into PRONTO3D using the contact algorithm to couple it with the finite element method.

  2. Constructing topologically connected surfaces for the comprehensive analysis of 3-D medical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Cutting, Court B.; Haddad, Betsy; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1991-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging deals with the visualization, manipulation, and measuring of objects in 3D medical images. So far, research efforts have concentrated primarily on visualization, using well-developed methods from computer graphics. Very little has been achieved in developing techniques for manipulating medical objects, or for extracting quantitative measurements from them beyond volume calculation (by counting voxels), and computing distances and angles between manually located surface points. A major reason for the slow pace in the development of manipulation and quantification methods lies with the limitations of current algorithms for constructing surfaces from 3D solid objects. We show that current surface construction algorithms either (a) do not construct valid surface descriptions of solid objects or (b) produce surface representations that are not particularly suitable for anything other than visualization. We present ALLIGATOR, a new surface construction algorithm that produces valid, topologically connected surface representations of solid objects. We have developed a modeling system based on the surface representations created by ALLIGATOR that is suitable for developing algorithms to visualize, manipulate, and quantify 3D medical objects. Using this modeling system we have developed a method for efficiently computing principle curvatures and directions on surfaces. These measurements form the basis for a new metric system being developed for morphometrics. The modeling system is also being used in the development of systems for quantitative pre-surgical planning and surgical augmentation.

  3. A 3D analysis of spatial relationship between geological structure and groundwater profile around Kobe City, Japan: based on ARCGIS 3D Analyst.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, A.; Tsukamoto, H.; Kazahaya, K.; Morikawa, N.; Takahashi, M.; Takahashi, H.; Yasuhara, M.; Ohwada, M.; Oyama, Y.; Inamura, A.; Handa, H.; Nakama, J.

    2008-12-01

    Kobe city is located on the northern side of Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan, containing 1,000-2,000 m thick Quaternary sediments. After the Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake (January 17, 1995), a number of geological and geophysical surveys were conducted in this region. Then high-temperature anomaly of groundwater accompanied with high Cl concentration was detected along fault systems in this area. In addition, dissolved He in groundwater showed nearly upper mantle-like 3He/4He ratio, although there were no Quaternary volcanic activities in this region. Some recent studies have assumed that these groundwater profiles are related with geological structure because some faults and joints can function as pathways for groundwater flow, and mantle-derived water can upwell through the fault system to the ground surface. To verify these hypotheses, we established 3D geological and hydrological model around Osaka sedimentary basin. Our primary goal is to analyze spatial relationship between geological structure and groundwater profile. In the study region, a number of geological and hydrological datasets, such as boring log data, seismic profiling data, groundwater chemical profile, were reported. We converted these datasets to meshed data on the GIS, and plotted in the three dimensional space to visualize spatial distribution. Furthermore, we projected seismic profiling data into three dimensional space and calculated distance between faults and sampling points, using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts. All 3D models are converted into VRML format, and can be used as a versatile dataset on personal computer. This research project has been conducted under the research contract with the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES).

  4. A fast technique applied to the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes with 3D conducting structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinacci, Guglielmo Liu, Yueqiang

    2009-03-20

    This paper illustrates the development of a 'fast' technique for the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) in fusion devices with three-dimensional conducting structures, by means of the recently developed CarMa code. Thanks to its peculiar features, the computational cost scales almost linearly with the number of discrete unknowns. Some large scale problems are solved in configurations of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

  5. Construction of topological structure of 3D coronary vessels for analysis of catheter navigation in interventional cardiology simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaoping; Chui, Cheekong K.; Cai, Yiyu; Mak, KoonHou

    1998-06-01

    This study presents an approach to build a 3D vascular system of coronary for the development of a virtual cardiology simulator. The 3D model of the coronary arterial tree is reconstructed from the geometric information segmented from the Visible Human data set for physical analysis of catheterization. The process of segmentation is guided by a 3D topologic hierarchy structure of coronary vessels which is obtained from a mechanical model by using Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) probing. This mechanical professional model includes all major coronary arterials ranging from right coronary artery to atrioventricular branch and from left main trunk to left anterior descending branch. All those branches are considered as the main operating sites for cardiology catheterization. Along with the primary arterial vasculature and accompanying secondary and tertiary networks obtained from a previous work, a more complete vascular structure can then be built for the simulation of catheterization. A novel method has been developed for real time Finite Element Analysis of catheter navigation based on this featured vasculature of vessels.

  6. Classification of mathematics deficiency using shape and scale analysis of 3D brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtek, Sebastian; Klassen, Eric; Gore, John C.; Ding, Zhaohua; Srivastava, Anuj

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the use of a recent technique for shape analysis of brain substructures in identifying learning disabilities in third-grade children. This Riemannian technique provides a quantification of differences in shapes of parameterized surfaces, using a distance that is invariant to rigid motions and re-parameterizations. Additionally, it provides an optimal registration across surfaces for improved matching and comparisons. We utilize an efficient gradient based method to obtain the optimal re-parameterizations of surfaces. In this study we consider 20 different substructures in the human brain and correlate the differences in their shapes with abnormalities manifested in deficiency of mathematical skills in 106 subjects. The selection of these structures is motivated in part by the past links between their shapes and cognitive skills, albeit in broader contexts. We have studied the use of both individual substructures and multiple structures jointly for disease classification. Using a leave-one-out nearest neighbor classifier, we obtained a 62.3% classification rate based on the shape of the left hippocampus. The use of multiple structures resulted in an improved classification rate of 71.4%.

  7. Sequence and 3D structure based analysis of TNT degrading proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bhattacherjee, Amrita; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Das, Santasabuj; Kundu, Sudip

    2014-03-01

    TNT, accidentally released at several manufacturing sites, contaminates ground water and soil. It has a toxic effect to algae and invertebrate, and chronic exposure to TNT also causes harmful effects to human. On the other hand, many plants including Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to metabolize TNT either completely or at least to a reduced less toxic form. In A. thaliana, the enzyme UDP glucosyltransferase (UDPGT) can further conjugate the reduced forms 2-HADNT and 4-HADNT (2-hydroxylamino-4, 6- dinitrotoluene and 4-hydroxylamino-2, 6- dinitrotoluene) of TNT. Based on the experimental analysis, existing literature and phylogenetic analysis, it is evident that among 107 UDPGT proteins only six are involved in the TNT degrading process. A total of 13 UDPGT proteins including five of these TNT degrading proteins fall within the same group of phylogeny. Thus, these 13 UDPGT proteins have been classified into two groups, TNT-degrading and TNT-non-degrading proteins. To understand the differences in TNT-degrading capacities; using homology modeling we first predicted two structures, taking one representative sequence from both the groups. Next, we performed molecular docking of the modeled structure and TNT reduced form 2-hydroxylamino-4, 6- dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). We observed that while the Trp residue located within the active site region of the TNT- degrading protein showed π-Cation interaction; such type of interaction was absent in TNT-non-degrading protein, as the respective Trp residue lay outside of the pocket in this case. We observed the conservation of this π-Cation interaction during MD simulation of TNT-degrading protein. Thus, the position and the orientation of the active site residue Trp could explain the presence and absence of TNT-degrading capacity of the UDPGT proteins.

  8. 3D Structured Grid Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Hafez, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Grid adaptation for structured meshes is the art of using information from an existing, but poorly resolved, solution to automatically redistribute the grid points in such a way as to improve the resolution in regions of high error, and thus the quality of the solution. This involves: (1) generate a grid vis some standard algorithm, (2) calculate a solution on this grid, (3) adapt the grid to this solution, (4) recalculate the solution on this adapted grid, and (5) repeat steps 3 and 4 to satisfaction. Steps 3 and 4 can be repeated until some 'optimal' grid is converged to but typically this is not worth the effort and just two or three repeat calculations are necessary. They also may be repeated every 5-10 time steps for unsteady calculations.

  9. 3DIANA: 3D Domain Interaction Analysis: A Toolbox for Quaternary Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Sanchez-Garcia, Ruben; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Cuenca-Alba, Jesus; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Carazo, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is experiencing a revolution with the advent of a new generation of Direct Electron Detectors, enabling a broad range of large and flexible structures to be resolved well below 1 nm resolution. Although EM techniques are evolving to the point of directly obtaining structural data at near-atomic resolution, for many molecules the attainable resolution might not be enough to propose high-resolution structural models. However, accessing information on atomic coordinates is a necessary step toward a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow proteins to perform specific tasks. For that reason, methods for the integration of EM three-dimensional maps with x-ray and NMR structural data are being developed, a modeling task that is normally referred to as fitting, resulting in the so called hybrid models. In this work, we present a novel application—3DIANA—specially targeted to those cases in which the EM map resolution is medium or low and additional experimental structural information is scarce or even lacking. In this way, 3DIANA statistically evaluates proposed/potential contacts between protein domains, presents a complete catalog of both structurally resolved and predicted interacting regions involving these domains and, finally, suggests structural templates to model the interaction between them. The evaluation of the proposed interactions is computed with DIMERO, a new method that scores physical binding sites based on the topology of protein interaction networks, which has recently shown the capability to increase by 200% the number of domain-domain interactions predicted in interactomes as compared to previous approaches. The new application displays the information at a sequence and structural level and is accessible through a web browser or as a Chimera plugin at http://3diana.cnb.csic.es. PMID:26772592

  10. Automatic segmentation of solitary pulmonary nodules based on local intensity structure analysis and 3D neighborhood features in 3D chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) segmentation method based on local intensity structure analysis and neighborhood feature analysis in chest CT images. Automated segmentation of SPNs is desirable for a chest computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAS) system since a SPN may indicate early stage of lung cancer. Due to the similar intensities of SPNs and other chest structures such as blood vessels, many false positives (FPs) are generated by nodule detection methods. To reduce such FPs, we introduce two features that analyze the relation between each segmented nodule candidate and it neighborhood region. The proposed method utilizes a blob-like structure enhancement (BSE) filter based on Hessian analysis to augment the blob-like structures as initial nodule candidates. Then a fine segmentation is performed to segment much more accurate region of each nodule candidate. FP reduction is mainly addressed by investigating two neighborhood features based on volume ratio and eigenvector of Hessian that are calculates from the neighborhood region of each nodule candidate. We evaluated the proposed method by using 40 chest CT images, include 20 standard-dose CT images that we randomly chosen from a local database and 20 low-dose CT images that were randomly chosen from a public database: LIDC. The experimental results revealed that the average TP rate of proposed method was 93.6% with 12.3 FPs/case.

  11. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-08

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/.

  12. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome

    PubMed Central

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J.; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  13. 3D and Multispectral Imaging For Subcutaneous Structures Classification And Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Price, Jeffery R; Meriaudeau, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    A classification method to differentiate subcutaneous structures is presented. To obtain characteristic spectral signatures, we are investigating light propagation phenomena in biological tissues by combining visible to near-infrared multi-wavelength skin imaging and three dimensional topographic imaging of the skin surface.

  14. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  15. Three-dimensional (3D) printing of mouse primary hepatocytes to generate 3D hepatic structure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyojin; Jeong, Jaemin; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Ji Sook; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Park, Jisun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The major problem in producing artificial livers is that primary hepatocytes cannot be cultured for many days. Recently, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology draws attention and this technology regarded as a useful tool for current cell biology. By using the 3D bio-printing, these problems can be resolved. Methods To generate 3D bio-printed structures (25 mm × 25 mm), cells-alginate constructs were fabricated by 3D bio-printing system. Mouse primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of 6–8 weeks old mice by a 2-step collagenase method. Samples of 4 × 107 hepatocytes with 80%–90% viability were printed with 3% alginate solution, and cultured with well-defined culture medium for primary hepatocytes. To confirm functional ability of hepatocytes cultured on 3D alginate scaffold, we conducted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence with hepatic marker genes. Results Isolated primary hepatocytes were printed with alginate. The 3D printed hepatocytes remained alive for 14 days. Gene expression levels of Albumin, HNF-4α and Foxa3 were gradually increased in the 3D structures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the primary hepatocytes produced hepatic-specific proteins over the same period of time. Conclusion Our research indicates that 3D bio-printing technique can be used for long-term culture of primary hepatocytes. It can therefore be used for drug screening and as a potential method of producing artificial livers. PMID:28203553

  16. 3D Structural Analysis of the Benton Uplift, Ouachita orogen, Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. E.; Wiltschko, D. V.

    2011-12-01

    The date for the formation of the Benton Uplift, Ouachita orogeny, is bracketed by Carboniferous synorogenic sediments deposited to the north and Late Pennsylvanian to early Permian isotopic dates from the weakly metamorphosed rocks within the uplift. We address the largely unknown structural history between these two constraints by presenting an improved 3-dimensional kinematic model using better constrained retrodeformable sections. These new sections are based on all surface and subsurface data, new zircon fission track dates and thermal maturation data including new 'crystallinity' data to constrain the maximum burial depth. Zircon fission track ages range from 307 ± 18.8 Ma to 333.4 ± 38.9 Ma or from the Late Devonian to early Permian. Maximum 'crystallinity' of both illite and chlorite indicate these exposed rocks experienced a temperature of ~300°C across the eastern Benton Uplift. This temperature is consistent with reconstructed burial depths using cumulative stratigraphic thickness without having to call on structural thickening. Comparing coarse and fine clay fractions, computed temperature for the fine clay fraction is less by ~100°C than that of the coarse clay fraction. This difference is the same for all formations studied. This uniform difference in temperature may indicate cooling of the orogen as it deformed or more than one thermal event.

  17. Processes of Equatorial Thermal Structure: An Analysis of Galileo Temperature Profile with 3-D Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majeed, T.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bougher, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Jupiter Thermosphere General Circulation Model (JTGCM) calculates the global dynamical structure of Jupiter's thermosphere self-consistently with its global thermal structure and composition. The main heat source that drives the thermospheric flow is high-latitude Joule heating. A secondary source of heating is the auroral process of particle precipitation. Global simulations of Jovian thermospheric dynamics indicate strong neutral outflows from the auroral ovals with velocities up to approximately 2 kilometers per second and subsequent convergence and downwelling at the Jovian equator. Such circulation is shown to be an important process for transporting significant amounts of auroral energy to equatorial latitudes and for regulating the global heat budget in a manner consistent with the high thermospheric temperatures observed by the Galileo probe. Adiabatic compression of the neutral atmosphere resulting from downward motion is an important source of equatorial heating (less than 0.06 microbar). The adiabatic heating continues to dominate between 0.06 and 0.2 microbar, but with an addition of comparable heating due to horizontal advection induced by the meridional flow. Thermal conduction plays an important role in transporting heat down to lower altitudes (greater than 0.2microbar) where it is balanced by the cooling associated with the wind transport processes. Interestingly, we find that radiative cooling caused by H3(+), CH4, and C2H2 emissions does not play a significant role in interpreting the Galileo temperature profile.

  18. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the deep Galicia rifted margin: A first analysis of the Galicia 3D wide-angle seismic dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakci, Gaye; Minshull, Timothy A.; Davy, Richard G.; Karplus, Marianne S.; Kaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Krabbenhoeft, Anne; Sawyer, Dale; Reston, Timothy J.; Shillington, Donna J.; Ranero, César R.

    2014-05-01

    Galicia 3D, a reflection-refraction and long offset seismic experiment was carried out from May through September 2013, at the Galicia rifted margin (in the northeast Atlantic Ocean, west of Spain) as a collaboration between US, UK, German and Spanish groups. The 3D multichannel seismic acquisition conducted by R/V Marcus Langseth covered a 64 km by 20 km (1280 km2) zone where the main geological features are the Peridotite Ridge (PR), composed of serpentinized peridotite and thought be upper mantle exhumed to the seafloor during rifting, and the S reflector which has been interpreted to be a low angle detachment fault overlain by fault bounded, rotated, continental crustal blocks. In the 3D box, two airgun arrays of 3300 cu.in. were fired alternately (in flip-flop configuration) every 37.5 m. All shots are recorded by 44 short period four component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and 26 ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) deployed and recovered by R/V Poseidon, as well as four 6 km hydrophone streamers with 12.5 m channel spacing towed by R/V Marcus Langseth. We present the preliminary results of the first arrival time tomography study which is carried out with a subset of the wide-angle dataset, in order to generate a 3D P-wave velocity volume for the entire depth sampled by the reflection data. After the relocation of OBSs and OBHs, an automatic first-arrival time picking approach is applied to a subset of the dataset, which comprises more than 5.5 million source-receiver pairs. Then, the first-arrival times are checked visually, in 3-dimensions. The a priori model used for the first-arrival time tomography is built up using information from previous seismic surveys carried out at the Galicia margin (e.g. ISE, 1997). The FAST algorithm of Zelt and Barton (1998) is used for the first-arrival time inversion. The 3D P-wave velocity volume can be used in interpreting the reflection dataset, as a starting point for migration, to quantify the thinning of the crustal layers

  19. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Some Structural Modified PC Sleeper with the Vibration Characteristics between Sleeper and Ballast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hirotaka; Urakawa, Fumihiro; Aikawa, Akira; Namura, Akira

    The vibration of concrete sleepers is an important factor engendering track deterioration. In this paper, we created a three-dimensional finite element model to reproduce a prestressed concrete (PC) sleeper in detail, expressing influence of ballast layers with a 3D spring series and dampers to reproduce their vibration and dynamic characteristics. Determination of these parameters bases on the experimental modal analysis using an impact excitation technique for PC sleepers by adjusting the accelerance between the analytical results and experimental results. Furthermore, we compared the difference of these characteristics between normal sleepers and those with some structural modifications. Analytical results clarified that such means as sleeper width extension and increased sleeper thickness will influence the reduction of ballasted track vibration as improvements of PC sleepers.

  20. RNA Structure: Advances and Assessment of 3D Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric

    2017-03-30

    Biological functions of RNA molecules are dependent upon sustained specific three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA, with or without the help of proteins. Understanding of RNA structure is frequently based on 2D structures, which describe only the Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs. Here, we hierarchically review the structural elements of RNA and how they contribute to RNA 3D structure. We focus our analysis on the non-WC base pairs and on RNA modules. Several computer programs have now been designed to predict RNA modules. We describe the RNA-Puzzles initiative, which is a community-wide, blind assessment of RNA 3D structure prediction programs to determine the capabilities and bottlenecks of current predictions. The assessment metrics used in RNA-Puzzles are briefly described. The detection of RNA 3D modules from sequence data and their automatic implementation belong to the current challenges in RNA 3D structure prediction. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biophysics Volume 46 is May 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. Quantitative 3D structured illumination microscopy of nuclear structures.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Felix; Miron, Ezequiel; Demmerle, Justin; Chitiashvili, Tsotne; Budco, Alexei; Alle, Quentin; Matsuda, Atsushi; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Schermelleh, Lothar; Markaki, Yolanda

    2017-05-01

    3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) is the super-resolution technique of choice for multicolor volumetric imaging. Here we provide a validated sample preparation protocol for labeling nuclei of cultured mammalian cells, image acquisition and registration practices, and downstream image analysis of nuclear structures and epigenetic marks. Using immunostaining and replication labeling combined with image segmentation, centroid mapping and nearest-neighbor analyses in open-source environments, 3D maps of nuclear structures are analyzed in individual cells and normalized to fluorescence standards on the nanometer scale. This protocol fills an unmet need for the application of 3D-SIM to the technically challenging nuclear environment, and subsequent quantitative analysis of 3D nuclear structures and epigenetic modifications. In addition, it establishes practical guidelines and open-source solutions using ImageJ/Fiji and the TANGO plugin for high-quality and routinely comparable data generation in immunostaining experiments that apply across model systems. From sample preparation through image analysis, the protocol can be executed within one week.

  2. Discovering Structural Regularity in 3D Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Pauly, Mark; Mitra, Niloy J.; Wallner, Johannes; Pottmann, Helmut; Guibas, Leonidas J.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a computational framework for discovering regular or repeated geometric structures in 3D shapes. We describe and classify possible regular structures and present an effective algorithm for detecting such repeated geometric patterns in point- or mesh-based models. Our method assumes no prior knowledge of the geometry or spatial location of the individual elements that define the pattern. Structure discovery is made possible by a careful analysis of pairwise similarity transformations that reveals prominent lattice structures in a suitable model of transformation space. We introduce an optimization method for detecting such uniform grids specifically designed to deal with outliers and missing elements. This yields a robust algorithm that successfully discovers complex regular structures amidst clutter, noise, and missing geometry. The accuracy of the extracted generating transformations is further improved using a novel simultaneous registration method in the spatial domain. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on a variety of examples and show applications to compression, model repair, and geometry synthesis. PMID:21170292

  3. Analysis and Compensation for Lateral Chromatic Aberration in a Color Coding Structured Light 3D Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junhui; Xue, Qi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    While color-coding methods have improved the measuring efficiency of a structured light three-dimensional (3D) measurement system, they decreased the measuring accuracy significantly due to lateral chromatic aberration (LCA). In this study, the LCA in a structured light measurement system is analyzed, and a method is proposed to compensate the error caused by the LCA. Firstly, based on the projective transformation, a 3D error map of LCA is constructed in the projector images by using a flat board and comparing the image coordinates of red, green and blue circles with the coordinates of white circles at preselected sample points within the measurement volume. The 3D map consists of the errors, which are the equivalent errors caused by LCA of the camera and projector. Then in measurements, error values of LCA are calculated and compensated to correct the projector image coordinates through the 3D error map and a tri-linear interpolation method. Eventually, 3D coordinates with higher accuracy are re-calculated according to the compensated image coordinates. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified in the following experiments. PMID:27598174

  4. Analysis and Compensation for Lateral Chromatic Aberration in a Color Coding Structured Light 3D Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junhui; Xue, Qi; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-09-03

    While color-coding methods have improved the measuring efficiency of a structured light three-dimensional (3D) measurement system, they decreased the measuring accuracy significantly due to lateral chromatic aberration (LCA). In this study, the LCA in a structured light measurement system is analyzed, and a method is proposed to compensate the error caused by the LCA. Firstly, based on the projective transformation, a 3D error map of LCA is constructed in the projector images by using a flat board and comparing the image coordinates of red, green and blue circles with the coordinates of white circles at preselected sample points within the measurement volume. The 3D map consists of the errors, which are the equivalent errors caused by LCA of the camera and projector. Then in measurements, error values of LCA are calculated and compensated to correct the projector image coordinates through the 3D error map and a tri-linear interpolation method. Eventually, 3D coordinates with higher accuracy are re-calculated according to the compensated image coordinates. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified in the following experiments.

  5. Strategies for the structural analysis of multi-protein complexes: lessons from the 3D-Repertoire project.

    PubMed

    Collinet, B; Friberg, A; Brooks, M A; van den Elzen, T; Henriot, V; Dziembowski, A; Graille, M; Durand, D; Leulliot, N; Saint André, C; Lazar, N; Sattler, M; Séraphin, B; van Tilbeurgh, H

    2011-08-01

    Structural studies of multi-protein complexes, whether by X-ray diffraction, scattering, NMR spectroscopy or electron microscopy, require stringent quality control of the component samples. The inability to produce 'keystone' subunits in a soluble and correctly folded form is a serious impediment to the reconstitution of the complexes. Co-expression of the components offers a valuable alternative to the expression of single proteins as a route to obtain sufficient amounts of the sample of interest. Even in cases where milligram-scale quantities of purified complex of interest become available, there is still no guarantee that good quality crystals can be obtained. At this step, protein engineering of one or more components of the complex is frequently required to improve solubility, yield or the ability to crystallize the sample. Subsequent characterization of these constructs may be performed by solution techniques such as Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to identify 'well behaved' complexes. Herein, we recount our experiences gained at protein production and complex assembly during the European 3D Repertoire project (3DR). The goal of this consortium was to obtain structural information on multi-protein complexes from yeast by combining crystallography, electron microscopy, NMR and in silico modeling methods. We present here representative set case studies of complexes that were produced and analyzed within the 3DR project. Our experience provides useful insight into strategies that are more generally applicable for structural analysis of protein complexes.

  6. 3D Structure of Tillage Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Torre, Iván; Losada, Juan Carlos; Falconer, Ruth; Hapca, Simona; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure may be defined as the spatial arrangement of soil particles, aggregates and pores. The geometry of each one of these elements, as well as their spatial arrangement, has a great influence on the transport of fluids and solutes through the soil. Fractal/Multifractal methods have been increasingly applied to quantify soil structure thanks to the advances in computer technology (Tarquis et al., 2003). There is no doubt that computed tomography (CT) has provided an alternative for observing intact soil structure. These CT techniques reduce the physical impact to sampling, providing three-dimensional (3D) information and allowing rapid scanning to study sample dynamics in near real-time (Houston et al., 2013a). However, several authors have dedicated attention to the appropriate pore-solid CT threshold (Elliot and Heck, 2007; Houston et al., 2013b) and the better method to estimate the multifractal parameters (Grau et al., 2006; Tarquis et al., 2009). The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the algorithm applied in the multifractal method (box counting and box gliding) and the cube size on the calculation of generalized fractal dimensions (Dq) in grey images without applying any threshold. To this end, soil samples were extracted from different areas plowed with three tools (moldboard, chissel and plow). Soil samples for each of the tillage treatment were packed into polypropylene cylinders of 8 cm diameter and 10 cm high. These were imaged using an mSIMCT at 155keV and 25 mA. An aluminium filter (0.25 mm) was applied to reduce beam hardening and later several corrections where applied during reconstruction. References Elliot, T.R. and Heck, R.J. 2007. A comparison of 2D and 3D thresholding of CT imagery. Can. J. Soil Sci., 87(4), 405-412. Grau, J, Médez, V.; Tarquis, A.M., Saa, A. and Díaz, M.C.. 2006. Comparison of gliding box and box-counting methods in soil image analysis. Geoderma, 134, 349-359. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and

  7. User's manual for FRAC3D: Supplement to report on stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.; Hopper, A. T.; Hayes, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    The FRAC3D computer program, designed for use in analyzing stresses in structures (including plates, bars, or blocks) which may contain part-circular surface cracks or embedded circular cracks is described. Instructions are provided for preparing input, including that for the supporting programs LATTICE and MATSOL as well as for FRAC3D. The course of a substantial illustrative calculation is shown with both input and output. The formulas underlying the calculations are summarized and related to the subroutines in which they are used. Many issues of strategy in using this program for analysing stresses around surface cracks are elucidated.

  8. Evaluation of reproducibility and reliability of 3D soft tissue analysis using 3D stereophotogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Plooij, J M; Swennen, G R J; Rangel, F A; Maal, T J J; Schutyser, F A C; Bronkhorst, E M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Bergé, S J

    2009-03-01

    In 3D photographs the bony structures are neither available nor palpable, therefore, the bone-related landmarks, such as the soft tissue gonion, need to be redefined. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility and reliability of 49 soft tissue landmarks, including newly defined 3D bone-related soft tissue landmarks with the use of 3D stereophotogrammetric images. Two observers carried out soft-tissue analysis on 3D photographs twice for 20 patients. A reference frame and 49 landmarks were identified on each 3D photograph. Paired Student's t-test was used to test the reproducibility and Pearson's correlation coefficient to determine the reliability of the landmark identification. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility of the landmarks were high. The study showed a high reliability coefficient for intraobserver (0.97 (0.90 - 0.99)) and interobserver reliability (0.94 (0.69 - 0.99)). Identification of the landmarks in the midline was more precise than identification of the paired landmarks. In conclusion, the redefinition of bone-related soft tissue 3D landmarks in combination with the 3D photograph reference system resulted in an accurate and reliable 3D photograph based soft tissue analysis. This shows that hard tissue data are not needed to perform accurate soft tissue analysis.

  9. Accuracy of the fast multipole boundary element method with quadratic elements in the analysis of 3D porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptaszny, Jacek

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a fast multipole boundary element method for 3D elasticity problem was developed by the application of the fast multipole algorithm and isoparametric 8-node boundary elements with quadratic shape functions. The problem is described by the boundary integral equation involving the Kelvin solutions. In order to keep the numerical integration error on appropriate level, an adaptive method with subdivision of boundary elements into subelements, described in the literature, was applied. An extension of the neighbour list of boundary element clusters, corresponding to near-field computations, was proposed in order to reduce the truncation error of expansions in problems with high stress concentration. Efficiency of the method is illustrated by numerical examples including a solid with single spherical cavity, solids with two interacting spherical cavities, and numerical homogenization of solids with cubic arrangement of spherical cavities. All results agree with analytical models available in the literature. The examples show that the method can be applied to the analysis of porous structures.

  10. 3D Structures of Responsive Nanocompartmentalized Microgels.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, Arjan P H; Oppermann, Alex; Caumanns, Tobias; Hebbeker, Pascal; Turnhoff, Sarah K; Tiwari, Rahul; Eisold, Sabine; Simon, Ulrich; Lu, Yan; Mayer, Joachim; Richtering, Walter; Walther, Andreas; Wöll, Dominik

    2016-11-09

    Compartmentalization in soft matter is important for segregating and coordinating chemical reactions, sequestering (re)active components, and integrating multifunctionality. Advances depend crucially on quantitative 3D visualization in situ with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we show the direct visualization of different compartments within adaptive microgels using a combination of in situ electron and super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. We unravel new levels of structural details and address the challenge of reconstructing 3D information from 2D projections for nonuniform soft matter as opposed to monodisperse proteins. Moreover, we visualize the thermally induced shrinkage of responsive core-shell microgels live in water. This strategy opens doors for systematic in situ studies of soft matter systems and their application as smart materials.

  11. Inferential modeling of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyu; Xu, Jinbo; Zeng, Jianyang

    2015-04-30

    For eukaryotic cells, the biological processes involving regulatory DNA elements play an important role in cell cycle. Understanding 3D spatial arrangements of chromosomes and revealing long-range chromatin interactions are critical to decipher these biological processes. In recent years, chromosome conformation capture (3C) related techniques have been developed to measure the interaction frequencies between long-range genome loci, which have provided a great opportunity to decode the 3D organization of the genome. In this paper, we develop a new Bayesian framework to derive the 3D architecture of a chromosome from 3C-based data. By modeling each chromosome as a polymer chain, we define the conformational energy based on our current knowledge on polymer physics and use it as prior information in the Bayesian framework. We also propose an expectation-maximization (EM) based algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters of the Bayesian model and infer an ensemble of chromatin structures based on interaction frequency data. We have validated our Bayesian inference approach through cross-validation and verified the computed chromatin conformations using the geometric constraints derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. We have further confirmed the inferred chromatin structures using the known genetic interactions derived from other studies in the literature. Our test results have indicated that our Bayesian framework can compute an accurate ensemble of 3D chromatin conformations that best interpret the distance constraints derived from 3C-based data and also agree with other sources of geometric constraints derived from experimental evidence in the previous studies. The source code of our approach can be found in https://github.com/wangsy11/InfMod3DGen.

  12. Multifractal analysis of white matter structural changes on 3D magnetic resonance imaging between normal aging and early Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Huang-Jing; Zhou, Lu-Ping; Zeng, Peng; Huang, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Hong-Xing; Ning, Xin-Bao

    2015-07-01

    Applications of multifractal analysis to white matter structure changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently received increasing attentions. Although some progresses have been made, there is no evident study on applying multifractal analysis to evaluate the white matter structural changes on MRI for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. In this paper, to explore multifractal analysis of white matter structural changes on 3D MRI volumes between normal aging and early AD, we not only extend the traditional box-counting multifractal analysis (BCMA) into the 3D case, but also propose a modified integer ratio based BCMA (IRBCMA) algorithm to compensate for the rigid division rule in BCMA. We verify multifractal characteristics in 3D white matter MRI volumes. In addition to the previously well studied multifractal feature, Δα, we also demonstrated Δf as an alternative and effective multifractal feature to distinguish NC from AD subjects. Both Δα and Δf are found to have strong positive correlation with the clinical MMSE scores with statistical significance. Moreover, the proposed IRBCMA can be an alternative and more accurate algorithm for 3D volume analysis. Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of multifractal analysis, which may contribute to clarify some aspects of the etiology of AD through detection of structural changes in white matter. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61271079), the Vice Chancellor Research Grant in University of Wollongong, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China.

  13. Evaluation of 3D Printer Accuracy in Producing Fractal Structure.

    PubMed

    Kikegawa, Kana; Takamatsu, Kyuuichirou; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical structures, also known as fractal structures, exhibit advantageous material properties, such as water- and oil-repellency as well as other useful optical characteristics, owing to its self-similarity. Various methods have been developed for producing hierarchical geometrical structures. Recently, fractal structures have been manufactured using a 3D printing technique that involves computer-aided design data. In this study, we confirmed the accuracy of geometrical structures when Koch curve-like fractal structures with zero to three generations were printed using a 3D printer. The fractal dimension was analyzed using a box-counting method. This analysis indicated that the fractal dimension of the third generation hierarchical structure was approximately the same as that of the ideal Koch curve. These findings demonstrate that the design and production of fractal structures can be controlled using a 3D printer. Although the interior angle deviated from the ideal value, the side length could be precisely controlled.

  14. Crustal density structure in northwestern South America derived from analysis and 3-D modeling of gravity and seismicity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Rojas, J.; Palma, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation of new gravity and seismicity datasets for northern South America. A 3-D forward density model was constructed on the basis of deep wide-angle seismic refraction sections, Moho depth from receiver functions, and surface geology. Density values were estimated from published borehole data for sediments by using empirical velocity-density functions and considering mineralogical-chemical composition variations under typical pressure-temperature conditions for upper and lower crustal rocks. The modeled 3-D density structure was kept as simple as possible. The continental and oceanic plates were formed by two sedimentary bodies, one crustal body, and one mantle lithosphere body overlying a sub-lithospheric mantle. The Caribbean plate was modeled with an atypical crustal thickness of ~ 18 km (including sediments). The geometry of the Caribbean plate was modeled using a combination of gravity modeling and analyses of the seismicity and focal-mechanism solutions. Intermediate seismicity and the orientation of the T-axes appeared aligned along the predicted position of the slab. As a result, the estimated slab dip angle under Maracaibo and the Mérida Andes was ~ 15° and increases up to ~ 20° after 100 km depth. The model shows two orientations in the slab strike: ~ N150°E ± 5 in western Colombia and southward underneath the Maracaibo block. The modeling results suggest that the northern South American upper and lower crusts are relatively light and the density of the Caribbean crust is typical for an oceanic crust.

  15. Automated modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Skiba, Pawel; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview over the current methods for automated modeling of RNA structures, with emphasis on template-based methods. The currently used approaches to RNA modeling are presented with a side view on the protein world, where many similar ideas have been used. Two main programs for automated template-based modeling are presented: ModeRNA assembling structures from fragments and MacroMoleculeBuilder performing a simulation to satisfy spatial restraints. Both approaches have in common that they require an alignment of the target sequence to a known RNA structure that is used as a modeling template. As a way to find promising template structures and to align the target and template sequences, we propose a pipeline combining the ParAlign and Infernal programs on RNA family data from Rfam. We also briefly summarize template-free methods for RNA 3D structure prediction. Typically, RNA structures generated by automated modeling methods require local or global optimization. Thus, we also discuss methods that can be used for local or global refinement of RNA structures.

  16. Formal representation of 3D structural geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhangang; Qu, Honggang; Wu, Zixing; Yang, Hongjun; Du, Qunle

    2016-05-01

    The development and widespread application of geological modeling methods has increased demands for the integration and sharing services of three dimensional (3D) geological data. However, theoretical research in the field of geological information sciences is limited despite the widespread use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in geology. In particular, fundamental research on the formal representations and standardized spatial descriptions of 3D structural models is required. This is necessary for accurate understanding and further applications of geological data in 3D space. In this paper, we propose a formal representation method for 3D structural models using the theory of point set topology, which produces a mathematical definition for the major types of geological objects. The spatial relationships between geologic boundaries, structures, and units are explained in detail using the 9-intersection model. Reasonable conditions for describing the topological space of 3D structural models are also provided. The results from this study can be used as potential support for the standardized representation and spatial quality evaluation of 3D structural models, as well as for specific needs related to model-based management, query, and analysis.

  17. 3-D analysis of grain selection process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arao, Tomoka; Esaka, Hisao; Shinozuka, Kei

    2012-07-01

    It is known that the grain selection plays an important role in the manufacturing process for turbine blades. There are some analytical or numerical models to treat the grain selection. However, the detailed mechanism of grain selection in 3-D is still uncertain. Therefore, an experimental research work using Al-Cu alloy has been carried out in order to understand the grain selection in 3-D.A mold made by Al2O3 was heated to 600 °C ( = liquids temperature of the alloy) and was set on a water-colded copper chill plate. Molten Al-20 wt%Cu alloy was cast into the mold and unidirectional solidified ingot was prepared. The size of ingot was approximately phi25×65H mm. To obtain the thermal history, 4 thermocouples were placed in the mold. It is confirmed that the alloy solidified unidirectionally from bottom to top. Solidified structure on a longitudinal cross section was observed and unidirectional solidification up to 40 mm was ensured. EBSD analysis has been performed on horizontal cross section at an interval of ca.200 μm. These observations were carried out 7-5 mm from the bottom surface. Crystallographic orientation of primary Al phase and size of solidified grains were characterized. A large solidified grain, the crystallographic orientation of which is approximately <101> along heat flow direction, is observed near the lowest cross section. The area of <101> grain decreased as solidification proceeded. On the other hand, it is found that the area of <001> grain increased.

  18. Toward mobile 3D visualization for structural biologists.

    PubMed

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Akavipat, Ruj; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2013-12-01

    Technological advances in crystallography have led to the ever-rapidly increasing number of biomolecular structures deposited in public repertoires. This undoubtedly shifts the bottleneck of structural biology research from obtaining high-quality structures to data analysis and interpretation. The recently available glasses-free autostereoscopic laptop offers an unprecedented opportunity to visualize and study 3D structures using a much more affordable, and for the first time, portable device. Together with a gamepad re-programmed for 3D structure controlling, we describe how the gaming technologies can deliver the output 3D images for high-quality viewing, comparable to that of a passive stereoscopic system, and can give the user more control and flexibility than the conventional controlling setup using only a mouse and a keyboard.

  19. Fluid–Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Cochran, Richard P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.

    2015-07-17

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in-vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with *CT. Experimental data from the in-vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed lea et dynamics, and force vectors from the in-vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements are important in validating and adjusting material parameters in computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices.

  20. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø; Einstein, Daniel R; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Cochran, Richard P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with [Formula: see text]CT. Experimental data from the in vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed leaflet dynamics, and force vectors from the in vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements enable validating and adjusting material parameters to improve the accuracy of computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices.

  1. In vivo application of 3D-line skeleton graph analysis (LSGA) technique with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of trabecular bone structure.

    PubMed

    Pothuaud, Laurent; Newitt, David C; Lu, Ying; MacDonald, Brian; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2004-05-01

    Over the last several years magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as a means of measuring in vivo 3D trabecular bone structure. In particular, MR based diagnosis could be used to complement standard bone mineral density (BMD) methods for assessing osteoporosis and evaluating longitudinal changes. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the 3D-LSGA technique for the evaluation of trabecular bone structure of high-resolution MR images, particularly for assessing longitudinal changes, in vivo. First, the reproducibility of topological 3D-LSGA based measurements was evaluated in a set of seven volunteers, and coefficients of variations ranged from 3.5% to 6%. Second, high-resolution MR images of the radius in 30 postmenopausal women from a placebo controlled drug study (Idoxifene), divided into placebo ( n=9) and treated ( n=21) groups, were obtained at baseline (BL) and after 1 year of treatment (follow-up, FU). In addition, dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures of BMD were obtained in the distal radius. Standard morphological measurements based on the mean intercept length (MIL) technique as well as 3D-LSGA based measurements were applied to the 3D MR images. Significant changes from BL to FU were detected, in the treated group, using the topological 3D-LSGA based measurements, morphological measures of volume of connected trabeculae and App Tb.N from MIL analysis. The duration of the study was short, and the number of patients remaining in the study was small, hence these results cannot be interpreted with regard to a true therapeutic response. Furthermore, the site (wrist) and the drug (idoxifene) are not optimal for follow-up study. However, this paper demonstrated the feasibility of using 3D-LSGA based evaluation coupled with in vivo high-resolution MR imaging as a complementary approach for the monitoring of trabecular bone changes in individual subjects.

  2. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable and Tough Hydrogels into Complex, Cellularized Structures.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungmin; Sycks, Dalton; Chan, Hon Fai; Lin, Shaoting; Lopez, Gabriel P; Guilak, Farshid; Leong, Kam W; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2015-07-15

    X. Zhao and co-workers develop on page 4035 a new biocompatible hydrogel system that is extremely tough and stretchable and can be 3D printed into complex structures, such as the multilayer mesh shown. Cells encapsulated in the tough and printable hydrogel maintain high viability. 3D-printed structures of the tough hydrogel can sustain high mechanical loads and deformations.

  3. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  4. Analysis of positions and substituents on genotoxicity of fluoroquinolones with quantitative structure-activity relationship and 3D Pharmacophore model.

    PubMed

    Fengxian, Chen; Reti, Hai

    2017-02-01

    The genotoxicity values of 21 quinolones were studied to establish a quantitative structure-activity relationship model and 3D Pharmacophore model separately for screening essential positions and substituents that contribute to genotoxicity of fluoroquinolones (FQs). A full factor experimental design was performed to analyze the specific main effect and second-order interaction effect of different positions and substituents on genotoxicity, forming a reasonable modification scheme which was validated on typical FQ with genotoxicity and efficacy data. Four positions (1, 5, 7, 8) were screened finally to form the full factorial experimental design which contained 72 congeners in total, illustrating that: the dominant effect of 5 and 7-positions on genotoxicity of FQs is main effect; meanwhile the effect of 1 and 8-positions is a second-order interaction effect; two adjacent positions always have stronger second-order interaction effect and lower genotoxicity; the obtained modification scheme had been validated on typical FQ congeners with the modified compound has a lower genotoxicity, higher synthesis feasibilities and efficacy.

  5. Microfabricating 3D Structures by Laser Origami

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-09

    technique generates 3D microstructures by controlled out-of- plane folding of 2D patterns through a variety of laser-based digital fabrication...processes. Digital microfabrication techniques such as laser direct-write (LDW) offer a viable alternative for generating 3D self-folding designs. These...folding at the microscale where manual or mechanized actuation of the smaller struc- tures is not practical. LDW techniques allow micromachining and

  6. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Cannone, Jamie J.; Sweeney, Blake A.; Petrov, Anton I.; Gutell, Robin R.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-01-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa. PMID:26048960

  7. R3D-2-MSA: the RNA 3D structure-to-multiple sequence alignment server.

    PubMed

    Cannone, Jamie J; Sweeney, Blake A; Petrov, Anton I; Gutell, Robin R; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles

    2015-07-01

    The RNA 3D Structure-to-Multiple Sequence Alignment Server (R3D-2-MSA) is a new web service that seamlessly links RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures to high-quality RNA multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) from diverse biological sources. In this first release, R3D-2-MSA provides manual and programmatic access to curated, representative ribosomal RNA sequence alignments from bacterial, archaeal, eukaryal and organellar ribosomes, using nucleotide numbers from representative atomic-resolution 3D structures. A web-based front end is available for manual entry and an Application Program Interface for programmatic access. Users can specify up to five ranges of nucleotides and 50 nucleotide positions per range. The R3D-2-MSA server maps these ranges to the appropriate columns of the corresponding MSA and returns the contents of the columns, either for display in a web browser or in JSON format for subsequent programmatic use. The browser output page provides a 3D interactive display of the query, a full list of sequence variants with taxonomic information and a statistical summary of distinct sequence variants found. The output can be filtered and sorted in the browser. Previous user queries can be viewed at any time by resubmitting the output URL, which encodes the search and re-generates the results. The service is freely available with no login requirement at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3d-2-msa.

  8. The 3-D inelastic analyses for computational structural mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The 3-D inelastic analysis method is a focused program with the objective to develop computationally effective analysis methods and attendant computer codes for three-dimensional, nonlinear time and temperature dependent problems present in the hot section of turbojet engine structures. Development of these methods was a major part of the Hot Section Technology (HOST) program over the past five years at Lewis Research Center.

  9. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  10. Development of 3D Geological Structure Analysis Method Using Multi-geophysical Data: Application to Hwasan Caldera in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G.; Yang, J.; Yi, M.; Kim, J.; Kwon, B.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-geophysical surveys were carried out around the Hwasan caldera at the Euisung Sub-basin in Korea. To overcome the limitations of survey resolutions of previous studies, 510 points of gravity and 32 points of magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained. To analyze three-dimensional density and resistivity models, gravity and MT inversions were carried out using Marquardt-Levenberg method and WSINV3DMT code, respectively. To carry out the objective structure analysis of multi-parametric geophysical data, a new classification technique, Structure Index (SI) method, was proposed. SI method consists of Type Angle (TA) and Type Intensity (TI) values. It is one of the projection techniques similar to the universal transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, and a mathematical method of showing the patterns of correlation and abnormalness of physical property values by TA and TI values. TA values indicate the correlation patterns of normalized data sets and TI values show the levels of the abnormalness of physical property values. For the processing, the density and resistivity values were estimated at the same nodes using kriging methods through S-GeMS based on GSLIB. Base on the results of the SI processing, all classified nodes were plotted and visualized in 3-dimensional space as shown in Fig. 1. The analyzed results of SI method using gravity and MT data match well with those of the previous researches, including the geologic map. First, the intrusive igneous rocks, which have high density and resistivity values, were analyzed according to the ring fault and intrusive igneous area at the north-east side of the Hwasan caldera. Second, the pyroclastic rocks at the center of the caldera, which is extended to a depth of around 1 km with low density and resistivity values, were imaged. The basement structure, which has a relatively low resistivity and high density at a depth of 5 km was also inferred by integration analysis. This method makes it possible to classify and three

  11. USJ metrology: from 0D to 3D analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2007-09-26

    The analysis of ultra shallow junctions is becoming a challenging task for which numerous tools and concepts are available. The requirements range from a simple 0D-analysis such as the integral dose or the sheet resistance over a simple 1D-profile (as obtained on blanket films) towards the 2D-dopant profile within a transistor. The ultimate complexity will be the analysis of a complete 3D-structure such as a FINFET, requiring a metrology tool with 3D-resolution. In each of these areas significant progress has been made in recent years and new concepts are emerging which will be discussed in this review.

  12. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pyka, Grzegorz; Kerckhofs, Greet

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  13. Structural requirements of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolones as potential antimalarials from 2D and 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Bai, Chongliang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a fatal tropical and subtropical disease caused by the protozoal species Plasmodium. Many commonly available antimalarial drugs and therapies are becoming ineffective because of the emergence of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, which drives the need for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Recently, a series of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolone analogs, derived from the famous compound endochin, were reported as promising candidates for orally efficacious antimalarials. In this study, to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these quinolones and investigate the structural requirements for antimalarial activity, the 2D multiple linear regressions (MLR) method and 3D comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods are employed to evolve different QSAR models. All these models give satisfactory results with highly accurate fitting and strong external predictive abilities for chemicals not used in model development. Furthermore, the contour maps from 3D models can provide an intuitive understanding of the key structure features responsible for the antimalarial activities. In conclusion, we summarize the detailed position-specific structural requirements of these derivatives accordingly. All these results are helpful for the rational design of new compounds with higher antimalarial bioactivities.

  14. Computational modeling of RNA 3D structures and interactions.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne K; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    RNA molecules have key functions in cellular processes beyond being carriers of protein-coding information. These functions are often dependent on the ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is difficult, which has prompted the development of computational methods for structure prediction from sequence. Recent progress in 3D structure modeling of RNA and emerging approaches for predicting RNA interactions with ions, ligands and proteins have been stimulated by successes in protein 3D structure modeling.

  15. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  16. 3-D object-oriented image analysis of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; Kerle, N.; van der Meijde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Geophysical data are the main source of information about the subsurface. Geophysical techniques are, however, highly non-unique in determining specific physical parameters and boundaries of subsurface objects. To obtain actual physical information, an inversion process is often applied, in which measurements at or above the Earth surface are inverted into a 2- or 3-D subsurface spatial distribution of the physical property. Interpreting these models into structural objects, related to physical processes, requires a priori knowledge and expert analysis which is susceptible to subjective choices and is therefore often non-repeatable. In this research, we implemented a recently introduced object-based approach to interpret the 3-D inversion results of a single geophysical technique using the available a priori information and the physical and geometrical characteristics of the interpreted objects. The introduced methodology is semi-automatic and repeatable, and allows the extraction of subsurface structures using 3-D object-oriented image analysis (3-D OOA) in an objective knowledge-based classification scheme. The approach allows for a semi-objective setting of thresholds that can be tested and, if necessary, changed in a very fast and efficient way. These changes require only changing the thresholds used in a so-called ruleset, which is composed of algorithms that extract objects from a 3-D data cube. The approach is tested on a synthetic model, which is based on a priori knowledge on objects present in the study area (Tanzania). Object characteristics and thresholds were well defined in a 3-D histogram of velocity versus depth, and objects were fully retrieved. The real model results showed how 3-D OOA can deal with realistic 3-D subsurface conditions in which the boundaries become fuzzy, the object extensions become unclear and the model characteristics vary with depth due to the different physical conditions. As expected, the 3-D histogram of the real data was

  17. 3-D models and structural analysis of rock avalanches: the study of the deformation process to better understand the propagation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, Céline; Abellan, Antonio; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Manzella, Irene

    2016-09-01

    Rock avalanches are extremely destructive and uncontrollable events that involve a great volume of material (> 106 m3) and several complex processes, and they are difficult to witness. For this reason the study of these phenomena using analog modeling and the accurate analysis of deposit structures and features of laboratory data and historic events become of great importance in the understanding of their behavior.The main objective of this research is to analyze rock avalanche dynamics and deformation process by means of a detailed structural analysis of the deposits coming from data of 3-D measurements of mass movements of different magnitudes, from decimeter level scale laboratory experiments to well-studied rock avalanches of several square kilometers' magnitude.Laboratory experiments were performed on a tilting plane on which a certain amount of a well-defined granular material is released, propagates and finally stops on a horizontal surface. The 3-D geometrical model of the deposit is then obtained using either a scan made with a 3-D digitizer (Konica Minolta VIVID 9i) or a photogrammetric method called structure from motion (SfM), which requires taking several pictures from different point of view of the object to be modeled.In order to emphasize and better detect the fault structures present in the deposits, we applied a median filter with different moving window sizes (from 3 × 3 to 9 × 9 nearest neighbors) to the 3-D datasets and a gradient operator along the direction of propagation.The application of these filters on the datasets results in (1) a precise mapping of the longitudinal and transversal displacement features observed at the surface of the deposits and (2) a more accurate interpretation of the relative movements along the deposit (i.e., normal, strike-slip, inverse faults) by using cross sections. Results show how the use of filtering techniques reveals disguised features in the original point cloud and that similar displacement patterns

  18. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  19. 3D Network Analysis for Indoor Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiliakou, E.; Dimopoulou, E.

    2016-10-01

    Indoor space differs from outdoor environments, since it is characterized by a higher level of structural complexity, geometry, as well as topological relations. Indoor space can be considered as the most important component in a building's conceptual modelling, on which applications such as indoor navigation, routing or analysis are performed. Therefore, the conceptual meaning of sub spaces or the activities taking place in physical building boundaries (e.g. walls), require the comprehension of the building's indoor hierarchical structure. The scope of this paper is to perform 3D network analysis in a building's interior and is structured as follows: In Section 1 the definition of indoor space is provided and indoor navigation requirements are analysed. Section 2 describes the processes of indoor space modeling, as well as routing applications. In Section 3, a case study is examined involving a 3D building model generated in CityEngine (exterior shell) and ArcScene (interior parts), in which the use of commercially available software tools (ArcGIS, ESRI), in terms of indoor routing and 3D network analysis, are explored. The fundamentals of performing 3D analysis with the ArcGIS Network Analyst extension were tested. Finally a geoprocessing model was presented, which was specifically designed to be used to interactively find the best route in ArcScene. The paper ends with discussion and concluding remarks on Section 4.

  20. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  1. Dynactin 3D structure: implications for assembly and dynein binding.

    PubMed

    Imai, Hiroshi; Narita, Akihiro; Maéda, Yuichiro; Schroer, Trina A

    2014-09-23

    The multisubunit protein complex, dynactin, is an essential component of the cytoplasmic dynein motor. High-resolution structural work on dynactin and the dynein/dynactin supercomplex has been limited to small subunits and recombinant fragments that do not report fully on either ≈1MDa assembly. In the present study, we used negative-stain electron microscopy and image analysis based on random conical tilt reconstruction to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) structure of native vertebrate dynactin. The 35-nm-long dynactin molecule has a V-shaped shoulder at one end and a flattened tip at the other end, both offset relative to the long axis of the actin-related protein (Arp) backbone. The shoulder projects dramatically away from the Arp filament core in a way that cannot be appreciated in two-dimensional images, which has implications for the mechanism of dynein binding. The 3D structure allows the helical parameters of the entire Arp filament core, which includes the actin capping protein, CP, to be determined for the first time. This structure exhibits near identity to F-actin and can be well fitted into the dynactin envelope. Molecular fitting of modeled CP-Arp polymers into the envelope shows that the filament contains between 7 and 9 Arp protomers and is capped at both ends. In the 7 Arp model, which agrees best with measured Arp stoichiometry and other structural information, actin capping protein (CP) is not present at the distal tip of the structure, unlike what is seen in the other models. The 3D structure suggests a mechanism for dynactin assembly and length specification.

  2. Myosin filament 3D structure in mammalian cardiac muscle☆

    PubMed Central

    AL-Khayat, Hind A.; Morris, Edward P.; Kensler, Robert W.; Squire, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of cardiac myopathies (e.g. familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy) are linked to mutations in cardiac muscle myosin filament proteins, including myosin and myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C). To understand the myopathies it is necessary to know the normal 3D structure of these filaments. We have carried out 3D single particle analysis of electron micrograph images of negatively stained isolated myosin filaments from rabbit cardiac muscle. Single filament images were aligned and divided into segments about 2 × 430 Å long, each of which was treated as an independent ‘particle’. The resulting 40 Å resolution 3D reconstruction showed both axial and azimuthal (no radial) myosin head perturbations within the 430 Å repeat, with successive crown rotations of approximately 60°, 60° and 0°, rather than the regular 40° for an unperturbed helix. However, it is shown that the projecting density peaks appear to start at low radius from origins closer to those expected for an unperturbed helical filament, and that the azimuthal perturbation especially increases with radius. The head arrangements in rabbit cardiac myosin filaments are very similar to those in fish skeletal muscle myosin filaments, suggesting a possible general structural theme for myosin filaments in all vertebrate striated muscles (skeletal and cardiac). PMID:18472277

  3. Preliminary design and analysis of procedures for the numerical generation of 3D block-structured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1986-08-01

    Aproaches to grid generation are analyzed. A grid-generation procedure for complex aircraft configurations could be based on a combination of three subprocesses: decomposition of the flow domain into 100 hexahedronal blocks; trilinear transfinite interpolation to generate initial grid point distributions; and elliptic mesh-size tuning and smoothing. To get insight into this procedure, mathematical models of the subprocesses were worked out. The results of the analysis are technical concepts required or desirable in the grid-generation procedure.

  4. Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) invariant chain and class II major histocompatibility complex: sequencing and structural analysis using 3D homology modelling.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniela S P; Reis, Marta I R; Nascimento, Diana S; do Vale, Ana; Pereira, Pedro J B; dos Santos, Nuno M S

    2007-07-01

    The present manuscript reports for the first time the sequencing and characterisation of sea bass (sb) MHCII alpha and beta chains and Ii chain cDNAs as well as their expression analysis under resting state. 3D homology modelling, using crystal structures from mammalian orthologues, has been used to illustrate and support putative structural homologies of the sea bass counterparts. The sbIi cDNA consists of 96 bp of 5'-UTR, a 843 bp open reading frame (ORF) and 899 bp of 3'-UTR including a canonical polyadenylation signal 16 nucleotides before the polyadenylation tail. The ORF was translated into a 280 amino acid sequence, in which all characteristic domains found in the Ii p41 human form could be identified, including the cytoplasmic N-terminus domain, the transmembrane (TM) region, the CLIP domain, the trimerization domain and the thyroglobulin (Tg) type I domain. The trimerization and Tg domains of sbIi were successfully modelled using the human counterparts as templates. Four different sequences of each class II alpha and beta MHCII were obtained from a single fish, apparently not derived from a single locus. All the characteristic features of the MHCII chain structure could be identified in the predicted ORF of sea bass alpha and beta sequences, consisting of leader peptide (LP), alpha1/beta1 and alpha2/beta2 domains, connecting peptide and TM and cytoplasmic regions. Furthermore, independently of the HLA-DR crystal structure used as template in homology modelling, a similar predicted 3D structure and trimeric quaternary architecture was obtained for sbMHC, with major deviations occurring only within the sea bass MHCII alpha1 domain.

  5. 3D face analysis for demographic biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tokola, Ryan A; Mikkilineni, Aravind K; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2015-01-01

    Despite being increasingly easy to acquire, 3D data is rarely used for face-based biometrics applications beyond identification. Recent work in image-based demographic biometrics has enjoyed much success, but these approaches suffer from the well-known limitations of 2D representations, particularly variations in illumination, texture, and pose, as well as a fundamental inability to describe 3D shape. This paper shows that simple 3D shape features in a face-based coordinate system are capable of representing many biometric attributes without problem-specific models or specialized domain knowledge. The same feature vector achieves impressive results for problems as diverse as age estimation, gender classification, and race classification.

  6. The 3D Structure of the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    When Rutherford, Geiger and Marsden discovered the atomic nucleus in 1909 in Manchester, they at the same time also laid the foundations for the most successful method to study the structure of nuclei and nucleons. They found a point-like scattering centre inside the atom and identified it with the atomic nucleus and the theoretical description of this process has been known as Rutherford scattering ever since. The deviation between the theoretical description for a point-like scattering centre and experimental data has since been used to reveal information about the structure of the nucleus as well as the nucleon. There has been a continuous development from Hofstadters experiments in the 1950s, over the SLAC experiments in the 60s and 70s to the the HERA experiments at DESY and the experimental programme at Jeffersonlab. In this paper I am presenting the most recent results in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering from the Hermes experiment at DESY, taken with a high density unpolarised target and a recoil detector in 2006/7.

  7. High precision analysis of an embryonic extensional fault-related fold using 3D orthorectified virtual outcrops: The viewpoint importance in structural geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Corradetti, Amerigo; Billi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Image-based 3D modeling has recently opened the way to the use of virtual outcrop models in geology. An intriguing application of this method involves the production of orthorectified images of outcrops using almost any user-defined point of view, so that photorealistic cross-sections suitable for numerous geological purposes and measurements can be easily generated. These purposes include the accurate quantitative analysis of fault-fold relationships starting from imperfectly oriented and partly inaccessible real outcrops. We applied the method of image-based 3D modeling and orthorectification to a case study from the northern Apennines, Italy, where an incipient extensional fault affecting well-layered limestones is exposed on a 10-m-high barely accessible cliff. Through a few simple steps, we constructed a high-quality image-based 3D model of the outcrop. In the model, we made a series of measurements including fault and bedding attitudes, which allowed us to derive the bedding-fault intersection direction. We then used this direction as viewpoint to obtain a distortion-free photorealistic cross-section, on which we measured bed dips and thicknesses as well as fault stratigraphic separations. These measurements allowed us to identify a slight difference (i.e. only 0.5°) between the hangingwall and footwall cutoff angles. We show that the hangingwall strain required to compensate the upward-decreasing displacement of the fault was accommodated by this 0.5° rotation (i.e. folding) and coeval 0.8% thickening of strata in the hangingwall relatively to footwall strata. This evidence is consistent with trishear fault-propagation folding. Our results emphasize the viewpoint importance in structural geology and therefore the potential of using orthorectified virtual outcrops.

  8. 3D Animations for Exploring Nucleon Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, Waverly; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years many intuitive pictures have been developed for the interpretation of electron hadron scattering experiments, such as a mechanism for transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering experiments. While Dr. Burkardt's pictures have been helpful for many researchers in the field, they are still difficult to visualize for broader audiences since they rely mostly on 2-dimensional static images. In order to make more accessible for a broader audience what can be learned from Jefferson Lab experiments, we have started to work on developing 3-dimensional animations for these processes. The goal is to enable the viewer to repeatedly look at the same microscopic mechanism for a specific reaction, with the viewpoint of the observer changing. This should help an audience that is not so familiar with these reactions to better understand what can be learned from various experiments at Jefferson Lab aimed at exploring the nucleon structure. Jefferson Lab Minority/Female Undergraduate Research Assistantship.

  9. Preliminary investigations on 3D PIC simulation of DPHC structure using NEPTUNE3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hailong; Dong, Ye; Zhou, Haijing; Zou, Wenkang; Wang, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Cubic region (34cm × 34cm × 18cm) including the double post-hole convolute (DPHC) structure was chosen to perform a series of fully 3D PIC simulations using NEPTUNE3D codes, massive data ( 200GB) could be acquired and solved in less than 5 hours. Cold-chamber tests were performed during which only cathode electron emission was considered without temperature rise or ion emission, current loss efficiency was estimated by comparisons between output magnetic field profiles with or without electron emission. PIC simulation results showed three stages of current transforming process with election emission in DPHC structure, the maximum ( 20%) current loss was 437kA at 15ns, while only 0.46% 0.48% was lost when driving current reached its peak. DPHC structure proved valuable functions during energy transform process in PTS facility, and NEPTUNE3D provided tools to explore this sophisticated physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant No. 11571293, 11505172.

  10. Reaction of 1Н,2Н,3Н,4Н-pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidinium bromide derivatives with molecular iodine: Comparative structure and spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov'yants, Margarita S.; Burykin, Igor V.; Kostrub, Vladimir V.; Tsupak, Evgeny B.; Starikova, Zoya A.; Kirsanova, Julia A.

    2012-02-01

    New salts C27H22N3O2BrI2 (1) and C27H19N3O2Br4I2·2CHCl3·2H2O (2) were synthesized by the iodination of derivatives of 1,3-dimethyl-2,4-dioxo-5,6,7-R-1Н,2Н,3Н,4Н-pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidinium bromide (R = phenyl (1a), p-bromphenyl (2a)) with an equimolar amount of iodine. The positive values of enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) indicate that the complexation of organic bromide and iodine molecule in chloroform solution is mainly entropically driven. The molecular and crystal structures (1) and (2) are studied by X-ray diffraction analysis. The structure of diiodinebromide 1 is composed of separate almost liner BrI2- and 1,3-dimethyl-2,4-dioxo-5,6,7-thriphenyl-1Н,2Н,3Н,4Н-pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidinium cation. The crystal structure 2 is built up of alternate layers of (CHNOBr3+)(I3-) (A) and (Br2I-)(СHСl3) (B), connected to each other by hydrogen bonds Br(BrI)⋯H(CHNOBr3+). The formation of the ions I3- and Br2I- occurs via the disproportionation of I2Br- under the action of solvent on C27H19N3O2Br4I2·2CHCl3·2H2O (2) crystallization.

  11. Tilted planes in 3D image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargas, Roy P.; Staples, Nancy J.; Malloy, Brian F.; Cantrell, Ken; Chhatriwala, Murtuza

    1998-03-01

    Reliable 3D wholebody scanners which output digitized 3D images of a complete human body are now commercially available. This paper describes a software package, called 3DM, being developed by researchers at Clemson University and which manipulates and extracts measurements from such images. The focus of this paper is on tilted planes, a 3DM tool which allows a user to define a plane through a scanned image, tilt it in any direction, and effectively define three disjoint regions on the image: the points on the plane and the points on either side of the plane. With tilted planes, the user can accurately take measurements required in applications such as apparel manufacturing. The user can manually segment the body rather precisely. Tilted planes assist the user in analyzing the form of the body and classifying the body in terms of body shape. Finally, titled planes allow the user to eliminate extraneous and unwanted points often generated by a 3D scanner. This paper describes the user interface for tilted planes, the equations defining the plane as the user moves it through the scanned image, an overview of the algorithms, and the interaction of the tilted plane feature with other tools in 3DM.

  12. 3-D visualization of geologic structures and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflug, R.; Klein, H.; Ramshorn, Ch.; Genter, M.; Stärk, A.

    Interactive 3-D computer graphics techniques are used to visualize geologic structures and simulated geologic processes. Geometric models that serve as input to 3-D viewing programs are generated from contour maps, from serial sections, or directly from simulation program output. Choice of viewing parameters strongly affects the perception of irregular surfaces. An interactive 3-D rendering program and its graphical user interface provide visualization tools for structural geology, seismic interpretation, and visual post-processing of simulations. Dynamic display of transient ground-water simulations and sedimentary process simulations can visualize processes developing through time.

  13. Finding Organized Structures in 3-D LADAR Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    work exists also on how to extract planar and linear objects from scattered 3-D point clouds , see for example [5], [6]. Methods were even proposed to...of structure detection and segmentation from 3-D point clouds collected from a single sensor location or integrated from multiple locations. In [2...primitives to point clouds are difficult to use practically for large data sets containing multiple complex structures, in opposition to multiple planar

  14. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  15. Direct-Write 3D Nanoprinting of Plasmonic Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Winkler, Robert; Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Karl-Franzens Univ.; ...

    2016-11-23

    During the past decade, significant progress has been made in the field of resonant optics ranging from fundamental aspects to concrete applications. And while several techniques have been introduced for the fabrication of highly defined metallic nanostructures, the synthesis of complex, free-standing three-dimensional (3D) structures is still an intriguing, but so far intractable, challenge. Here, we demonstrate a 3D direct-write synthesis approach that addresses this challenge. Specifically, we succeeded in the direct-write fabrication of 3D nanoarchitectures via electron-stimulated reactions, which are applicable on virtually any material and surface morphology. Furthermore, by that, complex 3D nanostructures composed of highly compact, puremore » gold can be fabricated, which reveal strong plasmonic activity and pave the way for a new generation of 3D nanoplasmonic architectures that can be printed on-demand.« less

  16. Direct-Write 3D Nanoprinting of Plasmonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Haselmann, Ulrich; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lewis, Brett B; Kothleitner, Gerald; Rack, Philip D; Plank, Harald

    2017-03-08

    During the past decade, significant progress has been made in the field of resonant optics ranging from fundamental aspects to concrete applications. While several techniques have been introduced for the fabrication of highly defined metallic nanostructures, the synthesis of complex, free-standing three-dimensional (3D) structures is still an intriguing, but so far intractable, challenge. In this study, we demonstrate a 3D direct-write synthesis approach that addresses this challenge. Specifically, we succeeded in the direct-write fabrication of 3D nanoarchitectures via electron-stimulated reactions, which are applicable on virtually any material and surface morphology. By that, complex 3D nanostructures composed of highly compact, pure gold can be fabricated, which reveal strong plasmonic activity and pave the way for a new generation of 3D nanoplasmonic architectures that can be printed on-demand.

  17. Direct-Write 3D Nanoprinting of Plasmonic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Robert; Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Haselmann, Ulrich; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lewis, Brett B.; Kothleitner, Gerald; Rack, Philip D.; Plank, Harald

    2016-11-23

    During the past decade, significant progress has been made in the field of resonant optics ranging from fundamental aspects to concrete applications. And while several techniques have been introduced for the fabrication of highly defined metallic nanostructures, the synthesis of complex, free-standing three-dimensional (3D) structures is still an intriguing, but so far intractable, challenge. Here, we demonstrate a 3D direct-write synthesis approach that addresses this challenge. Specifically, we succeeded in the direct-write fabrication of 3D nanoarchitectures via electron-stimulated reactions, which are applicable on virtually any material and surface morphology. Furthermore, by that, complex 3D nanostructures composed of highly compact, pure gold can be fabricated, which reveal strong plasmonic activity and pave the way for a new generation of 3D nanoplasmonic architectures that can be printed on-demand.

  18. 3D-Fun: predicting enzyme function from structure.

    PubMed

    von Grotthuss, Marcin; Plewczynski, Dariusz; Vriend, Gert; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2008-07-01

    The 'omics' revolution is causing a flurry of data that all needs to be annotated for it to become useful. Sequences of proteins of unknown function can be annotated with a putative function by comparing them with proteins of known function. This form of annotation is typically performed with BLAST or similar software. Structural genomics is nowadays also bringing us three dimensional structures of proteins with unknown function. We present here software that can be used when sequence comparisons fail to determine the function of a protein with known structure but unknown function. The software, called 3D-Fun, is implemented as a server that runs at several European institutes and is freely available for everybody at all these sites. The 3D-Fun servers accept protein coordinates in the standard PDB format and compare them with all known protein structures by 3D structural superposition using the 3D-Hit software. If structural hits are found with proteins with known function, these are listed together with their function and some vital comparison statistics. This is conceptually very similar in 3D to what BLAST does in 1D. Additionally, the superposition results are displayed using interactive graphics facilities. Currently, the 3D-Fun system only predicts enzyme function but an expanded version with Gene Ontology predictions will be available soon. The server can be accessed at http://3dfun.bioinfo.pl/ or at http://3dfun.cmbi.ru.nl/.

  19. Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography's Performance Analysis in Forest 3-D Structure Mapping with long term ALOS L band repeat pass InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q.; Zebker, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Acquiring accurate measurement of three-dimensional structure of forest globally , is key to improve quantitative understanding of the state and dynamics of ecosystems, particularly global carbon cycle. Moreover, forest contains a large portion of Earth's renewable natural resources. All these require an accurate, timely and cost-effective global forest vertical structure mapping. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) remote sensing is widely acknowledged as a powerful tool to accomplish this task. Within the last decade, a number of experimental demonstrations of 3-D InSAR techniques have suggested the possibility of remotely sensing global 3-D vegetation structure. Among all the 3-D InSAR techniques, Multiple Baseline SAR Tomography( MB Tomo-SAR) is a very promising one. Multiple baseline SAR tomography exploits InSAR images acquired from different baselines and form a synthetic aperture in the vertical direction in order to retrieval vertical structure. Though theoretical predictions and several laboratory experiments show great reconstruction results, applying the method in real world condition still face a lot of challenges, including low acquisition number, irregular sample distribution, atmospheric phase noise and time decorrelation effect. In this article, we use L band ALOS spaceborne SAR data in Hawaii area to test the performance of MB TomoSAR . In the process, advanced Fourier beamforming method, atmospheric phase screen removal algorithm and time decorrelation effect are all applied. In addition, we also utilize the Landsat vegetation index and the result with other 3-D reconstruction methods as comparison to validate its performance.

  20. Source inversion analysis of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using Green's functions calculated from a 3-D heterogeneous structure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, W.; Aoi, S.; Maeda, T.; Sekiguchi, H.; Kunugi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Source inversion analysis using near-source strong-motion records with an assumption of 1-D underground structure models has revealed the overall characteristics of the rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki mega-thrust earthquake. This assumption for the structure model is acceptable because the seismic waves radiated during the Tohoku-Oki event were rich in the very-low-frequency contents lower than 0.05 Hz, which are less affected by the small-scale heterogeneous structure. The analysis using more reliable Green's functions even in the higher-frequency range considering complex structure of the subduction zone will illuminate more detailed rupture process in space and time and the transition of the frequency dependence of the wave radiation for the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In this study, we calculate the near-source Green's functions using a 3-D underground structure model and perform the source inversion analysis using them. The 3-D underground structure model used in this study is the Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model (Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, 2012). A curved fault model on the Pacific plate interface is discretized into 287 subfaults at ~20 km interval. The Green's functions are calculated using GMS (Aoi et al., 2004), which is a simulation program package for the seismic wave field by the finite difference method using discontinuous grids (Aoi and Fujiwara, 1999). Computational region is 136-146.2E in longitude, 34-41.6N in latitude, and 0-100 km in depth. The horizontal and vertical grid intervals are 200 m and 100 m, respectively, for the shallower region and those for the deeper region are tripled. The number of the total grids is 2.1 billion. We derive 300-s records by calculating 36,000 steps with a time interval of 0.0083 second (120 Hz sampling). It takes nearly one hour to compute one case using 48 Graphics Processing Units (GPU) on TSUBAME2.0 supercomputer owned by Tokyo Institute of Technology. In total, 574 cases are

  1. 3D annotation and manipulation of medical anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Schaller, Christian; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Although the medical scanners are rapidly moving towards a three-dimensional paradigm, the manipulation and annotation/labeling of the acquired data is still performed in a standard 2D environment. Editing and annotation of three-dimensional medical structures is currently a complex task and rather time-consuming, as it is carried out in 2D projections of the original object. A major problem in 2D annotation is the depth ambiguity, which requires 3D landmarks to be identified and localized in at least two of the cutting planes. Operating directly in a three-dimensional space enables the implicit consideration of the full 3D local context, which significantly increases accuracy and speed. A three-dimensional environment is as well more natural optimizing the user's comfort and acceptance. The 3D annotation environment requires the three-dimensional manipulation device and display. By means of two novel and advanced technologies, Wii Nintendo Controller and Philips 3D WoWvx display, we define an appropriate 3D annotation tool and a suitable 3D visualization monitor. We define non-coplanar setting of four Infrared LEDs with a known and exact position, which are tracked by the Wii and from which we compute the pose of the device by applying a standard pose estimation algorithm. The novel 3D renderer developed by Philips uses either the Z-value of a 3D volume, or it computes the depth information out of a 2D image, to provide a real 3D experience without having some special glasses. Within this paper we present a new framework for manipulation and annotation of medical landmarks directly in three-dimensional volume.

  2. 3D Ultrasonic Wave Simulations for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Leckey Cara A/; Miler, Corey A.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for the detection of damage in aerospace materials is an important area of research at NASA. Ultrasonic guided Lamb waves are a promising SHM damage detection technique since the waves can propagate long distances. For complicated flaw geometries experimental signals can be difficult to interpret. High performance computing can now handle full 3-dimensional (3D) simulations of elastic wave propagation in materials. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate ultrasound scattering from flaws in materials. EFIT results have been compared to experimental data and the simulations provide unique insight into details of the wave behavior. This type of insight is useful for developing optimized experimental SHM techniques. 3D EFIT can also be expanded to model wave propagation and scattering in anisotropic composite materials.

  3. Proposed traceable structural resolution protocols for 3D imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, David; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Cournoyer, Luc; Carrier, Benjamin; Blais, François

    2009-08-01

    A protocol for determining structural resolution using a potentially-traceable reference material is proposed. Where possible, terminology was selected to conform to those published in ISO JCGM 200:2008 (VIM) and ASTM E 2544-08 documents. The concepts of resolvability and edge width are introduced to more completely describe the ability of an optical non-contact 3D imaging system to resolve small features. A distinction is made between 3D range cameras, that obtain spatial data from the total field of view at once, and 3D range scanners, that accumulate spatial data for the total field of view over time. The protocol is presented through the evaluation of a 3D laser line range scanner.

  4. CH5M3D: an HTML5 program for creating 3D molecular structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While a number of programs and web-based applications are available for the interactive display of 3-dimensional molecular structures, few of these provide the ability to edit these structures. For this reason, we have developed a library written in JavaScript to allow for the simple creation of web-based applications that should run on any browser capable of rendering HTML5 web pages. While our primary interest in developing this application was for educational use, it may also prove useful to researchers who want a light-weight application for viewing and editing small molecular structures. Results Molecular compounds are drawn on the HTML5 Canvas element, with the JavaScript code making use of standard techniques to allow display of three-dimensional structures on a two-dimensional canvas. Information about the structure (bond lengths, bond angles, and dihedral angles) can be obtained using a mouse or other pointing device. Both atoms and bonds can be added or deleted, and rotation about bonds is allowed. Routines are provided to read structures either from the web server or from the user’s computer, and creation of galleries of structures can be accomplished with only a few lines of code. Documentation and examples are provided to demonstrate how users can access all of the molecular information for creation of web pages with more advanced features. Conclusions A light-weight (≈ 75 kb) JavaScript library has been made available that allows for the simple creation of web pages containing interactive 3-dimensional molecular structures. Although this library is designed to create web pages, a web server is not required. Installation on a web server is straightforward and does not require any server-side modules or special permissions. The ch5m3d.js library has been released under the GNU GPL version 3 open-source license and is available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/ch5m3d/. PMID:24246004

  5. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-04-20

    We present the first 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence obtained from nonlinear force-free field simulations, with a detailed description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Through the use of a novel radiative transfer visualization technique for the Hα line such plasma-loaded magnetic field model produces synthetic images of the modeled prominence comparable with high-resolution observations. This allows us for the first time to use a single technique to consistently study, in both emission on the limb and absorption against the solar disk, the fine structures of prominences/filaments produced by a magnetic field model.

  6. On 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Holt, R. V.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.; Gellin, S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the 2-year program, to develop advanced 3-D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades and vanes. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulations models were developed; an eight-noded mid-surface shell element, a nine-noded mid-surface shell element and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program was developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  7. The 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.; Tipton, M. T.; Weber, G.

    1992-01-01

    A two-year program to develop advanced 3D inelastic structural stress analysis methods and solution strategies for more accurate and cost effective analysis of combustors, turbine blades, and vanes is described. The approach was to develop a matrix of formulation elements and constitutive models. Three constitutive models were developed in conjunction with optimized iterating techniques, accelerators, and convergence criteria within a framework of dynamic time incrementing. Three formulation models were developed: an eight-noded midsurface shell element; a nine-noded midsurface shell element; and a twenty-noded isoparametric solid element. A separate computer program has been developed for each combination of constitutive model-formulation model. Each program provides a functional stand alone capability for performing cyclic nonlinear structural analysis. In addition, the analysis capabilities incorporated into each program can be abstracted in subroutine form for incorporation into other codes or to form new combinations.

  8. Influence of material property variability on the mechanical behaviour of carotid atherosclerotic plaques: A 3D fluid-structure interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianmin; Teng, Zhongzhao; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Gillard, Jonathan H; Jing, Zaiping; Lu, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical analysis has been shown to be complementary to luminal stenosis in assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. However, patient-specific material properties are not available and the effect of material properties variability has not been fully quantified. Media and fibrous cap (FC) strips from carotid endarterectomy samples were classified into hard, intermediate and soft according to their incremental Young's modulus. Lipid and intraplaque haemorrhage/thrombus strips were classified as hard and soft. Idealised geometry-based 3D fluid-structure interaction analyses were performed to assess the impact of material property variability in predicting maximum principal stress (Stress-P1) and stretch (Stretch-P1). When FC was thick (1000 or 600 µm), Stress-P1 at the shoulder was insensitive to changes in material stiffness, whereas Stress-P1 at mid FC changed significantly. When FC was thin (200 or 65 µm), high stress concentrations shifted from the shoulder region to mid FC, and Stress-P1 became increasingly sensitive to changes in material properties, in particular at mid FC. Regardless of FC thickness, Stretch-P1 at these locations was sensitive to changes in material properties. Variability in tissue material properties influences both the location and overall stress/stretch value. This variability needs to be accounted for when interpreting the results of mechanical modelling. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25940741

  9. Influence of material property variability on the mechanical behaviour of carotid atherosclerotic plaques: a 3D fluid-structure interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianmin; Teng, Zhongzhao; Feng, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Yongxue; Brown, Adam J; Gillard, Jonathan H; Jing, Zaiping; Lu, Qingsheng

    2015-08-01

    Mechanical analysis has been shown to be complementary to luminal stenosis in assessing atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. However, patient-specific material properties are not available and the effect of material properties variability has not been fully quantified. Media and fibrous cap (FC) strips from carotid endarterectomy samples were classified into hard, intermediate and soft according to their incremental Young's modulus. Lipid and intraplaque haemorrhage/thrombus strips were classified as hard and soft. Idealised geometry-based 3D fluid-structure interaction analyses were performed to assess the impact of material property variability in predicting maximum principal stress (Stress-P1 ) and stretch (Stretch-P1 ). When FC was thick (1000 or 600 µm), Stress-P1 at the shoulder was insensitive to changes in material stiffness, whereas Stress-P1 at mid FC changed significantly. When FC was thin (200 or 65 µm), high stress concentrations shifted from the shoulder region to mid FC, and Stress-P1 became increasingly sensitive to changes in material properties, in particular at mid FC. Regardless of FC thickness, Stretch-P1 at these locations was sensitive to changes in material properties. Variability in tissue material properties influences both the location and overall stress/stretch value. This variability needs to be accounted for when interpreting the results of mechanical modelling.

  10. The 3D-based scaling index algorithm to optimize structure analysis of trabecular bone in postmenopausal women with and without osteoporotic spine fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Dirk; Monetti, Roberto A.; Bohm, Holger F.; Bauer, Jan; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Rath, Christoph W.

    2004-05-01

    The scaling index method (SIM) is a recently proposed non-linear technique to extract texture measures for the quantitative characterisation of the trabecular bone structure in high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI). The three-dimensional tomographic images are interpreted as a point distribution in a state space where each point (voxel) is defined by its x, y, z coordinates and the grey value. The SIM estimates local scaling properties to describe the nonlinear morphological features in this four-dimensional point distribution. Thus, it can be used for differentiating between cluster-, rod-, sheet-like and unstructured (background) image components, which makes it suitable for quantifying the microstructure of human cancellous bone. The SIM was applied to high resolution magnetic resonance images of the distal radius in patients with and without osteoporotic spine fractures in order to quantify the deterioration of bone structure. Using the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis the diagnostic performance of this texture measure in differentiating patients with and without fractures was compared with bone mineral density (BMD). The SIM demonstrated the best area under the curve (AUC) value for discriminating the two groups. The reliability of our new texture measure and the validity of our results were assessed by applying bootstrapping resampling methods. The results of this study show that trabecular structure measures derived from HR-MRI of the radius in a clinical setting using a recently proposed algorithm based on a local 3D scaling index method can significantly improve the diagnostic performance in differentiating postmenopausal women with and without osteoporotic spine fractures.

  11. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues. PMID:22539264

  12. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs.

    PubMed

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues.

  13. Designing 3D Structure by 5-7 Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xingting; Cho, Yigil; Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel; Kamien, Randall

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this talk is to explore how one can create 3D structures from 2D materials through the art of kirigami. Kirigami expands upon origami by allowing not only folds, but also cuts, into materials. If we take an incompressible material such as paper and remove a hole from it, the paper will buckle into the third dimension once that hole is sealed in order to relieve strain. Thus, orienting cuts and folds in certain places throughout a sheet of paper can influence its ``pop-up,'' 3D structure. To narrow down the inverse design problem, we confined ourselves to making only one kind of cut (which we call the ``5-7 cut'') on a honeycomb grid, and we show how this single cut can give rise to arbitrarily complex three dimensional structures. A simple set of rules exists: (a) one 5-7 cut divides the material into 2 sections which can choose to pop-up or down independently of each other, (b) rows of uniform cuts must pop up or down in unison, giving (nearly) arbitrary 2D structure, and (c) the 5-7 cuts can be arranged in various ways to create 6 basic pop-up ``modes,'' which can then be arranged to give (nearly) arbitrary 3D structure. These simple rules allow a framework for designing targeted 3D structure from an initial 2D sheet of material. This work was supported by NSF EFRI-ODISSEI Grant EFRI 13-31583.

  14. Coherent structures in 3D viscous time-periodic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znaien, J. G.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Trieling, R. R.; Clercx, H. J. H.

    2010-11-01

    Periodically driven laminar flows occur in many industrial processes from food-mixing devices to micro-mixer in lab-on-a-chip systems. The present study is motivated by better understanding fundamental transport phenomena in three-dimensional viscous time-periodic flows. Both numerical simulation and three-dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry measurements are performed to investigate the 3D advection of a passive scalar in a lid-driven cylindrical cavity flow. The flow is forced by a time-periodic in-plane motion of one endwall via a given forcing protocol. We concentrate on the formation and interaction of coherent structures due to fluid inertia, which play an important role in 3D mixing by geometrically determining the tracer transport. The disintegration of these structures by fluid inertia reflects an essentially 3D route to chaos. Data from tracking experiments of small particles will be compared with predictions from numerical simulations on transport of passive tracers.

  15. 3D printing of nano- and micro-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing techniques are being vigorously investigated as a replacement to the traditional and conventional methods in fabrication to bring forth cost and time effective approaches. Introduction of 3D printing has led to printing micro and nanoscale structures including tissues and organelles, bioelectric sensors and devices, artificial bones and transplants, microfluidic devices, batteries and various other biomaterials. Various microfabrication processes have been developed to fabricate micro components and assemblies at lab scale. 3D Fabrication processes that can accommodate the functional and geometrical requirements to realize complicated structures are becoming feasible through advances in additive manufacturing. This advancement could lead to simpler development mechanisms of novel components and devices exhibiting complex features. For instance, development of microstructure electrodes that can penetrate the epidermis of the skin to collect the bio potential signal may prove very effective than the electrodes that measure signal from the skin's surface. The micro and nanostructures will have to possess extraordinary material and mechanical properties for its dexterity in the applications. A substantial amount of research being pursued on stretchable and flexible devices based on PDMA, textiles, and organic electronics. Despite the numerous advantages these substrates and techniques could solely offer, 3D printing enables a multi-dimensional approach towards finer and complex applications. This review emphasizes the use of 3D printing to fabricate micro and nanostructures for that can be applied for human healthcare.

  16. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to ‘RNA 3D Align’ (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/. PMID:23716643

  17. 3D Frame Buffers For Interactive Analysis Of 3D Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gregory M.

    1984-10-01

    Two-dimensional data such as photos, X rays, various types of satellite images, sonar, radar, seismic plots, etc., in many cases must be analyzed using frame buffers for purposes of medical diagnoses, crop estimates, mineral exploration, and so forth. In many cases the same types of sensors used to gather such samples in two dimensions can gather 3D data for even more effective analysis. Just as 2D arrays of data can be analyzed using frame buffers, three-dimensional data can be analyzed using SOLIDS-BUFFEPmemories. Image processors deal with samples from two-dimensional arrays, and are based on frame buffers. The SOLIDS PROCESSOR system, deals with samples from a three-dimensional volume, or solid, and is based on a 3D frame buffer. This paper focuses upon the SOLIDS-BUFFER system, as used in the INSIGHT SOLIDS-PROCESSOR system from Phoenix Data Systems.

  18. The 3D structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, Spiros

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) represent one of the most powerful energy release phenomena in the entire solar system and are a major driver of space weather. Prior to 2006, our observational access to CMEs was limited to single viewpoint remote sensing observations in the inner/outer corona, and in-situ observations further away, e.g. at 1 AU. Taking all these factors together, turned out to be a major obstacle in our understanding and characterizing of the 3D structure and evolution of CMEs. The situation improved dramatically with the availability of multi-viewpoint imaging observations of CMEs, all way through from the Sun to 1 AU, from the STEREO mission since 2006, combined with observations from other missions (SOHO, Hinode, SDO, IRIS). With this talk we will discuss several key recent results in CME science resulting from the analysis of multi-viewpoint observations. This includes: (1) shape and structure; (2) kinematics and energetics; (3) trajectories, deflections and rotations; (4) arrival times and velocities at 1 AU; (5) magnetic field structure; (6) relationships with coronal and interplanetary shocks and solar energetic particles. The implications of these results in terms of CME theories and models will be also addressed. We will conclude with a discussion of important open issues in our understanding of CMEs and how these could be addressed with upcoming (Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus) and under-study missions (e.g., L5).

  19. 3D genome structure modeling by Lorentzian objective function.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Tuan; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-11-29

    The 3D structure of the genome plays a vital role in biological processes such as gene interaction, gene regulation, DNA replication and genome methylation. Advanced chromosomal conformation capture techniques, such as Hi-C and tethered conformation capture, can generate chromosomal contact data that can be used to computationally reconstruct 3D structures of the genome. We developed a novel restraint-based method that is capable of reconstructing 3D genome structures utilizing both intra-and inter-chromosomal contact data. Our method was robust to noise and performed well in comparison with a panel of existing methods on a controlled simulated data set. On a real Hi-C data set of the human genome, our method produced chromosome and genome structures that are consistent with 3D FISH data and known knowledge about the human chromosome and genome, such as, chromosome territories and the cluster of small chromosomes in the nucleus center with the exception of the chromosome 18. The tool and experimental data are available at https://missouri.box.com/v/LorDG.

  20. Coarse-grained modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne K; Maciejczyk, Maciej; Jankowska, Elzbieta J; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-07-01

    Functional RNA molecules depend on three-dimensional (3D) structures to carry out their tasks within the cell. Understanding how these molecules interact to carry out their biological roles requires a detailed knowledge of RNA 3D structure and dynamics as well as thermodynamics, which strongly governs the folding of RNA and RNA-RNA interactions as well as a host of other interactions within the cellular environment. Experimental determination of these properties is difficult, and various computational methods have been developed to model the folding of RNA 3D structures and their interactions with other molecules. However, computational methods also have their limitations, especially when the biological effects demand computation of the dynamics beyond a few hundred nanoseconds. For the researcher confronted with such challenges, a more amenable approach is to resort to coarse-grained modeling to reduce the number of data points and computational demand to a more tractable size, while sacrificing as little critical information as possible. This review presents an introduction to the topic of coarse-grained modeling of RNA 3D structures and dynamics, covering both high- and low-resolution strategies. We discuss how physics-based approaches compare with knowledge based methods that rely on databases of information. In the course of this review, we discuss important aspects in the reasoning process behind building different models and the goals and pitfalls that can result.

  1. RNA and protein 3D structure modeling: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Boniecki, Michał; Puton, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2011-09-01

    In analogy to proteins, the function of RNA depends on its structure and dynamics, which are encoded in the linear sequence. While there are numerous methods for computational prediction of protein 3D structure from sequence, there have been very few such methods for RNA. This review discusses template-based and template-free approaches for macromolecular structure prediction, with special emphasis on comparison between the already tried-and-tested methods for protein structure modeling and the very recently developed "protein-like" modeling methods for RNA. We highlight analogies between many successful methods for modeling of these two types of biological macromolecules and argue that RNA 3D structure can be modeled using "protein-like" methodology. We also highlight the areas where the differences between RNA and proteins require the development of RNA-specific solutions.

  2. 3D Seismic Imaging over a Potential Collapse Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, Roland; O'Connell, Daniel; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    The Middle-East has seen a recent boom in construction including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas. Before planning and construction can commence, however, the development areas need to be investigated to determine their suitability for the planned project. Subsurface parameters such as the type of material (soil/rock), thickness of top soil or rock layers, depth and elastic parameters of basement, for example, comprise important information needed before a decision concerning the suitability of the site for construction can be made. A similar problem arises in environmental impact studies, when subsurface parameters are needed to assess the geological heterogeneity of the subsurface. Environmental impact studies are typically required for each construction project, particularly for the scale of the aforementioned building boom in the Middle East. The current study was conducted in Qatar at the location of a future highway interchange to evaluate a suite of 3D seismic techniques in their effectiveness to interrogate the subsurface for the presence of karst-like collapse structures. The survey comprised an area of approximately 10,000 m2 and consisted of 550 source- and 192 receiver locations. The seismic source was an accelerated weight drop while the geophones consisted of 3-component 10 Hz velocity sensors. At present, we analyzed over 100,000 P-wave phase arrivals and performed high-resolution 3-D tomographic imaging of the shallow subsurface. Furthermore, dispersion analysis of recorded surface waves will be performed to obtain S-wave velocity profiles of the subsurface. Both results, in conjunction with density estimates, will be utilized to determine the elastic moduli of the subsurface rock layers.

  3. Strategies to reconstruct 3D Coffea arabica L. plant structure.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Fabio Takeshi; Tosti, Jonas Barbosa; Androcioli-Filho, Armando; Brancher, Jacques Duílio; Costes, Evelyne; Rakocevic, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Accurate model of structural elements is necessary to model the foliage and fruit distributions in cultivated plants, both of them being key parameters for yield prediction. However, the level of details in architectural data collection could vary, simplifying the data collection when plants get older and because of the high time cost required. In the present study, we aimed at reconstructing and analyzing plant structure, berry distributions and yield in Coffea arabica (Arabica coffee), by using both detailed or partial morphological information and probabilistic functions. Different datasets of coffee plant architectures were available with different levels of detail depending on the tree age. Three scales of decomposition-plant, axes and metamers were used reconstruct the plant architectures. CoffePlant3D, a software which integrates a series of mathematical, computational and statistical methods organized in three newly developed modules, AmostraCafe3D, VirtualCafe3D and Cafe3D, was developed to accurately reconstruct coffee plants in 3D, whatever the level of details available. The number of metamers of the 2nd order axes was shown to be linearly proportional to that of the orthotropic trunk, and the number of berries per metamer was modeled as a Gaussian function within a specific zone along the plagiotropic axes. This ratio of metamer emission rhythm between the orthotropic trunk and plagiotropic axes represents the pillar of botanical events in the C. arabica development and was central in our modeling approach, especially to reconstruct missing data. The methodology proposed for reconstructing coffee plants under the CoffePlant3D was satisfactorily validated across dataset available and could be performed for any other Arabica coffee variety.

  4. Superpose3D: A Local Structural Comparison Program That Allows for User-Defined Structure Representations

    PubMed Central

    Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Local structural comparison methods can be used to find structural similarities involving functional protein patches such as enzyme active sites and ligand binding sites. The outcome of such analyses is critically dependent on the representation used to describe the structure. Indeed different categories of functional sites may require the comparison program to focus on different characteristics of the protein residues. We have therefore developed superpose3D, a novel structural comparison software that lets users specify, with a powerful and flexible syntax, the structure description most suited to the requirements of their analysis. Input proteins are processed according to the user's directives and the program identifies sets of residues (or groups of atoms) that have a similar 3D position in the two structures. The advantages of using such a general purpose program are demonstrated with several examples. These test cases show that no single representation is appropriate for every analysis, hence the usefulness of having a flexible program that can be tailored to different needs. Moreover we also discuss how to interpret the results of a database screening where a known structural motif is searched against a large ensemble of structures. The software is written in C++ and is released under the open source GPL license. Superpose3D does not require any external library, runs on Linux, Mac OSX, Windows and is available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/superpose3D. PMID:20700534

  5. 3D Soil Images Structure Quantification using Relative Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Gonzalez-Nieto, P. L.; Bird, N. R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Soil voids manifest the cumulative effect of local pedogenic processes and ultimately influence soil behavior - especially as it pertains to aeration and hydrophysical properties. Because of the relatively weak attenuation of X-rays by air, compared with liquids or solids, non-disruptive CT scanning has become a very attractive tool for generating three-dimensional imagery of soil voids. One of the main steps involved in this analysis is the thresholding required to transform the original (greyscale) images into the type of binary representation (e.g., pores in white, solids in black) needed for fractal analysis or simulation with Lattice-Boltzmann models (Baveye et al., 2010). The objective of the current work is to apply an innovative approach to quantifying soil voids and pore networks in original X-ray CT imagery using Relative Entropy (Bird et al., 2006; Tarquis et al., 2008). These will be illustrated using typical imagery representing contrasting soil structures. Particular attention will be given to the need to consider the full 3D context of the CT imagery, as well as scaling issues, in the application and interpretation of this index.

  6. Instability and Wave Propagation in Structured 3D Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Fang, Nicholas X.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the complex instability and wrinkling pattern arising in 3D structured composites and the effect of the buckling pattern on the overall structural response. The 3D structured composites consisted of stiffer plates supported by soft matrix on both sides. Compression beyond the critical strain led to complex buckling patterns in the initially straight plates. The motivation of our work is to elaborate the formation of a system of prescribed periodic scatterers (metamaterials) due to buckling, and their effect to interfere wave propagation through the metamaterial structures. Such metamaterials made from elastomers enable large reversible deformation and, as a result, significant changes of the wave propagation properties. We developed analytical and finite element models to capture various aspects of the instability mechanism. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The ability to actively alter the 3D composite structure can enable on-demand tunability of many different functions, such as active control of wave propagation to create band-gaps and waveguides.

  7. Structure/response correlations and similarity/diversity analysis by GETAWAY descriptors. 2. Application of the novel 3D molecular descriptors to QSAR/QSPR studies.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto; Pavan, Manuela; Gramatica, Paola

    2002-01-01

    In a previous paper the theory of the new molecular descriptors called GETAWAY (GEometry, Topology, and Atom-Weights AssemblY) was explained. These descriptors have been proposed with the aim of matching 3D-molecular geometry, atom relatedness, and chemical information. In this paper prediction ability in structure-property correlations of GETAWAY descriptors has been tested extensively by analyzing the regressions of these descriptors for selected properties of some reference compound classes. Moreover, the general performance of the new descriptors in QSAR/QSPR has been evaluated with respect to other well-known sets of molecular descriptors.

  8. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-07-29

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  9. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C.; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants.This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance. PMID:26230701

  10. 3D morphometric analysis of human fetal cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Julia A; Hamzelou, Kia S; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2012-09-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R (2) = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R (2) = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R (2) = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure.

  11. 3D Morphometric Analysis of Human Fetal Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Hamzelou, Kia S.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Habas, Piotr A.; Kim, Kio; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    To date, growth of the human fetal cerebellum has been estimated primarily from linear measurements from ultrasound and 2D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we use 3D analytical methods to develop normative growth trajectories for the cerebellum in utero. We measured cerebellar volume, linear dimensions, and local surface curvature from 3D reconstructed MRI of the human fetal brain (N = 46). We found that cerebellar volume increased approximately 7-fold from 20 to 31 gestational weeks. The better fit of the exponential curve (R2 = 0.96) compared to the linear curve (R2 = 0.92) indicated acceleration in growth. Within-subject cerebellar and cerebral volumes were highly correlated (R2 = 0.94), though the cerebellar percentage of total brain volume increased from approximately 2.4% to 3.7% (R2 = 0.63). Right and left hemispheric volumes did not significantly differ. Transcerebellar diameter, vermal height, and vermal anterior to posterior diameter increased significantly at constant rates. From the local curvature analysis, we found that expansion along the inferior and superior aspects of the hemispheres resulted in decreased convexity, which is likely due to the physical constraints of the dura surrounding the cerebellum and the adjacent brainstem. The paired decrease in convexity along the inferior vermis and increased convexity of the medial hemisphere represents development of the paravermian fissure, which becomes more visible during this period. In this 3D morphometric analysis of the human fetal cerebellum, we have shown that cerebellar growth is accelerating at a greater pace than the cerebrum and described how cerebellar growth impacts the shape of the structure. PMID:22198870

  12. Molecular thermodynamics of trifluoroethanol-induced helix formation: analysis of the solvation structure and free energy by the 3D-RISM theory.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio; Kidera, Akinori

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces helical structure in peptides and proteins. The molecular mechanism is, however, still not completely elucidated. In this study, the TFE effects on the solvation structure and on the free energy change associated with the helix-coil transition of a polypeptide are analyzed by using the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) molecular theory of solvation. The theoretical result shows that TFE preferentially solvates at low concentrations around 30 vol% both for the helix and coil structures. However, the characteristic preferential solvation is not as significant in the TFE-induced helix stabilization as generally considered. It is also found that the overall energy contributes to the free energy difference more substantially than the solvation entropy.

  13. 3D printed components with ultrasonically arranged microscale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn-Jones, Thomas M.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper shows the first application of in situ manipulation of discontinuous fibrous structure mid-print, within a 3D printed polymeric composite architecture. Currently, rapid prototyping methods (fused filament fabrication, stereolithography) are gaining increasing popularity within the engineering commnity to build structural components. Unfortunately, the full potential of these components is limited by the mechanical properties of the materials used. The aim of this study is to create and demonstrate a novel method to instantaneously orient micro-scale glass fibres within a selectively cured photocurable resin system, using ultrasonic forces to align the fibres in the desired 3D architecture. To achieve this we have mounted a switchable, focused laser module on the carriage of a three-axis 3D printing stage, above an in-house ultrasonic alignment rig containing a mixture of photocurable resin and discontinuous 14 μm diameter glass fibre reinforcement(50 μm length). In our study, a suitable print speed of 20 mm s-1 was used, which is comparable to conventional additive layer techniques. We show the ability to construct in-plane orthogonally aligned sections printed side by side, where the precise orientation of the configurations is controlled by switching the ultrasonic standing wave profile mid-print. This approach permits the realisation of complex fibrous architectures within a 3D printed landscape. The versatile nature of the ultrasonic manipulation technique also permits a wide range of particle types (diameters, aspect ratios and functions) and architectures (in-plane, and out-plane) to be patterned, leading to the creation of a new generation of fibrous reinforced composites for 3D printing.

  14. Seeing More Is Knowing More: V3D Enables Real-Time 3D Visualization and Quantitative Analysis of Large-Scale Biological Image Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hanchuan; Long, Fuhui

    Everyone understands seeing more is knowing more. However, for large-scale 3D microscopic image analysis, it has not been an easy task to efficiently visualize, manipulate and understand high-dimensional data in 3D, 4D or 5D spaces. We developed a new 3D+ image visualization and analysis platform, V3D, to meet this need. The V3D system provides 3D visualization of gigabyte-sized microscopy image stacks in real time on current laptops and desktops. V3D streamlines the online analysis, measurement and proofreading of complicated image patterns by combining ergonomic functions for selecting a location in an image directly in 3D space and for displaying biological measurements, such as from fluorescent probes, using the overlaid surface objects. V3D runs on all major computer platforms and can be enhanced by software plug-ins to address specific biological problems. To demonstrate this extensibility, we built a V3Dbased application, V3D-Neuron, to reconstruct complex 3D neuronal structures from high-resolution brain images. V3D-Neuron can precisely digitize the morphology of a single neuron in a fruitfly brain in minutes, with about a 17-fold improvement in reliability and tenfold savings in time compared with other neuron reconstruction tools. Using V3D-Neuron, we demonstrate the feasibility of building a high-resolution 3D digital atlas of neurite tracts in the fruitfly brain. V3D can be easily extended using a simple-to-use and comprehensive plugin interface.

  15. Identification of the critical residues for the function of vacuolar H⁺-pyrophosphatase by mutational analysis based on the 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Mariko; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2014-12-01

    H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) converts energy from hydrolysis of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to active H(+) translocation across membranes. From the 3D structure resolved by crystallography, 17 amino acid residues in several domains of mung bean (Vigna radiata) enzyme were selected and substituted with alanine individually. The mutant enzymes were expressed in yeast cells to evaluate their biochemical role. The highly conserved residues in the substrate-binding site (T249, D269, D507 and N534) were shown to be essential for PPi hydrolysis and H(+) pump. The amino acid substitution of residues in the H(+) translocation pathway (I545, L555, N738, V746 and L749) resulted in mild decrease in the PPase activity and strong suppression of the H(+) pump. These results suggest that the decoupling of PPi hydrolysis and active H(+) translocation occurred in these five mutants including I545A. The alanine substitution of the C124 and C132, which form an intra-molecular disulfide bond, did not affect the enzyme activity. The modifications of the other residues in the vacuolar lumen loop, and M15 had relatively mild effect on the enzyme function. Functional roles of the 17 residues are discussed with consideration of the 3D structural information.

  16. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Sabarish; Liao, Pao-Chuan; Shin, Min C.; Tsap, Leonid V.

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  17. Slat Cove Unsteadiness Effect of 3D Flow Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that 2D, time accurate computations based on a pseudo-laminar zonal model of the slat cove region (within the framework of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations) are inadequate for predicting the full unsteady dynamics of the slat cove flow field. Even though such computations could capture the large-scale, unsteady vorticity structures in the slat cove region without requiring any external forcing, the simulated vortices were excessively strong and the recirculation zone was unduly energetic in comparison with the PIV measurements for a generic high-lift configuration. To resolve this discrepancy and to help enable physics based predictions of slat aeroacoustics, the present paper is focused on 3D simulations of the slat cove flow over a computational domain of limited spanwise extent. Maintaining the pseudo-laminar approach, current results indicate that accounting for the three-dimensionality of flow fluctuations leads to considerable improvement in the accuracy of the unsteady, nearfield solution. Analysis of simulation data points to the likely significance of turbulent fluctuations near the reattachment region toward the generation of broadband slat noise. The computed acoustic characteristics (in terms of the frequency spectrum and spatial distribution) within short distances from the slat resemble the previously reported, subscale measurements of slat noise.

  18. Using 3D visualization and seismic attributes to improve structural and stratigraphic resolution of reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J. ); Jones, G.L. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in hardware and software have given the interpreter and engineer new ways to view 3D seismic data and well bore information. Recent papers have also highlighted the use of various statistics and seismic attributes. By combining new 3D rendering technologies with recent trends in seismic analysis, the interpreter can improve the structural and stratigraphic resolution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. This paper gives several examples using 3D visualization to better define both the structural and stratigraphic aspects of several different structural types from around the world. Statistics, 3D visualization techniques and rapid animation are used to show complex faulting and detailed channel systems. These systems would be difficult to map using either 2D or 3D data with conventional interpretation techniques.

  19. Using 3D visualization and seismic attributes to improve structural and stratigraphic resolution of reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, J.; Jones, G.L.

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances in hardware and software have given the interpreter and engineer new ways to view 3D seismic data and well bore information. Recent papers have also highlighted the use of various statistics and seismic attributes. By combining new 3D rendering technologies with recent trends in seismic analysis, the interpreter can improve the structural and stratigraphic resolution of hydrocarbon reservoirs. This paper gives several examples using 3D visualization to better define both the structural and stratigraphic aspects of several different structural types from around the world. Statistics, 3D visualization techniques and rapid animation are used to show complex faulting and detailed channel systems. These systems would be difficult to map using either 2D or 3D data with conventional interpretation techniques.

  20. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  1. Cancer3D: understanding cancer mutations through protein structures.

    PubMed

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Hrabe, Thomas; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The new era of cancer genomics is providing us with extensive knowledge of mutations and other alterations in cancer. The Cancer3D database at http://www.cancer3d.org gives an open and user-friendly way to analyze cancer missense mutations in the context of structures of proteins in which they are found. The database also helps users analyze the distribution patterns of the mutations as well as their relationship to changes in drug activity through two algorithms: e-Driver and e-Drug. These algorithms use knowledge of modular structure of genes and proteins to separately study each region. This approach allows users to find novel candidate driver regions or drug biomarkers that cannot be found when similar analyses are done on the whole-gene level. The Cancer3D database provides access to the results of such analyses based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In addition, it displays mutations from over 14,700 proteins mapped to more than 24,300 structures from PDB. This helps users visualize the distribution of mutations and identify novel three-dimensional patterns in their distribution.

  2. The 3D lightweight structural characteristics of the beetle forewing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinxiang; Tuo, Wanyong; Guo, Zhensheng; Yan, Lili

    2017-02-01

    The present paper renewedly expounds upon the characteristics of the 3D lightweight structure of beetle forewings and notes that two biomimetic structures (models) that have appeared in recent years do not comply with these characteristics based on a comparison of the structures of the biological prototypes. The first model features transverse tubules based on observations of circular holes in cross-sectional figures of the Cybister forewing. The second is a biomimetic spherical cavity model with hollow trabeculae that reportedly exhibits superior mechanical properties because its structures are most similar to the biological prototype. Finally, a false biomimetic proposition that the mechanical properties of biomimetic structures with "fiber winding" patterns are superior to those of structures constructed of pure "epoxy" is also noted. Hopefully, the present study can serve to improve the state of research on biomimetic applications of beetle forewing structures.

  3. Manufacturing of a 3D complex hyperstable Cesic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroedel, Matthias; Courteau, Pascal; Poupinet, Anne; Sarri, Giuseppe

    2007-09-01

    Global astrometry requires extremely stable materials for instrument structures, such as optical benches. Cesic®, developed by ECM and Thales Alenia Space for mirrors and high stability structures, offers an excellent compromise in terms of structural strength, stability and very high lightweight capability, with a coefficient of thermal expansion that is virtually zero at cryogenic T°. The High-Stability Optical Bench (HSOB) GAIA study, realized by Thales Alenia Space under ESA contract, aimed to design, develop and test a full-scale representative of the HSOB bench, made entirely of Cesic®. The bench has been equipped with SAGEIS-CSO laser metrology system MOUSE1, a Michelson interferometer composed of integrated optics with nm-resolution. The HSOB bench has been submitted to a homogeneous T° step under vacuum to characterize 3-D expansion behavior of its two arms. The quite negligible interarm differential, measured with a nm-range reproducibility, demonstrates that a complete 3-D structure made of Cesic® has the same CTE homogeneity as do characterization samples, fully in line with the stringent GAIA requirements (1ppm at 120K). This demonstrates that Cesic® properties at cryogenic temperatures are fully appropriate to the manufacturing of complex highly stable optical structures. This successful study confirms ECM's and Thales Alenia Space's ability to design and manufacture monolithic lightweight highly stable optical structures, based on inner-cell triangular design made possible by the unique Cesic® manufacturing process.

  4. Alignment-independent technique for 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Jon G; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-04-01

    Molecular biochemistry is controlled by 3D phenomena but structure-activity models based on 3D descriptors are infrequently used for large data sets because of the computational overhead for determining molecular conformations. A diverse dataset of 146 androgen receptor binders was used to investigate how different methods for defining molecular conformations affect the performance of 3D-quantitative spectral data activity relationship models. Molecular conformations tested: (1) global minimum of molecules' potential energy surface; (2) alignment-to-templates using equal electronic and steric force field contributions; (3) alignment using contributions "Best-for-Each" template; (4) non-energy optimized, non-aligned (2D > 3D). Aggregate predictions from models were compared. Highest average coefficients of determination ranged from R Test (2) = 0.56 to 0.61. The best model using 2D > 3D (imported directly from ChemSpider) produced R Test (2) = 0.61. It was superior to energy-minimized and conformation-aligned models and was achieved in only 3-7 % of the time required using the other conformation strategies. Predictions averaged from models built on different conformations achieved a consensus R Test (2) = 0.65. The best 2D > 3D model was analyzed for underlying structure-activity relationships. For the compound strongest binding to the androgen receptor, 10 substructural features contributing to binding were flagged. Utility of 2D > 3D was compared for two other activity endpoints, each modeling a medium sized data set. Results suggested that large scale, accurate predictions using 2D > 3D SDAR descriptors may be produced for interactions involving endocrine system nuclear receptors and other data sets in which strongest activities are produced by fairly inflexible substrates.

  5. Alignment-independent technique for 3D QSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Jon G.; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B.; Buzatu, Dan A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular biochemistry is controlled by 3D phenomena but structure-activity models based on 3D descriptors are infrequently used for large data sets because of the computational overhead for determining molecular conformations. A diverse dataset of 146 androgen receptor binders was used to investigate how different methods for defining molecular conformations affect the performance of 3D-quantitative spectral data activity relationship models. Molecular conformations tested: (1) global minimum of molecules' potential energy surface; (2) alignment-to-templates using equal electronic and steric force field contributions; (3) alignment using contributions "Best-for-Each" template; (4) non-energy optimized, non-aligned (2D > 3D). Aggregate predictions from models were compared. Highest average coefficients of determination ranged from R Test 2 = 0.56 to 0.61. The best model using 2D > 3D (imported directly from ChemSpider) produced R Test 2 = 0.61. It was superior to energy-minimized and conformation-aligned models and was achieved in only 3-7 % of the time required using the other conformation strategies. Predictions averaged from models built on different conformations achieved a consensus R Test 2 = 0.65. The best 2D > 3D model was analyzed for underlying structure-activity relationships. For the compound strongest binding to the androgen receptor, 10 substructural features contributing to binding were flagged. Utility of 2D > 3D was compared for two other activity endpoints, each modeling a medium sized data set. Results suggested that large scale, accurate predictions using 2D > 3D SDAR descriptors may be produced for interactions involving endocrine system nuclear receptors and other data sets in which strongest activities are produced by fairly inflexible substrates.

  6. Computerized analysis of pelvic incidence from 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Janssen, Michiel M. A.; Pernuš, Franjo; Castelein, René M.; Viergever, Max A.

    2012-02-01

    The sagittal alignment of the pelvis can be evaluated by the angle of pelvic incidence (PI), which is constant for an arbitrary subject position and orientation and can be therefore compared among subjects in standing, sitting or supine position. In this study, PI was measured from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of normal subjects that were acquired in supine position. A novel computerized method, based on image processing techniques, was developed to automatically determine the anatomical references required to measure PI, i.e. the centers of the femoral heads in 3D, and the center and inclination of the sacral endplate in 3D. Multiplanar image reformation was applied to obtain perfect sagittal views with all anatomical structures completely in line with the hip axis, from which PI was calculated. The resulting PI (mean+/-standard deviation) was equal to 46.6°+/-9.2° for male subjects (N = 189), 47.6°+/-10.7° for female subjects (N = 181), and 47.1°+/-10.0° for all subjects (N = 370). The obtained measurements of PI from 3D images were not biased by acquisition projection or structure orientation, because all anatomical structures were completely in line with the hip axis. The performed measurements in 3D therefore represent PI according to the actual geometrical relationships among anatomical structures of the sacrum, pelvis and hips, as observed from the perfect sagittal views.

  7. 3D lidar imaging for detecting and understanding plant responses and canopy structure.

    PubMed

    Omasa, Kenji; Hosoi, Fumiki; Konishi, Atsumi

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and diagnosing plant responses to stress will benefit greatly from three-dimensional (3D) measurement and analysis of plant properties because plant responses are strongly related to their 3D structures. Light detection and ranging (lidar) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for direct 3D measurement of plant structure. Here the use of 3D lidar imaging to estimate plant properties such as canopy height, canopy structure, carbon stock, and species is demonstrated, and plant growth and shape responses are assessed by reviewing the development of lidar systems and their applications from the leaf level to canopy remote sensing. In addition, the recent creation of accurate 3D lidar images combined with natural colour, chlorophyll fluorescence, photochemical reflectance index, and leaf temperature images is demonstrated, thereby providing information on responses of pigments, photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal opening, and shape to environmental stresses; these data can be integrated with 3D images of the plants using computer graphics techniques. Future lidar applications that provide more accurate dynamic estimation of various plant properties should improve our understanding of plant responses to stress and of interactions between plants and their environment. Moreover, combining 3D lidar with other passive and active imaging techniques will potentially improve the accuracy of airborne and satellite remote sensing, and make it possible to analyse 3D information on ecophysiological responses and levels of various substances in agricultural and ecological applications and in observations of the global biosphere.

  8. Automatic structural matching of 3D image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Svjatoslav; Lutsiv, Vadim; Malyshev, Igor

    2015-10-01

    A new image matching technique is described. It is implemented as an object-independent hierarchical structural juxtaposition algorithm based on an alphabet of simple object-independent contour structural elements. The structural matching applied implements an optimized method of walking through a truncated tree of all possible juxtapositions of two sets of structural elements. The algorithm was initially developed for dealing with 2D images such as the aerospace photographs, and it turned out to be sufficiently robust and reliable for matching successfully the pictures of natural landscapes taken in differing seasons from differing aspect angles by differing sensors (the visible optical, IR, and SAR pictures, as well as the depth maps and geographical vector-type maps). At present (in the reported version), the algorithm is enhanced based on additional use of information on third spatial coordinates of observed points of object surfaces. Thus, it is now capable of matching the images of 3D scenes in the tasks of automatic navigation of extremely low flying unmanned vehicles or autonomous terrestrial robots. The basic principles of 3D structural description and matching of images are described, and the examples of image matching are presented.

  9. Automating the determination of 3D protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rayl, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    The creation of an automated method for determining 3D protein structure would be invaluable to the field of biology and presents an interesting challenge to computer science. Unfortunately, given the current level of protein knowledge, a completely automated solution method is not yet feasible, therefore, our group has decided to integrate existing databases and theories to create a software system that assists X-ray crystallographers in specifying a particular protein structure. By breaking the problem of determining overall protein structure into small subproblems, we hope to come closer to solving a novel structure by solving each component. By generating necessary information for structure determination, this method provides the first step toward designing a program to determine protein conformation automatically.

  10. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S; Liao, P; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-04-28

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell and its state. Chromosome analysis is significant in the detection of deceases and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The algorithm incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  11. An endoscopic 3D scanner based on structured light.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Christoph; Forster, Frank; Schick, Anton; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-07-01

    We present a new endoscopic 3D scanning system based on Single Shot Structured Light. The proposed design makes it possible to build an extremely small scanner. The sensor head contains a catadioptric camera and a pattern projection unit. The paper describes the working principle and calibration procedure of the sensor. The prototype sensor head has a diameter of only 3.6mm and a length of 14mm. It is mounted on a flexible shaft. The scanner is designed for tubular cavities and has a cylindrical working volume of about 30mm length and 30mm diameter. It acquires 3D video at 30 frames per second and typically generates approximately 5000 3D points per frame. By design, the resolution varies over the working volume, but is generally better than 200μm. A prototype scanner has been built and is evaluated in experiments with phantoms and biological samples. The recorded average error on a known test object was 92μm.

  12. 3-D Attenuation Structure around the SAFOD site, Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, N. L.; Thurber, C. H.; Zhang, H.; Roecker, S.

    2006-12-01

    We are developing models of the 3-D attenuation structure, both Qp and Qs, for a region about 15 km square centered on SAFOD. We are analyzing local earthquake data collected in 2001 and 2002 from the UW/RPI PASO array, the UC-Berkeley HRSN, and USGS seismic network stations around Parkfield. We determine the P- or S-wave t* values for an individual local earthquake for each of the observing stations by fitting observed spectra using a joint inversion for a common corner frequency, low-frequency amplitude, and t*. Within our initial data set, we examine 575 events recorded at up to 111 stations and obtain over 19000 P- wave t* values. We use these t* values in simul2000 and tomoDD to perform the inversion to obtain a 3-D, frequency-independent Qp model of the attenuation structure, using an existing 3-D Vp model and associated event locations. We will use this same procedure to obtain the Qs structure. In our preliminary Qp structure results, we observe a high Qp feature (about 250) at 0-8 km depth on the southwest side of the fault. We associate this feature with the high density, high velocity Salinian basement rocks. We also see a moderate Qp feature (about 150) in the fault zone that encompasses the hypocenters of our events. On the northeast side of the fault, we observe Qp values generally increasing with depth, from 125 at the surface to 200 at 8 km. We will present our final Qp and Qs models, identify major features within the two, and discuss how these features relate to the findings of other geophysical studies in the area (seismic velocity, electrical resistivity, anisotropy). We will discuss how these features relate to the nature of the crust in that area, including the local geology, presence of fluids, fracturing, etc.

  13. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Output data (3-D model) form the proposed method can be used for measurement of aortic shape and dimensions. Knowledge of aortic shape and size is very important in planning of minimally invasive procedure that is for selection of appropriate stent graft device for treatment of AAA. The technique is based on a 3-D deformable model and utilizes the level-set algorithm for implementation of the method. The method performs 3-D segmentation of CTA images and extracts a 3-D model of aortic wall. Once the 3-D model of aortic wall is available it is easy to perform all required measurements for appropriate stent graft selection. The method proposed in this paper uses the level-set algorithm for deformable models, instead of the classical snake algorithm. The main advantage of the level set algorithm is that it enables easy segmentation of complex structures, surpassing most of the drawbacks of the classical approach. We have extended the deformable model to incorporate the a priori knowledge about the shape of the AAA. This helps direct the evolution of the deformable model to correctly segment the aorta. The algorithm has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  14. Gene3D: modelling protein structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yeats, Corin; Maibaum, Michael; Marsden, Russell; Dibley, Mark; Lee, David; Addou, Sarah; Orengo, Christine A

    2006-01-01

    The Gene3D release 4 database and web portal (http://cathwww.biochem.ucl.ac.uk:8080/Gene3D) provide a combined structural, functional and evolutionary view of the protein world. It is focussed on providing structural annotation for protein sequences without structural representatives--including the complete proteome sets of over 240 different species. The protein sequences have also been clustered into whole-chain families so as to aid functional prediction. The structural annotation is generated using HMM models based on the CATH domain families; CATH is a repository for manually deduced protein domains. Amongst the changes from the last publication are: the addition of over 100 genomes and the UniProt sequence database, domain data from Pfam, metabolic pathway and functional data from COGs, KEGG and GO, and protein-protein interaction data from MINT and BIND. The website has been rebuilt to allow more sophisticated querying and the data returned is presented in a clearer format with greater functionality. Furthermore, all data can be downloaded in a simple XML format, allowing users to carry out complex investigations at their own computers.

  15. Water linked 3D coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suryabhan; Bhim, Anupam

    2016-12-01

    Three new coordination polymers (CPs) based on Cd and Pb, [Cd(OBA)(μ-H2O)(H2O)]n1, [Pb(OBA)(μ-H2O)]n2 [where OBA=4,4'-Oxybis(benzoate)] and [Pb(SDBA)(H2O)]n.1/4DMF 3 (SDBA=4,4'-Sulfonyldibenzoate), have been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal structural studies reveal that CPs 1 and 2 have three dimensional structure. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. Compound 3 has a supramolecular 3D structure involving water molecule and hydrogen bonds. A structural transformation is observed when 3 was heated at 100 °C or kept in methanol, forming [Pb(SDBA)]n4. Compound 4 is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH4 at room temperature. Luminescence studies revealed that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives.

  16. Laser beam melting 3D printing of Ti6Al4V based porous structured dental implants: fabrication, biocompatibility analysis and photoelastic study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Chen; Zhou, QianRong; Gong, YiMing; Li, RuiXue; Li, ChiChi; Klämpfl, Florian; Freund, Sebastian; Wu, XingWen; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiang; Schmidt, Michael; Ma, Duan; Yu, YouCheng

    2017-01-01

    Fabricating Ti alloy based dental implants with defined porous scaffold structure is a promising strategy for improving the osteoinduction of implants. In this study, we use Laser Beam Melting (LBM) 3D printing technique to fabricate porous Ti6Al4V dental implant prototypes with three controlled pore sizes (200, 350 and 500 μm). The mechanical stress distribution in the surrounding bone tissue is characterized by photoelastography and associated finite element simulation. For in-vitro studies, experiments on implants’ biocompatibility and osteogenic capability are conducted to evaluate the cellular response correlated to the porous structure. As the preliminary results, porous structured implants show a lower stress-shielding to the surrounding bone at the implant neck and a more densed distribution at the bottom site compared to the reference implant. From the cell proliferation tests and the immunofluorescence images, 350 and 500 μm pore sized implants demonstrate a better biocompatibility in terms of cell growth, migration and adhesion. Osteogenic genes expression of the 350 μm group is significantly increased alone with the ALP activity test. All these suggest that a pore size of 350 μm provides an optimal provides an optimal potential for improving the mechanical shielding to the surrounding bones and osteoinduction of the implant itself. PMID:28350007

  17. Laser beam melting 3D printing of Ti6Al4V based porous structured dental implants: fabrication, biocompatibility analysis and photoelastic study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Chen; Zhou, QianRong; Gong, YiMing; Li, RuiXue; Li, ChiChi; Klämpfl, Florian; Freund, Sebastian; Wu, XingWen; Sun, Yang; Li, Xiang; Schmidt, Michael; Ma, Duan; Yu, YouCheng

    2017-03-28

    Fabricating Ti alloy based dental implants with defined porous scaffold structure is a promising strategy for improving the osteoinduction of implants. In this study, we use Laser Beam Melting (LBM) 3D printing technique to fabricate porous Ti6Al4V dental implant prototypes with three controlled pore sizes (200, 350 and 500 μm). The mechanical stress distribution in the surrounding bone tissue is characterized by photoelastography and associated finite element simulation. For in-vitro studies, experiments on implants' biocompatibility and osteogenic capability are conducted to evaluate the cellular response correlated to the porous structure. As the preliminary results, porous structured implants show a lower stress-shielding to the surrounding bone at the implant neck and a more densed distribution at the bottom site compared to the reference implant. From the cell proliferation tests and the immunofluorescence images, 350 and 500 μm pore sized implants demonstrate a better biocompatibility in terms of cell growth, migration and adhesion. Osteogenic genes expression of the 350 μm group is significantly increased alone with the ALP activity test. All these suggest that a pore size of 350 μm provides an optimal provides an optimal potential for improving the mechanical shielding to the surrounding bones and osteoinduction of the implant itself.

  18. Synthesis, structure and properties of a 3D acentric coordination polymer with noninterpenetrated (10,3)-d topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Huijie; Li, Xuefei; Wang, Xiao; Li, Haiyan; Li, Yamin; Bai, Yan

    2017-01-01

    A new coordination polymer, {[Mn(HPIDC)(H2O)]·2H2O}n (1) (H3PIDC = 2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid), has been obtained by hydrothermal method and structurally characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction, elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). X-ray single crystal diffraction reveals that compound 1 crystallizing in acentric Pna21 space group, exhibits an ultimate racemic three-dimension framework with rare noninterpenetrated (10,3)-d (or utp) topology due to the alternate array of left- and right-handed helixes. Moreover, compound 1 also features ferroelectric, nonlinear optical (NLO) and antiferromagnetic behaviors.

  19. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  20. Analysis of temporal stability of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the stability of the images generated by electronic autostereoscopic 3D displays, studying the time course of the photometric and colorimetric parameters. The measurements were made on the basis of the procedure recommended in the European guideline EN 61747-6 for the characterization of electronic liquid-crystal displays (LCD). The study uses 3 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and numbers of pixels, taking the measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). For each of the displays, the time course is shown for the tristimulus values and the chromaticity coordinates in the XYZ CIE 1931 system and values from the time periods required to reach stable values of these parameters are presented. For the analysis of how the procedure recommended in the guideline EN 61747-6 for 2D displays influenced the results, and for the adaption of the procedure to the characterization of 3D displays, the experimental conditions of the standard procedure were varied, making the stability analysis in the two ocular channels (RE and LE) of the 3D mode and comparing the results with those corresponding to the 2D. The results of our study show that the stabilization time of a autostereoscopic 3D display with parallax barrier technology depends on the tristimulus value analysed (X, Y, Z) as well as on the presentation mode (2D, 3D); furthermore, it was found that whether the 3D mode is used depends on the ocular channel evaluated (RE, LE).

  1. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  2. Modeling and analysis of 3-D elongated shapes with applications to long bone morphometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, V.; Roux, C.; Lefevre, C.; Stindel, E.

    1996-02-01

    This paper presents a geometric model to be used as a framework for the description and analysis of three-dimensional (3-D) elongated shapes. Elongated shapes can be decomposed into two different parts: a 3-D curve (the central axis) and a 3-D surface (the straight surface). The central axis is described in terms of curvature and torsion. A novel concept of torsion image is introduced which allows the user to study the torsion of some relevant 3-D structures such as the medulla of long bones, without computing the third derivative. The description of the straight surface is based on an ordered set of Fourier Descriptors (FD`s), each set representing a 2-D slice of the structure. These descriptors possess completeness, continuity, and stability properties, and some geometrical invariancies. A polar diagram is built which contains the anatomical information of the straight surface and can be used as a tool for the analysis and discrimination of 3-D structures. A technique for the reconstruction of the 3-D surface from the model`s two components is presented. Various applications to the analysis of long bone structures, such as the ulna and radius, are derived from the model, namely, data compression, comparison of 3-D shapes, segmentation into 3-D primitives, and torsion and curvature analysis. The relevance of the method to morphometry and to clinical applications is discussed.

  3. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  4. 3D Image Analysis of Geomaterials using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulukutla, G.; Proussevitch, A.; Sahagian, D.

    2009-05-01

    Confocal microscopy is one of the most significant advances in optical microscopy of the last century. It is widely used in biological sciences but its application to geomaterials lingers due to a number of technical problems. Potentially the technique can perform non-invasive testing on a laser illuminated sample that fluoresces using a unique optical sectioning capability that rejects out-of-focus light reaching the confocal aperture. Fluorescence in geomaterials is commonly induced using epoxy doped with a fluorochrome that is impregnated into the sample to enable discrimination of various features such as void space or material boundaries. However, for many geomaterials, this method cannot be used because they do not naturally fluoresce and because epoxy cannot be impregnated into inaccessible parts of the sample due to lack of permeability. As a result, the confocal images of most geomaterials that have not been pre-processed with extensive sample preparation techniques are of poor quality and lack the necessary image and edge contrast necessary to apply any commonly used segmentation techniques to conduct any quantitative study of its features such as vesicularity, internal structure, etc. In our present work, we are developing a methodology to conduct a quantitative 3D analysis of images of geomaterials collected using a confocal microscope with minimal amount of prior sample preparation and no addition of fluorescence. Two sample geomaterials, a volcanic melt sample and a crystal chip containing fluid inclusions are used to assess the feasibility of the method. A step-by-step process of image analysis includes application of image filtration to enhance the edges or material interfaces and is based on two segmentation techniques: geodesic active contours and region competition. Both techniques have been applied extensively to the analysis of medical MRI images to segment anatomical structures. Preliminary analysis suggests that there is distortion in the

  5. Visualization and analysis of 3D microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Long, Fuhui; Zhou, Jianlong; Peng, Hanchuan

    2012-01-01

    In a wide range of biological studies, it is highly desirable to visualize and analyze three-dimensional (3D) microscopic images. In this primer, we first introduce several major methods for visualizing typical 3D images and related multi-scale, multi-time-point, multi-color data sets. Then, we discuss three key categories of image analysis tasks, namely segmentation, registration, and annotation. We demonstrate how to pipeline these visualization and analysis modules using examples of profiling the single-cell gene-expression of C. elegans and constructing a map of stereotyped neurite tracts in a fruit fly brain.

  6. Visualization and Analysis of 3D Microscopic Images

    PubMed Central

    Long, Fuhui; Zhou, Jianlong; Peng, Hanchuan

    2012-01-01

    In a wide range of biological studies, it is highly desirable to visualize and analyze three-dimensional (3D) microscopic images. In this primer, we first introduce several major methods for visualizing typical 3D images and related multi-scale, multi-time-point, multi-color data sets. Then, we discuss three key categories of image analysis tasks, namely segmentation, registration, and annotation. We demonstrate how to pipeline these visualization and analysis modules using examples of profiling the single-cell gene-expression of C. elegans and constructing a map of stereotyped neurite tracts in a fruit fly brain. PMID:22719236

  7. A 3-D Puzzle Approach to Building Protein-DNA Structures.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Deborah M

    2017-02-02

    Despite recent advances in structural analysis, it is still challenging to obtain a high resolution structure for a complex of RNA polymerase, transcriptional factors, and DNA. However, using biochemical constraints, 3-D printed models of available structures, and computer modeling, one can build biologically relevant models of such supramolecular complexes.

  8. Combining Amine-Reactive Cross-Linkers and Photo-Reactive Amino Acids for 3D-Structure Analysis of Proteins and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lössl, Philip; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the combination of chemical cross-linking and high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has matured into an alternative approach for analyzing 3D-structures of proteins and protein complexes. Using the distance constraints imposed by the cross-links, models of the protein or protein complex under investigation can be created. The majority of cross-linking studies are currently conducted with homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linkers. We extend this "traditional" cross-linking/MS strategy by adding complementary photo-cross-linking data. For this, the diazirine-containing unnatural amino acids photo-leucine and photo-methionine are incorporated into the proteins and cross-link formation is induced by UV-A irradiation. The advantage of the photo-cross-linking strategy is that it is not restricted to lysine residues and that hydrophobic regions in proteins can be targeted, which is advantageous for investigating membrane proteins. We consider the strategy of combining cross-linkers with orthogonal reactivities and distances to be ideally suited for maximizing the amount of structural information that can be gained from a cross-linking experiment.

  9. Characterizing 3D Vegetation Structure from Space: Mission Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Bergen, Kathleen; Blair, James B.; Dubayah, Ralph; Houghton, Richard; Hurtt, George; Kellndorfer, Josef; Lefsky, Michael; Ranson, Jon; Saatchi, Sasan; Shugart, H. H.; Wickland, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Human and natural forces are rapidly modifying the global distribution and structure of terrestrial ecosystems on which all of life depends, altering the global carbon cycle, affecting our climate now and for the foreseeable future, causing steep reductions in species diversity, and endangering Earth s sustainability. To understand changes and trends in terrestrial ecosystems and their functioning as carbon sources and sinks, and to characterize the impact of their changes on climate, habitat and biodiversity, new space assets are urgently needed to produce high spatial resolution global maps of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of vegetation, its biomass above ground, the carbon stored within and the implications for atmospheric green house gas concentrations and climate. These needs were articulated in a 2007 National Research Council (NRC) report (NRC, 2007) recommending a new satellite mission, DESDynI, carrying an L-band Polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-SAR) and a multi-beam lidar (Light RAnging And Detection) operating at 1064 nm. The objectives of this paper are to articulate the importance of these new, multi-year, 3D vegetation structure and biomass measurements, to briefly review the feasibility of radar and lidar remote sensing technology to meet these requirements, to define the data products and measurement requirements, and to consider implications of mission durations. The paper addresses these objectives by synthesizing research results and other input from a broad community of terrestrial ecology, carbon cycle, and remote sensing scientists and working groups. We conclude that: (1) current global biomass and 3-D vegetation structure information is unsuitable for both science and management and policy. The only existing global datasets of biomass are approximations based on combining land cover type and representative carbon values, instead of measurements of actual biomass. Current measurement attempts based on radar and multispectral

  10. 3D quantitative analysis of brain SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Ceskovic, Ivan; Petrovic, Ratimir; Loncaric, Srecko

    2001-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a computer-based technique for quantitative analysis of 3-D brain images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In particular, the volume and location of ischemic lesion and penumbra is important for early diagnosis and treatment of infracted regions of the brain. SPECT imaging is typically used as diagnostic tool to assess the size and location of the ischemic lesion. The segmentation method presented in this paper utilizes a 3-D deformable model in order to determine size and location of the regions of interest. The evolution of the model is computed using a level-set implementation of the algorithm. In addition to 3-D deformable model the method utilizes edge detection and region growing for realization of a pre-processing. Initial experimental results have shown that the method is useful for SPECT image analysis.

  11. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    PubMed

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci.

  12. Reducing Non-Uniqueness in Satellite Gravity Inversion using 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2013-12-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has been usually reduced by using a priori information from various sources, e.g. seismic tomography models. The reduction in non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation for 3D subsurface structures (objects) in seismic tomography models. However, these processes introduce additional uncertainty through the conversion relations due to the dependency on the other physical parameters such as temperature and pressure, or through the bias in the interpretation due to user choices and experience. In this research, a new methodology is introduced to extract the 3D subsurface structures from 3D geophysical data using a state-of-art 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis (OOA) technique. 3D OOA is tested using a set of synthetic models that simulate the real situation in the study area of this research. Then, 3D OOA is used to extract 3D subsurface objects from a real 3D seismic tomography model. The extracted 3D objects are used to reconstruct a forward model and its response is compared with the measured satellite gravity. Finally, the result of the forward modelling, based on the extracted 3D objects, is used to constrain the inversion process of satellite gravity data. Through this work, a new object-based approach is introduced to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. This can be used to constrain modelling and inversion of potential field data using the extracted 3D subsurface structures from other methods. In summary, a new approach is introduced to constrain inversion of satellite gravity measurements and enhance interpretation capabilities.

  13. Protein 3D structure computed from evolutionary sequence variation.

    PubMed

    Marks, Debora S; Colwell, Lucy J; Sheridan, Robert; Hopf, Thomas A; Pagnani, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Sander, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing.In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy.We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7-4.8 Å C(α)-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org). This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of protein structures

  14. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease.

  15. 3D Printing of Hierarchical Silk Fibroin Structures.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marianne R; Schaffner, Manuel; Carnelli, Davide; Studart, André R

    2016-12-21

    Like many other natural materials, silk is hierarchically structured from the amino acid level up to the cocoon or spider web macroscopic structures. Despite being used industrially in a number of applications, hierarchically structured silk fibroin objects with a similar degree of architectural control as in natural structures have not been produced yet due to limitations in fabrication processes. In a combined top-down and bottom-up approach, we exploit the freedom in macroscopic design offered by 3D printing and the template-guided assembly of ink building blocks at the meso- and nanolevel to fabricate hierarchical silk porous materials with unprecedented structural control. Pores with tunable sizes in the range 40-350 μm are generated by adding sacrificial organic microparticles as templates to a silk fibroin-based ink. Commercially available wax particles or monodisperse polycaprolactone made by microfluidics can be used as microparticle templates. Since closed pores are generated after template removal, an ultrasonication treatment can optionally be used to achieve open porosity. Such pore templating particles can be further modified with nanoparticles to create a hierarchical template that results in porous structures with a defined nanotopography on the pore walls. The hierarchically porous silk structures obtained with this processing technique can potentially be utilized in various application fields from structural materials to thermal insulation to tissue engineering scaffolds.

  16. Diagnosis and control of 3D elastic mechanical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajcin, Idriz; Soeffker, Dirk

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, a model-based approach for fault detection and vibration control of flexible structures is proposed and applied to 3D-structures. Faults like cracks or impacts acting on a flexible structure are considered as unknown inputs acting on the structure. The Proportional-Integral-Observer (PI-Observer) is used to estimate the system states as well as unknown inputs acting on a system. Also the effects of structural changes are understood as external effects (related to the unchanged structure) and are considered as fictitious external forces or moments. The paper deals with the design of the PI-Observer for practical applications when measurement noise and model uncertainties are present and shows its performance in experimental results. As examples, impacts acting upon a one side clamped elastic beam and on a thin plate structure are estimated using displacement or strain measurements. To control the vibration of the flexible plate, two piezoelectric patches bonded on the structure are used as actuators. The control algorithm introduced in this contribution contains a state feedback control and additionally a disturbance rejection. The disturbances are estimated using the PI-Observer. Experimental results show the performance and the robustness properties of the control strategy for the vibration control of a very thin plate.

  17. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors.

    PubMed

    Levashov, V A

    2016-03-07

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids' structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ1 ≥ λ2 ≥ λ3 ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ2/λ1) and (λ3/λ2) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ2 tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ1 and λ3. In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent "the Poisson ratio effect" at the atomic scale.

  18. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of high-grade host rocks to the Venetia kimberlite diatremes, Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Creus, P. K.; Anthonissen, C. J.; Stoch, B.; Ekkerd, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Beit Bridge Complex of the Central Zone (CZ) of the Limpopo Belt hosts the 519 ± 6 Ma Venetia kimberlite diatremes. Deformed shelf- or platform-type supracrustal sequences include the Mount Dowe, Malala Drift and Gumbu Groups, comprising quartzofeldspathic units, biotite-bearing gneiss, quartzite, metapelite, metacalcsilicate and ortho- and para-amphibolite. Previous studies define tectonometamorphic events at 3.3-3.1 Ga, 2.7-2.5 Ga and 2.04 Ga. Detailed structural mapping over 10 years highlights four deformation events at Venetia. Rules-based implicit 3D modelling in Leapfrog Geo™ provides an unprecedented insight into CZ ductile deformation and sheath folding. D1 juxtaposed gneisses against metasediments. D2 produced a pervasive axial planar foliation (S2) to isoclinal F2 folds. Sheared lithological contacts and S2 were refolded into regional, open, predominantly southward-verging, E-W trending F3 folds. Intrusion of a hornblendite protolith occurred at high angles to incipient S2. Constrictional-prolate D4 shows moderately NE-plunging azimuths defined by elongated hornblendite lenses, andalusite crystals in metapelite, crenulations in fuchsitic quartzite and sheath folding. D4 overlaps with a: 1) 2.03-2.01 Ga regional M3 metamorphic overprint; b) transpressional deformation at 2.2-1.9 Ga and c) 2.03 Ga transpressional, dextral shearing and thrusting around the CZ and d) formation of the Avoca, Bellavue and Baklykraal sheath folds and parallel lineations.

  19. Horizontal structure and propagation characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves observed by Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network (ANGWIN), using a 3-D spectral analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takashi S.; Nakamura, Takuji; Murphy, Damian; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Zhao, Yucheng; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    ANGWIN (Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network) is an international airglow imager/instrument network in the Antarctic, which commenced observations in 2011. It seeks to reveal characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves, and to study sources, propagation, breaking of the gravity waves over the Antarctic and the effects on general circulation and upper atmosphere. In this study, we compared distributions of horizontal phase velocity of the gravity waves at around 90 km altitude observed in the mesospheric airglow imaging over different locations using our new statistical analysis method of 3-D Fourier transform, developed by Matsuda et al. (2014). Results from the airglow imagers at four stations at Syowa (69S, 40E), Halley (76S, 27W), Davis (69S, 78E) and McMurdo (78S, 156E) out of the ANGWIN imagers have been compared, for the observation period between April 6 and May 21 in 2013. In addition to the horizontal distribution of propagation and phase speed, gravity wave energies have been quantitatively compared, indicating a smaller GW activity in higher latitude stations. We further investigated frequency dependence of gravity wave propagation direction, as well as nightly variation of the gravity wave direction and correlation with the background wind variations. We found that variation of propagation direction is partly due to the effect of background wind in the middle atmosphere, but variation of wave sources could play important role as well. Secondary wave generation is also needed to explain the observed results.

  20. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  1. Experimental 3-D SAR Human Target Signature Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-21

    through the wall structure that the radar signal must travel to get to the target, such as through and around studs . The different features from the...drywall made of wood stud , gypsum, insulating material, and vinyl coating. The second wall structure is made of cinder blocks and is a more challenging... wall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging from an experimental L-band through- wall SAR prototype. Tools and algorithms for 3-D visualization are

  2. Dual multispectral and 3D structured light laparoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Lin, Jianyu; Arya, Shobhit; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative feedback on tissue function, such as blood volume and oxygenation would be useful to the surgeon in cases where current clinical practice relies on subjective measures, such as identification of ischaemic bowel or tissue viability during anastomosis formation. Also, tissue surface profiling may be used to detect and identify certain pathologies, as well as diagnosing aspects of tissue health such as gut motility. In this paper a dual modality laparoscopic system is presented that combines multispectral reflectance and 3D surface imaging. White light illumination from a xenon source is detected by a laparoscope-mounted fast filter wheel camera to assemble a multispectral image (MSI) cube. Surface shape is then calculated using a spectrally-encoded structured light (SL) pattern detected by the same camera and triangulated using an active stereo technique. Images of porcine small bowel were acquired during open surgery. Tissue reflectance spectra were acquired and blood volume was calculated at each spatial pixel across the bowel wall and mesentery. SL features were segmented and identified using a `normalised cut' algoritm and the colour vector of each spot. Using the 3D geometry defined by the camera coordinate system the multispectral data could be overlaid onto the surface mesh. Dual MSI and SL imaging has the potential to provide augmented views to the surgeon supplying diagnostic information related to blood supply health and organ function. Future work on this system will include filter optimisation to reduce noise in tissue optical property measurement, and minimise spot identification errors in the SL pattern.

  3. 3-D Experimental Fracture Analysis at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Jackson; Albert S. Kobayashi

    2001-09-14

    T*e, which is an elastic-plastic fracture parameter based on incremental theory of plasticity, was determined numerically and experimentally. The T*e integral of a tunneling crack in 2024-T3 aluminum, three point bend specimen was obtained through a hybrid analysis of moire interferometry and 3-D elastic-plastic finite element analysis. The results were verified by the good agreement between the experimentally and numerically determined T*e on the specimen surface.

  4. POISs3: A 3D poisson smoother of structured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtimaeki, R.

    Flow solvers based on solving Navier-Stokes or Euler equations generally need a computational grid to represent the domain of the flow. A structured computational grid can be efficiently produced by algebraic methods like transfinite interpolation. Unfortunately, algebraic methods propagate all kinds of unsmoothness of the boundary into the field. Unsmoothness of the grid, in turn, can result in inaccuracy in the flow solver. In the present work a 3D elliptic grid smoother was developed. The smoother is based on solving three Poisson equations, one for each curvilinear direction. The Poisson equations formed in the physical region are first transformed to the computational (rectilinear) region. The resulting equations form a system of three coupled elliptic quasi-linear partial differential equations in the computational domain. A short review of the Poisson method is presented. The regularity of a grid cell is studied and a skewness value is developed.

  5. Multifunctional 3D printing of heterogeneous hydrogel structures.

    PubMed

    Nadernezhad, Ali; Khani, Navid; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Toprakhisar, Burak; Bakirci, Ezgi; Menceloglu, Yusuf; Unal, Serkan; Koc, Bahattin

    2016-09-15

    Multimaterial additive manufacturing or three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogel structures provides the opportunity to engineer geometrically dependent functionalities. However, current fabrication methods are mostly limited to one type of material or only provide one type of functionality. In this paper, we report a novel method of multimaterial deposition of hydrogel structures based on an aspiration-on-demand protocol, in which the constitutive multimaterial segments of extruded filaments were first assembled in liquid state by sequential aspiration of inks into a glass capillary, followed by in situ gel formation. We printed different patterned objects with varying chemical, electrical, mechanical, and biological properties by tuning process and material related parameters, to demonstrate the abilities of this method in producing heterogeneous and multi-functional hydrogel structures. Our results show the potential of proposed method in producing heterogeneous objects with spatially controlled functionalities while preserving structural integrity at the switching interface between different segments. We anticipate that this method would introduce new opportunities in multimaterial additive manufacturing of hydrogels for diverse applications such as biosensors, flexible electronics, tissue engineering and organ printing.

  6. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  7. Multifunctional 3D printing of heterogeneous hydrogel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadernezhad, Ali; Khani, Navid; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Toprakhisar, Burak; Bakirci, Ezgi; Menceloglu, Yusuf; Unal, Serkan; Koc, Bahattin

    2016-09-01

    Multimaterial additive manufacturing or three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogel structures provides the opportunity to engineer geometrically dependent functionalities. However, current fabrication methods are mostly limited to one type of material or only provide one type of functionality. In this paper, we report a novel method of multimaterial deposition of hydrogel structures based on an aspiration-on-demand protocol, in which the constitutive multimaterial segments of extruded filaments were first assembled in liquid state by sequential aspiration of inks into a glass capillary, followed by in situ gel formation. We printed different patterned objects with varying chemical, electrical, mechanical, and biological properties by tuning process and material related parameters, to demonstrate the abilities of this method in producing heterogeneous and multi-functional hydrogel structures. Our results show the potential of proposed method in producing heterogeneous objects with spatially controlled functionalities while preserving structural integrity at the switching interface between different segments. We anticipate that this method would introduce new opportunities in multimaterial additive manufacturing of hydrogels for diverse applications such as biosensors, flexible electronics, tissue engineering and organ printing.

  8. Multifunctional 3D printing of heterogeneous hydrogel structures

    PubMed Central

    Nadernezhad, Ali; Khani, Navid; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Toprakhisar, Burak; Bakirci, Ezgi; Menceloglu, Yusuf; Unal, Serkan; Koc, Bahattin

    2016-01-01

    Multimaterial additive manufacturing or three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogel structures provides the opportunity to engineer geometrically dependent functionalities. However, current fabrication methods are mostly limited to one type of material or only provide one type of functionality. In this paper, we report a novel method of multimaterial deposition of hydrogel structures based on an aspiration-on-demand protocol, in which the constitutive multimaterial segments of extruded filaments were first assembled in liquid state by sequential aspiration of inks into a glass capillary, followed by in situ gel formation. We printed different patterned objects with varying chemical, electrical, mechanical, and biological properties by tuning process and material related parameters, to demonstrate the abilities of this method in producing heterogeneous and multi-functional hydrogel structures. Our results show the potential of proposed method in producing heterogeneous objects with spatially controlled functionalities while preserving structural integrity at the switching interface between different segments. We anticipate that this method would introduce new opportunities in multimaterial additive manufacturing of hydrogels for diverse applications such as biosensors, flexible electronics, tissue engineering and organ printing. PMID:27630079

  9. 3D Wilson cycle: structural inheritance and subduction polarity reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaussier, Stephane; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Many orogenies display along-strike variations in their orogenic wedge geometry. For instance, the Alps is an example of lateral changes in the subducting lithosphere polarity. High resolution tomography has shown that the southeast dipping European lithosphere is separated from the northeast dipping Adriatic lithosphere by a narrow transition zone at about the "Judicarian" line (Kissling et al. 2006). The formation of such 3D variations remains conjectural. We investigate the conditions that can spontaneously induce such lithospheric structures, and intend to identify the main parameters controlling their formation and geometry. Using the 3D thermo-mechanical code, I3ELVIS (Gerya and Yuen 2007) we modelled a Wilson cycle starting from a continental lithosphere in an extensional setting resulting in continental breakup and oceanic spreading. At a later stage, divergence is gradually reversed to convergence, which induce subduction of the oceanic lithosphere formed during oceanic spreading. In this model, all lateral and longitudinal structures of the lithospheres are generated self-consistently, and are consequences of the initial continental structure, tectono-magmatic inheritance, and material rheology. Our numerical simulations point out the control of rheological parameters defining the brittle/plastic yielding conditions for the lithosphere. Formation of several opposing domains of opposing subduction polarity is facilitated by wide and weak oceanic lithospheres. Furthermore, contrasts of strength between the continental and oceanic lithosphere, as well as the angle between the plate suture and the shortening direction have a second order effect on the lateral geometry of the subduction zone. In our numerical experiments systematic lateral changes in the subduction lithosphere polarity during subduction initiation form spontaneously suggesting intrinsic physical origin of this phenomenon. Further studies are necessary to understand why this feature, observed

  10. 3D printing technology using high viscous materials - Synthesis of functional materials and fabrication of 3D metal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seongik

    In the 3D printing technology, the research for using various materials has been performing. In this research work, 3D printable high viscous materials are suggested as one of the solutions for problems in the traditional 3D printing technology. First, Cu-Ag coreshell was synthesized as a functional material. In terms of the reaction rate, reaction rate limiting step was defined as a fundamental research, and then prepared Cu-Ag coreshell was printed and analyzed. Second, the high viscous Cu paste was prepared and then metal 3D printed structure was fabricated by using new printing method. In the synthesis of Cu-Ag coreshell, different sizes of Cu particle, 2μm and 100nm were used, and when 2μm Cu was applied, the reaction rate was limited by film diffusion control. However, when 100nm Cu was applied, reaction rate was controlled by CuO film and the rate of the reaction, which includes removing CuO film in the solution, is limited by chemical reaction control. The shape of Cu-Ag particle is spherical in the 2μm Cu condition and dendrite shape in the 100nm Cu condition respectively. The conductivity of Cu-Ag coreshell paste increased as increasing content of coreshell particle in the paste and sintering temperature. In order to print high viscous metal paste, the high viscous Cu paste was printed by using screw extruder, and the viscosity of Cu paste was measured as a fundamental research. As increasing wt.% of Cu in the paste, the viscosity also increased. In addition, the shrinkage factor was reduced by increasing wt.% of Cu in the paste. An optimized printing condition for the high viscous material was obtained, and by using this condition, 3D metal structure was fabricated. The final product was heat treated and polished. Through these processes, a fine quality of metal 3D structure was printed.

  11. A software tool for 3D dose verification and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa'd, M. Al; Graham, J.; Liney, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    The main recent developments in radiotherapy have focused on improved treatment techniques in order to generate further significant improvements in patient prognosis. There is now an internationally recognised need to improve 3D verification of highly conformal radiotherapy treatments. This is because of the very high dose gradients used in modern treatment techniques, which can result in a small error in the spatial dose distribution leading to a serious complication. In order to gain the full benefits of using 3D dosimetric technologies (such as gel dosimetry), it is vital to use 3D evaluation methods and algorithms. We present in this paper a software solution that provides a comprehensive 3D dose evaluation and analysis. The software is applied to gel dosimetry, which is based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a read-out method. The software can also be used to compare any two dose distributions, such as two distributions planned using different methods of treatment planning systems, or different dose calculation algorithms.

  12. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Kast, Brian A.; Smith, Collin S.

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  13. Improved hybrid optimization algorithm for 3D protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A new improved hybrid optimization algorithm - PGATS algorithm, which is based on toy off-lattice model, is presented for dealing with three-dimensional protein structure prediction problems. The algorithm combines the particle swarm optimization (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA), and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Otherwise, we also take some different improved strategies. The factor of stochastic disturbance is joined in the particle swarm optimization to improve the search ability; the operations of crossover and mutation that are in the genetic algorithm are changed to a kind of random liner method; at last tabu search algorithm is improved by appending a mutation operator. Through the combination of a variety of strategies and algorithms, the protein structure prediction (PSP) in a 3D off-lattice model is achieved. The PSP problem is an NP-hard problem, but the problem can be attributed to a global optimization problem of multi-extremum and multi-parameters. This is the theoretical principle of the hybrid optimization algorithm that is proposed in this paper. The algorithm combines local search and global search, which overcomes the shortcoming of a single algorithm, giving full play to the advantage of each algorithm. In the current universal standard sequences, Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences are certified. Experiments show that the proposed new method outperforms single algorithms on the accuracy of calculating the protein sequence energy value, which is proved to be an effective way to predict the structure of proteins.

  14. 3D structure of eukaryotic flagella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Flagella/cilia are motile organelles with more than 400 proteins. To understand the mechanism of such complex systems, we need methods to describe molecular arrange-ments and conformations three-dimensionally in vivo. Cryo-electron tomography enabled us such a 3D structural analysis. Our group has been working on 3D structure of flagella/cilia using this method and revealed highly ordered and beautifully organized molecular arrangement. 3D structure gave us insights into the mechanism to gener-ate bending motion with well defined waveforms. In this review, I summarize our recent structural studies on fla-gella/cilia by cryo-electron tomography, mainly focusing on dynein microtubule-based ATPase motor proteins and the radial spoke, a regulatory protein complex.

  15. Proton-detected 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-28

    A proton-detected 3D (1)H/(13)C/(1)H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of (13)C-(1)H connectivities, and proximities of (13)C-(1)H and (1)H-(1)H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) (1)H/(1)H and 2D (13)C/(1)H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of (1)H-(1)H proximity and (13)C-(1)H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between (13)C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of (1)H-(1)H-(13)C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ⋅ H2O ⋅ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  16. Proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    A proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of 13C-1H connectivities, and proximities of 13C-1H and 1H-1H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including 1H-1H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) 1H/1H and 2D 13C/1H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of 1H-1H proximity and 13C-1H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) 1H/13C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of 1H-1H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between 13C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of 1H-1H-13C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ṡ H2O ṡ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  17. Visualization and Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd; Hagen, Hans

    2007-10-25

    Recent methods for extracting precise measurements ofspatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image dataopens the way for new analysis of the complex gene regulatory networkscontrolling animal development. To support analysis of this novel andhighly complex data we developed PointCloudXplore (PCX), an integratedvisualization framework that supports dedicated multi-modal, physical andinformation visualization views along with algorithms to aid in analyzingthe relationships between gene expression levels. Using PCX, we helpedour science stakeholders to address many questions in 3D gene expressionresearch, e.g., to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries andtemporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns arecontrolled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  18. Advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-06-01

    The global objective of this effort is to develop advanced computational tools for 3-D seismic analysis, and test the products using a model dataset developed under the joint aegis of the United States` Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the European Association of Exploration Geophysicists (EAEG). The goal is to enhance the value to the oil industry of the SEG/EAEG modeling project, carried out with US Department of Energy (DOE) funding in FY` 93-95. The primary objective of the ORNL Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) is to spearhead the computational innovations techniques that would enable a revolutionary advance in 3-D seismic analysis. The CESAR effort is carried out in collaboration with world-class domain experts from leading universities, and in close coordination with other national laboratories and oil industry partners.

  19. Structure Segmentation and Transfer Faults in the Marcellus Shale, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania: Implications for Gas Recovery Efficiency and Risk Assessment Using 3D Seismic Attribute Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Emily D.

    The Marcellus Shale has become an important unconventional gas reservoir in the oil and gas industry. Fractures within this organic-rich black shale serve as an important component of porosity and permeability useful in enhancing production. Horizontal drilling is the primary approach for extracting hydrocarbons in the Marcellus Shale. Typically, wells are drilled perpendicular to natural fractures in an attempt to intersect fractures for effective hydraulic stimulation. If the fractures are contained within the shale, then hydraulic fracturing can enhance permeability by further breaking the already weakened rock. However, natural fractures can affect hydraulic stimulations by absorbing and/or redirecting the energy away from the wellbore, causing a decreased efficiency in gas recovery, as has been the case for the Clearfield County, Pennsylvania study area. Estimating appropriate distances away from faults and fractures, which may limit hydrocarbon recovery, is essential to reducing the risk of injection fluid migration along these faults. In an attempt to mitigate the negative influences of natural fractures on hydrocarbon extraction within the Marcellus Shale, fractures were analyzed through the aid of both traditional and advanced seismic attributes including variance, curvature, ant tracking, and waveform model regression. Through the integration of well log interpretations and seismic data, a detailed assessment of structural discontinuities that may decrease the recovery efficiency of hydrocarbons was conducted. High-quality 3D seismic data in Central Pennsylvania show regional folds and thrusts above the major detachment interval of the Salina Salt. In addition to the regional detachment folds and thrusts, cross-regional, northwest-trending lineaments were mapped. These lineaments may pose a threat to hydrocarbon productivity and recovery efficiency due to faults and fractures acting as paths of least resistance for induced hydraulic stimulation fluids

  20. CARd-3D: Carbon Distribution in 3D Structure Program for Globular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ekambaram, Rajasekaran; Kannaiyan, Akila; Marimuthu, Vijayasarathy; Swaminathan, Vinobha Chinnaiah; Renganathan, Senthil; Perumal, Ananda Gopu

    2014-01-01

    Spatial arrangement of carbon in protein structure is analyzed here. Particularly, the carbon fractions around individual atoms are compared. It is hoped that it follows the principle of 31.45% carbon around individual atoms. The results reveal that globular protein's atoms follow this principle. A comparative study on monomer versus dimer reveal that carbon is better distributed in dimeric form than in its monomeric form. Similar study on solid versus liquid structures reveals that the liquid (NMR) structure has better carbon distribution over the corresponding solid (X-Ray) structure. The carbon fraction distributions in fiber and toxin protein are compared. Fiber proteins follow the principle of carbon fraction distribution. At the same time it has another broad spectrum of carbon distribution than in globular proteins. The toxin protein follows an abnormal carbon fraction distribution. The carbon fraction distribution plays an important role in deciding the structure and shape of proteins. It is hoped to help in understanding the protein folding and function.

  1. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-05-03

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of malignancies among men in the U.S. While surgery carries a significant risk of impotence and incontinence, traditional chemotherapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful. Hormone therapy is effective at early stage, but often fails with the eventual development of hormone-refractory tumors. We have been interested in developing therapeutics targeting specific metabolic deficiency of tumor cells. We recently showed that prostate tumor cells specifically lack an enzyme (argininosuccinate synthase, or ASS) involved in the synthesis of the amino acid arginine(1). This condition causes the tumor cells to become dependent on exogenous arginine, and they undergo metabolic stress when free arginine is depleted by arginine deiminase (ADI)(1,10). Indeed, we have shown that human prostate cancer cells CWR22Rv1 are effectively killed by ADI with caspase-independent apoptosis and aggressive autophagy (or macroautophagy)(1,2,3). Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that allows cells to metabolize unwanted proteins by lysosomal breakdown during nutritional starvation(4,5). Although the essential components of this pathway are well-characterized(6,7,8,9), many aspects of the molecular mechanism are still unclear - in particular, what is the role of autophagy in the death-response of prostate cancer cells after ADI treatment? In order to address this question, we required an experimental method to measure the level and extent of autophagic response in cells - and since there are no known molecular markers that can accurately track this process, we chose to develop an imaging-based approach, using quantitative 3D fluorescence microscopy(11,12). Using CWR22Rv1 cells specifically-labeled with fluorescent probes for autophagosomes and lysosomes, we show that 3D image stacks acquired with either widefield deconvolution microscopy (and later, with super-resolution, structured-illumination microscopy) can clearly capture the early

  2. The 3D Attenuation Structure of Deception Island (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, J.; De Siena, L.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Del Pezzo, E.; García-Yeguas, A.; Díaz-Moreno, A.

    2015-05-01

    The seismic and volcanological structure of Deception Island (Antarctica) is an intense focus topic in Volcano Geophysics. The interpretations given by scientists on the origin, nature, and location of the structures buried under the island strongly diverge. We present a high-resolution 3D P-wave attenuation tomography model obtained by using the coda normalization method on 20,293 high-quality waveforms produced by active sources. The checkerboard and synthetic anomaly tests guarantee the reproduction of the input anomalies under the island down to a depth of 4 km. The results, once compared with our current knowledge on the geological, geochemical, and geophysical structure of the region, depict Deception as a piecemeal caldera structure coming out of the Bransfield Trough. High-attenuation anomalies contouring the northeastern emerged caldera rim correlate with the locations of sediments. In our interpretation, the main attenuation contrast, which appears under the collapsed southeastern caldera rim, is related to the deeper feeding systems. A unique P-wave high-attenuation spherical-like anomaly in the inner bay extends between depths of 1 and 3 km. The northern contour of the anomaly coincides with the calderic rim both at 1 and 2 km, while smaller anomalies connect it with deeper structures below 3 km, dipping toward the Bransfield Trough. In our interpretation, the large upper anomaly is caused by a high-temperature shallow (1-3 km deep) geothermal system, located beneath the sediment-filled bay in the collapsed blocks and heated by smaller, deeper contributions of molten materials (magma) rising from southeast.

  3. 3D structures of membrane proteins from genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Sheridan, Robert; Rost, Burkhard; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that amino acid co-variation in proteins, extracted from the evolutionary sequence record, can be used to fold transmembrane proteins. We use this technique to predict previously unknown, 3D structures for 11 transmembrane proteins (with up to 14 helices) from their sequences alone. The prediction method (EVfold_membrane), applies a maximum entropy approach to infer evolutionary co-variation in pairs of sequence positions within a protein family and then generates all-atom models with the derived pairwise distance constraints. We benchmark the approach with blinded, de novo computation of known transmembrane protein structures from 23 families, demonstrating unprecedented accuracy of the method for large transmembrane proteins. We show how the method can predict oligomerization, functional sites, and conformational changes in transmembrane proteins. With the rapid rise in large-scale sequencing, more accurate and more comprehensive information on evolutionary constraints can be decoded from genetic variation, greatly expanding the repertoire of transmembrane proteins amenable to modelling by this method. PMID:22579045

  4. Pack Aluminization Synthesis of Superalloy 3D Woven and 3D Braided Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdeniz, Dinc; Levinson, Amanda J.; Sharp, Keith W.; Rowenhorst, David J.; Fonda, Richard W.; Dunand, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-architectured, precipitation-strengthened structures were created in a new process combining weaving, gas-phase alloying, diffusion, and precipitation. First, high-ductility Ni-20 wt pct Cr wires with 202 μm diameter were braided, or non-crimp orthogonal woven, into three-dimensional structures. Second, these structures were vapor-phase alloyed with Al at 1273 K (1000 °C) by pack cementation, creating uniform NiAl coatings on the wires when using a retort. Also, solid-state bonding was achieved at wire intersections, where two wires were sufficiently close to each other, as determined via optical and X-ray tomographic microscopy. Third, the NiAl-coated wires were fully homogenized and aged to form γ' precipitates distributed in a γ matrix phase, the same microstructure providing strength in nickel-based superalloys. The resulting structures—consisting of wires (i) woven in a controlled three-dimensional architecture, (ii) bonded at contact points and (iii) strengthened by γ' precipitates—are expected to show high strength at ambient and elevated temperatures, low density, and high permeability which is useful for active cooling.

  5. Towards an efficient compression of 3D coordinates of macromolecular structures

    PubMed Central

    Valasatava, Yana; Bradley, Anthony R.; Rose, Alexander S.; Duarte, Jose M.; Prlić, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The size and complexity of 3D macromolecular structures available in the Protein Data Bank is constantly growing. Current tools and file formats have reached limits of scalability. New compression approaches are required to support the visualization of large molecular complexes and enable new and scalable means for data analysis. We evaluated a series of compression techniques for coordinates of 3D macromolecular structures and identified the best performing approaches. By balancing compression efficiency in terms of the decompression speed and compression ratio, and code complexity, our results provide the foundation for a novel standard to represent macromolecular coordinates in a compact and useful file format. PMID:28362865

  6. Towards an efficient compression of 3D coordinates of macromolecular structures.

    PubMed

    Valasatava, Yana; Bradley, Anthony R; Rose, Alexander S; Duarte, Jose M; Prlić, Andreas; Rose, Peter W

    2017-01-01

    The size and complexity of 3D macromolecular structures available in the Protein Data Bank is constantly growing. Current tools and file formats have reached limits of scalability. New compression approaches are required to support the visualization of large molecular complexes and enable new and scalable means for data analysis. We evaluated a series of compression techniques for coordinates of 3D macromolecular structures and identified the best performing approaches. By balancing compression efficiency in terms of the decompression speed and compression ratio, and code complexity, our results provide the foundation for a novel standard to represent macromolecular coordinates in a compact and useful file format.

  7. Beam Optics Analysis - An Advanced 3D Trajectory Code

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Bui, Thuc; Vogler, William; Neilson, Jeff; Read, Mike; Shephard, Mark; Bauer, Andrew; Datta, Dibyendu; Beal, Mark

    2006-01-03

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. has completed initial development of an advanced, 3D program for modeling electron trajectories in electromagnetic fields. The code is being used to design complex guns and collectors. Beam Optics Analysis (BOA) is a fully relativistic, charged particle code using adaptive, finite element meshing. Geometrical input is imported from CAD programs generating ACIS-formatted files. Parametric data is inputted using an intuitive, graphical user interface (GUI), which also provides control of convergence, accuracy, and post processing. The program includes a magnetic field solver, and magnetic information can be imported from Maxwell 2D/3D and other programs. The program supports thermionic emission and injected beams. Secondary electron emission is also supported, including multiple generations. Work on field emission is in progress as well as implementation of computer optimization of both the geometry and operating parameters. The principle features of the program and its capabilities are presented.

  8. User's Manual for DuctE3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Analysis of Ducted Fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1997-01-01

    The program DuctE3D is used for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of ducted fans. This guide describes the input data required and the output files generated, in using DuctE3D. The analysis solves three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations to obtain the aerodynamic forces. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either the time domain or the frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis and aeroelastic analysis of an isolated fan row.

  9. 3D structure/function analysis of PilX reveals how minor pilins can modulate the virulence properties of type IV pili

    PubMed Central

    Helaine, Sophie; Dyer, David H.; Nassif, Xavier; Pelicic, Vladimir; Forest, Katrina T.

    2007-01-01

    Type IV pili (Tfp) are widespread filamentous bacterial organelles that mediate multiple virulence-related phenotypes. They are composed mainly of pilin subunits, which are processed before filament assembly by dedicated prepilin peptidases. Other proteins processed by these peptidases, whose molecular nature and mode of action remain enigmatic, play critical roles in Tfp biology. We have performed a detailed structure/function analysis of one such protein, PilX from Neisseria meningitidis, which is crucial for formation of bacterial aggregates and adhesion to human cells. The x-ray crystal structure of PilX reveals the α/β roll fold shared by all pilins, and we show that this protein colocalizes with Tfp. These observations suggest that PilX is a minor, or low abundance, pilin that assembles within the filaments in a similar way to pilin. Deletion of a PilX distinctive structural element, which is predicted to be exposed on the filament surface, abolishes aggregation and adhesion. Our results support a model in which surface-exposed motifs in PilX subunits stabilize bacterial aggregates against the disruptive force of pilus retraction and illustrate how a minor pilus component can enhance the functional properties of pili of rather simple composition and structure. PMID:17893339

  10. 3D-e-Chem-VM: Structural Cheminformatics Research Infrastructure in a Freely Available Virtual Machine.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Ross; Verhoeven, Stefan; Vass, Márton; Vriend, Gerrit; de Esch, Iwan J P; Lusher, Scott J; Leurs, Rob; Ridder, Lars; Kooistra, Albert J; Ritschel, Tina; de Graaf, Chris

    2017-02-27

    3D-e-Chem-VM is an open source, freely available Virtual Machine ( http://3d-e-chem.github.io/3D-e-Chem-VM/ ) that integrates cheminformatics and bioinformatics tools for the analysis of protein-ligand interaction data. 3D-e-Chem-VM consists of software libraries, and database and workflow tools that can analyze and combine small molecule and protein structural information in a graphical programming environment. New chemical and biological data analytics tools and workflows have been developed for the efficient exploitation of structural and pharmacological protein-ligand interaction data from proteomewide databases (e.g., ChEMBLdb and PDB), as well as customized information systems focused on, e.g., G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRdb) and protein kinases (KLIFS). The integrated structural cheminformatics research infrastructure compiled in the 3D-e-Chem-VM enables the design of new approaches in virtual ligand screening (Chemdb4VS), ligand-based metabolism prediction (SyGMa), and structure-based protein binding site comparison and bioisosteric replacement for ligand design (KRIPOdb).

  11. 3D-e-Chem-VM: Structural Cheminformatics Research Infrastructure in a Freely Available Virtual Machine

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    3D-e-Chem-VM is an open source, freely available Virtual Machine (http://3d-e-chem.github.io/3D-e-Chem-VM/) that integrates cheminformatics and bioinformatics tools for the analysis of protein–ligand interaction data. 3D-e-Chem-VM consists of software libraries, and database and workflow tools that can analyze and combine small molecule and protein structural information in a graphical programming environment. New chemical and biological data analytics tools and workflows have been developed for the efficient exploitation of structural and pharmacological protein–ligand interaction data from proteomewide databases (e.g., ChEMBLdb and PDB), as well as customized information systems focused on, e.g., G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRdb) and protein kinases (KLIFS). The integrated structural cheminformatics research infrastructure compiled in the 3D-e-Chem-VM enables the design of new approaches in virtual ligand screening (Chemdb4VS), ligand-based metabolism prediction (SyGMa), and structure-based protein binding site comparison and bioisosteric replacement for ligand design (KRIPOdb). PMID:28125221

  12. Uncertainty Analysis for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron J. Pawel; Dr. George L. Mesina

    2011-08-01

    In its current state, RELAP5-3D is a 'best-estimate' code; it is one of our most reliable programs for modeling what occurs within reactor systems in transients from given initial conditions. This code, however, remains an estimator. A statistical analysis has been performed that begins to lay the foundation for a full uncertainty analysis. By varying the inputs over assumed probability density functions, the output parameters were shown to vary. Using such statistical tools as means, variances, and tolerance intervals, a picture of how uncertain the results are based on the uncertainty of the inputs has been obtained.

  13. Breast tumor angiogenesis analysis using 3D power Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Lee, Yu-Hau; Chen, Dar-Ren; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process that correlates to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Breast cancer angiogenesis has been the most extensively studied and now serves as a paradigm for understanding the biology of angiogenesis and its effects on tumor outcome and patient prognosis. Most studies on characterization of angiogenesis focus on pixel/voxel counts more than morphological analysis. Nevertheless, in cancer, the blood flow is greatly affected by the morphological changes, such as the number of vessels, branching pattern, length, and diameter. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that can quantify vascular morphology using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound (US) on breast tumors. We propose a scheme to extract the morphological information from angiography and to relate them to tumor diagnosis outcome. At first, a 3-D thinning algorithm helps narrow down the vessels into their skeletons. The measurements of vascular morphology significantly rely on the traversing of the vascular trees produced from skeletons. Our study of 3-D assessment of vascular morphological features regards vessel count, length, bifurcation, and diameter of vessels. Investigations into 221 solid breast tumors including 110 benign and 111 malignant cases, the p values using the Student's t-test for all features are less than 0.05 indicating that the proposed features are deemed statistically significant. Our scheme focuses on the vascular architecture without involving the technique of tumor segmentation. The results show that the proposed method is feasible, and have a good agreement with the diagnosis of the pathologists.

  14. USM3D Analysis of Low Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years considerable improvement was made in NASA's in house boom prediction capability. As part of this improved capability, the USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver, when combined with a suitable unstructured grid, went from accurately predicting boom signatures at 1 body length to 10 body lengths. Since that time, the research emphasis has shifted from analysis to the design of supersonic configurations with boom signature mitigation In order to design an aircraft, the techniques for accurately predicting boom and drag need to be determined. This paper compares CFD results with the wind tunnel experimental results conducted on a Gulfstream reduced boom and drag configuration. Two different wind-tunnel models were designed and tested for drag and boom data. The goal of this study was to assess USM3D capability for predicting both boom and drag characteristics. Overall, USM3D coupled with a grid that was sheared and stretched was able to reasonably predict boom signature. The computational drag polar matched the experimental results for a lift coefficient above 0.1 despite some mismatch in the predicted lift-curve slope.

  15. 3dRNAscore: a distance and torsion angle dependent evaluation function of 3D RNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Zhao, Yunjie; Zhu, Chunyan; Xiao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Model evaluation is a necessary step for better prediction and design of 3D RNA structures. For proteins, this has been widely studied and the knowledge-based statistical potential has been proved to be one of effective ways to solve this problem. Currently, a few knowledge-based statistical potentials have also been proposed to evaluate predicted models of RNA tertiary structures. The benchmark tests showed that they can identify the native structures effectively but further improvements are needed to identify near-native structures and those with non-canonical base pairs. Here, we present a novel knowledge-based potential, 3dRNAscore, which combines distance-dependent and dihedral-dependent energies. The benchmarks on different testing datasets all show that 3dRNAscore are more efficient than existing evaluation methods in recognizing native state from a pool of near-native states of RNAs as well as in ranking near-native states of RNA models. PMID:25712091

  16. Advanced Visualization and Analysis of Climate Data using DV3D and UV-CDAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes DV3D, a Vistrails package of high-level modules for the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) interactive visual exploration system that enables exploratory analysis of diverse and rich data sets stored in the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). DV3D provides user-friendly workflow interfaces for advanced visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. The application builds on VTK, an open-source, object-oriented library, for visualization and analysis. DV3D provides the high-level interfaces, tools, and application integrations required to make the analysis and visualization power of VTK readily accessible to users without exposing burdensome details such as actors, cameras, renderers, and transfer functions. It can run as a desktop application or distributed over a set of nodes for hyperwall or distributed visualization applications. DV3D is structured as a set of modules which can be linked to create workflows in Vistrails. Figure 1 displays a typical DV3D workflow as it would appear in the Vistrails workflow builder interface of UV-CDAT and, on the right, the visualization spreadsheet output of the workflow. Each DV3D module encapsulates a complex VTK pipeline with numerous supporting objects. Each visualization module implements a unique interactive 3D display. The integrated Vistrails visualization spreadsheet offers multiple synchronized visualization displays for desktop or hyperwall. The currently available displays include volume renderers, volume slicers, 3D isosurfaces, 3D hovmoller, and various vector plots. The DV3D GUI offers a rich selection of interactive query, browse, navigate, and configure options for all displays. All configuration operations are saved as Vistrails provenance. DV3D's seamless integration with UV-CDAT's climate data management system (CDMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of climate data analysis operations, e

  17. Analysis of the 3D distribution of stacked self-assembled quantum dots by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 3D distribution of self-assembled stacked quantum dots (QDs) is a key parameter to obtain the highest performance in a variety of optoelectronic devices. In this work, we have measured this distribution in 3D using a combined procedure of needle-shaped specimen preparation and electron tomography. We show that conventional 2D measurements of the distribution of QDs are not reliable, and only 3D analysis allows an accurate correlation between the growth design and the structural characteristics. PMID:23249477

  18. Optical 3D shape, surface, and material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiziani, Hans J.

    2001-06-01

    Different techniques are available for macro- and micro- topometry. The methods are basically known but their industrial implementation requires robust measuring systems, where calibration is an important necessity. Different techniques will be presented. New elements such as liquid crystal displays and micromirror devices are available leading to new applications to be discussed. Combinative methods and integration in measuring systems becomes interesting. The state of the art and new developments will be presented. Together with calibration for 3D-shock or vibration analysis an object shape measuring systems will be directly combined with a vibration measuring system.

  19. A 3D structure model of integrin alpha 4 beta 1 complex: I. Construction of a homology model of beta 1 and ligand binding analysis.

    PubMed Central

    You, Tony J; Maxwell, David S; Kogan, Timothy P; Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Kassir, Jamal; Holland, George W; Dixon, Richard A F

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that integrin alpha 4 beta 1 binds to the vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) and fibronectin and plays an important role in signal transduction. Blocking the binding of VCAM to alpha 4 beta 1 is thought to be a way of controlling a number of disease processes. To better understand how various inhibitors might block the interaction of VCAM and fibronectin with alpha 4 beta 1, we began constructing a structure model for the integrin alpha 4 beta 1 complex. As the first step, we have built a homology model of the beta 1 subunit based on the I domain of the integrin CD11B subunit. The model, including a bound Mg(2+) ion, was optimized through a specially designed relaxation scheme involving restrained minimization and dynamics steps. The native ligand VCAM and two highly active small molecules (TBC772 and TBC3486) shown to inhibit binding of CS-1 and VCAM to alpha 4 beta 1 were docked into the active site of the refined model. Results from the binding analysis fit well with a pharmacophore model that was independently derived from active analog studies. A critical examination of residues in the binding site and analysis of docked ligands that are both potent and selective led to the proposal of a mechanism for beta 1/beta 7 ligand binding selectivity. PMID:11751331

  20. The development of a 3D risk analysis method.

    PubMed

    I, Yet-Pole; Cheng, Te-Lung

    2008-05-01

    Much attention has been paid to the quantitative risk analysis (QRA) research in recent years due to more and more severe disasters that have happened in the process industries. Owing to its calculation complexity, very few software, such as SAFETI, can really make the risk presentation meet the practice requirements. However, the traditional risk presentation method, like the individual risk contour in SAFETI, is mainly based on the consequence analysis results of dispersion modeling, which usually assumes that the vapor cloud disperses over a constant ground roughness on a flat terrain with no obstructions and concentration fluctuations, which is quite different from the real situations of a chemical process plant. All these models usually over-predict the hazardous regions in order to maintain their conservativeness, which also increases the uncertainty of the simulation results. On the other hand, a more rigorous model such as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model can resolve the previous limitations; however, it cannot resolve the complexity of risk calculations. In this research, a conceptual three-dimensional (3D) risk calculation method was proposed via the combination of results of a series of CFD simulations with some post-processing procedures to obtain the 3D individual risk iso-surfaces. It is believed that such technique will not only be limited to risk analysis at ground level, but also be extended into aerial, submarine, or space risk analyses in the near future.

  1. Somatotyping using 3D anthropometry: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Olds, Tim; Daniell, Nathan; Petkov, John; David Stewart, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Somatotyping is the quantification of human body shape, independent of body size. Hitherto, somatotyping (including the most popular method, the Heath-Carter system) has been based on subjective visual ratings, sometimes supported by surface anthropometry. This study used data derived from three-dimensional (3D) whole-body scans as inputs for cluster analysis to objectively derive clusters of similar body shapes. Twenty-nine dimensions normalised for body size were measured on a purposive sample of 301 adults aged 17-56 years who had been scanned using a Vitus Smart laser scanner. K-means Cluster Analysis with v-fold cross-validation was used to determine shape clusters. Three male and three female clusters emerged, and were visualised using those scans closest to the cluster centroid and a caricature defined by doubling the difference between the average scan and the cluster centroid. The male clusters were decidedly endomorphic (high fatness), ectomorphic (high linearity), and endo-mesomorphic (a mixture of fatness and muscularity). The female clusters were clearly endomorphic, ectomorphic, and the ecto-mesomorphic (a mixture of linearity and muscularity). An objective shape quantification procedure combining 3D scanning and cluster analysis yielded shape clusters strikingly similar to traditional somatotyping.

  2. Computational analysis of flow in 3D propulsive transition ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepri, Paavo

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis of fully three dimensional, statistically steady flows in propulsive transition ducts being considered for use in future aircraft of higher maneuverability is investigated. The purpose of the transition duct is to convert axisymmetric flow from conventional propulsion systems to that of a rectangular geometry of high aspect ratio. In an optimal design, the transition duct would be of minimal length in order to reduce the weight penalty, while the geometrical change would be gradual enough to avoid detrimental flow perturbations. Recent experiments conducted at the Propulsion Aerodynamics Branch have indicated that thrust losses in ducts of superelliptic cross-section can be surprisingly low, even if flow separation occurs near the divergent walls. In order to address the objective of developing a rational design procedure for optimal transition ducts, it is necessary to have available a reliable computational tool for the analysis of flows achieved in a sequence of configurations. Current CFD efforts involving complicated geometries usually must contend with two separate but interactive aspects: namely, grid generation and flow solution. The first two avenues of the present investigation were comprised of suitable grid generation for a class of transition ducts of superelliptic cross-section, and the subsequent application of the flow solver PAB3D to this geometry. The code, PAB3D, was developed as a comprehensive tool for the solution of both internal and external high speed flows. The third avenue of investigation has involved analytical formulations to aid in the understanding of the nature of duct flows, and also to provide a basis of comparison for subsequent numerical solutions. Numerical results to date include the generation of two preliminary grid systems for duct flows, and the initial application of PAB3D to the corresponding geometries, which are of the class tested experimentally.

  3. Voxel-coding method for quantification of vascular structure from 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Shahrokni, Ali; Zoroofi, Reza A.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents an image processing method for information extraction from 3D images of vasculature. It automates the study of vascular structures by extracting quantitative information such as skeleton, length, diameter, and vessel-to- tissue ratio for different vessels as well as their branches. Furthermore, it generates 3D visualization of vessels based on desired anatomical characteristics such as vessel diameter or 3D connectivity. Steps of the proposed approach are as follows. (1) Preprocessing, in which intensity adjustment, optimal thresholding, and median filtering are done. (2) 3D thinning, in which medial axis and skeleton of the vessels are found. (3) Branch labeling, in which different branches are identified and each voxel is assigned to the corresponding branch. (4) Quantitation, in which length of each branch is estimated, based on the number of voxels assigned to it, and its diameter is calculated using the medial axis direction. (5) Visualization, in which vascular structure is shown in 3D, using color coding and surface rendering methods. We have tested and evaluated the proposed algorithms using simulated images of multi-branch vessels and real confocal microscopic images of the vessels in rat brains. Experimental results illustrate performance of the methods and usefulness of the results for medical image analysis applications.

  4. Human Sinoatrial Node Structure: 3D Microanatomy of Sinoatrial Conduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Csepe, Thomas A.; Zhao, Jichao; Hansen, Brian J.; Li, Ning; Sul, Lidiya V.; Lim, Praise; Wang, Yufeng; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul ML.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite a century of extensive study on the human sinoatrial node (SAN), the structure-to-function features of specialized SAN conduction pathways (SACP) are still unknown and debated. We report a new method for direct analysis of the SAN microstructure in optically-mapped human hearts with and without clinical history of SAN dysfunction. Methods Two explanted donor human hearts were coronary-perfused and optically-mapped. Structural analyses of histological sections parallel to epicardium (~13-21μm intervals) were integrated with optical maps to create 3D computational reconstructions of the SAN complex. High-resolution fiber fields were obtained using 3D Eigen-analysis of the structure tensor, and used to analyze SACP microstructure with a fiber-tracking approach. Results Optical mapping revealed normal SAN activation of the atria through a lateral SACP proximal to the crista terminalis in Heart #1 but persistent SAN exit block in diseased Heart #2. 3D structural analysis displayed a functionally-observed SAN border composed of fibrosis, fat, and/or discontinuous fibers between SAN and atria, which was only crossed by several branching myofiber tracts in SACP regions. Computational 3D fiber-tracking revealed that myofiber tracts of SACPs created continuous connections between SAN #1 and atria, but in SAN #2, SACP region myofiber tracts were discontinuous due to fibrosis and fat. Conclusions We developed a new integrative functional, structural and computational approach that allowed for the resolution of the specialized 3D microstructure of human SACPs for the first time. Application of this integrated approach will shed new light on the role of the specialized SAN microanatomy in maintaining sinus rhythm. PMID:26743207

  5. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; ...

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, wemore » derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.« less

  6. 3D structural fluctuation of IgG1 antibody revealed by individual particle electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Tong, Huimin; Peng, Bo; Rames, Matthew J.; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2015-05-05

    Commonly used methods for determining protein structure, including X-ray crystallography and single-particle reconstruction, often provide a single and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure. However, in these methods, the protein dynamics and flexibility/fluctuation remain mostly unknown. Here, we utilized advances in electron tomography (ET) to study the antibody flexibility and fluctuation through structural determination of individual antibody particles rather than averaging multiple antibody particles together. Through individual-particle electron tomography (IPET) 3D reconstruction from negatively-stained ET images, we obtained 120 ab-initio 3D density maps at an intermediate resolution (~1–3 nm) from 120 individual IgG1 antibody particles. Using these maps as a constraint, we derived 120 conformations of the antibody via structural flexible docking of the crystal structure to these maps by targeted molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical analysis of the various conformations disclosed the antibody 3D conformational flexibility through the distribution of its domain distances and orientations. This blueprint approach, if extended to other flexible proteins, may serve as a useful methodology towards understanding protein dynamics and functions.

  7. Investigation of the deep crustal structure and magmatic activity at the NW Hellenic Volcanic Arc with 3-D aeromagnetic inversion and seimotectonic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, Angeliki; Tzanis, Andreas; Chailas, Stylianos; Stamatakis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of geophysical (aeromagnetic) and seismotectonic data, applied to the investigation of the deep structure, magmatic activity and geothermal potential of the north-western stretches of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is usually considered to be a single arcuate entity stretching from Sousaki (near Corinth) at the NW, to Nisyros Island at the SE. However, different types of and their ages indicate the presence of two different volcanic groups. Our study focuses on the northern part of the west (older) volcanic group and includes the Crommyonian (Sousaki) volcanic field at the west end of Megaris peninsula (east margin on the contemporary Corinth Rift), the Aegina and Methana volcanic complex at the Saronic Gulf, where typical Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanics predominate, and the Argolid peninsula to the south and south-west. In addition to the rocks associated with Quaternary volcanism, the study area includes a series of Mesozoic ultramafic (ophiolitic) outcrops at the Megaris peninsula, to the north and north-east of the Crommyonian volcanic field, as well as throughout the Argolid. A major deep structural and tectonic feature of the study area, and one with profound influence on crustal deformation and the evolution of rapidly deforming extensional structures like the Corinth Rift and the Saronic Gulf, is the local geometry and dynamics of the African oceanic crust subducting beneath the Aegean plate. Locally, the subducting slab has a NNW strike and ENE plunge, with the dip angle changing rapidly (steepening) approx. beneath the Argolid. The aeromagnetic data was extracted from the recently (re)compiled aeromagnetic map of Greece (Chailas et al, 2010) and was inverted with the UBC-GIF magnetic inversion suite (Li and Oldenburg, 1996). The inversion included rigorous geological constraints introduced by means of numerous in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. The inversion has imaged several isolated

  8. Three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction and function analysis of the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from Bacillus thuringiensis HD73.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yiling; Guo, Shuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is capable of producing a chitin-binding protein believed to be functionally important to bacteria during the stationary phase of its growth cycle. In this paper, the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from B. thuringiensis has been analyzed by computer technology. Primary and secondary structural analyses demonstrated that HD73_3189 is negatively charged and contains several α-helices, aperiodical coils and β-strands. Domain and motif analyses revealed that HD73_3189 contains a signal peptide, an N-terminal chitin binding 3 domains, two copies of a fibronectin-like domain 3 and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding domain classified as CBM_5_12. Moreover, analysis predicted the protein's associated localization site to be the cell wall. Ligand site prediction determined that amino acid residues GLU-312, TRP-334, ILE-341 and VAL-382 exposed on the surface of the target protein exhibit polar interactions with the substrate.

  9. Computerized 3-D reconstruction of complicated anatomical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasen, Arne; Drewes, Asbjorn M.; Assentoft, Joergen E.

    1992-06-01

    In the study of the rabbit hippocampal region, images of 430 serial sections were aligned by a `parameter-shift' algorithm. The resulting 3-D matrix represents a fixed and stained but `whole' rabbit brain. From this virtual object the slice procedure, displacement, and re- alignment could be computer simulated and the artifacts associated with these procedures estimated.

  10. Postprocessing techniques for 3D non-linear structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    How graphics postprocessing techniques are currently used to examine the results of 3-D nonlinear analyses, some new techniques which take advantage of recent technology, and how these results relate to both the finite element model and its geometric parent are reviewed.

  11. Uncertainty Analysis of RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra E Gertman; Dr. George L Mesina

    2012-07-01

    As world-wide energy consumption continues to increase, so does the demand for the use of alternative energy sources, such as Nuclear Energy. Nuclear Power Plants currently supply over 370 gigawatts of electricity, and more than 60 new nuclear reactors have been commissioned by 15 different countries. The primary concern for Nuclear Power Plant operation and lisencing has been safety. The safety of the operation of Nuclear Power Plants is no simple matter- it involves the training of operators, design of the reactor, as well as equipment and design upgrades throughout the lifetime of the reactor, etc. To safely design, operate, and understand nuclear power plants, industry and government alike have relied upon the use of best-estimate simulation codes, which allow for an accurate model of any given plant to be created with well-defined margins of safety. The most widely used of these best-estimate simulation codes in the Nuclear Power industry is RELAP5-3D. Our project focused on improving the modeling capabilities of RELAP5-3D by developing uncertainty estimates for its calculations. This work involved analyzing high, medium, and low ranked phenomena from an INL PIRT on a small break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident as wall as an analysis of a large break Loss-Of- Coolant Accident. Statistical analyses were performed using correlation coefficients. To perform the studies, computer programs were written that modify a template RELAP5 input deck to produce one deck for each combination of key input parameters. Python scripting enabled the running of the generated input files with RELAP5-3D on INL’s massively parallel cluster system. Data from the studies was collected and analyzed with SAS. A summary of the results of our studies are presented.

  12. Graphene originated 3D structures grown on the assembled nickel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paronyan, Tereza; Harutyunyan, Avetik; Honda Research Institute USA Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the fabrication of various morphologies of graphene originated structures became very important due to the perspective of wide range of new applications. Particularly, free standing 3D structured graphene foams could be imperative in energy related areas . Here, we present the new approach of the CVD growth of 3D graphene network by using primarily sintered Ni particle's (~40 μm size) assembles as a template-catalyst via decomposition of low rate of CH4 at 1100° C based on synthesis method described earlier. SEM and Raman spectra analysis revealed the formation of graphene structure containing a single up to few layers grown on the sintered metal particles served as a catalyst-template. After etching the metal frame without using any support polymer, 3D free-standing graphene microporous structure was formed demonstrating high BET surface area. Two probe measurements of frame resistance were ~2-8 Ω. Our approach allows controllable tune the pore size and thereby the surface area of 3D graphene network through the variation of the template-catalyst particles size.

  13. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  14. Real-time structured light intraoral 3D measurement pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, Radu; Tchouprakov, Andrei; Sokolov, Roman

    2013-02-01

    Computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is increasingly becoming a standard feature and service provided to patients in dentist offices and denture manufacturing laboratories. Although the quality of the tools and data has slowly improved in the last years, due to various surface measurement challenges, practical, accurate, invivo, real-time 3D high quality data acquisition and processing still needs improving. Advances in GPU computational power have allowed for achieving near real-time 3D intraoral in-vivo scanning of patient's teeth. We explore in this paper, from a real-time perspective, a hardware-software-GPU solution that addresses all the requirements mentioned before. Moreover we exemplify and quantify the hard and soft deadlines required by such a system and illustrate how they are supported in our implementation.

  15. Structural and functional imaging of 3D microfluidic mixers using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xi, Chuanwu; Marks, Daniel L; Parikh, Devang S; Raskin, Lutgarde; Boppart, Stephen A

    2004-05-18

    To achieve high mixing efficiency in microfluidic devices, complex designs are often required. Microfluidic devices have been evaluated with light and confocal microscopy, but fluid-flow characteristics at different depths are difficult to separate from the en face images produced. By using optical coherence tomography (OCT), an imaging modality capable of imaging 3D microstructures at micrometer-scale resolutions over millimeter-size scales, we obtained 3D dynamic functional and structural data for three representative microfluidic mixers: a Y channel mixer, a 3D serpentine mixer, and a vortex mixer. In the serpentine mixer, OCT image analysis revealed that the mixing efficiency was linearly dependent on the Reynolds number, whereas it appeared to have exponential dependence when imaged with light microscopy. The visual overlap of fluid flows in light-microscopy images leads to an overestimation of the mixing efficiency, an effect that was eliminated with OCT imaging. Doppler OCT measurements determined velocity profiles at various points in the serpentine mixer. Mixing patterns in the vortex mixer were compared with light-microscopy and OCT image analysis. These results demonstrate that OCT can significantly improve the characterization of 3D microfluidic device structure and function.

  16. Colossal Tooling Design: 3D Simulation for Ergonomic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Thomas, Robert E.; Babai, Majid

    2003-01-01

    The application of high-level 3D simulation software to the design phase of colossal mandrel tooling for composite aerospace fuel tanks was accomplished to discover and resolve safety and human engineering problems. The analyses were conducted to determine safety, ergonomic and human engineering aspects of the disassembly process of the fuel tank composite shell mandrel. Three-dimensional graphics high-level software, incorporating various ergonomic analysis algorithms, was utilized to determine if the process was within safety and health boundaries for the workers carrying out these tasks. In addition, the graphical software was extremely helpful in the identification of material handling equipment and devices for the mandrel tooling assembly/disassembly process.

  17. Small-angle scattering and 3D structure interpretation.

    PubMed

    Trewhella, Jill

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on advances in the application of solution small-angle scattering (SAS) in structural analysis of biomolecules and the complexes they form. Examples highlighted illustrate the unique contribution of SAS, using both X-rays and neutrons, in hybrid or integrative modelling methods. The increased information content when neutron scattering with contrast variation is used is a particular focus. Finally, progress toward an agreed reporting framework, the development of open data and model archives, and the importance of these initiatives is covered.

  18. Fragment-based strategy for structural optimization in combination with 3D-QSAR.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haoliang; Tai, Wenting; Hu, Shihe; Liu, Haichun; Zhang, Yanmin; Yao, Sihui; Ran, Ting; Lu, Shuai; Ke, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiao; Xu, Jinxing; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Fragment-based drug design has emerged as an important methodology for lead discovery and drug design. Different with other studies focused on fragment library design and active fragment identification, a fragment-based strategy was developed in combination with three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for structural optimization in this study. Based on a validated scaffold or fragment hit, a series of structural optimization was conducted to convert it to lead compounds, including 3D-QSAR modelling, active site analysis, fragment-based structural optimization and evaluation of new molecules. 3D-QSAR models and active site analysis provided sufficient information for confirming the SAR and pharmacophoric features for fragments. This strategy was evaluated through the structural optimization on a c-Met inhibitor scaffold 5H-benzo[4,5]cyclohepta[1,2-b]pyridin-5-one, which resulted in an c-Met inhibitor with high inhibitory activity. Our study suggested the effectiveness of this fragment-based strategy and the druggability of our newly explored active region. The reliability of this strategy indicated it could also be applied to facilitate lead optimization of other targets.

  19. Fragment-based strategy for structural optimization in combination with 3D-QSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haoliang; Tai, Wenting; Hu, Shihe; Liu, Haichun; Zhang, Yanmin; Yao, Sihui; Ran, Ting; Lu, Shuai; Ke, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiao; Xu, Jinxing; Chen, Yadong; Lu, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Fragment-based drug design has emerged as an important methodology for lead discovery and drug design. Different with other studies focused on fragment library design and active fragment identification, a fragment-based strategy was developed in combination with three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for structural optimization in this study. Based on a validated scaffold or fragment hit, a series of structural optimization was conducted to convert it to lead compounds, including 3D-QSAR modelling, active site analysis, fragment-based structural optimization and evaluation of new molecules. 3D-QSAR models and active site analysis provided sufficient information for confirming the SAR and pharmacophoric features for fragments. This strategy was evaluated through the structural optimization on a c-Met inhibitor scaffold 5H-benzo[4,5]cyclohepta[1,2-b]pyridin-5-one, which resulted in an c-Met inhibitor with high inhibitory activity. Our study suggested the effectiveness of this fragment-based strategy and the druggability of our newly explored active region. The reliability of this strategy indicated it could also be applied to facilitate lead optimization of other targets.

  20. 3D finite element analysis of porous Ti-based alloy prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mircheski, Ile; Gradišar, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, novel designs of porous acetabular cups are created and tested with 3D finite element analysis (FEA). The aim is to develop a porous acetabular cup with low effective radial stiffness of the structure, which will be near to the architectural and mechanical behavior of the natural bone. For the realization of this research, a 3D-scanner technology was used for obtaining a 3D-CAD model of the pelvis bone, a 3D-CAD software for creating a porous acetabular cup, and a 3D-FEA software for virtual testing of a novel design of the porous acetabular cup. The results obtained from this research reveal that a porous acetabular cup from Ti-based alloys with 60 ± 5% porosity has the mechanical behavior and effective radial stiffness (Young's modulus in radial direction) that meet and exceed the required properties of the natural bone. The virtual testing with 3D-FEA of a novel design with porous structure during the very early stage of the design and the development of orthopedic implants, enables obtaining a new or improved biomedical implant for a relatively short time and reduced price.

  1. Lead-oriented synthesis: Investigation of organolithium-mediated routes to 3-D scaffolds and 3-D shape analysis of a virtual lead-like library.

    PubMed

    Lüthy, Monique; Wheldon, Mary C; Haji-Cheteh, Chehasnah; Atobe, Masakazu; Bond, Paul S; O'Brien, Peter; Hubbard, Roderick E; Fairlamb, Ian J S

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic routes to six 3-D scaffolds containing piperazine, pyrrolidine and piperidine cores have been developed. The synthetic methodology focused on the use of N-Boc α-lithiation-trapping chemistry. Notably, suitably protected and/or functionalised medicinal chemistry building blocks were synthesised via concise, connective methodology. This represents a rare example of lead-oriented synthesis. A virtual library of 190 compounds was then enumerated from the six scaffolds. Of these, 92 compounds (48%) fit the lead-like criteria of: (i) -1⩽AlogP⩽3; (ii) 14⩽number of heavy atoms⩽26; (iii) total polar surface area⩾50Å(2). The 3-D shapes of the 190 compounds were analysed using a triangular plot of normalised principal moments of inertia (PMI). From this, 46 compounds were identified which had lead-like properties and possessed 3-D shapes in under-represented areas of pharmaceutical space. Thus, the PMI analysis of the 190 member virtual library showed that whilst scaffolds which may appear on paper to be 3-D in shape, only 24% of the compounds actually had 3-D structures in the more interesting areas of 3-D drug space.

  2. Development of the Improving Process for the 3D Printed Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagishi, Kensuke; Umezu, Shinjiro

    2017-01-01

    The authors focus on the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printer because the FDM 3D printer can print the utility resin material. It can print with low cost and therefore it is the most suitable for home 3D printer. The FDM 3D printer has the problem that it produces layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure. Therefore the authors developed the 3D-Chemical Melting Finishing (3D-CMF) for removing layer grooves. In this method, a pen-style device is filled with a chemical able to dissolve the materials used for building 3D printed structures. By controlling the behavior of this pen-style device, the convex parts of layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure are dissolved, which, in turn, fills the concave parts. In this study it proves the superiority of the 3D-CMF than conventional processing for the 3D printed structure. It proves utilizing the evaluation of the safety, selectively and stability. It confirms the improving of the 3D-CMF and it is confirmed utilizing the data of the surface roughness precision and the observation of the internal state and the evaluation of the mechanical characteristics.

  3. Development of the Improving Process for the 3D Printed Structure

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, Kensuke; Umezu, Shinjiro

    2017-01-01

    The authors focus on the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printer because the FDM 3D printer can print the utility resin material. It can print with low cost and therefore it is the most suitable for home 3D printer. The FDM 3D printer has the problem that it produces layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure. Therefore the authors developed the 3D-Chemical Melting Finishing (3D-CMF) for removing layer grooves. In this method, a pen-style device is filled with a chemical able to dissolve the materials used for building 3D printed structures. By controlling the behavior of this pen-style device, the convex parts of layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure are dissolved, which, in turn, fills the concave parts. In this study it proves the superiority of the 3D-CMF than conventional processing for the 3D printed structure. It proves utilizing the evaluation of the safety, selectively and stability. It confirms the improving of the 3D-CMF and it is confirmed utilizing the data of the surface roughness precision and the observation of the internal state and the evaluation of the mechanical characteristics. PMID:28054558

  4. Development of the Improving Process for the 3D Printed Structure.

    PubMed

    Takagishi, Kensuke; Umezu, Shinjiro

    2017-01-05

    The authors focus on the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printer because the FDM 3D printer can print the utility resin material. It can print with low cost and therefore it is the most suitable for home 3D printer. The FDM 3D printer has the problem that it produces layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure. Therefore the authors developed the 3D-Chemical Melting Finishing (3D-CMF) for removing layer grooves. In this method, a pen-style device is filled with a chemical able to dissolve the materials used for building 3D printed structures. By controlling the behavior of this pen-style device, the convex parts of layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure are dissolved, which, in turn, fills the concave parts. In this study it proves the superiority of the 3D-CMF than conventional processing for the 3D printed structure. It proves utilizing the evaluation of the safety, selectively and stability. It confirms the improving of the 3D-CMF and it is confirmed utilizing the data of the surface roughness precision and the observation of the internal state and the evaluation of the mechanical characteristics.

  5. Analysis and Simulation of 3D Scattering due to Heterogeneous Crustal Structure and Surface Topography on Regional Phases; Magnitude and Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-07

    inversion technique that is based on different weights for relatively high frequency waveform modeling of Pnl and relatively long period surface waves (Tan...et al., 2006). Pnl and surface waves are also allowed to shift in time to take into account of uncertainties in velocity structure. Joint...inversion of Pnl and surface waves provides better constraints on focal depth as well as source mechanisms. The pure strike-slip mechanism of the earthquake

  6. Structural analysis of the diadenylate cyclase reaction of DNA-integrity scanning protein A (DisA) and its inhibition by 3'-dATP.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martina; Deimling, Tobias; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Witte, Gregor

    2015-08-01

    The identification of the essential bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) synthesized by the DNA-integrity scanning protein A (DisA) has opened up a new and emerging field in bacterial signalling. To further analyse the diadenylate cyclase (DAC) reaction catalysed by the DAC domains of DisA, we crystallized Thermotoga maritima DisA in the presence of different ATP analogues and metal ions to identify the metal-binding site and trap the enzyme in pre- and post-reaction states. Through structural and biochemical assays we identified important residues essential for the reaction in the active site of the DAC domains. Our structures resolve the metal-binding site and thus explain the activation of ATP for the DAC reaction. Moreover, we were able to identify a potent inhibitor of the DAC domain. Based on the available structures and homology to annotated DAC domains we propose a common mechanism for c-di-AMP synthesis by DAC domains in c-di-AMP-producing species and a possible approach for its effective inhibition.

  7. Analysis of 3d complex structure and heterogeneity effects on formation and propagation of regional phases in Eurasia. Final report, 15 August 1992-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, T.; Wu, R.S.

    1994-12-13

    This document is the final report for this grant to develop new three-dimensional wave propagation techniques for high frequency waves in heterogeneous media. The report is divided into four sections, each being a published paper sponsored by this grant. In the first section we formulate a one-way wide-angle elastic wave propagation method for arbitrarily heterogeneous media in both the space and wavenumber domains using elastic Rayleigh integrals and local elastic Born scattering theory. In the second section this complex phase screen method is compared with fourth-order finite differences and exact eigenfunction expansion calculations for two-dimensional inhomogeneous media to assess the accuracy of the one-way propagation algorithm. In the third section, an observational study of continental margin structure influence on Lg propagation is presented, using data from the former Soviet stations for nuclear explosions at Novaya Zemlya. We find that bathymetric features can be correlated with energy levels of Lg, suggesting that waveguide structure influences regional phase energy partitioning. This idea is pursued in the fourth section, using Eurasian earthquake and nuclear explosion data along with information about the crustal structure in Eurasia. We develop empirical relations that reduce the scatter in the P/Lg discriminant at low frequency.

  8. 3D scanning of internal structure in gel engineering materials with visual scanning microscopic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yosuke; Gong, Jing; Masato, Makino; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2014-04-01

    The 3D printing technology, causing much attention from the beginning of 2013, will be possibly an alternative method to fabricate the biological soft tissues. Recently our group of Yamagata University has developed the world-first 3D Gel Printer to fabricate the complicated gel-materials with high-strength and biocompatibility. However, there are no 3D scanners that collect the data from the internal structure of complicated gel objects such as eye lens. It means that a new system for scanning the internal structure is needed now. In this study, firstly, we have tried to investigate the gel network of synthetic and biological gel with scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS). We calculated the Young's modulus of synthetic gels with the SMILS and with the tensile test, and precisely compared the results between them. The temperature dependences of the inside structure and the transparency are observed in the pig crystalline lens. The quantitative analysis indicates the importance of the internal structure of real object. Secondary, we show the new system named Gel-scanner that can provide the 2-dimentional data of the internal structure. From examining our findings, the scanning of internal structure will enable us to expect physical properties of the real object. We convince that the gelscanner will play major role in the various fields.

  9. ConvNet-Based Localization of Anatomical Structures in 3D Medical Images.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Bob; Wolterink, Jelmer; de Jong, Pim; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max; Isgum, Ivana

    2017-02-23

    Localization of anatomical structures is a prerequisite for many tasks in medical image analysis. We propose a method for automatic localization of one or more anatomical structures in 3D medical images through detection of their presence in 2D image slices using a convolutional neural network (ConvNet). A single ConvNet is trained to detect presence of the anatomical structure of interest in axial, coronal, and sagittal slices extracted from a 3D image. To allow the ConvNet to analyze slices of different sizes, spatial pyramid pooling is applied. After detection, 3D bounding boxes are created by combining the output of the ConvNet in all slices. In the experiments 200 chest CT, 100 cardiac CT angiography (CTA), and 100 abdomen CT scans were used. The heart, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta were localized in chest CT scans, the left cardiac ventricle in cardiac CTA scans, and the liver in abdomen CT scans. Localization was evaluated using the distances between automatically and manually defined reference bounding box centroids and walls. The best results were achieved in localization of structures with clearly defined boundaries (e.g. aortic arch) and the worst when the structure boundary was not clearly visible (e.g. liver). The method was more robust and accurate in localization multiple structures.

  10. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Logan, N. C.

    2016-11-01

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ˜10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  11. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data.

    PubMed

    Strait, E J; King, J D; Hanson, J M; Logan, N C

    2016-11-01

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ∼10(-3) to 10(-5) of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  12. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    DOE PAGES

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; ...

    2016-08-11

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ~10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Lastly, applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  13. 3D site specific sample preparation and analysis of 3D devices (FinFETs) by atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Kambham, Ajay Kumar; Kumar, Arul; Gilbert, Matthieu; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2013-09-01

    With the transition from planar to three-dimensional device architectures such as Fin field-effect-transistors (FinFETs), new metrology approaches are required to meet the needs of semiconductor technology. It is important to characterize the 3D-dopant distributions precisely as their extent, positioning relative to gate edges and absolute concentration determine the device performance in great detail. At present the atom probe has shown its ability to analyze dopant distributions in semiconductor and thin insulating materials with sub-nm 3D-resolution and good dopant sensitivity. However, so far most reports have dealt with planar devices or restricted the measurements to 2D test structures which represent only limited challenges in terms of localization and site specific sample preparation. In this paper we will discuss the methodology to extract the dopant distribution from real 3D-devices such as a 3D-FinFET device, requiring the sample preparation to be carried out at a site specific location with a positioning accuracy ∼50 nm.

  14. 3D Analysis of HCMV Induced-Nuclear Membrane Structures by FIB/SEM Tomography: Insight into an Unprecedented Membrane Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Clarissa; Neusser, Gregor; Kranz, Christine; Walther, Paul; Mertens, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We show that focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is an excellent method to analyze the three-dimensional structure of a fibroblast nucleus infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We found that the previously described infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane, which are unique among its kind, form an extremely complex network of membrane structures not predictable by previous two-dimensional studies. In all cases they contained further invaginations (2nd and 3rd order infoldings). Quantification revealed 5498 HCMV capsids within two nuclear segments, allowing an estimate of 15,000 to 30,000 capsids in the entire nucleus five days post infection. Only 0.8% proved to be enveloped capsids which were exclusively detected in 1st order infoldings (perinuclear space). Distribution of the capsids between 1st, 2nd and 3rd order infoldings is in complete agreement with the envelopment/de-envelopment model for egress of HCMV capsids from the nucleus and we confirm that capsid budding does occur at the large infoldings. Based on our results we propose the pushing membrane model: HCMV infection induces local disruption of the nuclear lamina and synthesis of new membrane material which is pushed into the nucleoplasm, forming complex membrane infoldings in a highly abundant manner, which then may be also used by nucleocapsids for budding. PMID:26556360

  15. Building a 3D Virtual Liver: Methods for Simulating Blood Flow and Hepatic Clearance on 3D Structures

    PubMed Central

    Rezania, Vahid; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a spatio-temporal modeling approach to describe blood and drug flow, as well as drug uptake and elimination, on an approximation of the liver. Extending on previously developed computational approaches, we generate an approximation of a liver, which consists of a portal and hepatic vein vasculature structure, embedded in the surrounding liver tissue. The vasculature is generated via constrained constructive optimization, and then converted to a spatial grid of a selected grid size. Estimates for surrounding upscaled lobule tissue properties are then presented appropriate to the same grid size. Simulation of fluid flow and drug metabolism (hepatic clearance) are completed using discretized forms of the relevant convective-diffusive-reactive partial differential equations for these processes. This results in a single stage, uniformly consistent method to simulate equations for blood and drug flow, as well as drug metabolism, on a 3D structure representative of a liver. PMID:27649537

  16. Analysis and dynamic 3D visualization of cerebral blood flow combining 3D and 4D MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Fiehler, Jens; Illies, Till; Möller, Dietmar; Handels, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present a method for the dynamic visualization of cerebral blood flow. Spatio-temporal 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image datasets and 3D MRA datasets with high spatial resolution were acquired for the analysis of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). One of the main tasks is the combination of the information of the 3D and 4D MRA image sequences. Initially, in the 3D MRA dataset the vessel system is segmented and a 3D surface model is generated. Then, temporal intensity curves are analyzed voxelwise in the 4D MRA image sequences. A curve fitting of the temporal intensity curves to a patient individual reference curve is used to extract the bolus arrival times in the 4D MRA sequences. After non-linear registration of both MRA datasets the extracted hemodynamic information is transferred to the surface model where the time points of inflow can be visualized color coded dynamically over time. The dynamic visualizations computed using the curve fitting method for the estimation of the bolus arrival times were rated superior compared to those computed using conventional approaches for bolus arrival time estimation. In summary the procedure suggested allows a dynamic visualization of the individual hemodynamic situation and better understanding during the visual evaluation of cerebral vascular diseases.

  17. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  18. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Particle-Reinforced Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H.; Lissenden, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation in particle-reinforced aluminum has been simulated using three distinct types of finite element model: a three-dimensional repeating unit cell, a three-dimensional multi-particle model, and two-dimensional multi-particle models. The repeating unit cell model represents a fictitious periodic cubic array of particles. The 3D multi-particle (3D-MP) model represents randomly placed and oriented particles. The 2D generalized plane strain multi-particle models were obtained from planar sections through the 3D-MP model. These models were used to study the tensile macroscopic stress-strain response and the associated stress and strain distributions in an elastoplastic matrix. The results indicate that the 2D model having a particle area fraction equal to the particle representative volume fraction of the 3D models predicted the same macroscopic stress-strain response as the 3D models. However, there are fluctuations in the particle area fraction in a representative volume element. As expected, predictions from 2D models having different particle area fractions do not agree with predictions from 3D models. More importantly, it was found that the microscopic stress and strain distributions from the 2D models do not agree with those from the 3D-MP model. Specifically, the plastic strain distribution predicted by the 2D model is banded along lines inclined at 45 deg from the loading axis while the 3D model prediction is not. Additionally, the triaxial stress and maximum principal stress distributions predicted by 2D and 3D models do not agree. Thus, it appears necessary to use a multi-particle 3D model to accurately predict material responses that depend on local effects, such as strain-to-failure, fracture toughness, and fatigue life.

  19. Structure and Metabolic-Flow Analysis of Molecular Complexity in a (13) C-Labeled Tree by 2D and 3D NMR.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-05-10

    Improved signal identification for biological small molecules (BSMs) in a mixture was demonstrated by using multidimensional NMR on samples from (13) C-enriched Rhododendron japonicum (59.5 atom%) cultivated in air containing (13) C-labeled carbon dioxide for 14 weeks. The resonance assignment of 386 carbon atoms and 380 hydrogen atoms in the mixture was achieved. 42 BSMs, including eight that were unlisted in the spectral databases, were identified. Comparisons between the experimental values and the (13) C chemical shift values calculated by density functional theory supported the identifications of unlisted BSMs. Tracing the (13) C/(12) C ratio by multidimensional NMR spectra revealed faster and slower turnover ratios of BSMs involved in central metabolism and those categorized as secondary metabolites, respectively. The identification of BSMs and subsequent flow analysis provided insight into the metabolic systems of the plant.

  20. Proteins without unique 3D structures: biotechnological applications of intrinsically unstable/disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are functional proteins or regions that do not have unique 3D structures under functional conditions. Therefore, from the viewpoint of their lack of stable 3D structure, IDPs/IDPRs are inherently unstable. As much as structure and function of normal ordered globular proteins are determined by their amino acid sequences, the lack of unique 3D structure in IDPs/IDPRs and their disorder-based functionality are also encoded in the amino acid sequences. Because of their specific sequence features and distinctive conformational behavior, these intrinsically unstable proteins or regions have several applications in biotechnology. This review introduces some of the most characteristic features of IDPs/IDPRs (such as peculiarities of amino acid sequences of these proteins and regions, their major structural features, and peculiar responses to changes in their environment) and describes how these features can be used in the biotechnology, for example for the proteome-wide analysis of the abundance of extended IDPs, for recombinant protein isolation and purification, as polypeptide nanoparticles for drug delivery, as solubilization tools, and as thermally sensitive carriers of active peptides and proteins.

  1. Stress Recovery and Error Estimation for 3-D Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, H. R.

    2000-01-01

    The C1-continuous stress fields obtained from finite element analyses are in general lower- order accurate than are the corresponding displacement fields. Much effort has focussed on increasing their accuracy and/or their continuity, both for improved stress prediction and especially error estimation. A previous project developed a penalized, discrete least squares variational procedure that increases the accuracy and continuity of the stress field. The variational problem is solved by a post-processing, 'finite-element-type' analysis to recover a smooth, more accurate, C1-continuous stress field given the 'raw' finite element stresses. This analysis has been named the SEA/PDLS. The recovered stress field can be used in a posteriori error estimators, such as the Zienkiewicz-Zhu error estimator or equilibrium error estimators. The procedure was well-developed for the two-dimensional (plane) case involving low-order finite elements. It has been demonstrated that, if optimal finite element stresses are used for the post-processing, the recovered stress field is globally superconvergent. Extension of this work to three dimensional solids is straightforward. Attachment: Stress recovery and error estimation for shell structure (abstract only). A 4-node, shear-deformable flat shell element developed via explicit Kirchhoff constraints (abstract only). A novel four-node quadrilateral smoothing element for stress enhancement and error estimation (abstract only).

  2. Aeroelastic Analysis of SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Wind-Tunnel Model Using FUN3D and a Nonlinear Structural Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Scott, Robert C.; Allen, Timothy J.; Sexton, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given in recent years to the design of highly flexible aircraft. The results of numerous studies demonstrate the significant performance benefits of strut-braced wing (SBW) and trussbraced wing (TBW) configurations. Critical aspects of the TBW configuration are its larger aspect ratio, wing span and thinner wings. These aspects increase the importance of considering fluid/structure and control system coupling. This paper presents high-fidelity Navier-Stokes simulations of the dynamic response of the flexible Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) truss-braced wing wind-tunnel model. The latest version of the SUGAR TBW finite element model (FEM), v.20, is used in the present simulations. Limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of the TBW wing/strut/nacelle are simulated at angle-of-attack (AoA) values of -1, 0 and +1 degree. The modal data derived from nonlinear static aeroelastic MSC.Nastran solutions are used at AoAs of -1 and +1 degrees. The LCO amplitude is observed to be dependent on AoA. LCO amplitudes at -1 degree are larger than those at +1 degree. The LCO amplitude at zero degrees is larger than either -1 or +1 degrees. These results correlate well with both wind-tunnel data and the behavior observed in previous studies using linear aerodynamics. The LCO onset at zero degrees AoA has also been computed using unloaded v.20 FEM modes. While the v.20 model increases the dynamic pressure at which LCO onset is observed, it is found that the LCO onset at and above Mach 0.82 is much different than that produced by an earlier version of the FEM, v. 19.

  3. Simultaneous Aerodynamic and Structural Design Optimization (SASDO) for a 3-D Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.; Newman, Perry A.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic and Structural Design Optimization (SASDO) is shown as an extension of the Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) method. It is extended by the inclusion of structure element sizing parameters as design variables and Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis responses as constraints. The method aims to reduce the computational expense. incurred in performing shape and sizing optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, FEM structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. SASDO is applied to a simple. isolated, 3-D wing in inviscid flow. Results show that the method finds the saine local optimum as a conventional optimization method with some reduction in the computational cost and without significant modifications; to the analysis tools.

  4. Analysis of scalability of high-performance 3D image processing platform for virtual colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. For this purpose, we previously developed a software platform for high-performance 3D medical image processing, called HPC 3D-MIP platform, which employs increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems such as the multicore, cluster, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable high-performance computing, the platform employed size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D-MIP algorithms, supported task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing, and consisted of a layered parallel software libraries that allow image processing applications to share the common functionalities. We evaluated the performance of the HPC 3D-MIP platform by applying it to computationally intensive processes in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results showed a 12-fold performance improvement on a workstation with 12-core CPUs over the original sequential implementation of the processes, indicating the efficiency of the platform. Analysis of performance scalability based on the Amdahl’s law for symmetric multicore chips showed the potential of a high performance scalability of the HPC 3D-MIP platform when a larger number of cores is available. PMID:24910506

  5. The three-dimensional elemental distribution based on the surface topography by confocal 3D-XRF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Qin, Min; Wang, Kai; Lin, Xue; Peng, Shiqi; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-09-01

    Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. However, it has rarely been applied to analyse surface topography and 3D elemental mapping in surface morphology. In this study, a surface adaptive algorithm using the progressive approximation method was designed to obtain surface topography. A series of 3D elemental mapping analyses in surface morphology were performed in laboratories to analyse painted pottery fragments from the Majiayao Culture (3300-2900 BC). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, sample surface topography and 3D elemental mapping were simultaneously obtained. Besides, component and depth analyses were also performed using synchrotron radiation confocal 3D-XRF and tabletop confocal 3D-XRF, respectively. The depth profiles showed that the sample has a layered structure. The 3D elemental mapping showed that the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat contain a large amount of Fe, Mn, and Ca, respectively. From the 3D elemental mapping analyses at different depths, a 3D rendering was obtained, clearly showing the 3D distributions of the red pigment, black pigment, and pottery coat. Compared with conventional 3D scanning, this method is time-efficient for analysing 3D elemental distributions and hence especially suitable for samples with non-flat surfaces.

  6. Multi Length Scale Imaging of Flocculated Estuarine Sediments; Insights into their Complex 3D Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Droppo, Ian; Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate

    2015-04-01

    Suspended estuarine sediments form flocs that are compositionally complex, fragile and irregularly shaped. The fate and transport of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is determined by the size, shape, density, porosity and stability of these flocs and prediction of SPM transport requires accurate measurements of these three-dimensional (3D) physical properties. However, the multi-scaled nature of flocs in addition to their fragility makes their characterisation in 3D problematic. Correlative microscopy is a strategy involving the spatial registration of information collected at different scales using several imaging modalities. Previously, conventional optical microscopy (COM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have enabled 2-dimensional (2D) floc characterisation at the gross (> 1 µm) and sub-micron scales respectively. Whilst this has proven insightful there remains a critical spatial and dimensional gap preventing the accurate measurement of geometric properties and an understanding of how structures at different scales are related. Within life sciences volumetric imaging techniques such as 3D micro-computed tomography (3D µCT) and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy [FIB-SEM (or FIB-tomography)] have been combined to characterise materials at the centimetre to micron scale. Combining these techniques with TEM enables an advanced correlative study, allowing material properties across multiple spatial and dimensional scales to be visualised. The aims of this study are; 1) to formulate an advanced correlative imaging strategy combining 3D µCT, FIB-tomography and TEM; 2) to acquire 3D datasets; 3) to produce a model allowing their co-visualisation; 4) to interpret 3D floc structure. To reduce the chance of structural alterations during analysis samples were first 'fixed' in 2.5% glutaraldehyde/2% formaldehyde before being embedding in Durcupan resin. Intermediate steps were implemented to improve contrast and remove pore water, achieved by the

  7. Genome3D: exploiting structure to help users understand their sequences

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cozzetto, Domenico; Dana, José M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mistry, Jaina; Murzin, Alexey G.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Oates, Matt E.; Punta, Marco; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Stahlhacke, Jonathan; Sternberg, Michael J.E.; Velankar, Sameer; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Genome3D (http://www.genome3d.eu) is a collaborative resource that provides predicted domain annotations and structural models for key sequences. Since introducing Genome3D in a previous NAR paper, we have substantially extended and improved the resource. We have annotated representatives from Pfam families to improve coverage of diverse sequences and added a fast sequence search to the website to allow users to find Genome3D-annotated sequences similar to their own. We have improved and extended the Genome3D data, enlarging the source data set from three model organisms to 10, and adding VIVACE, a resource new to Genome3D. We have analysed and updated Genome3D's SCOP/CATH mapping. Finally, we have improved the superposition tools, which now give users a more powerful interface for investigating similarities and differences between structural models. PMID:25348407

  8. Visualization and analysis of 3D gene expression patterns in zebrafish using web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potikanond, D.; Verbeek, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of patterns of gene expression patterns analysis plays an important role in developmental biology and molecular genetics. Visualizing both quantitative and spatio-temporal aspects of gene expression patterns together with referenced anatomical structures of a model-organism in 3D can help identifying how a group of genes are expressed at a certain location at a particular developmental stage of an organism. In this paper, we present an approach to provide an online visualization of gene expression data in zebrafish (Danio rerio) within 3D reconstruction model of zebrafish in different developmental stages. We developed web services that provide programmable access to the 3D reconstruction data and spatial-temporal gene expression data maintained in our local repositories. To demonstrate this work, we develop a web application that uses these web services to retrieve data from our local information systems. The web application also retrieve relevant analysis of microarray gene expression data from an external community resource; i.e. the ArrayExpress Atlas. All the relevant gene expression patterns data are subsequently integrated with the reconstruction data of the zebrafish atlas using ontology based mapping. The resulting visualization provides quantitative and spatial information on patterns of gene expression in a 3D graphical representation of the zebrafish atlas in a certain developmental stage. To deliver the visualization to the user, we developed a Java based 3D viewer client that can be integrated in a web interface allowing the user to visualize the integrated information over the Internet.

  9. Analysis of 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Lee, Jong Min; Ahrberg, Christian D; Chung, Bong Geun

    2017-01-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) simple multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator to create molecular gradients on the centimeter scale with a wide range of flow rates. To create the concentration gradients, a main channel (MC) was orthogonally intersected with vertical side microchannel (SC) in a 3D multi-layer microfluidic device. Through sequential dilution from the SC, a spatial gradient was generated in the MC. Two theoretical models were created to assist in the design of the 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator and to compare its performance against a two-dimensional equivalent. A first mass balance model was used to predict the steady-state concentrations reached, while a second computational fluid dynamic model was employed to predict spatial development of the gradient by considering convective as well as diffusive mass transport. Furthermore, the theoretical simulations were verified through experiments to create molecular gradients in a 3D multi-layer microfluidic gradient generator.

  10. Accuracy of 3D Imaging Software in Cephalometric Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-21

    Imaging and Communication in Medicine ( DICOM ) files into personal computer-based software to enable 3D reconstruction of the craniofacial skeleton. These...tissue profile. CBCT data can be imported as DICOM files into personal computer–based software to provide 3D reconstruction of the craniofacial...been acquired for the three pig models. The CBCT data were exported into DICOM multi-file format. They will be imported into a proprietary

  11. Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D.; Parkinson, R.D.

    1993-10-22

    As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

  12. Histo-anatomic 3D printing of dental structures.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, J; Beuer, F; Stimmelmayr, M; Edelhoff, D; Magne, P; Güth, J F

    2016-11-04

    The creation of dental restorations with natural appearance and biomechanics represents a major challenge for the restorative team. The manufacturing-process of high-aesthetic restorations from tooth-coloured restorative materials is currently dominated by manual manufacturing procedures and the outcome is highly dependent on the knowledge and skills of the performing dental technician. On the other hand, due to the simplicity of the manufacturing process, CAD/CAM restorations from different material classes gain more and more acceptance in the daily routine. Multi-layered restorations show significant aesthetic advantages versus monolithic ones, but are difficult to fabricate using digital technologies. The key element for the successful automated digital fabrication of aesthetic anterior restorations seems to be the form of the individual dentine core as defined by dentine enamel junction (DEJ) covered by a more transparent layer of material imitating the enamel layer to create the outer enamel surface (OES). This article describes the possibilities and technologies available for so-called '4D-printing'. It introduces the digital manufacturing process of multilayered anterior teeth using 3D multipart printing, taking the example of manufacturing replicas of extracted intact natural teeth.

  13. 1d, 2d, and 3d periodic structures: Electromagnetic characterization, design, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockett, Timothy John

    Periodic structures have many useful applications in electromagnetics including phased arrays, frequency selective surfaces, and absorbing interfaces. Their unique properties can be used to provide increased performance in antenna gain, electromagnetic propagation, and electromagnetic absorption. In antenna arrays, repeating elements create a larger eective aperture, increasing the gain of the antenna and the ability to scan the direction of the main beam. Three-dimensional periodic structures, such as an array of shaped pillars such as columns, cones, or prisms have the potential of improving electromagnetic absorption, improving performance in applications such as solar cell eciency and absorbing interfaces. Furthermore, research into periodic structures is a continuing endeavor where novel approaches and analysis in appropriate applications can be sought. This dissertation will address the analysis, diagnostics, and enhancement of 1D, 2D, and 3D periodic structures for antenna array applications and solar cell technology. In particular, a unique approach to array design will be introduced to prevent the appearance of undesirable grating lobes in large antenna arrays that employ subarrays. This approach, named the distortion diagnostic procedure, can apply directly to 1D and 2D periodic structures in the form of planar antenna arrays. Interesting corollaries included here are developments in millimeter-wave antenna measurements including spiral planar scanning, phaseless measurements, and addressing antennas that feature an internal source. Finally, analysis and enhancement of 3D periodic structures in nanostructure photovoltaic arrays and absorbing interfaces will be examined for their behavior and basic operation in regards to improved absorption of electromagnetic waves.

  14. 3-D Printed Ultem 9085 Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Daniel; Christensen, Sean; Fox, Emmet J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the mechanical properties of 3-D printed Ultem 9085. This document will focus on the capabilities, limitations, and complexities of 3D printing in general, and explain the methods by which this material is tested. Because 3-D printing is a relatively new process that offers an innovative means to produce hardware, it is important that the aerospace community understands its current advantages and limitations, so that future endeavors involving 3-D printing may be completely safe. This document encompasses three main sections: a Slosh damage assessment, a destructive test of 3-D printed Ultem 9085 samples, and a test to verify simulation for the 3-D printed SDP (SPHERES Docking Port). Described below, 'Slosh' and 'SDP' refer to two experiments that are built using Ultem 9085 for use with the SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) program onboard the International Space Station (ISS) [16]. The SPHERES Facility is managed out of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in California.

  15. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  16. A 3-D fluorescence imaging system incorporating structured illumination technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, L.; Emord, P.; Luquette, B.; McGee, B.; Nguyen, D.; Phipps, A.; Phillips, D.; Helguera, M.

    2010-02-01

    A currently available 2-D high-resolution, optical molecular imaging system was modified by the addition of a structured illumination source, OptigridTM, to investigate the feasibility of providing depth resolution along the optical axis. The modification involved the insertion of the OptigridTM and a lens in the path between the light source and the image plane, as well as control and signal processing software. Projection of the OptigridTM onto the imaging surface at an angle, was resolved applying the Scheimpflug principle. The illumination system implements modulation of the light source and provides a framework for capturing depth resolved mages. The system is capable of in-focus projection of the OptigridTM at different spatial frequencies, and supports the use of different lenses. A calibration process was developed for the system to achieve consistent phase shifts of the OptigridTM. Post-processing extracted depth information using depth modulation analysis using a phantom block with fluorescent sheets at different depths. An important aspect of this effort was that it was carried out by a multidisciplinary team of engineering and science students as part of a capstone senior design program. The disciplines represented are mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and imaging science. The project was sponsored by a financial grant from New York State with equipment support from two industrial concerns. The students were provided with a basic imaging concept and charged with developing, implementing, testing and validating a feasible proof-of-concept prototype system that was returned to the originator of the concept for further evaluation and characterization.

  17. The 3D velocity structure beneath Iceland: Identifying melt pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The integration of various seismic datasets, recorded by the broadband HOTSPOT network deployed across Iceland, provides one of the highest resolution studies of the crust and mantle structure associated with a plume-ridge system. The mantle P- and S-velocity models (ICEMAN), derived from teleseismic body-wave and surface wave analysis, show a vertical, cylindrical low velocity anomaly ˜200 km in diameter extending from ˜400 km, the maximum depth of resolution, up to ˜200 km above which low velocity material is present beneath all of Iceland. The maximum P- and S-velocity anomalies of -2% and -4% respectively are found beneath the northwestern edge of Vatnajokull. The crustal S-velocity model (ICECRTb) is constrained by local surface waves, refraction experiments and receiver functions, and shows significant variation in crustal thickness. The thinnest, ˜15 km, crust is found around coastal regions, the thickest crust is beneath northwestern Vatnajokull where it reaches a thickness of 45 km. Within this thick crustal root is a vertical low velocity anomaly connecting the core of the mantle anomaly to horizontal low velocity regions that extend along the western and eastern volcanic zones but not the northern volcanic zone. These crustal low velocity zones are interpreted as regions through which melt is fed from the mantle to shallow magma chambers beneath the rift zones, where crustal formation occurs. The pipework between the core of the mantle anomaly and the southern rift zones is responsible for ˜30 km thick crust. Its absence to the north results in relatively thin, ˜20 km thick, crust.

  18. Air-structured optical fiber drawn from a 3D-printed preform.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin; Canning, John; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Reid, Zane; Hossain, Md Arafat; Comatti, Jade-Edouard; Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2015-09-01

    A structured optical fiber is drawn from a 3D-printed structured preform. Preforms containing a single ring of holes around the core are fabricated using filament made from a modified butadiene polymer. More broadly, 3D printers capable of processing soft glasses, silica, and other materials are likely to come on line in the not-so-distant future. 3D printing of optical preforms signals a new milestone in optical fiber manufacture.

  19. Using "click-e-bricks" to make 3D elastomeric structures.

    PubMed

    Morin, Stephen A; Shevchenko, Yanina; Lessing, Joshua; Kwok, Sen Wai; Shepherd, Robert F; Stokes, Adam A; Whitesides, George M

    2014-09-10

    Soft, 3D elastomeric structures and composite structures are easy to fabricate using click-e-bricks, and the internal architecture of these structures together with the capabilities built into the bricks themselves provide mechanical, optical, electrical, and fluidic functions.

  20. Development of biologically active compounds by combining 3D QSAR and structure-based design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Wolfgang

    2002-11-01

    One of the major challenges in computational approaches to drug design is the accurate prediction of the binding affinity of novel biomolecules. In the present study an automated procedure which combines docking and 3D-QSAR methods was applied to several drug targets. The developed receptor-based 3D-QSAR methodology was tested on several sets of ligands for which the three-dimensional structure of the target protein has been solved - namely estrogen receptor, acetylcholine esterase and protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 1B. The molecular alignments of the studied ligands were determined using the docking program AutoDock and were compared with the X-ray structures of the corresponding protein-ligand complexes. The automatically generated protein-based ligand alignment obtained was subsequently taken as basis for a comparative field analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE approach. Using GRID interaction fields and applying variable selection procedures, highly predictive models were obtained. It is expected that concepts from receptor-based 3D QSAR will be valuable tools for the analysis of high-throughput screening as well as virtual screening data

  1. Characterizing 3D RNA structure by single molecule FRET.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, James D; Kenyon, Julia C; Symmons, Martyn F; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-07-01

    The importance of elucidating the three dimensional structures of RNA molecules is becoming increasingly clear. However, traditional protein structural techniques such as NMR and X-ray crystallography have several important drawbacks when probing long RNA molecules. Single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) has emerged as a useful alternative as it allows native sequences to be probed in physiological conditions and allows multiple conformations to be probed simultaneously. This review serves to describe the method of generating a three dimensional RNA structure from smFRET data from the biochemical probing of the secondary structure to the computational refinement of the final model.

  2. 3D texture analysis for classification of second harmonic generation images of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Brewer, Molly A.; Patankar, Manish; Singh, Vikas; Eliceiri, Kevin. W.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Remodeling of the collagen architecture in the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantify these alterations we implemented a form of 3D texture analysis to delineate the fibrillar morphology observed in 3D Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy image data of normal (1) and high risk (2) ovarian stroma, benign ovarian tumors (3), low grade (4) and high grade (5) serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors (6). We developed a tailored set of 3D filters which extract textural features in the 3D image sets to build (or learn) statistical models of each tissue class. By applying k-nearest neighbor classification using these learned models, we achieved 83–91% accuracies for the six classes. The 3D method outperformed the analogous 2D classification on the same tissues, where we suggest this is due the increased information content. This classification based on ECM structural changes will complement conventional classification based on genetic profiles and can serve as an additional biomarker. Moreover, the texture analysis algorithm is quite general, as it does not rely on single morphological metrics such as fiber alignment, length, and width but their combined convolution with a customizable basis set. PMID:27767180

  3. 3D texture analysis for classification of second harmonic generation images of human ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bruce; Campbell, Kirby R.; Tilbury, Karissa; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Brewer, Molly A.; Patankar, Manish; Singh, Vikas; Eliceiri, Kevin. W.; Campagnola, Paul J.

    2016-10-01

    Remodeling of the collagen architecture in the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been implicated in ovarian cancer. To quantify these alterations we implemented a form of 3D texture analysis to delineate the fibrillar morphology observed in 3D Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy image data of normal (1) and high risk (2) ovarian stroma, benign ovarian tumors (3), low grade (4) and high grade (5) serous tumors, and endometrioid tumors (6). We developed a tailored set of 3D filters which extract textural features in the 3D image sets to build (or learn) statistical models of each tissue class. By applying k-nearest neighbor classification using these learned models, we achieved 83–91% accuracies for the six classes. The 3D method outperformed the analogous 2D classification on the same tissues, where we suggest this is due the increased information content. This classification based on ECM structural changes will complement conventional classification based on genetic profiles and can serve as an additional biomarker. Moreover, the texture analysis algorithm is quite general, as it does not rely on single morphological metrics such as fiber alignment, length, and width but their combined convolution with a customizable basis set.

  4. SAFAS: Unifying Form and Structure through Interactive 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polys, Nicholas F.; Bacim, Felipe; Setareh, Mehdi; Jones, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a significant gap between the tools used for the design of a building's architectural form and those that evaluate the structural physics of that form. Seeking to bring the perspectives of visual design and structural engineering closer together, we developed and evaluated a design tool for students and practitioners to explore the…

  5. The 3D Structure of the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, Manuela; Valenti, Elena

    2016-06-01

    We review the observational evidences concerning the three-dimensional structure of the Galactic bulge. Although the inner few kpc of our Galaxy are normally referred to as the bulge, all the observations demonstrate that this region is dominated by a bar, i.e., the bulge is a bar. The bar has a boxy/peanut (X-shaped) structure in its outer regions, while it seems to become less and less elongated in its innermost region. A thinner and longer structure departing from the main bar has also been found, although the observational evidences that support the scenario of two separate structures has been recently challenged. Metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] ≲ -0.5 dex) trace a different structure, and also have different kinematics.

  6. Gene3D: Structural Assignment for Whole Genes and Genomes Using the CATH Domain Structure Database

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Shepherd, Adrian J.; Lee, David; Pearl, Frances M.G.; Rison, Stuart C.G.; Thornton, Janet M.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel web-based resource, Gene3D, of precalculated structural assignments to gene sequences and whole genomes. This resource assigns structural domains from the CATH database to whole genes and links these to their curated functional and structural annotations within the CATH domain structure database, the functional Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies (DHS) and PDBsum. Currently Gene3D provides annotation for 36 complete genomes (two eukaryotes, six archaea, and 28 bacteria). On average, between 30% and 40% of the genes of a given genome can be structurally annotated. Matches to structural domains are found using the profile-based method (PSI-BLAST). and a novel protocol, DRange, is used to resolve conflicts in matches involving different homologous superfamilies. PMID:11875040

  7. The 3D structures of VDAC represent a native conformation

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Sebastian; Abramson, Jeff; Mannella, Carmen; Wagner, Gerhard; Zeth, Kornelius

    2010-01-01

    The most abundant protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane is the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which facilitates the exchange of ions and molecules between mitochondria and cytosol and is regulated by interactions with other proteins and small molecules. VDAC has been extensively studied for more than three decades, and last year three independent investigations revealed a structure of VDAC-1 exhibiting 19 transmembrane β-strands, constituting a unique structural class of β-barrel membrane proteins. Here, we provide a historical perspective on VDAC research and give an overview of the experimental design used to obtain these structures. Furthermore, we validate the protein refolding approach and summarize biochemical and biophysical evidence that links the 19-stranded structure to the native form of VDAC. PMID:20708406

  8. 3D statistical failure analysis of monolithic dental ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Sadia; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I

    2016-07-05

    For adhesively retained ceramic crown of various types, it has been clinically observed that the most catastrophic failures initiate from the cement interface as a result of radial crack formation as opposed to Hertzian contact stresses originating on the occlusal surface. In this work, a 3D failure prognosis model is developed for interface initiated failures of monolithic ceramic crowns. The surface flaw distribution parameters determined by biaxial flexural tests on ceramic plates and point-to-point variations of multi-axial stress state at the intaglio surface are obtained by finite element stress analysis. They are combined on the basis of fracture mechanics based statistical failure probability model to predict failure probability of a monolithic crown subjected to single-cycle indentation load. The proposed method is verified by prior 2D axisymmetric model and experimental data. Under conditions where the crowns are completely bonded to the tooth substrate, both high flexural stress and high interfacial shear stress are shown to occur in the wall region where the crown thickness is relatively thin while high interfacial normal tensile stress distribution is observed at the margin region. Significant impact of reduced cement modulus on these stress states is shown. While the analyses are limited to single-cycle load-to-failure tests, high interfacial normal tensile stress or high interfacial shear stress may contribute to degradation of the cement bond between ceramic and dentin. In addition, the crown failure probability is shown to be controlled by high flexural stress concentrations over a small area, and the proposed method might be of some value to detect initial crown design errors.

  9. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a method for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm from computed tomography angiography images. The proposed method is automatic and requires minimal user assistance. Segmentation is performed in two steps. First inner and then outer aortic border is segmented. Those two steps are different due to different image conditions on two aortic borders. Outputs of these two segmentations give a complete 3-D model of abdominal aorta. Such a 3-D model is used in measurements of aneurysm area. The deformable model is implemented using the level-set algorithm due to its ability to describe complex shapes in natural manner which frequently occur in pathology. In segmentation of outer aortic boundary we introduced some knowledge based preprocessing to enhance and reconstruct low contrast aortic boundary. The method has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  10. MUFOLD: A new solution for protein 3D structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfen; Wang, Qingguo; Barz, Bogdan; He, Zhiquan; Kosztin, Ioan; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong

    2010-04-01

    There have been steady improvements in protein structure prediction during the past 2 decades. However, current methods are still far from consistently predicting structural models accurately with computing power accessible to common users. Toward achieving more accurate and efficient structure prediction, we developed a number of novel methods and integrated them into a software package, MUFOLD. First, a systematic protocol was developed to identify useful templates and fragments from Protein Data Bank for a given target protein. Then, an efficient process was applied for iterative coarse-grain model generation and evaluation at the Calpha or backbone level. In this process, we construct models using interresidue spatial restraints derived from alignments by multidimensional scaling, evaluate and select models through clustering and static scoring functions, and iteratively improve the selected models by integrating spatial restraints and previous models. Finally, the full-atom models were evaluated using molecular dynamics simulations based on structural changes under simulated heating. We have continuously improved the performance of MUFOLD by using a benchmark of 200 proteins from the Astral database, where no template with >25% sequence identity to any target protein is included. The average root-mean-square deviation of the best models from the native structures is 4.28 A, which shows significant and systematic improvement over our previous methods. The computing time of MUFOLD is much shorter than many other tools, such as Rosetta. MUFOLD demonstrated some success in the 2008 community-wide experiment for protein structure prediction CASP8.

  11. Minimizing camera-eye optical aberrations during the 3D reconstruction of retinal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldana-Iuit, Javier; Martinez-Perez, M. Elena; Espinosa-Romero, Arturo; Diaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2010-05-01

    3D reconstruction of blood vessels is a powerful visualization tool for physicians, since it allows them to refer to qualitative representation of their subject of study. In this paper we propose a 3D reconstruction method of retinal vessels from fundus images. The reconstruction method propose herein uses images of the same retinal structure in epipolar geometry. Images are preprocessed by RISA system for segmenting blood vessels and obtaining feature points for correspondences. The correspondence points process is solved using correlation. The LMedS analysis and Graph Transformation Matching algorithm are used for outliers suppression. Camera projection matrices are computed with the normalized eight point algorithm. Finally, we retrieve 3D position of the retinal tree points by linear triangulation. In order to increase the power of visualization, 3D tree skeletons are represented by surfaces via generalized cylinders whose radius correspond to morphological measurements obtained by RISA. In this paper the complete calibration process including the fundus camera and the optical properties of the eye, the so called camera-eye system is proposed. On one hand, the internal parameters of the fundus camera are obtained by classical algorithms using a reference pattern. On the other hand, we minimize the undesirable efects of the aberrations induced by the eyeball optical system assuming that contact enlarging lens corrects astigmatism, spherical and coma aberrations are reduced changing the aperture size and eye refractive errors are suppressed adjusting camera focus during image acquisition. Evaluation of two self-calibration proposals and results of 3D blood vessel surface reconstruction are presented.

  12. Structured light imaging system for structural and optical characterization of 3D tissue-simulating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songde; Smith, Zach; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-10-01

    There is a pressing need for a phantom standard to calibrate medical optical devices. However, 3D printing of tissue-simulating phantom standard is challenged by lacking of appropriate methods to characterize and reproduce surface topography and optical properties accurately. We have developed a structured light imaging system to characterize surface topography and optical properties (absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient) of 3D tissue-simulating phantoms. The system consisted of a hyperspectral light source, a digital light projector (DLP), a CMOS camera, two polarizers, a rotational stage, a translation stage, a motion controller, and a personal computer. Tissue-simulating phantoms with different structural and optical properties were characterized by the proposed imaging system and validated by a standard integrating sphere system. The experimental results showed that the proposed system was able to achieve pixel-level optical properties with a percentage error of less than 11% for absorption coefficient and less than 7% for reduced scattering coefficient for phantoms without surface curvature. In the meanwhile, 3D topographic profile of the phantom can be effectively reconstructed with an accuracy of less than 1% deviation error. Our study demonstrated that the proposed structured light imaging system has the potential to characterize structural profile and optical properties of 3D tissue-simulating phantoms.

  13. Subtractive 3D Printing of Optically Active Diamond Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Aiden A.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-05-01

    Controlled fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures is an essential step in engineering of high performance photonic and optoelectronic devices. Diamond in particular has recently attracted considerable attention as a promising platform for quantum technologies, photonics and high resolution sensing applications. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of optically active, functional diamond structures using gas-mediated electron beam induced etching (EBIE). The technique achieves dry chemical etching at room temperature through the dissociation of surface-adsorbed H2O molecules by energetic electrons in a water vapor environment. Parallel processing is possible by electron flood exposure and the use of an etch mask, while high resolution, mask-free, iterative editing is demonstrated by direct write etching of inclined facets of diamond microparticles. The realized structures demonstrate the potential of EBIE for the fabrication of optically active structures in diamond.

  14. Study on embedding fiber Bragg grating sensor into the 3D printing structure for health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiya; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude; Fang, Liang; Chen, Yiyang

    2016-10-01

    3D printing technology is a rapidly developing manufacturing technology, which is known as a core technology in the third industrial revolution. With the continuous improvement of the application of 3D printing products, the health monitoring of the 3D printing structure is particularly important. Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing technology is a new type of optical sensing technology with unique advantages comparing to traditional sensing technology, and it has great application prospects in structural health monitoring. In this paper, the FBG sensors embedded in the internal structure of the 3D printing were used to monitor the static and dynamic strain variation of 3D printing structure during loading process. The theoretical result and experimental result has good consistency and the characteristic frequency detected by FBG sensor is consistent with the testing results of traditional accelerator in the dynamic experiment. The results of this paper preliminary validate that FBG embedded in the 3D printing structure can effectively detecting the static and dynamic stain change of the 3D printing structure, which provide some guidance for the health monitoring of 3D printing structure.

  15. Delineation of nuclear structures in 3D multicellular systems

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-13

    A pipeline, implemented within the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) and The Visualization Toolkit (VTK) framework, to delineate each nucleus and to profile morphometric and colony organization. At an abstract level, our approach is an extension of a previously developed method for monolayer call structure models.

  16. Characterization of ABS specimens produced via the 3D printing technology for drone structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Carlo Giovanni; Brischetto, Salvatore; Torre, Roberto; Maggiore, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) technology is widely used in rapid prototyping. 3D printers for home desktop applications are usually employed to make non-structural objects. When the mechanical stresses are not excessive, this technology can also be successfully employed to produce structural objects, not only in prototyping stage but also in the realization of series pieces. The innovative idea of the present work is the application of this technology, implemented in a desktop 3D printer, to the realization of components for aeronautical use, especially for unmanned aerial systems. For this purpose, the paper is devoted to the statistical study of the performance of a desktop 3D printer to understand how the process performs and which are the boundary limits of acceptance. Mechanical and geometrical properties of ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) specimens, such as tensile strength and stiffness, have been evaluated. ASTM638 type specimens have been used. A capability analysis has been applied for both mechanical and dimensional performances. Statistically stable limits have been determined using experimentally collected data.

  17. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established.

  18. Analysis of scalability of high-performance 3D image processing platform for virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Wu, Yin; Cai, Wenli

    2014-03-01

    One of the key challenges in three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is to enable the fast turn-around time, which is often required for interactive or real-time response. This inevitably requires not only high computational power but also high memory bandwidth due to the massive amount of data that need to be processed. For this purpose, we previously developed a software platform for high-performance 3D medical image processing, called HPC 3D-MIP platform, which employs increasingly available and affordable commodity computing systems such as the multicore, cluster, and cloud computing systems. To achieve scalable high-performance computing, the platform employed size-adaptive, distributable block volumes as a core data structure for efficient parallelization of a wide range of 3D-MIP algorithms, supported task scheduling for efficient load distribution and balancing, and consisted of a layered parallel software libraries that allow image processing applications to share the common functionalities. We evaluated the performance of the HPC 3D-MIP platform by applying it to computationally intensive processes in virtual colonoscopy. Experimental results showed a 12-fold performance improvement on a workstation with 12-core CPUs over the original sequential implementation of the processes, indicating the efficiency of the platform. Analysis of performance scalability based on the Amdahl's law for symmetric multicore chips showed the potential of a high performance scalability of the HPC 3DMIP platform when a larger number of cores is available.

  19. A 3D contact analysis approach for the visualization of the electrical contact asperities

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The electrical contact is an important phenomenon that should be given into consideration to achieve better performance and long term reliability for the design of devices. Based upon this importance, the electrical contact interface has been visualized as a ‘‘3D Contact Map’’ and used in order to investigate the contact asperities. The contact asperities describe the structures above and below the contact spots (the contact spots define the 3D contact map) to the two conductors which make the contact system. The contact asperities require the discretization of the 3D microstructures of the contact system into voxels. A contact analysis approach has been developed and introduced in this paper which shows the way to the 3D visualization of the contact asperities of a given contact system. For the discretization of 3D microstructure of contact system into voxels, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) method is used in order to collect the data of a 250 V, 16 A rated AC single pole rocker switch which is used as a contact system for investigation. PMID:28105383

  20. Efficiency analysis for 3D filtering of multichannel images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhemiakin, Ruslan A.; Rubel, Oleksii; Abramov, Sergey K.; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Vozel, Benoit; Chehdi, Kacem

    2016-10-01

    Modern remote sensing systems basically acquire images that are multichannel (dual- or multi-polarization, multi- and hyperspectral) where noise, usually with different characteristics, is present in all components. If noise is intensive, it is desirable to remove (suppress) it before applying methods of image classification, interpreting, and information extraction. This can be done using one of two approaches - by component-wise or by vectorial (3D) filtering. The second approach has shown itself to have higher efficiency if there is essential correlation between multichannel image components as this often happens for multichannel remote sensing data of different origin. Within the class of 3D filtering techniques, there are many possibilities and variations. In this paper, we consider filtering based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) and pay attention to two aspects of processing. First, we study in detail what changes in DCT coefficient statistics take place for 3D denoising compared to component-wise processing. Second, we analyze how selection of component images united into 3D data array influences efficiency of filtering and can the observed tendencies be exploited in processing of images with rather large number of channels.

  1. Imaging solar coronal magnetic structures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartledge, N. P.

    The study of solar coronal structures and, in particular prominences, is a key part of understanding the highly complex physical mechanisms occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. Solar prominences are important in their own right and some of the most puzzling questions in solar theory have arisen through their study. For example, how do they form and how is their mass continuously replenished? How can the magnetic field provide their continuous support against gravity over time periods of several months? How can such cool, dense material exist in thermal equilibrium in the surrounding coronal environment? Why do they erupt? A study of their structure and that of the surrounding medium is important in determining the nature of the coronal plasma and magnetic field. Also, prominences are closely associated with other key phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares which occur as a prominence loses equilibrium and rises from the solar surface. Our current understanding of these fascinating structures is extremely limited and we know very little about their basic global structure. In fact, recent prominence observations have caused our basic paradigms to be challenged (Priest, 1996) and so we must set up new models in order to gain even a fundamental understanding. Prominences are highly nonlinear, three-dimensional structures. Large feet (or barbs) reach out from the main body of a prominence and reach down to the photosphere where the dense material continuously drains away. These provide a real clue to the three-dimensional nature of the coronal field and its relation to the photospheric field. It is important, therefore, to make stereographic observations of prominences in order to gain a basic understanding of their essentially three-dimensional nature and attempt to formulate new paradigms for their structure and evolution. There is no doubt that the study of prominences in three dimensions is a crucial exercise if we are to develop a better

  2. PROP3D: A Program for 3D Euler Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic (Flutter and Forced Response) Analysis of Propellers. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1996-01-01

    This guide describes the input data required, for steady or unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic analysis of propellers and the output files generated, in using PROP3D. The aerodynamic forces are obtained by solving three dimensional unsteady, compressible Euler equations. A normal mode structural analysis is used to obtain the aeroelastic equations, which are solved using either time domain or frequency domain solution method. Sample input and output files are included in this guide for steady aerodynamic analysis of single and counter-rotation propellers, and aeroelastic analysis of single-rotation propeller.

  3. PACS-based interface for 3D anatomical structure visualization and surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, Christophe; Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2002-05-01

    The interpretation of radiological image is routine but it remains a rather difficult task for physicians. It requires complex mental processes, that permit translation from 2D slices into 3D localization and volume determination of visible diseases. An easier and more extensive visualization and exploitation of medical images can be reached through the use of computer-based systems that provide real help from patient admission to post-operative followup. In this way, we have developed a 3D visualization interface linked to a PACS database that allows manipulation and interaction on virtual organs delineated from CT-scan or MRI. This software provides the 3D real-time surface rendering of anatomical structures, an accurate evaluation of volumes and distances and the improvement of radiological image analysis and exam annotation through a negatoscope tool. It also provides a tool for surgical planning allowing the positioning of an interactive laparoscopic instrument and the organ resection. The software system could revolutionize the field of computerized imaging technology. Indeed, it provides a handy and portable tool for pre-operative and intra-operative analysis of anatomy and pathology in various medical fields. This constitutes the first step of the future development of augmented reality and surgical simulation systems.

  4. ProSAT+: visualizing sequence annotations on 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Richter, Stefan; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    PRO: tein S: tructure A: nnotation T: ool-plus (ProSAT(+)) is a new web server for mapping protein sequence annotations onto a protein structure and visualizing them simultaneously with the structure. ProSAT(+) incorporates many of the features of the preceding ProSAT and ProSAT2 tools but also provides new options for the visualization and sharing of protein annotations. Data are extracted from the UniProt KnowledgeBase, the RCSB PDB and the PDBe SIFTS resource, and visualization is performed using JSmol. User-defined sequence annotations can be added directly to the URL, thus enabling visualization and easy data sharing. ProSAT(+) is available at http://prosat.h-its.org.

  5. Rapid Prototyping across the Spectrum: RF to Optical 3D Electromagnetic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-17

    fabricated using 3D printer . The fill factor decreases radially outwards and the voids are visible in the unit cells as you approach the periphery of the...with thin walls) [29]. Figure 6: Examples of lenses fabricated with AM (a) GRIN lens fabricated using 3D printer . The fill factor decreases...AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2015-002 Rapid Prototyping across the Spectrum: RF to Optical 3D Electromagnetic Structures Jeffery W. Allen Monica S. Allen Brett

  6. 3D Printing for Spacecraft Multi-Functional Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddy, P. A.; Huang, C. Y.; Lyke, J.; Baur, J.; Durstock, M.; MacDonald, E.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional printing, more formally Additive Manufacturing (AM), is being explored by groups worldwide for use in space missions, but we recognize the amazing potential of this emerging technology to produce space weather environmental sensors at costs commensurate with declining research budgets. We present here a plan to go substantially beyond the novelty stage of this technology by developing a foundation for using AM in high-assurance space system missions. Our two-pronged approach involves (1) a disciplined investigation of material properties and reliability (electrical, mechanical, radiation) of AM and (2) the extension of this knowledge to make complex structures that can exploit the advantages of AM. We address the design, manufacture, and optimization of multifunctional space structures using multi-physics design methods, integrated computational models, and AM. Integrated multifunctional structures have significant advantage in flexibility, size, weight, and power in comparison to formally attached elements, but their design and fabrication can be complex. The complexity and range in element shape, processing method, material properties and vehicle integration make this an ideal problem to advance the current state of the art methods for multiphysics mechanism design and strengthening AM processing science.

  7. Canonical structure of higher derivative gravity in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Guellue, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram

    2010-05-15

    We give an explicitly gauge-invariant canonical analysis of linearized quadratic gravity theories in three dimensions for both flat and de Sitter backgrounds. In flat backgrounds, we also study the effects of the gravitational Chern-Simons term, include the sources, and compute the weak field limit as well as scattering between spinning massive particles.

  8. Topologic connection between 2-D layered structures and 3-D diamond structures for conventional semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    When coming to identify new 2D materials, our intuition would suggest us to look from layered instead of 3D materials. However, since graphite can be hypothetically derived from diamond by stretching it along its [111] axis, many 3D materials can also potentially be explored as new candidates for 2D materials. Using a density functional theory, we perform a systematic study over the common Group IV, III–V, and II–VI semiconductors along different deformation paths to reveal new structures that are topologically connected to but distinctly different from the 3D parent structure. Specifically, we explore two major phase transition paths, originating respectively from wurtzite and NiAs structure, by applying compressive and tensile strain along the symmetry axis, and calculating the total energy changes to search for potential metastable states, as well as phonon spectra to examine the structural stability. Each path is found to further split into two branches under tensile strain–low buckled and high buckled structures, which respectively lead to a low and high buckled monolayer structure. Most promising new layered or planar structures identified include BeO, GaN, and ZnO on the tensile strain side, Ge, Si, and GaP on the compressive strain side. PMID:27090430

  9. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  10. Structural 3d Monitoring Using a New Sinusoidal Fitting Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Habib, A.; Lichti, D.; El-Badry, M.

    2016-06-01

    Digital photogrammetric systems combined with image processing techniques have been used for structural monitoring purposes for more than a decade. For applications requiring sub-millimetre level precision, the use of off-the-shelf DSLR cameras is a suitable choice, especially when the low cost of the involved sensors is a priority. The disadvantage in the use of entry level DSLRs is that there is a trade-off between frame rate and burst rate - a high frame rate is either not available or it cannot be sustained long enough. This problem must be overcome when monitoring a structural element undergoing a dynamic test, where a range of loads are cycled through multiple times a second. In order to estimate deflections during such a scenario, this paper proposes a new least-squares adjustment for sinusoidal fitting. The new technique is capable of processing multiple back-to-back bursts of data within the same adjustment, which synthetically increases the de-facto temporal resolution of the system. The paper describes a beam deformation test done in a structures laboratory. The experimental results were assessed in terms of both their precision and accuracy. The new method increased the effective sampling frequency three-fold, which improved the standard deviations of the estimated parameters with up to two orders of magnitude. A residual RMSE as low as 30 μm was attained, and likewise the RMSE of the computed amplitudes between the photogrammetric system and the control laser transducers was as small as 34 μm.

  11. Determining the 3-D structure and motion of objects using a scanning laser range sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandhakumar, N.; Smith, Philip W.

    1993-12-01

    In order for the EVAHR robot to autonomously track and grasp objects, its vision system must be able to determine the 3-D structure and motion of an object from a sequence of sensory images. This task is accomplished by the use of a laser radar range sensor which provides dense range maps of the scene. Unfortunately, the currently available laser radar range cameras use a sequential scanning approach which complicates image analysis. Although many algorithms have been developed for recognizing objects from range images, none are suited for use with single beam, scanning, time-of-flight sensors because all previous algorithms assume instantaneous acquisition of the entire image. This assumption is invalid since the EVAHR robot is equipped with a sequential scanning laser range sensor. If an object is moving while being imaged by the device, the apparent structure of the object can be significantly distorted due to the significant non-zero delay time between sampling each image pixel. If an estimate of the motion of the object can be determined, this distortion can be eliminated; but, this leads to the motion-structure paradox - most existing algorithms for 3-D motion estimation use the structure of objects to parameterize their motions. The goal of this research is to design a rigid-body motion recovery technique which overcomes this limitation. The method being developed is an iterative, linear, feature-based approach which uses the non-zero image acquisition time constraint to accurately recover the motion parameters from the distorted structure of the 3-D range maps. Once the motion parameters are determined, the structural distortion in the range images is corrected.

  12. Genome3D: a UK collaborative project to annotate genomic sequences with predicted 3D structures based on SCOP and CATH domains

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cuff, Alison; Dana, Jose M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Hunter, Sarah; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mitchell, Alex; Murzin, Alexey G.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Rackham, Owen J. L.; Smith, James; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Velankar, Sameer; Yeats, Corin; Orengo, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Genome3D, available at http://www.genome3d.eu, is a new collaborative project that integrates UK-based structural resources to provide a unique perspective on sequence–structure–function relationships. Leading structure prediction resources (DomSerf, FUGUE, Gene3D, pDomTHREADER, Phyre and SUPERFAMILY) provide annotations for UniProt sequences to indicate the locations of structural domains (structural annotations) and their 3D structures (structural models). Structural annotations and 3D model predictions are currently available for three model genomes (Homo sapiens, E. coli and baker’s yeast), and the project will extend to other genomes in the near future. As these resources exploit different strategies for predicting structures, the main aim of Genome3D is to enable comparisons between all the resources so that biologists can see where predictions agree and are therefore more trusted. Furthermore, as these methods differ in whether they build their predictions using CATH or SCOP, Genome3D also contains the first official mapping between these two databases. This has identified pairs of similar superfamilies from the two resources at various degrees of consensus (532 bronze pairs, 527 silver pairs and 370 gold pairs). PMID:23203986

  13. 3D nano-structures for laser nano-manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Seniutinas, Gediminas; Gervinskas, Gediminas; Brasselet, Etienne; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2013-01-01

    Summary The resputtering of gold films from nano-holes defined in a sacrificial PMMA mask, which was made by electron beam lithography, was carried out with a dry plasma etching tool in order to form well-like structures with a high aspect ratio (height/width ≈ 3–4) at the rims of the nano-holes. The extraordinary transmission through the patterns of such nano-wells was investigated experimentally and numerically. By doing numerical simulations of 50-nm and 100-nm diameter polystyrene beads in water and air, we show the potential of such patterns for self-induced back-action (SIBA) trapping. The best trapping conditions were found to be a trapping force of 2 pN/W/μm2 (numerical result) exerted on a 50-nm diameter bead in water. The simulations were based on the analytical Lorentz force model. PMID:24062979

  14. 3-D Structure of Sunspots using Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Gary, G. Allen; Reardon, K.

    2006-01-01

    We use the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) of the INAF/Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory and installed at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) Dunn Solar Telescope, to understand the structure of sunspots. Using the spectral lines FeI 6301.5 A, FeII 7224.4 A, and CaII 8542.6 A, we examine the spectroscopic variation of sunspot penumbral and umbral structures at the heights of formation of these lines. These high resolution observations were acquired on 2004 July 30-31, of active region NOAA 10654, using the high order NSO adaptive optics system. We map the spatio-temporal variation of Doppler signatures in these spectral lines, from the photosphere to the chromosphere. From a 70-minute temporal average of individual 32-second cadence Doppler observations we find that the averaged velocities decrease with height, about 3.5 times larger in the deeper photosphere (FeII 7224.4 A; height-of-formation approx. 50 km) than in the upper photosphere FeI 6301.5 A; height-of-formation approx. 350 km), There is a remarkable coherence of Doppler signals over the height difference of 300 km. From a high-speed animation of the Doppler sequence we find evidence for what appears to be ejection of high speed gas concentrations from edges of penumbral filaments into the surrounding granular photosphere. The Evershed flow persists a few arcseconds beyond the traditionally demarcated penumbra-granulation boundary. We present these and other results and discuss the implications of these measurements for sunspot models.

  15. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this program is to produce a series of new computer codes that permit more accurate and efficient three-dimensional inelastic structural analysis of combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. Each code embodies a progression of mathematical models for increasingly comprehensive representation of the geometrical features, loading conditions, and forms of nonlinear material response that distinguish these three groups of hot section components.

  16. Fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic structures using laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaso, P.; Jandura, D.; Pudis, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology based on two photon polymerization. We used three-dimensional dip-in direct-laser-writing (DLW) optical lithography to fabricate 2D and 3D optical structures for optoelectronics and for optical sensing applications. DLW lithography allows us use a non conventional way how to couple light into the waveguide structure. We prepared ring resonator and we investigated its transmission spectral characteristic. We present 3D inverse opal structure from its design to printing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Finally, SEM images of some prepared photonic crystal structures were performed.

  17. Shape analysis of corpus callosum in phenylketonuria using a new 3D correspondence algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Christ, Shawn E.; Karsch, Kevin; Peck, Dawn; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    Statistical shape analysis of brain structures has gained increasing interest from neuroimaging community because it can precisely locate shape differences between healthy and pathological structures. The most difficult and crucial problem is establishing shape correspondence among individual 3D shapes. This paper proposes a new algorithm for 3D shape correspondence. A set of landmarks are sampled on a template shape, and initial correspondence is established between the template and the target shape based on the similarity of locations and normal directions. The landmarks on the target are then refined by iterative thin plate spline. The algorithm is simple and fast, and no spherical mapping is needed. We apply our method to the statistical shape analysis of the corpus callosum (CC) in phenylketonuria (PKU), and significant local shape differences between the patients and the controls are found in the most anterior and posterior aspects of the corpus callosum.

  18. Molecular Phylogeny and Predicted 3D Structure of Plant beta-D-N-Acetylhexosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Anowar

    2014-01-01

    beta-D-N-Acetylhexosaminidase, a family 20 glycosyl hydrolase, catalyzes the removal of β-1,4-linked N-acetylhexosamine residues from oligosaccharides and their conjugates. We constructed phylogenetic tree of β-hexosaminidases to analyze the evolutionary history and predicted functions of plant hexosaminidases. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the complex history of evolution of plant β-hexosaminidase that can be described by gene duplication events. The 3D structure of tomato β-hexosaminidase (β-Hex-Sl) was predicted by homology modeling using 1now as a template. Structural conformity studies of the best fit model showed that more than 98% of the residues lie inside the favoured and allowed regions where only 0.9% lie in the unfavourable region. Predicted 3D structure contains 531 amino acids residues with glycosyl hydrolase20b domain-I and glycosyl hydrolase20 superfamily domain-II including the (β/α)8 barrel in the central part. The α and β contents of the modeled structure were found to be 33.3% and 12.2%, respectively. Eleven amino acids were found to be involved in ligand-binding site; Asp(330) and Glu(331) could play important roles in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The predicted model provides a structural framework that can act as a guide to develop a hypothesis for β-Hex-Sl mutagenesis experiments for exploring the functions of this class of enzymes in plant kingdom. PMID:25165734

  19. Molecular phylogeny and predicted 3D structure of plant beta-D-N-acetylhexosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Anowar; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2014-01-01

    beta-D-N-Acetylhexosaminidase, a family 20 glycosyl hydrolase, catalyzes the removal of β-1,4-linked N-acetylhexosamine residues from oligosaccharides and their conjugates. We constructed phylogenetic tree of β-hexosaminidases to analyze the evolutionary history and predicted functions of plant hexosaminidases. Phylogenetic analysis reveals the complex history of evolution of plant β-hexosaminidase that can be described by gene duplication events. The 3D structure of tomato β-hexosaminidase (β-Hex-Sl) was predicted by homology modeling using 1now as a template. Structural conformity studies of the best fit model showed that more than 98% of the residues lie inside the favoured and allowed regions where only 0.9% lie in the unfavourable region. Predicted 3D structure contains 531 amino acids residues with glycosyl hydrolase20b domain-I and glycosyl hydrolase20 superfamily domain-II including the (β/α)8 barrel in the central part. The α and β contents of the modeled structure were found to be 33.3% and 12.2%, respectively. Eleven amino acids were found to be involved in ligand-binding site; Asp(330) and Glu(331) could play important roles in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The predicted model provides a structural framework that can act as a guide to develop a hypothesis for β-Hex-Sl mutagenesis experiments for exploring the functions of this class of enzymes in plant kingdom.

  20. Uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions with efficient clustering of 3-D interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Aung, Z; Tan, S-H; Ng, S-K; Tan, K-L

    2007-01-01

    The biological mechanisms with which proteins interact with one another are best revealed by studying the structural interfaces between interacting proteins. Protein-protein interfaces can be extracted from 3-D structural data of protein complexes and then clustered to derive biological insights. However, conventional protein interface clustering methods lack computational scalability and statistical support. In this work, we present a new method named "PPiClust" to systematically encode, cluster and analyze similar 3-D interface patterns in protein complexes efficiently. Experimental results showed that our method is effective in discovering visually consistent and statistically significant clusters of interfaces, and at the same time sufficiently time-efficient to be performed on a single computer. The interface clusters are also useful for uncovering the structural basis of protein interactions. Analysis of the resulting interface clusters revealed groups of structurally diverse proteins having similar interface patterns. We also found, in some of the interface clusters, the presence of well-known linear binding motifs which were non-contiguous in the primary sequences. These results suggest that PPiClust can discover not only statistically significant but also biologically significant protein interface clusters from protein complex structural data.

  1. Monte Carlo generators for studies of the 3D structure of the nucleon

    DOE PAGES

    Avakian, Harut; D'Alesio, U.; Murgia, F.

    2015-01-23

    In this study, extraction of transverse momentum and space distributions of partons from measurements of spin and azimuthal asymmetries requires development of a self consistent analysis framework, accounting for evolution effects, and allowing control of systematic uncertainties due to variations of input parameters and models. Development of realistic Monte-Carlo generators, accounting for TMD evolution effects, spin-orbit and quark-gluon correlations will be crucial for future studies of quark-gluon dynamics in general and 3D structure of the nucleon in particular.

  2. Analysis of 3-D Propagation Effects Due to Environmental Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    presence of 3-D environmental variations, especially shelf break canyons . Work was also performed in support of 2-D propagation in shallow water to...propagation in the Monterey Bay Canyon . This was motivated by observations of highly variable directional features in measured acoustic vector data...Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 the Monterey Bay Canyon were used as inputs to the model, and broadband calculations were performed

  3. 3D Display Calibration by Visual Pattern Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoseok; Chang, Hyun Sung; Nam, Dongkyung; Kweon, In So

    2017-02-06

    Nearly all 3D displays need calibration for correct rendering. More often than not, the optical elements in a 3D display are misaligned from the designed parameter setting. As a result, 3D magic does not perform well as intended. The observed images tend to get distorted. In this paper, we propose a novel display calibration method to fix the situation. In our method, a pattern image is displayed on the panel and a camera takes its pictures twice at different positions. Then, based on a quantitative model, we extract all display parameters (i.e., pitch, slanted angle, gap or thickness, offset) from the observed patterns in the captured images. For high accuracy and robustness, our method analyzes the patterns mostly in frequency domain. We conduct two types of experiments for validation; one with optical simulation for quantitative results and the other with real-life displays for qualitative assessment. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is quite accurate, about a half order of magnitude higher than prior work; is efficient, spending less than 2 s for computation; and is robust to noise, working well in the SNR regime as low as 6 dB.

  4. Electrodeposition-based 3D Printing of Metallic Microarchitectures with Controlled Internal Structures.

    PubMed

    Seol, Seung Kwon; Kim, Daeho; Lee, Sanghyeon; Kim, Jung Hyun; Chang, Won Suk; Kim, Ji Tae

    2015-08-26

    3D printing of metallic microarchitectures with controlled internal structures is realized at room temperature in ambient air conditions by the manipulation of metal ion concentration and pulsed electric potentials in the electrolyte meniscus during the meniscus-guided electrodeposition. Precise control of the printing nozzle enables the drawing of complex 3D microarchitectures with well-defined geometries and positions.

  5. Searching protein 3-D structures for optimal structure alignment using intelligent algorithms and data structures.

    PubMed

    Novosád, Tomáš; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Yang, Jack Y

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for measuring protein similarity based on their 3-D structure (protein tertiary structure). The algorithm used a suffix tree for discovering common parts of main chains of all proteins appearing in the current research collaboratory for structural bioinformatics protein data bank (PDB). By identifying these common parts, we build a vector model and use some classical information retrieval (IR) algorithms based on the vector model to measure the similarity between proteins--all to all protein similarity. For the calculation of protein similarity, we use term frequency × inverse document frequency ( tf × idf ) term weighing schema and cosine similarity measure. The goal of this paper is to introduce new protein similarity metric based on suffix trees and IR methods. Whole current PDB database was used to demonstrate very good time complexity of the algorithm as well as high precision. We have chosen the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) database for verification of the precision of our algorithm because it is maintained primarily by humans. The next success of this paper would be the ability to determine SCOP categories of proteins not included in the latest version of the SCOP database (v. 1.75) with nearly 100% precision.

  6. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets.

  7. 3D thermography in non-destructive testing of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellstein, Piotr; Szwedo, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    The combination of 3D scanners and infrared cameras has lead to the introduction of 3D thermography. Such analysis produces results in the form of three-dimensional thermograms, where the temperatures are mapped on a 3D model reconstruction of the inspected object. All work in the field of 3D thermography focused on its utility in passive thermography inspections. The authors propose a new real-time 3D temperature mapping method, which for the first time can be applied to active thermography analyses. All steps required to utilise 3D thermography are discussed, starting from acquisition of three-dimensional and infrared data, going through image processing and scene reconstruction, finishing with thermal projection and ray-tracing visualisation techniques. The application of the developed method was tested during diagnosis of several industrial composite structures—boats, planes and wind turbine blades.

  8. Cross modality registration of video and magnetic tracker data for 3D appearance and structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Dusty; Chen, Chao-I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2010-02-01

    The paper reports a fully-automated, cross-modality sensor data registration scheme between video and magnetic tracker data. This registration scheme is intended for use in computerized imaging systems to model the appearance, structure, and dimension of human anatomy in three dimensions (3D) from endoscopic videos, particularly colonoscopic videos, for cancer research and clinical practices. The proposed cross-modality calibration procedure operates this way: Before a colonoscopic procedure, the surgeon inserts a magnetic tracker into the working channel of the endoscope or otherwise fixes the tracker's position on the scope. The surgeon then maneuvers the scope-tracker assembly to view a checkerboard calibration pattern from a few different viewpoints for a few seconds. The calibration procedure is then completed, and the relative pose (translation and rotation) between the reference frames of the magnetic tracker and the scope is determined. During the colonoscopic procedure, the readings from the magnetic tracker are used to automatically deduce the pose (both position and orientation) of the scope's reference frame over time, without complicated image analysis. Knowing the scope movement over time then allows us to infer the 3D appearance and structure of the organs and tissues in the scene. While there are other well-established mechanisms for inferring the movement of the camera (scope) from images, they are often sensitive to mistakes in image analysis, error accumulation, and structure deformation. The proposed method using a magnetic tracker to establish the camera motion parameters thus provides a robust and efficient alternative for 3D model construction. Furthermore, the calibration procedure does not require special training nor use expensive calibration equipment (except for a camera calibration pattern-a checkerboard pattern-that can be printed on any laser or inkjet printer).

  9. A 3D model describing the initial structure of an artificial hydrological catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, T.; Schneider, A.; Buczko, U.; Gerke, H. H.

    2009-04-01

    -distributions of hydraulic properties for the modelling of surface runoff, erosion and soil water and solute movement. Continuous measurements of the dynamic development of structural features like surface relief, vegetation patterns and crust formation will be used to create time-slices that allow a first estimation of the temporal and spatial change of structural features and connected hydraulic parameters. The combined 3D analysis of different parameters at different points of time allows the deduction and classification of volumes dominated by certain processes and their spatial development over time.

  10. Analysis of a 3-D system function measured for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, Jürgen; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Borgert, Jörn

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new tomographic imaging approach that can quantitatively map magnetic nanoparticle distributions in vivo. It is capable of volumetric real-time imaging at particle concentrations low enough to enable clinical applications. For image reconstruction in 3-D MPI, a system function (SF) is used, which describes the relation between the acquired MPI signal and the spatial origin of the signal. The SF depends on the instrumental configuration, the applied field sequence, and the magnetic particle characteristics. Its properties reflect the quality of the spatial encoding process. This work presents a detailed analysis of a measured SF to give experimental evidence that 3-D MPI encodes information using a set of 3-D spatial patterns or basis functions that is stored in the SF. This resembles filling 3-D k-space in magnetic resonance imaging, but is faster since all information is gathered simultaneously over a broad acquisition bandwidth. A frequency domain analysis shows that the finest structures that can be encoded with the presented SF are as small as 0.6 mm. SF simulations are performed to demonstrate that larger particle cores extend the set of basis functions towards higher resolution and that the experimentally observed spatial patterns require the existence of particles with core sizes of about 30 nm in the calibration sample. A simple formula is presented that qualitatively describes the basis functions to be expected at a certain frequency.

  11. Proof of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hinderdael, Michaël; Jardon, Zoé; Lison, Margot; De Baere, Dieter; Devesse, Wim; Strantza, Maria; Guillaume, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Currently, research on structural health monitoring systems is focused on direct integration of the system into a component or structure. The latter results in a so-called smart structure. One example of a smart structure is a component with integrated strain sensing for continuous load monitoring. Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, now also enables such integration of functions inside components. As a proof-of-concept, the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technique was used to integrate a strain sensing element inside polymer (ABS) tensile test samples. The strain sensing element consisted of a closed capillary filled with a fluid and connected to an externally mounted pressure sensor. The volumetric deformation of the integrated capillary resulted in pressure changes in the fluid. The obtained pressure measurements during tensile testing are reported in this paper and compared to state-of-the-art extensometer measurements. The sensitivity of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor is primarily a function of the compressibility of the capillary fluid. Air- and watertightness are of critical importance for the proper functioning of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor. Therefore, the best after-treatment procedure was selected on basis of a comparative analysis. The obtained pressure measurements are linear with respect to the extensometer readings, and the uncertainty on the strain measurement of a capillary filled with water (incompressible fluid) is ±3.1 µstrain, which is approximately three times less sensitive than conventional strain gauges (±1 µstrain), but 32 times more sensitive than the same sensor based on air (compressible fluid) (±101 µstrain). PMID:28208779

  12. Proof of Concept of Integrated Load Measurement in 3D Printed Structures.

    PubMed

    Hinderdael, Michaël; Jardon, Zoé; Lison, Margot; De Baere, Dieter; Devesse, Wim; Strantza, Maria; Guillaume, Patrick

    2017-02-09

    Currently, research on structural health monitoring systems is focused on direct integration of the system into a component or structure. The latter results in a so-called smart structure. One example of a smart structure is a component with integrated strain sensing for continuous load monitoring. Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, now also enables such integration of functions inside components. As a proof-of-concept, the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technique was used to integrate a strain sensing element inside polymer (ABS) tensile test samples. The strain sensing element consisted of a closed capillary filled with a fluid and connected to an externally mounted pressure sensor. The volumetric deformation of the integrated capillary resulted in pressure changes in the fluid. The obtained pressure measurements during tensile testing are reported in this paper and compared to state-of-the-art extensometer measurements. The sensitivity of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor is primarily a function of the compressibility of the capillary fluid. Air- and watertightness are of critical importance for the proper functioning of the 3D printed pressure-based strain sensor. Therefore, the best after-treatment procedure was selected on basis of a comparative analysis. The obtained pressure measurements are linear with respect to the extensometer readings, and the uncertainty on the strain measurement of a capillary filled with water (incompressible fluid) is ±3.1 µstrain, which is approximately three times less sensitive than conventional strain gauges (±1 µstrain), but 32 times more sensitive than the same sensor based on air (compressible fluid) (±101 µstrain).

  13. Sequence co-evolution gives 3D contacts and structures of protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A; Schärfe, Charlotta P I; Rodrigues, João P G L M; Green, Anna G; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Sander, Chris; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Marks, Debora S

    2014-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions are fundamental to many biological processes. Experimental screens have identified tens of thousands of interactions, and structural biology has provided detailed functional insight for select 3D protein complexes. An alternative rich source of information about protein interactions is the evolutionary sequence record. Building on earlier work, we show that analysis of correlated evolutionary sequence changes across proteins identifies residues that are close in space with sufficient accuracy to determine the three-dimensional structure of the protein complexes. We evaluate prediction performance in blinded tests on 76 complexes of known 3D structure, predict protein–protein contacts in 32 complexes of unknown structure, and demonstrate how evolutionary couplings can be used to distinguish between interacting and non-interacting protein pairs in a large complex. With the current growth of sequences, we expect that the method can be generalized to genome-wide elucidation of protein–protein interaction networks and used for interaction predictions at residue resolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03430.001 PMID:25255213

  14. New potent and selective cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) inhibitors based on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, L E; Turpeinen, M; Rahnasto, M; Wittekindt, C; Poso, A; Pelkonen, O; Raunio, H; Juvonen, R O

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) enzyme metabolises a number of clinically important drugs. Drug-drug interactions resulting from inhibition or induction of CYP2B6 activity may cause serious adverse effects. The aims of this study were to construct a three-dimensional structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of the CYP2B6 protein and to identify novel potent and selective inhibitors of CYP2B6 for in vitro research purposes. Experimental approach: The inhibition potencies (IC50 values) of structurally diverse chemicals were determined with recombinant human CYP2B6 enzyme. Two successive models were constructed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). Key results: Three compounds proved to be very potent and selective competitive inhibitors of CYP2B6 in vitro (IC50<1 μM): 4-(4-chlorobenzyl)pyridine (CBP), 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP), and 4-benzylpyridine (BP). A complete inhibition of CYP2B6 activity was achieved with 0.1 μM CBP, whereas other CYP-related activities were not affected. Forty-one compounds were selected for further testing and construction of the final CoMFA model. The created CoMFA model was of high quality and predicted accurately the inhibition potency of a test set (n=7) of structurally diverse compounds. Conclusions and implications: Two CoMFA models were created which revealed the key molecular characteristics of inhibitors of the CYP2B6 enzyme. The final model accurately predicted the inhibitory potencies of several structurally unrelated compounds. CBP, BP and NBP were identified as novel potent and selective inhibitors of CYP2B6 and CBP especially is a suitable inhibitor for in vitro screening studies. PMID:17325652

  15. Quantification of Dynamic Morphological Drug Responses in 3D Organotypic Cell Cultures by Automated Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Härmä, Ville; Schukov, Hannu-Pekka; Happonen, Antti; Ahonen, Ilmari; Virtanen, Johannes; Siitari, Harri; Åkerfelt, Malin; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Nees, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Glandular epithelial cells differentiate into complex multicellular or acinar structures, when embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix. The spectrum of different multicellular morphologies formed in 3D is a sensitive indicator for the differentiation potential of normal, non-transformed cells compared to different stages of malignant progression. In addition, single cells or cell aggregates may actively invade the matrix, utilizing epithelial, mesenchymal or mixed modes of motility. Dynamic phenotypic changes involved in 3D tumor cell invasion are sensitive to specific small-molecule inhibitors that target the actin cytoskeleton. We have used a panel of inhibitors to demonstrate the power of automated image analysis as a phenotypic or morphometric readout in cell-based assays. We introduce a streamlined stand-alone software solution that supports large-scale high-content screens, based on complex and organotypic cultures. AMIDA (Automated Morphometric Image Data Analysis) allows quantitative measurements of large numbers of images and structures, with a multitude of different spheroid shapes, sizes, and textures. AMIDA supports an automated workflow, and can be combined with quality control and statistical tools for data interpretation and visualization. We have used a representative panel of 12 prostate and breast cancer lines that display a broad spectrum of different spheroid morphologies and modes of invasion, challenged by a library of 19 direct or indirect modulators of the actin cytoskeleton which induce systematic changes in spheroid morphology and differentiation versus invasion. These results were independently validated by 2D proliferation, apoptosis and cell motility assays. We identified three drugs that primarily attenuated the invasion and formation of invasive processes in 3D, without affecting proliferation or apoptosis. Two of these compounds block Rac signalling, one affects cellular cAMP/cGMP accumulation. Our approach supports

  16. Multivoxel pattern analysis reveals 3D place information in the human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Misun; Jeffery, Kate J; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2017-03-20

    The spatial world is three-dimensional (3D), and humans and other animals move both horizontally and vertically within it. Extant neuroscientific studies have typically investigated spatial navigation on a horizontal two-dimensional plane, leaving much unknown about how 3D spatial information is represented in the brain. Specifically, horizontal and vertical information may be encoded in the same or different neural structures with equal or unequal sensitivity. Here, we investigated these possibilities using functional MRI (fMRI) while participants were passively moved within a 3D lattice structure as if riding a rollercoaster. Multivoxel pattern analysis was used to test for the existence of information relating to where and in which direction participants were heading in this virtual environment. Behaviorally, participants had similarly accurate memory for vertical and horizontal locations, and the right anterior hippocampus expressed place information that was sensitive to changes along both horizontal and vertical axes. This is suggestive of isotropic 3D place encoding. By contrast, participants indicated their heading direction faster and more accurately when they were heading in a tilted-up or tilted-down direction. This direction information was expressed in the right retrosplenial cortex and posterior hippocampus, and was only sensitive to vertical pitch, which could reflect the importance of the vertical (gravity) axis as a reference frame. Overall, our findings extend previous knowledge of how we represent the spatial world and navigate within it, by taking into account the important third dimension.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTThe spatial world is three-dimensional (3D) -- we can move horizontally across surfaces, but also vertically, going up slopes or stairs. Little is known about how the brain supports representations of 3D space. A key question is whether or not horizontal and vertical information is equally well represented. Here we measured functional MRI

  17. Importance of a 3D forward modeling tool for surface wave analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pageot, Damien; Le Feuvre, Mathieu; Donatienne, Leparoux; Philippe, Côte; Yann, Capdeville

    2016-04-01

    Since a few years, seismic surface waves analysis methods (SWM) have been widely developed and tested in the context of subsurface characterization and have demonstrated their effectiveness for sounding and monitoring purposes, e.g., high-resolution tomography of the principal geological units of California or real time monitoring of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano. Historically, these methods are mostly developed under the assumption of semi-infinite 1D layered medium without topography. The forward modeling is generally based on Thomson-Haskell matrix based modeling algorithm and the inversion is driven by Monte-Carlo sampling. Given their efficiency, SWM have been transfered to several scale of which civil engineering structures in order to, e.g., determine the so-called V s30 parameter or assess other critical constructional parameters in pavement engineering. However, at this scale, many structures may often exhibit 3D surface variations which drastically limit the efficiency of SWM application. Indeed, even in the case of an homogeneous structure, 3D geometry can bias the dispersion diagram of Rayleigh waves up to obtain discontinuous phase velocity curves which drastically impact the 1D mean velocity model obtained from dispersion inversion. Taking advantages of high-performance computing center accessibility and wave propagation modeling algorithm development, it is now possible to consider the use of a 3D elastic forward modeling algorithm instead of Thomson-Haskell method in the SWM inversion process. We use a parallelized 3D elastic modeling code based on the spectral element method which allows to obtain accurate synthetic data with very low numerical dispersion and a reasonable numerical cost. In this study, we choose dike embankments as an illustrative example. We first show that their longitudinal geometry may have a significant effect on dispersion diagrams of Rayleigh waves. Then, we demonstrate the necessity of 3D elastic modeling as a forward

  18. Exome-Scale Discovery of Hotspot Mutation Regions in Human Cancer Using 3D Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tokheim, Collin; Bhattacharya, Rohit; Niknafs, Noushin; Gygax, Derek M; Kim, Rick; Ryan, Michael; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    The impact of somatic missense mutation on cancer etiology and progression is often difficult to interpret. One common approach for assessing the contribution of missense mutations in carcinogenesis is to identify genes mutated with statistically nonrandom frequencies. Even given the large number of sequenced cancer samples currently available, this approach remains underpowered to detect drivers, particularly in less studied cancer types. Alternative statistical and bioinformatic approaches are needed. One approach to increase power is to focus on localized regions of increased missense mutation density or hotspot regions, rather than a whole gene or protein domain. Detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in three-dimensional (3D) protein structure may also be beneficial because linear sequence alone does not fully describe the biologically relevant organization of codons. Here, we present a novel and statistically rigorous algorithm for detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in 3D protein structures. We analyzed approximately 3 × 10(5) mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 216 tumor-type-specific hotspot regions. In addition to experimentally determined protein structures, we considered high-quality structural models, which increase genomic coverage from approximately 5,000 to more than 15,000 genes. We provide new evidence that 3D mutation analysis has unique advantages. It enables discovery of hotspot regions in many more genes than previously shown and increases sensitivity to hotspot regions in tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Although hotspot regions have long been known to exist in both TSGs and oncogenes, we provide the first report that they have different characteristic properties in the two types of driver genes. We show how cancer researchers can use our results to link 3D protein structure and the biologic functions of missense mutations in cancer, and to generate testable hypotheses about driver mechanisms. Our results

  19. Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) for a 3-D Flexible Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumbert, Clyde R.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    2001-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of an optimization method called Simultaneous Aerodynamic Analysis and Design Optimization (SAADO) are extended from single discipline analysis (aerodynamics only) to multidisciplinary analysis - in this case, static aero-structural analysis - and applied to a simple 3-D wing problem. The method aims to reduce the computational expense incurred in performing shape optimization using state-of-the-art Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow analysis, Finite Element Method (FEM) structural analysis and sensitivity analysis tools. Results for this small problem show that the method reaches the same local optimum as conventional optimization. However, unlike its application to the win,, (single discipline analysis), the method. as I implemented here, may not show significant reduction in the computational cost. Similar reductions were seen in the two-design-variable (DV) problem results but not in the 8-DV results given here.

  20. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  1. Customisable 3D printed microfluidics for integrated analysis and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, T; Harding, M J; Harris, R A; Friel, R J; Christie, S D R

    2016-08-16

    The formation of smart Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices featuring integrated sensing optics is currently hindered by convoluted and expensive manufacturing procedures. In this work, a series of 3D-printed LOC devices were designed and manufactured via stereolithography (SL) in a matter of hours. The spectroscopic performance of a variety of optical fibre combinations were tested, and the optimum path length for performing Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy determined. The information gained in these trials was then used in a reaction optimisation for the formation of carvone semicarbazone. The production of high resolution surface channels (100-500 μm) means that these devices were capable of handling a wide range of concentrations (9 μM-38 mM), and are ideally suited to both analyte detection and process optimisation. This ability to tailor the chip design and its integrated features as a direct result of the reaction being assessed, at such a low time and cost penalty greatly increases the user's ability to optimise both their device and reaction. As a result of the information gained in this investigation, we are able to report the first instance of a 3D-printed LOC device with fully integrated, in-line monitoring capabilities via the use of embedded optical fibres capable of performing UV-vis spectroscopy directly inside micro channels.

  2. Wear Analysis of Thermal Spray Coatings on 3D Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.

    2014-01-01

    Even though the application of thermal spray coatings on complex geometries gained a greater interest in the last decade, the effect of different geometrical features on the wear behavior is still ill-defined. In this study, the wear resistance of FTC-FeCSiMn coated 3D surfaces was investigated. The wear test was carried out by means of two innovative testing procedures. The first test is a Pin-on-Tubes test where the rotating motion is realized by a lathe chuck. The specimens in the second test were fixed on the table and a robot arm operated the pin. This wear test was applied on specimens with concave or convex surfaces. The residual stresses, which were determined by means of an incremental hole-drilling method, show a dependency on the substrate geometry. The obtained stresses were put in relation to the different radii. After the wear test, a 3D-profilometer determined the wear volume and the sections of the coatings were characterized by a scanning electron microscope. The results indicate that the wear resistance is strongly influenced by the geometry of the substrate.

  3. 3D motion analysis of keratin filaments in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf; Aach, Til

    2010-03-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for 3D motion estimation of keratin intermediate filaments in vitro. Keratin filaments are elastic cables forming a complex scaffolding within epithelial cells. To understand the mechanisms of filament formation and network organisation under physiological and pathological conditions, quantitative measurements of dynamic network alterations are essential. Therefore we acquired time-lapse series of 3D images using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Based on these image series, we show that a dense vector field can be computed such that the displacements from one frame to the next can be determined. Our method is based on a two-step registration process: First, a rigid pre-registration is applied in order to compensate for possible global cell movement. This step enables the subsequent nonrigid registration to capture only the sought local deformations of the filaments. As the transformation model of the deformable registration algorithm is based on Free Form Deformations, it is well suited for modeling filament network dynamics. The optimization is performed using efficient linear programming techniques such that the huge amount of image data of a time series can be efficiently processed. The evaluation of our results illustrates the potential of our approach.

  4. Metrological analysis of the human foot: 3D multisensor exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Potosi, A.; Meneses Fonseca, J.; León Téllez, J.

    2011-08-01

    In the podiatry field, many of the foot dysfunctions are mainly generated due to: Congenital malformations, accidents or misuse of footwear. For the treatment or prevention of foot disorders, the podiatrist diagnoses prosthesis or specific adapted footwear, according to the real dimension of foot. Therefore, it is necessary to acquire 3D information of foot with 360 degrees of observation. As alternative solution, it was developed and implemented an optical system of threedimensional reconstruction based in the principle of laser triangulation. The system is constituted by an illumination unit that project a laser plane into the foot surface, an acquisition unit with 4 CCD cameras placed around of axial foot axis, an axial moving unit that displaces the illumination and acquisition units in the axial axis direction and a processing and exploration unit. The exploration software allows the extraction of distances on three-dimensional image, taking into account the topography of foot. The optical system was tested and their metrological performances were evaluated in experimental conditions. The optical system was developed to acquire 3D information in order to design and make more appropriate footwear.

  5. Complex Crustal Structure Beneath Western Turkey Revealed by 3D Seismic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubuk-Sabuncu, Yesim; Taymaz, Tuncay; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present a 3D radially anisotropic velocity model of the crust and uppermost mantle structure beneath the Sea of Marmara and surroundings based on the full waveform inversion method. The intense seismic activity and crustal deformation are observed in the Northwest Turkey due to transition tectonics between the strike-slip North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the extensional Aegean region. We have selected and simulated complete waveforms of 62 earthquakes (Mw > 4.0) occurred during 2007-2015, and recorded at (Δ < 10°) distances. Three component earthquake data is obtained from broadband seismic stations of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Center (KOERI, Turkey), Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN, Greece) and Earthquake Research Center of Turkey (AFAD-DAD). The spectral-element solver of the wave equation, SES3D algorithm, is used to simulate seismic wave propagation in 3D spherical coordinates (Fichtner, 2009). The Large Scale Seismic Inversion Framework (LASIF) workflow tool is also used to perform full seismic waveform inversion (Krischer et al., 2015). The initial 3D Earth model is implemented from the multi-scale seismic tomography study of Fichtner et al. (2013). Discrepancies between the observed and simulated synthetic waveforms are determined using the time-frequency misfits which allows a separation between phase and amplitude information (Fichtner et al., 2008). The conjugate gradient optimization method is used to iteratively update the initial Earth model when minimizing the misfit. The inversion is terminated after 19 iterations since no further advances are observed in updated models. Our analysis revealed shear wave velocity variations of the shallow and deeper crustal structure beneath western Turkey down to depths of ~35-40 km. Low shear wave velocity anomalies are observed in the upper and mid crustal depths beneath major fault zones located in the study region. Low velocity zones also tend to mark the outline of young volcanic

  6. Laser direct writing 3D structures for microfluidic channels: flow meter and mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lin, Zheng-Da; Wu, Bo-Long; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Shin, Chow-Shing; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2015-03-01

    The 3D laser direct-writing technology is aimed at the modeling of arbitrary three-dimensional (3D) complex microstructures by scanning a laser-focusing point along predetermined trajectories. Through the perspective technique, the details of designed 3D structures can be properly fabricated in a microchannel. This study introduces a direct reading flow meter and a 3D passive mixer fabricated by laser direct writing for microfluidic applications. The flow meter consists of two rod-shaped springs, a pillar, an anchor, and a wedge-shaped indicator, installed inside a microfluidic channel. The indicator is deflected by the flowing fluid while restrained by the spring to establish an equilibrium indication according to the flow rate. The measurement is readily carried out by optical microscopy observation. The 3D passive Archimedes-screw-shaped mixer is designed to disturb the laminar flow 3D direction for enhancing the mixing efficiency. The simulation results indicate that the screw provides 3D disturbance of streamlines in the microchannel. The mixing demonstration for fluids flowing in the micrchannel approximately agrees with the simulation result. Thanks to the advantage of the laser direct writing technology, this study performs the ingenious applications of 3D structures for microchannels.

  7. 3D Printers Can Provide an Added Dimension for Teaching Structure-Energy Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blauch, David N.; Carroll, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D printer is used to prepare a variety of models representing potential energy as a function of two geometric coordinates. These models facilitate the teaching of structure-energy relationships in molecular conformations and in chemical reactions.

  8. A pair-conformation-dependent scoring function for evaluating 3D RNA-protein complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haotian; Huang, Yangyu

    2017-01-01

    Computational prediction of RNA-protein complex 3D structures includes two basic steps: one is sampling possible structures and another is scoring the sampled structures to pick out the correct one. At present, constructing accurate scoring functions is still not well solved and the performances of the scoring functions usually depend on used benchmarks. Here we propose a pair-conformation-dependent scoring function, 3dRPC-Score, for 3D RNA-protein complex structure prediction by considering the nucleotide-residue pairs having the same energy if their conformations are similar, instead of the distance-only dependence of the most existing scoring functions. Benchmarking shows that 3dRPC-Score has a consistent performance in three test sets. PMID:28358834

  9. A pair-conformation-dependent scoring function for evaluating 3D RNA-protein complex structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Haotian; Huang, Yangyu; Xiao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Computational prediction of RNA-protein complex 3D structures includes two basic steps: one is sampling possible structures and another is scoring the sampled structures to pick out the correct one. At present, constructing accurate scoring functions is still not well solved and the performances of the scoring functions usually depend on used benchmarks. Here we propose a pair-conformation-dependent scoring function, 3dRPC-Score, for 3D RNA-protein complex structure prediction by considering the nucleotide-residue pairs having the same energy if their conformations are similar, instead of the distance-only dependence of the most existing scoring functions. Benchmarking shows that 3dRPC-Score has a consistent performance in three test sets.

  10. A 3D acquisition system combination of structured-light scanning and shape from silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Changku; Tao, Li; Wang, Peng; He, Li

    2006-05-01

    A robust and accurate three dimensional (3D) acquisition system is presented, which is a combination of structured-light scanning and shape from silhouette. Using common world coordinate system, two groups of point data can be integrated into the final complete 3D model without any integration and registration algorithm. The mathematics model of structured-light scanning is described in detail, and the shape from silhouette algorithm is introduced as well. The complete 3D model of a cup with a handle is obtained successfully by the proposed technique. At last the measurement on a ball bearing is performed, with the measurement precision better than 0.15 mm.

  11. Effect of 3d doping on the electronic structure of BaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, John A.; Buling, A.; Green, R.J.; Boyko, T.D.; Skorikov, N.A.; Kurmaev, E.Z.; Neumann, M.; Finkelstein, L.D.; Ni, Ni; Thaler, Alexander; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul; Moewes, A.

    2012-04-25

    The electronic structure of BaFe2As2 doped with Co, Ni and Cu has been studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods, but a clear picture of the dopant 3d states has not yet emerged. Herein we provide experimental evidence of the distribution of Co, Ni and Cu 3d states in the valence band. We conclude that the Co and Ni 3d states provide additional free carriers to the Fermi level, while the Cu 3d states are found at the bottom of the valence band in a localized 3d10 shell. These findings help shed light on why superconductivity can occur in BaFe2As2 doped with Co and Ni but not Cu.

  12. Performance analysis of 3-D shape measurement algorithm with a short baseline projector-camera system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyang; Li, Youfu

    A number of works for 3-D shape measurement based on structured light have been well-studied in the last decades. A common way to model the system is to use the binocular stereovision-like model. In this model, the projector is treated as a camera, thus making a projector-camera-based system unified with a well-established traditional binocular stereovision system. After calibrating the projector and camera, a 3-D shape information is obtained by conventional triangulation. However, in such a stereovision-like system, the short baseline problem exists and limits the measurement accuracy. Hence, in this work, we present a new projecting-imaging model based on fringe projection profilometry (FPP). In this model, we first derive a rigorous mathematical relationship that exists between the height of an object's surface, the phase difference distribution map, and the parameters of the setup. Based on this model, we then study the problem of how the uncertainty of relevant parameters, particularly the baseline's length, affects the 3-D shape measurement accuracy using our proposed model. We provide an extensive uncertainty analysis on the proposed model through partial derivative analysis, relative error analysis, and sensitivity analysis. Moreover, the Monte Carlo simulation experiment is also conducted which shows that the measurement performance of the projector-camera system has a short baseline.

  13. The MHOST finite element program: 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, Shohei

    1989-01-01

    The user options available for running the MHOST finite element analysis package is described. MHOST is a solid and structural analysis program based on the mixed finite element technology, and is specifically designed for 3-D inelastic analysis. A family of 2- and 3-D continuum elements along with beam and shell structural elements can be utilized, many options are available in the constitutive equation library, the solution algorithms and the analysis capabilities. The outline of solution algorithms is discussed along with the data input and output, analysis options including the user subroutines and the definition of the finite elements implemented in the program package.

  14. Deformable registration of 3D vessel structures to a single projection image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikic, Darko; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Alignment of angiographic preoperative 3D scans to intraoperative 2D projections is an important issue for 3D depth perception and navigation during interventions. Currently, in a setting where only one 2D projection is available, methods employing a rigid transformation model present the state of the art for this problem. In this work, we introduce a method capable of deformably registering 3D vessel structures to a respective single projection of the scene. Our approach addresses the inherent ill-posedness of the problem by incorporating a priori knowledge about the vessel structures into the formulation. We minimize the distance between the 2D points and corresponding projected 3D points together with regularization terms encoding the properties of length preservation of vessel structures and smoothness of deformation. We demonstrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed method by quantitative tests on synthetic examples as well as real angiographic scenes.

  15. Analysis of 3d Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, G. A.; Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have carried out an investigation of the Coso Geothermal field utilizing a dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipole array profiling over the east flank of the field. Motivation for this study is that electrical resistivity/conductivity mapping can contribute to better understanding of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and by monitoring changes in the underground resistivity properties in the vicinity of injection due to fracture porosity enhancement. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data was carried out using 2D MT imaging technology to construct a starting 3D resistivity model from a series of 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric field measurements (Zxy impedance elements) along different measurement transects. This model was then refined through a 3D inversion process. The 3D resisitivity model clearly showed the controlling geological structures influencing well production at Coso and shows correlations with mapped surface features such as faults and regional geoelectric strike. We have also correlated the model with an acoustic and shear velocity model of the field to show that the near-vertical high conductivity (low resistivity) structure on the eastern flank of the producing field is also a zone of increase acoustic velocity and increased Vp/Vs ratio.

  16. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  17. 3D high-resolution two-photon crosslinked hydrogel structures for biological studies.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Laura; Urciuolo, Anna; Giulitti, Stefano; Giustina, Gioia Della; Tromayer, Maximilian; Liska, Robert; Elvassore, Nicola; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2017-03-25

    Hydrogels are widely used as matrices for cell growth due to the their tuneable chemical and physical properties, which mimic the extracellular matrix of natural tissue. The microfabrication of hydrogels into arbitrarily complex 3D structures is becoming essential for numerous biological applications, and in particular for investigating the correlation between cell shape and cell function in a 3D environment. Micrometric and sub-micrometric resolution hydrogel scaffolds are required to deeply investigate molecular mechanisms behind cell-matrix interaction and downstream cellular processes. We report the design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking. Hydrated structures of lateral linewidth down to 0.5 µm, lateral and axial resolution down to a few µm are demonstrated. According to the processing parameters, different degrees of polymerization are obtained, resulting in hydrated scaffolds of variable swelling and deformation. The 3D hydrogels are biocompatible and promote cell adhesion and migration. Interestingly, according to the polymerization degree, 3D hydrogel woodpile structures show variable extent of cell adhesion and invasion. Human BJ cell lines show capability of deforming 3D micrometric resolved hydrogel structures.

  18. Observed 3D Structure, Generation, and Dissipation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddies in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Tian, Jiwei; Qiu, Bo; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Ping; Wu, Dexing; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies with horizontal scales of 50–300 km are the most energetic form of flows in the ocean. They are the oceanic analogues of atmospheric storms and are effective transporters of heat, nutrients, dissolved carbon, and other biochemical materials in the ocean. Although oceanic eddies have been ubiquitously observed in the world oceans since 1960s, our understanding of their three-dimensional (3D) structure, generation, and dissipation remains fragmentary due to lack of systematic full water-depth measurements. To bridge this knowledge gap, we designed and conducted a multi-months field campaign, called the South China Sea Mesoscale Eddy Experiment (S-MEE), in the northern South China Sea in 2013/2014. The S-MEE for the first time captured full-depth 3D structures of an anticyclonic and cyclonic eddy pair, which are characterized by a distinct vertical tilt of their axes. By observing the eddy evolution at an upstream versus downstream location and conducting an eddy energy budget analysis, the authors further proposed that generation of submesoscale motions most likely constitutes the dominant dissipation mechanism for the observed eddies.

  19. Observed 3D Structure, Generation, and Dissipation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddies in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Tian, Jiwei; Qiu, Bo; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Ping; Wu, Dexing; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-04-14

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies with horizontal scales of 50-300 km are the most energetic form of flows in the ocean. They are the oceanic analogues of atmospheric storms and are effective transporters of heat, nutrients, dissolved carbon, and other biochemical materials in the ocean. Although oceanic eddies have been ubiquitously observed in the world oceans since 1960s, our understanding of their three-dimensional (3D) structure, generation, and dissipation remains fragmentary due to lack of systematic full water-depth measurements. To bridge this knowledge gap, we designed and conducted a multi-months field campaign, called the South China Sea Mesoscale Eddy Experiment (S-MEE), in the northern South China Sea in 2013/2014. The S-MEE for the first time captured full-depth 3D structures of an anticyclonic and cyclonic eddy pair, which are characterized by a distinct vertical tilt of their axes. By observing the eddy evolution at an upstream versus downstream location and conducting an eddy energy budget analysis, the authors further proposed that generation of submesoscale motions most likely constitutes the dominant dissipation mechanism for the observed eddies.

  20. Observed 3D Structure, Generation, and Dissipation of Oceanic Mesoscale Eddies in the South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Tian, Jiwei; Qiu, Bo; Zhao, Wei; Chang, Ping; Wu, Dexing; Wan, Xiuquan

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies with horizontal scales of 50–300 km are the most energetic form of flows in the ocean. They are the oceanic analogues of atmospheric storms and are effective transporters of heat, nutrients, dissolved carbon, and other biochemical materials in the ocean. Although oceanic eddies have been ubiquitously observed in the world oceans since 1960s, our understanding of their three-dimensional (3D) structure, generation, and dissipation remains fragmentary due to lack of systematic full water-depth measurements. To bridge this knowledge gap, we designed and conducted a multi-months field campaign, called the South China Sea Mesoscale Eddy Experiment (S-MEE), in the northern South China Sea in 2013/2014. The S-MEE for the first time captured full-depth 3D structures of an anticyclonic and cyclonic eddy pair, which are characterized by a distinct vertical tilt of their axes. By observing the eddy evolution at an upstream versus downstream location and conducting an eddy energy budget analysis, the authors further proposed that generation of submesoscale motions most likely constitutes the dominant dissipation mechanism for the observed eddies. PMID:27074710

  1. Structure-based 3D QSAR and design of novel acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Wolfgang; Contreras, Jean-Marie; Parrot, Isabelle; Rival, Yveline M.; Wermuth, Camille G.

    2001-05-01

    The paper describes the construction, validation and application of a structure-based 3D QSAR model of novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. Initial use was made of four X-ray structures of AChE complexed with small, non-specific inhibitors to create a model of the binding of recently developed aminopyridazine derivatives. Combined automated and manual docking methods were applied to dock the co-crystallized inhibitors into the binding pocket. Validation of the modelling process was achieved by comparing the predicted enzyme-bound conformation with the known conformation in the X-ray structure. The successful prediction of the binding conformation of the known inhibitors gave confidence that we could use our model to evaluate the binding conformation of the aminopyridazine compounds. The alignment of 42 aminopyridazine compounds derived by the docking procedure was taken as the basis for a 3D QSAR analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE method. A model of high quality was obtained using the GRID water probe, as confirmed by the cross-validation method (q2 LOO=0.937, q2 L50% O=0.910). The validated model, together with the information obtained from the calculated AChE-inhibitor complexes, were considered for the design of novel compounds. Seven designed inhibitors which were synthesized and tested were shown to be highly active. After performing our modelling study the X-ray structure of AChE complexed with donepezil, an inhibitor structurally related to the developed aminopyirdazines, has been made available. The good agreement found between the predicted binding conformation of the aminopyridazines and the one observed for donepezil in the crystal structure further supports our developed model.

  2. FIJI Macro 3D ART VeSElecT: 3D Automated Reconstruction Tool for Vesicle Structures of Electron Tomograms

    PubMed Central

    Kaltdorf, Kristin Verena; Schulze, Katja; Helmprobst, Frederik; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Stigloher, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Automatic image reconstruction is critical to cope with steadily increasing data from advanced microscopy. We describe here the Fiji macro 3D ART VeSElecT which we developed to study synaptic vesicles in electron tomograms. We apply this tool to quantify vesicle properties (i) in embryonic Danio rerio 4 and 8 days past fertilization (dpf) and (ii) to compare Caenorhabditis elegans N2 neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) wild-type and its septin mutant (unc-59(e261)). We demonstrate development-specific and mutant-specific changes in synaptic vesicle pools in both models. We confirm the functionality of our macro by applying our 3D ART VeSElecT on zebrafish NMJ showing smaller vesicles in 8 dpf embryos then 4 dpf, which was validated by manual reconstruction of the vesicle pool. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of C. elegans septin mutant unc-59(e261) on vesicle pool formation and vesicle size. Automated vesicle registration and characterization was implemented in Fiji as two macros (registration and measurement). This flexible arrangement allows in particular reducing false positives by an optional manual revision step. Preprocessing and contrast enhancement work on image-stacks of 1nm/pixel in x and y direction. Semi-automated cell selection was integrated. 3D ART VeSElecT removes interfering components, detects vesicles by 3D segmentation and calculates vesicle volume and diameter (spherical approximation, inner/outer diameter). Results are collected in color using the RoiManager plugin including the possibility of manual removal of non-matching confounder vesicles. Detailed evaluation considered performance (detected vesicles) and specificity (true vesicles) as well as precision and recall. We furthermore show gain in segmentation and morphological filtering compared to learning based methods and a large time gain compared to manual segmentation. 3D ART VeSElecT shows small error rates and its speed gain can be up to 68 times faster in comparison to manual annotation

  3. On 3-D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components (base program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Bak, M. J.; Nakazawa, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    A 3-D Inelastic Analysis Method program is described. This program consists of a series of new computer codes embodying a progression of mathematical models (mechanics of materials, special finite element, boundary element) for streamlined analysis of: (1) combustor liners, (2) turbine blades, and (3) turbine vanes. These models address the effects of high temperatures and thermal/mechanical loadings on the local (stress/strain)and global (dynamics, buckling) structural behavior of the three selected components. Three computer codes, referred to as MOMM (Mechanics of Materials Model), MHOST (Marc-Hot Section Technology), and BEST (Boundary Element Stress Technology), have been developed and are briefly described in this report.

  4. Three-dimensional inelastic analysis for hot section components, BEST 3D code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Raymond B.; Banerjee, Prasanta K.

    1987-01-01

    The goal is the development of an alternative stress analysis tool, distinct from the finite element method, applicable to the engineering analysis of gas turbine engine structures. The boundary element method was selected for this development effort on the basis of its already demonstrated applicability to a variety of geometries and problem types characteristic of gas turbine engine components. Major features of the BEST3D computer program are described, and some of the significant developments carried out as part of the Inelastic Methods Contract are outlined.

  5. Edge structure preserving 3D image denoising by local surface approximation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peihua; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2012-08-01

    In various applications, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), 3D images are becoming increasingly popular. To improve the reliability of subsequent image analyses, 3D image denoising is often a necessary preprocessing step, which is the focus of the current paper. In the literature, most existing image denoising procedures are for 2D images. Their direct extensions to 3D cases generally cannot handle 3D images efficiently because the structure of a typical 3D image is substantially more complicated than that of a typical 2D image. For instance, edge locations are surfaces in 3D cases which would be much more challenging to handle compared to edge curves in 2D cases. We propose a novel 3D image denoising procedure in this paper, based on local approximation of the edge surfaces using a set of surface templates. An important property of this method is that it can preserve edges and major edge structures (e.g., intersections of two edge surfaces and pointed corners). Numerical studies show that it works well in various applications.

  6. System for the Analysis and Visualization of Large 3D Anatomical Trees

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kun-Chang; Ritman, Erik L.; Higgins, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Modern micro-CT and multi-detector helical CT scanners can produce high-resolution 3D digital images of various anatomical trees. The large size and complexity of these trees make it essentially impossible to define them interactively. Automatic approaches have been proposed for a few specific problems, but none of these approaches guarantee extracting geometrically accurate multi-generational tree structures. This paper proposes an interactive system for defining and visualizing large anatomical trees and for subsequent quantitative data mining. The system consists of a large number of tools for automatic image analysis, semi-automatic and interactive tree editing, and an assortment of visualization tools. Results are presented for a variety of 3D high-resolution images. PMID:17669390

  7. Mechanical performance and parameter sensitivity analysis of 3D braided composites joints.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N.

  8. Mechanical Performance and Parameter Sensitivity Analysis of 3D Braided Composites Joints

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Nan, Bo; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    3D braided composite joints are the important components in CFRP truss, which have significant influence on the reliability and lightweight of structures. To investigate the mechanical performance of 3D braided composite joints, a numerical method based on the microscopic mechanics is put forward, the modeling technologies, including the material constants selection, element type, grid size, and the boundary conditions, are discussed in detail. Secondly, a method for determination of ultimate bearing capacity is established, which can consider the strength failure. Finally, the effect of load parameters, geometric parameters, and process parameters on the ultimate bearing capacity of joints is analyzed by the global sensitivity analysis method. The results show that the main pipe diameter thickness ratio γ, the main pipe diameter D, and the braided angle α are sensitive to the ultimate bearing capacity N. PMID:25121121

  9. When Plans Change: Task Analysis and Taxonomy of 3-D Situation Awareness Challenges of UAV Replanning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    3-D difficulties, we conducted a cognitive task analysis of the replanning problem with the Navy?s VC-6 Squadron recently returned from Iraq . Key 3-D...the Navy’s VC-6 Squadron recently returned from Iraq . Key 3-D spatial challenges involved rationalizing complex combinations of avoiding airspace and...conducted a requirements analysis of the replanning problem with Navy UAV operators recently returned from the war in Iraq , and report our findings

  10. 3D texture analysis of solitary pulmonary nodules using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we have investigated a new approach for texture features extraction using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT image. Traditionally texture analysis is performed in 2D and is suitable for images collected from 2D imaging modality. The use of 3D imaging modalities provide the scope of texture analysis from 3D object and 3D texture feature are more realistic to represent 3D object. In this work, Haralick's texture features are extended in 3D and computed from volumetric data considering 26 neighbors. The optimal texture features to characterize the internal structure of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules (SPN) are selected based on area under curve (AUC) values of ROC curve and p values from 2-tailed Student's t-test. The selected texture feature in 3D to represent SPN can be used in efficient Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) design plays an important role in fast and accurate lung cancer screening. The reduced number of input features to the CAD system will decrease the computational time and classification errors caused by irrelevant features. In the present work, SPN are classified from Ground Glass Nodule (GGN) using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier considering top five 3D texture features and top five 2D texture features separately. The classification is performed on 92 SPN and 25 GGN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database and classification accuracy using 3D texture features and 2D texture features provide 97.17% and 89.1% respectively.

  11. 2D and 3D reconstruction and geomechanical characterization of kilometre-scale complex folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Bistacchi, Andrea; Iudica, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    points based on their normal vector orientations to identify and map bedding and fractures. Combined stereographic analysis of bedding orientations and use of filters allowed the quantification of fold hinge and limb geometries and their 3D reconstruction in GOCAD. Fracture patterns derived from points clouds and field data allowed identifying different geomechanical domains associated to the folded structure. Our results encourage the integrated analysis of high-resolution point clouds and detailed structural and geomechanical field data as inputs to the 3D geometrical reconstruction and modelling of folded rock masses. Validation of virtual outcrop reconstructions through a comparison with field structural measurements suggests that very precise geometrical constraints can be obtained by TLS on geological bodies with complex geometrical features. However, additional constraints on TLS survey layout design are required to optimise the reconstruction and distinction of specific structural elements associated to folding as bedding and fold-related fracture systems.

  12. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    PubMed Central

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUSstart) and after (3D-iCEUSend) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUSstart and 3D-iCEUSend data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  13. Structure of Pseudoknot PK26 Shows 3D Domain Swapping in an RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lietzke, Susan E; Barnes, Cindy L.

    1998-01-01

    3D domain swapping provides a facile pathway for the evolution of oligomeric proteins and allosteric mechanisms and a means for using monomer-oligomer equilibria to regulate biological activity. The term "3D domain swapping" describes the exchange of identical domains between two protein monomers to create an oligomer. 3D domain swapping has, so far, only been recognized in proteins. In this study, the structure of the pseudoknot PK26 is reported and it is a clear example of 3D domain swapping in RNA. PK26 was chosen for study because RNA pseudoknots are required structures in several biological processes and they arise frequently in in vitro selection experiments directed against protein targets. PK26 specifically inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with nanomolar affinity. We have now determined the 3.1 A resolution crystal structure of PK26 and find that it forms a 3D domain swapped dimer. PK26 shows extensive base pairing between and within strands. Formation of the dimer requires the linker region between the pseudoknot folds to adopt a unique conformation that allows a base within a helical stem to skip one base in the stacking register. Rearrangement of the linker would permit a monomeric pseudoknot to form. This structure shows how RNA can use 3D domain swapping to build large scale oligomers like the putative hexamer in the packaging RNA of bacteriophage Phi29.

  14. Curvilinear Immersed Boundary Method for Simulating Fluid Structure Interaction with Complex 3D Rigid Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-01-01

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782–1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions unconditionally unstable iteration schemes result even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong-coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken’s acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the

  15. A Method for 3D Histopathology Reconstruction Supporting Mouse Microvasculature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Arpino, John-Michael; Yin, Hao; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-01-01

    Structural abnormalities of the microvasculature can impair perfusion and function. Conventional histology provides good spatial resolution with which to evaluate the microvascular structure but affords no 3-dimensional information; this limitation could lead to misinterpretations of the complex microvessel network in health and disease. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate an accurate, fully automated 3D histology reconstruction method to visualize the arterioles and venules within the mouse hind-limb. Sections of the tibialis anterior muscle from C57BL/J6 mice (both normal and subjected to femoral artery excision) were reconstructed using pairwise rigid and affine registrations of 5 µm-thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections digitized at 0.25 µm/pixel. Low-resolution intensity-based rigid registration was used to initialize the nucleus landmark-based registration, and conventional high-resolution intensity-based registration method. The affine nucleus landmark-based registration was developed in this work and was compared to the conventional affine high-resolution intensity-based registration method. Target registration errors were measured between adjacent tissue sections (pairwise error), as well as with respect to a 3D reference reconstruction (accumulated error, to capture propagation of error through the stack of sections). Accumulated error measures were lower (p<0.01) for the nucleus landmark technique and superior vasculature continuity was observed. These findings indicate that registration based on automatic extraction and correspondence of small, homologous landmarks may support accurate 3D histology reconstruction. This technique avoids the otherwise problematic “banana-into-cylinder” effect observed using conventional methods that optimize the pairwise alignment of salient structures, forcing them to be section-orthogonal. This approach will provide a valuable tool for high-accuracy 3D histology tissue reconstructions for

  16. Mesh Convolutional Restricted Boltzmann Machines for Unsupervised Learning of Features With Structure Preservation on 3-D Meshes.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhizhong; Liu, Zhenbao; Han, Junwei; Vong, Chi-Man; Bu, Shuhui; Chen, Chun Long Philip

    2016-06-30

    Discriminative features of 3-D meshes are significant to many 3-D shape analysis tasks. However, handcrafted descriptors and traditional unsupervised 3-D feature learning methods suffer from several significant weaknesses: 1) the extensive human intervention is involved; 2) the local and global structure information of 3-D meshes cannot be preserved, which is in fact an important source of discriminability; 3) the irregular vertex topology and arbitrary resolution of 3-D meshes do not allow the direct application of the popular deep learning models; 4) the orientation is ambiguous on the mesh surface; and 5) the effect of rigid and nonrigid transformations on 3-D meshes cannot be eliminated. As a remedy, we propose a deep learning model with a novel irregular model structure, called mesh convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (MCRBMs). MCRBM aims to simultaneously learn structure-preserving local and global features from a novel raw representation, local function energy distribution. In addition, multiple MCRBMs can be stacked into a deeper model, called mesh convolutional deep belief networks (MCDBNs). MCDBN employs a novel local structure preserving convolution (LSPC) strategy to convolve the geometry and the local structure learned by the lower MCRBM to the upper MCRBM. LSPC facilitates resolving the challenging issue of the orientation ambiguity on the mesh surface in MCDBN. Experiments using the proposed MCRBM and MCDBN were conducted on three common aspects: global shape retrieval, partial shape retrieval, and shape correspondence. Results show that the features learned by the proposed methods outperform the other state-of-the-art 3-D shape features.

  17. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated.

  18. 3D and 4D atlas system of living human body structure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Takatsu, A; Hattori, A; Ezumi, T; Oda, S; Yanai, T; Tominaga, H

    1998-01-01

    A reference system for accessing anatomical information from a complete 3D structure of the whole body "living human", including 4D cardiac dynamics, was reconstructed with 3D and 4D data sets obtained from normal volunteers. With this system, we were able to produce a human atlas in which sectional images can be accessed from any part of the human body interactively by real-time image generation.

  19. Cryogenic optical localization provides 3D protein structure data with Angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Boening, Daniel; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-02-01

    We introduce Cryogenic Optical Localization in 3D (COLD), a method to localize multiple fluorescent sites within a single small protein with Angstrom resolution. We demonstrate COLD by determining the conformational state of the cytosolic Per-ARNT-Sim domain from the histidine kinase CitA of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and resolving the four biotin sites of streptavidin. COLD provides quantitative 3D information about small- to medium-sized biomolecules on the Angstrom scale and complements other techniques in structural biology.

  20. Linear-time protein 3-D structure searching with insertions and deletions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two biomolecular 3-D structures are said to be similar if the RMSD (root mean square deviation) between the two molecules' sequences of 3-D coordinates is less than or equal to some given constant bound. Tools for searching for similar structures in biomolecular 3-D structure databases are becoming increasingly important in the structural biology of the post-genomic era. Results We consider an important, fundamental problem of reporting all substructures in a 3-D structure database of chain molecules (such as proteins) which are similar to a given query 3-D structure, with consideration of indels (i.e., insertions and deletions). This problem has been believed to be very difficult but its exact computational complexity has not been known. In this paper, we first prove that the problem in unbounded dimensions is NP-hard. We then propose a new algorithm that dramatically improves the average-case time complexity of the problem in 3-D in case the number of indels k is bounded by a constant. Our algorithm solves the above problem for a query of size m and a database of size N in average-case O(N) time, whereas the time complexity of the previously best algorithm was O(Nmk+1). Conclusions Our results show that although the problem of searching for similar structures in a database based on the RMSD measure with indels is NP-hard in the case of unbounded dimensions, it can be solved in 3-D by a simple average-case linear time algorithm when the number of indels is bounded by a constant. PMID:20047663

  1. Tailored complex 3D vortex lattice structures by perturbed multiples of three-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Joseph, Joby

    2012-04-20

    As three-plane waves are the minimum number required for the formation of vortex-embedded lattice structures by plane wave interference, we present our experimental investigation on the formation of complex 3D photonic vortex lattice structures by a designed superposition of multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves. The unfolding of the generated complex photonic lattice structures with higher order helical phase is realized by perturbing the superposition of a relatively phase-encoded, axially equidistant multiple of three noncoplanar plane waves. Through a programmable spatial light modulator assisted single step fabrication approach, the unfolded 3D vortex lattice structures are experimentally realized, well matched to our computer simulations. The formation of higher order intertwined helices embedded in these 3D spiraling vortex lattice structures by the superposition of the multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves interference is also studied.

  2. Building Proteins in a Day: Efficient 3D Molecular Structure Estimation with Electron Cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Punjani, Ali; Brubaker, Marcus A; Fleet, David J

    2017-04-01

    Discovering the 3D atomic-resolution structure of molecules such as proteins and viruses is one of the foremost research problems in biology and medicine. Electron Cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) is a promising vision-based technique for structure estimation which attempts to reconstruct 3D atomic structures from a large set of 2D transmission electron microscope images. This paper presents a new Bayesian framework for cryo-EM structure estimation that builds on modern stochastic optimization techniques to allow one to scale to very large datasets. We also introduce a novel Monte-Carlo technique that reduces the cost of evaluating the objective function during optimization by over five orders of magnitude. The net result is an approach capable of estimating 3D molecular structure from large-scale datasets in about a day on a single CPU workstation.

  3. Microstructure analysis of the secondary pulmonary lobules by 3D synchrotron radiation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Umetani, K.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Moriyama, N.; Itoh, H.

    2014-03-01

    Recognition of abnormalities related to the lobular anatomy has become increasingly important in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of lung abnormalities at clinical routines of CT examinations. This paper aims a 3-D microstructural analysis of the pulmonary acinus with isotropic spatial resolution in the range of several micrometers by using micro CT. Previously, we demonstrated the ability of synchrotron radiation micro CT (SRμCT) using offset scan mode in microstructural analysis of the whole part of the secondary pulmonary lobule. In this paper, we present a semiautomatic method to segment the acinar and subacinar airspaces from the secondary pulmonary lobule and to track small vessels running inside alveolar walls in human acinus imaged by the SRμCT. The method beains with and segmentation of the tissues such as pleural surface, interlobular septa, alveola wall, or vessel using a threshold technique and 3-D connected component analysis. 3-D air space are then conustructed separated by tissues and represented branching patterns of airways and airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole. A graph-partitioning approach isolated acini whose stems are interactively defined as the terminal bronchiole in the secondary pulmonary lobule. Finally, we performed vessel tracking using a non-linear sate space which captures both smoothness of the trajectories and intensity coherence along vessel orientations. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can extract several acinar airspaces from the 3-D SRμCT image of secondary pulmonary lobule and that the extracted acinar airspace enable an accurate quantitative description of the anatomy of the human acinus for interpretation of the basic unit of pulmonary structure and function.

  4. Three-axis distributed fiber optic strain measurement in 3D woven composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading.

  5. Three-Axis Distributed Fiber Optic Strain Measurement in 3D Woven Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellucci, Matt; Klute, Sandra; Lally, Evan M.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Lowry, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in composite materials technologies have broken further from traditional designs and require advanced instrumentation and analysis capabilities. Success or failure is highly dependent on design analysis and manufacturing processes. By monitoring smart structures throughout manufacturing and service life, residual and operational stresses can be assessed and structural integrity maintained. Composite smart structures can be manufactured by integrating fiber optic sensors into existing composite materials processes such as ply layup, filament winding and three-dimensional weaving. In this work optical fiber was integrated into 3D woven composite parts at a commercial woven products manufacturing facility. The fiber was then used to monitor the structures during a VARTM manufacturing process, and subsequent static and dynamic testing. Low cost telecommunications-grade optical fiber acts as the sensor using a high resolution commercial Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR) system providing distributed strain measurement at spatial resolutions as low as 2mm. Strain measurements using the optical fiber sensors are correlated to resistive strain gage measurements during static structural loading. Keywords: fiber optic, distributed strain sensing, Rayleigh scatter, optical frequency domain reflectometry

  6. Single cell detection using 3D magnetic rolled-up structures.

    PubMed

    Ger, Tzong-Rong; Huang, Hao-Ting; Huang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Mei-Feng

    2013-11-07

    A 3D rolled-up structure made of a SiO2 layer and a fishbone-like magnetic thin film was proposed here as a biosensor. The magnetoresistance (MR) measurement results of the sensor suggest that the presence of the stray field, which is induced by the magnetic nanoparticles, significantly increased the switching field. Comparing the performance of the 2D sensor and 3D sensor designed in this study, the response in switching field variation was 12.14% in the 2D sensor and 62.55% in the 3D sensor. The response in MR ratio variation was 4.55% in the 2D sensor and 82.32% in the 3D sensor. In addition, the design of the 3D sensor structure also helped to attract and trap a single magnetic cell due to its stronger stray field compared with the 2D structure. The 3D magnetic biosensor designed here can provide important information for future biochip research and applications.

  7. Stereomicroscopic 3D-pattern profiling of murine and human intestinal inflammation reveals unique structural phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Palacios, Alex; Kodani, Tomohiro; Kaydo, Lindsey; Pietropaoli, Davide; Corridoni, Daniele; Howell, Scott; Katz, Jeffry; Xin, Wei; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Cominelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Histology is fundamental to assess two-dimensional intestinal inflammation; however, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are often indistinguishable microscopically on the basis of mucosal biopsies. Here, we use stereomicroscopy (SM) to rapidly profile the entire intestinal topography and assess inflammation. We examine the mucosal surface of >700 mice (encompassing >16 strains and various IBD-models), create a profiling catalogue of 3D-stereomicroscopic abnormalities and demonstrate that mice with comparable histological scores display unique sub-clusters of 3D-structure-patterns of IBD pathology, which we call 3D-stereoenterotypes, and which are otherwise indiscernible histologically. We show that two ileal IBD-stereoenterotypes (‘cobblestones' versus ‘villous mini-aggregation') cluster separately within two distinct mouse lines of spontaneous ileitis, suggesting that host genetics drive unique and divergent inflammatory 3D-structural patterns in the gut. In humans, stereomicroscopy reveals ‘liquefaction' lesions and hierarchical fistulous complexes, enriched with clostridia/segmented filamentous bacteria, running under healthy mucosa in Crohn's disease. We suggest that stereomicroscopic (3D-SMAPgut) profiling can be easily implemented and enable the comprehensive study of inflammatory 3D structures, genetics and flora in IBD. PMID:26154811

  8. Efficient global wave propagation adapted to 3-D structural complexity: a pseudospectral/spectral-element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Kuangdai; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; van Driel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridian equations, which is then solved by a 2-D spectral element method (SEM). Computational efficiency of such a hybrid method stems from lateral smoothness of 3-D Earth models and axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period ranging from 34 s down to 11 s. It turns out that our method has run up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM, featured by a computational advantage expanding with seismic frequency.

  9. Gene3D: structural assignments for the biologist and bioinformaticist alike

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Daniel W. A.; Rison, Stuart C. G.; Bray, James E.; Lee, David; Pearl, Frances; Thornton, Janet M.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2003-01-01

    The Gene3D database (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath_new/Gene3D/) provides structural assignments for genes within complete genomes. These are available via the internet from either the World Wide Web or FTP. Assignments are made using PSI-BLAST and subsequently processed using the DRange protocol. The DRange protocol is an empirically benchmarked method for assessing the validity of structural assignments made using sequence searching methods where appropriate assignment statistics are collected and made available. Gene3D links assignments to their appropriate entries in relevent structural and classification resources (PDBsum, CATH database and the Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies). Release 2.0 of Gene3D includes 62 genomes, 2 eukaryotes, 10 archaea and 40 bacteria. Currently, structural assignments can be made for between 30 and 40 percent of any given genome. In any genome, around half of those genes assigned a structural domain are assigned a single domain and the other half of the genes are assigned multiple structural domains. Gene3D is linked to the CATH database and is updated with each new update of CATH. PMID:12520054

  10. 3D integration of microcomponents in a single glass chip by femtosecond laser direct writing for biochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Hanada, Yasutaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-05-01

    3D integration of microcomponents in a single glass chip by femtosecond laser direct writing followed by post annealing and successive wet etching is described for application to biochemical analysis. Integration of microfluidics and microoptics realized some functional microdevices like a μ-fluidic dye laser and a biosensor. As one of practical applications, we demonstrate inspection of living microorganisms using the microchip with 3D microfluidic structures fabricated by the present technique.

  11. RETRAN-3D MOD003 Peach Bottom Turbine Trip 2 Multidimensional Kinetics Analysis Models and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Michitsugu; Ogura, Katsunori; Gose, Garry C.; Wu, J.-Y

    2003-04-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 (PB2/TT2) has been performed using RETRAN-3D MOD003. The purpose of the analysis was to investigate the PB2/TT2 overpressurization transient using the RETRAN-3D multidimensional kinetics model.

  12. Real time 3D structural and Doppler OCT imaging on graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Gorczyńska, Iwona; Bukowska, Danuta; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Targowski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    In this report the application of graphics processing unit (GPU) programming for real-time 3D Fourier domain Optical Coherence Tomography (FdOCT) imaging with implementation of Doppler algorithms for visualization of the flows in capillary vessels is presented. Generally, the time of the data processing of the FdOCT data on the main processor of the computer (CPU) constitute a main limitation for real-time imaging. Employing additional algorithms, such as Doppler OCT analysis, makes this processing even more time consuming. Lately developed GPUs, which offers a very high computational power, give a solution to this problem. Taking advantages of them for massively parallel data processing, allow for real-time imaging in FdOCT. The presented software for structural and Doppler OCT allow for the whole processing with visualization of 2D data consisting of 2000 A-scans generated from 2048 pixels spectra with frame rate about 120 fps. The 3D imaging in the same mode of the volume data build of 220 × 100 A-scans is performed at a rate of about 8 frames per second. In this paper a software architecture, organization of the threads and optimization applied is shown. For illustration the screen shots recorded during real time imaging of the phantom (homogeneous water solution of Intralipid in glass capillary) and the human eye in-vivo is presented.

  13. Analysis of wave propagation in periodic 3D waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Christoph; Bischoff, Stefan; Gaul, Lothar

    2013-11-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a growing research field in the realm of civil engineering. SHM concepts are implemented using integrated sensors and actuators to evaluate the state of a structure. Within this work, wave-based techniques are addressed. Dispersion effects for propagating waves in waveguides of different materials are analyzed for various different cross-sections. Since analytical theory is limited, a general approach based on the Waveguide Finite Element Method is applied. Numerical results are verified experimentally.

  14. 3D building reconstruction from ALS data using unambiguous decomposition into elementary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarząbek-Rychard, M.; Borkowski, A.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the paper is to develop an automated method that enables for the recognition and semantic interpretation of topological building structures. The novelty of the proposed modeling approach is an unambiguous decomposition of complex objects into predefined simple parametric structures, resulting in the reconstruction of one topological unit without independent overlapping elements. The aim of a data processing chain is to generate complete polyhedral models at LOD2 with an explicit topological structure and semantic information. The algorithms are performed on 3D point clouds acquired by airborne laser scanning. The presented methodology combines data-based information reflected in an attributed roof topology graph with common knowledge about buildings stored in a library of elementary structures. In order to achieve an appropriate balance between reconstruction precision and visualization aspects, the implemented library contains a set of structure-depended soft modeling rules instead of strictly defined geometric primitives. The proposed modeling algorithm starts with roof plane extraction performed by the segmentation of building point clouds, followed by topology identification and recognition of predefined structures. We evaluate the performance of the novel procedure by the analysis of the modeling accuracy and the degree of modeling detail. The assessment according to the validation methods standardized by the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing shows that the completeness of the algorithm is above 80%, whereas the correctness exceeds 98%.

  15. ProFunc: a server for predicting protein function from 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Watson, James D; Thornton, Janet M

    2005-07-01

    ProFunc (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/ProFunc) is a web server for predicting the likely function of proteins whose 3D structure is known but whose function is not. Users submit the coordinates of their structure to the server in PDB format. ProFunc makes use of both existing and novel methods to analyse the protein's sequence and structure identifying functional motifs or close relationships to functionally characterized proteins. A summary of the analyses provides an at-a-glance view of what each of the different methods has found. More detailed results are available on separate pages. Often where one method has failed to find anything useful another may be more forthcoming. The server is likely to be of most use in structural genomics where a large proportion of the proteins whose structures are solved are of hypothetical proteins of unknown function. However, it may also find use in a comparative analysis of members of large protein families. It provides a convenient compendium of sequence and structural information that often hold vital functional clues to be followed up experimentally.

  16. 3D-printing and mechanics of bio-inspired articulated and multi-material structures.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Ravikumar, Nakul; Barthelat, Francois; Martini, Roberto

    2016-12-21

    3D-printing technologies allow researchers to build simplified physical models of complex biological systems to more easily investigate their mechanics. In recent years, a number of 3D-printed structures inspired by the dermal armors of various fishes have been developed to study their multiple mechanical functionalities, including flexible protection, improved hydrodynamics, body support, or tail prehensility. Natural fish armors are generally classified according to their shape, material and structural properties as elasmoid scales, ganoid scales, placoid scales, carapace scutes, or bony plates. Each type of dermal armor forms distinct articulation patterns that facilitate different functional advantages. In this paper, we highlight recent studies that developed 3D-printed structures not only to inform the design and application of some articulated and multi-material structures, but also to explain the mechanics of the natural biological systems they mimic.

  17. Lithographically-generated 3D lamella layers and their structural color.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang; Lu, Bingrui; Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Xu, Chen

    2016-04-28

    Inspired by the structural color from the multilayer nanophotonic structures in Morpho butterfly wing scales, 3D lamellae layers in dielectric polymers (polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA) with n ∼ 1.5 were designed and fabricated by standard top-down electron beam lithography with one-step exposure followed by an alternating development/dissolution process of PMMA/LOR (lift-off resist) multilayers. This work offers direct proof of the structural blue/green color via lithographically-replicated PMMA/air multilayers, analogous to those in real Morpho butterfly wings. The success of nanolithography in this work for the 3D lamellae structures in dielectric polymers not only enables us to gain deeper insight into the mysterious blue color of the Morpho butterfly wings, but also breaks through the bottleneck in technical development toward broad applications in gas/liquid sensors, 3D meta-materials, coloring media, and infrared imaging devices, etc.

  18. Lithographically-generated 3D lamella layers and their structural color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sichao; Chen, Yifang; Lu, Bingrui; Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Xu, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the structural color from the multilayer nanophotonic structures in Morpho butterfly wing scales, 3D lamellae layers in dielectric polymers (polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA) with n ~ 1.5 were designed and fabricated by standard top-down electron beam lithography with one-step exposure followed by an alternating development/dissolution process of PMMA/LOR (lift-off resist) multilayers. This work offers direct proof of the structural blue/green color via lithographically-replicated PMMA/air multilayers, analogous to those in real Morpho butterfly wings. The success of nanolithography in this work for the 3D lamellae structures in dielectric polymers not only enables us to gain deeper insight into the mysterious blue color of the Morpho butterfly wings, but also breaks through the bottleneck in technical development toward broad applications in gas/liquid sensors, 3D meta-materials, coloring media, and infrared imaging devices, etc.

  19. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  20. System for conveyor belt part picking using structured light and 3D pose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielemann, J.; Skotheim, Ø.; Nygaard, J. O.; Vollset, T.

    2009-01-01

    Automatic picking of parts is an important challenge to solve within factory automation, because it can remove tedious manual work and save labor costs. One such application involves parts that arrive with random position and orientation on a conveyor belt. The parts should be picked off the conveyor belt and placed systematically into bins. We describe a system that consists of a structured light instrument for capturing 3D data and robust methods for aligning an input 3D template with a 3D image of the scene. The method uses general and robust pre-processing steps based on geometric primitives that allow the well-known Iterative Closest Point algorithm to converge quickly and robustly to the correct solution. The method has been demonstrated for localization of car parts with random position and orientation. We believe that the method is applicable for a wide range of industrial automation problems where precise localization of 3D objects in a scene is needed.

  1. 3D printing of weft knitted textile based structures by selective laser sintering of nylon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecroft, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing whereby the building up of layers of material creates objects. The selective laser sintering process (SLS) uses a laser beam to sinter powdered material to create objects. This paper builds upon previous research into 3D printed textile based material exploring the use of SLS using nylon powder to create flexible weft knitted structures. The results show the potential to print flexible textile based structures that exhibit the properties of traditional knitted textile structures along with the mechanical properties of the material used, whilst describing the challenges regarding fineness of printing resolution. The conclusion highlights the potential future development and application of such pieces.

  2. Definition of subsurface stratigraphy, structure and rock properties from 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Bruce S.

    1999-10-01

    This paper summarizes how three-dimensional (3-D) seismic technology is being used, primarily in the petroleum industry, to define subsurface structure, stratigraphy and rock properties. A 3-D seismic data volume: (a) provides a more accurate image of the subsurface than can be obtained with 2-D seismic methods; (b) is continuous, and so has a much greater spatial sampling than is obtained with 2-D seismic or other subsurface data (e.g., wells); and (c) can be viewed and interpreted interactively from a variety of perspectives, thus enhancing the interpreter's ability to generate an accurate description of subsurface features of interest. Seismic interpretation was once the almost exclusive realm of geophysicists, however, most 3-D seismic interpretation today is conducted by multidisciplinary teams that integrate geophysical, geological, petrophysical and engineering data and concepts into the 3-D seismic interpretation. These factors, plus proper survey design, help to increase the chances of success of a 3-D seismic interpretation project. Although there are cases where the technology is not appropriate or cannot be applied (for economic reasons or otherwise), the general success of 3-D seismic has led it to become a mainstay of the petroleum industry. The approach and technology, first developed in that industry, have potential applications in other applied and fundamental earth science disciplines, including mining, environmental geology, structural geology and stratigraphy.

  3. Internal Structure of Periglacial Landforms: Assessment using 3D Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Adrian; Kneisel, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of internal heterogeneities within periglacial landforms (e.g. frost table topography or varying ice content) is in most cases not inferable from the surface. Hence, to develop an enhanced understanding of the interaction between surface and subsurface processes, it is necessary to analyse the internal structure of different periglacial landforms and landform elements. The assessment of the internal structure is provided by the application of three-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI). ERI is the technique of merging datum points from several parallel and perpendicular performed two-dimensional ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography) measurements and inverting the data set with a 3D inversion algorithm (sometimes also referred to as quasi-3D ERT). The application of this method has proven to be a valuable tool for mapping the spatial extent of isolated permafrost bodies and associated subsurface conditions. In this contribution, we present results from four ERI measurements, carried out in summer 2014 at different investigation sites in the Swiss Alps: Three measurements were performed on pebbly rockglaciers of different size and topographical position and one measurement was performed on a solifluction slope. Each of the 3D survey grids consists of 17 to 32 single 2D ERT surveys (Dipol-Dipol or Wenner-Schlumberger array) and covers an area of between 6000 m² and 7000 m², depending on the specific survey grid set-up. The inversions of the data sets were performed using the two different inversion algorithms of the software products "RES3DINV" and "BERT" (Boundless Electrical Resistivity Tomography) for a comparative analysis and to further support the geomorphological interpretation of the geophysical models. Each of the resulting resistivity models shows strong small-scale spatial heterogeneities between the investigated landforms but also within landform elements. For the investigated rockglacier sites, these structures include

  4. Low-resolution characterization of the 3D structure of the Euglena gracilis photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Coltelli, Primo; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2008-10-24

    This paper deals with the first characterization of the structure of the photoreceptive organelle of the unicellular alga Euglena gracilis (Euglenophyta). This organelle has a three-dimensional organization consisting of up to 50 closely stacked membrane lamellae. Ionically induced unstacking of the photoreceptor lamellae revealed ordered arrays well suited to structural analysis by electron microscopy and image analysis, which ultimately yielded a low-resolution picture of the structure. Each lamella is formed by the photoreceptive membrane protein of the cell assembled within the membrane layer in a hexagonal lattice. The first order diffraction spots in the calculated Fourier transform reveals the presence of 6-fold symmetrized topography (better resolution about 90A). The 2D and 3D structural data are very similar with those recently published on proteorodopsin, a membrane protein used by marine bacterio-plankton as light-driven proton pump. In our opinion these similarity indicate that a photoreceptive protein belonging to the same superfamily of proteorodopsin could form the Euglena photoreceptor.

  5. Low-resolution characterization of the 3D structure of the Euglena gracilis photoreceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Barsanti, Laura; Coltelli, Primo; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2008-10-24

    This paper deals with the first characterization of the structure of the photoreceptive organelle of the unicellular alga Euglena gracilis (Euglenophyta). This organelle has a three-dimensional organization consisting of up to 50 closely stacked membrane lamellae. Ionically induced unstacking of the photoreceptor lamellae revealed ordered arrays well suited to structural analysis by electron microscopy and image analysis, which ultimately yielded a low-resolution picture of the structure. Each lamella is formed by the photoreceptive membrane protein of the cell assembled within the membrane layer in a hexagonal lattice. The first order diffraction spots in the calculated Fourier transform reveals the presence of 6-fold symmetrized topography (better resolution about 90 A). The 2D and 3D structural data are very similar with those recently published on proteorodopsin, a membrane protein used by marine bacterio-plankton as light-driven proton pump. In our opinion these similarity indicate that a photoreceptive protein belonging to the same superfamily of proteorodopsin could form the Euglena photoreceptor.

  6. A study of the effects of degraded imagery on tactical 3D model generation using structure-from-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolick, Leslie; Harguess, Josh

    2016-05-01

    An emerging technology in the realm of airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems is structure-from-motion (SfM), which enables the creation of three-dimensional (3D) point clouds and 3D models from two-dimensional (2D) imagery. There are several existing tools, such as VisualSFM and open source project OpenSfM, to assist in this process, however, it is well-known that pristine imagery is usually required to create meaningful 3D data from the imagery. In military applications, such as the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for surveillance operations, imagery is rarely pristine. Therefore, we present an analysis of structure-from-motion packages on imagery that has been degraded in a controlled manner.

  7. Characterisation of the surface structure of 3D printed scaffolds for cell infiltration and surgical suturing.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cantu, Laura; Gleadall, Andrew; Faris, Callum; Segal, Joel; Shakesheff, Kevin; Yang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    3D printing is of great interest for tissue engineering scaffolds due to the ability to form complex geometries and control internal structures, including porosity and pore size. The porous structure of scaffolds plays an important role in cell ingrowth and nutrition infusion. Although the internal porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds have been frequently studied, the surface porosity and pore size, which are critical for cell infiltration and mass transport, have not been investigated. The surface geometry can differ considerably from the internal scaffold structure depending on the 3D printing process. It is vital to be able to control the surface geometry of scaffolds as well as the internal structure to fabricate optimal architectures. This work presents a method to control the surface porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds. Six scaffold designs have been printed with surface porosities ranging from 3% to 21%. We have characterised the overall scaffold porosity and surface porosity using optical microscopy and microCT. It has been found that surface porosity has a significant impact on cell infiltration and proliferation. In addition, the porosity of the surface has been found to have an effect on mechanical properties and on the forces required to penetrate the scaffold with a surgical suturing needle. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the surface geometry of extrusion-based 3D printed scaffolds and demonstrates the importance of surface geometry in cell infiltration and clinical manipulation.

  8. Novel scanning electron microscopy methods for analyzing the 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Koga, Daisuke; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The structure of the Golgi apparatus has been extensively examined by light and electron microscopy, but details of its three-dimensional (3D) structure have remained unclear because of the technical limitations of conventional microscopy techniques. To overcome this problem, we have developed several novel scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods for observing the 3D structure of subcellular organelles including the Golgi apparatus: (1) an osmium maceration method that facilitates SEM observation of membranous organelles, including the Golgi apparatus, by selectively removing soluble cytoplasmic proteins, (2) an osmium impregnation/maceration method that combines an osmium impregnation method with the osmium maceration method to determine the polarity of the Golgi apparatus by SEM, (3) a correlative light and SEM method that combines a cryosectioning technique with the osmium maceration method to enable correlation of the immunocytochemical distribution of molecules with the 3D ultrastructure of the Golgi apparatus, and (4) array tomography based on the systematic collection and integration of SEM images of serial ultrathin sections on glass slides for revealing the 3D ultrastructure of the entire Golgi apparatus. Together, the novel SEM techniques listed above can reveal the complete 3D structure of the Golgi apparatus in different cell types.

  9. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  10. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  11. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-04-28

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand-strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases.

  12. Partial order optimum likelihood (POOL): maximum likelihood prediction of protein active site residues using 3D Structure and sequence properties.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenxu; Wei, Ying; Murga, Leonel F; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Williams, Ronald J

    2009-01-01

    A new monotonicity-constrained maximum likelihood approach, called Partial Order Optimum Likelihood (POOL), is presented and applied to the problem of functional site prediction in protein 3D structures, an important current challenge in genomics. The input consists of electrostatic and geometric properties derived from the 3D structure of the query protein alone. Sequence-based conservation information, where available, may also be incorporated. Electrostatics features from THEMATICS are combined with multidimensional isotonic regression to form maximum likelihood estimates of probabilities that specific residues belong to an active site. This allows likelihood ranking of all ionizable residues in a given protein based on THEMATICS features. The corresponding ROC curves and statistical significance tests demonstrate that this method outperforms prior THEMATICS-based methods, which in turn have been shown previously to outperform other 3D-structure-based methods for identifying active site residues. Then it is shown that the addition of one simple geometric property, the size rank of the cleft in which a given residue is contained, yields improved performance. Extension of the method to include predictions of non-ionizable residues is achieved through the introduction of environment variables. This extension results in even better performance than THEMATICS alone and constitutes to date the best functional site predictor based on 3D structure only, achieving nearly the same level of performance as methods that use both 3D structure and sequence alignment data. Finally, the method also easily incorporates such sequence alignment data, and when this information is included, the resulting method is shown to outperform the best current methods using any combination of sequence alignments and 3D structures. Included is an analysis demonstrating that when THEMATICS features, cleft size rank, and alignment-based conservation scores are used individually or in combination

  13. i3Drefine software for protein 3D structure refinement and its assessment in CASP10.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8(th) CASP experiment. During the 9(th) and recently concluded 10(th) CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as 'MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT') was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/.

  14. Vibration Analysis using 3D Image Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Splitthof, K.

    2010-06-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  15. 3D topography of biologic tissue by multiview imaging and structured light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    Obtaining three-dimensional (3D) information of biologic tissue is important in many medical applications. This paper presents two methods for reconstructing 3D topography of biologic tissue: multiview imaging and structured light illumination. For each method, the working principle is introduced, followed by experimental validation on a diabetic foot model. To compare the performance characteristics of these two imaging methods, a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) is used as a standard control. The wound surface topography of the diabetic foot model is measured by multiview imaging and structured light illumination methods respectively and compared with the CMM measurements. The comparison results show that the structured light illumination method is a promising technique for 3D topographic imaging of biologic tissue.

  16. Structure-From-Motion in 3D Space Using 2D Lidars

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-Geol; Bok, Yunsu; Kim, Jun-Sik; Shim, Inwook; Kweon, In So

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel structure-from-motion methodology using 2D lidars (Light Detection And Ranging). In 3D space, 2D lidars do not provide sufficient information for pose estimation. For this reason, additional sensors have been used along with the lidar measurement. In this paper, we use a sensor system that consists of only 2D lidars, without any additional sensors. We propose a new method of estimating both the 6D pose of the system and the surrounding 3D structures. We compute the pose of the system using line segments of scan data and their corresponding planes. After discarding the outliers, both the pose and the 3D structures are refined via nonlinear optimization. Experiments with both synthetic and real data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28165372

  17. An optical real-time 3D measurement for analysis of facial shape and movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Chen, Wenjing; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun

    2003-12-01

    Optical non-contact 3-D shape measurement provides a novel and useful tool for analysis of facial shape and movement in presurgical and postsurgical regular check. In this article we present a system, which allows a precise 3-D visualization of the patient's facial before and after craniofacial surgery. We discussed, in this paper, the real time 3-D image capture, processing and the 3-D phase unwrapping method to recover complex shape deformation when the movement of the mouth. The result of real-time measurement for facial shape and movement will be helpful for the more ideal effect in plastic surgery.

  18. 3D QSAR models built on structure-based alignments of Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Falchi, Federico; Manetti, Fabrizio; Carraro, Fabio; Naldini, Antonella; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele; Schenone, Silvia; Bruno, Olga; Brullo, Chiara; Botta, Maurizio

    2009-06-01

    Quality QSAR: A combination of docking calculations and a statistical approach toward Abl inhibitors resulted in a 3D QSAR model, the analysis of which led to the identification of ligand portions important for affinity. New compounds designed on the basis of the model were found to have very good affinity for the target, providing further validation of the model itself.The X-ray crystallographic coordinates of the Abl tyrosine kinase domain in its active, inactive, and Src-like inactive conformations were used as targets to simulate the binding mode of a large series of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (known Abl inhibitors) by means of GOLD software. Receptor-based alignments provided by molecular docking calculations were submitted to a GRID-GOLPE protocol to generate 3D QSAR models. Analysis of the results showed that the models based on the inactive and Src-like inactive conformations had very poor statistical parameters, whereas the sole model based on the active conformation of Abl was characterized by significant internal and external predictive ability. Subsequent analysis of GOLPE PLS pseudo-coefficient contour plots of this model gave us a better understanding of the relationships between structure and affinity, providing suggestions for the next optimization process. On the basis of these results, new compounds were designed according to the hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor and acceptor contours, and were found to have improved enzymatic and cellular activity with respect to parent compounds. Additional biological assays confirmed the important role of the selected compounds as inhibitors of cell proliferation in leukemia cells.

  19. 3D Printing Meets Computational Astrophysics: Deciphering the Structure of Eta Carinae’s Colliding Winds Using 3D Prints of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, Theodore R.; Clementel, Nicola; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Kruip, Chael; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Teodoro, Mairan

    2015-01-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (>120 MSun), highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9) binary Eta Carinae. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (Makerbot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of Eta Carinae's inner (r ~110 AU) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. These 3D prints reveal important, previously unknown 'finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ~1.045) that protrude radially outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively-cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the hot, adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unknown physical features highlight the important role 3D printing can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  20. The 3D Structure of the Binding Pocket of the Human Oxytocin Receptor for Benzoxazine Antagonists, Determined by Molecular Docking, Scoring Functions and 3D-QSAR Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jójárt, Balázs; Martinek, Tamás A.; Márki, Árpád

    2005-05-01

    Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies were performed to determine the binding mode for a series of benzoxazine oxytocin antagonists taken from the literature. Structural hypotheses were generated by docking the most active molecule to the rigid receptor by means of AutoDock 3.05. The cluster analysis yielded seven possible binding conformations. These structures were refined by using constrained simulated annealing, and the further ligands were aligned in the refined receptor by molecular docking. A good correlation was found between the estimated Δ G bind and the p K i values for complex F. The Connolly-surface analysis, CoMFA and CoMSIA models q CoMFA 2 = 0.653, q CoMSA 2 = 0.630 and r pred,CoMFA 2 = 0.852 , r pred,CoMSIA 2 = 0.815) confirmed the scoring function results. The structural features of the receptor-ligand complex and the CoMFA and CoMSIA fields are in closely connected. These results suggest that receptor-ligand complex F is the most likely binding hypothesis for the studied benzoxazine analogs.

  1. 3D neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled analysis of MYRRHA

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, M.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2012-07-01

    The current tendency in multiphysics calculations applied to reactor physics is the use of already validated computer codes, coupled by means of an iterative approach. In this paper such an approach is explained concerning neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled analysis with MCNPX and COBRA-IV codes using a driver program and file exchange between codes. MCNPX provides the neutronic analysis of heterogeneous nuclear systems, both in critical and subcritical states, while COBRA-IV is a subchannel code that can be used for rod bundles or core thermal-hydraulics analysis. In our model, the MCNP temperature dependence of nuclear data is handled via pseudo-material approach, mixing pre-generated cross section data set to obtain the material with the desired cross section temperature. On the other hand, COBRA-IV has been updated to allow for the simulation of liquid metal cooled reactors. The coupled computational tool can be applied to any geometry and coolant, as it is the case of single fuel assembly, at pin-by-pin level, or full core simulation with the average pin of each fuel-assembly. The coupling tool has been applied to the critical core layout of the SCK-CEN MYRRHA concept, an experimental LBE cooled fast reactor presently in engineering design stage. (authors)

  2. 3D multi-layered fibrous cellulose structure using an electrohydrodynamic process for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseong; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-11-01

    Micro/nanofibrous structures have been applied widely in various tissue-engineering applications because the topological structures are similar to the extracellular matrix (ECM), which encourages a high degree of cell adhesion and growth. However, it has been difficult to produce a three-dimensional (3D) fibrous structure using controllable macro-pores. Recently, cellulose has been considered a high-potential natural-origin biomaterial, but its use in 3D biomedical structures has been limited due to its narrow processing window. Here, we suggest a new 3D cellulose scaffold consisting of multi-layered struts made of submicron-sized entangled fibers that were fabricated using an electrohydrodynamic direct jet (EHDJ) process that is spin-printing. By optimizing processing conditions (electric field strength, cellulose feeding rate, and distance between nozzle and target), we can achieve a multi-layered cellulose structure consisting of the cylindrically entangled cellulose fibers. To compare the properties of the fabricated 3D cellulose structure, we used a PCL fibrous scaffold, which has a similar fibrous morphology and pore geometry, as a control. The physical and in vitro biocompatibilities of both fibrous scaffolds were assessed using human dermal fibroblasts, and the cellulose structure showed higher cell adhesion and metabolic activities compared with the control. These results suggest the EHDJ process to be an effective fabricating tool for tissue engineering and the cellulose scaffold has high potential as a tissue regenerative material.

  3. Enhanced genome annotation using structural profiles in the program 3D-PSSM.

    PubMed

    Kelley, L A; MacCallum, R M; Sternberg, M J

    2000-06-02

    A method (three-dimensional position-specific scoring matrix, 3D-PSSM) to recognise remote protein sequence homologues is described. The method combines the power of multiple sequence profiles with knowledge of protein structure to provide enhanced recognition and thus functional assignment of newly sequenced genomes. The method uses structural alignments of homologous proteins of similar three-dimensional structure in the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) database to obtain a structural equivalence of residues. These equivalences are used to extend multiply aligned sequences obtained by standard sequence searches. The resulting large superfamily-based multiple alignment is converted into a PSSM. Combined with secondary structure matching and solvation potentials, 3D-PSSM can recognise structural and functional relationships beyond state-of-the-art sequence methods. In a cross-validated benchmark on 136 homologous relationships unambiguously undetectable by position-specific iterated basic local alignment search tool (PSI-Blast), 3D-PSSM can confidently assign 18 %. The method was applied to the remaining unassigned regions of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome and an additional 13 regions were assigned with 95 % confidence. 3D-PSSM is available to the community as a web server: http://www.bmm.icnet.uk/servers/3dpssm

  4. EDCs DataBank: 3D-Structure database of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Montes-Grajales, Diana; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-01-02

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are a group of compounds that affect the endocrine system, frequently found in everyday products and epidemiologically associated with several diseases. The purpose of this work was to develop EDCs DataBank, the only database of EDCs with three-dimensional structures. This database was built on MySQL using the EU list of potential endocrine disruptors and TEDX list. It contains the three-dimensional structures available on PubChem, as well as a wide variety of information from different databases and text mining tools, useful for almost any kind of research regarding EDCs. The web platform was developed employing HTML, CSS and PHP languages, with dynamic contents in a graphic environment, facilitating information analysis. Currently EDCs DataBank has 615 molecules, including pesticides, natural and industrial products, cosmetics, drugs and food additives, among other low molecular weight xenobiotics. Therefore, this database can be used to study the toxicological effects of these molecules, or to develop pharmaceuticals targeting hormone receptors, through docking studies, high-throughput virtual screening and ligand-protein interaction analysis. EDCs DataBank is totally user-friendly and the 3D-structures of the molecules can be downloaded in several formats. This database is freely available at http://edcs.unicartagena.edu.co.

  5. Automatic segmentation and analysis of fibrin networks in 3D confocal microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Mu, Jian; Machlus, Kellie R.; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Rosen, Elliot D.; Xu, Zhiliang; Alber, Mark S.; Chen, Danny Z.

    2012-02-01

    Fibrin networks are a major component of blood clots that provides structural support to the formation of growing clots. Abnormal fibrin networks that are too rigid or too unstable can promote cardiovascular problems and/or bleeding. However, current biological studies of fibrin networks rarely perform quantitative analysis of their structural properties (e.g., the density of branch points) due to the massive branching structures of the networks. In this paper, we present a new approach for segmenting and analyzing fibrin networks in 3D confocal microscopy images. We first identify the target fibrin network by applying the 3D region growing method with global thresholding. We then produce a one-voxel wide centerline for each fiber segment along which the branch points and other structural information of the network can be obtained. Branch points are identified by a novel approach based on the outer medial axis. Cells within the fibrin network are segmented by a new algorithm that combines cluster detection and surface reconstruction based on the α-shape approach. Our algorithm has been evaluated on computer phantom images of fibrin networks for identifying branch points. Experiments on z-stack images of different types of fibrin networks yielded results that are consistent with biological observations.

  6. Structure light telecentric stereoscopic vision 3D measurement system based on Scheimpflug condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Qing; Gao, Jian; Lin, Hui; Chen, Yun; Yunbo, He; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Guanjin; Chen, Xin

    2016-11-01

    We designed a new three-dimensional (3D) measurement system for micro components: a structure light telecentric stereoscopic vision 3D measurement system based on the Scheimpflug condition. This system creatively combines the telecentric imaging model and the Scheimpflug condition on the basis of structure light stereoscopic vision, having benefits of a wide measurement range, high accuracy, fast speed, and low price. The system measurement range is 20 mm×13 mm×6 mm, the lateral resolution is 20 μm, and the practical vertical resolution reaches 2.6 μm, which is close to the theoretical value of 2 μm and well satisfies the 3D measurement needs of micro components such as semiconductor devices, photoelectron elements, and micro-electromechanical systems. In this paper, we first introduce the principle and structure of the system and then present the system calibration and 3D reconstruction. We then present an experiment that was performed for the 3D reconstruction of the surface topography of a wafer, followed by a discussion. Finally, the conclusions are presented.

  7. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  8. 3D inelastic analysis methods for hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dame, L. T.; Chen, P. C.; Hartle, M. S.; Huang, H. T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective is to develop analytical tools capable of economically evaluating the cyclic time dependent plasticity which occurs in hot section engine components in areas of strain concentration resulting from the combination of both mechanical and thermal stresses. Three models were developed. A simple model performs time dependent inelastic analysis using the power law creep equation. The second model is the classical model of Professors Walter Haisler and David Allen of Texas A and M University. The third model is the unified model of Bodner, Partom, et al. All models were customized for linear variation of loads and temperatures with all material properties and constitutive models being temperature dependent.

  9. High Resolution Krylov Space 3-D Wavenumber-Frequency Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    wavenumber-frequency distri- bution of signal modes. That is, PPER (k, f, t) = eH(k) R̂[f, t] e(k). (3) Different from eq.(2), here R̂[f, t] is a time... PPER (k, f, t) frequency f w av en um be r k Capon wavenumber frequency analysis 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 30

  10. Simulation approach of atomic layer deposition in large 3D structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwille, Matthias C.; Barth, Jonas; Schössler, Timo; Schön, Florian; Bartha, Johann W.; Oettel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    We present a new simulation method predicting thicknesses of thin films obtained by atomic layer deposition in high aspect ratio 3D geometries as they appear in MEMS manufacturing. The method features a Monte-Carlo computation of film deposition in free molecular flow, as well as in the Knudsen and diffusive gas regime, applicable for large structures. We compare our approach to analytic and simulation results from the literature. The capability of the method is demonstrated by a comparison to experimental film thicknesses in a large 3D structure. Finally, the feasability to extract process parameters, i.e. sticking coefficients is shown.

  11. 3D Kinematics and Hydrodynamic Analysis of Freely Swimming Cetacean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan; Sheinberg, Dustin; Liu, Geng; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank; Javed, Joveria

    2015-11-01

    It's widely thought that flexibility and the ability to control flexibility are crucial elements in determining the performance of animal swimming. However, there is a lack of quantification of both span-wise and chord-wise deformation of Cetacean's flukes and associated hydrodynamic performance during actively swimming. To fill this gap, we examined the motion and flexure of both dolphin fluke and orca fluke in steady swimming using a combined experimental and computational approach. It is found that the fluke surface morphing can effectively modulate the flow structures and influence the propulsive performance. Findings from this work are fundamental for understanding key kinematic features of effective Cetacean propulsors, and for quantifying the hydrodynamic force production that naturally occurs during different types of swimming. This work is supported by ONR MURI N00014-14-1-0533 and NSF CBET-1313217.

  12. The Relationship between Oxygen A-band Photon Pathlength Distributions and 3D Structures of Heating Rate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Min, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Broadband heating directly drives the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and its vertical profiles strongly depend upon cloud three-dimensional (3D) structures. Due to the complexity of cloud 3D problems and the difficulties in observations of broadband heating rate profiles (BBHRP), there are still large uncertainties in the relationship of clouds, radiation and climate feedback. Oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions (PPLD) contain rich information about the 3D structures of clouds and BBHRP and can be observed by both ground based and space based measurements. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore the possibility of connecting A-band PPLD and BBHRP and consequently to describe the internal relationship between them together with the cloud 3D effects on BBHRP. A 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is applied to simulate solar broadband heating rate profiles and oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions of several ideal cloud fields and two typical cloud fields generated by cloud resolving model (CRM). Principal components (PCs) and the first four moments are selected to represent the vertical structures of BBHRP and PPLD, respectively. In ideal cloud fields, the moments show clear constraint to PCs of BBHRP. The results demonstrate the feasibility to describe the vertical structures of BBHRP by PPLD. The relationship between moments and PCs turns complicated in CRM cloud fields due to the composition of various 3D effects. However, detailed analysis still show that the moments, the PCs and total cloud optical depth are effective factors in defining BBHRP, especially for the vertical structures of relative low clouds. Further, a statistical fitting between the PCs and the moments by a two-layer neural network is applied to provide a quantitative representation of the linkages.

  13. Evaluation of stereoscopic 3D displays for image analysis tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinsipp-Byma, E.; Rehfeld, N.; Eck, R.

    2009-02-01

    In many application domains the analysis of aerial or satellite images plays an important role. The use of stereoscopic display technologies can enhance the image analyst's ability to detect or to identify certain objects of interest, which results in a higher performance. Changing image acquisition from analog to digital techniques entailed the change of stereoscopic visualisation techniques. Recently different kinds of digital stereoscopic display techniques with affordable prices have appeared on the market. At Fraunhofer IITB usability tests were carried out to find out (1) with which kind of these commercially available stereoscopic display techniques image analysts achieve the best performance and (2) which of these techniques achieve a high acceptance. First, image analysts were interviewed to define typical image analysis tasks which were expected to be solved with a higher performance using stereoscopic display techniques. Next, observer experiments were carried out whereby image analysts had to solve defined tasks with different visualization techniques. Based on the experimental results (performance parameters and qualitative subjective evaluations of the used display techniques) two of the examined stereoscopic display technologies were found to be very good and appropriate.

  14. Sub aquatic 3D visualization and temporal analysis utilizing ArcGIS online and 3D applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used 3D Visualization tools to illustrate some complex water quality data we’ve been collecting in the Great Lakes. These data include continuous tow data collected from our research vessel the Lake Explorer II, and continuous water quality data collected from an autono...

  15. Function and 3D Structure of the N-Glycans on Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masamichi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in eukaryotic cells and plays important roles in many biological processes, such as the immune response and protein quality control systems. It has been notoriously difficult to study glycoproteins by X-ray crystallography since the glycan moieties usually have a heterogeneous chemical structure and conformation, and are often mobile. Nonetheless, recent technical advances in glycoprotein crystallography have accelerated the accumulation of 3D structural information. Statistical analysis of “snapshots” of glycoproteins can provide clues to understanding their structural and dynamic aspects. In this review, we provide an overview of crystallographic analyses of glycoproteins, in which electron density of the glycan moiety is clearly observed. These well-defined N-glycan structures are in most cases attributed to carbohydrate-protein and/or carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and may function as “molecular glue” to help stabilize inter- and intra-molecular interactions. However, the more mobile N-glycans on cell surface receptors, the electron density of which is usually missing on X-ray crystallography, seem to guide the partner ligand to its binding site and prevent irregular protein aggregation by covering oligomerization sites away from the ligand-binding site. PMID:22942711

  16. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided.

  17. Multi-scale modelling of strongly heterogeneous 3D composite structures using spatial Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Said, Bassam; Ivanov, Dmitry; Long, Andrew C.; Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    3D composite materials are characterized by complex internal yarn architectures, leading to complex deformation and failure development mechanisms. Net-shaped preforms, which are originally periodic in nature, lose their periodicity when the fabric is draped, deformed on a tool, and consolidated to create geometrically complex composite components. As a result, the internal yarn architecture, which dominates the mechanical behaviour, becomes dependent on the structural geometry. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of 3D composites requires an accurate representation of the yarn architecture within structural scale models. When applied to 3D composites, conventional finite element modelling techniques are limited to either homogenised properties at the structural scale, or the unit cell scale for a more detailed material property definition. Consequently, these models fail to capture the complex phenomena occurring across multiple length scales and their effects on a 3D composite's mechanical response. Here a multi-scale modelling approach based on a 3D spatial Voronoi tessellation is proposed. The model creates an intermediate length scale suitable for homogenisation to deal with the non-periodic nature of the final material. Information is passed between the different length scales to allow for the effect of the structural geometry to be taken into account on the smaller scales. The stiffness and surface strain predictions from the proposed model have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The proposed modelling framework has been used to gain important insight into the behaviour of this category of materials. It has been observed that the strain and stress distributions are strongly dependent on the internal yarn architecture and consequently on the final component geometry. Even for simple coupon tests, the internal architecture and geometric effects dominate the mechanical response. Consequently, the behaviour of 3D woven

  18. 3D Reacting Flow Analysis of LANTR Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Bulman, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents performance predictions for LANTR nozzles and the system implications for their use in a manned Mars mission. The LANTR concept is rocket thrust augmentation by injecting Oxygen into the nozzle to combust the Hydrogen exhaust of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket. The performance predictions are based on three-dimensional reacting flow simulations using VULCAN. These simulations explore a range of O2/H2 mixture ratios, injector configurations, and concepts. These performance predictions are used for a trade analysis within a system study for a manned Mars mission. Results indicate that the greatest benefit of LANTR will occur with In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). However, Hydrogen propellant volume reductions may allow greater margins for fitting tanks within the launch vehicle where packaging issues occur.

  19. Galerkin Boundary Integral Analysis for the 3D Helmholtz Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Swager, Melissa; Gray, Leonard J; Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A linear element Galerkin boundary integral analysis for the three-dimensional Helmholtz equation is presented. The emphasis is on solving acoustic scattering by an open (crack) surface, and to this end both a dual equation formulation and a symmetric hypersingular formulation have been developed. All singular integrals are defined and evaluated via a boundary limit process, facilitating the evaluation of the (finite) hypersingular Galerkin integral. This limit process is also the basis for the algorithm for post-processing of the surface gradient. The analytic integrations required by the limit process are carried out by employing a Taylor series expansion for the exponential factor in the Helmholtz fundamental solutions. For the open surface, the implementations are validated by comparing the numerical results obtained by using the two different methods.

  20. SimRNAweb: a web server for RNA 3D structure modeling with optional restraints.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Marcin; Boniecki, Michał J; Dawson, Wayne; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-07-08

    RNA function in many biological processes depends on the formation of three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, RNA structure is difficult to determine experimentally, which has prompted the development of predictive computational methods. Here, we introduce a user-friendly online interface for modeling RNA 3D structures using SimRNA, a method that uses a coarse-grained representation of RNA molecules, utilizes the Monte Carlo method to sample the conformational space, and relies on a statistical potential to describe the interactions in the folding process. SimRNAweb makes SimRNA accessible to users who do not normally use high performance computational facilities or are unfamiliar with using the command line tools. The simplest input consists of an RNA sequence to fold RNA de novo. Alternatively, a user can provide a 3D structure in the PDB format, for instance a preliminary model built with some other technique, to jump-start the modeling close to the expected final outcome. The user can optionally provide secondary structure and distance restraints, and can freeze a part of the starting 3D structure. SimRNAweb can be used to model single RNA sequences and RNA-RNA complexes (up to 52 chains). The webserver is available at http://genesilico.pl/SimRNAweb.

  1. 3D flexible NiTi-braided elastomer composites for smart structure applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, L.; Vokoun, D.; Šittner, P.; Finckh, H.

    2012-04-01

    While outstanding functional properties of thin NiTi wires are nowadays well recognized and beneficially utilized in medical NiTi devices, development of 2D/3D wire structures made out of these NiTi wires remains challenging and mostly unexplored. The research is driven by the idea of creating novel 2D/3D smart structures which inherit the functional properties of NiTi wires and actively utilize geometrical deformations within the structure to create new/improved functional properties. Generally, textile technology provides attractive processing methods for manufacturing 2D/3D smart structures made out of NiTi wires. Such structures may be beneficially combined with soft elastomers to create smart deformable composites. Following this route, we carried out experimental work focused on development of 3D flexible NiTi-braided elastomer composites involving their design, laboratory manufacture and thermomechanical testing. We describe the manufacturing technology and structural properties of these composites; and perform thermomechanical tests on the composites, focusing particularly on quasistatic tensile properties, energy absorption, damping and actuation under tensile loading. Functional thermomechanical properties of the composites are discussed with regard to the mechanical properties of the components and architecture of the composites. It is found that the composites indeed inherit all important features of the thermomechanical behavior of NiTi wires but, due to their internal architecture, outperform single NiTi wires in some features such as the magnitude of recoverable strain, superelastic damping capacity and thermally induced actuation strain.

  2. Segmented images and 3D images for studying the anatomical structures in MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Sook; Chung, Min Suk; Cho, Jae Hyun

    2004-05-01

    For identifying the pathological findings in MRIs, the anatomical structures in MRIs should be identified in advance. For studying the anatomical structures in MRIs, an education al tool that includes the horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is necessary. Such an educational tool, however, is hard to obtain. Therefore, in this research, such an educational tool which helps medical students and doctors study the anatomical structures in MRIs was made as follows. A healthy, young Korean male adult with standard body shape was selected. Six hundred thirteen horizontal MRIs of the entire body were scanned and inputted to the personal computer. Sixty anatomical structures in the horizontal MRIs were segmented to make horizontal segmented images. Coronal, sagittal MRIs and coronal, sagittal segmented images were made. 3D images of anatomical structures in the segmented images were reconstructed by surface rendering method. Browsing software of the MRIs, segmented images, and 3D images was composed. This educational tool that includes horizontal, coronal, sagittal MRIs of entire body, corresponding segmented images, 3D images, and browsing software is expected to help medical students and doctors study anatomical structures in MRIs.

  3. Seismic source inversion using Green's reciprocity and a 3-D structural model for the Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutė, S.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a feasibility study for seismic source inversions using a 3-D velocity model for the Japanese Islands. The approach involves numerically calculating 3-D Green's tensors, which is made efficient by exploiting Green's reciprocity. The rationale for 3-D seismic source inversion has several aspects. For structurally complex regions, such as the Japan area, it is necessary to account for 3-D Earth heterogeneities to prevent unknown structure polluting source solutions. In addition, earthquake source characterisation can serve as a means to delineate existing faults. Source parameters obtained for more realistic Earth models can then facilitate improvements in seismic tomography and early warning systems, which are particularly important for seismically active areas, such as Japan. We have created a database of numerically computed 3-D Green's reciprocals for a 40°× 40°× 600 km size area around the Japanese Archipelago for >150 broadband stations. For this we used a regional 3-D velocity model, recently obtained from full waveform inversion. The model includes attenuation and radial anisotropy and explains seismic waveform data for periods between 10 - 80 s generally well. The aim is to perform source inversions using the database of 3-D Green's tensors. As preliminary steps, we present initial concepts to address issues that are at the basis of our approach. We first investigate to which extent Green's reciprocity works in a discrete domain. Considering substantial amounts of computed Green's tensors we address storage requirements and file formatting. We discuss the importance of the initial source model, as an intelligent choice can substantially reduce the search volume. Possibilities to perform a Bayesian inversion and ways to move to finite source inversion are also explored.

  4. Optical Measurement of Micromechanics and Structure in a 3D Fibrin Extracellular Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlarchyk, Maxwell Aaron

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanics to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed an optical tweezers-based microrheology system to investigate the fundamental role of ECM mechanical properties in determining cellular behavior. Further, this thesis outlines the development of a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local structure and mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers-based passive and active microrheology respectively. Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present microrheological studies in the context of fibrin hydrogels. Microrheology and confocal imaging were used to directly measure local changes in micromechanics and structure respectively in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrinogen concentration, as well as in our strain gradient device, in which the concentration of fibrinogen is held constant. Orbital particle tracking, and raster image correlation analysis are used to quantify changes in fibrin mechanics on the

  5. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  6. FPGA Implementation of Optimal 3D-Integer DCT Structure for Video Compression

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, J. Augustin; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2015-01-01

    A novel optimal structure for implementing 3D-integer discrete cosine transform (DCT) is presented by analyzing various integer approximation methods. The integer set with reduced mean squared error (MSE) and high coding efficiency are considered for implementation in FPGA. The proposed method proves that the least resources are utilized for the integer set that has shorter bit values. Optimal 3D-integer DCT structure is determined by analyzing the MSE, power dissipation, coding efficiency, and hardware complexity of different integer sets. The experimental results reveal that direct method of computing the 3D-integer DCT using the integer set [10, 9, 6, 2, 3, 1, 1] performs better when compared to other integer sets in terms of resource utilization and power dissipation. PMID:26601120

  7. FPGA Implementation of Optimal 3D-Integer DCT Structure for Video Compression.

    PubMed

    Jacob, J Augustin; Kumar, N Senthil

    2015-01-01

    A novel optimal structure for implementing 3D-integer discrete cosine transform (DCT) is presented by analyzing various integer approximation methods. The integer set with reduced mean squared error (MSE) and high coding efficiency are considered for implementation in FPGA. The proposed method proves that the least resources are utilized for the integer set that has shorter bit values. Optimal 3D-integer DCT structure is determined by analyzing the MSE, power dissipation, coding efficiency, and hardware complexity of different integer sets. The experimental results reveal that direct method of computing the 3D-integer DCT using the integer set [10, 9, 6, 2, 3, 1, 1] performs better when compared to other integer sets in terms of resource utilization and power dissipation.

  8. Protein-protein interaction networks studies and importance of 3D structure knowledge.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Chun; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca

    2013-12-01

    Protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs) are a powerful tool to study biological processes in living cells. In this review, we present the progress of PPIN studies from abstract to more detailed representations. We will focus on 3D interactome networks, which offer detailed information at the atomic level. This information can be exploited in understanding not only the underlying cellular mechanisms, but also how human variants and disease-causing mutations affect protein functions and complexes' stability. Recent studies have used structural information on PPINs to also understand the molecular mechanisms of binding partner selection. We will address the challenges in generating 3D PPINs due to the restricted number of solved protein structures. Finally, some of the current use of 3D PPINs will be discussed, highlighting their contribution to the studies in genotype-phenotype relationships and in the optimization of targeted studies to design novel chemical compounds for medical treatments.

  9. Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Varnai, Tamas

    2012-03-16

    found that local effects were often much larger than the overall values mentioned above, and were especially large for high sun and near convective clouds such as cumulus. The study also found that statistical methods such as neural networks appear promising for enabling cloud models to consider radiative interactions between nearby atmospheric columns. Finally, through collaboration with German scientists, the project found that new methods (especially one called stepwise kriging) show great promise in filling gaps between cloud radar scans. If applied to data from the new DOE scanning cloud radars, these methods can yield large, continuous three-dimensional cloud structures for future radiative simulations.

  10. 3D watershed-based segmentation of internal structures within MR brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Gloria; Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2000-06-01

    In this paper an image-based method founded on mathematical morphology is presented in order to facilitate the segmentation of cerebral structures on 3D magnetic resonance images (MRIs). The segmentation is described as an immersion simulation, applied to the modified gradient image, modeled by a generated 3D region adjacency graph (RAG). The segmentation relies on two main processes: homotopy modification and contour decision. The first one is achieved by a marker extraction stage where homogeneous 3D regions are identified in order to attribute an influence zone only to relevant minima of the image. This stage uses contrasted regions from morphological reconstruction and labeled flat regions constrained by the RAG. The goal of the decision stage is to precisely locate the contours of regions detected by the marker extraction. This decision is performed by a 3D extension of the watershed transform. Upon completion of the segmentation, the outcome of the preceding process is presented to the user for manual selection of the structures of interest (SOI). Results of this approach are described and illustrated with examples of segmented 3D MRIs of the human head.

  11. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  12. Predicting 3D Structure, Flexibility, and Stability of RNA Hairpins in Monovalent and Divalent Ion Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Jin, Lei; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    A full understanding of RNA-mediated biology would require the knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures, structural flexibility, and stability of RNAs. To predict RNA 3D structures and stability, we have previously proposed a three-bead coarse-grained predictive model with implicit salt/solvent potentials. In this study, we further develop the model by improving the implicit-salt electrostatic potential and including a sequence-dependent coaxial stacking potential to enable the model to simulate RNA 3D structure folding in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. The model presented here can predict 3D structures of RNA hairpins with bulges/internal loops (<77 nucleotides) from their sequences at the corresponding experimental ion conditions with an overall improved accuracy compared to the experimental data; the model also makes reliable predictions for the flexibility of RNA hairpins with bulge loops of different lengths at several divalent/monovalent ion conditions. In addition, the model successfully predicts the stability of RNA hairpins with various loops/stems in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. PMID:26682822

  13. Free energy force field (FEFF) 3D-QSAR analysis of a set of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Filho, Osvaldo A.; Mishra, Rama K.; Hopfinger, A. J.

    2001-09-01

    Free energy force field (FEFF) 3D-QSAR analysis was used to construct ligand-receptor binding models for a set of 18 structurally diverse antifolates including pyrimethamine, cycloguanil, methotrexate, aminopterin and trimethoprim, and 13 pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines. The molecular target (`receptor') used was a 3D-homology model of a specific mutant type of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The dependent variable of the 3D-QSAR models is the IC50 inhibition constant for the specific mutant type of PfDHFR. The independent variables of the 3D-QSAR models (the descriptors) are scaled energy terms of a modified first-generation AMBER force field combined with a hydration shell aqueous solvation model and a collection of 2D-QSAR descriptors often used in QSAR studies. Multiple temperature molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the genetic function approximation (GFA) were employed using partial least square (PLS) and multidimensional linear regressions as the fitting functions to develop FEFF 3D-QSAR models for the binding process. The significant FEFF energy terms in the best 3D-QSAR models include energy contributions of the direct ligand-receptor interaction. Some changes in conformational energy terms of the ligand due to binding to the enzyme are also found to be important descriptors. The FEFF 3D-QSAR models indicate some structural features perhaps relevant to the mechanism of resistance of the PfDHFR to current antimalarials. The FEFF 3D-QSAR models are also compared to receptor-independent (RI) 4D-QSAR models developed in an earlier study and subsequently refined using recently developed generalized alignment rules.

  14. IMPROMPTU: a system for automatic 3D medical image-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, G; Hoford, J D; Hoffman, E A; Higgins, W E

    1995-01-01

    The utility of three-dimensional (3D) medical imaging is hampered by difficulties in extracting anatomical regions and making measurements in 3D images. Presently, a user is generally forced to use time-consuming, subjective, manual methods, such as slice tracing and region painting, to define regions of interest. Automatic image-analysis methods can ameliorate the difficulties of manual methods. This paper describes a graphical user interface (GUI) system for constructing automatic image-analysis processes for 3D medical-imaging applications. The system, referred to as IMPROMPTU, provides a user-friendly environment for prototyping, testing and executing complex image-analysis processes. IMPROMPTU can stand alone or it can interact with an existing graphics-based 3D medical image-analysis package (VIDA), giving a strong environment for 3D image-analysis, consisting of tools for visualization, manual interaction, and automatic processing. IMPROMPTU links to a large library of 1D, 2D, and 3D image-processing functions, referred to as VIPLIB, but a user can easily link in custom-made functions. 3D applications of the system are given for left-ventricular chamber, myocardial, and upper-airway extractions.

  15. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Ale