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Sample records for 3d target localization

  1. Towards real-time MRI-guided 3D localization of deforming targets for non-invasive cardiac radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Lowther, N J; Liney, G P; Rai, R; Bode, F; Dunst, J; Schweikard, A; Keall, P J

    2016-11-21

    Radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum in the left atrium (LA) has recently been proposed for non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Precise real-time target localization during treatment is necessary due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion and high radiation doses. To determine the 3D position of the LA for motion compensation during radiosurgery, a tracking method based on orthogonal real-time MRI planes was developed for AF treatments with an MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Four healthy volunteers underwent cardiac MRI of the LA. Contractile motion was quantified on 3D LA models derived from 4D scans with 10 phases acquired in end-exhalation. Three localization strategies were developed and tested retrospectively on 2D real-time scans (sagittal, temporal resolution 100 ms, free breathing). The best-performing method was then used to measure 3D target positions in 2D-2D orthogonal planes (sagittal-coronal, temporal resolution 200-252 ms, free breathing) in 20 configurations of a digital phantom and in the volunteer data. The 3D target localization accuracy was quantified in the phantom and qualitatively assessed in the real data. Mean cardiac contraction was  ⩽  3.9 mm between maximum dilation and contraction but anisotropic. A template matching approach with two distinct template phases and ECG-based selection yielded the highest 2D accuracy of 1.2 mm. 3D target localization showed a mean error of 3.2 mm in the customized digital phantoms. Our algorithms were successfully applied to the 2D-2D volunteer data in which we measured a mean 3D LA motion extent of 16.5 mm (SI), 5.8 mm (AP) and 3.1 mm (LR). Real-time target localization on orthogonal MRI planes was successfully implemented for highly deformable targets treated in cardiac radiosurgery. The developed method measures target shifts caused by respiration and cardiac contraction. If the detected motion can be compensated accordingly, an MRI-guided radiotherapy

  2. Towards real-time MRI-guided 3D localization of deforming targets for non-invasive cardiac radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Lowther, N. J.; Liney, G. P.; Rai, R.; Bode, F.; Dunst, J.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2016-11-01

    Radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum in the left atrium (LA) has recently been proposed for non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Precise real-time target localization during treatment is necessary due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion and high radiation doses. To determine the 3D position of the LA for motion compensation during radiosurgery, a tracking method based on orthogonal real-time MRI planes was developed for AF treatments with an MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Four healthy volunteers underwent cardiac MRI of the LA. Contractile motion was quantified on 3D LA models derived from 4D scans with 10 phases acquired in end-exhalation. Three localization strategies were developed and tested retrospectively on 2D real-time scans (sagittal, temporal resolution 100 ms, free breathing). The best-performing method was then used to measure 3D target positions in 2D-2D orthogonal planes (sagittal-coronal, temporal resolution 200-252 ms, free breathing) in 20 configurations of a digital phantom and in the volunteer data. The 3D target localization accuracy was quantified in the phantom and qualitatively assessed in the real data. Mean cardiac contraction was  ⩽  3.9 mm between maximum dilation and contraction but anisotropic. A template matching approach with two distinct template phases and ECG-based selection yielded the highest 2D accuracy of 1.2 mm. 3D target localization showed a mean error of 3.2 mm in the customized digital phantoms. Our algorithms were successfully applied to the 2D-2D volunteer data in which we measured a mean 3D LA motion extent of 16.5 mm (SI), 5.8 mm (AP) and 3.1 mm (LR). Real-time target localization on orthogonal MRI planes was successfully implemented for highly deformable targets treated in cardiac radiosurgery. The developed method measures target shifts caused by respiration and cardiac contraction. If the detected motion can be compensated accordingly, an MRI-guided radiotherapy

  3. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Kothari, Ninad B; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat's adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision.

  4. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J.

    2016-01-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat’s adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision. PMID:27608186

  5. Localization of metal targets by time reversal of electromagnetic waves . 3D-numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhamouche, Mehdi; Bernard, Laurent; Serhir, Mohammed; Pichon, Lionel; Lesselier, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes a criterion for locating obstacles by time reversal (TR) of electromagnetic (EM) waves based on the analysis of the density of EM energy map in time domain. Contrarily to a monochromatic study of the TR, the wide-band approach requires to determine the instant of the wave focus. This enables us to locate the focal spots that are indicative of the positions. The criterion proposed is compared to the inverse of the minimum entropy criterion as used in the literature [X. Xu, E.L. Miller, C.M. Rappaport, IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 41, 1804 (2003)]. An application for the localization of 3D metal targets is proposed using finite integration technique (FIT) as computational tool at the modeling stage. An experimental validation is presented for canonical three-dimensional configurations with two kinds of metal objects. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Numelec 2012", Edited by Adel Razek.

  6. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  7. 3D localization of a labeled target by means of a stereo vision configuration with subvoxel resolution.

    PubMed

    Arias H, Néstor A; Sandoz, Patrick; Meneses, Jaime E; Suarez, Miguel A; Gharbi, Tijani

    2010-11-08

    We present a method for the visual measurement of the 3D position and orientation of a moving target. Three dimensional sensing is based on stereo vision while high resolution results from a pseudo-periodic pattern (PPP) fixed onto the target. The PPP is suited for optimizing image processing that is based on phase computations. We describe experimental setup, image processing and system calibration. Resolutions reported are in the micrometer range for target position (x,y,z) and of 5:3x10(-4) rad: for target orientation (θx,θy,θz). These performances have to be appreciated with respect to the vision system used. The latter makes that every image pixel corresponds to an actual distance of 0:3x0:3 mm2 on the target while the PPP is made of elementary dots of 1 mm with a period of 2 mm. Target tilts as large as π=4 are allowed with respect to the Z axis of the system.

  8. WE-AB-BRA-01: 3D-2D Image Registration for Target Localization in Spine Surgery: Comparison of Similarity Metrics Against Robustness to Content Mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M; Siewerdsen, J H; Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S; Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G; Lo, S F; Wolinsky, J P; Gokaslan, Z L; Aygun, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided spine surgery, mapping 3D preoperative images to 2D intraoperative images via 3D-2D registration can provide valuable assistance in target localization. However, the presence of surgical instrumentation, hardware implants, and soft-tissue resection/displacement causes mismatches in image content, confounding existing registration methods. Manual/semi-automatic methods to mask such extraneous content is time consuming, user-dependent, error prone, and disruptive to clinical workflow. We developed and evaluated 2 novel similarity metrics within a robust registration framework to overcome such challenges in target localization. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study in 19 spine surgery patients included 19 preoperative 3D CT images and 50 intraoperative mobile radiographs in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine regions. A neuroradiologist provided truth definition of vertebral positions in CT and radiography. 3D-2D registration was performed using the CMA-ES optimizer with 4 gradient-based image similarity metrics: (1) gradient information (GI); (2) gradient correlation (GC); (3) a novel variant referred to as gradient orientation (GO); and (4) a second variant referred to as truncated gradient correlation (TGC). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) of the vertebral levels. Results: Conventional similarity metrics were susceptible to gross registration error and failure modes associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation: for GI, the median PDE and interquartile range was 33.0±43.6 mm; similarly for GC, PDE = 23.0±92.6 mm respectively. The robust metrics GO and TGC, on the other hand, demonstrated major improvement in PDE (7.6 ±9.4 mm and 8.1± 18.1 mm, respectively) and elimination of gross failure modes. Conclusion: The proposed GO and TGC similarity measures improve registration accuracy and robustness to gross failure in the presence of strong image content mismatch. Such

  9. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was also evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF

  10. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE < 6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved

  11. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  <  6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved

  12. 3D object recognition based on local descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakab, Marek; Benesova, Wanda; Racev, Marek

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an enhanced method of 3D object description and recognition based on local descriptors using RGB image and depth information (D) acquired by Kinect sensor. Our main contribution is focused on an extension of the SIFT feature vector by the 3D information derived from the depth map (SIFT-D). We also propose a novel local depth descriptor (DD) that includes a 3D description of the key point neighborhood. Thus defined the 3D descriptor can then enter the decision-making process. Two different approaches have been proposed, tested and evaluated in this paper. First approach deals with the object recognition system using the original SIFT descriptor in combination with our novel proposed 3D descriptor, where the proposed 3D descriptor is responsible for the pre-selection of the objects. Second approach demonstrates the object recognition using an extension of the SIFT feature vector by the local depth description. In this paper, we present the results of two experiments for the evaluation of the proposed depth descriptors. The results show an improvement in accuracy of the recognition system that includes the 3D local description compared with the same system without the 3D local description. Our experimental system of object recognition is working near real-time.

  13. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkina, Viktoriya

    2016-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  14. Exploring local regularities for 3D object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Huaiwen; Qin, Shengfeng

    2016-11-01

    In order to find better simplicity measurements for 3D object recognition, a new set of local regularities is developed and tested in a stepwise 3D reconstruction method, including localized minimizing standard deviation of angles(L-MSDA), localized minimizing standard deviation of segment magnitudes(L-MSDSM), localized minimum standard deviation of areas of child faces (L-MSDAF), localized minimum sum of segment magnitudes of common edges (L-MSSM), and localized minimum sum of areas of child face (L-MSAF). Based on their effectiveness measurements in terms of form and size distortions, it is found that when two local regularities: L-MSDA and L-MSDSM are combined together, they can produce better performance. In addition, the best weightings for them to work together are identified as 10% for L-MSDSM and 90% for L-MSDA. The test results show that the combined usage of L-MSDA and L-MSDSM with identified weightings has a potential to be applied in other optimization based 3D recognition methods to improve their efficacy and robustness.

  15. Experimental 3-D SAR Human Target Signature Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-21

    through the wall structure that the radar signal must travel to get to the target, such as through and around studs . The different features from the...drywall made of wood stud , gypsum, insulating material, and vinyl coating. The second wall structure is made of cinder blocks and is a more challenging... wall synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging from an experimental L-band through- wall SAR prototype. Tools and algorithms for 3-D visualization are

  16. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  17. 3-D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localization.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Céline; Marchand, Eric; Eck, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel model-based tracking approach for 3-D localization. One main difficulty of standard model-based approach lies in the presence of low-level ambiguities between different edges. In this paper, given a 3-D model of the edges of the environment, we derive a multiple hypotheses tracker which retrieves the potential poses of the camera from the observations in the image. We also show how these candidate poses can be integrated into a particle filtering framework to guide the particle set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localization problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights.

  18. Protein function prediction using local 3D templates.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Watson, James D; Thornton, Janet M

    2005-08-19

    The prediction of a protein's function from its 3D structure is becoming more and more important as the worldwide structural genomics initiatives gather pace and continue to solve 3D structures, many of which are of proteins of unknown function. Here, we present a methodology for predicting function from structure that shows great promise. It is based on 3D templates that are defined as specific 3D conformations of small numbers of residues. We use four types of template, covering enzyme active sites, ligand-binding residues, DNA-binding residues and reverse templates. The latter are templates generated from the target structure itself and scanned against a representative subset of all known protein structures. Together, the templates provide a fairly thorough coverage of the known structures and ensure that if there is a match to a known structure it is unlikely to be missed. A new scoring scheme provides a highly sensitive means of discriminating between true positive and false positive template matches. In all, the methodology provides a powerful new tool for function prediction to complement those already in use.

  19. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P. J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on 3D super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision.

  20. Saliency detection for videos using 3D FFT local spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zhiling; AlRegib, Ghassan

    2015-03-01

    Bottom-up spatio-temporal saliency detection identifies perceptually important regions of interest in video sequences. The center-surround model proves to be useful for visual saliency detection. In this work, we explore using 3D FFT local spectra as features for saliency detection within the center-surround framework. We develop a spectral location based decomposition scheme to divide a 3D FFT cube into two components, one related to temporal changes and the other related to spatial changes. Temporal saliency and spatial saliency are detected separately using features derived from each spectral component through a simple center-surround comparison method. The two detection results are then combined to yield a saliency map. We apply the same detection algorithm to different color channels (YIQ) and incorporate the results into the final saliency determination. The proposed technique is tested with the public CRCNS database. Both visual and numerical evaluations verify the promising performance of our technique.

  1. 3D target array for pulsed multi-sourced radiography

    DOEpatents

    Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2016-02-23

    The various technologies presented herein relate to the generation of x-rays and other charged particles. A plurality of disparate source materials can be combined on an array to facilitate fabrication of co-located mixed tips (point sources) which can be utilized to form a polychromatic cloud, e.g., a plurality of x-rays having a range of energies and or wavelengths, etc. The tips can be formed such that the x-rays are emitted in a direction different to other charged particles to facilitate clean x-ray sourcing. Particles, such as protons, can be directionally emitted to facilitate generation of neutrons at a secondary target. The various particles can be generated by interaction of a laser irradiating the array of tips. The tips can be incorporated into a plurality of 3D conical targets, the conical target sidewall(s) can be utilized to microfocus a portion of a laser beam onto the tip material.

  2. 3-D Imaging of Partly Concealed Targets by Laser Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    laser in the green wavelength region was used for illumination. 3-D Imaging of Partly Concealed Targets by Laser Radar 11 - 8 RTO-MP-SET-094...acknowledge Marie Carlsson and Ann Charlotte Gustavsson for their assistance in some of the experiments. 7.0 REFERENCES [1] U. Söderman, S. Ahlberg...SPIE Vol. 3707, pp. 432-448, USA, 1999. [14] D. Letalick, H. Larsson, M. Carlsson, and A.-C. Gustavsson , “Laser sensors for urban warfare,” FOI

  3. Echolocation of multiple targets in 3-d space from a single emission.

    PubMed

    Yano, M; Matsuo, I; Tani, J

    2002-09-01

    Using frequency-modulated echolocation sound, bat can capture a moving target in real three-dimensional (3-D) space. It is impossible to locate multiple targets in 3-D space by using only the delay time between an emission and the resultingechoes received at two points (i.e., two ears). To locate multiple targets in 3-D space requires directional information for each target. The spectrum of the echoes from nearly equidistant targets includes spectral components of both the interference between the echoes and the interference resulting from the physical process of reception at the external ear. The frequency of the spectral notch, which is the frequency corresponding to the minimum of the external ear's transfer function (EEDNF), provides a crucial cue for directional localization. In the model we present, a computational model todiscriminate multiple close targets in 3-D space utilizing echoes evoked by a single emission by distinguishing the interference of echoes from each object and the EEDNF corresponding to each target.

  4. A model of echolocation of multiple targets in 3D space from a single emission.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, I; Tani, J; Yano, M

    2001-07-01

    Bats, using frequency-modulated echolocation sounds, can capture a moving target in real 3D space. The process by which they are able to accomplish this, however, is not completely understood. This work offers and analyzes a model for description of one mechanism that may play a role in the echolocation process of real bats. This mechanism allows for the localization of targets in 3D space from the echoes produced by a single emission. It is impossible to locate multiple targets in 3D space by using only the delay time between an emission and the resulting echoes received at two points (i.e., two ears). To locate multiple targets in 3D space requires directional information for each target. The frequency of the spectral notch, which is the frequency corresponding to the minimum of the external ear's transfer function, provides a crucial cue for directional localization. The spectrum of the echoes from nearly equidistant targets includes spectral components of both the interference between the echoes and the interference resulting from the physical process of reception at the external ear. Thus, in order to extract the spectral component associated with the external ear, this component must first be distinguished from the spectral components associated with the interference of echoes from nearly equidistant targets. In the model presented, a computation that consists of the deconvolution of the spectrum is used to extract the external-ear-dependent component in the time domain. This model describes one mechanism that can be used to locate multiple targets in 3D space.

  5. A universal approach for automatic organ segmentations on 3D CT images based on organ localization and 3D GrabCut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Ito, Takaaki; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a universal approach to automatic segmentation of different internal organ and tissue regions in three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) scans. The proposed approach combines object localization, a probabilistic atlas, and 3D GrabCut techniques to achieve automatic and quick segmentation. The proposed method first detects a tight 3D bounding box that contains the target organ region in CT images and then estimates the prior of each pixel inside the bounding box belonging to the organ region or background based on a dynamically generated probabilistic atlas. Finally, the target organ region is separated from the background by using an improved 3D GrabCut algorithm. A machine-learning method is used to train a detector to localize the 3D bounding box of the target organ using template matching on a selected feature space. A content-based image retrieval method is used for online generation of a patient-specific probabilistic atlas for the target organ based on a database. A 3D GrabCut algorithm is used for final organ segmentation by iteratively estimating the CT number distributions of the target organ and backgrounds using a graph-cuts algorithm. We applied this approach to localize and segment twelve major organ and tissue regions independently based on a database that includes 1300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected numerous CT scans and manually input nine principal types of inner organ regions for performance evaluation. Preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed approach for addressing automatic organ segmentation issues on CT images.

  6. Multi-AUV Target Search Based on Bioinspired Neurodynamics Model in 3-D Underwater Environments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang; Zhu, Daqi; Yang, Simon X

    2016-11-01

    Target search in 3-D underwater environments is a challenge in multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (multi-AUVs) exploration. This paper focuses on an effective strategy for multi-AUV target search in the 3-D underwater environments with obstacles. First, the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence is applied to extract information of environment from the sonar data to build a grid map of the underwater environments. Second, a topologically organized bioinspired neurodynamics model based on the grid map is constructed to represent the dynamic environment. The target globally attracts the AUVs through the dynamic neural activity landscape of the model, while the obstacles locally push the AUVs away to avoid collision. Finally, the AUVs plan their search path to the targets autonomously by a steepest gradient descent rule. The proposed algorithm deals with various situations, such as static targets search, dynamic targets search, and one or several AUVs break down in the 3-D underwater environments with obstacles. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is capable of guiding multi-AUV to achieve search task of multiple targets with higher efficiency and adaptability compared with other algorithms.

  7. Geometric-model-free tracking of extended targets using 3D lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinemann, Philipp; Klappstein, Jens; Dickmann, Juergen; von Hundelshausen, Felix; Wünsche, Hans-Joachim

    2012-06-01

    Tracking of extended targets in high definition, 360-degree 3D-LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements is a challenging task and a current research topic. It is a key component in robotic applications, and is relevant to path planning and collision avoidance. This paper proposes a new method without a geometric model to simultaneously track and accumulate 3D-LIDAR measurements of an object. The method itself is based on a particle filter and uses an object-related local 3D grid for each object. No geometric object hypothesis is needed. Accumulation allows coping with occlusions. The prediction step of the particle filter is governed by a motion model consisting of a deterministic and a probabilistic part. Since this paper is focused on tracking ground vehicles, a bicycle model is used for the deterministic part. The probabilistic part depends on the current state of each particle. A function for calculating the current probability density function for state transition is developed. It is derived in detail and based on a database consisting of vehicle dynamics measurements over several hundreds of kilometers. The adaptive probability density function narrows down the gating area for measurement data association. The second part of the proposed method addresses weighting the particles with a cost function. Different 3D-griddependent cost functions are presented and evaluated. Evaluations with real 3D-LIDAR measurements show the performance of the proposed method. The results are also compared to ground truth data.

  8. Test target for characterizing 3D resolution of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Hao, Bingtao; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Li, Jiao

    2014-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive 3D imaging technology which has been applied or investigated in many diagnostic fields including ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, cardiovasology, endoscopy, brain imaging and so on. Optical resolution is an important characteristic that can describe the quality and utility of an image acquiring system. We employ 3D printing technology to design and fabricate a test target for characterizing 3D resolution of optical coherence tomography. The test target which mimics USAF 1951 test chart was produced with photopolymer. By measuring the 3D test target, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of a spectral domain OCT system was evaluated. For comparison, conventional microscope and surface profiler were employed to characterize the 3D test targets. The results demonstrate that the 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  9. "Stereo Compton cameras" for the 3-D localization of radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Adachi, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera is a viable and convenient tool used to visualize the distribution of radioactive isotopes that emit gamma rays. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in 2011, there is a particularly urgent need to develop "gamma cameras", which can visualize the distribution of such radioisotopes. In response, we propose a portable Compton camera, which comprises 3-D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators coupled with thin monolithic MPPC arrays. The pulse-height ratio of two MPPC-arrays allocated at both ends of the scintillator block determines the depth of interaction (DOI), which dramatically improves the position resolution of the scintillation detectors. We report on the detailed optimization of the detector design, based on Geant4 simulation. The results indicate that detection efficiency reaches up to 0.54%, or more than 10 times that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, along with a moderate angular resolution of 8.1° (FWHM). By applying the triangular surveying method, we also propose a new concept for the stereo measurement of gamma rays by using two Compton cameras, thus enabling the 3-D positional measurement of radioactive isotopes for the first time. From one point source simulation data, we ensured that the source position and the distance to the same could be determined typically to within 2 meters' accuracy and we also confirmed that more than two sources are clearly separated by the event selection from two point sources of simulation data.

  10. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  11. 3-D Target Location from Stereoscopic SAR Images

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    1999-10-01

    SAR range-Doppler images are inherently 2-dimensional. Targets with a height offset lay over onto offset range and azimuth locations. Just which image locations are laid upon depends on the imaging geometry, including depression angle, squint angle, and target bearing. This is the well known layover phenomenon. Images formed with different aperture geometries will exhibit different layover characteristics. These differences can be exploited to ascertain target height information, in a stereoscopic manner. Depending on the imaging geometries, height accuracy can be on the order of horizontal position accuracies, thereby rivaling the best IFSAR capabilities in fine resolution SAR images. All that is required for this to work are two distinct passes with suitably different geometries from any plain old SAR.

  12. Intensity-based 2D 3D registration for lead localization in robot guided deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hunsche, Stefan; Sauner, Dieter; Majdoub, Faycal El; Neudorfer, Clemens; Poggenborg, Jörg; Goßmann, Axel; Maarouf, Mohammad

    2017-03-21

    Intraoperative assessment of lead localization has become a standard procedure during deep brain stimulation surgery in many centers, allowing immediate verification of targeting accuracy and, if necessary, adjustment of the trajectory. The most suitable imaging modality to determine lead positioning, however, remains controversially discussed. Current approaches entail the implementation of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In the present study, we adopted the technique of intensity-based 2D 3D registration that is commonly employed in stereotactic radiotherapy and spinal surgery. For this purpose, intraoperatively acquired 2D x-ray images were fused with preoperative 3D computed tomography (CT) data to verify lead placement during stereotactic robot assisted surgery. Accuracy of lead localization determined from 2D 3D registration was compared to conventional 3D 3D registration in a subsequent patient study. The mean Euclidian distance of lead coordinates estimated from intensity-based 2D 3D registration versus flat-panel detector CT 3D 3D registration was 0.7 mm  ±  0.2 mm. Maximum values of these distances amounted to 1.2 mm. To further investigate 2D 3D registration a simulation study was conducted, challenging two observers to visually assess artificially generated 2D 3D registration errors. 95% of deviation simulations, which were visually assessed as sufficient, had a registration error below 0.7 mm. In conclusion, 2D 3D intensity-based registration revealed high accuracy and reliability during robot guided stereotactic neurosurgery and holds great potential as a low dose, cost effective means for intraoperative lead localization.

  13. Intensity-based 2D 3D registration for lead localization in robot guided deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsche, Stefan; Sauner, Dieter; El Majdoub, Faycal; Neudorfer, Clemens; Poggenborg, Jörg; Goßmann, Axel; Maarouf, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Intraoperative assessment of lead localization has become a standard procedure during deep brain stimulation surgery in many centers, allowing immediate verification of targeting accuracy and, if necessary, adjustment of the trajectory. The most suitable imaging modality to determine lead positioning, however, remains controversially discussed. Current approaches entail the implementation of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In the present study, we adopted the technique of intensity-based 2D 3D registration that is commonly employed in stereotactic radiotherapy and spinal surgery. For this purpose, intraoperatively acquired 2D x-ray images were fused with preoperative 3D computed tomography (CT) data to verify lead placement during stereotactic robot assisted surgery. Accuracy of lead localization determined from 2D 3D registration was compared to conventional 3D 3D registration in a subsequent patient study. The mean Euclidian distance of lead coordinates estimated from intensity-based 2D 3D registration versus flat-panel detector CT 3D 3D registration was 0.7 mm  ±  0.2 mm. Maximum values of these distances amounted to 1.2 mm. To further investigate 2D 3D registration a simulation study was conducted, challenging two observers to visually assess artificially generated 2D 3D registration errors. 95% of deviation simulations, which were visually assessed as sufficient, had a registration error below 0.7 mm. In conclusion, 2D 3D intensity-based registration revealed high accuracy and reliability during robot guided stereotactic neurosurgery and holds great potential as a low dose, cost effective means for intraoperative lead localization.

  14. TARGET CHARACTERIZATION IN 3D USING INFRARED LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    B. FOY; B. MCVEY; R. PETRIN; J. TIEE; C. WILSON

    2001-04-01

    We report examples of the use of a scanning tunable CO{sub 2} laser lidar system in the 9-11 {micro}m region to construct images of vegetation and rocks at ranges of up to 5 km from the instrument. Range information is combined with horizontal and vertical distances to yield an image with three spatial dimensions simultaneous with the classification of target type. Object classification is made possible by the distinct spectral signatures of both natural and man-made objects. Several multivariate statistical methods are used to illustrate the degree of discrimination possible among the natural variability of objects in both spectral shape and amplitude.

  15. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models.

  16. Mechanisms of DNA Damage Response to Targeted Irradiation in Organotypic 3D Skin Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M.; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  17. 3D super-resolution imaging by localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Magenau, Astrid; Gaus, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in all fields of biology to visualize structures and monitor dynamic processes and distributions. Contrary to conventional microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are limited by their spatial resolution, super-resolution techniques such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have made it possible to observe and quantify structure and processes on the single molecule level. Here, we describe a method to image and quantify the molecular distribution of membrane-associated proteins in two and three dimensions with nanometer resolution.

  18. Geofencing-Based Localization for 3d Data Acquisition Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Kamio, T.; Yasojima, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2016-06-01

    Users require navigation for many location-based applications using moving sensors, such as autonomous robot control, mapping route navigation and mobile infrastructure inspection. In indoor environments, indoor positioning systems using GNSSs can provide seamless indoor-outdoor positioning and navigation services. However, instabilities in sensor position data acquisition remain, because the indoor environment is more complex than the outdoor environment. On the other hand, simultaneous localization and mapping processing is better than indoor positioning for measurement accuracy and sensor cost. However, it is not easy to estimate position data from a single viewpoint directly. Based on these technical issues, we focus on geofencing techniques to improve position data acquisition. In this research, we propose a methodology to estimate more stable position or location data using unstable position data based on geofencing in indoor environments. We verify our methodology through experiments in indoor environments.

  19. Fast non local means denoising for 3D MR images.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Pierrick; Yger, Pierre; Barillot, Christian

    2006-01-01

    One critical issue in the context of image restoration is the problem of noise removal while keeping the integrity of relevant image information. Denoising is a crucial step to increase image conspicuity and to improve the performances of all the processings needed for quantitative imaging analysis. The method proposed in this paper is based on an optimized version of the Non Local (NL) Means algorithm. This approach uses the natural redundancy of information in image to remove the noise. Tests were carried out on synthetic datasets and on real 3T MR images. The results show that the NL-means approach outperforms other classical denoising methods, such as Anisotropic Diffusion Filter and Total Variation.

  20. Novel target fabrication using 3D printing developed at University of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Sallee R.; Deininger, Michael; Gillespie, Robb S.; Di Stefano, Carlos A.; MacDonald, Michael J.; Manuel, Mario J-E.; Young, Rachel P.; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Keiter, Paul A.; Drake, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    The University of Michigan has been fabricating targets for high-energy-density experiments for the past decade. We utilize the technique of machined acrylic bodies and mating components acting as constraints to build repeatable targets. Combining 3D printing with traditional machining, we are able to take advantage of the very best part of both aspects of manufacturing. Furthermore, we present several recent campaigns to act as showcase and introduction of our techniques and our experience with 3D printing, effecting how we utilize 3D printing in our target builds.

  1. Novel target fabrication using 3D printing developed at University of Michigan

    DOE PAGES

    Klein, Sallee R.; Deininger, Michael; Gillespie, Robb S.; ...

    2016-05-24

    The University of Michigan has been fabricating targets for high-energy-density experiments for the past decade. We utilize the technique of machined acrylic bodies and mating components acting as constraints to build repeatable targets. Combining 3D printing with traditional machining, we are able to take advantage of the very best part of both aspects of manufacturing. Furthermore, we present several recent campaigns to act as showcase and introduction of our techniques and our experience with 3D printing, effecting how we utilize 3D printing in our target builds.

  2. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  3. Fast and Precise 3D Fluorophore Localization based on Gradient Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongqiang; Xu, Jianquan; Jin, Jingyi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Li; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Astigmatism imaging approach has been widely used to encode the fluorophore’s 3D position in single-particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. Here, we present a new high-speed localization algorithm based on gradient fitting to precisely decode the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore. This algebraic algorithm determines the center of the fluorescent emitter by finding the position with the best-fit gradient direction distribution to the measured point spread function (PSF), and can retrieve the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore in a single iteration. Through numerical simulation and experiments with mammalian cells, we demonstrate that our algorithm yields comparable localization precision to the traditional iterative Gaussian function fitting (GF) based method, while exhibits over two orders-of-magnitude faster execution speed. Our algorithm is a promising high-speed analyzing method for 3D particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. PMID:26390959

  4. Cryogenic optical localization provides 3D protein structure data with Angstrom resolution.

    PubMed

    Weisenburger, Siegfried; Boening, Daniel; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-02-01

    We introduce Cryogenic Optical Localization in 3D (COLD), a method to localize multiple fluorescent sites within a single small protein with Angstrom resolution. We demonstrate COLD by determining the conformational state of the cytosolic Per-ARNT-Sim domain from the histidine kinase CitA of Geobacillus thermodenitrificans and resolving the four biotin sites of streptavidin. COLD provides quantitative 3D information about small- to medium-sized biomolecules on the Angstrom scale and complements other techniques in structural biology.

  5. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  6. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  7. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  8. Optimal-tradeoff circular harmonic function filters for 3D target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Kumar, Bhagavatula V. K.; Xie, Chunyan; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2003-09-01

    3D target recognition is of significant interest because representing the object in 3D space couuld essentially provide a solution to pose variation and self-occlusion problems that are big challenges in 2D pattern recognition. Correlation filers have been used in a variety of 2D pattern matching applications and many correlation filter designs have been developed to handle problems such as rotations. Correlation filters also offer other benefits such as shift-invariance, graceful degradation and closed-form solutions. The 3D extension of correlation filter is a natural extension to handle 3D pattern recognition problem. In this paper, we propose a 3D correlation filter design method based on cylindrical circular harmonic function (CCHF) and use LADAR imagery to illustrate the good performance of CCHF filters.

  9. 3-D Solid Texture Classification Using Locally-Oriented Wavelet Transforms.

    PubMed

    Dicente Cid, Yashin; Muller, Henning; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2017-02-06

    Many image acquisition techniques used in biomedical imaging, material analysis, and structural geology are capable of acquiring 3-D solid images. Computational analysis of these images is complex but necessary since it is difficult for humans to visualize and quantify their detailed 3-D content. One of the most common methods to analyze 3-D data is to characterize the volumetric texture patterns. Texture analysis generally consists of encoding the local organization of image scales and directions, which can be extremely diverse in 3-D. Current state-of-the- art techniques face many challenges when working with 3-D solid texture, where most approaches are not able to consistently characterize both scale and directional information. 3-D Riesz- wavelets can deal with both properties. One key property of Riesz filterbanks is steerability, which can be used to locally align the filters and compare textures with arbitrary (local) orientations. This paper proposes and compares three novel local alignment criteria for higher-order 3-D Riesz-wavelet transforms. The estimations of local texture orientations are based on higher- order extensions of regularized structure tensors. An experimental evaluation of the proposed methods for the classification of synthetic 3-D solid textures with alterations (such as rotations and noise) demonstrated the importance of local directional information for robust and accurate solid texture recognition. These alignment methods improved the accuracy of the unaligned Riesz descriptors up to 0.63, from 0.32 to 0.95 over 1 in the rotated data, which is better than all other techniques that are published and tested on the same database.

  10. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  11. A physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhixiong; Liu, Wenli; Hong, Baoyu; Hao, Bingtao; Wang, Lele; Li, Jiao

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely employed as non-invasive 3D imaging diagnostic instrument, particularly in the field of ophthalmology. Although OCT has been approved for use in clinic in USA, Europe and Asia, international standardization of this technology is still in progress. Validation of OCT imaging capabilities is considered extremely important to ensure its effective use in clinical diagnoses. Phantom with appropriate test targets can assist evaluate and calibrate imaging performance of OCT at both installation and throughout lifetime of the instrument. In this paper, we design and fabricate a physical model eye with 3D resolution test targets to characterize OCT imaging performance. The model eye was fabricated with transparent resin to simulate realistic ophthalmic testing environment, and most key optical elements including cornea, lens and vitreous body were realized. The test targets which mimic USAF 1951 test chart were fabricated on the fundus of the model eye by 3D printing technology. Differing from traditional two dimensional USAF 1951 test chart, a group of patterns which have different thickness in depth were fabricated. By measuring the 3D test targets, axial resolution as well as lateral resolution of an OCT system can be evaluated at the same time with this model eye. To investigate this specialized model eye, it was measured by a scientific spectral domain OCT instrument and a clinical OCT system respectively. The results demonstrate that the model eye with 3D resolution test targets have the potential of qualitatively and quantitatively validating the performance of OCT systems.

  12. A 3D Interactive Multi-object Segmentation Tool using Local Robust Statistics Driven Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Kikinis, Ron; Bouix, Sylvain; Shenton, Martha; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Extracting anatomical and functional significant structures renders one of the important tasks for both the theoretical study of the medical image analysis, and the clinical and practical community. In the past, much work has been dedicated only to the algorithmic development. Nevertheless, for clinical end users, a well designed algorithm with an interactive software is necessary for an algorithm to be utilized in their daily work. Furthermore, the software would better be open sourced in order to be used and validated by not only the authors but also the entire community. Therefore, the contribution of the present work is twofolds: First, we propose a new robust statistics based conformal metric and the conformal area driven multiple active contour framework, to simultaneously extract multiple targets from MR and CT medical imagery in 3D. Second, an open source graphically interactive 3D segmentation tool based on the aforementioned contour evolution is implemented and is publicly available for end users on multiple platforms. In using this software for the segmentation task, the process is initiated by the user drawn strokes (seeds) in the target region in the image. Then, the local robust statistics are used to describe the object features, and such features are learned adaptively from the seeds under a non-parametric estimation scheme. Subsequently, several active contours evolve simultaneously with their interactions being motivated by the principles of action and reaction — This not only guarantees mutual exclusiveness among the contours, but also no longer relies upon the assumption that the multiple objects fill the entire image domain, which was tacitly or explicitly assumed in many previous works. In doing so, the contours interact and converge to equilibrium at the desired positions of the desired multiple objects. Furthermore, with the aim of not only validating the algorithm and the software, but also demonstrating how the tool is to be used, we

  13. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  14. Edge structure preserving 3D image denoising by local surface approximation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peihua; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2012-08-01

    In various applications, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI), 3D images are becoming increasingly popular. To improve the reliability of subsequent image analyses, 3D image denoising is often a necessary preprocessing step, which is the focus of the current paper. In the literature, most existing image denoising procedures are for 2D images. Their direct extensions to 3D cases generally cannot handle 3D images efficiently because the structure of a typical 3D image is substantially more complicated than that of a typical 2D image. For instance, edge locations are surfaces in 3D cases which would be much more challenging to handle compared to edge curves in 2D cases. We propose a novel 3D image denoising procedure in this paper, based on local approximation of the edge surfaces using a set of surface templates. An important property of this method is that it can preserve edges and major edge structures (e.g., intersections of two edge surfaces and pointed corners). Numerical studies show that it works well in various applications.

  15. 3D Geovisualization & Stylization to Manage Comprehensive and Participative Local Urban Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasebin, M.; Christophe, S.; Jacquinod, F.; Vinesse, A.; Mahon, H.

    2016-10-01

    3D geo-visualization is more and more used and appreciated to support public participation, and is generally used to present predesigned planned projects. Nevertheless, other participatory processes may benefit from such technology such as the elaboration of urban planning documents. In this article, we present one of the objectives of the PLU++ project: the design of a 3D geo-visualization system that eases the participation concerning local urban plans. Through a pluridisciplinary approach, it aims at covering the different aspects of such a system: the simulation of built configurations to represent regulation information, the efficient stylization of these objects to make people understand their meanings and the interaction between 3D simulation and stylization. The system aims at being adaptive according to the participation context and to the dynamic of the participation. It will offer the possibility to modify simulation results and the rendering styles of the 3D representations to support participation. The proposed 3D rendering styles will be used in a set of practical experiments in order to test and validate some hypothesis from past researches of the project members about 3D simulation, 3D semiotics and knowledge about uses.

  16. Toward 3D-guided prostate biopsy target optimization: an estimation of tumor sampling probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the ~23% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsy still yields false negatives. Therefore, we propose optimization of biopsy targeting to meet the clinician's desired tumor sampling probability, optimizing needle targets within each tumor and accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. We obtained multiparametric MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. We estimated the probability, P, of obtaining a tumor sample with a single biopsy. Given an RMS needle delivery error of 3.5 mm for a contemporary fusion biopsy system, P >= 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors when the point of optimal sampling probability was targeted. Therefore, more than one biopsy core must be taken from 74% of the tumors to achieve P >= 95% for a biopsy system with an error of 3.5 mm. Our experiments indicated that the effect of error along the needle axis on the percentage of core involvement (and thus the measured tumor burden) was mitigated by the 18 mm core length.

  17. Automatic organ localizations on 3D CT images by using majority-voting of multiple 2D detections based on local binary patterns and Haar-like features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamaguchi, Shoutarou; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes an approach to accomplish the fast and automatic localization of the different inner organ regions on 3D CT scans. The proposed approach combines object detections and the majority voting technique to achieve the robust and quick organ localization. The basic idea of proposed method is to detect a number of 2D partial appearances of a 3D target region on CT images from multiple body directions, on multiple image scales, by using multiple feature spaces, and vote all the 2D detecting results back to the 3D image space to statistically decide one 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ. Ensemble learning was used to train the multiple 2D detectors based on template matching on local binary patterns and Haar-like feature spaces. A collaborative voting was used to decide the corner coordinates of the 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ region based on the coordinate histograms from detection results in three body directions. Since the architecture of the proposed method (multiple independent detections connected to a majority voting) naturally fits the parallel computing paradigm and multi-core CPU hardware, the proposed algorithm was easy to achieve a high computational efficiently for the organ localizations on a whole body CT scan by using general-purpose computers. We applied this approach to localization of 12 kinds of major organ regions independently on 1,300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected 300 CT scans (with human indicated organ and tissue locations) for training, and then, applied the proposed approach with the training results to localize each of the target regions on the other 1,000 CT scans for the performance testing. The experimental results showed the possibility of the proposed approach to automatically locate different kinds of organs on the whole body CT scans.

  18. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape.

    PubMed

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-02-09

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype.

  19. Full-aspect 3D target reconstruction of interferometric circular SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yun; Bao, Qian; Hou, Liying; Yu, Lingjuan; Hong, Wen

    2016-10-01

    Circular SAR has several attractive features, such as full-aspect observation, high resolution, and 3D target reconstruction capability, thus it has important potential in fine feature description of typical targets. However, the 3D reconstruction capability relies on the scattering persistence of the target. For target with a highly directive scattering property, the resolution in the direction perpendicular to the instantaneous slant plane is very low compared to the range and azimuth resolutions, and the 3D structure of target can hardly be obtained. In this paper, an Interferometric Circular SAR (InCSAR) method is proposed to reconstruct the full-aspect 3D structure of typical targets. InCSAR uses two sensors with a small incident angle difference to collect data in a circular trajectory. The method proposed in this paper calculates the interferometric phase difference (IPD) of the image pair at equally spaced height slices, and mask the original image with an IPD threshold. The main principle is that when a scatterer is imaged at a wrong height, the image pair has an offset, which results in a nonzero IPD, and only when the scatterer is correctly imaged at its true height, the IPD is near zero. The IPD threshold is used to retain scatterers that is correctly imaged at the right height, and meanwhile eliminate scatterers that is imaged at a wrong height, thus the 3D target structure can be retrieved. The proposed method is validated by real data processing, both the data collected in the microwave chamber and the GOTCHA airborne data.

  20. 3-D Localization Method for a Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule Endoscope and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sehyuk; Sitti, Metin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3-D localization method for a magnetically actuated soft capsule endoscope (MASCE). The proposed localization scheme consists of three steps. First, MASCE is oriented to be coaxially aligned with an external permanent magnet (EPM). Second, MASCE is axially contracted by the enhanced magnetic attraction of the approaching EPM. Third, MASCE recovers its initial shape by the retracting EPM as the magnetic attraction weakens. The combination of the estimated direction in the coaxial alignment step and the estimated distance in the shape deformation (recovery) step provides the position of MASCE in 3-D. It is experimentally shown that the proposed localization method could provide 2.0–3.7 mm of distance error in 3-D. This study also introduces two new applications of the proposed localization method. First, based on the trace of contact points between the MASCE and the surface of the stomach, the 3-D geometrical model of a synthetic stomach was reconstructed. Next, the relative tissue compliance at each local contact point in the stomach was characterized by measuring the local tissue deformation at each point due to the preloading force. Finally, the characterized relative tissue compliance parameter was mapped onto the geometrical model of the stomach toward future use in disease diagnosis. PMID:25383064

  1. Framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms in conjunction with 3D landmark localization and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Hoegen, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms. Phantoms are designed using a CAD system and created with a 3D printer, and comprise realistic shapes including branches and pathologies such as abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). To transfer ground truth information to the 3D image coordinate system, we use a landmark-based registration scheme utilizing fiducial markers integrated in the phantom design. For accurate 3D localization of the markers we developed a novel 3D parametric intensity model that is directly fitted to the markers in the images. We also performed a quantitative evaluation of different vessel segmentation approaches for a phantom of an AAA.

  2. Evidence of Toroidally Localized Turbulence with Applied 3D Fields in the DIII-D Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R S; Shafer, M W; Ferraro, N M; McKee, G R; Zeng, L; Rhodes, T L; Canik, J M; Paz-Soldan, C; Nazikian, R; Unterberg, E A

    2016-09-23

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. These processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  3. Optimal Local Searching for Fast and Robust Textureless 3D Object Tracking in Highly Cluttered Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byung-Kuk; Park, Jong-Il; Hinterstoisser, Stefan; Ilic, Slobodan

    2013-06-13

    Edge-based tracking is a fast and plausible approach for textureless 3D object tracking, but its robustness is still very challenging in highly cluttered backgrounds due to numerous local minima. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel method for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds. The proposed method is based on optimal local searching of 3D-2D correspondences between a known 3D object model and 2D scene edges in an image with heavy background clutter. In our searching scheme, searching regions are partitioned into three levels (interior, contour, and exterior) with respect to the previous object region, and confident searching directions are determined by evaluating candidates of correspondences on their region levels; thus, the correspondences are searched among likely candidates in only the confident directions instead of searching through all candidates. To ensure the confident searching direction, we also adopt the region appearance, which is efficiently modeled on a newly defined local space (called a searching bundle). Experimental results and performance evaluations demonstrate that our method fully supports fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking even in highly cluttered backgrounds.

  4. Optimal local searching for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Seo, Byung-Kuk; Park, Hanhoon; Park, Jong-Il; Hinterstoisser, Stefan; Ilic, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Edge-based tracking is a fast and plausible approach for textureless 3D object tracking, but its robustness is still very challenging in highly cluttered backgrounds due to numerous local minima. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel method for fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking in highly cluttered backgrounds. The proposed method is based on optimal local searching of 3D-2D correspondences between a known 3D object model and 2D scene edges in an image with heavy background clutter. In our searching scheme, searching regions are partitioned into three levels (interior, contour, and exterior) with respect to the previous object region, and confident searching directions are determined by evaluating candidates of correspondences on their region levels; thus, the correspondences are searched among likely candidates in only the confident directions instead of searching through all candidates. To ensure the confident searching direction, we also adopt the region appearance, which is efficiently modeled on a newly defined local space (called a searching bundle). Experimental results and performance evaluations demonstrate that our method fully supports fast and robust textureless 3D object tracking even in highly cluttered backgrounds.

  5. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; ...

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agreesmore » qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.« less

  6. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  7. 3D numerical thermal stress analysis of the high power target for the SLC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, E.M.; Hodgson, J.A.

    1991-05-01

    The volumetrically nonuniform power deposition of the incident 33 GeV electron beam in the SLC Positron Source Target is hypothesized to be the most likely cause target failure. The resultant pulsed temperature distributions are known to generate complicated stress fields with no known closed-form analytical solution. 3D finite element analyses of these temperature distributions and associated thermal stress fields in the new High Power Target are described here. Operational guidelines based on the results of these analyses combined with assumptions made about the fatigue characteristics of the exotic target material are proposed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  8. 3D modelling of the electromagnetic response of geophysical targets using the FDTD method

    SciTech Connect

    Debroux, P.S.

    1996-05-01

    A publicly available and maintained electromagnetic finite-difference time domain (FDTD) code has been applied to the forward modelling of the response of 1D, 2D and 3D geophysical targets to a vertical magnetic dipole excitation. The FDTD method is used to analyze target responses in the 1 MHz to 100 MHz range, where either conduction or displacement currents may have the controlling role. The response of the geophysical target to the excitation is presented as changes in the magnetic field ellipticity. The results of the FDTD code compare favorably with previously published integral equation solutions of the response of 1D targets, and FDTD models calculated with different finite-difference cell sizes are compared to find the effect of model discretization on the solution. The discretization errors, calculated as absolute error in ellipticity, are presented for the different ground geometry models considered, and are, for the most part, below 10% of the integral equation solutions. Finally, the FDTD code is used to calculate the magnetic ellipticity response of a 2D survey and a 3D sounding of complicated geophysical targets. The response of these 2D and 3D targets are too complicated to be verified with integral equation solutions, but show the proper low- and high-frequency responses.

  9. 3D Imaging of Rapidly Spinning Space Targets Based on a Factorization Method

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Yanxian; Wei, Shaoming; Wang, Jun; Mao, Shiyi

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of space targets can provide crucial information about the target shape and size, which are significant supports for the application of automatic target classification and recognition. In this paper, a new 3D imaging of space spinning targets via a factorization method is proposed. Firstly, after the translational compensation, the scattering centers two-dimensional (2D) range and range-rate sequence induced by the target spinning is extracted using a high resolution spectral estimation technique. Secondly, measurement data association is implemented to obtain the scattering center trajectory matrix by using a range-Doppler tracker. Then, we use an initial coarse angular velocity to generate the projection matrix, which consists of the scattering centers range and cross-range, and a factorization method is applied iteratively to the projection matrix to estimate the accurate angular velocity. Finally, we use the accurate estimate spinning angular velocity to rescale the projection matrix and the well-scaled target 3D geometry is reconstructed. Compared to the previous literature methods, ambiguity in the spatial axes can be removed by this method. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:28216588

  10. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution.

  11. Handling realistic assumptions in hypothesis testing of 3D co-localization of genomic elements.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Jonas; Lien, Tonje G; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Holden, Lars; Borgan, Ornulf; Glad, Ingrid K; Hovig, Eivind

    2013-05-01

    The study of chromatin 3D structure has recently gained much focus owing to novel techniques for detecting genome-wide chromatin contacts using next-generation sequencing. A deeper understanding of the architecture of the DNA inside the nucleus is crucial for gaining insight into fundamental processes such as transcriptional regulation, genome dynamics and genome stability. Chromatin conformation capture-based methods, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, are now paving the way for routine genome-wide studies of chromatin 3D structure in a range of organisms and tissues. However, appropriate methods for analyzing such data are lacking. Here, we propose a hypothesis test and an enrichment score of 3D co-localization of genomic elements that handles intra- or interchromosomal interactions, both separately and jointly, and that adjusts for biases caused by structural dependencies in the 3D data. We show that maintaining structural properties during resampling is essential to obtain valid estimation of P-values. We apply the method on chromatin states and a set of mutated regions in leukemia cells, and find significant co-localization of these elements, with varying enrichment scores, supporting the role of chromatin 3D structure in shaping the landscape of somatic mutations in cancer.

  12. 4Pi fluorescence detection and 3D particle localization with a single objective

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzbauer, J.; McGorty, R.; Huang, B.

    2013-01-01

    Coherent detection through two opposing objectives (4Pi configuration) improves the precision of three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule localization substantially along the axial direction, but suffers from instrument complexity and maintenance difficulty. To address these issues, we have realized 4Pi fluorescence detection by sandwiching the sample between the objective and a mirror, and create interference of direct incidence and mirror-reflected signal at the camera with a spatial light modulator. Multifocal imaging using this single-objective mirror interference scheme offers improvement in the axial localization similar to the traditional 4Pi method. We have also devised several PSF engineering schemes to enable 3D localization with a single emitter image, offering better axial precision than normal single-objective localization methods such as astigmatic imaging. PMID:24105517

  13. Photometry unlocks 3D information from 2D localization microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Franke, Christian; Sauer, Markus; van de Linde, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We developed a straightforward photometric method, temporal, radial-aperture-based intensity estimation (TRABI), that allows users to extract 3D information from existing 2D localization microscopy data. TRABI uses the accurate determination of photon numbers in different regions of the emission pattern of single emitters to generate a z-dependent photometric parameter. This method can determine fluorophore positions up to 600 nm from the focal plane and can be combined with biplane detection to further improve axial localization.

  14. 3D modeling of large targets and clutter utilizing Ka band monopulse SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jerry A.; Barr, Doug; Shurtz, Ric; Channell, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama have developed a dual mode, Ka Band Radar and IIR system for the purpose of data collection and tracker algorithm development. The system is comprised of modified MMW and IIR sensors and is mounted in a stabilized ball on a UH-1 helicopter operated by Redstone Technical Test Center. Several missile programs under development require MMW signatures of multiple target and clutter scenes. Traditionally these target signatures have been successfully collected using static radars and targets mounted on a turntable to produce models from ISAR images; clutter scenes have been homogeneously characterized using information on various classes of clutter. However, current and future radar systems require models of many targets too large for turntables, as well as high resolution 3D scattering characteristics of urban and other non-homogenous clutter scenes. In partnership with industry independent research and development (IRAD) activities the U.S. Army RDEC has developed a technique for generating 3D target and clutter models using SAR imaging in the MMW spectrum. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of funded projects and resulting data products with an emphasis on MMW data reduction and analysis, especially the unique 3D modeling capabilities of the monopulse radar flying SAR profiles. Also, a discussion of lessons learned and planned improvements will be presented.

  15. Relativistic Laser Pulse Intensification with 3D Printed Micro-Tube Plasma Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liangliang; Snyder, Joseph; Pukhov, Alexander; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    The potential and applications of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) are restricted by the parameter space of existing lasers and targets. Advancing the laser intensity to the extreme regime is motivated by the production of energetic particle beams and by the quest to explore the exotic regimes of light-matter interaction. Target density and dimensions can always be varied to optimize the outcome. Here, we propose to create another degree of freedom in the parameter space of LPI using recent advances in 3D printing of materials. Fine structures at nm scale with high repetition and accuracy can nowadays be manufactured, allowing for a full precise control of the target. We demonstrate, via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, that 3D-printed micro-tube plasma (MTP) targets yield an intensity enhancement factor of 2-5. The novel MTP targets not only act as a plasma optical device to reach the 1023W/cm2 threshold based on today's intensities, but can also boost the generation of secondary particle and radiation sources. This work demonstrates that the combination of high contrast high power lasers and nano-3D printing techniques opens new paths in the intensity frontier and LPI micro-engineering.

  16. ConvNet-Based Localization of Anatomical Structures in 3D Medical Images.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Bob; Wolterink, Jelmer; de Jong, Pim; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max; Isgum, Ivana

    2017-02-23

    Localization of anatomical structures is a prerequisite for many tasks in medical image analysis. We propose a method for automatic localization of one or more anatomical structures in 3D medical images through detection of their presence in 2D image slices using a convolutional neural network (ConvNet). A single ConvNet is trained to detect presence of the anatomical structure of interest in axial, coronal, and sagittal slices extracted from a 3D image. To allow the ConvNet to analyze slices of different sizes, spatial pyramid pooling is applied. After detection, 3D bounding boxes are created by combining the output of the ConvNet in all slices. In the experiments 200 chest CT, 100 cardiac CT angiography (CTA), and 100 abdomen CT scans were used. The heart, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta were localized in chest CT scans, the left cardiac ventricle in cardiac CTA scans, and the liver in abdomen CT scans. Localization was evaluated using the distances between automatically and manually defined reference bounding box centroids and walls. The best results were achieved in localization of structures with clearly defined boundaries (e.g. aortic arch) and the worst when the structure boundary was not clearly visible (e.g. liver). The method was more robust and accurate in localization multiple structures.

  17. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  18. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of 3D Angiogram and MRI in Delineating the AVM Target for Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Avkshtol, V; Tanny, S; Reddy, K; Chen, C; Parsai, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) provides an excellent alternative to embolization and surgical excision for the management of appropriately selected cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The currently accepted standard for delineating AVMs is planar digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA can be used to acquire a 3D data set that preserves osseous structures (3D-DA) at the time of the angiography for SRT planning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative noninvasive method of visualizing the AVM nidus with comparable spatial resolution. We utilized 3D-DA and T1 post-contrast MRI data to evaluate the differences in SRT target volumes. Methods: Four patients underwent 3D-DA and high-resolution MRI. 3D T1 post-contrast images were obtained in all three reconstruction planes. A planning CT was fused with MRI and 3D-DA data sets. The AVMs were contoured utilizing one of the image sets at a time. Target volume, centroid, and maximum and minimum dimensions were analyzed for each patient. Results: Targets delineated using post-contrast MRI demonstrated a larger mean volume. AVMs >2 cc were found to have a larger difference between MRI and 3D-DA volumes. Larger AVMs also demonstrated a smaller relative uncertainty in contour centroid position (1 mm). AVM targets <2 cc had smaller absolute differences in volume, but larger differences in contour centroid position (2.5 mm). MRI targets demonstrated a more irregular shape compared to 3D-DA targets. Conclusions: Our preliminary data supports the use of MRI alone to delineate AVM targets >2 cc. The greater centroid stability for AVMs >2 cc ensures accurate target localization during image fusion. The larger MRI target volumes did not result in prohibitively greater volumes of normal brain tissue receiving the prescription dose. The larger centroid instability for AVMs <2 cc precludes the use of MRI alone for target delineation. We recommend incorporating a 3D-DA for these patients.

  19. High-resolution DTI of a localized volume using 3D single-shot diffusion-weighted STimulated echo-planar imaging (3D ss-DWSTEPI).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun-Kee; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Parker, Dennis L

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) using conventional single-shot (SS) 2D diffusion-weighted (DW)-EPI is subject to severe susceptibility artifacts. Multishot DW imaging (DWI) techniques can reduce these distortions, but they generally suffer from artifacts caused by motion-induced phase errors. Parallel imaging can also reduce the distortions if the sensitivity profiles of the receiver coils allow a sufficiently high reduction factor for the desired field of view (FOV). A novel 3D DTI technique, termed 3D single-shot STimulated EPI (3D ss-STEPI), was developed to acquire high-resolution DW images of a localized region. The new technique completes k-space acquisition of a limited 3D volume after a single diffusion preparation. Because the DW magnetization is stored in the longitudinal direction until readout, it undergoes T(1) rather than T(2) decay. Inner volume imaging (IVI) is used to limit the imaging volume. This reduces the time required for EPI readout of each complete k(x)-k(y) plane, and hence reduces T(2)(*) decay during the readout and T(1) decay between the readout of each k(z). 3D ss-STEPI images appear to be free of severe susceptibility and motion artifacts. 3D ss-STEPI allows high-resolution DTI of limited volumes of interest, such as localized brain regions, cervical spinal cord, optic nerve, and other extracranial organs.

  20. Recursive estimation of 3D motion and surface structure from local affine flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Calway, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    A recursive structure from motion algorithm based on optical flow measurements taken from an image sequence is described. It provides estimates of surface normals in addition to 3D motion and depth. The measurements are affine motion parameters which approximate the local flow fields associated with near-planar surface patches in the scene. These are integrated over time to give estimates of the 3D parameters using an extended Kalman filter. This also estimates the camera focal length and, so, the 3D estimates are metric. The use of parametric measurements means that the algorithm is computationally less demanding than previous optical flow approaches and the recursive filter builds in a degree of noise robustness. Results of experiments on synthetic and real image sequences demonstrate that the algorithm performs well.

  1. Local motion-compensated method for high-quality 3D coronary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of coronary artery from X-ray angiograms rotationally acquired on C-arm has great clinical value. While cardiac-gated reconstruction has shown promising results, it suffers from the problem of residual motion. This work proposed a new local motion-compensated reconstruction method to handle this issue. An initial image was firstly reconstructed using a regularized iterative reconstruction method. Then a 3D/2D registration method was proposed to estimate the residual vessel motion. Finally, the residual motion was compensated in the final reconstruction using the extended iterative reconstruction method. Through quantitative evaluation, it was found that high-quality 3D reconstruction could be obtained and the result was comparable to state-of-the-art method. PMID:28018741

  2. Local motion-compensated method for high-quality 3D coronary artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Bai, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-12-01

    The 3D reconstruction of coronary artery from X-ray angiograms rotationally acquired on C-arm has great clinical value. While cardiac-gated reconstruction has shown promising results, it suffers from the problem of residual motion. This work proposed a new local motion-compensated reconstruction method to handle this issue. An initial image was firstly reconstructed using a regularized iterative reconstruction method. Then a 3D/2D registration method was proposed to estimate the residual vessel motion. Finally, the residual motion was compensated in the final reconstruction using the extended iterative reconstruction method. Through quantitative evaluation, it was found that high-quality 3D reconstruction could be obtained and the result was comparable to state-of-the-art method.

  3. Recent Developments in the VISRAD 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, Joseph; Woodruff, P.; Golovkin, I.

    2011-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e . g . , that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. VISRAD includes a variety of user-friendly graphics for setting up targets and displaying results, can readily display views from any point in space, and can be used to generate image sequences for animations. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  4. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  5. The Donegal Sign Tree: A Local Legend Confirmed with Holographic Radar and 3-D Magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, T.; Cassidy, M.; Inagaki, M.; Windsor, C.; Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Bulleti, A.; Valentini, S.; Borgioli, G.; Ivashov, S.; Zhuravlev, A.; Razewig, V.; Vasiliev, I.; Bechtel, E.

    2009-05-01

    A tree at a crossroad in Historic Donegal, PA (founded 1722) bears unusual burls. Two are similar in size, and lie on opposite sides of the trunk at a height of six feet. Locals say that the tree engulfed an old road sign, and the geometry of the burls gives this appearance. However, the trunk between these two burls bears no welt where it sealed after swallowing the sign. In addition, there are other burls farther up the tree, which are not consistent with engulfed signs. Although the locals all know the legend of the swallowed sign, none ever actually saw the sign; not even an octogenarian who has lived at the crossroad his entire life, and recalls the tree as a child just as it is today. In order to test the veracity of the legend, this study performed subsurface imaging of the tree using holographic subsurface radar (Rascan), and 3-D measurements of the magnetic field about the tree using cesium vapor sensors. The Rascan system used is a continuous wave subsurface radar that operates at 5 discrete frequencies between 1.5 and 2.0 GHz. Reflections from subsurface objects are recorded as the phase difference pattern between an internal reference signal, and the reflected signal. Thus, it is a microwave analogy for optical holography. Rascan records reflections with two receiving antennae - parallel and perpendicular to the transmitter - so a single set of scans provides ten images; five frequencies at two polarizations. This ensures that an object at arbitrary depth will produce a strong phase difference in one of the images. As a consequence, elongate objects that are angled from the plane of scanning (e.g. a dipping sheet) produce "zebra stripes" of contrast values that vary cyclically with depth. The presence of stripes, and their relative positions in the different frequency images (the movement of which has been dubbed the "zebra shift") is useful for determining the relative depth of different portions of a dipping planar, or curved subsurface object. Rascan

  6. Uniform Local Binary Pattern Based Texture-Edge Feature for 3D Human Behavior Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yue; Wang, Guangchao; Fan, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D somatosensory technology, human behavior recognition has become an important research field. Human behavior feature analysis has evolved from traditional 2D features to 3D features. In order to improve the performance of human activity recognition, a human behavior recognition method is proposed, which is based on a hybrid texture-edge local pattern coding feature extraction and integration of RGB and depth videos information. The paper mainly focuses on background subtraction on RGB and depth video sequences of behaviors, extracting and integrating historical images of the behavior outlines, feature extraction and classification. The new method of 3D human behavior recognition has achieved the rapid and efficient recognition of behavior videos. A large number of experiments show that the proposed method has faster speed and higher recognition rate. The recognition method has good robustness for different environmental colors, lightings and other factors. Meanwhile, the feature of mixed texture-edge uniform local binary pattern can be used in most 3D behavior recognition.

  7. A 3D-printed local drug delivery patch for pancreatic cancer growth suppression.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hee-Gyeong; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Kang, Kyung Shin; Hong, Jung Min; Pati, Ruby Gupta; Park, Moon Nyeo; Shim, In Kyong; Lee, Chan Mi; Kim, Song Cheol; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-09-28

    Since recurrence and metastasis of pancreatic cancer has a worse prognosis, chemotherapy has been typically performed to attack the remained malignant cells after resection. However, it is difficult to achieve the therapeutic concentration at the tumor site with systemic chemotherapy. Numerous local drug delivery systems have been studied to overcome the shortcomings of systemic delivery. However, because most systems involve dissolution of the drug within the carrier, the concentration of the drug is limited to the saturation solubility, and consequently cannot reach the sufficient drug dose. Therefore, we hypothesized that 3D printing of a biodegradable patch incorporated with a high drug concentration would provide a versatile shape to be administered at the exact tumor site as well as an appropriate therapeutic drug concentration with a controlled release. Here, we introduce the 3D-printed patches composed of a blend of poly(lactide-co-glycolide), polycaprolactone, and 5-fluorouracil for delivering the anti-cancer drug in a prolonged controlled manner and therapeutic dose. 3D printing technology can manipulate the geometry of the patch and the drug release kinetics. The patches were flexible, and released the drug over four weeks, and thereby suppressed growth of the subcutaneous pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice with minimized side effects. Our approach reveals that 3D printing of bioabsorbable implants containing anti-cancer drugs could be a powerful method for an effective local delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to treatment of cancers.

  8. 3D handheld laser scanner based approach for automatic identification and localization of EEG sensors.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Laurent; Cecchin, Thierry; Ternisien, Eric; Maillard, Louis

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes and assesses for the first time the use of a handheld 3D laser scanner for scalp EEG sensor localization and co-registration with magnetic resonance images. Study on five subjects showed that the scanner had an equivalent accuracy, a better repeatability, and was faster than the reference electromagnetic digitizer. According to electrical source imaging, somatosensory evoked potentials experiments validated its ability to give precise sensor localization. With our automatic labeling method, the data provided by the scanner could be directly introduced in the source localization studies.

  9. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  10. Cooperative Wall-climbing Robots in 3D Environments for Surveillance and Target Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-08

    distribution of impeller vanes, volume of the chamber, and sealing effect , etc. Fig. 5 and 6 show some exemplary simulation results. In paper [11], we...Environments for Surveillance and Target Tracking 11 multiple nonholonomic mobile robots using Cartesian coordinates. Based on the special feature...gamma-ray or x-ray cargo inspection system. Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the objects inside a cargo can be obtained by effectively

  11. 3D mapping of the dense interstellar gas around the Local Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Welsh, B. Y.; Vergely, J. L.; Crifo, F.; Sfeir, D.

    2003-12-01

    We present intermediate results from a long-term program of mapping the neutral absorption characteristics of the local interstellar medium, motivated by the availability of accurate and consistent parallaxes from the Hipparcos satellite. Equivalent widths of the interstellar NaI D-line doublet at 5890 Å are presented for the lines-of-sight towards some 311 new target stars lying within ~ 350 pc of the Sun. Using these data, together with NaI absorption measurements towards a further ~ 240 nearby targets published in the literature (for many of them, in the directions of molecular clouds), and the ~ 450 lines-of-sight already presented by (Sfeir et al. \\cite{sfeir99}), we show 3D absorption maps of the local distribution of neutral gas towards 1005 sight-lines with Hipparcos distances as viewed from a variety of different galactic projections. The data are synthesized by means of two complementary methods, (i) by mapping of iso-equivalent width contours, and (ii) by density distribution calculation from the inversion of column-densities, a method devised by Vergely et al. (\\cite{vergely01}). Our present data confirms the view that the local cavity is deficient in cold and neutral interstellar gas. The closest dense and cold gas ``wall'', in the first quadrant, is at ~ 55-60 pc. There are a few isolated clouds at closer distance, if the detected absorption is not produced by circumstellar material. The maps reveal narrow or wide ``interstellar tunnels'' which connect the Local Bubble to surrounding cavities, as predicted by the model of Cox & Smith (1974). In particular, one of these tunnels, defined by stars at 300 to 600 pc from the Sun showing negligible sodium absorption, connects the well known CMa void (Gry et al. \\cite{gry85}), which is part of the Local Bubble, with the supershell GSH 238+00+09 (Heiles \\cite{heiles98}). High latitude lines-of-sight with the smallest absorption are found in two ``chimneys'', whose directions are perpendicular to the

  12. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  13. Characterizing the effects of droplines on target acquisition performance on a 3-D perspective display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Min-Ju; Johnson, Walter W.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of droplines on target acquisition performance on a 3-D perspective display in which participants were required to move a cursor into a target cube as quickly as possible. Participants' performance and coordination strategies were characterized using both Fitts' law and acquisition patterns of the 3 viewer-centered target display dimensions (azimuth, elevation, and range). Participants' movement trajectories were recorded and used to determine movement times for acquisitions of the entire target and of each of its display dimensions. The goodness of fit of the data to a modified Fitts function varied widely among participants, and the presence of droplines did not have observable impacts on the goodness of fit. However, droplines helped participants navigate via straighter paths and particularly benefited range dimension acquisition. A general preference for visually overlapping the target with the cursor prior to capturing the target was found. Potential applications of this research include the design of interactive 3-D perspective displays in which fast and accurate selection and manipulation of content residing at multiple ranges may be a challenge.

  14. Interim results from a neural network 3-D automatic target recognition program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoet, William; Rainey, Timothy G.; Slutz, Lee A.; Weingard, Fred

    1992-09-01

    Recent results from the Artificial Neural VIsion Learning (ANVIL) program are presented. The focus of the ANVIL program is to apply neural network technologies to the air-to-surface 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) problem. The 3D Multiple Object Detection and Location System (MODALS) neural network was developed under the ANVIL program to simultaneously detect, locate, segment, and identify multiple targets. The performance results show a very high identification accuracy, a high detection rate, and low false alarm rate, even for areas with high clutter and shadowing. The results are shown as detection/false alarm curves and identification/false alarm curves. In addition, positional detection accuracy is shown for various scale sizes. To provide data for the program, visible terrain board imagery was collected under a variety of background and lighting conditions. Tests were made on over 500 targets of five types and two classes. These targets varied in scale by up to -25%, varied in azimuth by up to 120 degrees, and varied in elevation by up to 10 degrees. The performance results are shown for targets with resolution ranging from 9 to 700 pixels on target. This work is being performed under contract to Wright Laboratory AAAT-1.

  15. Ultra wide band millimeter wave holographic ``3-D`` imaging of concealed targets on mannequins

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; Gribble, R.P.

    1994-08-01

    Ultra wide band (chirp frequency) millimeter wave ``3-D`` holography is a unique technique for imaging concealed targets on human subjects with extremely high lateral and depth resolution. Recent ``3-D`` holographic images of full size mannequins with concealed weapons illustrate the efficacy of this technique for airport security. A chirp frequency (24 GHz to 40 GHz) holographic system was used to construct extremely high resolution images (optical quality) using polyrod antenna in a bi-static configuration using an x-y scanner. Millimeter wave chirp frequency holography can be simply described as a multi-frequency detection and imaging technique where the target`s reflected signals are decomposed into discrete frequency holograms and reconstructed into a single composite ``3-D`` image. The implementation of this technology for security at airports, government installations, etc., will require real-time (video rate) data acquisition and computer image reconstruction of large volumetric data sets. This implies rapid scanning techniques or large, complex ``2-D`` arrays and high speed computing for successful commercialization of this technology.

  16. 3-D Facial Landmark Localization With Asymmetry Patterns and Shape Regression from Incomplete Local Features.

    PubMed

    Sukno, Federico M; Waddington, John L; Whelan, Paul F

    2015-09-01

    We present a method for the automatic localization of facial landmarks that integrates nonrigid deformation with the ability to handle missing points. The algorithm generates sets of candidate locations from feature detectors and performs combinatorial search constrained by a flexible shape model. A key assumption of our approach is that for some landmarks there might not be an accurate candidate in the input set. This is tackled by detecting partial subsets of landmarks and inferring those that are missing, so that the probability of the flexible model is maximized. The ability of the model to work with incomplete information makes it possible to limit the number of candidates that need to be retained, drastically reducing the number of combinations to be tested with respect to the alternative of trying to always detect the complete set of landmarks. We demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method in the face recognition grand challenge database, where we obtain average errors of approximately 3.5 mm when targeting 14 prominent facial landmarks. For the majority of these our method produces the most accurate results reported to date in this database. Handling of occlusions and surfaces with missing parts is demonstrated with tests on the Bosphorus database, where we achieve an overall error of 4.81 and 4.25 mm for data with and without occlusions, respectively. To investigate potential limits in the accuracy that could be reached, we also report experiments on a database of 144 facial scans acquired in the context of clinical research, with manual annotations performed by experts, where we obtain an overall error of 2.3 mm, with averages per landmark below 3.4 mm for all 14 targeted points and within 2 mm for half of them. The coordinates of automatically located landmarks are made available on-line.

  17. Multi-camera sensor system for 3D segmentation and localization of multiple mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Losada, Cristina; Mazo, Manuel; Palazuelos, Sira; Pizarro, Daniel; Marrón, Marta

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for obtaining the motion segmentation and 3D localization of multiple mobile robots in an intelligent space using a multi-camera sensor system. The set of calibrated and synchronized cameras are placed in fixed positions within the environment (intelligent space). The proposed algorithm for motion segmentation and 3D localization is based on the minimization of an objective function. This function includes information from all the cameras, and it does not rely on previous knowledge or invasive landmarks on board the robots. The proposed objective function depends on three groups of variables: the segmentation boundaries, the motion parameters and the depth. For the objective function minimization, we use a greedy iterative algorithm with three steps that, after initialization of segmentation boundaries and depth, are repeated until convergence.

  18. Effective 3D protein structure prediction with local adjustment genetic-annealing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Lin, Xiao-Li

    2010-09-01

    The protein folding problem consists of predicting protein tertiary structure from a given amino acid sequence by minimizing the energy function. The protein folding structure prediction is computationally challenging and has been shown to be NP-hard problem when the 3D off-lattice AB model is employed. In this paper, the local adjustment genetic-annealing (LAGA) algorithm was used to search the ground state of 3D offlattice AB model for protein folding structure. The algorithm included an improved crossover strategy and an improved mutation strategy, where a local adjustment strategy was also used to enhance the searching ability. The experiments were carried out with the Fibonacci sequences. The experimental results demonstrate that the LAGA algorithm appears to have better performance and accuracy compared to the previous methods.

  19. Simulation and testing of a multichannel system for 3D sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Edward Albert

    Three-dimensional (3D) audio involves the ability to localize sound anywhere in a three-dimensional space. 3D audio can be used to provide the listener with the perception of moving sounds and can provide a realistic listening experience for applications such as gaming, video conferencing, movies, and concerts. The purpose of this research is to simulate and test 3D audio by incorporating auditory localization techniques in a multi-channel speaker system. The objective is to develop an algorithm that can place an audio event in a desired location by calculating and controlling the gain factors of each speaker. A MATLAB simulation displays the location of the speakers and perceived sound, which is verified through experimentation. The scenario in which the listener is not equidistant from each of the speakers is also investigated and simulated. This research is envisioned to lead to a better understanding of human localization of sound, and will contribute to a more realistic listening experience.

  20. Local Metric Learning in 2D/3D Deformable Registration With Application in the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Mageras, Gig; Pizer, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of disease sites subject to respiratory motion, soft tissue deformations can affect localization accuracy. We describe the application of a method of 2D/3D deformable registration to soft tissue localization in abdomen. The method, called registration efficiency and accuracy through learning a metric on shape (REALMS), is designed to support real-time IGRT. In a previously developed version of REALMS, the method interpolated 3D deformation parameters for any credible deformation in a deformation space using a single globally-trained Riemannian metric for each parameter. We propose a refinement of the method in which the metric is trained over a particular region of the deformation space, such that interpolation accuracy within that region is improved. We report on the application of the proposed algorithm to IGRT in abdominal disease sites, which is more challenging than in lung because of low intensity contrast and nonrespiratory deformation. We introduce a rigid translation vector to compensate for nonrespiratory deformation, and design a special region-of-interest around fiducial markers implanted near the tumor to produce a more reliable registration. Both synthetic data and actual data tests on abdominal datasets show that the localized approach achieves more accurate 2D/3D deformable registration than the global approach. PMID:24771575

  1. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  2. Superpose3D: A Local Structural Comparison Program That Allows for User-Defined Structure Representations

    PubMed Central

    Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    Local structural comparison methods can be used to find structural similarities involving functional protein patches such as enzyme active sites and ligand binding sites. The outcome of such analyses is critically dependent on the representation used to describe the structure. Indeed different categories of functional sites may require the comparison program to focus on different characteristics of the protein residues. We have therefore developed superpose3D, a novel structural comparison software that lets users specify, with a powerful and flexible syntax, the structure description most suited to the requirements of their analysis. Input proteins are processed according to the user's directives and the program identifies sets of residues (or groups of atoms) that have a similar 3D position in the two structures. The advantages of using such a general purpose program are demonstrated with several examples. These test cases show that no single representation is appropriate for every analysis, hence the usefulness of having a flexible program that can be tailored to different needs. Moreover we also discuss how to interpret the results of a database screening where a known structural motif is searched against a large ensemble of structures. The software is written in C++ and is released under the open source GPL license. Superpose3D does not require any external library, runs on Linux, Mac OSX, Windows and is available at http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/superpose3D. PMID:20700534

  3. Freehand photoacoustic tomography for 3D angiography using local gradient information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Thomas; Wild, Esther; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2016-03-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) is capable of imaging optical absorption in depths beyond the diffusion limit. As blood is one of the main absorbers in tissue, one important application is the visualization of vasculature, which can provide important clues for diagnosing diseases like cancer. While the state-of-the-art work in photo-acoustic 3D angiography has focused on computed tomography systems involving complex setups, we propose an approach based on optically tracking a freehand linear ultrasound probe that can be smoothly integrated into the clinical workflow. To this end, we present a method for calibration of a PAT system using an N-wire phantom specifically designed for PAT and show how to use local gradient information in the 3D reconstructed volume to significantly enhance the signal. According to experiments performed with a tissue mimicking intra-lipid phantom, the signal-to-noise ratio, contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio measured in the full field of view of the linear probe can be improved by factors of 1.7+/-0.7, 14.6+/-5.8 and 2.8+/-1.2 respectively, when comparing the post envelope detection reconstructed 3D volume with the processed one. Qualitative validation performed in tissue mimicking gelatin phantoms further showed good agreement of the reconstructed vasculature with corresponding structures extracted from X-ray computed tomographies. As our method provides high contrast 3D images of the vasculature despite a low hardware complexity its potential for clinical application is high.

  4. Rapid object indexing using locality sensitive hashing and joint 3D-signature space estimation.

    PubMed

    Matei, Bogdan; Shan, Ying; Sawhney, Harpreet S; Tan, Yi; Kumar, Rakesh; Huber, Daniel; Hebert, Martial

    2006-07-01

    We propose a new method for rapid 3D object indexing that combines feature-based methods with coarse alignment-based matching techniques. Our approach achieves a sublinear complexity on the number of models, maintaining at the same time a high degree of performance for real 3D sensed data that is acquired in largely uncontrolled settings. The key component of our method is to first index surface descriptors computed at salient locations from the scene into the whole model database using the Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH), a probabilistic approximate nearest neighbor method. Progressively complex geometric constraints are subsequently enforced to further prune the initial candidates and eliminate false correspondences due to inaccuracies in the surface descriptors and the errors of the LSH algorithm. The indexed models are selected based on the MAP rule using posterior probability of the models estimated in the joint 3D-signature space. Experiments with real 3D data employing a large database of vehicles, most of them very similar in shape, containing 1,000,000 features from more than 365 models demonstrate a high degree of performance in the presence of occlusion and obscuration, unmodeled vehicle interiors and part articulations, with an average processing time between 50 and 100 seconds per query.

  5. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach.

  6. Injectable 3-D Fabrication of Medical Electronics at the Target Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiaokang; Yang, Xueyao; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Conventional transplantable biomedical devices generally request sophisticated surgery which however often causes big trauma and serious pain to the patients. Here, we show an alternative way of directly making three-dimensional (3-D) medical electronics inside the biological body through sequential injections of biocompatible packaging material and liquid metal ink. As the most typical electronics, a variety of medical electrodes with different embedded structures were demonstrated to be easily formed at the target tissues. Conceptual in vitro experiments provide strong evidences for the excellent performances of the injectable electrodes. Further in vivo animal experiments disclosed that the formed electrode could serve as both highly efficient ECG (Electrocardiograph) electrode and stimulator electrode. These findings clarified the unique features and practicability of the liquid metal based injectable 3-D fabrication of medical electronics. The present strategy opens the way for directly manufacturing electrophysiological sensors or therapeutic devices in situ via a truly minimally invasive approach. PMID:24309385

  7. Locally conservative groundwater flow in the continuous Galerkin method using 3-D prismatic patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Zhao, Yingwang; Lin, Yu-Feng F.; Xu, Hua

    2016-11-01

    A new procedure has been developed to improve the velocity field computed by the continuous Galerkin finite element method (CG). It enables extending the postprocessing algorithm proposed by Cordes and Kinzelbach (1992) to three-dimensional (3-D) models by using prismatic patches for saturated groundwater flow. This approach leverages a dual mesh to preserve local mass conservation and provides interpolated velocities based on consistent fluxes. To develop this 3-D approach, a triangular conservative patch is introduced by computing not only advection fluxes, but also vertical infiltrations, storage changes, and other sink or source terms. This triangular patch is then used to develop a prismatic patch, which consists of subprisms in two layers. By dividing a single two-layer patch into two separate one-layer patches, two dimensional (2-D) algorithms can be applied to compute velocities. As a consequence, each subelement is able to preserve local mass conservation. A hypothetical 3-D model is used to evaluate the precision of streamlines and flow rates generated by this approach and the FEFLOW simulation program.

  8. Automated localization of implanted seeds in 3D TRUS images used for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-07-15

    An algorithm has been developed in this paper to localize implanted radioactive seeds in 3D ultrasound images for a dynamic intraoperative brachytherapy procedure. Segmentation of the seeds is difficult, due to their small size in relatively low quality of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. In this paper, intraoperative seed segmentation in 3D TRUS images is achieved by performing a subtraction of the image before the needle has been inserted, and the image after the seeds have been implanted. The seeds are searched in a 'local' space determined by the needle position and orientation information, which are obtained from a needle segmentation algorithm. To test this approach, 3D TRUS images of the agar and chicken tissue phantoms were obtained. Within these phantoms, dummy seeds were implanted. The seed locations determined by the seed segmentation algorithm were compared with those obtained from a volumetric cone-beam flat-panel micro-CT scanner and human observers. Evaluation of the algorithm showed that the rms error in determining the seed locations using the seed segmentation algorithm was 0.98 mm in agar phantoms and 1.02 mm in chicken phantoms.

  9. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    SciTech Connect

    Zarghami, Niloufar Jensen, Michael D.; Talluri, Srikanth; Dick, Frederick A.; Foster, Paula J.; Chambers, Ann F.; Wong, Eugene

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs.

  10. 3-D inversion of airborne electromagnetic data parallelized and accelerated by local mesh and adaptive soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dikun; Oldenburg, Douglas W.; Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods are highly efficient tools for assessing the Earth's conductivity structures in a large area at low cost. However, the configuration of AEM measurements, which typically have widely distributed transmitter-receiver pairs, makes the rigorous modelling and interpretation extremely time-consuming in 3-D. Excessive overcomputing can occur when working on a large mesh covering the entire survey area and inverting all soundings in the data set. We propose two improvements. The first is to use a locally optimized mesh for each AEM sounding for the forward modelling and calculation of sensitivity. This dedicated local mesh is small with fine cells near the sounding location and coarse cells far away in accordance with EM diffusion and the geometric decay of the signals. Once the forward problem is solved on the local meshes, the sensitivity for the inversion on the global mesh is available through quick interpolation. Using local meshes for AEM forward modelling avoids unnecessary computing on fine cells on a global mesh that are far away from the sounding location. Since local meshes are highly independent, the forward modelling can be efficiently parallelized over an array of processors. The second improvement is random and dynamic down-sampling of the soundings. Each inversion iteration only uses a random subset of the soundings, and the subset is reselected for every iteration. The number of soundings in the random subset, determined by an adaptive algorithm, is tied to the degree of model regularization. This minimizes the overcomputing caused by working with redundant soundings. Our methods are compared against conventional methods and tested with a synthetic example. We also invert a field data set that was previously considered to be too large to be practically inverted in 3-D. These examples show that our methodology can dramatically reduce the processing time of 3-D inversion to a practical level without losing resolution

  11. Local mode theory for C3v molecules: CH3D, CHD3, SiH3D, and SiHD3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halonen, L.; Child, M. S.

    1983-11-01

    A three parameter potential model for the stretching vibrations of AH3D and AHD3 species (A=C or Si) is shown to give good agreement with experimental data thereby justifying predictions for the term values of unobserved levels. The structures of the overtone manifolds for different molecules are rationalized by means of an AH3 local mode to normal mode correlation diagram.

  12. Sound localization with head movement: implications for 3-d audio displays

    PubMed Central

    McAnally, Ken I.; Martin, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of sound localization is improved if listeners are allowed to move their heads during signal presentation. This study describes the function relating localization accuracy to the extent of head movement in azimuth. Sounds that are difficult to localize were presented in the free field from sources at a wide range of azimuths and elevations. Sounds remained active until the participants' heads had rotated through windows ranging in width of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, or 64° of azimuth. Error in determining sound-source elevation and the rate of front/back confusion were found to decrease with increases in azimuth window width. Error in determining sound-source lateral angle was not found to vary with azimuth window width. Implications for 3-d audio displays: the utility of a 3-d audio display for imparting spatial information is likely to be improved if operators are able to move their heads during signal presentation. Head movement may compensate in part for a paucity of spectral cues to sound-source location resulting from limitations in either the audio signals presented or the directional filters (i.e., head-related transfer functions) used to generate a display. However, head movements of a moderate size (i.e., through around 32° of azimuth) may be required to ensure that spatial information is conveyed with high accuracy. PMID:25161605

  13. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  14. Denoising 3D MR images by the enhanced non-local means filter for Rician noise.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yang, Cihui; Pan, Ning; Song, Enmin; Green, Richard

    2010-12-01

    The non-local means (NLM) filter removes noise by calculating the weighted average of the pixels in the global area and shows superiority over existing local filter methods that only consider local neighbor pixels. This filter has been successfully extended from 2D images to 3D images and has been applied to denoising 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this article, a novel filter based on the NLM filter is proposed to improve the denoising effect. Considering the characteristics of Rician noise in the MR images, denoising by the NLM filter is first performed on the squared magnitude images. Then, unbiased correcting is carried out to eliminate the biased deviation. When performing the NLM filter, the weight is calculated based on the Gaussian-filtered image to reduce the disturbance of the noise. The performance of this filter is evaluated by carrying out a qualitative and quantitative comparison of this method with three other filters, namely, the original NLM filter, the unbiased NLM (UNLM) filter and the Rician NLM (RNLM) filter. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed filter achieves better denoising performance over the other filters being compared.

  15. Proposed NRC portable target case for short-range triangulation-based 3D imaging systems characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Benjamin; MacKinnon, David; Cournoyer, Luc; Beraldin, J.-Angelo

    2011-03-01

    The National Research Council of Canada (NRC) is currently evaluating and designing artifacts and methods to completely characterize 3-D imaging systems. We have gathered a set of artifacts to form a low-cost portable case and provide a clearly-defined set of procedures for generating characteristic values using these artifacts. In its current version, this case is specifically designed for the characterization of short-range (standoff distance of 1 centimeter to 3 meters) triangulation-based 3-D imaging systems. The case is known as the "NRC Portable Target Case for Short-Range Triangulation-based 3-D Imaging Systems" (NRC-PTC). The artifacts in the case have been carefully chosen for their geometric, thermal, and optical properties. A set of characterization procedures are provided with these artifacts based on procedures either already in use or are based on knowledge acquired from various tests carried out by the NRC. Geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T), a well-known terminology in the industrial field, was used to define the set of tests. The following parameters of a system are characterized: dimensional properties, form properties, orientation properties, localization properties, profile properties, repeatability, intermediate precision, and reproducibility. A number of tests were performed in a special dimensional metrology laboratory to validate the capability of the NRC-PTC. The NRC-PTC will soon be subjected to reproducibility testing using an intercomparison evaluation to validate its use in different laboratories.

  16. Robust Locally Weighted Regression For Ground Surface Extraction In Mobile Laser Scanning 3D Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurunnabi, A.; West, G.; Belton, D.

    2013-10-01

    A new robust way for ground surface extraction from mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data is proposed in this paper. Fitting polynomials along 2D/3D points is one of the well-known methods for filtering ground points, but it is evident that unorganized point clouds consist of multiple complex structures by nature so it is not suitable for fitting a parametric global model. The aim of this research is to develop and implement an algorithm to classify ground and non-ground points based on statistically robust locally weighted regression which fits a regression surface (line in 2D) by fitting without any predefined global functional relation among the variables of interest. Afterwards, the z (elevation)-values are robustly down weighted based on the residuals for the fitted points. The new set of down weighted z-values along with x (or y) values are used to get a new fit of the (lower) surface (line). The process of fitting and down-weighting continues until the difference between two consecutive fits is insignificant. Then the final fit represents the ground level of the given point cloud and the ground surface points can be extracted. The performance of the new method has been demonstrated through vehicle based mobile laser scanning 3D point cloud data from urban areas which include different problematic objects such as short walls, large buildings, electric poles, sign posts and cars. The method has potential in areas like building/construction footprint determination, 3D city modelling, corridor mapping and asset management.

  17. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  18. High-resolution 3D simulations of NIF ignition targets performed on Sequoia with HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, M. M.; Clark, D. S.; Jones, O. S.; Kerbel, G. D.; Sepke, S.; Patel, M. V.; Koning, J. M.; Schroeder, C. R.

    2015-11-01

    Developments in the multiphysics ICF code HYDRA enable it to perform large-scale simulations on the Sequoia machine at LLNL. With an aggregate computing power of 20 Petaflops, Sequoia offers an unprecedented capability to resolve the physical processes in NIF ignition targets for a more complete, consistent treatment of the sources of asymmetry. We describe modifications to HYDRA that enable it to scale to over one million processes on Sequoia. These include new options for replicating parts of the mesh over a subset of the processes, to avoid strong scaling limits. We consider results from a 3D full ignition capsule-only simulation performed using over one billion zones run on 262,000 processors which resolves surface perturbations through modes l = 200. We also report progress towards a high-resolution 3D integrated hohlraum simulation performed using 262,000 processors which resolves surface perturbations on the ignition capsule through modes l = 70. These aim for the most complete calculations yet of the interactions and overall impact of the various sources of asymmetry for NIF ignition targets. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Electronic structure and local magnetism of 3d-5d impurity substituted CeFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rakesh; Das, G. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a systematic first-principles study of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of Ce[Fe0.75M0.25]2 compounds, where M is a 3d, 4d or 5d transition or post-transition element, using the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. The d-f band hybridizations existing in CeFe2 get modified by the impurity M in an orderly manner across a period for each impurity series: the hybridization is strongest for the Mn group impurity in the period and gets diminished on either side of it. The weakening of the d-f hybridization strength is also associated with a relative localization of the Ce 4f states with respect to the delocalized 4f states in CeFe2. The above effects are most prominent for 3d impurity series, while for 4d and 5d impurities, the hybridizations and relocalizations are relatively weak due primarily to the relatively extended nature of 4d and 5d wavefunctions. The Ce local moment is found to decrease from the CeFe2 value in proportion to the strength of relocalization, thus following almost the same orderly trend as obeyed by the d-f hybridization. Further, depending on the way the spin-up and spin-down densities of states of an impurity shift relative to the Fermi energy, the impurity local moments are highest for Mn or Fe group, reduce on either side, become zero for Ni to Ga, and are small but negative for V and Ti. The Ce hyperfine field is found to follow the M local moment in a linear fashion, and vice-versa.

  20. Evaluation and comparison of current biopsy needle localization and tracking methods using 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shen, Yi; Bernard, Adeline; Cachard, Christian; Liebgott, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    This article compares four different biopsy needle localization algorithms in both 3D and 4D situations to evaluate their accuracy and execution time. The localization algorithms were: Principle component analysis (PCA), random Hough transform (RHT), parallel integral projection (PIP) and ROI-RK (ROI based RANSAC and Kalman filter). To enhance the contrast of the biopsy needle and background tissue, a line filtering pre-processing step was implemented. To make the PCA, RHT and PIP algorithms comparable with the ROI-RK method, a region of interest (ROI) strategy was added. Simulated and ex-vivo data were used to evaluate the performance of the different biopsy needle localization algorithms. The resolutions of the sectorial and cylindrical volumes were 0.3mm×0.4mm×0.6mmand0.1mm×0.1mm×0.2mm (axial×lateral×azimuthal) respectively. In so far as the simulation and experimental results show, the ROI-RK method successfully located and tracked the biopsy needle in both 3D and 4D situations. The tip localization error was within 1.5mm and the axis accuracy was within 1.6mm. To the best of our knowledge, considering both localization accuracy and execution time, the ROI-RK was the most stable and time-saving method. Normally, accuracy comes at the expense of time. However, the ROI-RK method was able to locate the biopsy needle with high accuracy in real time, which makes it a promising method for clinical applications.

  1. Can 3D light localization be reached in ‘white paint’?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, T.; Schertel, L.; Ackermann, M.; Aubry, G. J.; Aegerter, C. M.; Maret, G.

    2016-01-01

    When waves scatter multiple times in 3D random media, a disorder driven phase transition from diffusion to localization may occur (Anderson 1958 Phys. Rev. 109 1492-505 Abrahams et al 1979 Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 673-6). In ‘The question of classical localization: a theory of white paint?’ Anderson suggested the possibility to observe light localization in TiO2 samples (Anderson 1985 Phil. Mag. B 52 505-9). We recently claimed the observation of localization effects measuring photon time of flight (ToF) distributions (Störzer et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 063904) and evaluating transmission profiles (TPs) (Sperling et al 2013 Nat. Photonics 7 48-52) in such TiO2 samples. Here we present a careful study of the long time tail of ToF distributions and the long time behavior of the TP width for very thin samples and different turbidities that questions the localization interpretation. We further show new data that allow an alternative consistent explanation of these previous data by a fluorescence process. An adapted diffusion model including an appropriate exponential fluorescence decay accounts for the shape of the ToF distributions and the TP width. These observations question whether the strong localization regime can be reached with visible light scattering in polydisperse TiO2 samples, since the disorder parameter can hardly be increased any further in such a ‘white paint’ material.

  2. Recognizing Objects in 3D Point Clouds with Multi-Scale Local Features

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms. PMID:25517694

  3. Recognizing objects in 3D point clouds with multi-scale local features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-12-15

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms.

  4. Functional classification of protein 3D structures from predicted local interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Parasuram, Ramya; Lee, Joslynn S; Yin, Pengcheng; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2010-12-01

    A new approach to the functional classification of protein 3D structures is described with application to some examples from structural genomics. This approach is based on functional site prediction with THEMATICS and POOL. THEMATICS employs calculated electrostatic potentials of the query structure. POOL is a machine learning method that utilizes THEMATICS features and has been shown to predict accurate, precise, highly localized interaction sites. Extension to the functional classification of structural genomics proteins is now described. Predicted functionally important residues are structurally aligned with those of proteins with previously characterized biochemical functions. A 3D structure match at the predicted local functional site then serves as a more reliable predictor of biochemical function than an overall structure match. Annotation is confirmed for a structural genomics protein with the ribulose phosphate binding barrel (RPBB) fold. A putative glucoamylase from Bacteroides fragilis (PDB ID 3eu8) is shown to be in fact probably not a glucoamylase. Finally a structural genomics protein from Streptomyces coelicolor annotated as an enoyl-CoA hydratase (PDB ID 3g64) is shown to be misannotated. Its predicted active site does not match the well-characterized enoyl-CoA hydratases of similar structure but rather bears closer resemblance to those of a dehalogenase with similar fold.

  5. Robust statistical approaches for local planar surface fitting in 3D laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurunnabi, Abdul; Belton, David; West, Geoff

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes robust methods for local planar surface fitting in 3D laser scanning data. Searching through the literature revealed that many authors frequently used Least Squares (LS) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for point cloud processing without any treatment of outliers. It is known that LS and PCA are sensitive to outliers and can give inconsistent and misleading estimates. RANdom SAmple Consensus (RANSAC) is one of the most well-known robust methods used for model fitting when noise and/or outliers are present. We concentrate on the recently introduced Deterministic Minimum Covariance Determinant estimator and robust PCA, and propose two variants of statistically robust algorithms for fitting planar surfaces to 3D laser scanning point cloud data. The performance of the proposed robust methods is demonstrated by qualitative and quantitative analysis through several synthetic and mobile laser scanning 3D data sets for different applications. Using simulated data, and comparisons with LS, PCA, RANSAC, variants of RANSAC and other robust statistical methods, we demonstrate that the new algorithms are significantly more efficient, faster, and produce more accurate fits and robust local statistics (e.g. surface normals), necessary for many point cloud processing tasks. Consider one example data set used consisting of 100 points with 20% outliers representing a plane. The proposed methods called DetRD-PCA and DetRPCA, produce bias angles (angle between the fitted planes with and without outliers) of 0.20° and 0.24° respectively, whereas LS, PCA and RANSAC produce worse bias angles of 52.49°, 39.55° and 0.79° respectively. In terms of speed, DetRD-PCA takes 0.033 s on average for fitting a plane, which is approximately 6.5, 25.4 and 25.8 times faster than RANSAC, and two other robust statistical methods, respectively. The estimated robust surface normals and curvatures from the new methods have been used for plane fitting, sharp feature

  6. Estimating 3D tilt from local image cues in natural scenes

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Johannes; McCann, Brian C.; Geisler, Wilson S.

    2016-01-01

    Estimating three-dimensional (3D) surface orientation (slant and tilt) is an important first step toward estimating 3D shape. Here, we examine how three local image cues from the same location (disparity gradient, luminance gradient, and dominant texture orientation) should be combined to estimate 3D tilt in natural scenes. We collected a database of natural stereoscopic images with precisely co-registered range images that provide the ground-truth distance at each pixel location. We then analyzed the relationship between ground-truth tilt and image cue values. Our analysis is free of assumptions about the joint probability distributions and yields the Bayes optimal estimates of tilt, given the cue values. Rich results emerge: (a) typical tilt estimates are only moderately accurate and strongly influenced by the cardinal bias in the prior probability distribution; (b) when cue values are similar, or when slant is greater than 40°, estimates are substantially more accurate; (c) when luminance and texture cues agree, they often veto the disparity cue, and when they disagree, they have little effect; and (d) simplifying assumptions common in the cue combination literature is often justified for estimating tilt in natural scenes. The fact that tilt estimates are typically not very accurate is consistent with subjective impressions from viewing small patches of natural scene. The fact that estimates are substantially more accurate for a subset of image locations is also consistent with subjective impressions and with the hypothesis that perceived surface orientation, at more global scales, is achieved by interpolation or extrapolation from estimates at key locations. PMID:27738702

  7. Discovery of previously unrecognised local faults in London, UK, using detailed 3D geological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiss, Don; Haslam, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In parts of London, faulting introduces lateral heterogeneity to the local ground conditions, especially where construction works intercept the Palaeogene Lambeth Group. This brings difficulties to the compilation of a ground model that is fully consistent with the ground investigation data, and so to the design and construction of engineering works. However, because bedrock in the London area is rather uniform at outcrop, and is widely covered by Quaternary deposits, few faults are shown on the geological maps of the area. This paper discusses a successful resolution of this problem at a site in east central London, where tunnels for a new underground railway station are planned. A 3D geological model was used to provide an understanding of the local geological structure, in faulted Lambeth Group strata, that had not been possible by other commonly-used methods. This model includes seven previously unrecognised faults, with downthrows ranging from about 1 m to about 12 m. The model was constructed in the GSI3D geological modelling software using about 145 borehole records, including many legacy records, in an area of 850 m by 500 m. The basis of a GSI3D 3D geological model is a network of 2D cross-sections drawn by a geologist, generally connecting borehole positions (where the borehole records define the level of the geological units that are present), and outcrop and subcrop lines for those units (where shown by a geological map). When the lines tracing the base of each geological unit within the intersecting cross-sections are complete and mutually consistent, the software is used to generate TIN surfaces between those lines, so creating a 3D geological model. Even where a geological model is constructed as if no faults were present, changes in apparent dip between two data points within a single cross-section can indicate that a fault is present in that segment of the cross-section. If displacements of similar size with the same polarity are found in a series

  8. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  9. Automated foveola localization in retinal 3D-OCT images using structural support vector machine prediction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Mei; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Rehg, James M

    2012-01-01

    We develop an automated method to determine the foveola location in macular 3D-OCT images in either healthy or pathological conditions. Structural Support Vector Machine (S-SVM) is trained to directly predict the location of the foveola, such that the score at the ground truth position is higher than that at any other position by a margin scaling with the associated localization loss. This S-SVM formulation directly minimizes the empirical risk of localization error, and makes efficient use of all available training data. It deals with the localization problem in a more principled way compared to the conventional binary classifier learning that uses zero-one loss and random sampling of negative examples. A total of 170 scans were collected for the experiment. Our method localized 95.1% of testing scans within the anatomical area of the foveola. Our experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively identify the location of the foveola, facilitating diagnosis around this important landmark.

  10. Localization of spots in FISH images of breast cancer using 3-D shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Les, T; Markiewicz, T; Osowski, S; Jesiotr, M; Kozlowski, W

    2016-06-01

    The fluorescence in situ (FISH) belongs to the most often used molecular cytogenetic techniques, applied in many areas of diagnosis and research. The analysis of FISH images relies on localization and counting the red and green spots in order to determine HER2 status of the breast cancer samples. The algorithm of spot localization presented in the paper is based on 3-D shape analysis of the image objects. The subsequent regions of the image are matched to the reference pattern and the results of this matching influence localization of spots. The paper compares different shapes of the reference pattern and their efficiency in spot localization. The numerical experiments have been performed on the basis of 12 cases (patients), each represented by three images. Few thousands of cells have been analysed. The quantitative analyses comparing different versions of algorithm are presented and compared to the expert results. The best version of the procedure provides the absolute relative difference to the expert results smaller than 3%. These results confirm high efficiency of the proposed approach to the spot identification. The proposed method of FISH image analysis improves the efficiency of detecting fluorescent signals in FISH images. The evaluation results are encouraging for further testing of the developed automatic system directed to application in medical practice.

  11. Face recognition based on matching of local features on 3D dynamic range sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeagaray-Patrón, B. A.; Kober, Vitaly

    2016-09-01

    3D face recognition has attracted attention in the last decade due to improvement of technology of 3D image acquisition and its wide range of applications such as access control, surveillance, human-computer interaction and biometric identification systems. Most research on 3D face recognition has focused on analysis of 3D still data. In this work, a new method for face recognition using dynamic 3D range sequences is proposed. Experimental results are presented and discussed using 3D sequences in the presence of pose variation. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of conventional face recognition algorithms based on descriptors.

  12. Vertical Corner Feature Based Precise Vehicle Localization Using 3D LIDAR in Urban Area.

    PubMed

    Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-08-10

    Tall buildings are concentrated in urban areas. The outer walls of buildings are vertically erected to the ground and almost flat. Therefore, the vertical corners that meet the vertical planes are present everywhere in urban areas. These corners act as convenient landmarks, which can be extracted by using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor. A vertical corner feature based precise vehicle localization method is proposed in this paper and implemented using 3D LIDAR (Velodyne HDL-32E). The vehicle motion is predicted by accumulating the pose increment output from the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm based on the geometric relations between the scan data of the 3D LIDAR. The vertical corner is extracted using the proposed corner extraction method. The vehicle position is then corrected by matching the prebuilt corner map with the extracted corner. The experiment was carried out in the Gangnam area of Seoul, South Korea. In the experimental results, the maximum horizontal position error is about 0.46 m and the 2D Root Mean Square (RMS) horizontal error is about 0.138 m.

  13. Vertical Corner Feature Based Precise Vehicle Localization Using 3D LIDAR in Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-01-01

    Tall buildings are concentrated in urban areas. The outer walls of buildings are vertically erected to the ground and almost flat. Therefore, the vertical corners that meet the vertical planes are present everywhere in urban areas. These corners act as convenient landmarks, which can be extracted by using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor. A vertical corner feature based precise vehicle localization method is proposed in this paper and implemented using 3D LIDAR (Velodyne HDL-32E). The vehicle motion is predicted by accumulating the pose increment output from the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm based on the geometric relations between the scan data of the 3D LIDAR. The vertical corner is extracted using the proposed corner extraction method. The vehicle position is then corrected by matching the prebuilt corner map with the extracted corner. The experiment was carried out in the Gangnam area of Seoul, South Korea. In the experimental results, the maximum horizontal position error is about 0.46 m and the 2D Root Mean Square (RMS) horizontal error is about 0.138 m. PMID:27517936

  14. Local 3-D Toroidal Plasma Tomography Using the Phillips-Tikhonov Regularization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Junghee; Choe, Wonho

    2008-11-01

    Tomography is one of a powerful diagnostic method for obtaining the local information from the line-integrated plasma emission in fusion devices. The 3-D tomography is a complicated task compared to the 2-D tomography. Because of the limitation of the spatial distribution of the array detectors around a torus, the regularization algorithm such as the Phillips-Tikhonov method is advantageous to achieve more reliable reconstruction. In this work, we performed a feasibility study of 3-D tomography for toroidal plasmas. Four tangentially-viewing array detectors of each array consisting of 16x16 detector elements were assumed to be implemented. The reconstruction area is configured as 70 cm x 50 cm of poloidal cross-section and 40 toroidal layers, which has spatial resolution of 5 cm. We chose the phantoms which are KSTAR plasma-like profiles combined with the equilibrium flux surfaces with n = 0, 1, 2, 3 modes. The change of the emission peak in each layer in the reconstruction result agrees reasonably well with that of the phantom, with relative error of 5 - 10 %.

  15. An optimal sensing strategy for recognition and localization of 3-D natural quadric objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Hahn, Hernsoo

    1991-01-01

    An optimal sensing strategy for an optical proximity sensor system engaged in the recognition and localization of 3-D natural quadric objects is presented. The optimal sensing strategy consists of the selection of an optimal beam orientation and the determination of an optimal probing plane that compose an optimal data collection operation known as an optimal probing. The decision of an optimal probing is based on the measure of discrimination power of a cluster of surfaces on a multiple interpretation image (MII), where the measure of discrimination power is defined in terms of a utility function computing the expected number of interpretations that can be pruned out by a probing. An object representation suitable for active sensing based on a surface description vector (SDV) distribution graph and hierarchical tables is presented. Experimental results are shown.

  16. Full optical characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays using local viewing angle and imaging measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boher, Pierre; Leroux, Thierry; Bignon, Thibault; Collomb-Patton, Véronique

    2012-03-01

    Two commercial auto-stereoscopic 3D displays are characterized a using Fourier optics viewing angle system and an imaging video-luminance-meter. One display has a fixed emissive configuration and the other adapts its emission to the observer position using head tracking. For a fixed emissive condition, three viewing angle measurements are performed at three positions (center, right and left). Qualified monocular and binocular viewing spaces in front of the display are deduced as well as the best working distance. The imaging system is then positioned at this working distance and crosstalk homogeneity on the entire surface of the display is measured. We show that the crosstalk is generally not optimized on all the surface of the display. Display aspect simulation using viewing angle measurements allows understanding better the origin of those crosstalk variations. Local imperfections like scratches and marks generally increase drastically the crosstalk, demonstrating that cleanliness requirements for this type of display are quite critical.

  17. 3D tract-specific local and global analysis of white matter integrity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan; Huang, Chao; Daianu, Madelaine; Zhan, Liang; Dennis, Emily L; Reid, Robert I; Jack, Clifford R; Zhu, Hongtu; Thompson, Paul M

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive decline in memory and other aspects of cognitive function. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) offers a non-invasive approach to delineate the effects of AD on white matter (WM) integrity. Previous studies calculated either some summary statistics over regions of interest (ROI analysis) or some statistics along mean skeleton lines (Tract Based Spatial Statistic [TBSS]), so they cannot quantify subtle local WM alterations along major tracts. Here, a comprehensive WM analysis framework to map disease effects on 3D tracts both locally and globally, based on a study of 200 subjects: 49 healthy elderly normal controls, 110 with mild cognitive impairment, and 41 AD patients has been presented. 18 major WM tracts were extracted with our automated clustering algorithm-autoMATE (automated Multi-Atlas Tract Extraction); we then extracted multiple DWI-derived parameters of WM integrity along the WM tracts across all subjects. A novel statistical functional analysis method-FADTTS (Functional Analysis for Diffusion Tensor Tract Statistics) was applied to quantify degenerative patterns along WM tracts across different stages of AD. Gradually increasing WM alterations were found in all tracts in successive stages of AD. Among all 18 WM tracts, the fornix was most adversely affected. Among all the parameters, mean diffusivity (MD) was the most sensitive to WM alterations in AD. This study provides a systematic workflow to examine WM integrity across automatically computed 3D tracts in AD and may be useful in studying other neurological and psychiatric disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1191-1207, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 3D tract‐specific local and global analysis of white matter integrity in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yan; Huang, Chao; Daianu, Madelaine; Zhan, Liang; Dennis, Emily L.; Reid, Robert I.; Jack, Clifford R.; Zhu, Hongtu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive decline in memory and other aspects of cognitive function. Diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI) offers a non‐invasive approach to delineate the effects of AD on white matter (WM) integrity. Previous studies calculated either some summary statistics over regions of interest (ROI analysis) or some statistics along mean skeleton lines (Tract Based Spatial Statistic [TBSS]), so they cannot quantify subtle local WM alterations along major tracts. Here, a comprehensive WM analysis framework to map disease effects on 3D tracts both locally and globally, based on a study of 200 subjects: 49 healthy elderly normal controls, 110 with mild cognitive impairment, and 41 AD patients has been presented. 18 major WM tracts were extracted with our automated clustering algorithm—autoMATE (automated Multi‐Atlas Tract Extraction); we then extracted multiple DWI‐derived parameters of WM integrity along the WM tracts across all subjects. A novel statistical functional analysis method—FADTTS (Functional Analysis for Diffusion Tensor Tract Statistics) was applied to quantify degenerative patterns along WM tracts across different stages of AD. Gradually increasing WM alterations were found in all tracts in successive stages of AD. Among all 18 WM tracts, the fornix was most adversely affected. Among all the parameters, mean diffusivity (MD) was the most sensitive to WM alterations in AD. This study provides a systematic workflow to examine WM integrity across automatically computed 3D tracts in AD and may be useful in studying other neurological and psychiatric disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1191–1207, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27883250

  19. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Normand Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu; Rowlands, John A.; Crystal, Eugene

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied. The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to characterize

  20. Study of a dense, coronal thick target source with the microwave data and 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory; Xu, Yan

    2015-04-01

    We present a detailed 3D modeling of a dense, coronal thick target X-ray flare using the GX Simulator tool, photospheric magnetic measurements, and microwave data. The developed model offers a remarkable agreement between the synthesized and observed spectra and images in both X-ray and microwave domains, which validates the entire model. The flaring loop parameters validated via the modeling are fully consistent with those derived from the X-ray spectral fit, but do not easily agree with those derived from the fit of the X-ray image sizes computed at various energies. Specifically, the plasma density obtained in the modeling is noticeably smaller than that derived from the size fit. The performed modeling suggests that the accelerated electrons are trapped at the coronal part of the flaring loop by a turbulence, while proves that the data are clearly inconsistent with the electron magnetic trapping in the weak diffusion regime mediated by the Coulomb collisions. Thus, the modeling confirms the interpretation of the coronal thick-target sources as the sites of electron acceleration in flares.This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-1250374, AGS-1262772, AGS-1153424, AGS-1348513, and AGS-1408703 and NASA grants NNX14AC87G and NNX-13AG13G to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  1. A New Methodology for 3D Target Detection in Automotive Radar Applications

    PubMed Central

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lukin, Sergyi; Matuozzo, Gianfranco; Pascazio, Vito; Schirinzi, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Today there is a growing interest in automotive sensor monitoring systems. One of the main challenges is to make them an effective and valuable aid in dangerous situations, improving transportation safety. The main limitation of visual aid systems is that they do not produce accurate results in critical visibility conditions, such as in presence of rain, fog or smoke. Radar systems can greatly help in overcoming such limitations. In particular, imaging radar is gaining interest in the framework of Driver Assistance Systems (DAS). In this manuscript, a new methodology able to reconstruct the 3D imaged scene and to detect the presence of multiple targets within each line of sight is proposed. The technique is based on the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) theory and produces the estimation of multiple targets for each line of sight, their range distance and their reflectivities. Moreover, a fast approach for 2D focus based on the FFT algorithm is proposed. After the description of the proposed methodology, different simulated case studies are reported in order to evaluate the performances of the proposed approach. PMID:27136558

  2. A New Methodology for 3D Target Detection in Automotive Radar Applications.

    PubMed

    Baselice, Fabio; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Lukin, Sergyi; Matuozzo, Gianfranco; Pascazio, Vito; Schirinzi, Gilda

    2016-04-29

    Today there is a growing interest in automotive sensor monitoring systems. One of the main challenges is to make them an effective and valuable aid in dangerous situations, improving transportation safety. The main limitation of visual aid systems is that they do not produce accurate results in critical visibility conditions, such as in presence of rain, fog or smoke. Radar systems can greatly help in overcoming such limitations. In particular, imaging radar is gaining interest in the framework of Driver Assistance Systems (DAS). In this manuscript, a new methodology able to reconstruct the 3D imaged scene and to detect the presence of multiple targets within each line of sight is proposed. The technique is based on the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) theory and produces the estimation of multiple targets for each line of sight, their range distance and their reflectivities. Moreover, a fast approach for 2D focus based on the FFT algorithm is proposed. After the description of the proposed methodology, different simulated case studies are reported in order to evaluate the performances of the proposed approach.

  3. Intrafractional 3D localization using kilovoltage digital tomosynthesis for sliding-window intensity modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Pham, Hai; Tang, Grace; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To implement novel imaging sequences integrated into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and determine 3D positions for intrafractional patient motion monitoring and management. Method In one method, we converted a static gantry IMRT beam into a series of arcs in which dose index and multileaf collimator positions for all control points were unchanged, but gantry angles were modified to oscillate ±3° around the original angle. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired continuously throughout delivery and reconstructed to provide a series of 6° arc digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images which served to evaluate the in-plane positions of embedded-fiducials/vertebral-body. To obtain out-of-plane positions via triangulation, a 20° gantry rotation with beam hold-off was inserted during delivery to produce a pair of 6° DTS images separated by 14°. In a second method, the gantry remained stationary, but both kV source and detector moved over a 15° longitudinal arc using pitch and translational adjustment of the robotic arms. Evaluation of localization accuracy in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom during simulated intrafractional motion used programmed couch translations from customized scripts. Purpose-built software was used to reconstruct DTS images, register them to reference template images and calculate 3D fiducial positions. Result No significant dose difference (<0.5%) was found between the original and converted IMRT beams. For a typical hypofractionated spine treatment, 200 single DTS (6° arc) and 10 paired DTS (20° arc) images were acquired for each IMRT beam, providing in-plane and out-of-plane monitoring every 1.6 and 34.5 seconds, respectively. Mean ± standard deviation error in predicted position was −0.3±0.2 mm, −0.1±0.1 mm in-plane, and 0.2±0.4 mm out-of-plane with rotational gantry, 0.8±0.1 mm, −0.7±0.3 mm in-plane and 1.1±0.1 mm out-of-plane with translational source/detector. Conclusion Acquiring 3D fiducial positions

  4. Intrafractional 3D localization using kilovoltage digital tomosynthesis for sliding-window intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Pham, Hai; Tang, Grace; Mageras, Gig

    2015-09-07

    To implement novel imaging sequences integrated into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and determine 3D positions for intrafractional patient motion monitoring and management.In one method, we converted a static gantry IMRT beam into a series of arcs in which dose index and multileaf collimator positions for all control points were unchanged, but gantry angles were modified to oscillate ± 3° around the original angle. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired continuously throughout delivery and reconstructed to provide a series of 6° arc digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images which served to evaluate the in-plane positions of embedded-fiducials/vertebral-body. To obtain out-of-plane positions via triangulation, a 20° gantry rotation with beam hold-off was inserted during delivery to produce a pair of 6° DTS images separated by 14°. In a second method, the gantry remained stationary, but both kV source and detector moved over a 15° longitudinal arc using pitch and translational adjustment of the robotic arms. Evaluation of localization accuracy in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom during simulated intrafractional motion used programmed couch translations from customized scripts. Purpose-built software was used to reconstruct DTS images, register them to reference template images and calculate 3D fiducial positions.No significant dose difference (<0.5%) was found between the original and converted IMRT beams. For a typical hypofractionated spine treatment, 200 single DTS (6° arc) and 10 paired DTS (20° arc) images were acquired for each IMRT beam, providing in-plane and out-of-plane monitoring every 1.6 and 34.5 s, respectively. Mean ± standard deviation error in predicted position was -0.3 ± 0.2 mm, -0.1 ± 0.1 mm in-plane, and 0.2 ± 0.4 mm out-of-plane with rotational gantry, 0.8 ± 0.1 mm, -0.7 ± 0.3 mm in-plane and 1.1 ± 0.1 mm out-of-plane with translational source/detector.Acquiring 3D fiducial positions from kV-DTS during fixed gantry

  5. Clean localization super-resolution microscopy for 3D biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    We propose clean localization microscopy (a variant of fPALM) using a molecule filtering technique. Localization imaging involves acquiring a large number of images containing single molecule signatures followed by one-to-one mapping to render a super-resolution image. In principle, this process can be repeated for other z-planes to construct a 3D image. But, single molecules observed from off-focal planes result in false representation of their presence in the focal plane, resulting in incorrect quantification and analysis. We overcome this with a single molecule filtering technique that imposes constraints on the diffraction limited spot size of single molecules in the image plane. Calibration with sub-diffraction size beads puts a natural cutoff on the actual diffraction-limited size of single molecules in the focal plane. This helps in distinguishing beads present in the focal plane from those in the off-focal planes thereby providing an estimate of the single molecules in the focal plane. We study the distribution of actin (labeled with a photoactivatable CAGE 552 dye) in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells.

  6. Clean localization super-resolution microscopy for 3D biological imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Partha P.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-15

    We propose clean localization microscopy (a variant of fPALM) using a molecule filtering technique. Localization imaging involves acquiring a large number of images containing single molecule signatures followed by one-to-one mapping to render a super-resolution image. In principle, this process can be repeated for other z-planes to construct a 3D image. But, single molecules observed from off-focal planes result in false representation of their presence in the focal plane, resulting in incorrect quantification and analysis. We overcome this with a single molecule filtering technique that imposes constraints on the diffraction limited spot size of single molecules in the image plane. Calibration with sub-diffraction size beads puts a natural cutoff on the actual diffraction-limited size of single molecules in the focal plane. This helps in distinguishing beads present in the focal plane from those in the off-focal planes thereby providing an estimate of the single molecules in the focal plane. We study the distribution of actin (labeled with a photoactivatable CAGE 552 dye) in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells.

  7. Immuno- and correlative light microscopy-electron tomography methods for 3D protein localization in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mari, Muriel; Geerts, Willie J C; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2014-10-01

    Compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells is created and maintained through membrane rearrangements that include membrane transport and organelle biogenesis. Three-dimensional reconstructions with nanoscale resolution in combination with protein localization are essential for an accurate molecular dissection of these processes. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key model system for identifying genes and characterizing pathways essential for the organization of cellular ultrastructures. Electron microscopy studies of yeast, however, have been hampered by the presence of a cell wall that obstructs penetration of resins and cryoprotectants, and by the protein dense cytoplasm, which obscures the membrane details. Here we present an immuno-electron tomography (IET) method, which allows the determination of protein distribution patterns on reconstructed organelles from yeast. In addition, we extend this IET approach into a correlative light microscopy-electron tomography procedure where structures positive for a specific protein localized through a fluorescent signal are resolved in 3D. These new investigative tools for yeast will help to advance our understanding of the endomembrane system organization in eukaryotic cells.

  8. Local and Global 3-D Effects in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Oz, E.; Yoo, J.; Daughton, W.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2009-11-01

    One of the key open questions in Magnetic Reconnection is the nature of the mechanism that governs the reconnection rate in real astrophysical and laboratory systems. Comparisons between fully kinetic 2-D simulations of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) and experimental data show that the 2-D, collisionless expression for the electric field due to particle dynamics [1] does not match MRX data; related to this is a factor of 3-5 discrepancy in the layer width [2,3]. Adding collisions to the simulation leads to a broadening of the layer, but the level of collisionality present in MRX may not be high enough to resolve the discrepancy. Ongoing research on MRX explores the role of fluctuations and 3-D effects in the force balance. Significant toroidal asymmetries have been found, manifested by regions of high inductive electric field moving in the electron flow direction within the layer. Electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range [4] tend to occur in discharges with high local currents and a rapid local reconnection rate. The precise relation of these phenomena to fast reconnection is actively being investigated. [1] M. Hesse, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 6:1781 (1999). [2] Y. Ren, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 082113 (2008). [3] S. Dorfman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102107 (2008). [4] H. Ji, et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 92 (2004) 115001. Supported by NDSEG, DOE, NASA, and NSF.

  9. 3D passive photon counting automatic target recognition using advanced correlation filters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-03-15

    In this Letter, we present results for detecting and recognizing 3D objects in photon counting images using integral imaging with maximum average correlation height filters. We show that even under photon starved conditions objects may be automatically recognized in passively sensed 3D images using advanced correlation filters. We show that the proposed filter synthesized with ideal training images can detect and recognize a 3D object in photon counting images, even in the presence of occlusions and obscuration.

  10. Target-tilt and vertical-hemifield asymmetries in free-scan search for 3-D targets.

    PubMed

    Previc, F H; Naegele, P D

    2001-04-01

    In this study, asymmetries in finding pictorial 3-D targets defined by their tilt and rotation in space were investigated by means of a free-scan search task. In Experiment 1, feature search for cube tilt and rotation, as assessed by a spatial forced-choice task, was slow but still exhibited a characteristic "flat" slope; it was also much faster to upward-tilted cubes and to targets located in the upper half of the search field. Faster search times for cubes and rectangular solids in the upper field, an advantage for upward-tilted cubes, and a strong interaction between target tilt and direction of lighting (upward or downward) for the rectangular solids were all demonstrated in Experiment 2. Finally, an advantage in searching for tilted cubes located in the upper half of the display was shown in Experiment 3, which used a present-absent search task. The results of this study confirm that the upper-field bias in visual search is due mainly to a biased search mechanism and not to the features of the target stimulus or to specific ecological factors.

  11. Local indices for similarity analysis (LISA)-a 3D-QSAR formalism based on local molecular similarity.

    PubMed

    Verma, Jitender; Malde, Alpeshkumar; Khedkar, Santosh; Iyer, Radhakrishnan; Coutinho, Evans

    2009-12-01

    A simple quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach termed local indices for similarity analysis (LISA) has been developed. In this technique, the global molecular similarity is broken up as local similarity at each grid point surrounding the molecules and is used as a QSAR descriptor. In this way, a view of the molecular sites permitting favorable and rational changes to enhance activity is obtained. The local similarity index, calculated on the basis of Petke's formula, segregates the regions into "equivalent", "favored similar", and "disfavored similar" (alternatively "favored dissimilar") potentials with respect to a reference molecule in the data set. The method has been tested on three large and diverse data sets-thrombin, glycogen phosphorylase b, and thermolysin inhibitors. The QSAR models derived using genetic algorithm incorporated partial least square analysis statistics are found to be comparable to the ones obtained by the standard three-dimensional (3D)-QSAR methods, such as comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis. The graphical interpretation of the LISA models is straightforward, and the outcome of the models corroborates well with literature data. The LISA models give insight into the binding mechanisms of the ligand with the enzyme and allow fine-tuning of the molecules at the local level to improve their activity.

  12. 3-D localization of gamma ray sources with coded apertures for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Several small gamma cameras for radioguided surgery using CdTe or CdZnTe have parallel or pinhole collimators. Coded aperture imaging is a well-known method for gamma ray source directional identification, applied in astrophysics mainly. The increase in efficiency due to the substitution of the collimators by the coded masks renders the method attractive for gamma probes used in radioguided surgery. We have constructed and operationally verified a setup consisting of two CdTe gamma cameras with Modified Uniform Redundant Array (MURA) coded aperture masks of rank 7 and 19 and a video camera. The 3-D position of point-like radioactive sources is estimated via triangulation using decoded images acquired by the gamma cameras. We have also developed code for both fast and detailed simulations and we have verified the agreement between experimental results and simulations. In this paper we present a simulation study for the spatial localization of two point sources using coded aperture masks with rank 7 and 19.

  13. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  14. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets.

  15. A method for simultaneously delineating multiple targets in 3D-FISH using limited channels, lasers, and fluorochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, F Y; Yang, X; Chen, D Y; Ma, W Y; Zheng, J G; Zhang, X M

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested a link between the spatial organization of genomes and fundamental biological processes such as genome reprogramming, gene expression, and differentiation. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved nuclei (3D-FISH), in combination with confocal microscopy, has become an effective technique for analyzing 3D genome structure and spatial patterns of defined nucleus targets including entire chromosome territories and single gene loci. This technique usually requires the simultaneous visualization of numerous targets labeled with different colored fluorochromes. Thus, the number of channels and lasers must be sufficient for the commonly used labeling scheme of 3D-FISH, "one probe-one target". However, these channels and lasers are usually restricted by a given microscope system. This paper presents a method for simultaneously delineating multiple targets in 3D-FISH using limited channels, lasers, and fluorochromes. In contrast to other labeling schemes, this method is convenient and simple for multicolor 3D-FISH studies, which may result in widespread adoption of the technique. Lastly, as an application of the method, the nucleus locations of chromosome territory 18/21 and centromere 18/21/13 in normal human lymphocytes were analyzed, which might present evidence of a radial higher order chromatin arrangement.

  16. 3D dynamic rupture simulation and local tomography studies following the 2010 Haiti earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, Roby

    The 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquake was the first major earthquake in southern Haiti in 250 years. As this event could represent the beginning of a new period of active seismicity in the region, and in consideration of how vulnerable the population is to earthquake damage, it is important to understand the nature of this event and how it has influenced seismic hazards in the region. Most significantly, the 2010 earthquake occurred on the secondary Leogâne thrust fault (two fault segments), not the Enriquillo Fault, the major strike-slip fault in the region, despite it being only a few kilometers away. We first use a finite element model to simulate rupture along the Leogâne fault. We varied friction and background stress to investigate the conditions that best explain observed surface deformations and why the rupture did not to jump to the nearby Enriquillo fault. Our model successfully replicated rupture propagation along the two segments of the Leogâne fault, and indicated that a significant stress increase occurred on the top and to the west of the Enriquillo fault. We also investigated the potential ground shaking level in this region if a rupture similar to the Mw 7.0 2010 Haiti earthquake were to occur on the Enriquillo fault. We used a finite element method and assumptions on regional stress to simulate low frequency dynamic rupture propagation for the segment of the Enriquillo fault closer to the capital. The high-frequency ground motion components were calculated using the specific barrier model, and the hybrid synthetics were obtained by combining the low-frequencies ( 1Hz) from the stochastic simulation using matched filtering at a crossover frequency of 1 Hz. The average horizontal peak ground acceleration, computed at several sites of interest through Port-au-Prince (the capital), has a value of 0.35g. Finally, we investigated the 3D local tomography of this region. We considered 897 high-quality records from the earthquake catalog as recorded by

  17. 3D-resolved targeting of photodynamic therapy using temporal focusing

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Christopher J; Wu, Jackie; Uzel, Sebastien G M; Klein, Oliver; Evans, Conor L; So, Peter T C

    2014-01-01

    A method for selectively inducing apoptosis in tumor nodules is presented, with close-to-cellular level resolution, using 3D-resolved widefield temporal focusing illumination. Treatment times on the order of seconds were achieved using Verteporfin as the photosensitizer, with doses of 30 μg ml−1 and below. Results were achieved on both 2D and 3D cell cultures, demonstrating that treatment was possible through approximately one hundred microns of dense tumor nodules. PMID:25620902

  18. Three-dimensional two-fluid investigation of 3D-localized magnetic reconnection and its relation to whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Dae; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    A full three-dimensional computer code was developed in order to simulate a 3D-localized magnetic reconnection. We assume an incompressible two-fluid regime where the ions are stationary, and electron inertia and Hall effects are present. We solve a single dimensionless differential equation for perturbed magnetic fields with arbitrary background fields. The code has successfully reproduced both experimental and analytic solutions to resonance and Gendrin mode whistler waves in a uniform background field. The code was then modified to model 3D-localized magnetic reconnection as a 3D-localized perturbation on a hyperbolic-tangent background field. Three-dimensional properties that are asymmetric in the out-of-plane direction have been observed. These properties pertained to magnetic field lines, electron currents and their convection. Helicity and energy have also been examined, as well as the addition of a guide field.

  19. 3D amino-induced electroless plating: a powerful toolset for localized metallization on polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alexandre; Berthelot, Thomas; Viel, Pascal; Jégou, Pascale; Palacin, Serge

    2011-11-18

    The "3D amino-induced electroless plating" (3D-AIEP) process is an easy and cost-effective way to produce metallic patterns onto flexible polymer substrates with a micrometric resolution and based on the direct printing of the mask with a commercial printer. Its effectiveness is based on the covalent grafting onto substrates of a 3D polymer layer which presents the ability to entrap Pd species. Therefore, this activated Pd-loaded and 3D polymer layer acts both as a seed layer for electroless metal growth and as an interdigital layer for enhanced mechanical properties of the metallic patterns. Consequently, flexible and transparent poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) sheets were selectively metalized with nickel or copper patterns. The electrical properties of the obtained metallic patterns were also studied.

  20. Joint Cross-Range Scaling and 3D Geometry Reconstruction of ISAR Targets Based on Factorization Method.

    PubMed

    Lei Liu; Feng Zhou; Xue-Ru Bai; Ming-Liang Tao; Zi-Jing Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the factorization method is applied to reconstruct the 3D geometry of a target from its sequential inverse synthetic aperture radar images. However, this method requires performing cross-range scaling to all the sub-images and thus has a large computational burden. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes a novel method for joint cross-range scaling and 3D geometry reconstruction of steadily moving targets. In this method, we model the equivalent rotational angular velocity (RAV) by a linear polynomial with time, and set its coefficients randomly to perform sub-image cross-range scaling. Then, we generate the initial trajectory matrix of the scattering centers, and solve the 3D geometry and projection vectors by the factorization method with relaxed constraints. After that, the coefficients of the polynomial are estimated from the projection vectors to obtain the RAV. Finally, the trajectory matrix is re-scaled using the estimated rotational angle, and accurate 3D geometry is reconstructed. The two major steps, i.e., the cross-range scaling and the factorization, are performed repeatedly to achieve precise 3D geometry reconstruction. Simulation results have proved the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  1. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  2. A challenge problem for 2D/3D imaging of targets from a volumetric data set in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteel, Curtis H., Jr.; Gorham, LeRoy A.; Minardi, Michael J.; Scarborough, Steven M.; Naidu, Kiranmai D.; Majumder, Uttam K.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a challenge problem whose scope is the 2D/3D imaging of stationary targets from a volumetric data set of X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected in an urban environment. The data for this problem was collected at a scene consisting of numerous civilian vehicles and calibration targets. The radar operated in circular SAR mode and completed 8 circular flight paths around the scene with varying altitudes. Data consists of phase history data, auxiliary data, processing algorithms, processed images, as well as ground truth data. Interest is focused on mitigating the large side lobes in the point spread function. Due to the sparse nature of the elevation aperture, traditional imaging techniques introduce excessive artifacts in the processed images. Further interests include the formation of highresolution 3D SAR images with single pass data and feature extraction for 3D SAR automatic target recognition applications. The purpose of releasing the Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set is to provide the community with X-band SAR data that supports the development of new algorithms for high-resolution 2D/3D imaging.

  3. An Algorithm to Identify and Localize Suitable Dock Locations from 3-D LiDAR Scans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-10

    3-D) LiDARs have proved themselves very useful on many autonomous ground vehicles, such as the Google Driverless Car Project, the DARPA, Defense...appear in a typical point cloud data set, relative to other clusters such as cars , trees, boulders, etc. In this algorithm, these values were

  4. GIS prospectivity mapping and 3D modeling validation for potential uranium deposit targets in Shangnan district, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jiayu; Wang, Gongwen; Sha, Yazhou; Liu, Jiajun; Wen, Botao; Nie, Ming; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    Integrating multi-source geoscience information (such as geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and remote sensing) using GIS mapping is one of the key topics and frontiers in quantitative geosciences for mineral exploration. GIS prospective mapping and three-dimensional (3D) modeling can be used not only to extract exploration criteria and delineate metallogenetic targets but also to provide important information for the quantitative assessment of mineral resources. This paper uses the Shangnan district of Shaanxi province (China) as a case study area. GIS mapping and potential granite-hydrothermal uranium targeting were conducted in the study area combining weights of evidence (WofE) and concentration-area (C-A) fractal methods with multi-source geoscience information. 3D deposit-scale modeling using GOCAD software was performed to validate the shapes and features of the potential targets at the subsurface. The research results show that: (1) the known deposits have potential zones at depth, and the 3D geological models can delineate surface or subsurface ore-forming features, which can be used to analyze the uncertainty of the shape and feature of prospectivity mapping at the subsurface; (2) single geochemistry anomalies or remote sensing anomalies at the surface require combining the depth exploration criteria of geophysics to identify potential targets; and (3) the single or sparse exploration criteria zone with few mineralization spots at the surface has high uncertainty in terms of the exploration target.

  5. A new optimization approach for the calibration of an ultrasound probe using a 3D optical localizer.

    PubMed

    Dardenne, G; Cano, J D Gil; Hamitouche, C; Stindel, E; Roux, C

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a fast procedure for the calibration of an ultrasound (US) probe using a 3D optical localizer. This calibration step allows us to obtain the 3D position of any point located on the 2D ultrasonic (US) image. To carry out correctly this procedure, a phantom of known geometric properties is probed and these geometries are found in the US images. A segmentation step is applied in order to obtain automatically the needed information in the US images and then, an optimization approach is performed to find the optimal calibration parameters. A new optimization method to estimate the calibration parameters for an ultrasound (US) probe is developed.

  6. Identifying High Potential Well Targets with 3D Seismic and Mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R. J.

    2015-10-30

    Seismic reflection the primary tool used in petroleum exploration and production, but use in geothermal exploration is less standard, in part due to cost but also due to the challenges in identifying the highly-permeable zones essential for economic hydrothermal systems [e.g. Louie et al., 2011; Majer, 2003]. Newer technology, such as wireless sensors and low-cost high performance computing, has helped reduce the cost and effort needed to conduct 3D surveys. The second difficulty, identifying permeable zones, has been less tractable so far. Here we report on the use of seismic attributes from a 3D seismic survey to identify and map permeable zones in a hydrothermal area.

  7. A cut-&-paste strategy for the 3-D inversion of helicopter-borne electromagnetic data - II. Combining regional 1-D and local 3-D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, A.; Scheunert, M.; Afanasjew, M.; Börner, R.-U.; Siemon, B.; Spitzer, K.

    2016-07-01

    As a standard procedure, multi-frequency helicopter-borne electromagnetic (HEM) data are inverted to conductivity-depth models using 1-D inversion methods, which may, however, fail in areas of strong lateral conductivity contrasts (so-called induction anomalies). Such areas require more realistic multi-dimensional modelling. Since the full 3-D inversion of an entire HEM data set is still extremely time consuming, our idea is to combine fast 1-D and accurate but numerically expensive 3-D inversion of HEM data in such a way that the full 3-D inversion is only carried out for those parts of a HEM survey which are affected by induction anomalies. For all other parts, a 1-D inversion method is sufficient. We present a newly developed algorithm for identification, selection, and extraction of induction anomalies in HEM data sets and show how the 3-D inversion model of the anomalous area is re-integrated into the quasi-1-D background. Our proposed method is demonstrated to work properly on a synthetic and a field HEM data set from the Cuxhaven tunnel valley in Germany. We show that our 1-D/3-D approach yields better results compared to 1-D inversions in areas where 3-D effects occur.

  8. Local plate/rod descriptors of 3D trabecular bone micro-CT images from medial axis topologic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peyrin, Francoise; Attali, Dominique; Chappard, Christine; Benhamou, Claude Laurent

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Trabecular bone microarchitecture is made of a complex network of plate and rod structures evolving with age and disease. The purpose of this article is to propose a new 3D local analysis method for the quantitative assessment of parameters related to the geometry of trabecular bone microarchitecture. Methods: The method is based on the topologic classification of the medial axis of the 3D image into branches, rods, and plates. Thanks to the reversibility of the medial axis, the classification is next extended to the whole 3D image. Finally, the percentages of rods and plates as well as their mean thicknesses are calculated. The method was applied both to simulated test images and 3D micro-CT images of human trabecular bone. Results: The classification of simulated phantoms made of plates and rods shows that the maximum error in the quantitative percentages of plate and rods is less than 6% and smaller than with the structure model index (SMI). Micro-CT images of human femoral bone taken in osteoporosis and early or advanced osteoarthritis were analyzed. Despite the large physiological variability, the present method avoids the underestimation of rods observed with other local methods. The relative percentages of rods and plates were not significantly different between osteoarthritis and osteoporotic groups, whereas their absolute percentages were in relation to an increase of rod and plate thicknesses in advanced osteoarthritis with also higher relative and absolute number of nodes. Conclusions: The proposed method is model-independent, robust to surface irregularities, and enables geometrical characterization of not only skeletal structures but entire 3D images. Its application provided more accurate results than the standard SMI on simple simulated phantoms, but the discrepancy observed on the advanced osteoarthritis group raises questions that will require further investigations. The systematic use of such a local method in the characterization of

  9. Reaching to virtual targets: The oblique effect reloaded in 3-D.

    PubMed

    Kaspiris-Rousellis, Christos; Siettos, Constantinos I; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Smyrnis, Nikolaos

    2017-02-20

    Perceiving and reproducing direction of visual stimuli in 2-D space produces the visual oblique effect, which manifests as increased precision in the reproduction of cardinal compared to oblique directions. A second cognitive oblique effect emerges when stimulus information is degraded (such as when reproducing stimuli from memory) and manifests as a systematic distortion where reproduced directions close to the cardinal axes deviate toward the oblique, leading to space expansion at cardinal and contraction at oblique axes. We studied the oblique effect in 3-D using a virtual reality system to present a large number of stimuli, covering the surface of an imaginary half sphere, to which subjects had to reach. We used two conditions, one with no delay (no-memory condition) and one where a three-second delay intervened between stimulus presentation and movement initiation (memory condition). A visual oblique effect was observed for the reproduction of cardinal directions compared to oblique, which did not differ with memory condition. A cognitive oblique effect also emerged, which was significantly larger in the memory compared to the no-memory condition, leading to distortion of directional space with expansion near the cardinal axes and compression near the oblique axes on the hemispherical surface. This effect provides evidence that existing models of 2-D directional space categorization could be extended in the natural 3-D space.

  10. Kinematics of local and high-z galaxies through 3D modeling of emission-line datacubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Teodoro, Enrico M.

    2015-12-01

    The kinematics is a fundamental tool to infer the dynamical structure of galaxies and to understand their formation and evolution. Spectroscopic observations of gas emission lines are often used to derive rotation curves and velocity dispersions. It is however difficult to disentangle these two quantities in low spatial-resolution data because of beam smearing. In this thesis, we present 3D-Barolo, a new software to derive the gas kinematics of disk galaxies from emission-line data-cubes. The code builds tilted-ring models in the 3D observational space and compares them with the actual data-cubes. 3D-Barolo works with data at a wide range of spatial resolutions without being affected by instrumental biases. We use 3D-Barolo to derive rotation curves and velocity dispersions of several galaxies in both the local and the high-redshift Universe. We run our code on HI observations of nearby galaxies and we compare our results with 2D traditional approaches. We show that a 3D approach to the derivation of the gas kinematics has to be preferred to a 2D approach whenever a galaxy is resolved with less than about 20 elements across the disk. We moreover analyze a sample of galaxies at z~1, observed in the H-alpha line with the KMOS/VLT spectrograph. Our 3D modeling reveals that the kinematics of these high-z systems is comparable to that of local disk galaxies, with steeply-rising rotation curves followed by a flat part and H-alpha velocity dispersions of 15-40 km/s over the whole disks. This evidence suggests that disk galaxies were already fully settled about 7-8 billion years ago. In summary, 3D-Barolo is a powerful and robust tool to separate physical and instrumental effects and to derive a reliable kinematics. The analysis of large samples of galaxies at different redshifts with 3D-Barolo will provide new insights on how galaxies assemble and evolve throughout cosmic time.

  11. Detecting Distance between Injected Microspheres and Target Tumor via 3D Reconstruction of Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Colby, Sean M.; Davis, Cassi A.; Basciano, Christopher; Greene, Kevin; Feo, John T.; Kennedy, Andrew

    2012-08-28

    One treatment increasing in use for solid tumors in the liver is radioembolization via the delivery of 90Y microspheres to the vascular bed within or near the location of the tumor. It is desirable as part of the treatment for the microspheres to embed preferentially in or near the tumor. This work details an approach for analyzing the deposition of microspheres with respect to the location of the tumor. The approach used is based upon thin-slice serial sectioning of the tissue sample, followed by high resolution imaging, microsphere detection, and 3-D reconstruction of the tumor surface. Distance from the microspheres to the tumor was calculated using a fast deterministic point inclusion method.

  12. Fourier-Space Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Sadot, O.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-12-05

    Nonlinear growth of 3-D broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and later amplified during acceleration by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation velocities are measured for the first time and are found to be in excellent agreement with Haan predictions. The measured growth of long-wavelength modes is consistent with enhanced, nonlinear, long-wavelength generation in ablatively driven targets.

  13. Localization and visualization of excess chemical potential in statistical mechanical integral equation theory 3D-HNC-RISM.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Liu, Peng-Jun; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2008-02-01

    In this study the excess chemical potential of the integral equation theory, 3D-RISM-HNC [Q. Du, Q. Wei, J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 13463-13470], is visualized in three-dimensional form and localized at interaction sites of solute molecule. Taking the advantage of reference interaction site model (RISM), the calculation equations of chemical excess potential are reformulized according to the solute interaction sites s in molecular space. Consequently the solvation free energy is localized at every interaction site of solute molecule. For visualization of the 3D-RISM-HNC calculation results, the excess chemical potentials are described using radial and three-dimensional diagrams. It is found that the radial diagrams of the excess chemical potentials are more sensitive to the bridge functions than the radial diagrams of solvent site density distributions. The diagrams of average excess chemical potential provide useful information of solute-solvent electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. The local description of solvation free energy at active sites of solute in 3D-RISM-HNC may broaden the application scope of statistical mechanical integral equation theory in solution chemistry and life science.

  14. A fast 3D image simulation algorithm of moving target for scanning laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jicheng; Shi, Zhiguang; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Dong

    2014-10-01

    Scanning Laser Radar has been widely used in many military and civil areas. Usually there are relative movements between the target and the radar, so the moving target image modeling and simulation is an important research content in the field of signal processing and system design of scan-imaging laser radar. In order to improve the simulation speed and hold the accuracy of the image simulation simultaneously, a novel fast simulation algorithm is proposed in this paper. Firstly, for moving target or varying scene, an inequation that can judge the intersection relations between the pixel and target bins is obtained by deriving the projection of target motion trajectories on the image plane. Then, by utilizing the time subdivision and approximate treatments, the potential intersection relations of pixel and target bins are determined. Finally, the goal of reducing the number of intersection operations could be achieved by testing all the potential relations and finding which of them is real intersection. To test the method's performance, we perform computer simulations of both the new proposed algorithm and a literature's algorithm for six targets. The simulation results show that the two algorithm yield the same imaging result, whereas the number of intersection operations of former is equivalent to only 1% of the latter, and the calculation efficiency increases a hundredfold. The novel simulation acceleration idea can be applied extensively in other more complex application environments and provide equally acceleration effect. It is very suitable for the case to produce a great large number of laser radar images.

  15. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-09-23

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone's acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals.

  16. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone’s acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals. PMID:26404314

  17. RELAP5-3D thermal hydraulic analysis of the target cooling system in the SPES experimental facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Buffa, P.; Palermo, G.; Prete, G.

    2014-11-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) experimental facility, under construction at the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) Laboratories of Legnaro, Italy, is a second generation Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) plant for advanced nuclear physic studies. The UCx target-ion source system works at temperature of about 2273 K, producing a high level of radiation (105 Sv/h), for this reason a careful risk analysis for the target chamber is among the major safety issues. In this paper, the obtained results of thermofluid-dynamics simulations of accidental transients in the SPES target cooling system are reported. The analysis, performed by using the RELAP5-3D 2.4.2 qualified thermal-hydraulic system code, proves good safety performance of this system during different accidental conditions.

  18. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Carsten; Riefke, Björn; Gründemann, Stephan; Krebs, Alice; Christian, Sven; Prinz, Florian; Osterland, Marc; Golfier, Sven; Räse, Sebastian; Ansari, Nariman; Esner, Milan; Bickle, Marc; Pampaloni, Francesco; Mattheyer, Christian; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Parczyk, Karsten; Prechtl, Stefan; Steigemann, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  19. 3-D Localization of Virtual Sound Sources: Effects of Visual Environment, Pointing Method, and Training

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Goupell, Matthew J.; Laback, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The ability to localize sound sources in three-dimensional space was tested in humans. In experiment 1, naive subjects listened to noises filtered with subject-specific head-related transfer functions. The tested conditions included the pointing method (head or manual pointing) and the visual environment (VE) (darkness or virtual VE). The localization performance was not significantly different between the pointing methods. The virtual VE significantly improved the horizontal precision and reduced the number of front-back confusions. These results show the benefit of using a virtual VE in sound localization tasks. In experiment 2, subjects were provided sound localization training. Over the course of training, the performance improved for all subjects, with the largest improvements occurring during the first 400 trials. The improvements beyond the first 400 trials were smaller. After the training, there was still no significant effect of pointing method, showing that the choice of either head- or manual-pointing method plays a minor role in sound localization performance. The results of experiment 2 reinforce the importance of perceptual training for at least 400 trials in sound localization studies. PMID:20139459

  20. The importance of 3D local averaging in turbulence theory: some examples from high-resolution DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Pui-Kuen; Zhai, X. M.; Iyer, K. P.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2016-11-01

    Dissipation fluctuations in turbulence become increasingly intermittent as the Reynolds number increases. Both theoretical and practical reasons then force us to consider the fluctuations averaged locally over three-dimensional (3D) volumes of various sizes. Often, the practice has been to supplant 3D averages by 1D averages, and to replace proper 3D quantities by convenient 1D surrogates. We examine the consequence of these practices using DNS data on a large grid of 81923 at a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number 1300. We show that these common practices can often lead to erroneous results and significant ambiguities. For instance, both the dissipation and enstrophy turn out to possess the same inertial-range intermittency exponent; moments of locally-averaged dissipation and enstrophy become closer to each other with increasing order (because extreme events in both are spatially co-located); the longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale similarly-all in contrast to results obtained using the simplifying practices mentioned above. Supported by NSF Grants ACI-1036170 and ACI-1640771.

  1. 3D source localization of interictal spikes in epilepsy patients with MRI lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Worrell, Gregory A.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; He, Bin

    2006-08-01

    The present study aims to accurately localize epileptogenic regions which are responsible for epileptic activities in epilepsy patients by means of a new subspace source localization approach, i.e. first principle vectors (FINE), using scalp EEG recordings. Computer simulations were first performed to assess source localization accuracy of FINE in the clinical electrode set-up. The source localization results from FINE were compared with the results from a classic subspace source localization approach, i.e. MUSIC, and their differences were tested statistically using the paired t-test. Other factors influencing the source localization accuracy were assessed statistically by ANOVA. The interictal epileptiform spike data from three adult epilepsy patients with medically intractable partial epilepsy and well-defined symptomatic MRI lesions were then studied using both FINE and MUSIC. The comparison between the electrical sources estimated by the subspace source localization approaches and MRI lesions was made through the coregistration between the EEG recordings and MRI scans. The accuracy of estimations made by FINE and MUSIC was also evaluated and compared by R2 statistic, which was used to indicate the goodness-of-fit of the estimated sources to the scalp EEG recordings. The three-concentric-spheres head volume conductor model was built for each patient with three spheres of different radii which takes the individual head size and skull thickness into consideration. The results from computer simulations indicate that the improvement of source spatial resolvability and localization accuracy of FINE as compared with MUSIC is significant when simulated sources are closely spaced, deep, or signal-to-noise ratio is low in a clinical electrode set-up. The interictal electrical generators estimated by FINE and MUSIC are in concordance with the patients' structural abnormality, i.e. MRI lesions, in all three patients. The higher R2 values achieved by FINE than MUSIC

  2. Connecting Global Measures of 3D Magnetic Reconnection to Local Kinetic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William Scott

    2015-07-16

    After giving the motivation for the work, slides present the topic under the following headings: Description of LAPD experiment; Actual simulation setup; Simple kinetic theory of ined-tied tearing; Diagnostics to characterizing 3D reconnection; Example #1 - short-tied system; and Example #2 - long line-tied system. Colorful simulations are shown for quasipotential vs field line exponentiation, field line integrated Ohms Law, and correlation with agyrotopy & energy conversion for example #1; and evolution of current density for largest case, field exponentiation vs quasi-potential, and time evolution of magnetic field lines for example #2. To satisfy line-tied boundary conditions, there is need for superposition of oblique modes--the simple two-mode approximation works surprisingly well. For force-free layers with bg >1, the fastest growing periodic modes are oblique with kxλ ~0.5. This implies a minimum length of Ly > 2πλbg. There are strong correlations between σ → Ξ → A0e (observable with spacecraft). Electron pressure tensor is the dominant non-ideal term.

  3. 3D localized photoactivation of pa-GFP in living cells using two-photon interactions.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Testa, Ilaria; Faretta, Mario; Magrassi, Raffaella; Barozzi, Sara; Parazzoli, Dario; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    We report about two-photon activation of a photoactivatable derivative of the Aequorea Victoria green fluorescent protein (paGFP). This special form of the molecule increases its fluorescence intensity when excited by 488 nm after irradiation with high intensity light at 413 nm. The aim in this work was to evaluate the use of two-photon interactions for confining the molecular switching of pa-GFP in the bright state. Therefore experiments were performed using fixed and living cells which were expressing the paGFP fluorophore and microspheres whose surface was modified by specific adsorption of the chromophores. The molecular switches were activated in a range of wavelength from 720 nm to 840 nm. The optimal wavelength for activation was then chosen for cell imaging. A comparison between the conventional activation and two-photon mode demonstrates clearly the better three- dimensional (3D) confinement and the possibility of selection of cell volumes of interest. This enables molecular trafficking studies at high signal to noise ratio.

  4. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard

  5. An Estimation Theory Approach to Detection and Ranging of Obscured Targets in 3-D LADAR Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    set consists of 100 laser pulse returns. The first set was collected as a control set using the target shown in figure 2.2. The second set was...containing 2 surfaces. 36 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 Pixel (99,107) Control # of P ho to ns Sample # Figure 4.4...show the first pulse return of control data from a pixel corresponding to the front surface and back surface respectively. 37 0 2 4 6 8 10

  6. Target detect system in 3D using vision apply on plant reproduction by tissue culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results for a system in tree dimension that use a system vision to manipulate plants in a tissue culture process. The system is able to estimate the position of the plant in the work area, first calculate the position and send information to the mechanical system, and recalculate the position again, and if it is necessary, repositioning the mechanical system, using an neural system to improve the location of the plant. The system use only the system vision to sense the position and control loop using a neural system to detect the target and positioning the mechanical system, the results are compared with an open loop system.

  7. Online 3D Ear Recognition by Combining Global and Local Features

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Zhang, Bob; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional shape of the ear has been proven to be a stable candidate for biometric authentication because of its desirable properties such as universality, uniqueness, and permanence. In this paper, a special laser scanner designed for online three-dimensional ear acquisition was described. Based on the dataset collected by our scanner, two novel feature classes were defined from a three-dimensional ear image: the global feature class (empty centers and angles) and local feature class (points, lines, and areas). These features are extracted and combined in an optimal way for three-dimensional ear recognition. Using a large dataset consisting of 2,000 samples, the experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of fusing global and local features, obtaining an equal error rate of 2.2%. PMID:27935955

  8. 3d N = 1 Chern-Simons-matter theory and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimpis, Dimitrios; Zhu, Yaodong

    2016-10-01

    We consider the most general, classically-conformal, three-dimensional N = 1 Chern-Simons-matter theory with global symmetry Sp (2) and gauge group U (N) × U (N). We show that the Lagrangian in the on-shell formulation of the theory admits one more free parameter as compared to the theory formulated in off-shell N = 1 superspace. The theory on T3 can be formally localized. We partially carry out the localization procedure for the theory on T3 with periodic boundary conditions. In particular we show that restricting to the saddle points with vanishing gauge connection gives a trivial contribution to the partition function, i.e. the bosonic and fermionic contributions exactly cancel each other.

  9. Frequency Localized Regularity Criteria for the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Z.; Grujić, Z.

    2017-04-01

    Two regularity criteria are established to highlight which Littlewood-Paley frequencies play an essential role in possible singularity formation in a Leray-Hopf weak solution to the Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. One of these is a frequency localized refinement of known Ladyzhenskaya-Prodi-Serrin-type regularity criteria restricted to a finite window of frequencies, the lower bound of which diverges to {+∞} as t approaches an initial singular time.

  10. A 3D Computational fluid dynamics model validation for candidate molybdenum-99 target geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Dale, Greg; Vorobieff, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Molybdenum-99 (99Mo) is the parent product of technetium-99m (99mTc), a radioisotope used in approximately 50,000 medical diagnostic tests per day in the U.S. The primary uses of this product include detection of heart disease, cancer, study of organ structure and function, and other applications. The US Department of Energy seeks new methods for generating 99Mo without the use of highly enriched uranium, to eliminate proliferation issues and provide a domestic supply of 99mTc for medical imaging. For this project, electron accelerating technology is used by sending an electron beam through a series of 100Mo targets. During this process a large amount of heat is created, which directly affects the operating temperature dictated by the tensile stress limit of the wall material. To maintain the required temperature range, helium gas is used as a cooling agent that flows through narrow channels between the target disks. In our numerical study, we investigate the cooling performance on a series of new geometry designs of the cooling channel. This research is supported by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Improved 2D/3D registration robustness using local spatial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Momi, Elena; Eckman, Kort; Jaramaz, Branislav; DiGioia, Anthony, III

    2006-03-01

    Xalign is a tool designed to measure implant orientation after joint arthroplasty by co-registering a projection of an implant model and a digitally reconstructed radiograph of the patient's anatomy with a post operative x-ray. A mutual information based registration method is used to automate alignment. When using basic mutual information, the presence of local maxima can result in misregistration. To increase robustness of registration, our research is aimed at improving the similarity function by modifying the information measure and incorporating local spatial information. A test dataset with known groundtruth parameters was created to evaluate the performance of this measure. A synthetic radiograph was generated first from a preoperative pelvic CT scan to act as the gold standard. The voxel weights used to generate the image were then modified and new images were generated with the CT rigidly transformed. The roll, pitch and yaw angles span a range of -10/+10 degrees, while x, y and z translations range from -10mm to +10mm. These images were compared with the reference image. The proposed cost function correctly identified the correct pose in all tests and did not exhibit any local maxima which would slow or prevent locating the global maximum.

  12. Local and cluster critical dynamics of the 3d random-site Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaneyko, D.; Ilnytskyi, J.; Berche, B.; Holovatch, Yu.

    2006-10-01

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations for the critical dynamics of the three-dimensional site-diluted quenched Ising model. Three different dynamics are considered, these correspond to the local update Metropolis scheme as well as to the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. The lattice sizes of L=10-96 are analysed by a finite-size-scaling technique. The site dilution concentration p=0.85 was chosen to minimize the correction-to-scaling effects. We calculate numerical values of the dynamical critical exponents for the integrated and exponential autocorrelation times for energy and magnetization. As expected, cluster algorithms are characterized by lower values of dynamical critical exponent than the local one: also in the case of dilution critical slowing down is more pronounced for the Metropolis algorithm. However, the striking feature of our estimates is that they suggest that dilution leads to decrease of the dynamical critical exponent for the cluster algorithms. This phenomenon is quite opposite to the local dynamics, where dilution enhances critical slowing down.

  13. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  14. Camera And Site Calibration For Three-Dimensional (3-D) Target Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzy, William H...; Prell, Arthur M.; Shimp, Paul B.

    1982-02-01

    Three-dimensional target configurations attached to the head, neck, and pelvis of human volunteer subjects undergoing impact acceleration and vibration experiments are acquired by at least two cameras. Linear displacement and orientation parameters are derived from the digitized data film by a least squares algorithm. In order to minimize low frequency errors, it is necessary to calibrate individual high-speed cameras to determine points in the film plane. In addition, it is required to know how these cameras are located and oriented in the laboratory reference system. This paper will describe the procedure and the dedicated apparatus for camera calibration, discuss problems, and compare three surveying methods used to locate and determine camera orientation.

  15. Travel time calculation in regular 3D grid in local and regional scale using fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional 3D seismic velocity models of crust and sediments are very important for numerous technics like mantle and core tomography, localization of local and regional events and others. Most of those techniques require calculation of wave travel time through the 3D model. This can be achieved using multiple approaches from simple ray tracing to advanced full waveform calculation. In this study simple and efficient implementation of fast marching method is presented. This method provides more information than ray tracing and is much less complicated than methods like full waveform being the perfect compromise. Presented code is written in C++, well commented and is easy to modify for different types of studies. Additionally performance is widely discussed including possibilities of multithreading and massive parallelism like GPU. Source code will be published in 2016 as it is part of the PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  16. Robust 3D object localization and pose estimation for random bin picking with the 3DMaMa algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotheim, Øystein; Thielemann, Jens T.; Berge, Asbjørn; Sommerfelt, Arne

    2010-02-01

    Enabling robots to automatically locate and pick up randomly placed and oriented objects from a bin is an important challenge in factory automation, replacing tedious and heavy manual labor. A system should be able to recognize and locate objects with a predefined shape and estimate the position with the precision necessary for a gripping robot to pick it up. We describe a system that consists of a structured light instrument for capturing 3D data and a robust approach for object location and pose estimation. The method does not depend on segmentation of range images, but instead searches through pairs of 2D manifolds to localize candidates for object match. This leads to an algorithm that is not very sensitive to scene complexity or the number of objects in the scene. Furthermore, the strategy for candidate search is easily reconfigurable to arbitrary objects. Experiments reported in this paper show the utility of the method on a general random bin picking problem, in this paper exemplified by localization of car parts with random position and orientation. Full pose estimation is done in less than 380 ms per image. We believe that the method is applicable for a wide range of industrial automation problems where precise localization of 3D objects in a scene is needed.

  17. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. -K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. -W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  18. “SP-G”, a Putative New Surfactant Protein – Tissue Localization and 3D Structure

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class. PMID:23094088

  19. Nonrigid motion correction in 3D using autofocusing with localized linear translations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Cunningham, Charles H; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from nonrigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric--more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multichannel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called "Butterfly" navigators, which are modifications of the spin-warp sequence that provides intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, nonrigid motion was observed.

  20. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  1. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed ‡

    PubMed Central

    Avanthey, Loïca; Beaudoin, Laurent; Gademer, Antoine; Roux, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results. PMID:27196913

  2. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed.

    PubMed

    Avanthey, Loïca; Beaudoin, Laurent; Gademer, Antoine; Roux, Michel

    2016-05-17

    Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results.

  3. Incorporating a measure of local scale in voxel-based 3-D image registration.

    PubMed

    Nyúl, László G; Udupa, Jayaram K; Saha, Punam K

    2003-02-01

    We present a new class of approaches for rigid-body registration and their evaluation in studying multiple sclerosis (MS) via multiprotocol magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three pairs of rigid-body registration algorithms were implemented, using cross-correlation and mutual information (MI), operating on original gray-level images, and utilizing the intermediate images resulting from our new scale-based method. In the scale image, every voxel has the local "scale" value assigned to it, defined as the radius of the largest ball centered at the voxel with homogeneous intensities. Three-dimensional image data of the head were acquired from ten MS patients for each of six MRI protocols. Images in some of the protocols were acquired in registration. The registered pairs were used as ground truth. Accuracy and consistency of the six registration methods were measured within and between protocols for known amounts of misregistrations. Our analysis indicates that there is no "best" method. For medium misregistration, the method using MI, for small add large misregistration the method using normalized cross-correlation performs best. For high-resolution data the correlation method and for low-resolution data the MI method, both using the original gray-level images, are the most consistent. We have previously demonstrated the use of local scale information in fuzzy connectedness segmentation and image filtering. Scale may also have potential for image registration as suggested by this work.

  4. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  5. Fully Automatic Localization and Segmentation of 3D Vertebral Bodies from CT/MR Images via a Learning-Based Method.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengwen; Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Bansmann, Martin; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of fully automatic localization and segmentation of 3D vertebral bodies from CT/MR images. We propose a learning-based, unified random forest regression and classification framework to tackle these two problems. More specifically, in the first stage, the localization of 3D vertebral bodies is solved with random forest regression where we aggregate the votes from a set of randomly sampled image patches to get a probability map of the center of a target vertebral body in a given image. The resultant probability map is then further regularized by Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to eliminate potential ambiguity caused by the neighboring vertebral bodies. The output from the first stage allows us to define a region of interest (ROI) for the segmentation step, where we use random forest classification to estimate the likelihood of a voxel in the ROI being foreground or background. The estimated likelihood is combined with the prior probability, which is learned from a set of training data, to get the posterior probability of the voxel. The segmentation of the target vertebral body is then done by a binary thresholding of the estimated probability. We evaluated the present approach on two openly available datasets: 1) 3D T2-weighted spine MR images from 23 patients and 2) 3D spine CT images from 10 patients. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth (each MR image contains at least 7 vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 and each CT image contains 5 vertebral bodies from L1 to L5), we evaluated the present approach with leave-one-out experiments. Specifically, for the T2-weighted MR images, we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.6 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 88.7% and a mean surface distance of 1.5 mm, respectively. For the CT images we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.9 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 91.0% and a mean surface distance of 0.9 mm, respectively.

  6. Fully Automatic Localization and Segmentation of 3D Vertebral Bodies from CT/MR Images via a Learning-Based Method

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chengwen; Belavý, Daniel L.; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Bansmann, Martin; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of fully automatic localization and segmentation of 3D vertebral bodies from CT/MR images. We propose a learning-based, unified random forest regression and classification framework to tackle these two problems. More specifically, in the first stage, the localization of 3D vertebral bodies is solved with random forest regression where we aggregate the votes from a set of randomly sampled image patches to get a probability map of the center of a target vertebral body in a given image. The resultant probability map is then further regularized by Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to eliminate potential ambiguity caused by the neighboring vertebral bodies. The output from the first stage allows us to define a region of interest (ROI) for the segmentation step, where we use random forest classification to estimate the likelihood of a voxel in the ROI being foreground or background. The estimated likelihood is combined with the prior probability, which is learned from a set of training data, to get the posterior probability of the voxel. The segmentation of the target vertebral body is then done by a binary thresholding of the estimated probability. We evaluated the present approach on two openly available datasets: 1) 3D T2-weighted spine MR images from 23 patients and 2) 3D spine CT images from 10 patients. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth (each MR image contains at least 7 vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 and each CT image contains 5 vertebral bodies from L1 to L5), we evaluated the present approach with leave-one-out experiments. Specifically, for the T2-weighted MR images, we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.6 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 88.7% and a mean surface distance of 1.5 mm, respectively. For the CT images we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.9 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 91.0% and a mean surface distance of 0.9 mm, respectively. PMID:26599505

  7. Automatic 3D shape severity quantification and localization for deformational plagiocephaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmosukarto, Indriyati; Shapiro, Linda G.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Speltz, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the occurrence of deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly in children. This increase has coincided with the "Back to Sleep" campaign that was introduced to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). However, there has yet to be an objective quantification of the degree of severity for these two conditions. Most diagnoses are done on subjective factors such as patient history and physician examination. The existence of an objective quantification would help research in areas of diagnosis and intervention measures, as well as provide a tool for finding correlation between the shape severity and cognitive outcome. This paper describes a new shape severity quantification and localization method for deformational plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Our results show that there is a positive correlation between the new shape severity measure and the scores entered by a human expert.

  8. Adaptive local grid refinement for the compressible 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Thilo

    A method is presented based on a three-dimensional Euler code, using the explicit finite volume technique and a Runge-Kutta scheme, and applied in an adaptive version for the transonic flow around wings. The method allows embedded subgrids at two levels of refinement. Computations are performed with both various fixed refined grids and in an adaptive version applying a pressure or density gradient sensor. When comparing the results of embedded grid computations with calculations on only a total coarse or fine mesh, it can be stated that the local grid refinement technique is an effective framework to obtain well-resolved solutions with, at the same time, a minimum of grid points.

  9. Localization of 3D inertial Alfvén wave and generation of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. P.; Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, N.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper deals with the nonlinear interaction of Inertial Alfvén wave (IAW) and fast magnetosonic wave in the low beta plasma, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to the background magnetic pressure. In this paper, the localization and turbulent spectra of IAW along with the density dips correlated with the fast magnetosonic wave have been investigated. Variation of parallel electric field along and across the field lines has also been studied. Taking ponderomotive nonlinear effect in the dynamics of fast magnetosonic wave, couple of dimensionless equations has been derived. These coupled equations have been simulated numerically using the pseudo-spectral method. The obtained results reveal that the Kolmogorov scaling is followed by a steeper scaling in magnetic power spectrum, which is consistent with the observations by the FAST and Hawkeye spacecraft in auroral region. The relevance of present investigation has been discussed for auroral plasmas.

  10. Interactive 3D segmentation of the prostate in magnetic resonance images using shape and local appearance similarity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahedi, Maysam; Fenster, Aaron; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Ward, Aaron D.

    2013-03-01

    3D segmentation of the prostate in medical images is useful to prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy guidance, but is time-consuming to perform manually. Clinical translation of computer-assisted segmentation algorithms for this purpose requires a comprehensive and complementary set of evaluation metrics that are informative to the clinical end user. We have developed an interactive 3D prostate segmentation method for 1.5T and 3.0T T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2W MRI) acquired using an endorectal coil. We evaluated our method against manual segmentations of 36 3D images using complementary boundary-based (mean absolute distance; MAD), regional overlap (Dice similarity coefficient; DSC) and volume difference (ΔV) metrics. Our technique is based on inter-subject prostate shape and local boundary appearance similarity. In the training phase, we calculated a point distribution model (PDM) and a set of local mean intensity patches centered on the prostate border to capture shape and appearance variability. To segment an unseen image, we defined a set of rays - one corresponding to each of the mean intensity patches computed in training - emanating from the prostate centre. We used a radial-based search strategy and translated each mean intensity patch along its corresponding ray, selecting as a candidate the boundary point with the highest normalized cross correlation along each ray. These boundary points were then regularized using the PDM. For the whole gland, we measured a mean+/-std MAD of 2.5+/-0.7 mm, DSC of 80+/-4%, and ΔV of 1.1+/-8.8 cc. We also provided an anatomic breakdown of these metrics within the prostatic base, mid-gland, and apex.

  11. 3-D crustal structure along the North Anatolian Fault Zone in north-central Anatolia revealed by local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolsal-Ćevikbilen, Seda; Biryol, C. Berk; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Taymaz, Tuncay; Adıyaman, Hande E.; Özacar, A. Arda

    2012-03-01

    3-D P-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs variations in the crust along the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in north-central Anatolia were investigated by the inversion of local P- and S-wave traveltimes, to gain a better understanding of the seismological characteristics of the region. The 3-D local earthquake tomography inversions included 5444 P- and 3200 S-wave readings obtained from 168 well-located earthquakes between 2006 January and 2008 May. Dense ray coverage yields good resolution, particularly in the central part of the study area. The 3-D Vp and Vp/Vs tomographic images reveal clear correlations with both the surface geology and significant tectonic units in the region. We observed the lower limit of the seismogenic zone for north-central Anatolia at 15 km depth. Final earthquake locations display a distributed pattern throughout the study area, with most of the earthquakes occurring on the major splays of the NAFZ, rather than its master strand. We identify three major high-velocity blocks in the mid-crust separated by the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan Suture and interpret these blocks to be continental basement fragments that were accreted onto the margin following the closure of Neo-Tethyan Ocean. These basement blocks may have in part influenced the rupture propagations of the historical 1939, 1942 and 1943 earthquakes. In addition, large variations in the Vp/Vs ratio in the mid-crust were observed and have been correlated with the varying fluid contents of the existing lithologies and related tectonic structures.

  12. Scalable fluidic injector arrays for viral targeting of intact 3-D brain circuits.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephanie; Bernstein, Jacob; Boyden, Edward

    2010-01-21

    Our understanding of neural circuits--how they mediate the computations that subserve sensation, thought, emotion, and action, and how they are corrupted in neurological and psychiatric disorders--would be greatly facilitated by a technology for rapidly targeting genes to complex 3-dimensional neural circuits, enabling fast creation of "circuit-level transgenics." We have recently developed methods in which viruses encoding for light-sensitive proteins can sensitize specific cell types to millisecond-timescale activation and silencing in the intact brain. We here present the design and implementation of an injector array capable of delivering viruses (or other fluids) to dozens of defined points within the 3-dimensional structure of the brain (Figure. 1A, 1B). The injector array comprises one or more displacement pumps that each drive a set of syringes, each of which feeds into a polyimide/fused-silica capillary via a high-pressure-tolerant connector. The capillaries are sized, and then inserted into, desired locations specified by custom-milling a stereotactic positioning board, thus allowing viruses or other reagents to be delivered to the desired set of brain regions. To use the device, the surgeon first fills the fluidic subsystem entirely with oil, backfills the capillaries with the virus, inserts the device into the brain, and infuses reagents slowly (<0.1 microliters/min). The parallel nature of the injector array facilitates rapid, accurate, and robust labeling of entire neural circuits with viral payloads such as optical sensitizers to enable light-activation and silencing of defined brain circuits. Along with other technologies, such as optical fiber arrays for light delivery to desired sets of brain regions, we hope to create a toolbox that enables the systematic probing of causal neural functions in the intact brain. This technology may not only open up such systematic approaches to circuit-focused neuroscience in mammals, and facilitate labeling of

  13. New local potential useful for genome annotation and 3D modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Cohen, Fred E.

    2003-07-17

    A new potential energy function representing the conformational preferences of sequentially local regions of a protein backbone is presented. This potential is derived from secondary structure probabilities such as those produced by neural network-based prediction methods. The potential is applied to the problem of remote homolog identification, in combination with a distance dependent inter-residue potential and position-based scoring matrices. This fold recognition jury is implemented in a Java application called JThread. These methods are benchmarked on several test sets, including one released entirely after development and parameterization of JThread. In benchmark tests to identify known folds structurally similar (but not identical) to the native structure of a sequence, JThread performs significantly better than PSI-BLAST, with 10 percent more structures correctly identified as the most likely structural match in a fold library, and 20 percent more structures correctly narrowed down to a set of five possible candidates. JThread also significantly improves the average sequence alignment accuracy, from 53 percent to 62 percent of residues correctly aligned. Reliable fold assignments and alignments are identified, making the method useful for genome annotation. JThread is applied to predicted open reading frames (ORFs) from the genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and Drosophila melanogaster, identifying 20 new structural annotations in the former and 801 in the latter.

  14. A posteriori correction for source decay in 3D bioluminescent source localization using multiview measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Liu, Dan; Wang, Ruifang

    2009-02-01

    As a novel optical molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be used to monitor the biological activities non-invasively at the cellular and molecular levels. In most of known BLT studies, however, the time variation of the bioluminescent source is neglected. It gives rise to the inconsistent views during the multiview continuous wave measurement. In other words, the real measured data from different measured views come from 'different' bioluminescent sources. It could bring large errors in bioluminescence reconstruction. In this paper, a posteriori correction strategy for adaptive FEM-based reconstruction is proposed and developed. The method helps to improve the source localization considering the bioluminescent energy variance during the multiview measurement. In the method, the correction for boundary signals by means of a posteriori correction strategy, which adopts the energy ratio of measured data in the overlapping domains between the adjacent measurements as the correcting factor, can eliminate the effect of the inconsistent views. Then the adaptive mesh refinement with a posteriori error estimation helps to improve the precision and efficiency of BLT reconstruction. In addition, a priori permissible source region selection based on the surface measured data further reduces the ill-posedness of BLT and enhances numerical stability. Finally, three-dimension numerical simulations using the heterogeneous phantom are performed. The numerically measured data is generated by Monte Carlo (MC) method which is known as the Gold standard and can avoid the inverse crime. The reconstructed result with correction shows more accuracy compared to that without correction.

  15. A local quasicontinuum method for 3D multilattice crystalline materials: Application to shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorkin, V.; Elliott, R. S.; Tadmor, E. B.

    2014-07-01

    The quasicontinuum (QC) method, in its local (continuum) limit, is applied to materials with a multilattice crystal structure. Cauchy-Born (CB) kinematics, which accounts for the shifts of the crystal motif, is used to relate atomic motions to continuum deformation gradients. To avoid failures of CB kinematics, QC is augmented with a phonon stability analysis that detects lattice period extensions and identifies the minimum required periodic cell size. This approach is referred to as Cascading Cauchy-Born kinematics (CCB). In this paper, the method is described and developed. It is then used, along with an effective interaction potential (EIP) model for shape-memory alloys, to simulate the shape-memory effect and pseudoelasticity in a finite specimen. The results of these simulations show that (i) the CCB methodology is an essential tool that is required in order for QC-type simulations to correctly capture the first-order phase transitions responsible for these material behaviors, and (ii) that the EIP model adopted in this work coupled with the QC/CCB methodology is capable of predicting the characteristic behavior found in shape-memory alloys.

  16. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  17. 3D-printed hierarchical scaffold for localized isoniazid/rifampin drug delivery and osteoarticular tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Li, Kun; Zhu, Yufang; Zhang, Jianhua; Ye, Xiaojian

    2015-04-01

    After surgical treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis (TB), it is necessary to fill the surgical defect with an implant, which combines the merits of osseous regeneration and local multi-drug therapy so as to avoid drug resistance and side effects. In this study, a 3D-printed macro/meso-porous composite scaffold is fabricated. High dosages of isoniazid (INH)/rifampin (RFP) anti-TB drugs are loaded into chemically modified mesoporous bioactive ceramics in advance, which are then bound with poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) through a 3D printing procedure. The composite scaffolds show greatly prolonged drug release time compared to commercial calcium phosphate scaffolds either in vitro or in vivo. In addition, the drug concentrations on the periphery tissues of defect are maintained above INH/RFP minimal inhibitory concentrations even up to 12 weeks post-surgery, while they are extremely low in blood. Examinations of certain serum enzymes suggest no harm to hepatic or renal functions. Micro-CT evaluations and histology results also indicate partly degradation of the composite scaffolds and new bone growth in the cavity. These results suggest promising applications of our hierarchical composite scaffold in bone regeneration and local anti-TB therapy after osteoarticular TB debridement surgery.

  18. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  19. Dynamical History Of The Local Group In ΛCDM slowromancapii@ - Including External Perturbers In 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Indranil; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    We attempt to fit the observed radial velocities (RVs) of ˜ 30 Local Group (LG) galaxies using a 3D dynamical model of it and its immediate environment within the context of the standard cosmological paradigm, ΛCDM. This extends and confirms the basic results of our previous axisymmetric investigation of the LG (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We find that there remains a tendency for observed RVs to exceed those predicted by our best-fitting model. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our 2D model, with a root mean square value of ˜ 50 km/s. Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy problem. Nonetheless, the 2D and 3D results differ in several other ways such as which galaxies' RVs are most problematic and the preferred values of parameters common to both models. The anomalously high RVs of several LG dwarfs may be better explained if the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) were once moving much faster than in our models. This would allow LG dwarfs to gain very high RVs via gravitational slingshot encounters with a massive fast-moving galaxy. Such a scenario is possible in some modified gravity theories, especially those which require the MW and M31 to have previously undergone a close flyby. In a ΛCDM context, however, this scenario is not feasible as the resulting dynamical friction would cause a rapid merger.

  20. 3D molecular modeling and evolutionary study of the Trypanosoma brucei DNA Topoisomerase IB, as a new emerging pharmacological target.

    PubMed

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Roubelakis, Maria G; Feidakis, Christos; Anagnou, Nikolaos P; Kossida, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an outline is proposed that may lead to specific drug design targeting of the Trypanosoma brucei DNA Topoisomerase IB. In this direction, an unequivocally specific platform was designed for the development of selective modulators. The designed platform is focused on the unique structural and catalytic features of the enzyme. Extensive phylogenetic analysis based on all available published genomes indicated a broad distribution of DNA topoisomerases across eukaryotic species and revealed structurally important amino acids which could be assigned as potentially strong contributors to the regulation of the mechanism of the T. brucei DNA Topoisomerase IB. Based on the above, we propose a comprehensive in silico 3D model for the structure of the T. brucei DNA Topoisomerase IB. Our approach provides an efficient intergraded platform with both evolutionary and structural insights for the rational design of pharmacophore models as well as novel modulators as the anti-T. brucei DNA Topoisomerase IB agents with therapeutic potential.

  1. Computational 3D structures of drug-targeting proteins in the 2009-H1N1 influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qi-Shi; Wang, Shu-Qing; Huang, Ri-Bo; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) and M2 proton channel of influenza virus are the drug-targeting proteins, based on which several drugs were developed. However these once powerful drugs encountered drug-resistant problem to the H5N1 and H1N1 flu. To address this problem, the computational 3D structures of NA and M2 proteins of 2009-H1N1 influenza virus were built using the molecular modeling technique and computational chemistry method. Based on the models the structure features of NA and M2 proteins were analyzed, the docking structures of drug-protein complexes were computed, and the residue mutations were annotated. The results may help to solve the drug-resistant problem and stimulate designing more effective drugs against 2009-H1N1 influenza pandemic.

  2. Correction of Depth-Dependent Aberrations in 3D Single Molecule Localization and Super-resolution Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McGorty, Ryan; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule switching based super-resolution microscopy techniques have been extended into three dimensions through various 3D single molecule localization methods. However, the localization accuracy in z can be severely degraded by the presence of aberrations, particularly the spherical aberration introduced by the refractive-index-mismatch when imaging into an aqueous sample with an oil immersion objective. This aberration confines the imaging depth in most experiments to regions close to the coverslip. Here, we show a method to obtain accurate, depth dependent z calibrations by measuring the point spread function (PSF) at the coverslip surface, calculating the microscope pupil function through phase retrieval, and then computing the depth dependent PSF with the addition of spherical aberrations. We demonstrate experimentally that this method can maintain z localization accuracy over a large range of imaging depths. Our super-resolution images of a mammalian cell nucleus acquired between 0 and 2.5 μm past the coverslip show that this method produces accurate z localizations even in the deepest focal plane. PMID:24562125

  3. Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) with Anatomically Guided (3D) Neural Targeting Shows Superior Chronic Axial Low Back Pain Relief Compared to Traditional SCS-LUMINA Study.

    PubMed

    Veizi, Elias; Hayek, Salim M; North, James; Brent Chafin, T; Yearwood, Thomas L; Raso, Louis; Frey, Robert; Cairns, Kevin; Berg, Anthony; Brendel, John; Haider, Nameer; McCarty, Matthew; Vucetic, Henry; Sherman, Alden; Chen, Lilly; Mekel-Bobrov, Nitzan

    2017-01-20

    BACKGROUND : The aim of this study was to determine whether spinal cord stimulation (SCS) using 3D neural targeting provided sustained overall and low back pain relief in a broad routine clinical practice population.

  4. High-resolution 3-D P wave attenuation structure of the New Madrid Seismic Zone using local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisrat, Shishay T.; DeShon, Heather R.; Pesicek, Jeremy; Thurber, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution P wave seismic attenuation model for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is determined using P wave path attenuation (t*) values of small-magnitude earthquakes (MD < 3.9). Events were recorded at 89 broadband and short-period seismometers of the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Zone Network and 40 short-period seismometers of the Portable Array for Numerical Data Acquisition experiment. The amplitude spectra of all the earthquakes are simultaneously inverted for source, path (t*), and site parameters. The t* values are inverted for QP using local earthquake tomography methods and a known 3-D P wave velocity model for the region. The four major seismicity arms of the NMSZ exhibit reduced QP (higher attenuation) than the surrounding crust. The highest attenuation anomalies coincide with areas of previously reported high swarm activity attributed to fluid-rich fractures along the southeast extension of the Reelfoot fault. The QP results are consistent with previous attenuation studies in the region, which showed that active fault zones and fractured crust in the NMSZ are highly attenuating.

  5. Accurate quantification of local changes for carotid arteries in 3D ultrasound images using convex optimization-based deformable registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jieyu; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Registration of longitudinally acquired 3D ultrasound (US) images plays an important role in monitoring and quantifying progression/regression of carotid atherosclerosis. We introduce an image-based non-rigid registration algorithm to align the baseline 3D carotid US with longitudinal images acquired over several follow-up time points. This algorithm minimizes the sum of absolute intensity differences (SAD) under a variational optical-flow perspective within a multi-scale optimization framework to capture local and global deformations. Outer wall and lumen were segmented manually on each image, and the performance of the registration algorithm was quantified by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute distance (MAD) of the outer wall and lumen surfaces after registration. In this study, images for 5 subjects were registered initially by rigid registration, followed by the proposed algorithm. Mean DSC generated by the proposed algorithm was 79:3+/-3:8% for lumen and 85:9+/-4:0% for outer wall, compared to 73:9+/-3:4% and 84:7+/-3:2% generated by rigid registration. Mean MAD of 0:46+/-0:08mm and 0:52+/-0:13mm were generated for lumen and outer wall respectively by the proposed algorithm, compared to 0:55+/-0:08mm and 0:54+/-0:11mm generated by rigid registration. The mean registration time of our method per image pair was 143+/-23s.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-07-15

    tumor was consistently greater when using spherical tumor shapes as opposed to no shape assumption. However, an assumption of spherical tumor shape for RMSE = 3.5 mm led to a mean overestimation of tumor sampling probabilities of 3%, implying that assuming spherical tumor shape may be reasonable for many prostate tumors. The authors also determined that a biopsy system would need to have a RMS needle delivery error of no more than 1.6 mm in order to sample 95% of tumors with one core. The authors’ experiments also indicated that the effect of axial-direction error on the measured tumor burden was mitigated by the 18 mm core length at 3.5 mm RMSE. Conclusions: For biopsy systems with RMSE ≥ 3.5 mm, more than one biopsy core must be taken from the majority of tumors to achieveP ≥ 95%. These observations support the authors’ perspective that some tumors of clinically significant sizes may require more than one biopsy attempt in order to be sampled during the first biopsy session. This motivates the authors’ ongoing development of an approach to optimize biopsy plans with the aim of achieving a desired probability of obtaining a sample from each tumor, while minimizing the number of biopsies. Optimized planning of within-tumor targets for MRI-3D TRUS fusion biopsy could support earlier diagnosis of prostate cancer while it remains localized to the gland and curable.

  7. Impact of patient rotational errors on target and critical structure dose in IMRT: A 3D simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Xing, A.; Vial, P.; Scotti, A.; Stirton, R.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, Lois

    2013-06-01

    The impact of 3D rotational errors in patient positioning on dose delivered target volumes and critical structures in IMRT was studied. Patient rotational errors ranging from -30 to +30 was introduced to IMRT treatment plans of pelvis, head and neck and brain treatment sites and the impact of rotational error on DVH metrics was assessed. The magnitude of impact of rotational error on the error in dose delivered to the target volume and critical structures depends on the location of the structures from plan isocentre. In studied plans, a maximum percentage difference of up to -9.8(1s=13.4) % in D95 to PTV was observed for head and neck treatments. Similarly, in Brain treatments a maximum difference of up to 24.0(1s=33.0) % in maximum dose of Optic chiasm was observed. The results suggest that failure to correct patient's rotational error results in under-dosage to target volumes and over-dosage to the critical structures in some specific treatment scenarios.

  8. Automatic segmentation of solitary pulmonary nodules based on local intensity structure analysis and 3D neighborhood features in 3D chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) segmentation method based on local intensity structure analysis and neighborhood feature analysis in chest CT images. Automated segmentation of SPNs is desirable for a chest computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAS) system since a SPN may indicate early stage of lung cancer. Due to the similar intensities of SPNs and other chest structures such as blood vessels, many false positives (FPs) are generated by nodule detection methods. To reduce such FPs, we introduce two features that analyze the relation between each segmented nodule candidate and it neighborhood region. The proposed method utilizes a blob-like structure enhancement (BSE) filter based on Hessian analysis to augment the blob-like structures as initial nodule candidates. Then a fine segmentation is performed to segment much more accurate region of each nodule candidate. FP reduction is mainly addressed by investigating two neighborhood features based on volume ratio and eigenvector of Hessian that are calculates from the neighborhood region of each nodule candidate. We evaluated the proposed method by using 40 chest CT images, include 20 standard-dose CT images that we randomly chosen from a local database and 20 low-dose CT images that were randomly chosen from a public database: LIDC. The experimental results revealed that the average TP rate of proposed method was 93.6% with 12.3 FPs/case.

  9. About Non-Line-Of-Sight Satellite Detection and Exclusion in a 3D Map-Aided Localization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Peyraud, Sébastien; Bétaille, David; Renault, Stéphane; Ortiz, Miguel; Mougel, Florian; Meizel, Dominique; Peyret, François

    2013-01-01

    Reliable GPS positioning in city environment is a key issue actually, signals are prone to multipath, with poor satellite geometry in many streets. Using a 3D urban model to forecast satellite visibility in urban contexts in order to improve GPS localization is the main topic of the present article. A virtual image processing that detects and eliminates possible faulty measurements is the core of this method. This image is generated using the position estimated a priori by the navigation process itself, under road constraints. This position is then updated by measurements to line-of-sight satellites only. This closed-loop real-time processing has shown very first promising full-scale test results. PMID:23344379

  10. An investigation of matching symmetry in the human pinnae with possible implications for 3D ear recognition and sound localization.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Reijniers, Jonas; Shriver, Mark D; Snyders, Jonatan; Suetens, Paul; Nielandt, Joachim; De Tré, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The human external ears, or pinnae, have an intriguing shape and, like most parts of the human external body, bilateral symmetry is observed between left and right. It is a well-known part of our auditory sensory system and mediates the spatial localization of incoming sounds in 3D from monaural cues due to its shape-specific filtering as well as binaural cues due to the paired bilateral locations of the left and right ears. Another less broadly appreciated aspect of the human pinna shape is its uniqueness from one individual to another, which is on the level of what is seen in fingerprints and facial features. This makes pinnae very useful in human identification, which is of great interest in biometrics and forensics. Anatomically, the type of symmetry observed is known as matching symmetry, with structures present as separate mirror copies on both sides of the body, and in this work we report the first such investigation of the human pinna in 3D. Within the framework of geometric morphometrics, we started by partitioning ear shape, represented in a spatially dense way, into patterns of symmetry and asymmetry, following a two-factor anova design. Matching symmetry was measured in all substructures of the pinna anatomy. However, substructures that 'stick out' such as the helix, tragus, and lobule also contained a fair degree of asymmetry. In contrast, substructures such as the conchae, antitragus, and antihelix expressed relatively stronger degrees of symmetric variation in relation to their levels of asymmetry. Insights gained from this study were injected into an accompanying identification setup exploiting matching symmetry where improved performance is demonstrated. Finally, possible implications of the results in the context of ear recognition as well as sound localization are discussed.

  11. An investigation of matching symmetry in the human pinnae with possible implications for 3D ear recognition and sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Peter; Reijniers, Jonas; Shriver, Mark D; Snyders, Jonatan; Suetens, Paul; Nielandt, Joachim; De Tré, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The human external ears, or pinnae, have an intriguing shape and, like most parts of the human external body, bilateral symmetry is observed between left and right. It is a well-known part of our auditory sensory system and mediates the spatial localization of incoming sounds in 3D from monaural cues due to its shape-specific filtering as well as binaural cues due to the paired bilateral locations of the left and right ears. Another less broadly appreciated aspect of the human pinna shape is its uniqueness from one individual to another, which is on the level of what is seen in fingerprints and facial features. This makes pinnae very useful in human identification, which is of great interest in biometrics and forensics. Anatomically, the type of symmetry observed is known as matching symmetry, with structures present as separate mirror copies on both sides of the body, and in this work we report the first such investigation of the human pinna in 3D. Within the framework of geometric morphometrics, we started by partitioning ear shape, represented in a spatially dense way, into patterns of symmetry and asymmetry, following a two-factor anova design. Matching symmetry was measured in all substructures of the pinna anatomy. However, substructures that ‘stick out’ such as the helix, tragus, and lobule also contained a fair degree of asymmetry. In contrast, substructures such as the conchae, antitragus, and antihelix expressed relatively stronger degrees of symmetric variation in relation to their levels of asymmetry. Insights gained from this study were injected into an accompanying identification setup exploiting matching symmetry where improved performance is demonstrated. Finally, possible implications of the results in the context of ear recognition as well as sound localization are discussed. PMID:25382291

  12. Spectrum simulation of rough and nanostructured targets from their 2D and 3D image by Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiettekatte, François; Chicoine, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Corteo is a program that implements Monte Carlo (MC) method to simulate ion beam analysis (IBA) spectra of several techniques by following the ions trajectory until a sufficiently large fraction of them reach the detector to generate a spectrum. Hence, it fully accounts for effects such as multiple scattering (MS). Here, a version of Corteo is presented where the target can be a 2D or 3D image. This image can be derived from micrographs where the different compounds are identified, therefore bringing extra information into the solution of an IBA spectrum, and potentially significantly constraining the solution. The image intrinsically includes many details such as the actual surface or interfacial roughness, or actual nanostructures shape and distribution. This can for example lead to the unambiguous identification of structures stoichiometry in a layer, or at least to better constraints on their composition. Because MC computes in details the trajectory of the ions, it simulates accurately many of its aspects such as ions coming back into the target after leaving it (re-entry), as well as going through a variety of nanostructures shapes and orientations. We show how, for example, as the ions angle of incidence becomes shallower than the inclination distribution of a rough surface, this process tends to make the effective roughness smaller in a comparable 1D simulation (i.e. narrower thickness distribution in a comparable slab simulation). Also, in ordered nanostructures, target re-entry can lead to replications of a peak in a spectrum. In addition, bitmap description of the target can be used to simulate depth profiles such as those resulting from ion implantation, diffusion, and intermixing. Other improvements to Corteo include the possibility to interpolate the cross-section in angle-energy tables, and the generation of energy-depth maps.

  13. A transferrin variant as the targeting ligand for polymeric nanoparticles incorporated in 3-D PLGA porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André M; Chen, Kevin Y; Kamei, Daniel T

    2017-04-01

    We have developed doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (DP) conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and transferrin (Tf) to form Tf-PEG-DPs (TPDPs), and incorporated these TPDPs into three-dimensional (3-D) PLGA porous scaffolds to form a controlled delivery system. To our knowledge, this represents the first use of a Tf variant (oxalate Tf) to improve the targeted delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs) in PLGA scaffolds to PC3 prostate cancer cells. The PLGA scaffolds with TPDPs incorporated have been shown to release drugs for sustained delivery and provided a continuous release of DOX. The MTS assay was also performed to determine the potency of native and oxalate TPDPs, and a 3.0-fold decrease in IC50 values were observed between the native and oxalate TPDPs. The lower IC50 value for the oxalate version signifies greater potency compared to the native version, since a lower concentration of drug was required to achieve the same therapeutic effect. These results suggest that this technology has potential to become a new implantable polymeric device to improve the controlled and targeted drug delivery of Tf-conjugated NPs for cancer therapy.

  14. The diameter of the CoRoT target HD 49933. Combining the 3D limb darkening, asteroseismology, and interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, L.; Mourard, D.; Berio, P.; Thévenin, F.; Ligi, R.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Chesneau, O.; Delaa, O.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Stee, Ph.; Boyajian, T.; Morel, P.; Pichon, B.; Kervella, P.; Schmider, F. X.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Ridgway, S. T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2011-10-01

    Context. The interpretation of stellar pulsations in terms of internal structure depends on the knowledge of the fundamental stellar parameters. Long-base interferometers permit us to determine very accurate stellar radii, which are independent constraints for stellar models that help us to locate the star in the HR diagram. Aims: Using a direct interferometric determination of the angular diameter and advanced three-dimensional (3D) modeling, we derive the radius of the CoRoT target HD 49933 and reduce the global stellar parameter space compatible with seismic data. Methods: The VEGA/CHARA spectro-interferometer is used to measure the angular diameter of the star. A 3D radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the surface is performed to compute the limb darkening and derive a reliable diameter from visibility curves. The other fundamental stellar parameters (mass, age, and Teff) are found by fitting the large and small p-mode frequency separations using a stellar evolution model that includes microscopic diffusion. Results: We obtain a limb-darkened angular diameter of θLD = 0.445 ± 0.012 mas. With the Hipparcos parallax, we obtain a radius of R = 1.42 ± 0.04 R⊙. The corresponding stellar evolution model that fits both large and small frequency separations has a mass of 1.20 ± 0.08 M⊙ and an age of 2.7 Gy. The atmospheric parameters are Teff = 6640 ± 100 K, log g = 4.21 ± 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.38.

  15. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-06-27

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area.

  16. Orientation-weighted local Minkowski functionals in 3D for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone structure in the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Bitterling, H.; Weber, C.; Kuhn, V.; Eckstein, F.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Fragility fractures or pathologic fractures of the hip, i.e. fractures with no apparent trauma, represent the worst complication in osteoporosis with a mortality close to 25% during the first post-traumatic year. Over 90% of hip fractures result from falls from standing height. A substantial number of femoral fractures are initiated in the femoral neck or the trochanteric regions which contain an internal architecture of trabeculae that are functionally highly specialized to withstand the complex pattern of external and internal forces associated with human gait. Prediction of the mechanical strength of bone tissue can be achieved by dedicated texture analysis of data obtained by high resolution imaging modalities, e.g. computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Since in the case of the proximal femur, the connectivity, regional distribution and - most of all - the preferred orientation of individual trabeculae change considerably within narrow spatial limits, it seems most reasonable to evaluate the femoral bone structure on an orientation-weighted, local scale. In past studies, we could demonstrate the advantages of topological analysis of bone structure using the Minkowski Functionals in 3D on a global and on a local scale. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the prediction of the mechanical competence of the proximal femur by a new algorithm considering orientational changes of topological properties in the trabecular architecture is feasible and better suited than conventional methods based on the measurement of the mineral density of bone tissue (BMD).

  17. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  18. A fully-automatic locally adaptive thresholding algorithm for blood vessel segmentation in 3D digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    Boegel, Marco; Hoelter, Philip; Redel, Thomas; Maier, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is still a devastating disease. Planning of endovascular aneurysm therapy is increasingly based on hemodynamic simulations necessitating reliable vessel segmentation and accurate assessment of vessel diameters. In this work, we propose a fully-automatic, locally adaptive, gradient-based thresholding algorithm. Our approach consists of two steps. First, we estimate the parameters of a global thresholding algorithm using an iterative process. Then, a locally adaptive version of the approach is applied using the estimated parameters. We evaluated both methods on 8 clinical 3D DSA cases. Additionally, we propose a way to select a reference segmentation based on 2D DSA measurements. For large vessels such as the internal carotid artery, our results show very high sensitivity (97.4%), precision (98.7%) and Dice-coefficient (98.0%) with our reference segmentation. Similar results (sensitivity: 95.7%, precision: 88.9% and Dice-coefficient: 90.7%) are achieved for smaller vessels of approximately 1mm diameter.

  19. Local structures around 3d metal dopants in topological insulator Bi2Se3 studied by EXAFS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Wei, Xinyuan; Wang, Jiajia; Pan, Hong; Ji, Fuhao; Xi, Fuchun; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Zhang, Shuo; Jiang, Zheng; Wen, Wen; Huang, Yuying; Ye, Mao; Yang, Zhongqin; Qiao, Shan

    2014-09-01

    Transition-metal-doped Bi2Se3 crystals, X0.05Bi2Se3 (X =Cr, Co, Ni, and Cu), are prepared and studied by powder x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements to get the local structures around the dopants. Cr atoms substitute Bi atoms and Co atoms may substitute Bi atoms or form Co3Se4 (C2/m) clusters. Cu is also found taking the Bi substitutional site, which differs from the reported superconductor phase of Cu-doped Bi2Se3, suggesting the dependence of site occupancy of Cu in Bi2Se3 on the process of sample growing. For Ni0.05Bi2Se3, Ni atoms form Ni3Se4 (C2/m) clusters. The nearest neighbors of X (X =Cr, Co, and Cu) are Se atoms, and the X-Se bond lengths are extracted from EXAFS as 2.50 Å for Cr-Se, 2.40 Å for Co-Se, and 2.38 Å for Cu-Se, which show the direct evidences of dramatic structural relaxations around 3d dopants. The bond information of local structures around dopants is valuable for subsequent theoretical studies, and can hardly be obtained from other techniques.

  20. A proposal for combining mapping, localization and target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grönwall, Christina; Hendeby, Gustaf; Sinivaara, Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is a well-known positioning approach in GPS-denied environments such as urban canyons and inside buildings. Autonomous/aided target detection and recognition (ATR) is commonly used in military application to detect threats and targets in outdoor environments. This papers present approaches to combine SLAM with ATR in ways that compensate for the drawbacks in each method. The methods use physical objects that are recognizable by ATR as unambiguous features in SLAM, while SLAM provides the ATR with better position estimates. Landmarks in the form of 3D point features based on normal aligned radial features (NARF) are used in conjunction with identified objects and 3D object models that replace landmarks when possible. This leads to a more compact map representation with fewer landmarks, which partly compensates for the introduced cost of the ATR. We analyze three approaches to combine SLAM and 3D-data; point-point matching ignoring NARF features, point-point matching using the set of points that are selected by NARF feature analysis, and matching of NARF features using nearest neighbor analysis. The first two approaches are is similar to the common iterative closest point (ICP). We propose an algorithm that combines EKF-SLAM and ATR based on rectangle estimation. The intended application is to improve the positioning of a first responder moving through an indoor environment, where the map offers localization and simultaneously helps locate people, furniture and potentially dangerous objects such as gas canisters.

  1. Targeting Resources for Local Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Focusing state and federal dollars on targeted areas, the Kentucky Appalachian Community Development Initiative helps communities in eastern Kentucky fund their own strategies for economic growth. In Hindman, the project focuses on creating the Kentucky School of Crafts, to train master artisans; supporting the Kentucky Appalachian Artisan Center;…

  2. Recurrence patterns of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma after 3D conformal (chemo)-radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To establish recurrence patterns among locally advanced head and neck non-nasopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with radical (chemo-) radiotherapy and to correlate the sites of loco-regional recurrence with radiotherapy doses and target volumes Method 151 locally advanced HNSCC patients were treated between 2004-2005 using radical three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients with prior surgery to the primary tumour site were excluded. The sites of locoregional relapses were correlated with radiotherapy plans by the radiologist and a planning dosimetrist. Results Median age was 59 years (range:34-89). 35 patients had stage III disease, 116 patients had stage IV A/B. 36 patients were treated with radiotherapy alone, 42 with induction chemotherapy, 63 with induction and concomitant chemoradiotherapy and 10 concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 38 months (range 3-62). 3-year cause specific survival was 66.8%. 125 of 151 (82.8%) achieved a complete response to treatment. Amongst these 125 there were 20 local-regional recurrence, comprising 8 local, 5 regional and 7 simultaneous local and regional; synchronous distant metastases occurred in 7 of the 20. 9 patients developed distant metastases in the absence of locoregional failure. For the 14 local recurrences with planning data available, 12 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 1 was out-of-field. Of the 11 regional failures with planning data available, 7 were in-field, 1 was marginal and 3 were out-of-field recurrences. Conclusion The majority of failures following non-surgical treatment for locally advanced HNSCC were loco-regional, within the radiotherapy target volume. Improving locoregional control remains a high priority. PMID:21609453

  3. Portable, Easy-to-Operate, and Antifouling Microcapsule Array Chips Fabricated by 3D Ice Printing for Visual Target Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Zhang, Fang-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Dong; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Li, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2015-06-16

    Herein, we proposed a portable, easy-to-operate, and antifouling microcapsule array chip for target detection. This prepackaged chip was fabricated by innovative and cost-effective 3D ice printing integrating with photopolymerization sealing which could eliminate complicated preparation of wet chemistry and effectively resist outside contaminants. Only a small volume of sample (2 μL for each microcapsule) was consumed to fulfill the assay. All the reagents required for the analysis were stored in ice form within the microcapsule before use, which guaranteed the long-term stability of microcapsule array chips. Nitrite and glucose were chosen as models for proof of concept to achieve an instant quantitative detection by naked eyes without the need of external sophisticated instruments. The simplicity, low cost, and small sample consumption endowed ice-printing microcapsule array chips with potential commercial value in the fields of on-site environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and rapid high-throughput point-of-care quantitative assay.

  4. Structure and mechanical properties of a-C:H films deposited on a 3D target: comparative study on target scale and aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Y.; Choi, J.

    2017-04-01

    Recently, the bipolar-type plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (bipolar PBII&D) method has attracted large attention owing to its non-line-of-sight coating technique. In particular, bipolar PBII&D is beneficial in coating a hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film on a 3D target. Therefore, in this study, a-C:H films were prepared onto a complex-shaped 3D target such as macrotrench (pitch: 20 mm, aspect ratio: 1.0), microchannel (width: 100 µm, aspect ratio: 20), microtrench (pitch: 4 µm, aspect ratio: 2.0), or nanotrench (pitch: 300 nm, aspect ratio: 2.0) using bipolar PBII&D, and the film properties were evaluated. With regard to the mechanical properties, the film thickness and hardness were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and nanoindentation measurements, respectively. With regard to the structural properties, the microstructure of the films was evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Subsequently, the structural and mechanical properties were compared with each other to reveal the target scale- and aspect ratio-dependence on the film properties. Furthermore, the coating mechanism was elucidated by analyzing the plasma behavior around the target using a plasma simulation method. The particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) and the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) methods were simultaneously used as the plasma simulation method. Each of these is a calculation method that analyzes the behavior of ions and radicals, respectively. As a result, the a-C:H films were successfully coated onto any scale and any shape of the target. In contrast, the results of the hardness and those from the Raman spectroscopy on the sidewall surface indicated non-uniformity of the film structure and depended on the scale and aspect ratio of a target, i.e. the hardness and Raman data show different values depending on the target scale and aspect ratio. The result of the plasma simulation suggested that such non-uniform mechanical or structural

  5. Determination of Rectification Corrections for Semi Gantry Crane Rail Axes in the Local 3D Coordinate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, Daria; Kamiński, Waldemar

    2015-02-01

    Electronic tacheometers are currently the standard instruments used in geodetic work, including also geodetic engineering measurements. The main advantage connected with this equipment is among others high accuracy of the measurement and thus high accuracy of the final determinations represented for example by the points' coordinates. One of many applications of the tacheometers is the measurement of crane rail axes. This measurement is based on polar method and it allows to get the spatial coordinates of points in 3D local system. The standard technology of measurement of crane rail axes and development of its calculations' results is well-known and widely presented in the subject literature. At the same time new methods of observations results evaluation are developing. Some new proposals for the development of measurement results were already presented in (Kamiński, 2013). This paper is a generalisation of the paper quoted above. The authors developed the concept which was presented there by a proposal for determining rectification corrections for semi gantry crane rail axes. To carried out the task, the parametric method with conditions on parameters was used. Moreover the practical tests on simulated measurement results were conducted. The results obtained from alignment confirmed the theoretical assumptions. Despite the fact that analyses were carried out only on the simulated data, it is already possible to say that presented method for determination of rectification corrections for crane rail axes can be used for development of the observations from real measurement.

  6. Reconstructing 3-D maps of the local viscoelastic properties using a finite-amplitude modulated radiation force.

    PubMed

    Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard; Bezerianos, Anastasios

    2014-02-01

    A modulated acoustic radiation force, produced by two confocal tone-burst ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies (i.e. 2.0 MHz ± Δf/2, where Δf is the difference frequency), can be used to remotely generate modulated low-frequency (Δf ≤ 500 Hz) shear waves in attenuating media. By appropriately selecting the duration of the two beams, the energy of the generated shear waves can be concentrated around the difference frequency (i.e., Δf ± Δf/2). In this manner, neither their amplitude nor their phase information is distorted by frequency-dependent effects, thereby, enabling a more accurate reconstruction of the viscoelastic properties. Assuming a Voigt viscoelastic model, this paper describes the use of a finite-element-method model to simulate three-dimensional (3-D) shear-wave propagation in viscoelastic media containing a spherical inclusion. Nonlinear propagation is assumed for the two ultrasound beams, so that higher harmonics are developed in the force and shear spectrum. Finally, an inverse reconstruction algorithm is used to extract 3-D maps of the local shear modulus and viscosity from the simulated shear-displacement fields based on the fundamental and second-harmonic component. The quality of the reconstructed maps is evaluated using the contrast between the inclusion and the background and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). It is shown that the shear modulus can be accurately reconstructed based on the fundamental component, such that the observed contrast deviates from the true contrast by a root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of only 0.38 and the CNR is greater than 30 dB. If the second-harmonic component is used, the RMSE becomes 1.54 and the corresponding CNR decreases by approximately 10-15 dB. The reconstructed shear viscosity maps based on the second harmonic are shown to be of higher quality than those based on the fundamental. The effects of noise are also investigated and a fusion operation between the two spectral components is

  7. A microwave imaging-based 3D localization algorithm for an in-body RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rohit; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2015-01-01

    A microwave imaging-based technique for 3D localization of an in-body RF source is presented. Such a technique can be useful for localization of an RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes for positioning of any abnormality in the gastrointestinal tract. Microwave imaging is used to determine the dielectric properties (relative permittivity and conductivity) of the tissues that are required for a precise localization. A 2D microwave imaging algorithm is used for determination of the dielectric properties. Calibration method is developed for removing any error due to the used 2D imaging algorithm on the imaging data of a 3D body. The developed method is tested on a simple 3D heterogeneous phantom through finite-difference-time-domain simulations. Additive white Gaussian noise at the signal-to-noise ratio of 30 dB is added to the simulated data to make them more realistic. The developed calibration method improves the imaging and the localization accuracy. Statistics on the localization accuracy are generated by randomly placing the RF source at various positions inside the small intestine of the phantom. The cumulative distribution function of the localization error is plotted. In 90% of the cases, the localization accuracy was found within 1.67 cm, showing the capability of the developed method for 3D localization.

  8. 3D Osteoarthritic Changes in TMJ Condylar Morphology Correlates with Specific Systemic and Local Biomarkers of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Walker, David; Schilling, Juan; Sugai, James; Giannobile, William; Paniagua, Beatriz; Benavides, Erika; Zhu, Hongtu; Marron, J. Steve; Jung, Bryan T.; Baranowski, David; Rhodes, Jesse; Nackley, Andrea; Lim, Pei Feng; Ludlow, John B.; Nguyen, Tung; Goncalves, Joao R.; Wolford, Larry; Kapila, Sunil; Styner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess 3D morphological variations and local and systemic biomarker profiles in subjects with a diagnosis of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA). Design Twenty-eight patients with long-term TMJ OA (39.9 ± 16 years), 12 patients at initial diagnosis of OA (47.4 ± 16.1 years), and 12 healthy controls (41.8 ± 12.2 years) were recruited. All patients were female and had cone beam CT scans taken. TMJ arthrocentesis and venipuncture were performed on 12 OA and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Serum and synovial fluid levels of 50 biomarkers of arthritic inflammation were quantified by protein microarrays. Shape Analysis MANCOVA tested statistical correlations between biomarker levels and variations in condylar morphology. Results Compared with healthy controls, the OA average condyle was significantly smaller in all dimensions except its anterior surface, with areas indicative of bone resorption along the articular surface, particularly in the lateral pole. Synovial fluid levels of ANG, GDF15, TIMP-1, CXCL16, MMP-3 and MMP-7 were significantly correlated with bone apposition of the condylar anterior surface. Serum levels of ENA-78, MMP-3, PAI-1, VE-Cadherin, VEGF, GM-CSF, TGFβb1, IFNγg, TNFαa, IL-1αa, and IL-6 were significantly correlated with flattening of the lateral pole. Expression levels of ANG were significantly correlated with the articular morphology in healthy controls. Conclusions Bone resorption at the articular surface, particularly at the lateral pole was statistically significant at initial diagnosis of TMJ OA. Synovial fluid levels of ANG, GDF15, TIMP-1, CXCL16, MMP-3 and MMP-7 were correlated with bone apposition. Serum levels of ENA-78, MMP-3, PAI-1, VE-Cadherin, VEGF, GM-CSF, TGFβ1, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-1α, and IL-6 were correlated with bone resorption. PMID:25278075

  9. A Novel Multi-Purpose Matching Representation of Local 3D Surfaces: A Rotationally Invariant, Efficient, and Highly Discriminative Approach With an Adjustable Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Osaimi, Faisal R

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to local 3D surface matching representation suitable for a range of 3D vision applications is introduced. Local 3D surface patches around key points on the 3D surface are represented by 2D images such that the representing 2D images enjoy certain characteristics which positively impact the matching accuracy, robustness, and speed. First, the proposed representation is complete, in the sense, there is no information loss during their computation. Second, the 3DoF 2D representations are strictly invariant to all the 3DoF rotations. To optimally avail surface information, the sensitivity of the representations to surface information is adjustable. This also provides the proposed matching representation with the means to optimally adjust to a particular class of problems/applications or an acquisition technology. Each 2D matching representation is a sequence of adjustable integral kernels, where each kernel is efficiently computed from a triple of precise 3D curves (profiles) formed by intersecting three concentric spheres with the 3D surface. Robust techniques for sampling the profiles and establishing correspondences among them were devised. Based on the proposed matching representation, two techniques for the detection of key points were presented. The first is suitable for static images, while the second is suitable for 3D videos. The approach was tested on the face recognition grand challenge v2.0, the 3D twins expression challenge, and the Bosphorus data sets, and a superior face recognition performance was achieved. In addition, the proposed approach was used in object class recognition and tested on a Kinect data set.

  10. Electrostatic Contributions Drive the Interaction Between Staphylococcus aureus Protein Efb-C and its Complement Target C3d

    SciTech Connect

    Haspel, N.; Ricklin, D.; Geisbrecht, B.V.; Kavraki, L.E.; Lambris, J.D.

    2008-11-13

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  11. Electrostatic contributions drive the interaction between Staphylococcus aureus protein Efb-C and its complement target C3d.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Nurit; Ricklin, Daniel; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lambris, John D

    2008-11-01

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  12. Integration of multi-source and multi-scale datasets for 3D structural modeling for subsurface exploration targeting, Luanchuan Mo-polymetallic district, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gongwen; Ma, Zhenbo; Li, Ruixi; Song, Yaowu; Qu, Jianan; Zhang, Shouting; Yan, Changhai; Han, Jiangwei

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, multi-source (geophysical, geochemical, geological and remote sensing) datasets were used to construct multi-scale (district-, deposit-, and orebody-scale) 3D geological models and extract 3D exploration criteria for subsurface Mo-polymetallic exploration targeting in the Luanchuan district in China. The results indicate that (i) a series of region-/district-scale NW-trending thrusts controlled main Mo-polymetallic forming, and they were formed by regional Indosinian Qinling orogenic events, the secondary NW-trending district-scale folds and NE-trending faults and the intrusive stock structure are produced based on thrust structure in Caledonian-Indosinian orogenic events; they are ore-bearing zones and ore-forming structures; (ii) the NW-trending district-scale and NE-trending deposit-scale normal faults were crossed and controlled by the Jurassic granite stocks in 3D space, they are associated with the magma-skarn Mo polymetallic mineralization (the 3D buffer distance of ore-forming granite stocks is 600 m) and the NW-trending hydrothermal Pb-Zn deposits which are surrounded by the Jurassic granite stocks and constrained by NW-trending or NE-trending faults (the 3D buffer distance of ore-forming fault is 700 m); and (iii) nine Mo polymetallic and four Pb-Zn targets were identified in the subsurface of the Luanchuan district.

  13. A fast approach to 3D HSQC-based spectroscopy based on a Fourier phase encoding of pre-targeted resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yulan; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Zhang, Zhiyong; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) provides a unique window into structure and dynamics at an atomic level. Traditionally, given the scan-by-scan time modulation involved in these experiments, the duration of nD NMR increases exponentially with spectral dimensionality. In addition, acquisition times increase as the number of spectral elements being sought in each indirect domain - given by the ratio between the spectral bandwidth being targeted and the resolution desired. These long sampling times can be substantially reduced by exploiting information that is often available from lower-dimensionality acquisitions. This work presents a novel approach that exploits previous 2D information to speed up the acquisition of 3D spectra, based on what we denote as a Time-Optimized FouriEr Encoding (TOFEE) of pre-targeted peaks. Such 3D TOFEE experiments, which present points in common with Hadamard-encoded 3D acquisitions, do not necessarily require more scans than their 2D counterparts. This is here demonstrated based on extensions of 2D Heteronuclear Single-quantum Coherence (HSQC) experiments, to 3D HSQC-TOCSY or 3D HSQC-NOESY acquisitions. The theoretical basis of this new approach is given, and experimental demonstrations are presented on small molecule and protein-based model systems.

  14. Importance of protocol target definition on the ability to spare normal tissue: An IMRT and 3D-CRT planning comparison for intraorbital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hein, Patrick A.; Gladstone, David J.; Bellerive, Marc R.; Hug, Eugen B. . E-mail: Eugen.B.Hug@hitchcock.org

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: We selected five intraorbital tumor sites that are frequently found in clinical practice in children diagnosed with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma and performed three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. Results of target coverage and doses to critical structures were compared. The goal of this study was to evaluate and to document realistic expectations as to organ-sparing capabilities of modern radiation therapy planning technologies with a focus on lens-sparing irradiation. Furthermore, we investigated potential added benefits of IMRT compared with 3D-CRT and the influence of protocol volume criteria definitions on the ability to obtain normal tissue dose sparing using the orbit as an example of a complex anatomic site. Methods and Materials: The five intraorbital tumor sites were placed retrobulbar, temporal, nasal, in the upper inner and upper outer quadrant, the latter two more complex in shape. Gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), and planning target volume (PTV) were defined in image-fused computed tomography and magnetic resonance data sets. 3D-CRT and IMRT photon plans, using equal beam angles and collimation for direct comparison, were designed to 45 Gy prescription dose according to Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group-D9602 (IRSG-D9602) protocol (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study V [IRS-V] protocol) for Stage I, Clinical Group 3 orbital rhabdomyosarcoma. To compare the impact of changed target definitions in IMRT planning, additional IMRT plans were generated using modified volume and dose coverage criteria. The minimum dose constraint (95%) of the PTV was substituted by a required minimum volume coverage (95%) with the prescribed dose. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained, including target volumes, lens, optic nerves, optic chiasm, lacrimal gland, bony orbit, pituitary gland, frontal and temporal lobes. Results: Protocol target volume coverage criteria

  15. Transorbital target localization in the porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2013-03-01

    Current pharmacological therapies for the treatment of chronic optic neuropathies such as glaucoma are often inadequate due to their inability to directly affect the optic nerve and prevent neuron death. While drugs that target the neurons have been developed, existing methods of administration are not capable of delivering an effective dose of medication along the entire length of the nerve. We have developed an image-guided system that utilizes a magnetically tracked flexible endoscope to navigate to the back of the eye and administer therapy directly to the optic nerve. We demonstrate the capabilities of this system with a series of targeted surgical interventions in the orbits of live pigs. Target objects consisted of NMR microspherical bulbs with a volume of 18 μL filled with either water or diluted gadolinium-based contrast, and prepared with either the presence or absence of a visible coloring agent. A total of 6 pigs were placed under general anesthesia and two microspheres of differing color and contrast content were blindly implanted in the fat tissue of each orbit. The pigs were scanned with T1-weighted MRI, image volumes were registered, and the microsphere containing gadolinium contrast was designated as the target. The surgeon was required to navigate the flexible endoscope to the target and identify it by color. For the last three pigs, a 2D/3D registration was performed such that the target's coordinates in the image volume was noted and its location on the video stream was displayed with a crosshair to aid in navigation. The surgeon was able to correctly identify the target by color, with an average intervention time of 20 minutes for the first three pigs and 3 minutes for the last three.

  16. Targeted manipulation of leaf form via local growth repression.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Robert; Kasprzewska, Ania; Fleming, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    A classical view is that leaf shape is the result of local promotion of growth linked to cell proliferation. However, an alternative hypothesis is that leaf form is the result of local repression of growth in an otherwise growing system. Here we show that leaf form can indeed be manipulated in a directed fashion by local repression of growth. We show that targeting expression of an inhibitor of a cyclin-dependent kinase (KRP1) to the sinus area of developing leaves of Arabidopsis leads to local growth repression and the formation of organs with extreme lobing, including generation of leaflet-like organs. Directing KRP1 expression to other regions of the leaf using an miRNA target sequence tagging approach also leads to predictable novel leaf forms, and repression of growth in the leaf margin blocks the outgrowth of lobes, leading to a smoother perimeter. In addition, we show that decreased growth around the perimeter and across the leaf abaxial surface leads to a change in 3D form, as predicted by mechanical models of leaf growth. Our analysis provides experimental evidence that local repression of growth influences leaf shape, suggesting that it could be part of the mechanism of morphogenesis in plants in the context of an otherwise growing system.

  17. Comparative Local Quality Assessment of 3D Medical Image Segmentations with Focus on Statistical Shape Model-Based Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Landesberger, Tatiana von; Basgier, Dennis; Becker, Meike

    2016-12-01

    The quality of automatic 3D medical segmentation algorithms needs to be assessed on test datasets comprising several 3D images (i.e., instances of an organ). The experts need to compare the segmentation quality across the dataset in order to detect systematic segmentation problems. However, such comparative evaluation is not supported well by current methods. We present a novel system for assessing and comparing segmentation quality in a dataset with multiple 3D images. The data is analyzed and visualized in several views. We detect and show regions with systematic segmentation quality characteristics. For this purpose, we extended a hierarchical clustering algorithm with a connectivity criterion. We combine quality values across the dataset for determining regions with characteristic segmentation quality across instances. Using our system, the experts can also identify 3D segmentations with extraordinary quality characteristics. While we focus on algorithms based on statistical shape models, our approach can also be applied to cases, where landmark correspondences among instances can be established. We applied our approach to three real datasets: liver, cochlea and facial nerve. The segmentation experts were able to identify organ regions with systematic segmentation characteristics as well as to detect outlier instances.

  18. Geo-Referenced Dynamic Pushbroom Stereo Mosaics for 3D and Moving Target Extraction - A New Geometric Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    different real video sequences of large-scale 3D scenes to show the accuracy and effectiveness of the representation. Applications include airborne or ground...a moving platform, we will have to naturally and effectively handle obvious motion parallax and object occlusions in order to be able to detect...stereo mosaics of static scenes. These results are mainly presented in Sections 3 and 4. Second, an effective and efficient patch-based stereo

  19. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-07-27

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of {beta}1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPKpathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  20. NOTE: Adaptation of a 3D prostate cancer atlas for transrectal ultrasound guided target-specific biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, R.; Werahera, P. N.; Barqawi, A.; Crawford, E. D.; Shinohara, K.; Simoneau, A. R.; Suri, J. S.

    2008-10-01

    Due to lack of imaging modalities to identify prostate cancer in vivo, current TRUS guided prostate biopsies are taken randomly. Consequently, many important cancers are missed during initial biopsies. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential clinical utility of a high-speed registration algorithm for a 3D prostate cancer atlas. This 3D prostate cancer atlas provides voxel-level likelihood of cancer and optimized biopsy locations on a template space (Zhan et al 2007). The atlas was constructed from 158 expert annotated, 3D reconstructed radical prostatectomy specimens outlined for cancers (Shen et al 2004). For successful clinical implementation, the prostate atlas needs to be registered to each patient's TRUS image with high registration accuracy in a time-efficient manner. This is implemented in a two-step procedure, the segmentation of the prostate gland from a patient's TRUS image followed by the registration of the prostate atlas. We have developed a fast registration algorithm suitable for clinical applications of this prostate cancer atlas. The registration algorithm was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) to meet the critical processing speed requirements for atlas guided biopsy. A color overlay of the atlas superposed on the TRUS image was presented to help pick statistically likely regions known to harbor cancer. We validated our fast registration algorithm using computer simulations of two optimized 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols to maximize the overall detection rate. Using a GPU, patient's TRUS image segmentation and atlas registration took less than 12 s. The prostate cancer atlas guided 7- and 12-core biopsy protocols had cancer detection rates of 84.81% and 89.87% respectively when validated on the same set of data. Whereas the sextant biopsy approach without the utility of 3D cancer atlas detected only 70.5% of the cancers using the same histology data. We estimate 10-20% increase in prostate cancer detection rates

  1. Targeted Business Incentives and Local Labor Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses a regression discontinuity design to examine the effects of geographically targeted business incentives on local labor markets. Unlike elsewhere in the United States, enterprise zone (EZ) designations in Texas are determined in part by a cutoff rule based on census block group poverty rates. Exploiting this discontinuity as a…

  2. Automatic localization of vertebral levels in x-ray fluoroscopy using 3D-2D registration: a tool to reduce wrong-site surgery.

    PubMed

    Otake, Y; Schafer, S; Stayman, J W; Zbijewski, W; Kleinszig, G; Graumann, R; Khanna, A J; Siewerdsen, J H

    2012-09-07

    Surgical targeting of the incorrect vertebral level (wrong-level surgery) is among the more common wrong-site surgical errors, attributed primarily to the lack of uniquely identifiable radiographic landmarks in the mid-thoracic spine. The conventional localization method involves manual counting of vertebral bodies under fluoroscopy, is prone to human error and carries additional time and dose. We propose an image registration and visualization system (referred to as LevelCheck), for decision support in spine surgery by automatically labeling vertebral levels in fluoroscopy using a GPU-accelerated, intensity-based 3D-2D (namely CT-to-fluoroscopy) registration. A gradient information (GI) similarity metric and a CMA-ES optimizer were chosen due to their robustness and inherent suitability for parallelization. Simulation studies involved ten patient CT datasets from which 50 000 simulated fluoroscopic images were generated from C-arm poses selected to approximate the C-arm operator and positioning variability. Physical experiments used an anthropomorphic chest phantom imaged under real fluoroscopy. The registration accuracy was evaluated as the mean projection distance (mPD) between the estimated and true center of vertebral levels. Trials were defined as successful if the estimated position was within the projection of the vertebral body (namely mPD <5 mm). Simulation studies showed a success rate of 99.998% (1 failure in 50 000 trials) and computation time of 4.7 s on a midrange GPU. Analysis of failure modes identified cases of false local optima in the search space arising from longitudinal periodicity in vertebral structures. Physical experiments demonstrated the robustness of the algorithm against quantum noise and x-ray scatter. The ability to automatically localize target anatomy in fluoroscopy in near-real-time could be valuable in reducing the occurrence of wrong-site surgery while helping to reduce radiation exposure. The method is applicable beyond the

  3. Automatic localization of vertebral levels in x-ray fluoroscopy using 3D-2D registration: a tool to reduce wrong-site surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    Surgical targeting of the incorrect vertebral level (wrong-level surgery) is among the more common wrong-site surgical errors, attributed primarily to the lack of uniquely identifiable radiographic landmarks in the mid-thoracic spine. The conventional localization method involves manual counting of vertebral bodies under fluoroscopy, is prone to human error and carries additional time and dose. We propose an image registration and visualization system (referred to as LevelCheck), for decision support in spine surgery by automatically labeling vertebral levels in fluoroscopy using a GPU-accelerated, intensity-based 3D-2D (namely CT-to-fluoroscopy) registration. A gradient information (GI) similarity metric and a CMA-ES optimizer were chosen due to their robustness and inherent suitability for parallelization. Simulation studies involved ten patient CT datasets from which 50 000 simulated fluoroscopic images were generated from C-arm poses selected to approximate the C-arm operator and positioning variability. Physical experiments used an anthropomorphic chest phantom imaged under real fluoroscopy. The registration accuracy was evaluated as the mean projection distance (mPD) between the estimated and true center of vertebral levels. Trials were defined as successful if the estimated position was within the projection of the vertebral body (namely mPD <5 mm). Simulation studies showed a success rate of 99.998% (1 failure in 50 000 trials) and computation time of 4.7 s on a midrange GPU. Analysis of failure modes identified cases of false local optima in the search space arising from longitudinal periodicity in vertebral structures. Physical experiments demonstrated the robustness of the algorithm against quantum noise and x-ray scatter. The ability to automatically localize target anatomy in fluoroscopy in near-real-time could be valuable in reducing the occurrence of wrong-site surgery while helping to reduce radiation exposure. The method is applicable beyond

  4. Targeting and Localization for Mars Rover Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.; Crockett, Thomas; Fox, Jason M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Rabe, Kenneth J.; McCurdy, Michael; Pyrzak, Guy

    2006-01-01

    In this work we discuss how the quality of localization knowledge impacts the remote operation of rovers on the surface of Mars. We look at the techniques of localization estimation used in the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rover missions. We examine the motivation behind the modes of targeting for different types of activities, such as navigation, remote science, and in situ science. We discuss the virtues and shortcomings of existing approaches and new improvements in the latest operations tools used to support the Mars Exploration Rover missions and rover technology development tasks at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We conclude with future directions we plan to explore in improving the localization knowledge available for operations and more effective targeting of rovers and their instrument payloads.

  5. Targeting and Localization for Mars Rover Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.; Crockett, Thomas; Fox, Jason M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Rabe, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    A design and a partially developed application framework were presented for improving localization and targeting for surface spacecraft. The program has value for the Mars Science Laboratory mission, and has been delivered to support the Mars Exploration Rovers as part of the latest version of the Maestro science planning tool. It also has applications for future missions involving either surface-based or low-altitude atmospheric robotic vehicles. The targeting and localization solutions solve the problem of how to integrate localization estimate updates into operational planning tools, operational data product generalizations, and flight software by adding expanded flexibility to flight software, the operations data product pipeline, and operations planning tools based on coordinate frame updates during a planning cycle.

  6. Evaluation of the combined effects of target size, respiratory motion and background activity on 3D and 4D PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-June; Ionascu, Dan; Killoran, Joseph; Mamede, Marcelo; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Chin, Lee; Berbeco, Ross

    2008-07-01

    Gated (4D) PET/CT has the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of radiotherapy at treatment sites where internal organ motion is significant. However, the best methodology for applying 4D-PET/CT to target definition is not currently well established. With the goal of better understanding how to best apply 4D information to radiotherapy, initial studies were performed to investigate the effect of target size, respiratory motion and target-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) on 3D (ungated) and 4D PET images. Using a PET/CT scanner with 4D or gating capability, a full 3D-PET scan corrected with a 3D attenuation map from 3D-CT scan and a respiratory gated (4D) PET scan corrected with corresponding attenuation maps from 4D-CT were performed by imaging spherical targets (0.5-26.5 mL) filled with 18F-FDG in a dynamic thorax phantom and NEMA IEC body phantom at different TBRs (infinite, 8 and 4). To simulate respiratory motion, the phantoms were driven sinusoidally in the superior-inferior direction with amplitudes of 0, 1 and 2 cm and a period of 4.5 s. Recovery coefficients were determined on PET images. In addition, gating methods using different numbers of gating bins (1-20 bins) were evaluated with image noise and temporal resolution. For evaluation, volume recovery coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated as a function of the number of gating bins. Moreover, the optimum thresholds which give accurate moving target volumes were obtained for 3D and 4D images. The partial volume effect and signal loss in the 3D-PET images due to the limited PET resolution and the respiratory motion, respectively were measured. The results show that signal loss depends on both the amplitude and pattern of respiratory motion. However, the 4D-PET successfully recovers most of the loss induced by the respiratory motion. The 5-bin gating method gives the best temporal resolution with acceptable image noise. The results based on the 4D

  7. Real-time motion- and B0-correction for LASER-localized spiral-accelerated 3D-MRSI of the brain at 3T.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Hess, Aaron T; Gagoski, Borjan; Tisdall, M Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J W; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2014-03-01

    The full potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often limited by localization artifacts, motion-related artifacts, scanner instabilities, and long measurement times. Localized adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) provides accurate B1-insensitive spatial excitation even at high magnetic fields. Spiral encoding accelerates MRSI acquisition, and thus, enables 3D-coverage without compromising spatial resolution. Real-time position- and shim/frequency-tracking using MR navigators correct motion- and scanner instability-related artifacts. Each of these three advanced MRI techniques provides superior MRSI data compared to commonly used methods. In this work, we integrated in a single pulse sequence these three promising approaches. Real-time correction of motion, shim, and frequency-drifts using volumetric dual-contrast echo planar imaging-based navigators were implemented in an MRSI sequence that uses low-power gradient modulated short-echo time LASER localization and time efficient spiral readouts, in order to provide fast and robust 3D-MRSI in the human brain at 3T. The proposed sequence was demonstrated to be insensitive to motion- and scanner drift-related degradations of MRSI data in both phantoms and volunteers. Motion and scanner drift artifacts were eliminated and excellent spectral quality was recovered in the presence of strong movement. Our results confirm the expected benefits of combining a spiral 3D-LASER-MRSI sequence with real-time correction. The new sequence provides accurate, fast, and robust 3D metabolic imaging of the human brain at 3T. This will further facilitate the use of 3D-MRSI for neuroscience and clinical applications.

  8. 3D Near Infrared and Ultrasound Imaging of Peripheral Blood Vessels for Real-Time Localization and Needle Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin I.; Balter, Max L.; Maguire, Timothy J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a portable imaging device designed to detect peripheral blood vessels for cannula insertion that are otherwise difficult to visualize beneath the skin. The device combines near infrared stereo vision, ultrasound, and real-time image analysis to map the 3D structure of subcutaneous vessels. We show that the device can identify adult forearm vessels and be used to guide manual insertions in tissue phantoms with increased first-stick accuracy compared to unassisted cannulation. We also demonstrate that the system may be coupled with a robotic manipulator to perform automated, image-guided venipuncture. PMID:27981261

  9. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Ullah, Shahid; Schmidt, Staffan; Nandania, Jatin; Velagapudi, Vidya; Beck, Olof; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lauschke, Volker M

    2017-03-06

    Adverse reactions or lack of response to medications are important concerns for drug development programs. However, faithful predictions of drug metabolism and toxicity are difficult because animal models show only limited translatability to humans. Furthermore, current in vitro systems, such as hepatic cell lines or primary human hepatocyte (PHH) 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, can be used only for acute toxicity tests because of their immature phenotypes and inherent instability. Therefore, the migration to novel phenotypically stable models is of prime importance for the pharmaceutical industry. Novel 3-dimensional (3D) culture systems have been shown to accurately mimic in vivo hepatic phenotypes on transcriptomic and proteomic level, but information about their metabolic stability is lacking. Using a combination of targeted and untargeted high-resolution mass spectrometry, we found that PHHs in 3D spheroid cultures remained metabolically stable for multiple weeks, whereas metabolic patterns of PHHs from the same donors cultured as conventional 2D monolayers rapidly deteriorated. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic differences between donors were maintained in 3D spheroid cultures, enabling studies of interindividual variability in drug metabolism and toxicity. We conclude that the 3D spheroid system is metabolically stable and constitutes a suitable model for in vitro studies of long-term drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics.-Vorrink, S. U., Ullah, S., Schmid, S., Nandania, J., Velagapudi, V., Beck, O., Ingelman-Sundberg, M., Lauschke, V. M. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolic stability of primary human hepatocytes in long-term 3D spheroid cultures revealed by a combination of targeted and untargeted metabolomics.

  10. Artemisinin activity-based probes identify multiple molecular targets within the asexual stage of the malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum 3D7

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; Barton, Victoria; Phanchana, Matthew; Charoensutthivarakul, Sitthivut; Wong, Michael H. L.; Hemingway, Janet; Biagini, Giancarlo A.; O’Neill, Paul M.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The artemisinin (ART)-based antimalarials have contributed significantly to reducing global malaria deaths over the past decade, but we still do not know how they kill parasites. To gain greater insight into the potential mechanisms of ART drug action, we developed a suite of ART activity-based protein profiling probes to identify parasite protein drug targets in situ. Probes were designed to retain biological activity and alkylate the molecular target(s) of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 parasites in situ. Proteins tagged with the ART probe can then be isolated using click chemistry before identification by liquid chromatography–MS/MS. Using these probes, we define an ART proteome that shows alkylated targets in the glycolytic, hemoglobin degradation, antioxidant defense, and protein synthesis pathways, processes essential for parasite survival. This work reveals the pleiotropic nature of the biological functions targeted by this important class of antimalarial drugs. PMID:26858419

  11. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  12. A comparison of needle tip localization accuracy using 2D and 3D trans-rectal ultrasound for high-dose-rate prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Hoover, Douglas A.; Surry, Kathleen; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Montreuil, Jacques; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Background: High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is a prostate cancer treatment option involving the insertion of hollow needles into the gland through the perineum to deliver a radioactive source. Conventional needle imaging involves indexing a trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe in the superior/inferior (S/I) direction, using the axial transducer to produce an image set for organ segmentation. These images have limited resolution in the needle insertion direction (S/I), so the sagittal transducer is used to identify needle tips, requiring a manual registration with the axial view. This registration introduces a source of uncertainty in the final segmentations and subsequent treatment plan. Our lab has developed a device enabling 3D-TRUS guided insertions with high S/I spatial resolution, eliminating the need to align axial and sagittal views. Purpose: To compare HDR-BT needle tip localization accuracy between 2D and 3D-TRUS. Methods: 5 prostate cancer patients underwent conventional 2D TRUS guided HDR-BT, during which 3D images were also acquired for post-operative registration and segmentation. Needle end-length measurements were taken, providing a gold standard for insertion depths. Results: 73 needles were analyzed from all 5 patients. Needle tip position differences between imaging techniques was found to be largest in the S/I direction with mean+/-SD of -2.5+/-4.0 mm. End-length measurements indicated that 3D TRUS provided statistically significantly lower mean+/-SD insertion depth error of -0.2+/-3.4 mm versus 2.3+/-3.7 mm with 2D guidance (p < .001). Conclusions: 3D TRUS may provide more accurate HDR-BT needle localization than conventional 2D TRUS guidance for the majority of HDR-BT needles.

  13. Automatic segmentation of the prostate in 3D MR images by atlas matching using localized mutual information.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stefan; van der Heide, Uulke A; Lips, Irene M; van Vulpen, Marco; Staring, Marius; Pluim, Josien P W

    2008-04-01

    An automatic method for delineating the prostate (including the seminal vesicles) in three-dimensional magnetic resonance scans is presented. The method is based on nonrigid registration of a set of prelabeled atlas images. Each atlas image is nonrigidly registered with the target patient image. Subsequently, the deformed atlas label images are fused to yield a single segmentation of the patient image. The proposed method is evaluated on 50 clinical scans, which were manually segmented by three experts. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) is used to quantify the overlap between the automatic and manual segmentations. We investigate the impact of several factors on the performance of the segmentation method. For the registration, two similarity measures are compared: Mutual information and a localized version of mutual information. The latter turns out to be superior (median DeltaDSC approximately equal 0.02, p < 0.01 with a paired two-sided Wilcoxon test) and comes at no added computational cost, thanks to the use of a novel stochastic optimization scheme. For the atlas fusion step we consider a majority voting rule and the "simultaneous truth and performance level estimation" algorithm, both with and without a preceding atlas selection stage. The differences between the various fusion methods appear to be small and mostly not statistically significant (p > 0.05). To assess the influence of the atlas composition, two atlas sets are compared. The first set consists of 38 scans of healthy volunteers. The second set is constructed by a leave-one-out approach using the 50 clinical scans that are used for evaluation. The second atlas set gives substantially better performance (DeltaDSC=0.04, p < 0.01), stressing the importance of a careful atlas definition. With the best settings, a median DSC of around 0.85 is achieved, which is close to the median interobserver DSC of 0.87. The segmentation quality is especially good at the prostate-rectum interface, where the

  14. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-12-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process.

  15. Spreading to localized targets in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ye; Ma, Long; Zeng, An; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2016-01-01

    As an important type of dynamics on complex networks, spreading is widely used to model many real processes such as the epidemic contagion and information propagation. One of the most significant research questions in spreading is to rank the spreading ability of nodes in the network. To this end, substantial effort has been made and a variety of effective methods have been proposed. These methods usually define the spreading ability of a node as the number of finally infected nodes given that the spreading is initialized from the node. However, in many real cases such as advertising and news propagation, the spreading only aims to cover a specific group of nodes. Therefore, it is necessary to study the spreading ability of nodes towards localized targets in complex networks. In this paper, we propose a reversed local path algorithm for this problem. Simulation results show that our method outperforms the existing methods in identifying the influential nodes with respect to these localized targets. Moreover, the influential spreaders identified by our method can effectively avoid infecting the non-target nodes in the spreading process. PMID:27966613

  16. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  17. Design of the influenza virus inhibitors targeting the PA endonuclease using 3D-QSAR modeling, side-chain hopping, and docking.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhihui; Zhang, Lijie; Fu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhonghua; Lin, Jianping

    2014-01-15

    With the emergence of drug resistance and the structural determination of the PA N-terminal domain (PAN), influenza endonucleases have become an attractive target for antiviral therapies for influenza infection. Here, we combined 3D-QSAR with side-chain hopping and molecular docking to produce novel structures as endonuclease inhibitors. First, a new molecular library was generated with side-chain hopping on an existing template molecule, L-742001, using an in-house fragment library that targets bivalent-cation-binding proteins. Then, the best 3D-QSAR model (AAAHR.500), with q(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.97 from phase modeling, was constructed from 23 endonuclease inhibitors and validated with 17 test compounds. The AAAHR.500 model was then used to select effective candidates from the new molecular library. Combining 3D-QSAR with docking using Glide and Autodock, 13 compounds were considered the most likely candidate inhibitors. Docking studies showed that the binding modes of these compounds were consistent with the crystal structures of known inhibitors. These compounds could serve as potential endonuclease inhibitors for further biological activity tests.

  18. Combining controlled-source seismology and local earthquake tomography to derive a 3-D crustal model of the western Alpine region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Michael; Kissling, Edi; Husen, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    We present a newly developed approach of combining controlled-source seismology (CSS) and local earthquake tomography (LET) data to obtain a new 3-D crustal model of the western Alpine region. Our approach combines either data by taking into account the strengths of the individual seismic methods. Our western Alpine 3-D model is primarily based on a well-defined Moho, constrained by CSS and LET data, and includes smooth lateral variations in seismic velocities mainly constrained by LET data, but locally also by CSS data. The consistent combination of results from the two different seismic methods is feasible due to LET Moho elements, as defined by characteristic P-wave velocities and their uncertainty estimates. These uncertainty estimates are based on values of the diagonal element of the resolution matrix, absolute P-wave velocities that are typical for crust and mantle and a specific velocity gradient across the Moho discontinuity. Finally, our definition of LET Moho elements and their uncertainties is validated by comparisons of highest quality Moho results from both methods coinciding in 353 localities. Our model clearly shows three Moho surfaces, being Europe, Adria and Liguria as well as major tectonic structures like suture zones and the high-velocity Ivrea body. In general, it is in a good agreement with previous studies. The biggest differences occur along plate boundaries, where the strong lateral velocity variations are best resolved by LET. Due to the larger number of available Moho reflector elements a more accurate definition of plate boundaries at Moho level is possible and, therefore, new insights in deep lithosphere structures of the Alpine collision zone can be expected. Furthermore, our new 3-D crustal model directly includes a 3-D migrated image of the Ivrea body.

  19. Calculation of Local Water Densities in Biological Systems — A Comparison of Molecular Dynamics Simulations and the 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Stumpe, Martin C.; Blinov, Nikolay; Wishart, David; Kovalenko, Andriy; Pande, Vijay S.

    2010-01-01

    Water plays a unique role in all living organisms. Not only is it nature’s ubiquitous solvent, but it also actively takes part in many cellular processes. In particular, the structure and properties of interfacial water near biomolecules like proteins are often related to the function of the respective molecule. It can therefore be highly instructive to study the local water density around solutes in cellular systems, particularly when solvent-mediated forces like the hydrophobic effect are relevant. Computational methods like molecular dynamics (MD) simulations seem well suited to study these systems at the atomic level. However, due to sampling requirements, it is not clear that MD simulations are indeed the method of choice to obtain converged densities at a given level of precision. We here compare the calculation of local water densities with two different methods, MD simulations and the three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure (3D-RISM-KH). In particular, we investigate the convergence of the local water density to assess the required simulation times for different levels of resolution. Moreover, we provide a quantitative comparison of the densities calculated with MD and with 3D-RISM-KH, and investigate the effect of the choice of the water model for both methods. Our results show that 3D-RISM-KH yields density distributions that are very similar to those from MD up to a 0.5 Å resolution, but for significantly reduced computational cost. The combined use of MD and 3D-RISM-KH emerges as an auspicious perspective for efficient solvent sampling in dynamical systems. PMID:21174421

  20. Real-time target tracking of soft tissues in 3D ultrasound images based on robust visual information and mechanical simulation.

    PubMed

    Royer, Lucas; Krupa, Alexandre; Dardenne, Guillaume; Le Bras, Anthony; Marchand, Eric; Marchal, Maud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time approach that allows tracking deformable structures in 3D ultrasound sequences. Our method consists in obtaining the target displacements by combining robust dense motion estimation and mechanical model simulation. We perform evaluation of our method through simulated data, phantom data, and real-data. Results demonstrate that this novel approach has the advantage of providing correct motion estimation regarding different ultrasound shortcomings including speckle noise, large shadows and ultrasound gain variation. Furthermore, we show the good performance of our method with respect to state-of-the-art techniques by testing on the 3D databases provided by MICCAI CLUST'14 and CLUST'15 challenges.

  1. 3D localized 2D ultrafast J-resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopy: in vitro study on a 7 T imaging system.

    PubMed

    Roussel, T; Giraudeau, P; Ratiney, H; Akoka, S; Cavassila, S

    2012-02-01

    2D Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a well known tool for the analysis of complicated and overlapped MR spectra and was therefore originally used for structural analysis. It also presents a potential for biomedical applications as shown by an increasing number of works related to localized in vivo experiments. However, 2D MRS suffers from long acquisition times due to the necessary collection of numerous increments in the indirect dimension (t(1)). This paper presents the first 3D localized 2D ultrafast J-resolved MRS sequence, developed on a small animal imaging system, allowing the acquisition of a 3D localized 2D J-resolved MRS spectrum in a single scan. Sequence parameters were optimized regarding Signal-to-Noise ratio and spectral resolution. Sensitivity and spatial localization properties were characterized and discussed. An automatic post-processing method allowing the reduction of artifacts inherent to ultrafast excitation is also presented. This sequence offers an efficient signal localization and shows a great potential for in vivo dynamic spectroscopy.

  2. 3-D ADI-FDTD modeling of GPR backscatter from complex targets for the training of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassen, D. S.; Everett, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Artificial neural networks can provide approximate solutions to ground-penetrating radar (GPR) problems in cases where real time performance is needed. Examples include discrimination of landmines or UXO's, and in circumstances that require a high number of successive forward problems, for example inversion or imaging. The training of neural networks to work within even a limited range of targets and electromagnetic properties requires a large set of successive examples generated from numerical methods such as finite difference time domain (FDTD). The traditional FDTD technique suffers from numerical dispersion unless time steps are kept below the Courant stability limit. The accurate modeling of electromagnetic scattering by complex targets require a refined grid, subgrids, or conformal grids that can significantly increase computation time, making neural network training inefficient. A relatively recent FDTD technique, ADI-FDTD, uses implicit equations that help to cancel numerical dispersion and allow for unconditionally stable modeling of EM propagation and therefore is not bound by the Courant stability limit. The technique is especially efficient for the accurate modeling of complex targets. Our ADI-FDTD code includes the ability to refine the model grid and to implement a conformal gridding to improve model accuracy without effecting the overall computation time. We will explore the tradeoff in computation time and accuracy in modeling the GPR backscatter of various targets using both the ADI-FDTD technique and the traditional FDTD technique for the purpose of neural network training.

  3. Localization of Analytic Regularity Criteria on the Vorticity and Balance Between the Vorticity Magnitude and Coherence of the Vorticity Direction in the 3D NSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, Zoran; Guberović, Rafaela

    2010-09-01

    The first part of the paper provides spatio-temporal localization of a family of analytic regularity classes for the 3D NSE obtained by Beirao Da Veiga (space-time integrability of the gradient of the velocity on {mathbb{R}^3 × (0,T)} which is out of the range of the Sobolev embedding theorem reduction to the classical Foias-Ladyzhenskaya-Prodi-Serrin space-time integrability conditions on the velocity) as well as the localization of the Beale-Kato-Majda regularity criterion (time integrability of the L ∞-norm of the vorticity). The second part introduces a family of local, scaling invariant, hybrid geometric-analytic classes in which coherence of the vorticity direction serves as a weight in the local spatio-temporal integrability of the vorticity magnitude.

  4. Novel Vertical 3D Structure of TaOx-based RRAM with Self-localized Switching Region by Sidewall Electrode Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Muxi; Cai, Yimao; Wang, Zongwei; Fang, Yichen; Liu, Yefan; Yu, Zhizhen; Pan, Yue; Zhang, Zhenxing; Tan, Jing; Yang, Xue; Li, Ming; Huang, Ru

    2016-01-01

    A novel vertical 3D RRAM structure with greatly improved reliability behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated through basically compatible process featuring self-localized switching region by sidewall electrode oxidation. Compared with the conventional structure, due to the effective confinement of the switching region, the newly-proposed structure shows about two orders higher endurance (>108 without verification operation) and better retention (>180h@150 °C), as well as high uniformity. Corresponding model is put forward, on the base of which thorough theoretical analysis and calculations are conducted as well, demonstrating that, resulting from the physically-isolated switching from neighboring cells, the proposed structure exhibits dramatically improved reliability due to effective suppression of thermal effects and oxygen vacancies diffusion interference, indicating that this novel structure is very promising for future high density 3D RRAM application. PMID:26884054

  5. Estimation of local stresses and elastic properties of a mortar sample by FFT computation of fields on a 3D image

    SciTech Connect

    Escoda, J.; Willot, F.; Jeulin, D.; Sanahuja, J.; Toulemonde, C.

    2011-05-15

    This study concerns the prediction of the elastic properties of a 3D mortar image, obtained by micro-tomography, using a combined image segmentation and numerical homogenization approach. The microstructure is obtained by segmentation of the 3D image into aggregates, voids and cement paste. Full-fields computations of the elastic response of mortar are undertaken using the Fast Fourier Transform method. Emphasis is made on highly-contrasted properties between aggregates and matrix, to anticipate needs for creep or damage computation. The representative volume element, i.e. the volume size necessary to compute the effective properties with a prescribed accuracy, is given. Overall, the volumes used in this work were sufficient to estimate the effective response of mortar with a precision of 5%, 6% and 10% for contrast ratios of 100, 1000 and 10,000, resp. Finally, a statistical and local characterization of the component of the stress field parallel to the applied loading is carried out.

  6. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  7. Cooperative localization of marine targets by UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmailifar, Sayyed Majid; Saghafi, Fariborz

    2017-03-01

    The paper introduces a cooperative system to search for and localize targets by the use of low cost sensors. The system works based on collaboration of several decentralized, similar and self-organized components that are separately installed on flying vehicles. Interactions and information sharing between these flying vehicles construct a sensor and actuating network that cause the flying vehicles to search more intelligently and gather more efficient signals despite poor quality sensors. In each flying vehicle, a modified version of Monte-Carlo filter is implemented in order to fuse its own sensor measurements with the information received from the other vehicles and the priori of the targets to evolve into the posterior. The target posterior is then used to generate guidance points for the vehicle searching guidance law. The searching guidance law directs the vehicle through guidance points where the best measurements are available for an optimum search. Observability studies are performed to show that the developed system is able to extract the states of targets from measurements. In addition, numerical results by the use of an accurate simulation program, statistically show the performance of the developed system.

  8. A heterogeneous sensor network simulation system with integrated terrain data for real-time target detection in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Tanner, Steve; Rushing, John; Graves, Sara; Criswell, Evans

    2008-03-01

    Large scale sensor networks composed of many low-cost small sensors networked together with a small number of high fidelity position sensors can provide a robust, fast and accurate air defense and warning system. The team has been developing simulations of such large networks, and is now adding terrain data in an effort to provide more realistic analysis of the approach. This work, a heterogeneous sensor network simulation system with integrated terrain data for real-time target detection in a three-dimensional environment is presented. The sensor network can be composed of large numbers of low fidelity binary and bearing-only sensors, and small numbers of high fidelity position sensors, such as radars. The binary and bearing-only sensors are randomly distributed over a large geographic region; while the position sensors are distributed evenly. The elevations of the sensors are determined through the use of DTED Level 0 dataset. The targets are located through fusing measurement information from all types of sensors modeled by the simulation. The network simulation utilizes the same search-based optimization algorithm as in our previous two-dimensional sensor network simulation with some significant modifications. The fusion algorithm is parallelized using spatial decomposition approach: the entire surveillance area is divided into small regions and each region is assigned to one compute node. Each node processes sensor measurements and terrain data only for the assigned sub region. A master process combines the information from all the compute nodes to get the overall network state. The simulation results have indicated that the distributed fusion algorithm is efficient enough so that an optimal solution can be reached before the arrival of the next sensor data with a reasonable time interval, and real-time target detection can be achieved. The simulation was performed on a Linux cluster with communication between nodes facilitated by the Message Passing Interface

  9. Impairment-Based 3-D Robotic Intervention Improves Upper Extremity Work Area in Chronic Stroke: Targeting Abnormal Joint Torque Coupling With Progressive Shoulder Abduction Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael D.; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa M.; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of a robotic system (ACT3D) that allowed for a quantitative measurement of abnormal joint torque coupling in chronic stroke survivors and, most importantly, a quantitative means of initiating and progressing an impairment-based intervention, is described. Individuals with chronic moderate to severe stroke (n = 8) participated in this single-group pretest-posttest design study. Subjects were trained over eight weeks by progressively increasing the level of shoulder abduction loading experienced by the participant during reaching repetitions as performance improved. Reaching work area was evaluated pre- and postintervention for ten different shoulder abduction loading levels along with isometric single-joint strength and a qualitative clinical assessment of impairment. There was a significant effect of session (pre versus post) with an increase in reaching work area, despite no change in single-joint strength. This data suggests that specifically targeting the abnormal joint torque coupling impairment through progressive shoulder abduction loading is an effective strategy for improving reaching work area following hemiparetic stroke. Application of robotics, namely, the ACT3D, allowed for quantitative control of the exercise parameters needed to directly target the synergistic coupling impairment. The targeted reduction of abnormal joint torque coupling is likely the key factor explaining the improvements in reaching range of motion achieved with this intervention. PMID:20657711

  10. High-Resolution Imaged-Based 3D Reconstruction Combined with X-Ray CT Data Enables Comprehensive Non-Destructive Documentation and Targeted Research of Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Providing web-based data of complex and sensitive astromaterials (including meteorites and lunar samples) in novel formats enhances existing preliminary examination data on these samples and supports targeted sample requests and analyses. We have developed and tested a rigorous protocol for collecting highly detailed imagery of meteorites and complex lunar samples in non-contaminating environments. These data are reduced to create interactive 3D models of the samples. We intend to provide these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/.

  11. Evaluation and localization of an artificial drainage network by 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography.

    PubMed

    Jouen, T; Clément, R; Henine, H; Chaumont, C; Vincent, B; Tournebize, J

    2016-08-26

    In France, 10 % of total arable land is equipped with subsurface drainage systems, to control winter and spring waterlogging due to a temporary perched water table. Most of these systems were installed in the1980s and have aged since then and may now need maintenance. Sometimes, the location of the systems is known, but the standard situation in France is that the original as-built master sketches are no longer available. Performance assessment of drainage systems and curative actions are complicated since drain location is unknown. In this article, the authors test the application of a non-destructive drain detection method which consists in water injection at the outfall of the drainage network combined with time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring. To assess the performance of this methodology, which consists in measuring electrical resistivity from electrodes placed at the nodes of a 1.2-m regular mesh, the authors interpreted the signal using a two-step approach. The first step is based on 3D ERT numerical modelling during a scenario of surface infiltration processes (forward modelling followed by geophysical inversion); this step optimizes the ERT method for locating the infiltration at depths below 1 m. The second step is the validation of the results obtained by numerical modelling with an experimental data set, using water injection into the drainage network combined with time-lapse ERT monitoring on an experimental field site. The results showed the relevance of time-lapse ERT monitoring on a small agricultural plot for locating the drainage network. The numerical results also showed several limitations of the combined methodology: (i) it is necessary to use an electrode spacing unit less than 1.20 m, which does not facilitate investigation on large agriculture plots, (ii) measurements must be taken when resistivity contrast is the strongest between the infiltration area and the soil and (iii) the volume of water needed for

  12. Genetically targeted 3D visualisation of Drosophila neurons under Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microscopy using miniSOG

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Julian; Browning, Alyssa; Lechner, Lorenz; Terada, Masako; Howard, Gillian; Jefferis, Gregory S. X. E.

    2016-01-01

    Large dimension, high-resolution imaging is important for neural circuit visualisation as neurons have both long- and short-range patterns: from axons and dendrites to the numerous synapses at terminal endings. Electron Microscopy (EM) is the favoured approach for synaptic resolution imaging but how such structures can be segmented from high-density images within large volume datasets remains challenging. Fluorescent probes are widely used to localise synapses, identify cell-types and in tracing studies. The equivalent EM approach would benefit visualising such labelled structures from within sub-cellular, cellular, tissue and neuroanatomical contexts. Here we developed genetically-encoded, electron-dense markers using miniSOG. We demonstrate their ability in 1) labelling cellular sub-compartments of genetically-targeted neurons, 2) generating contrast under different EM modalities, and 3) segmenting labelled structures from EM volumes using computer-assisted strategies. We also tested non-destructive X-ray imaging on whole Drosophila brains to evaluate contrast staining. This enabled us to target specific regions for EM volume acquisition. PMID:27958322

  13. Optical full-depth refocusing of 3-D objects based on subdivided-elemental images and local periodic δ-functions in integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Ling-Yu; Dong, Xiao-Bin; Jang, Jae-Young; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2016-05-16

    We propose a new approach for optical refocusing of three-dimensional (3-D) objects on their real depth without a pickup-range limitation based on subdivided-elemental image arrays (sub-EIAs) and local periodic δ-function arrays (L-PDFAs). The captured EIA from the 3-D objects locating out of the pickup-range, is divided into a number of sub-EIAs depending on the object distance from the lens array. Then, by convolving these sub-EIAs with each L-PDFA whose spatial period corresponds to the specific object's depth, as well as whose size is matched to that of the sub-EIA, arrays of spatially-filtered sub-EIAs (SF-sub-EIAs) for each object depth can be uniquely extracted. From these arrays of SF-sub-EIAs, 3-D objects can be optically reconstructed to be refocused on their real depth. Operational principle of the proposed method is analyzed based on ray-optics. In addition, to confirm the feasibility of the proposed method in the practical application, experiments with test objects are carried out and the results are comparatively discussed with those of the conventional method.

  14. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S. Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  15. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-01

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α* of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α* is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  16. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Yun, G S; Lee, J E; Kim, M; Choi, M J; Lee, W; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Sabbagh, S A; Park, Y S; Lee, S G; Bak, J G

    2014-06-01

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α* of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α* is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  17. Localization of α-synuclein in teleost central nervous system: immunohistochemical and Western blot evidence by 3D5 monoclonal antibody in the common carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Rosa; Toni, Mattia; Casini, Arianna; Vivacqua, Giorgio; Yu, Shun; D'este, Loredana; Cioni, Carla

    2015-05-01

    Alpha synuclein (α-syn) is a 140 amino acid vertebrate-specific protein, highly expressed in the human nervous system and abnormally accumulated in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, known as synucleinopathies. The common occurrence of α-syn aggregates suggested a role for α-syn in these disorders, although its biological activity remains poorly understood. Given the high degree of sequence similarity between vertebrate α-syns, we investigated this proteins in the central nervous system (CNS) of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio, with the aim of comparing its anatomical and cellular distribution with that of mammalian α-syn. The distribution of α-syn was analyzed by semiquantitative western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence by a novel monoclonal antibody (3D5) against a fully conserved epitope between carp and human α-syn. The distribution of 3D5 immunoreactivity was also compared with that of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and serotonin (5HT) by double immunolabelings. The results showed that a α-syn-like protein of about 17 kDa is expressed to different levels in several brain regions and in the spinal cord. Immunoreactive materials were localized in neuronal perikarya and varicose fibers but not in the nucleus. The present findings indicate that α-syn-like proteins may be expressed in a few subpopulations of catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons in the carp brain. However, evidence of cellular colocalization 3D5/TH or 3D5/5HT was rare. Differently, the same proteins appear to be coexpressed with ChAT by cholinergic neurons in several motor and reticular nuclei. These results sustain the functional conservation of the α-syn expression in cholinergic systems and suggest that α-syn modulates similar molecular pathways in phylogenetically distant vertebrates.

  18. A comparison study of atlas-based 3D cardiac MRI segmentation: global versus global and local transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryanani, Aditya; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a standard-of-care imaging modality for cardiac function assessment and guidance of cardiac interventions thanks to its high image quality and lack of exposure to ionizing radiation. Cardiac health parameters such as left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass, thickness, and strain can be assessed by segmenting the heart from cardiac MRI images. Furthermore, the segmented pre-operative anatomical heart models can be used to precisely identify regions of interest to be treated during minimally invasive therapy. Hence, the use of accurate and computationally efficient segmentation techniques is critical, especially for intra-procedural guidance applications that rely on the peri-operative segmentation of subject-specific datasets without delaying the procedure workflow. Atlas-based segmentation incorporates prior knowledge of the anatomy of interest from expertly annotated image datasets. Typically, the ground truth atlas label is propagated to a test image using a combination of global and local registration. The high computational cost of non-rigid registration motivated us to obtain an initial segmentation using global transformations based on an atlas of the left ventricle from a population of patient MRI images and refine it using well developed technique based on graph cuts. Here we quantitatively compare the segmentations obtained from the global and global plus local atlases and refined using graph cut-based techniques with the expert segmentations according to several similarity metrics, including Dice correlation coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  19. 3D He-3 diffusion MRI as a local in vivo morphometric tool to evaluate emphysematous rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Laicher, Gernot J.; Timchalk, Charles

    2008-08-21

    In this work, we validate 3He magnetic resonance imaging as a non-invasive morphometric tool to assess emphysematous disease state on a local level. Emphysema was induced intratracheally in rats with 25U/100g body weight of porcine pancreatic elastase dissolved in 200 μL saline. Rats were then paired with saline-dosed controls. Nine three-dimensional 3He diffusion-weighted images were acquired at one-, two-, or three-weeks post-dose, after which the lungs were harvested and prepared for histological analysis. Recently introduced indices sensitive to the heterogeneity of the airspace size distribution were calculated. These indices, D1 and D2, were derived from the moments of the mean equivalent airway diameters. Averaged over the entire lung, it is shown that the 3He diffusivity (Dave) and anisotropy (Dan) both correlate with histology (R = 0.85, p < 0.0001 and R = 0.88, p < 0.0001, respectively). By matching small (0.046 cm2) regions in 3He images with corresponding regions in histological slices, Dave and Dan each correlate significantly with both D1 and D2 (R = 0.93, p < 0.0001). It is concluded that 3He MRI is a viable non-invasive morphometric tool for localized in vivo emphysema assessment.

  20. On the numerical simulation of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in laser-driven ICF targets using the FastRad3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jason; Schmitt, Andrew; Zalesak, Steve

    2015-11-01

    The ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a key factor in the performance of directly-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets. Although this subject has been studied for quite some time, the accurate simulation of the ablative RT instability has proven to be a challenging task for many radiation hydrodynamics codes, particularly when it comes to capturing the ablatively-stabilized region of the linear dispersion spectrum and modeling ab initio perturbations. In this poster, we present results from recent two-dimensional numerical simulations of the ablative RT instability that were performed using the Eulerian code FastRad3D at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. We consider both planar and spherical geometries, low and moderate-Z target materials, different laser wavelengths and where possible, compare our findings with experiment data, linearized theory and/or results from other radiation hydrodynamics codes. Overall, we find that FastRad3D is capable of simulating the ablative RT instability quite accurately, although some uncertainties/discrepancies persist. We discuss these issues, as well as some of the numerical challenges associated with modeling this class of problems. Work supported by U.S. DOE/NNSA.

  1. 3D-localization microscopy and tracking of FoF1-ATP synthases in living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Anja; Renz, Marc; Klütsch, Diana; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Börsch, Michael

    2015-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases are membrane-embedded protein machines that catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. Using photoactivation-based localization microscopy (PALM) in TIR-illumination as well as structured illumination microscopy (SIM), we explore the spatial distribution and track single FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli cells under physiological conditions at different temperatures. For quantitative diffusion analysis by mean-squared-displacement measurements, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with its significant membrane curvature has to be considered. Therefore, we applied a 'sliding observation window' approach (M. Renz et al., Proc. SPIE 8225, 2012) and obtained the one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of FoF1-ATP synthase diffusing on the long axis in living E. coli cells.

  2. Results and DVH analysis of late rectal bleeding in patients treated with 3D-CRT or IMRT for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Nakata, Kensei; Takagi, Masaru; Saito, Masato; Hirokawa, Naoki; Hareyama, Masato; Sakata, Koh-ichi

    2015-01-01

    In patients undergoing radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, dose–volume histograms and clinical variables were examined to search for correlations between radiation treatment planning parameters and late rectal bleeding. We analyzed 129 patients with localized prostate cancer who were managed from 2002 to 2010 at our institution. They were treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT, 70 Gy/35 fractions, 55 patients) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 76 Gy/38 fractions, 74 patients). All radiation treatment plans were retrospectively reconstructed, dose–volume histograms of the rectum were generated, and the doses delivered to the rectum were calculated. Time to rectal bleeding ranged from 9–53 months, with a median of 18.7 months. Of the 129 patients, 33 patients had Grade 1 bleeding and were treated with steroid suppositories, while 25 patients with Grade 2 bleeding received argon plasma laser coagulation therapy (APC). Three patients with Grade 3 bleeding required both APC and blood transfusion. The 5-year incidence rate of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding was 21.8% for the 3D-CRT group and 21.6% for the IMRT group. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in the average values from V65 to V10 between Grades 0–1 and Grades 2–3. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with V65 ≥ 17% had a significantly increased risk (P = 0.032) of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding. Of the 28 patients of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding, 17 patients (60.7%) were cured by a single session of APC, while the other 11 patients required two sessions. Thus, none of the patients had any further rectal bleeding after the second APC session. PMID:25212601

  3. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  4. Localization of Metal Electrodes in the Intact Rat Brain Using Registration of 3D Microcomputed Tomography Images to a Magnetic Resonance Histology Atlas1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Jana Schaich; Vu, Mai-Anh; Badea, Cristian; Badea, Alexandra; Johnson, G. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous neural recordings taken from multiple areas of the rodent brain are garnering growing interest because of the insight they can provide about spatially distributed neural circuitry. The promise of such recordings has inspired great progress in methods for surgically implanting large numbers of metal electrodes into intact rodent brains. However, methods for localizing the precise location of these electrodes have remained severely lacking. Traditional histological techniques that require slicing and staining of physical brain tissue are cumbersome and become increasingly impractical as the number of implanted electrodes increases. Here we solve these problems by describing a method that registers 3D computed tomography (CT) images of intact rat brains implanted with metal electrode bundles to a magnetic resonance imaging histology (MRH) atlas. Our method allows accurate visualization of each electrode bundle’s trajectory and location without removing the electrodes from the brain or surgically implanting external markers. In addition, unlike physical brain slices, once the 3D images of the electrode bundles and the MRH atlas are registered, it is possible to verify electrode placements from many angles by “reslicing” the images along different planes of view. Furthermore, our method can be fully automated and easily scaled to applications with large numbers of specimens. Our digital imaging approach to efficiently localizing metal electrodes offers a substantial addition to currently available methods, which, in turn, may help accelerate the rate at which insights are gleaned from rodent network neuroscience. PMID:26322331

  5. Accurate and Fully Automatic Hippocampus Segmentation Using Subject-Specific 3D Optimal Local Maps Into a Hybrid Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of the hippocampus (HC) is an essential step toward prevention, diagnosis, and follow-up of various brain disorders due to the implication of the structural changes of the HC in those disorders. In this respect, the development of automatic segmentation methods that can accurately, reliably, and reproducibly segment the HC has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. This paper presents an innovative 3-D fully automatic method to be used on top of the multiatlas concept for the HC segmentation. The method is based on a subject-specific set of 3-D optimal local maps (OLMs) that locally control the influence of each energy term of a hybrid active contour model (ACM). The complete set of the OLMs for a set of training images is defined simultaneously via an optimization scheme. At the same time, the optimal ACM parameters are also calculated. Therefore, heuristic parameter fine-tuning is not required. Training OLMs are subsequently combined, by applying an extended multiatlas concept, to produce the OLMs that are anatomically more suitable to the test image. The proposed algorithm was tested on three different and publicly available data sets. Its accuracy was compared with that of state-of-the-art methods demonstrating the efficacy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:27170866

  6. Validation of hip joint center localization methods during gait analysis using 3D EOS imaging in typically developing and cerebral palsy children.

    PubMed

    Assi, Ayman; Sauret, Christophe; Massaad, Abir; Bakouny, Ziad; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa; Ghanem, Ismat

    2016-07-01

    Localization of the hip joint center (HJC) is essential in computation of gait data. EOS low dose biplanar X-rays have been shown to be a good reference in evaluating various methods of HJC localization in adults. The aim is to evaluate predictive and functional techniques for HJC localization in typically developing (TD) and cerebral palsy (CP) children, using EOS as an image based reference. Eleven TD and 17 CP children underwent 3D gait analysis. Six HJC localization methods were evaluated in each group bilaterally: 3 predictive (Plug in Gait, Bell and Harrington) and 3 functional methods based on the star arc technique (symmetrical center of rotation estimate, center transformation technique and geometrical sphere fitting). All children then underwent EOS low dose biplanar radiographs. Pelvis, lower limbs and their corresponding external markers were reconstructed in 3D. The center of the femoral head was considered as the reference (HJCEOS). Euclidean distances between HJCs estimated by each of the 6 methods and the HJCEOS were calculated; distances were shown to be lower in predictive compared to functional methods (p<0.0001). Contrarily to findings in adults, functional methods were shown to be less accurate than predictive methods in TD and CP children, which could be mainly due to the shorter thigh segment in children. Harrington method was shown to be the most accurate in the prediction of HJC (mean error≈18mm, SD=9mm) and quasi-equivalent to the Bell method. The bias for each method was quantified, allowing its correction for an improved HJC estimation.

  7. 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine Thienoyl Regioisomers as Targeted Antifolates for Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wallace, Adrianne; Raghavan, Sudhir; Deis, Siobhan M.; Wilson, Mike R.; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Orr, Steven; George, Christina; O’Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Mitchell-Ryan, Shermaine; Dann, Charles E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    2-Amino-4-oxo-6-substituted-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidine antifolate thiophene regioisomers of AGF94 (4) with a thienoyl side chain and three-carbon bridge lengths [AGF150 (5) and AGF154 (7)] were synthesized as potential antitumor agents. These analogues inhibited proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) sublines expressing folate receptors (FRs) α or β (IC50s < 1 nM) or the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (IC50 < 7 nM). Compounds 5 and 7 inhibited KB, IGROV1, and SKOV3 human tumor cells at subnanomolar concentrations, reflecting both FRα and PCFT uptake. AGF152 (6) and AGF163 (8), 2,4-diamino-5-substituted-furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thiophene regioisomers, also inhibited growth of FR-expressing CHO and KB cells. All four analogues inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Crystal structures of human GARFTase complexed with 5 and 7 were reported. In severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing SKOV3 tumors, 7 was efficacious. The selectivity of these compounds for PCFT and for FRα and β over the ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier is a paradigm for selective tumor targeting. PMID:26317331

  8. The studies of the spin Hamiltonian parameters and local structures for various 3d3 hexacyanometallates of paramagnetic salts with diluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui-Ning; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Zhou, Hong-Fei

    2016-09-01

    The spin Hamiltonian parameters (SHPs) (g factors, hyperfine structure constants and zero-field splittings (ZFSs)) and local structures for various 3d3 hexacyanometallates of paramagnetic salts K3Cr(CN)6 and K4V(CN)6ṡ3H2O with the diluents K3Co(CN)6, K3Mn(CN)6 and K4Fe(CN)6ṡ3H2O are theoretically investigated from the perturbation calculations of these parameters for a rhombically distorted octahedral 3d3 cluster. The paramagnetic systems are found to undergo the local axial distortions ΔZ (≈-0.19, -0.18 and 0.09 Å) and the planar bond angle variations Δφ (≈ 3.5∘, 5.3∘ and 1.4∘) for K3Cr(CN)6 with K3Co(CN)6, K3Cr(CN)6 with K3Mn(CN)6 and K4V(CN)6ṡ3H2O with K4Fe(CN)6ṡ 3H2O, respectively. The signs for ZFSs D and E are analyzed in the light of those for ΔZ and the rhombic distortion angle δφ (= φ‧- π/4) related to an ideal octahedron. Microscopically, the magnitudes of ΔZ and Δφ can be conveniently illustrated by the axial (ADD) and perpendicular distortion degrees (PDD), respectively, for the paramagnetic systems with the corresponding diluents. The local structural properties are analyzed from the relative ionic radius deviation Δr of the equivalent diluent cation from the host paramagnetic cation, the axial and perpendicular ZFS variations ΔF and ΔG for ZFSs with the diluent related to the host, the relative deviation ΔDq of the cubic crystal-field parameter for the diluent related to the host. The above studies would be helpful to the investigations on synthesis, structures and properties of 3d3 hexacyanometallates in paramagnetic salts.

  9. Feasibility of Using Volumetric Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with a 3-D Transducer to Evaluate Therapeutic Response after Targeted Therapy in Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) with a 3-D transducer to evaluate therapeutic responses to targeted therapy. Rabbits with hepatic VX2 carcinomas, divided into a treatment group (n = 22, 30 mg/kg/d sorafenib) and a control group (n = 13), were evaluated with DCE-US using 2-D and 3-D transducers and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging at baseline and 1 d after the first treatment. Perfusion parameters were collected, and correlations between parameters were analyzed. In the treatment group, both volumetric and 2-D DCE-US perfusion parameters, including peak intensity (33.2 ± 19.9 vs. 16.6 ± 10.7, 63.7 ± 20.0 vs. 30.1 ± 19.8), slope (15.3 ± 12.4 vs. 5.7 ± 4.5, 37.3 ± 20.4 vs. 15.7 ± 13.0) and area under the curve (AUC; 1004.1 ± 560.3 vs. 611.4 ± 421.1, 1332.2 ± 708.3 vs. 670.4 ± 388.3), had significantly decreased 1 d after the first treatment (p = 0.00). In the control group, 2-D DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time to peak and slope had significantly changed (p < 0.05); however, volumetric DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time-intensity AUC, AUC during wash-in and AUC during wash-out had significantly changed (p = 0.00). CT perfusion imaging parameters, including blood flow, blood volume and permeability of the capillary vessel surface, had significantly decreased in the treatment group (p = 0.00); however, in the control group, peak intensity and blood volume had significantly increased (p = 0.00). It is feasible to use DCE-US with a 3-D transducer to predict early therapeutic response after targeted therapy because perfusion parameters, including peak intensity, slope and AUC, significantly decreased, which is similar to the trend observed for 2-D DCE-US and CT perfusion imaging parameters.

  10. 3D-segmentation of the 18F-choline PET signal for target volume definition in radiation therapy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ciernik, I Frank; Brown, Derek W; Schmid, Daniel; Hany, Thomas; Egli, Peter; Davis, J Bernard

    2007-02-01

    Volumetric assessment of PET signals becomes increasingly relevant for radiotherapy (RT) planning. Here, we investigate the utility of 18F-choline PET signals to serve as a structure for semi-automatic segmentation for forward treatment planning of prostate cancer. 18F-choline PET and CT scans of ten patients with histologically proven prostate cancer without extracapsular growth were acquired using a combined PET/CT scanner. Target volumes were manually delineated on CT images using standard software. Volumes were also obtained from 18F-choline PET images using an asymmetrical segmentation algorithm. PTVs were derived from CT 18F-choline PET based clinical target volumes (CTVs) by automatic expansion and comparative planning was performed. As a read-out for dose given to non-target structures, dose to the rectal wall was assessed. Planning target volumes (PTVs) derived from CT and 18F-choline PET yielded comparable results. Optimal matching of CT and 18F-choline PET derived volumes in the lateral and cranial-caudal directions was obtained using a background-subtracted signal thresholds of 23.0+/-2.6%. In antero-posterior direction, where adaptation compensating for rectal signal overflow was required, optimal matching was achieved with a threshold of 49.5+/-4.6%. 3D-conformal planning with CT or 18F-choline PET resulted in comparable doses to the rectal wall. Choline PET signals of the prostate provide adequate spatial information amendable to standardized asymmetrical region growing algorithms for PET-based target volume definition for external beam RT.

  11. Development of drug loaded nanoparticles for tumor targeting. Part 2: Enhancement of tumor penetration through receptor mediated transcytosis in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H.; Puré, Ellen; Huang, Xuefei

    2013-04-01

    We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor models, presumably through tandem cycles of CD44 mediated endocytosis and exocytosis. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the NPs, better penetration of multilayered tumor cells was observed with much improved cytotoxicities against both drug sensitive and drug resistant cancer spheroids compared to the free drug. Thus, targeting receptors such as CD44 that can readily undergo recycling between the cell surface and interior of the cells can become a useful strategy to enhance the tumor penetration potential of NPs and the efficiency of drug delivery through receptor mediated transcytosis.We report that receptor mediated transcytosis can be utilized to facilitate tumor penetration by drug loaded nanoparticles (NPs). We synthesized hyaluronan (HA) coated silica nanoparticles (SNPs) containing a highly fluorescent core to target CD44 expressed on the cancer cell surface. Although prior studies have primarily focused on CD44 mediated endocytosis to facilitate cellular uptake of HA-NPs by cancer cells, we discovered that, once internalized, the HA-SNPs could be transported out of the cells with their cargo. The exported NPs could be taken up by neighboring cells. This enabled the HA-SNPs to penetrate deeper inside tumors and reach a much greater number of tumor cells in 3D tumor

  12. Histograms of Oriented 3D Gradients for Fully Automated Fetal Brain Localization and Robust Motion Correction in 3 T Magnetic Resonance Images

    PubMed Central

    Macnaught, Gillian; Denison, Fiona C.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly emerging diagnostic imaging tool. However, automated fetal brain localization is one of the biggest obstacles in expediting and fully automating large-scale fetal MRI processing. We propose a method for automatic localization of fetal brain in 3 T MRI when the images are acquired as a stack of 2D slices that are misaligned due to fetal motion. First, the Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) feature descriptor is extended from 2D to 3D images. Then, a sliding window is used to assign a score to all possible windows in an image, depending on the likelihood of it containing a brain, and the window with the highest score is selected. In our evaluation experiments using a leave-one-out cross-validation strategy, we achieved 96% of complete brain localization using a database of 104 MRI scans at gestational ages between 34 and 38 weeks. We carried out comparisons against template matching and random forest based regression methods and the proposed method showed superior performance. We also showed the application of the proposed method in the optimization of fetal motion correction and how it is essential for the reconstruction process. The method is robust and does not rely on any prior knowledge of fetal brain development. PMID:28251155

  13. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  14. New weather depiction technology for night vision goggle (NVG) training: 3D virtual/augmented reality scene-weather-atmosphere-target simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folaron, Michelle; Deacutis, Martin; Hegarty, Jennifer; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Schroeder, John; Colby, Frank P.

    2007-04-01

    US Navy and Marine Corps pilots receive Night Vision Goggle (NVG) training as part of their overall training to maintain the superiority of our forces. This training must incorporate realistic targets; backgrounds; and representative atmospheric and weather effects they may encounter under operational conditions. An approach for pilot NVG training is to use the Night Imaging and Threat Evaluation Laboratory (NITE Lab) concept. The NITE Labs utilize a 10' by 10' static terrain model equipped with both natural and cultural lighting that are used to demonstrate various illumination conditions, and visual phenomena which might be experienced when utilizing night vision goggles. With this technology, the military can safely, systematically, and reliably expose pilots to the large number of potentially dangerous environmental conditions that will be experienced in their NVG training flights. A previous SPIE presentation described our work for NAVAIR to add realistic atmospheric and weather effects to the NVG NITE Lab training facility using the NVG - WDT(Weather Depiction Technology) system (Colby, et al.). NVG -WDT consist of a high end multiprocessor server with weather simulation software, and several fixed and goggle mounted Heads Up Displays (HUDs). Atmospheric and weather effects are simulated using state-of-the-art computer codes such as the WRF (Weather Research μ Forecasting) model; and the US Air Force Research Laboratory MODTRAN radiative transport model. Imagery for a variety of natural and man-made obscurations (e.g. rain, clouds, snow, dust, smoke, chemical releases) are being calculated and injected into the scene observed through the NVG via the fixed and goggle mounted HUDs. This paper expands on the work described in the previous presentation and will describe the 3D Virtual/Augmented Reality Scene - Weather - Atmosphere - Target Simulation part of the NVG - WDT. The 3D virtual reality software is a complete simulation system to generate realistic

  15. Numerical simulations of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in planar inertial-confinement-fusion targets using the FastRad3D code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Karasik, M.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a central issue in the performance of laser-accelerated inertial-confinement-fusion targets. Historically, the accurate numerical simulation of this instability has been a challenging task for many radiation hydrodynamics codes, particularly when it comes to capturing the ablatively stabilized region of the linear dispersion spectrum and modeling ab initio perturbations. Here, we present recent results from two-dimensional numerical simulations of the ablative RT instability in planar laser-ablated foils that were performed using the Eulerian code FastRad3D. Our study considers polystyrene, (cryogenic) deuterium-tritium, and beryllium target materials, quarter- and third-micron laser light, and low and high laser intensities. An initial single-mode surface perturbation is modeled in our simulations as a small modulation to the target mass density and the ablative RT growth-rate is calculated from the time history of areal-mass variations once the target reaches a steady-state acceleration. By performing a sequence of such simulations with different perturbation wavelengths, we generate a discrete dispersion spectrum for each of our examples and find that in all cases the linear RT growth-rate γ is well described by an expression of the form γ = α [ k g / ( 1 + ɛ k L m ) ] 1 / 2 - β k V a , where k is the perturbation wavenumber, g is the acceleration of the target, Lm is the minimum density scale-length, Va is the ablation velocity, and ɛ is either one or zero. The dimensionless coefficients α and β in the above formula depend on the particular target and laser parameters and are determined from two-dimensional simulation results through the use of a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure. While our findings are generally consistent with those of Betti et al. (Phys. Plasmas 5, 1446 (1998)), the ablative RT growth-rates predicted in this investigation are somewhat smaller than the values previously reported for the

  16. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  17. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B.; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G.; Werner, John S.; Burns, Marie E.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed. PMID:26114038

  18. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  19. 3D-QSAR and molecular modeling studies on 2,3-dideoxy hexenopyranosid-4-uloses as anti-tubercular agents targeting alpha-mannosidase.

    PubMed

    Shah, Priyanka; Saquib, Mohammad; Sharma, Smriti; Husain, Irfan; Sharma, Sandeep K; Singh, Vinayak; Srivastava, Ranjana; Shaw, Arun K; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-04-01

    Ligand-based and structure-based methods were applied in combination to exploit the physicochemical properties of 2,3-dideoxy hex-2-enopyranosid-4-uloses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Statistically valid 3D-QSAR models with good correlation and predictive power were obtained with CoMFA steric and electrostatic fields (r(2) = 0.797, q(2) = 0.589) and CoMSIA with combined steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (r(2) = 0.867, q(2) = 0.570) based on training set of 33 molecules with predictive r(2) of 0.808 and 0.890 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The results illustrate the requirement of optimal alkyl chain length at C-1 position and acceptor groups along hydroxy methyl substituent of C-6 to enhance the anti-tubercular activity of the 2,3-dideoxy hex-2-enopyranosid-4-uloses while any substitution at C-3 position exert diminishing effect on anti-tubercular activity of these enulosides. Further, homology modeling of M. tuberculosis alpha-mannosidase followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations on co-complexed models were performed to gain insight into the rationale for binding affinity of selected inhibitors with the target of interest. The comprehensive information obtained from this study will help to better understand the structural basis of biological activity of this class of molecules and guide further design of more potent analogues as anti-tubercular agents.

  20. Analysis of local molecular motions of aromatic sidechains in proteins by 2D and 3D fast MAS NMR spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Piotr; Pawlak, Tomasz; Jeziorna, Agata; Trébosc, Julien; Hou, Guangjin; Vega, Alexander J; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Dracinsky, Martin; Polenova, Tatyana; Potrzebowski, Marek J

    2015-11-21

    We report a new multidimensional magic angle spinning NMR methodology, which provides an accurate and detailed probe of molecular motions occurring on timescales of nano- to microseconds, in sidechains of proteins. The approach is based on a 3D CPVC-RFDR correlation experiment recorded under fast MAS conditions (ν(R) = 62 kHz), where (13)C-(1)H CPVC dipolar lineshapes are recorded in a chemical shift resolved manner. The power of the technique is demonstrated in model tripeptide Tyr-(d)Ala-Phe and two nanocrystalline proteins, GB1 and LC8. We demonstrate that, through numerical simulations of dipolar lineshapes of aromatic sidechains, their detailed dynamic profile, i.e., the motional modes, is obtained. In GB1 and LC8 the results unequivocally indicate that a number of aromatic residues are dynamic, and using quantum mechanical calculations, we correlate the molecular motions of aromatic groups to their local environment in the crystal lattice. The approach presented here is general and can be readily extended to other biological systems.

  1. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  2. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling.

    PubMed

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-21

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  3. On the local acceleration and flow trajectory of jet flows from circular and semi-circular pipes via 3D particle tracking velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Tae; Liberzon, Alex; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The distinctive differences between two jet flows that share the same hydraulic diameter dh = 0.01 m and Re ~ 6000, but different (nozzle) shape are explored via 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry using OpenPTV (http://www.openptv.net). The two jets are formed from circular and semicircular pipes and released in a quiescent water tank of 40 dh height, 40 dh wide, and 200 dh long. The recirculating system is seeded with 100 μm particles, where flow measurements are performed in the intermediate flow field (14.5 < x /dh <18.5) at 550Hz for a total of ~ 30,000 frames. Analysis is focused on the spatial distribution of the local flow acceleration and curvature of the Lagrangian trajectories. The velocity and acceleration of particles are estimated by low-pass filtering their position with a moving cubic spline fitting, while the curvature is obtained from the Frenet-Serret equations. Probability density functions (p.d.f.) of these quantities are obtained at various sub-volumes containing a given streamwise velocity range, and compared between the two cases to evaluate the memory effects in the intermediate flow field.

  4. Enhancing Macrophage Drug Delivery Efficiency via Co-Localization of Cells and Drug-Loaded Microcarriers in 3D Resonant Ultrasound Field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Wu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel synthetic 3D molecular transfer system which involved the use of model drug calcein-AM-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (CAPMs) and resonant ultrasound field (RUF) with frequency of 1 MHz and output intensity of 0.5 W/cm2 for macrophage drug delivery was explored. We hypothesized that the efficiency of CAPMs-mediated drug delivery aided by RUF can be promoted by increasing the contact opportunities between cells and the micrometer-sized drug carriers due to effects of acoustic radiation forces generated by RUF. Through the fluoromicroscopic and flow cytometric analyses, our results showed that both DH82 macrophages and CAPMs can be quickly brought to acoustic pressure nodes within 20 sec under RUF exposure, and were consequently aggregated throughout the time course. The efficacy of cellular uptake of CAPMs was enhanced with increased RUF exposure time where a 3-fold augmentation (P < 0.05) was obtained after 15 min of RUF exposure. We further demonstrated that the enhanced CAPM delivery efficiency was mainly contributed by the co-localization of cells and CAPMs resulting from the application of the RUF, rather than from sonoporation. In summary, the developed molecular delivery approach provides a feasible means for macrophage drug delivery. PMID:26267789

  5. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  6. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  8. Quantum evolution: The case of weak localization for a 3D alloy-type Anderson model and application to Hamiltonian based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenwei

    Over the years, people have found Quantum Mechanics to be extremely useful in explaining various physical phenomena from a microscopic point of view. Anderson localization, named after physicist P. W. Anderson, states that disorder in a crystal can cause non-spreading of wave packets, which is one possible mechanism (at single electron level) to explain metal-insulator transitions. The theory of quantum computation promises to bring greater computational power over classical computers by making use of some special features of Quantum Mechanics. The first part of this dissertation considers a 3D alloy-type model, where the Hamiltonian is the sum of the finite difference Laplacian corresponding to free motion of an electron and a random potential generated by a sign-indefinite single-site potential. The result shows that localization occurs in the weak disorder regime, i.e., when the coupling parameter lambda is very small, for energies E ≤ --Clambda 2. The second part of this dissertation considers adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) algorithms for the unstructured search problem to the case when the number of marked items is unknown. In an ideal situation, an explicit quantum algorithm together with a counting subroutine are given that achieve the optimal Grover speedup over classical algorithms, i.e., roughly speaking, reduce O(2n) to O(2n/2), where n is the size of the problem. However, if one considers more realistic settings, the result shows this quantum speedup is achievable only under a very rigid control precision requirement (e.g., exponentially small control error).

  9. Motion correction for improved target localization with on-board cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Schreibmann, E; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2006-01-21

    On-board imager (OBI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become available in radiotherapy clinics to accurately identify the target in the treatment position. However, due to the relatively slow gantry rotation (typically about 60 s for a full 360 degrees scan) in acquiring the CBCT projection data, the patient's respiratory motion causes serious problems such as blurring, doubling, streaking and distortion in the reconstructed images, which heavily degrade the image quality and the target localization. In this work, we present a motion compensation method for slow-rotating CBCT scans by incorporating into image reconstruction a patient-specific motion model, which is derived from previously obtained four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning CT images of the same patient via deformable registration. The registration of the 4D CT phases results in transformations representing a temporal sequence of three-dimensional (3D) deformation fields, or in other words, a 4D model of organ motion. The algorithm was developed heuristically in two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam geometry and extended to 3D cone-beam geometry. By simulations with digital phantoms capable of translational motion and other complex motion, we demonstrated that the algorithm can reduce the motion artefacts locally, and restore the tumour size and shape, which may thereby improve the accuracy of target localization and patient positioning when CBCT is used as the treatment guidance.

  10. Clinical outcome of protocol based image (MRI) guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pötter, Richard; Georg, Petra; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Grimm, Magdalena; Berger, Daniel; Nesvacil, Nicole; Georg, Dietmar; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Reinthaller, Alexander; Sturdza, Alina; Kirisits, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background To analyse the overall clinical outcome and benefits by applying protocol based image guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± chemotherapy (ChT). Methods Treatment schedule was EBRT with 45–50.4 Gy ± concomitant cisplatin chemotherapy plus 4 × 7 Gy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients were treated in the “protocol period” (2001–2008) with the prospective application of the High Risk CTV concept (D90) and dose volume constraints for organs at risk including biological modelling. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of dose escalation in large tumours (prescribed D90 > 85 Gy), often with inserting additional interstitial needles. Dose volume constraints (D2cc) were 70–75 Gy for rectum and sigmoid and 90 Gy for bladder. Late morbidity was prospectively scored, using LENT/SOMA Score. Disease outcome and treatment related late morbidity were evaluated and compared using actuarial analysis. Findings One hundred and fifty-six consecutive patients (median age 58 years) with cervix cancer FIGO stages IB–IVA were treated with definitive radiotherapy in curative intent. Histology was squamous cell cancer in 134 patients (86%), tumour size was >5 cm in 103 patients (66%), lymph node involvement in 75 patients (48%). Median follow-up was 42 months for all patients. Interstitial techniques were used in addition to intracavitary brachytherapy in 69/156 (44%) patients. Total prescribed mean dose (D90) was 93 ± 13 Gy, D2cc 86 ± 17 Gy for bladder, 65 ± 9 Gy for rectum and 64 ± 9 Gy for sigmoid. Complete remission was achieved in 151/156 patients (97%). Overall local control at 3 years was 95%; 98% for tumours 2–5 cm, and 92% for tumours >5 cm (p = 0.04), 100% for IB, 96% for IIB, 86% for IIIB. Cancer specific survival at 3 years was overall 74%, 83% for tumours 2–5 cm, 70% for tumours >5 cm, 83% for IB, 84% for IIB, 52% for IIIB. Overall

  11. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  12. 3D MI-DRAGON: new model for the reconstruction of US FDA drug- target network and theoretical-experimental studies of inhibitors of rasagiline derivatives for AChE.

    PubMed

    Prado-Prado, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Escobar, Manuel; Alonso, Nerea; Caamaño, Olga; Yañez, Matilde; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2012-01-01

    The number of neurodegenerative diseases has been increasing in recent years. Many of the drug candidates to be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases present specific 3D structural features. An important protein in this sense is the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which is the target of many Alzheimer's dementia drugs. Consequently, the prediction of Drug-Protein Interactions (DPIs/nDPIs) between new drug candidates and specific 3D structure and targets is of major importance. To this end, we can use Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) models to carry out a rational DPIs prediction. Unfortunately, many previous QSAR models developed to predict DPIs take into consideration only 2D structural information and codify the activity against only one target. To solve this problem we can develop some 3D multi-target QSAR (3D mt-QSAR) models. In this study, using the 3D MI-DRAGON technique, we have introduced a new predictor for DPIs based on two different well-known software. We have used the MARCH-INSIDE (MI) and DRAGON software to calculate 3D structural parameters for drugs and targets respectively. Both classes of 3D parameters were used as input to train Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN) algorithms using as benchmark dataset the complex network (CN) made up of all DPIs between US FDA approved drugs and their targets. The entire dataset was downloaded from the DrugBank database. The best 3D mt-QSAR predictor found was an ANN of Multi-Layer Perceptron-type (MLP) with profile MLP 37:37-24-1:1. This MLP classifies correctly 274 out of 321 DPIs (Sensitivity = 85.35%) and 1041 out of 1190 nDPIs (Specificity = 87.48%), corresponding to training Accuracy = 87.03%. We have validated the model with external predicting series with Sensitivity = 84.16% (542/644 DPIs; Specificity = 87.51% (2039/2330 nDPIs) and Accuracy = 86.78%. The new CNs of DPIs reconstructed from US FDA can be used to explore large DPI databases in order to discover both new drugs

  13. Polycaprolactone-Coated 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: In Vitro Alendronate Release Behavior and Local Delivery Effect on In Vivo Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of in vitro alendronate (AD) release behavior through polycaprolactone (PCL) coating on in vivo bone formation using PCL-coated 3D printed interconnected porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds. Higher AD and Ca2+ ion release was observed at lower pH (5.0) than that at higher pH (7.4). AD and Ca2+ release, surface morphology, and phase analysis after release indicated a matrix degradation dominated AD release caused by TCP dissolution. PCL coating showed its effectiveness for controlled and sustained AD release. Six different scaffold compositions, namely, (i) TCP (bare TCP), (ii) TCP + AD (AD-coated TCP), (iii) TCP + PCL (PCL-coated TCP), (iv) TCP + PCL + AD, (v) TCP + AD + PCL, and (vi) TCP + AD + PCL + AD were tested in the distal femoral defect of Sprague–Dawley rats for 6 and 10 weeks. An excellent bone formation inside the micro and macro pores of the scaffolds was observed from histomorphology. Histomorphometric analysis revealed maximum new bone formation in TCP + AD + PCL scaffolds after 6 weeks. No adverse effect of PCL on bioactivity of TCP and in vivo bone formation was observed. All scaffolds with AD showed higher bone formation and reduced TRAP (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) positive cells activity compared to bare TCP and TCP coated with only PCL. Bare TCP scaffolds showed the highest TRAP positive cells activity followed by TCP + PCL scaffolds, whereas TCP + AD scaffolds showed the lowest TRAP activity. A higher TRAP positive cells activity was observed in TCP + AD + PCL compared to TCP + AD scaffolds after 6 weeks. Our results show that in vivo local AD delivery from PCL-coated 3DP TCP scaffolds could further induce increased early bone formation. PMID:24826838

  14. Presentation of a High Resolution Time Lapse 3D Groundwater Model of Metsähovi for Calculating the Gravity Effect of Groundwater in Local Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokkanen, T. M.; Hartikainen, A.; Raja-Halli, A.; Virtanen, H.; Makinen, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study is to construct a fine resolution time lapse groundwater (GW) model of Metsähovi (MH). GW, geological, and soil moisture (SM) data were collected for several years to achieve the goal. The knowledge of the behavior of the GW at local scale is essential for superconductive gravimeter (SG) investigations performing in MH. DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA Almost 50 sensors have been recorded SM data some 6 years with 1 to 5 minutes sampling frequency. The GW table has been monitored, both in bedrock and in soil, in many stages with all together 15 piezometers. Two geological sampling campaigns were conducted to get the knowledge of hydrological properties of soil in the study area of 200×200 m2 around SG station in MH. PRINCIPLE OF TIME LAPSE 3D HYDROGEOLOGICAL MODEL The model of study site consists of the surfaces of ground and bedrock gridded with 2×2 m2 resolution. The height of GW table was interpolated to 2×2×0.1 m3 grid between GW and SM monitoring points. Close to the outline of the study site and areas lacking of sensors GW table was defined by extrapolation and considering the geological information of the area. The bedrock porosity is 2% and soil porosity determined by geological information and SM recordings is from 5 to 35%. Only fully saturated media is considered in the time lapse model excluding unsaturated one. BENEFICIERS With a new model the fluctuation of GW table can be followed with ranging time lapses from 1 minute to 1 month. The gravity effect caused by the variation of GW table can be calculated more accurate than before in MH. Moreover, the new model can be validated and refined by measured gravity, i.e. hydrological model can be improved by SG recordings (Figure 1).

  15. Localization of a noisy broadband surface target using time differences of multipath arrivals.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, John; Siderius, Martin; McCargar, Reid; Allen, John S; Pusey, Grant

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies [Tiemann et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 2355-2365 (2006)] have reported the localization of marine mammals in 3-D from their clicks using multipath arrivals. Bathymetric variations were advantageously used to predict multipath arrival times with a raytracer. These arrivals are directly discernible from the time series for impulsive sources, such as whale clicks, but extension of the method to continuous broadband sources presents additional complications. By pulse compressing noise emitted from a small boat using two hydrophones, the hyperbolic direct-arrival ambiguity can be refined in both range and bearing. Acoustic-derived results are validated with target GPS measurements.

  16. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  17. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  18. MRI-Guided 3D Optimization Significantly Improves DVH Parameters of Pulsed-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lindegaard, Jacob C. Tanderup, Kari; Nielsen, Soren Kynde; Haack, Soren; Gelineck, John

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume histogram parameters of standard Point A and magnetic resonance imaging-based three-dimensional optimized dose plans in 21 consecutive patients who underwent pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients received external beam radiotherapy (elective target dose, 45 Gy in 25-30 fractions; tumor target dose, 50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions). PDR-BT was applied with a tandem-ring applicator. Additional ring-guided titanium needles were used in 4 patients and a multichannel vaginal cylinder in 2 patients. Dose planning was done using 1.5 Tesla T{sub 1}-weighted and T{sub 2}-weighted paratransversal magnetic resonance imaging scans. T{sub 1}-weighted visible oil-containing tubes were used for applicator reconstruction. The prescribed standard dose for PDR-BT was 10 Gy (1 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h) for two to three fractions to reach a physical dose of 80 Gy to Point A. The total dose (external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy) was normalized to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions using {alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor, {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy for normal tissue, and a repair half-time of 1.5 h. The goal of optimization was dose received by 90% of the target volume (D{sub 90}) of {>=}85 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} in the high-risk clinical target volume (cervix and remaining tumor at brachytherapy), but keeping the minimal dose to 2 cm{sup 3} of the bladder and rectum/sigmoid at <90 and <75 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, respectively. Results: Using three-dimensional optimization, all dose-volume histogram constraints were met in 16 of 21 patients compared with 3 of 21 patients with two-dimensional library plans (p < 0.001). Optimization increased the minimal target dose (D{sub 100}) of the high-risk clinical target volume (p < 0.007) and decreased the minimal dose to 2 cm{sup 3} for the sigmoid significantly (p = 0.03). For the high-risk clinical target volume, D

  19. Local structure preserving sparse coding for infrared target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding performs well in image classification. However, robust target recognition requires a lot of comprehensive template images and the sparse learning process is complex. We incorporate sparsity into a template matching concept to construct a local sparse structure matching (LSSM) model for general infrared target recognition. A local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation is proposed to simultaneously preserve the local sparse and structural information of objects. By adding a spatial local structure constraint into the classical sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc can improve the stability of sparse representation for targets and inhibit background interference in infrared images. Furthermore, a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation is proposed, which extends LSPSc to the kernel space to weaken the influence of the linear structure constraint in nonlinear natural data. Because of the anti-interference and fault-tolerant capabilities, both LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSM can implement target identification based on a simple template set, which just needs several images containing enough local sparse structures to learn a sufficient sparse structure dictionary of a target class. Specifically, this LSSM approach has stable performance in the target detection with scene, shape and occlusions variations. High performance is demonstrated on several datasets, indicating robust infrared target recognition in diverse environments and imaging conditions. PMID:28323824

  20. Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro; Weltman, Eduardo; Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  2. Modeling of local 3D effects of the April 6th 2009 l’Aquila (Italy) event in the City of Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, A.; Oprsal, I.; Rovelli, A.; Marra, F.; Govoni, A.; Vinci, S.

    2009-12-01

    Several events of the seismic sequence started on 6th of April 2009, that struck the town of l'Aquila, Italy, have been recorded by an array of seismic stations, located approximately 90 km south-west of the epicenters. One of the stations is in a 80-m-deep borehole, installed since the early 2008 in the middle of the main sedimentary body of the city: the Tiber valley. This represents a unique opportunity to tune seismic simulations of the soil shaking due to a seismic sequence located in Central Apennines region. This latter is considered, with the Albani Hills one, the main seismogenic area responsible of the seismic hazard in the city. We have generated a 3D velocity model for a portion of the city (5 EW x 3 NS km2 wide, and 200 m deep, including topography) where the array is located. A viscoelastic wave propagation due to S-wave pulse of general polarization and given incidence is obtained by the 3D FD hybrid numerical modeling. The 3D pulse response and the borehole recording are then used to generate the complete 3D synthetics covering the area. The results are verified by comparing to the surface recordings and large ground motion amplifications data.

  3. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  4. 3D Molecular Modelling Study of the H7N9 RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase as an Emerging Pharmacological Target

    PubMed Central

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Currently not much is known about the H7N9 strain, and this is the major drawback for a scientific strategy to tackle this virus. Herein, the 3D complex structure of the H7N9 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase has been established using a repertoire of molecular modelling techniques including homology modelling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. Strikingly, it was found that the oligonucleotide cleft and tunnel in the H7N9 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase are structurally very similar to the corresponding region on the hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase crystal structure. A direct comparison and a 3D postdynamics analysis of the 3D complex of the H7N9 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase provide invaluable clues and insight regarding the role and mode of action of a series of interacting residues on the latter enzyme. Our study provides a novel and efficiently intergraded platform with structural insights for the H7N9 RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase. We propose that future use and exploitation of these insights may prove invaluable in the fight against this lethal, ongoing epidemic. PMID:24187616

  5. 3D statistical shape models incorporating 3D random forest regression voting for robust CT liver segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norajitra, Tobias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2015-03-01

    During image segmentation, 3D Statistical Shape Models (SSM) usually conduct a limited search for target landmarks within one-dimensional search profiles perpendicular to the model surface. In addition, landmark appearance is modeled only locally based on linear profiles and weak learners, altogether leading to segmentation errors from landmark ambiguities and limited search coverage. We present a new method for 3D SSM segmentation based on 3D Random Forest Regression Voting. For each surface landmark, a Random Regression Forest is trained that learns a 3D spatial displacement function between the according reference landmark and a set of surrounding sample points, based on an infinite set of non-local randomized 3D Haar-like features. Landmark search is then conducted omni-directionally within 3D search spaces, where voxelwise forest predictions on landmark position contribute to a common voting map which reflects the overall position estimate. Segmentation experiments were conducted on a set of 45 CT volumes of the human liver, of which 40 images were randomly chosen for training and 5 for testing. Without parameter optimization, using a simple candidate selection and a single resolution approach, excellent results were achieved, while faster convergence and better concavity segmentation were observed, altogether underlining the potential of our approach in terms of increased robustness from distinct landmark detection and from better search coverage.

  6. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  7. Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-02

    28-2012 Final Report 04/15/2009 - 11/30/2011 Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization FA9550-09-1-0303 Alexander M...randomly placed sensors. MIMO radar, High-Resolution radar 19 Distributed MIMO Radar for Imaging and High Resolution Target Localization Air Force Office...configured with its antennas collocated [6] or distributed over an area [7, 8]. We refer to radio elements of a MIMO radar as nodes. Nodes may be equipped

  8. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  9. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  10. 3D-spectral CDIs: a fast alternative to 3D inversion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnae, James

    2015-09-01

    Virtually all airborne electromagnetic (AEM) data is interpreted using stitched 1D conductivity sections, derived from constrained inversion or fast but fairly accurate approximations. A small subset of this AEM data recently has been inverted using either block 3D models or thin plates, which processes have limitations in terms of cost and accuracy, and the results are in general strongly biased by the choice of starting models. Recent developments in spectral modelling have allowed fast 3D approximations of the EM response of both vortex induction and current gathering for simple geological target geometries. Fitting these spectral responses to AEM data should be sufficient to accurately locate current systems within the ground, and the behaviour of these local current systems can in theory approximately define a conductivity structure in 3D. This paper describes the results of initial testing of the algorithm in fitting vortex induction in a small target at the Forrestania test range, Western Australia, using results from a versatile time-domain electromagnetic (VTEM)-Max survey.

  11. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  12. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  13. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with Transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  14. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  15. Optimizing visual comfort for stereoscopic 3D display based on color-plus-depth signals.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Jiang, Qiuping; Fu, Randi; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Gangyi

    2016-05-30

    Visual comfort is a long-facing problem in stereoscopic 3D (S3D) display. In this paper, targeting to produce S3D content based on color-plus-depth signals, a general framework for depth mapping to optimize visual comfort for S3D display is proposed. The main motivation of this work is to remap the depth range of color-plus-depth signals to a new depth range that is suitable to comfortable S3D display. Towards this end, we first remap the depth range globally based on the adjusted zero disparity plane, and then present a two-stage global and local depth optimization solution to solve the visual comfort problem. The remapped depth map is used to generate the S3D output. We demonstrate the power of our approach on perceptually uncomfortable and comfortable stereoscopic images.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  17. Finding the Enemy: Using 3-D Laser Radar (LADAR) Imaging for Real Time Combat Identification of Ground Targets in an Obscured Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Algorithms”, p. 197. 23 Ibid, p. 197. 24 http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Bayesian+theory, p. 1. 25 Abdallah, Mahmoud A., Tayib I. Samu , and...Bibliography Abdallah, Mahmoud A., Tayib I. Samu , and William A. Grissom. “Automatic Target Identification Using Neural Networks.” SPIE Vol

  18. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  19. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  20. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  1. Measurement of Localized Corrosion Rates at Inclusion Particles in AA7075 by In Situ Three Dimensional (3D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Williams, Jason J.; Stannard, Tyler J.; Xiao, Xianghui; De Carlo, Francesco; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to measure the localized corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles present in 7075 aluminum alloys in deionized ultra-filtered (DIUF) water. The evolution of hydrogen bubbles was captured as a function of time and the measured volume was used to calculate the local corrosion rate of Mg2Si particles. It was shown that in the absence of chloride ions, stress was needed to create fresh particle surfaces, either by fracture or debonding, to initiate corrosion at the particles.

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization applications for super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Cremer, Marion; Schermelleh, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization on three-dimensionally preserved cells (3D-FISH) is an efficient tool to analyze the subcellular localization and spatial arrangement of targeted DNA sequences and RNA transcripts at the single cell level. 3D reconstructions from serial optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) have long been considered the gold standard for 3D-FISH analyses. Recent super-resolution techniques circumvent the diffraction-limit of optical resolution and have defined a new state-of-the-art in bioimaging. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) represents one of these technologies. Notably, 3D-SIM renders an eightfold improved volumetric resolution over conventional imaging, and allows the simultaneous visualization of differently labeled target structures. These features make this approach highly attractive for the analysis of spatial relations and substructures of nuclear targets that escape detection by conventional light microscopy. Here, we focus on the application of 3D-SIM for the visualization of subnuclear 3D-FISH preparations. In comparison with conventional fluorescence microscopy, the quality of 3D-SIM data is dependent to a much greater extent on the optimal sample preparation, labeling and acquisition conditions. We describe typical problems encountered with super-resolution imaging of in situ hybridizations in mammalian tissue culture cells and provide optimized DNA-/(RNA)-FISH protocols including combinations with immunofluorescence staining (Immuno-FISH) and DNA replication labeling using click chemistry.

  3. Impact of target-to-background ratio, target size, emission scan duration, and activity on physical figures of merit for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, M; Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Sacchetti, G; Comi, S; Rudoni, M; Carriero, A; Inglese, E

    2007-10-01

    The aim of our work is to describe the way in which physical figures of merit such as contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) behave when varying acquisition parameters such as emission scan duration (ESD) or activity at the start of acquisition (A(acq)) that in clinical practice can be selected by the user, or object properties such as target dimensions or target-to-background (T/B) ratio, which depend uniquely on the intrinsic characteristics of the object being imaged. Figures of merit, used to characterize image quality and quantitative accuracy for a 3D-LSO based PET/CT scanner, were studied as a function of ESD and A(acq) for different target sizes and T/B ratios using a multivariate approach in a wide range of conditions approaching the ones that can be encountered in clinical practice. An annular ring of water bags of 3 cm thickness was fitted over an IEC phantom in order to obtain counting rates similar to those found in average patients. The average scatter fraction (SF) of the modified IEC phantom was similar to the mean SF measured on patients with a similar scanner. A supplemental set of micro-hollow spheres was positioned inside the phantom. The NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the IEC phantom to approximate the clinical situation of having activity that extends beyond the scanner. The phantoms were filled with a solution of water and 18F (12 kBq/mL) and the spheres with various T/B ratios of 22.5, 10.3, and 3.6. Sequential imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying background activity concentrations of about 12, 9, 6.4, 5.3, and 3.1 kBq/mL, positioned on the linear portion of the phantom's NECR curve, well below peak NECR of 61.2 kcps that is reached at 31.8 kBq/mL. The ESD was set to 1, 2, 3, and 4 min/bed. With T/B ratios of 3.6, 10.3, and 22.5, the 13.0, 8.1, and 6.5 mm spheres were detectable for the whole ranges of background activity concentration and ESD, respectively. The ESD resulted as the most significant

  4. Impact of target-to-background ratio, target size, emission scan duration, and activity on physical figures of merit for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Brambilla, M.; Matheoud, R.; Secco, C.; Sacchetti, G.; Comi, S.; Rudoni, M.; Carriero, A.; Inglese, E.

    2007-10-15

    The aim of our work is to describe the way in which physical figures of merit such as contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) behave when varying acquisition parameters such as emission scan duration (ESD) or activity at the start of acquisition (A{sub acq}) that in clinical practice can be selected by the user, or object properties such as target dimensions or target-to-background (T/B) ratio, which depend uniquely on the intrinsic characteristics of the object being imaged. Figures of merit, used to characterize image quality and quantitative accuracy for a 3D-LSO based PET/CT scanner, were studied as a function of ESD and A{sub acq} for different target sizes and T/B ratios using a multivariate approach in a wide range of conditions approaching the ones that can be encountered in clinical practice. An annular ring of water bags of 3 cm thickness was fitted over an IEC phantom in order to obtain counting rates similar to those found in average patients. The average scatter fraction (SF) of the modified IEC phantom was similar to the mean SF measured on patients with a similar scanner. A supplemental set of micro-hollow spheres was positioned inside the phantom. The NEMA NU 2-2001 scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the IEC phantom to approximate the clinical situation of having activity that extends beyond the scanner. The phantoms were filled with a solution of water and {sup 18}F (12 kBq/mL) and the spheres with various T/B ratios of 22.5, 10.3, and 3.6. Sequential imaging was performed to acquire PET images with varying background activity concentrations of about 12, 9, 6.4, 5.3, and 3.1 kBq/mL, positioned on the linear portion of the phantom's NECR curve, well below peak NECR of 61.2 kcps that is reached at 31.8 kBq/mL. The ESD was set to 1, 2, 3, and 4 min/bed. With T/B ratios of 3.6, 10.3, and 22.5, the 13.0, 8.1, and 6.5 mm spheres were detectable for the whole ranges of background activity concentration and ESD, respectively. The ESD resulted as the most

  5. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-03-11

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility.

  6. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility. PMID:26978366

  7. Coupling 3D groundwater modeling with CFC-based age dating to classify local groundwater circulation in an unconfined crystalline aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, Tamara; Marçais, Jean; Thomas, Zahra; Abbott, Benjamin W.; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; Aquilina, Luc; Labasque, Thierry; Pinay, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen pollution of freshwater and estuarine environments is one of the most urgent environmental crises. Shallow aquifers with predominantly local flow circulation are particularly vulnerable to agricultural contaminants. Water transit time and flow path are key controls on catchment nitrogen retention and removal capacity, but the relative importance of hydrogeological and topographical factors in determining these parameters is still uncertain. We used groundwater dating and numerical modeling techniques to assess transit time and flow path in an unconfined aquifer in Brittany, France. The 35.5 km2 study catchment has a crystalline basement underneath a ∼60 m thick weathered and fractured layer, and is separated into a distinct upland and lowland area by an 80 m-high butte. We used groundwater discharge and groundwater ages derived from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) concentration to calibrate a free-surface flow model simulating groundwater flow circulation. We found that groundwater flow was highly local (mean travel distance = 350 m), substantially smaller than the typical distance between neighboring streams (∼1 km), while CFC-based ages were quite old (mean = 40 years). Sensitivity analysis revealed that groundwater travel distances were not sensitive to geological parameters (i.e. arrangement of geological layers and permeability profile) within the constraints of the CFC age data. However, circulation was sensitive to topography in the lowland area where the water table was near the land surface, and to recharge rate in the upland area where water input modulated the free surface of the aquifer. We quantified these differences with a local groundwater ratio (rGW-LOCAL), defined as the mean groundwater travel distance divided by the mean of the reference surface distances (the distance water would have to travel across the surface of the digital elevation model). Lowland, rGW-LOCAL was near 1, indicating primarily topographical controls. Upland, rGW-LOCAL

  8. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  9. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  11. Automated modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Skiba, Pawel; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview over the current methods for automated modeling of RNA structures, with emphasis on template-based methods. The currently used approaches to RNA modeling are presented with a side view on the protein world, where many similar ideas have been used. Two main programs for automated template-based modeling are presented: ModeRNA assembling structures from fragments and MacroMoleculeBuilder performing a simulation to satisfy spatial restraints. Both approaches have in common that they require an alignment of the target sequence to a known RNA structure that is used as a modeling template. As a way to find promising template structures and to align the target and template sequences, we propose a pipeline combining the ParAlign and Infernal programs on RNA family data from Rfam. We also briefly summarize template-free methods for RNA 3D structure prediction. Typically, RNA structures generated by automated modeling methods require local or global optimization. Thus, we also discuss methods that can be used for local or global refinement of RNA structures.

  12. CRISM MTRDR Applications - Hyperspectral Targeted Observation Local Area Mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, F. P.; Seelos, K. D.; Viviano, C. E.; Morgan, F.; Humm, D. C.; Murchie, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    for the majority of the Mars science community. For sites where multiple overlapping high quality CRISM targeted observations are available, the MTRDR data processing also allows for the generation of scientifically compelling mosaic products. The first such product set was generated for the Gale Crater MSL landing ellipse and field site and was made available to the MSL team prior to landing. The CRISM Gale Crater mosaic product set illustrates local area VNIR and IR surface spectral variability and the distribution of ferric and mafic minerals, hydrated phases, and phyllosilicates. The Gale Crater product set and targeted observations mosaics for additional sites of particular scientific interest will be presented in detail, highlighting the integrated utility of the end-to-end CRISM hyperspectral targeted observation data processing pipeline and mosaicking procedures.

  13. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  14. [Regional clinical audit, guideline targets, and local and regional benchmarks].

    PubMed

    Casino, F G; Lopez, T

    2005-01-01

    Regional clinical Audit, guideline Targets and local and regional Benchmarks In order to improve the quality of dialysis treatment, we have devised some routines, particularly suitable for electronic data management systems. First, we suggest a systematic monthly analysis of 10 common clinical performance measures (CPM), with the following guideline based targets: predialysis systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 140 mmHg; session length >/= 240 min; dialysis dose (spKt/V) >/=1.3; normalized protein catabolic rate (NPCR) >/=1.2 g/kg/d; hemoglobin (Hb) >/=11 g/dL; serum calcium (Ca) 8.4-9.5 mg/dL; serum phosphorus (P) 3.5-5.5 mg/dL; Ca x P /=20 mmol/L; serum potassium (K) 3.5-6.0 mmol/L. The Hb target should be reached in at least 85% of all maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients in the unit; for all other targets, an arbitrary >/=80% is proposed. Since the above percentages are quite difficult to reach on a short-term basis, an intermediate local or regional standard (benchmark) could be devised as an average of the percentage of patients who actually reach the targets for each CPM at any dialysis unit in a given regional area; and therefore, from truly comparable patients. As an example, we simulated a regional audit by using the above targets with available data from 398 patients from southern Italy. A further step in this process was to find the cause(s) of failure in each patient who did not reach the targets. To this end, we suggest a systematic search of the well-known factors that could affect each CPM, for each failed patient. As an example, we screened all patients with Hb < 11 g/dL at a single unit, to establish the presence/absence of any common cause associated with inadequate response to epoetin treatment. Moreover, by using criteria for prescribing iron therapy or increasing epoetin dose, we found that some patients did not receive the appropriate therapy after blood sampling results. To avoid this possible

  15. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Heavy Ion Track Structure Calculation of Local Dose and 3D Time Evolution of Radiolytic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions have gained considerable importance in radiotherapy due to their advantageous dose distribution profile and high Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Heavy ions are difficult to produce on Earth, but they are present in space and it is impossible at this moment to completely shield astronauts from them. The risk of these radiations is poorly understood, which is a concern for a 3-years Mars mission. The effects of radiation are mainly due to DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), although non-targeted effects are also very important. DNA can be damaged by the direct interaction of radiation and by reactions with chemical species produced by the radiolysis of water. The energy deposition is of crucial importance to understand biological effects of radiation. Therefore, much effort has been done recently to improve models of radiation tracks.

  16. Dual-color multiple-particle tracking at 50-nm localization and over 100-µm range in 3D with temporal focusing two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yu; Li, Chunqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale particle tracking in three dimensions is crucial to directly observe dynamics of molecules and nanoparticles in living cells. Here we present a three-dimensional particle tracking method based on temporally focused two-photon excitation. Multiple particles are imaged at 30 frames/s in volume up to 180 × 180 × 100 µm3. The spatial localization precision can reach 50 nm. We demonstrate its capability of tracking fast swimming microbes at speed of ~200 µm/s. Two-photon dual-color tracking is achieved by simultaneously exciting two kinds of fluorescent beads at 800 nm to demonstrate its potential in molecular interaction studies. Our method provides a simple wide-field fluorescence imaging approach for deep multiple-particle tracking. PMID:27867724

  17. 3-D Ultrasound Localization Microscopy for Identifying Microvascular Morphology Features of Tumor Angiogenesis at a Resolution Beyond the Diffraction Limit of Conventional Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fanglue; Shelton, Sarah E.; Espíndola, David; Rojas, Juan D.; Pinton, Gianmarco; Dayton, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis has been known as a hallmark of solid tumor cancers for decades, yet ultrasound has been limited in its ability to detect the microvascular changes associated with malignancy. Here, we demonstrate the potential of 'ultrasound localization microscopy' applied volumetrically in combination with quantitative analysis of microvascular morphology, as an approach to overcome this limitation. This pilot study demonstrates our ability to image complex microvascular patterns associated with tumor angiogenesis in-vivo at a resolution of tens of microns - substantially better than the diffraction limit of traditional clinical ultrasound, yet using an 8 MHz clinical ultrasound probe. Furthermore, it is observed that data from healthy and tumor-bearing tissue exhibit significant differences in microvascular pattern and density. Results suggests that with continued development of these novel technologies, ultrasound has the potential to detect biomarkers of cancer based on the microvascular 'fingerprint' of malignant angiogenesis rather than through imaging of blood flow dynamics or the tumor mass itself. PMID:28042327

  18. Enhancing the detectability of a high-resistivity target by using a synthetic aperture source for 3D marine CSEM modelling of a rugged seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Shen, Jinsong; Gao, Yan

    2016-10-01

    When processing marine controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data from a rugged seafloor, enhancing the reservoir response and suppressing the topographic effect and other interference are significant issues, especially in shallow water. We simulated the CSEM responses specific to these issues using an efficient finite-difference (FD) code. The synthetic aperture technique was applied to steer the EM field toward a high-resistivity target on the seafloor. A weighted 2D synthetic aperture source was constructed by imposing a real weighting factor on each source point. Numerical experiments showed that using the weighted 2D synthetic aperture source significantly enhanced the effective CSEM signals. Because of the destructive interference between bathymetric distortion and the airwave effect in shallow water, the synthetic aperture technique is useful for dealing with seafloor topography. Better results can be obtained before steering the distorted response with a bathymetric correction. However, the detectability results may exhibit a huge difference in numerical values if the background resistivity of the bathymetric model is estimated incorrectly.

  19. Investigation of new 2-aryl substituted Benzothiopyrano[4,3-d]pyrimidines as kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Silvia; Marini, Anna Maria; Fornaciari, Giacomo; Simorini, Francesca; La Motta, Concettina; Taliani, Sabrina; Sartini, Stefania; Da Settimo, Federico; García-Argáez, Aída Nelly; Gia, Ornella; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; D'Ocon, Pilar; Fioravanti, Anna; Orlandi, Paola; Bocci, Guido; Dalla Via, Lisa

    2015-10-20

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) pathway has emerged as one of the most important positive modulators of Angiogenesis, a central process implicated in tumour growth and metastatic dissemination. This led to the design and development of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule ATP-competitive VEGFR-inhibitors. In this study, we describe the synthesis and the biological evaluation of novel 2-aryl substituted benzothiopyrano-fused pyrimidines 1a-i, 2a-i and 3a-i. The ability of the compounds to target the VEGF pathway was determined in vitro exploiting the compounds' antiproliferative efficacy against HUVEC cells. The VEGFR-2 inhibition was confirmed by enzymatic assays on recombinant human kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), by cell-based phospho-VEGFR-2 inhibition assays, and by ex vivo rat aortic ring tests. The selectivity profile of the best performing derivatives belonging to series 2 was further explored combining modeling studies and additional assays in a panel of human cell lines and other kinases.

  20. Targeting Colorectal Cancer Proliferation, Stemness and Metastatic Potential Using Brassicaceae Extracts Enriched in Isothiocyanates: A 3D Cell Model-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lucília P; Silva, Patrícia; Duarte, Marlene; Rodrigues, Liliana; Duarte, Catarina M M; Albuquerque, Cristina; Serra, Ana Teresa

    2017-04-10

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) recurrence is often attributable to circulating tumor cells and/or cancer stem cells (CSCs) that resist to conventional therapies and foster tumor progression. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) derived from Brassicaceae vegetables have demonstrated anticancer effects in CRC, however little is known about their effect in CSCs and tumor initiation properties. Here we examined the effect of ITCs-enriched Brassicaceae extracts derived from watercress and broccoli in cell proliferation, CSC phenotype and metastasis using a previously developed three-dimensional HT29 cell model with CSC-like traits. Both extracts were phytochemically characterized and their antiproliferative effect in HT29 monolayers was explored. Next, we performed cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry analysis in HT29 spheroids treated with watercress and broccoli extracts and respective main ITCs, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and sulforaphane (SFN). Soft agar assays and relative quantitative expression analysis of stemness markers and Wnt/β-catenin signaling players were performed to evaluate the effect of these phytochemicals in stemness and metastasis. Our results showed that both Brassicaceae extracts and ITCs exert antiproliferative effects in HT29 spheroids, arresting cell cycle at G₂/M, possibly due to ITC-induced DNA damage. Colony formation and expression of LGR5 and CD133 cancer stemness markers were significantly reduced. Only watercress extract and PEITC decreased ALDH1 activity in a dose-dependent manner, as well as β-catenin expression. Our research provides new insights on CRC therapy using ITC-enriched Brassicaceae extracts, specially watercress extract, to target CSCs and circulating tumor cells by impairing cell proliferation, ALDH1-mediated chemo-resistance, anoikis evasion, self-renewal and metastatic potential.

  1. SU-C-213-07: Fabrication and Testing of a 3D-Printed Small Animal Rectal Cooling Device to Evaluate Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector During Prostate SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycushko, B; Chopra, R; Futch, C; Bing, C; Wodzak, M; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Medin, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to SBRT treatments. Relevant to prostate SBRT, this work details the fabrication and testing of a 3D-printed cooling device to facilitate the investigation of the radioprotective effect of local hypothermia on the rat rectum. Methods: A 3cm long, two-channel rectal cooling device was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The water intake nozzle is connected to a 1mm diameter brass pipe from which water flows and circulates back around to the exit nozzle. Both nozzles are connected by plastic tubing to a water chiller pump. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within a rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. CBCT images from a small-animal irradiator were evaluated for imaging artifacts which could affect Monte Carlo dose calculations during treatment planning. Results: The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature (37°C) to 15°C in 10–20 minutes from device insertion. Rectal temperature was maintained at 15±3°C during active cooling. MRI thermometry tests revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device, with the desired temperature range maintained within the surrounding few millimeters. Conclusion: A 3D printed rectal cooling device was fabricated for the purpose of inducing local hypothermia in rat rectums. Rectal cooling capabilities were characterized in-vivo to facilitate an investigation of the radioprotective effect of hypothermia for late rectal

  2. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  3. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. 3D local structure around copper site of rabbit prion-related protein: Quantitative determination by XANES spectroscopy combined with multiple-scattering calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, P. X.; Lian, F. L.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Yi; Chu, W. S.; Zhao, H. F.; Zhang, S.; Li, J.; Lin, D. H.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Prion-related protein (PrP), a cell-surface copper-binding glycoprotein, is considered to be responsible for a number of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The structural conversion of PrP from the normal cellular isoform (PrPC) to the post-translationally modified form (PrPSc) is thought to be relevant to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. Rabbits are one of the few mammalian species that appear to be resistant to TSEs, because of the structural characteristics of the rabbit prion protein (RaPrPC) itself. Here we determined the three-dimensional local structure around the C-terminal high-affinity copper-binding sites using X-ray absorption near-edge structure combined with ab initio calculations in the framework of the multiple-scattering (MS) theory. Result shows that two amino acid resides, Gln97 and Met108, and two histidine residues, His95 and His110, are involved in binding this copper(II) ion. It might help us understand the roles of copper in prion conformation conversions, and the molecular mechanisms of prion-involved diseases.

  5. Estimates of mercury flux into the United States from non-local and global sources: results from a 3-D CTM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Streets, D.; Kim, M.; Crist, K.

    2008-11-01

    The sensitivity of Hg concentration and deposition in the United States to emissions in China was investigated by using a global chemical transport model: Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART). Two forms of gaseous Hg were included in the model: elemental Hg (HG(0) and oxidized or reactive Hg (HGO). We simulated three different emission scenarios to evaluate the model's sensitivity. One scenario included no emissions from China, while the others were based on different estimates of Hg emissions in China. The results indicated, in general, that when Hg emissions were included, HG(0) concentrations increased both locally and globally. Increases in Hg concentrations in the United States were greatest during spring and summer, by as much as 7%. Ratios of calculated concentrations of Hg and CO near the source region in eastern Asia agreed well with ratios based on measurements. Increases similar to those observed for HG(0) were also calculated for deposition of HGO. Calculated increases in wet and dry deposition in the United States were 5 7% and 5 9%, respectively. The results indicate that long-range transcontinental transport of Hg has a non-negligible impact on Hg deposition levels in the United States.

  6. Measurements of Polarization Transfers in Real Compton Scattering by a proton target at JLAB. A new source of information on the 3D shape of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-03-01

    In this thesis work, results of the analysis of the polarization transfers measured in real Compton scattering (RCS) by the Collaboration E07-002 at the Je fferson Lab Hall-C are presented. The data were collected at large scattering angle (theta_cm = 70deg) and with a polarized incident photon beam at an average energy of 3.8 GeV. Such a kind of experiments allows one to understand more deeply the reaction mechanism, that involves a real photon, by extracting both Compton form factors and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) (also relevant for possibly shedding light on the total angular momentum of the nucleon). The obtained results for the longitudinal and transverse polarization transfers K_LL and K_LT, are of crucial importance, since they confirm unambiguously the disagreement between experimental data and pQCD prediction, as it was found in E99-114 experiment, and favor the Handbag mechanism. The E99-114 and E07-002 results can contribute to attract new interest on the great yield of the Compton scattering by a nucleon target, as demonstrated by the recent approval of an experimental proposal submitted to the Jefferson Lab PAC 42 for a Wide-angle Compton Scattering experiment, at 8 and 10 GeV Photon Energies. The new experiments approved to run with the updated 12 GeV electron beam at JLab, are characterized by much higher luminosities, and a new GEM tracker is under development to tackle the challenging backgrounds. Within this context, we present a new multistep tracking algorithm, based on (i) a Neural Network (NN) designed for a fast and efficient association of the hits measured by the GEM detector which allows the track identification, and (ii) the application of both a Kalman filter and Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother to further improve the track reconstruction. The full procedure, i.e. NN and filtering, appears very promising, with high performances in terms of both association effciency and reconstruction accuracy, and these preliminary results will

  7. Influence of local and external processes on the annual nitrogen cycle and primary productivity on Georges Bank: A 3-D biological-physical modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Rubao; Davis, Cabell; Chen, Changsheng; Beardsley, Robert

    2008-09-01

    Georges Bank is one of the world's most highly productive marine areas, but the mechanisms of nutrient supply to support such high productivity remain poorly understood. Intrusions of nutrient-poor Labrador Slope Water (LSW) into the Gulf of Maine (NAO-dependent) potentially can reduce nutrient delivery to the bank, but this mechanism has not been quantitatively examined. In this paper, we present the first whole-year continuous model simulation results using a biological-physical model developed for the Gulf of Maine/Georges Bank region. This high-resolution three-dimensional coupled model consists of the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) and a Nitrogen-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model, and was used to examine the influences of local and external processes on nitrogen and phytoplankton dynamics on Georges Bank. The model captured the general pattern of spatial-temporal distributions of nitrogen and phytoplankton and provided a diagnostic analysis of different processes that control nitrogen fluxes on Georges Bank. Specifically, numerical experiments were conducted to examine seasonal variation in nitrogen transport into the central bank (new nitrogen supply) versus nitrogen regenerated internally in this region. Compared with previous observation-based studies, the model provided a quantitative estimate of nitrogen flux by integrating the transport over a longer time period and a complete spatial domain. The results suggest that, during summer months, internal nitrogen regeneration is the major nitrogen source for primary production on the central bank, while nitrogen supply through physical transport (e.g. tidal pumping) contributes about 1/5 of the total nitrogen demand, with an estimated on-bank nitrogen transport at least 50% less than previous estimates. By comparing the model runs using different nitrogen concentrations in deep Slope Water, the potential influence of NAO-dependent intrusions of LSW was examined. The results suggest

  8. An initial study on the estimation of time-varying volumetric treatment images and 3D tumor localization from single MV cine EPID images

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Pankaj Mak, Raymond H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Bryant, Jonathan H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Lewis, John H.; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: In this work the authors develop and investigate the feasibility of a method to estimate time-varying volumetric images from individual MV cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images. Methods: The authors adopt a two-step approach to time-varying volumetric image estimation from a single cine EPID image. In the first step, a patient-specific motion model is constructed from 4DCT. In the second step, parameters in the motion model are tuned according to the information in the EPID image. The patient-specific motion model is based on a compact representation of lung motion represented in displacement vector fields (DVFs). DVFs are calculated through deformable image registration (DIR) of a reference 4DCT phase image (typically peak-exhale) to a set of 4DCT images corresponding to different phases of a breathing cycle. The salient characteristics in the DVFs are captured in a compact representation through principal component analysis (PCA). PCA decouples the spatial and temporal components of the DVFs. Spatial information is represented in eigenvectors and the temporal information is represented by eigen-coefficients. To generate a new volumetric image, the eigen-coefficients are updated via cost function optimization based on digitally reconstructed radiographs and projection images. The updated eigen-coefficients are then multiplied with the eigenvectors to obtain updated DVFs that, in turn, give the volumetric image corresponding to the cine EPID image. Results: The algorithm was tested on (1) Eight digital eXtended CArdiac-Torso phantom datasets based on different irregular patient breathing patterns and (2) patient cine EPID images acquired during SBRT treatments. The root-mean-squared tumor localization error is (0.73 ± 0.63 mm) for the XCAT data and (0.90 ± 0.65 mm) for the patient data. Conclusions: The authors introduced a novel method of estimating volumetric time-varying images from single cine EPID images and a PCA-based lung motion model

  9. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  10. The Sodium Channel as a Target for Local Anesthetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fozzard, Harry A.; Sheets, Michael F.; Hanck, Dorothy A.

    2011-01-01

    Na channels are the source of excitatory currents for the nervous system and muscle. They are the target for a class of drugs called local anesthetics (LA), which have been used for local and regional anesthesia and for excitatory problems such as epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmia. These drugs are prototypes for new analgesic drugs. The drug-binding site has been localized to the inner pore of the channel, where drugs interact mainly with a phenylalanine in domain IV S6. Drug affinity is both voltage- and use-dependent. Voltage-dependency is the result of changes in the conformation of the inner pore during channel activation and opening, allowing high energy interaction of drugs with the phenylalanine. LA drugs also reduce the gating current of Na channels, which represents the movement of charged residues in the voltage sensors. Specifically, drug binding to phenylalanine locks the domain III S4 in its outward (activated) position, and slows recovery of the domain IV S4. Although strongly affecting gating, LA drugs almost certainly also block by steric occlusion of the pore. Molecular definition of the binding and blocking interactions may help in new drug development. PMID:22053156

  11. 3-D transient analysis of pebble-bed HTGR by TORT-TD/ATTICA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Seubert, A.; Sureda, A.; Lapins, J.; Buck, M.; Bader, J.; Laurien, E.

    2012-07-01

    As most of the acceptance criteria are local core parameters, application of transient 3-D fine mesh neutron transport and thermal hydraulics coupled codes is mandatory for best estimate evaluations of safety margins. This also applies to high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR). Application of 3-D fine-mesh transient transport codes using few energy groups coupled with 3-D thermal hydraulics codes becomes feasible in view of increasing computing power. This paper describes the discrete ordinates based coupled code system TORT-TD/ATTICA3D that has recently been extended by a fine-mesh diffusion solver. Based on transient analyses for the PBMR-400 design, the transport/diffusion capabilities are demonstrated and 3-D local flux and power redistribution effects during a partial control rod withdrawal are shown. (authors)

  12. Pose detection of a 3D object using template matched filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Kenia; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of 3D pose recognition of a rigid object is difficult to solve because the pose in a 3D space can vary with multiple degrees of freedom. In this work, we propose an accurate method for 3D pose estimation based on template matched filtering. The proposed method utilizes a bank of space-variant filters which take into account different pose states of the target and local statistical properties of the input scene. The state parameters of location coordinates, orientation angles, and scaling parameters of the target are estimated with high accuracy in the input scene. Experimental tests are performed for real and synthetic scenes. The proposed system yields good performance for 3D pose recognition in terms of detection efficiency, location and orientation errors.

  13. The role of the vestibular system in manual target localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Susan R.; Mueller, S. Alyssa

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts experience perceptual and sensory-motor disturbances during spaceflight and immediately after return to the 1-g environment of Earth. During spaceflight, sensory information from the eyes, limbs and vestibular organs is reinterpreted by the central nervous system so that astronauts can produce appropriate body movements in microgravity. Alterations in sensory-motor function may affect eye-head-hand coordination and, thus, the crewmember's ability to manually locate objects in extrapersonal space. Previous reports have demonstrated that crewmembers have difficulty in estimating joint and limb position and in pointing to memorized target positions on orbit and immediately postflight. One set of internal cues that may assist in the manual localization of objects is information from the vestibular system. This system contributes to our sense of the body's position in space by providing information on head position and movement and the orientation of the body with respect to gravity. Research on the vestibular system has concentrated on its role in oculo-motor control. Little is known about the role that vestibular information plays in manual motor control, such as reaching and pointing movements. Since central interpretation of vestibular information is altered in microgravity, it is important to determine its role in this process. This summer, we determined the importance of vestibular information in a subject's ability to point accurately toward a target in extrapersonal space. Subjects were passively rotated across the earth-vertical axis and then asked to point back to a previously-seen target. In the first paradigm, the subjects used both visual and vestibular cues for the pointing response, while, in the second paradigm, subjects used only vestibular information. Subjects were able to point with 85 percent accuracy to a target using vestibular information alone. We infer from this result that vestibular input plays a role in the spatial programming of

  14. Registration of MRI to intraoperative radiographs for target localization in spinal interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Goerres, J.; Jacobson, M. W.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-01-01

    Decision support to assist in target vertebra localization could provide a useful aid to safe and effective spine surgery. Previous solutions have shown 3D-2D registration of preoperative CT to intraoperative radiographs to reliably annotate vertebral labels for assistance during level localization. We present an algorithm (referred to as MR-LevelCheck) to perform 3D-2D registration based on a preoperative MRI to accommodate the increasingly common clinical scenario in which MRI is used instead of CT for preoperative planning. Straightforward adaptation of gradient/intensity-based methods appropriate to CT-to-radiograph registration is confounded by large mismatch and noncorrespondence in image intensity between MRI and radiographs. The proposed method overcomes such challenges with a simple vertebrae segmentation step using vertebra centroids as seed points (automatically defined within existing workflow). Forwards projections are computed using segmented MRI and registered to radiographs via gradient orientation (GO) similarity and the CMA-ES (covariance-matrix-adaptation evolutionary-strategy) optimizer. The method was tested in an IRB-approved study involving 10 patients undergoing cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spine surgery following preoperative MRI. The method successfully registered each preoperative MRI to intraoperative radiographs and maintained desirable properties of robustness against image content mismatch and large capture range. Robust registration performance was achieved with projection distance error (PDE) (median  ±  IQR)  =  4.3  ±  2.6 mm (median  ±  IQR) and 0% failure rate. Segmentation accuracy for the continuous max-flow method yielded dice coefficient  =  88.1  ±  5.2, accuracy  =  90.6  ±  5.7, RMSE  =  1.8  ±  0.6 mm, and contour affinity ratio (CAR)  =  0.82  ±  0.08. Registration performance was found to be robust for

  15. Registration of MRI to intraoperative radiographs for target localization in spinal interventions.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M W; Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G; Khanna, A J; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2017-01-21

    Decision support to assist in target vertebra localization could provide a useful aid to safe and effective spine surgery. Previous solutions have shown 3D-2D registration of preoperative CT to intraoperative radiographs to reliably annotate vertebral labels for assistance during level localization. We present an algorithm (referred to as MR-LevelCheck) to perform 3D-2D registration based on a preoperative MRI to accommodate the increasingly common clinical scenario in which MRI is used instead of CT for preoperative planning. Straightforward adaptation of gradient/intensity-based methods appropriate to CT-to-radiograph registration is confounded by large mismatch and noncorrespondence in image intensity between MRI and radiographs. The proposed method overcomes such challenges with a simple vertebrae segmentation step using vertebra centroids as seed points (automatically defined within existing workflow). Forwards projections are computed using segmented MRI and registered to radiographs via gradient orientation (GO) similarity and the CMA-ES (covariance-matrix-adaptation evolutionary-strategy) optimizer. The method was tested in an IRB-approved study involving 10 patients undergoing cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spine surgery following preoperative MRI. The method successfully registered each preoperative MRI to intraoperative radiographs and maintained desirable properties of robustness against image content mismatch and large capture range. Robust registration performance was achieved with projection distance error (PDE) (median  ±  IQR)  =  4.3  ±  2.6 mm (median  ±  IQR) and 0% failure rate. Segmentation accuracy for the continuous max-flow method yielded dice coefficient  =  88.1  ±  5.2, accuracy  =  90.6  ±  5.7, RMSE  =  1.8  ±  0.6 mm, and contour affinity ratio (CAR)  =  0.82  ±  0.08. Registration performance was found to be robust for

  16. DNA biosensing with 3D printing technology.

    PubMed

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2017-01-16

    3D printing, an upcoming technology, has vast potential to transform conventional fabrication processes due to the numerous improvements it can offer to the current methods. To date, the employment of 3D printing technology has been examined for applications in the fields of engineering, manufacturing and biological sciences. In this study, we examined the potential of adopting 3D printing technology for a novel application, electrochemical DNA biosensing. Metal 3D printing was utilized to construct helical-shaped stainless steel electrodes which functioned as a transducing platform for the detection of DNA hybridization. The ability of electroactive methylene blue to intercalate into the double helix structure of double-stranded DNA was then exploited to monitor the DNA hybridization process, with its inherent reduction peak serving as an analytical signal. The designed biosensing approach was found to demonstrate superior selectivity against a non-complementary DNA target, with a detection range of 1-1000 nM.

  17. [Species-specific localization of DNA from pericentromeric heterochromatin on polytene chromosomes in the salivary gland cells and 3D-nuclear organization nurse cells in Drosophila virilis, and Drosophila kanekoi (Diptera: Drosophilidae)].

    PubMed

    Usov, K E; Vasserlauf, I É; Abylkasymova, G M; Stegniĭ, V N

    2014-11-01

    Microdissection of the chromocenter of D. virilis salivary gland polytene chromosomes has been carried out and the region-specific. DNA library (DvirIII) has been obtained. FISH was used for DvirIII hybridization with salivary gland polytene chromosomes and ovarian nurse cells of D. virilis and D. kanekoi. Localization of DvirIII in the pericentromeric regions of chromosomes and in the telomeric region of chromosome 5 was observed in both species. Moreover, species specificity in the localization of DNA sequences of DvirIII in some chromosomal regions was detected. In order to study the three-dimensional organization of pericentromeric heterochromatin region of polytene chromosomes of ovarian nurse cells of D. virilis and D. kanekoi, 3D FISH DvirIII was performed with nurse cells of these species. As a result, species specificity in the distribution of DvirIII signals in the nuclear space was revealed. Namely, the signal was detected in the local chromocenter at one pole of the nucleus in D. virilis, while the signal from the telomeric region of chromosome 5 was detected on another pole. At the same time, DvirIII signals in D. kanekoi are localized in two separate areas in the nucleus: the first belongs to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2 and another to pericentromeric regions of the remaining chromosomes.

  18. Non-Invasive Targeted Peripheral Nerve Ablation Using 3D MR Neurography and MRI-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU): Pilot Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Merel; Staruch, Robert M.; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; van den Bosch, Maurice A.; Burns, Dennis K.; Chhabra, Avneesh; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been proposed for noninvasive treatment of neuropathic pain and has been investigated in in-vivo studies. However, ultrasound has important limitations regarding treatment guidance and temperature monitoring. Magnetic resonance (MR)-imaging guidance may overcome these limitations and MR-guided HIFU (MR-HIFU) has been used successfully for other clinical indications. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing 3D MR neurography to identify and guide ablation of peripheral nerves using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Methods Volumetric MR-HIFU was used to induce lesions in the peripheral nerves of the lower limbs in three pigs. Diffusion-prep MR neurography and T1-weighted images were utilized to identify the target, plan treatment and immediate post-treatment evaluation. For each treatment, one 8 or 12 mm diameter treatment cell was used (sonication duration 20 s and 36 s, power 160–300 W). Peripheral nerves were extracted < 3 hours after treatment. Ablation dimensions were calculated from thermal maps, post-contrast MRI and macroscopy. Histological analysis included standard H&E staining, Masson’s trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Results All targeted peripheral nerves were identifiable on MR neurography and T1-weighted images and could be accurately ablated with a single exposure of focused ultrasound, with peak temperatures of 60.3 to 85.7°C. The lesion dimensions as measured on MR neurography were similar to the lesion dimensions as measured on CE-T1, thermal dose maps, and macroscopy. Histology indicated major hyperacute peripheral nerve damage, mostly confined to the location targeted for ablation. Conclusion Our preliminary results indicate that targeted peripheral nerve ablation is feasible with MR-HIFU. Diffusion-prep 3D MR neurography has potential for guiding therapy procedures where either nerve targeting or avoidance is desired, and may

  19. The Design and Discovery of Water Soluble 4-Substituted-2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Multitargeted Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Microtubule Targeting Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Ihnat, Michael; Thorpe, Jessica E.; Disch, Bryan C.; Bastian, Anja; Bailey-Downs, Lora C.; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F.; Rohena, Cristina C.; Hamel, Ernest; Mooberry, Susan L.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis and biological evaluations of fourteen 4-substituted 2,6-dimethylfuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines are reported. Four compounds (11–13, 15) inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFR-β), and target tubulin leading to cytotoxicity. Compound 11 has nanomolar potency, comparable to sunitinib and semaxinib, against tumor cell lines overexpressing VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-β. Further, 11 binds at the colchicine site on tubulin, depolymerizes cellular microtubules and inhibits purified tubulin assembly and overcomes both βIII-tubulin and P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance, and initiates mitotic arrest leading to apoptosis. In vivo, its HCl salt, 21, reduced tumor size and vascularity in xenograft and allograft murine models and was superior to docetaxel and sunitinib, without overt toxicity. Thus 21 affords potential combination chemotherapy in a single agent. PMID:24890652

  20. Additively Manufactured 3D Porous Ti-6Al-4V Constructs Mimic Trabecular Bone Structure and Regulate Osteoblast Proliferation, Differentiation and Local Factor Production in a Porosity and Surface Roughness Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Alice; Humayun, Aiza; Cohen, David J.; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing by laser sintering is able to produce high resolution metal constructs for orthopaedic and dental implants. In this study, we used a human trabecular bone template to design and manufacture Ti-6Al-4V constructs with varying porosity via laser sintering. Characterization of constructs revealed interconnected porosities ranging from 15–70% with compressive moduli of 2063–2954 MPa. These constructs with macro porosity were further surface-treated to create a desirable multi-scale micro-/nano-roughness, which has been shown to enhance the osseointegration process. Osteoblasts (MG63 cells) exhibited high viability when grown on the constructs. Proliferation (DNA) and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALP), an early differentiation marker, decreased as porosity increased, while osteocalcin (OCN), a late differentiation marker, as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2, BMP4) increased with increasing porosity. 3D constructs with the highest porosity and surface modification supported the greatest osteoblast differentiation and local factor production. These results indicate that additively manufactured 3D porous constructs mimicking human trabecular bone and produced with additional surface treatment can be customized for increased osteoblast response. Increased factors for osteoblast maturation and differentiation on high porosity constructs suggest the enhanced performance of these surfaces for increasing osseointegration in vivo. PMID:25287305

  1. Localized harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound surgery targeting.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-08-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired radio-frequency (RF) signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude.

  2. 3D nanopillar optical antenna photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Pradeep; Hung, Chung-Hong; Shapiro, Joshua; Scofield, Adam; Lin, Andrew; Williams, Benjamin S; Huffaker, Diana L

    2012-11-05

    We demonstrate 3D surface plasmon photoresponse in nanopillar arrays resulting in enhanced responsivity due to both Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances (LSPRs) and Surface Plasmon Polariton Bloch Waves (SPP-BWs). The LSPRs are excited due to a partial gold shell coating the nanopillar which acts as a 3D Nanopillar Optical Antenna (NOA) in focusing light into the nanopillar. Angular photoresponse measurements show that SPP-BWs can be spectrally coincident with LSPRs to result in a x2 enhancement in responsivity at 1180 nm. Full-wave Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations substantiate both the spatial and spectral coupling of the SPP-BW / LSPR for enhanced absorption and the nature of the LSPR. Geometrical control of the 3D NOA and the self-aligned metal hole lattice allows the hybridization of both localized and propagating surface plasmon modes for enhanced absorption. Hybridized plasmonic modes opens up new avenues in optical antenna design in nanoscale photodetectors.

  3. Auto convergence for stereoscopic 3D cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Buyue; Kothandaraman, Sreenivas; Batur, Aziz Umit

    2012-03-01

    Viewing comfort is an important concern for 3-D capable consumer electronics such as 3-D cameras and TVs. Consumer generated content is typically viewed at a close distance which makes the vergence-accommodation conflict particularly pronounced, causing discomfort and eye fatigue. In this paper, we present a Stereo Auto Convergence (SAC) algorithm for consumer 3-D cameras that reduces the vergence-accommodation conflict on the 3-D display by adjusting the depth of the scene automatically. Our algorithm processes stereo video in realtime and shifts each stereo frame horizontally by an appropriate amount to converge on the chosen object in that frame. The algorithm starts by estimating disparities between the left and right image pairs using correlations of the vertical projections of the image data. The estimated disparities are then analyzed by the algorithm to select a point of convergence. The current and target disparities of the chosen convergence point determines how much horizontal shift is needed. A disparity safety check is then performed to determine whether or not the maximum and minimum disparity limits would be exceeded after auto convergence. If the limits would be exceeded, further adjustments are made to satisfy the safety limits. Finally, desired convergence is achieved by shifting the left and the right frames accordingly. Our algorithm runs real-time at 30 fps on a TI OMAP4 processor. It is tested using an OMAP4 embedded prototype stereo 3-D camera. It significantly improves 3-D viewing comfort.

  4. 3D-shape-based retrieval within the MPEG-7 framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, Titus; Preteux, Francoise J.

    2001-05-01

    Because of the continuous development of multimedia technologies, virtual worlds and augmented reality, 3D contents become a common feature of the today information systems. Hence, standardizing tools for content-based indexing of visual data is a key issue for computer vision related applications. Within the framework of the future MPEG-7 standard, tools for intelligent content-based access to 3D information, targeting applications such as search and retrieval and browsing of 3D model databases, have been recently considered and evaluated. In this paper, we present the 3D Shape Spectrum Descriptor (3D SSD), recently adopted within the current MPEG-7 Committee Draft (CD). The proposed descriptor aims at providing an intrinsic shape description of a 3D mesh and is defined as the distribution of the shape index over the entire mesh. The shape index is a local geometric attribute of a 3D surface, expressed as the angular coordinate of a polar representation of the principal curvature vector. Experimental results have been carried out upon the MPEG-7 3D model database consisting of about 1300 meshes in VRML 2.0 format. Objective retrieval results, based upon the definition of a ground truth subset, are reported in terms of Bull Eye Percentage (BEP) score.

  5. 3D Printing Multi-Functionality: Embedded RF Antennas and Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemelya, C. M.; Zemba, M.; Liang, M.; Espalin, D.; Kief, C.; Xin, H.; Wicker, R. B.; MacDonald, E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Significant research and press has recently focused on the fabrication freedom of Additive Manufacturing (AM) to create both conceptual models and final end-use products. This flexibility allows design modifications to be immediately reflected in 3D printed structures, creating new paradigms within the manufacturing process. 3D printed products will inevitably be fabricated locally, with unit-level customization, optimized to unique mission requirements. However, for the technology to be universally adopted, the processes must be enhanced to incorporate additional technologies; such as electronics, actuation, and electromagnetics. Recently, a novel 3D printing platform, Multi3D manufacturing, was funded by the presidential initiative for revitalizing manufacturing in the USA using 3D printing (America Makes - also known as the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute). The Multi3D system specifically targets 3D printed electronics in arbitrary form; and building upon the potential of this system, this paper describes RF antennas and components fabricated through the integration of material extrusion 3D printing with embedded wire, mesh, and RF elements.

  6. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  7. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  8. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  9. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  10. Targeting the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter for Selective Delivery of 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]Pyrimidine Antifolate Inhibitors of De Novo Purine Biosynthesis in the Chemotherapy of Solid TumorsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Wang, Yiqiang; Wu, Jianmei; Stout, Mark; Hou, Zhanjun; Fulterer, Andreas; Chang, Min-Hwang; Romero, Michael F.; Cherian, Christina; Gangjee, Aleem

    2010-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter with an acidic pH optimum, approximating the microenvironments of solid tumors. We tested 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates with one to six carbons in the bridge region for inhibition of proliferation in isogenic Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HeLa cells expressing PCFT or reduced folate carrier (RFC). Only analogs with three and four bridge carbons (N-{4-[3-2-amino-4-oxo-4,7-dihydro-3H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-6-yl)propyl]benzoyl}-l-glutamic acid (compound 2) and N-{4-[4-2-amino-4-oxo-4,7-dihydro-3H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidin-6-yl)butyl]benzoyl}*-l-glutamic acid (compound 3), respectively) were inhibitory, with 2 ≫ 3. Activity toward RFC-expressing cells was negligible. Compound 2 and pemetrexed (Pmx) competed with [3H]methotrexate for PCFT transport in PCFT-expressing CHO (R2/hPCFT4) cells from pH 5.5 to 7.2; inhibition increased with decreasing pH. In Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with PCFT cRNA, uptake of 2, like that of Pmx, was electrogenic. Cytotoxicity of 2 toward R2/hPCFT4 cells was abolished in the presence of adenosine or 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide, suggesting that glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase) in de novo purine biosynthesis was the primary target. Compound 2 decreased GTP and ATP pools by ∼50 and 75%, respectively. By an in situ GARFTase assay, 2 was ∼20-fold more inhibitory toward intracellular GARFTase than toward cell growth or colony formation. Compound 2 irreversibly inhibited clonogenicity, although this required at least 4 h of exposure. Our results document the potent antiproliferative activity of compound 2, attributable to its efficient cellular uptake by PCFT, resulting in inhibition of GARFTase and de novo purine biosynthesis. Furthermore, they establish the feasibility of selective chemotherapy drug delivery via PCFT over RFC, a process that takes advantage of a unique biological feature of solid tumors. PMID

  11. Tumor Targeting with Novel 6-Substituted Pyrrolo [2,3-d] Pyrimidine Antifolates with Heteroatom Bridge Substitutions via Cellular Uptake by Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter and Inhibition of de Novo Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Golani, Lalit K; Wallace-Povirk, Adrianne; Deis, Siobhan M; Wong, Jennifer; Ke, Jiyuan; Gu, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Wilson, Mike R; Li, Xinxin; Polin, Lisa; de Waal, Parker W; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; O'Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Dann, Charles E; Matherly, Larry H; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-09-08

    Targeted antifolates with heteroatom replacements of the carbon vicinal to the phenyl ring in 1 by N (4), O (8), or S (9), or with N-substituted formyl (5), acetyl (6), or trifluoroacetyl (7) moieties, were synthesized and tested for selective cellular uptake by folate receptor (FR) α and β or the proton-coupled folate transporter. Results show increased in vitro antiproliferative activity toward engineered Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing FRs by 4-9 over the CH2 analogue 1. Compounds 4-9 inhibited de novo purine biosynthesis and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). X-ray crystal structures for 4 with FRα and GARFTase showed that the bound conformations of 4 required flexibility for attachment to both FRα and GARFTase. In mice bearing IGROV1 ovarian tumor xenografts, 4 was highly efficacious. Our results establish that heteroatom substitutions in the 3-atom bridge region of 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines related to 1 provide targeted antifolates that warrant further evaluation as anticancer agents.

  12. The role of visual context in manual target localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Susan R.

    1993-01-01

    During space flight and immediately after return to the 1-g environment of earth, astronauts experience perceptual and sensory-motor disturbances. These changes result from adaptation of the astronaut to the microgravity environment of space. During space flight, sensory information from the eyes, limbs, and vestibular organs is reinterpreted by the central nervous system in order to produce appropriate body movements in the microgravity. This adaptation takes several days to develop. Upon return to earth, the changes in the sensory-motor system are no longer appropriate to a 1-g environment. Over several days, the astronaut must re-adapt to the terrestrial environment. Alterations in sensory-motor function may affect eye-head-hand coordination and, thus, the crewmember's ability to manually locate objects in extrapersonal space. Previous reports have demonstrated that crewmembers have difficulty in estimating joint and limb position and in pointing to memorized target positions on orbit and immediately postflight. The ability to point at or reach toward an object or perform other manual tasks is essential for safe Shuttle operation and may be compromised particularly during re-entry and landing sequences and during possible emergency egress from the Shuttle. An understanding of eye-head-hand coordination and the changes produced during space flight is necessary to develop effective countermeasures. This summer's project formed part of the study of the sensory cues use in the manual localization of objects.

  13. Advancements in 3D Structural Analysis of Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Drew L; Faulds, James E; Mayhew, Brett; McNamara, David

    2013-06-23

    Robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin, USA is a product of both anomalously high regional heat flow and active fault-controlled extension. Elevated permeability associated with some fault systems provides pathways for circulation of geothermal fluids. Constraining the local-scale 3D geometry of these structures and their roles as fluid flow conduits is crucial in order to mitigate both the costs and risks of geothermal exploration and to identify blind (no surface expression) geothermal resources. Ongoing studies have indicated that much of the robust geothermal activity in the Great Basin is associated with high density faulting at structurally complex fault intersection/interaction areas, such as accommodation/transfer zones between discrete fault systems, step-overs or relay ramps in fault systems, intersection zones between faults with different strikes or different senses of slip, and horse-tailing fault terminations. These conceptualized models are crucial for locating and characterizing geothermal systems in a regional context. At the local scale, however, pinpointing drilling targets and characterizing resource potential within known or probable geothermal areas requires precise 3D characterization of the system. Employing a variety of surface and subsurface data sets, we have conducted detailed 3D geologic analyses of two Great Basin geothermal systems. Using EarthVision (Dynamic Graphics Inc., Alameda, CA) we constructed 3D geologic models of both the actively producing Brady’s geothermal system and a ‘greenfield’ geothermal prospect at Astor Pass, NV. These 3D models allow spatial comparison of disparate data sets in 3D and are the basis for quantitative structural analyses that can aid geothermal resource assessment and be used to pinpoint discrete drilling targets. The relatively abundant data set at Brady’s, ~80 km NE of Reno, NV, includes 24 wells with lithologies interpreted from careful analysis of cuttings and core, a 1

  14. Superplastic forming using NIKE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M.

    1996-12-04

    The superplastic forming process requires careful control of strain rates in order to avoid strain localizations. A load scheduler was developed and implemented into the nonlinear finite element code NIKE3D to provide strain rate control during forming simulation and process schedule output. Often the sheets being formed in SPF are very thin such that less expensive membrane elements can be used as opposed to shell elements. A large strain membrane element was implemented into NIKE3D to assist in SPF process modeling.

  15. 2D/3D Image Registration using Regression Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Frederick, Brandon; Mageras, Gig; Chang, Sha; Pizer, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In computer vision and image analysis, image registration between 2D projections and a 3D image that achieves high accuracy and near real-time computation is challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel method that can rapidly detect an object’s 3D rigid motion or deformation from a 2D projection image or a small set thereof. The method is called CLARET (Correction via Limited-Angle Residues in External Beam Therapy) and consists of two stages: registration preceded by shape space and regression learning. In the registration stage, linear operators are used to iteratively estimate the motion/deformation parameters based on the current intensity residue between the target projec-tion(s) and the digitally reconstructed radiograph(s) (DRRs) of the estimated 3D image. The method determines the linear operators via a two-step learning process. First, it builds a low-order parametric model of the image region’s motion/deformation shape space from its prior 3D images. Second, using learning-time samples produced from the 3D images, it formulates the relationships between the model parameters and the co-varying 2D projection intensity residues by multi-scale linear regressions. The calculated multi-scale regression matrices yield the coarse-to-fine linear operators used in estimating the model parameters from the 2D projection intensity residues in the registration. The method’s application to Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) requires only a few seconds and yields good results in localizing a tumor under rigid motion in the head and neck and under respiratory deformation in the lung, using one treatment-time imaging 2D projection or a small set thereof. PMID:24058278

  16. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  17. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  18. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  20. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  1. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  2. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  4. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  5. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  6. Infrared moving point target detection based on spatial-temporal local contrast filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lizhen; Zhu, Hu; Tao, Chao; Wei, Yantao

    2016-05-01

    Infrared moving point target detection is a challenging task. In this paper, we define a novel spatial local contrast (SLC) and a novel temporal local contrast (TLC) to enhance the target's contrast. Based on the defined spatial local contrast and temporal local contrast, we propose a simple but powerful spatial-temporal local contrast filter (STLCF) to detect moving point target from infrared image sequences. In order to verify the performance of spatial-temporal local contrast filter on detecting moving point target, different detection methods are used to detect the target from several infrared image sequences for comparison. The experimental results show that the proposed spatial-temporal local contrast filter has great superiority in moving point target detection.

  7. Crashworthiness simulations with DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Hoover, C.G.; Kay, G.J.; Lee, A.S.; De Groot, A.J.

    1996-04-01

    Current progress in parallel algorithm research and applications in vehicle crash simulation is described for the explicit, finite element algorithms in DYNA3D. Problem partitioning methods and parallel algorithms for contact at material interfaces are the two challenging algorithm research problems that are addressed. Two prototype parallel contact algorithms have been developed for treating the cases of local and arbitrary contact. Demonstration problems for local contact are crashworthiness simulations with 222 locally defined contact surfaces and a vehicle/barrier collision modeled with arbitrary contact. A simulation of crash tests conducted for a vehicle impacting a U-channel small sign post embedded in soil has been run on both the serial and parallel versions of DYNA3D. A significant reduction in computational time has been observed when running these problems on the parallel version. However, to achieve maximum efficiency, complex problems must be appropriately partitioned, especially when contact dominates the computation.

  8. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  9. Reproducibility of 3D chromatin configuration reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Mark R.; Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Vazquez, Mariel; Arsuaga, Javier

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of eukaryotic chromatin plays an important role in processes such as gene regulation and cancer-driving gene fusions. Observing or inferring this 3D structure at even modest resolutions had been problematic, since genomes are highly condensed and traditional assays are coarse. However, recently devised high-throughput molecular techniques have changed this situation. Notably, the development of a suite of chromatin conformation capture (CCC) assays has enabled elicitation of contacts—spatially close chromosomal loci—which have provided insights into chromatin architecture. Most analysis of CCC data has focused on the contact level, with less effort directed toward obtaining 3D reconstructions and evaluating the accuracy and reproducibility thereof. While questions of accuracy must be addressed experimentally, questions of reproducibility can be addressed statistically—the purpose of this paper. We use a constrained optimization technique to reconstruct chromatin configurations for a number of closely related yeast datasets and assess reproducibility using four metrics that measure the distance between 3D configurations. The first of these, Procrustes fitting, measures configuration closeness after applying reflection, rotation, translation, and scaling-based alignment of the structures. The others base comparisons on the within-configuration inter-point distance matrix. Inferential results for these metrics rely on suitable permutation approaches. Results indicate that distance matrix-based approaches are preferable to Procrustes analysis, not because of the metrics per se but rather on account of the ability to customize permutation schemes to handle within-chromosome contiguity. It has recently been emphasized that the use of constrained optimization approaches to 3D architecture reconstruction are prone to being trapped in local minima. Our methods of reproducibility assessment provide a

  10. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  11. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  12. Visual search is influenced by 3D spatial layout.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Nonie J; Grove, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Many activities necessitate the deployment of attention to specific distances and directions in our three-dimensional (3D) environment. However, most research on how attention is deployed is conducted with two dimensional (2D) computer displays, leaving a large gap in our understanding about the deployment of attention in 3D space. We report how each of four parameters of 3D visual space influence visual search: 3D display volume, distance in depth, number of depth planes, and relative target position in depth. Using a search task, we find that visual search performance depends on 3D volume, relative target position in depth, and number of depth planes. Our results demonstrate an asymmetrical preference for targets in the front of a display unique to 3D search and show that arranging items into more depth planes reduces search efficiency. Consistent with research using 2D displays, we found slower response times to find targets in displays with larger 3D volumes compared with smaller 3D volumes. Finally, in contrast to the importance of target depth relative to other distractors, target depth relative to the fixation point did not affect response times or search efficiency.

  13. Evaluation of three types of reference image data for external beam radiotherapy target localization using digital tomosynthesis (DTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Ren Lei; Yan Hui; Wu, Q.; Yoo Sua; Oldham, M.; Yin Fangfang

    2007-08-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a fast, low-dose three-dimensional (3D) imaging approach which yields slice images with excellent in-plane resolution, though low plane-to-plane resolution. A stack of DTS slices can be reconstructed from a single limited-angle scan, with typical scan angles ranging from 10 deg. to 40 deg. and acquisition times of less than 10 s. The resulting DTS slices show soft tissue contrast approaching that of full cone-beam CT. External beam radiotherapy target localization using DTS requires the registration of on-board DTS images with corresponding reference image data. This study evaluates three types of reference volume: original reference CT, exact reference DTS (RDTS), and a more computationally efficient approximate reference DTS (RDTS{sub approx}), as well as three different DTS scan angles (22 deg., 44 deg., and 65 deg.) for the DTS target localization task. Three-dimensional mutual information (MI) shared between reference and on-board DTS volumes was computed in a region surrounding the spine of a chest phantom, as translations spanning {+-}5 mm and rotations spanning {+-}5 deg. were simulated along each dimension in the reference volumes. The locations of the MI maxima were used as surrogates for registration accuracy, and the width of the MI peaks were used to characterize the registration robustness. The results show that conventional treatment planning CT volumes are inadequate reference volumes for direct registration with on-board DTS data. The efficient RDTS{sub approx} method also appears insufficient for MI-based registration without further refinement of the technique, though it may be suitable for manual registration performed by a human observer. The exact RDTS volumes, on the other hand, delivered a 3D DTS localization accuracy of 0.5 mm and 0.5 deg. along each axis, using only a single 44 deg. coronal on-board DTS scan of the chest phantom.

  14. The Indoor Localization and Tracking Estimation Method of Mobile Targets in Three-Dimensional Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zixi; Wu, Chengdong; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Yunzhou; Guan, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Indoor localization is a significant research area in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Generally, the nodes of WSNs are deployed in the same plane, i.e., the floor, as the target to be positioned, which causes the sensing signal to be influenced or even blocked by unpredictable obstacles, like furniture. However, a 3D system, like Cricket, can reduce the negative impact of obstacles to the maximum extent and guarantee the sensing signal transmission by using the line of sight (LOS). However, most of the traditional localization methods are not available for the new deployment mode. In this paper, we propose the self-localization of beacons method based on the Cayley–Menger determinant, which can determine the positions of beacons stuck in the ceiling; and differential sensitivity analysis (DSA) is also applied to eliminate measurement errors in measurement data fusion. Then, the calibration of beacons scheme is proposed to further refine the locations of beacons by the mobile robot. According to the robot’s motion model based on dead reckoning, which is the process of determining one’s current position, we employ the H∞ filter and the strong tracking filter (STF) to calibrate the rough locations, respectively. Lastly, the optimal node selection scheme based on geometric dilution precision (GDOP) is presented here, which is able to pick the group of beacons with the minimum GDOP from all of the beacons. Then, we propose the GDOP-based weighting estimation method (GWEM) to associate redundant information with the position of the target. To verify the proposed methods in the paper, we design and conduct a simulation and an experiment in an indoor setting. Compared to EKF and the H∞ filter, the adopted STF method can more effectively calibrate the locations of beacons; GWEM can provide centimeter-level precision in 3D environments by using the combination of beacons that minimizes GDOP. PMID:26610518

  15. Evaluation of three types of reference image data for external beam radiotherapy target localization using digital tomosynthesis (DTS).

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Devon J; Ren, Lei; Yan, Hui; Wu, Q; Yoo, Sua; Oldham, M; Yin, Fang Fang

    2007-08-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a fast, low-dose three-dimensional (3D) imaging approach which yields slice images with excellent in-plane resolution, though low plane-to-plane resolution. A stack of DTS slices can be reconstructed from a single limited-angle scan, with typical scan angles ranging from 10 degrees to 40 degrees and acquisition times of less than 10 s. The resulting DTS slices show soft tissue contrast approaching that of full cone-beam CT. External beam radiotherapy target localization using DTS requires the registration of on-board DTS images with corresponding reference image data. This study evaluates three types of reference volume: original reference CT, exact reference DTS (RDTS), and a more computationally efficient approximate reference DTS (RDTSapprox), as well as three different DTS scan angles (22 degrees, 44 degrees, and 65 degrees) for the DTS target localization task. Three-dimensional mutual information (MI) shared between reference and onboard DTS volumes was computed in a region surrounding the spine of a chest phantom, as translations spanning +/-5 mm and rotations spanning +/-5 degrees were simulated along each dimension in the reference volumes. The locations of the MI maxima were used as surrogates for registration accuracy, and the width of the MI peaks were used to characterize the registration robustness. The results show that conventional treatment planning CT volumes are inadequate reference volumes for direct registration with on-board DTS data. The efficient RDTSapprox method also appears insufficient for MI-based registration without further refinement of the technique, though it may be suitable for manual registration performed by a human observer. The exact RDTS volumes, on the other hand, delivered a 3D DTS localization accuracy of 0.5 mm and 0.50 along each axis, using only a single 44 degrees coronal on-board DTS scan of the chest phantom.

  16. The Indoor Localization and Tracking Estimation Method of Mobile Targets in Three-Dimensional Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zixi; Wu, Chengdong; Li, Zhao; Zhang, Yunzhou; Guan, Bo

    2015-11-24

    Indoor localization is a significant research area in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Generally, the nodes of WSNs are deployed in the same plane, i.e., the floor, as the target to be positioned, which causes the sensing signal to be influenced or even blocked by unpredictable obstacles, like furniture. However, a 3D system, like Cricket, can reduce the negative impact of obstacles to the maximum extent and guarantee the sensing signal transmission by using the line of sight (LOS). However, most of the traditional localization methods are not available for the new deployment mode. In this paper, we propose the self-localization of beacons method based on the Cayley-Menger determinant, which can determine the positions of beacons stuck in the ceiling; and differential sensitivity analysis (DSA) is also applied to eliminate measurement errors in measurement data fusion. Then, the calibration of beacons scheme is proposed to further refine the locations of beacons by the mobile robot. According to the robot's motion model based on dead reckoning, which is the process of determining one's current position, we employ the H∞ filter and the strong tracking filter (STF) to calibrate the rough locations, respectively. Lastly, the optimal node selection scheme based on geometric dilution precision (GDOP) is presented here, which is able to pick the group of beacons with the minimum GDOP from all of the beacons. Then, we propose the GDOP-based weighting estimation method (GWEM) to associate redundant information with the position of the target. To verify the proposed methods in the paper, we design and conduct a simulation and an experiment in an indoor setting. Compared to EKF and the H∞ filter, the adopted STF method can more effectively calibrate the locations of beacons; GWEM can provide centimeter-level precision in 3D environments by using the combination of beacons that minimizes GDOP.

  17. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  18. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  19. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  20. MAP3D: a media processor approach for high-end 3D graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsa, Lucia; Stadnicki, Steven; Basoglu, Chris

    1999-12-01

    Equator Technologies, Inc. has used a software-first approach to produce several programmable and advanced VLIW processor architectures that have the flexibility to run both traditional systems tasks and an array of media-rich applications. For example, Equator's MAP1000A is the world's fastest single-chip programmable signal and image processor targeted for digital consumer and office automation markets. The Equator MAP3D is a proposal for the architecture of the next generation of the Equator MAP family. The MAP3D is designed to achieve high-end 3D performance and a variety of customizable special effects by combining special graphics features with high performance floating-point and media processor architecture. As a programmable media processor, it offers the advantages of a completely configurable 3D pipeline--allowing developers to experiment with different algorithms and to tailor their pipeline to achieve the highest performance for a particular application. With the support of Equator's advanced C compiler and toolkit, MAP3D programs can be written in a high-level language. This allows the compiler to successfully find and exploit any parallelism in a programmer's code, thus decreasing the time to market of a given applications. The ability to run an operating system makes it possible to run concurrent applications in the MAP3D chip, such as video decoding while executing the 3D pipelines, so that integration of applications is easily achieved--using real-time decoded imagery for texturing 3D objects, for instance. This novel architecture enables an affordable, integrated solution for high performance 3D graphics.

  1. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions. PMID:28029145

  2. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-12-25

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions.

  3. Tracked 3D ultrasound in radio-frequency liver ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Taylor, Russell H.; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that radio frequency (RF) ablation is a simple, safe and potentially effective treatment for selected patients with liver metastases. Despite all recent therapeutic advancements, however, intra-procedural target localization and precise and consistent placement of the tissue ablator device are still unsolved problems. Various imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) have been tried as guidance modalities. Transcutaneous US imaging, due to its real-time nature, may be beneficial in many cases, but unfortunately, fails to adequately visualize the tumor in many cases. Intraoperative or laparoscopic US, on the other hand, provides improved visualization and target imaging. This paper describes a system for computer-assisted RF ablation of liver tumors, combining navigational tracking of a conventional imaging ultrasound probe to produce 3D ultrasound imaging with a tracked RF ablation device supported by a passive mechanical arm and spatially registered to the ultrasound volume.

  4. Analysis of the topological properties of the proximal femur on a regional scale: evaluation of multi-detector CT-scans for the assessment of biomechanical strength using local Minkowski functionals in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Link, T. M.; Monetti, R. A.; Kuhn, V.; Eckstein, F.; Raeth, C. W.; Reiser, M.

    2006-03-01

    In our recent studies on the analysis of bone texture in the context of Osteoporosis, we could already demonstrate the great potential of the topological evaluation of bone architecture based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) in 2D and 3D for the prediction of the mechanical strength of cubic bone specimens depicted by high resolution MRI. Other than before, we now assess the mechanical characteristics of whole hip bone specimens imaged by multi-detector computed tomography. Due to the specific properties of the imaging modality and the bone tissue in the proximal femur, this requires to introduce a new analysis method. The internal architecture of the hip is functionally highly specialized to withstand the complex pattern of external and internal forces associated with human gait. Since the direction, connectivity and distribution of the trabeculae changes considerably within narrow spatial limits it seems most reasonable to evaluate the femoral bone structure on a local scale. The Minkowski functionals are a set of morphological descriptors for the topological characterization of binarized, multi-dimensional, convex objects with respect to shape, structure, and the connectivity of their components. The MF are usually used as global descriptors and may react very sensitively to minor structural variations which presents a major limitation in a number of applications. The objective of this work is to assess the mechanical competence of whole hip bone specimens using parameters based on the MF. We introduce an algorithm that considers the local topological aspects of the bone architecture of the proximal femur allowing to identify regions within the bone that contribute more to the overall mechanical strength than others.

  5. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  6. A task-dependent effect of memory and hand-target on proprioceptive localization.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie A H; Fiehler, Katja; Henriques, Denise Y P

    2012-06-01

    We examine whether the task goal affects the accuracy and precision with which participants can localize an unseen hand. Proprioceptive localization was measured using three different tasks: two goal-directed movement tasks (reaching to and reproducing final hand-target location) and a perceptual estimation task in which participants judged the location of the hand-target relative to visual references. We also assessed whether proprioceptive localization in these different tasks is affected by localization from memory, the hand-target being localized (left or right) or the movement path of the proprioceptive target (9 paths, derived from combinations of starting and final hand-target positions). We found that participants were less precise when reaching from memory, but not when reproducing or estimating remembered final hand-target location. Participants also misperceived the felt location of their hands, judging their left hand to be more leftward and their right hand to be more rightward when reaching to and when estimating final hand-target location, but not when reproducing hand-target location. The movement path of the proprioceptive target did not affect localization, regardless of the task goal. Overall, localization seems poorer when proprioception is used to guide a reach with the opposite hand, particularly from memory, and best when merely reproducing the proprioceptive target site. This may have an important application in neuro-rehabilitation, whereby one task may better establish or re-establish important or failing sensory connections.

  7. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Ninad B; Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment.

  8. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ninad B.; Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over