Science.gov

Sample records for 3d template matching

  1. Pose detection of a 3D object using template matched filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Kenia; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of 3D pose recognition of a rigid object is difficult to solve because the pose in a 3D space can vary with multiple degrees of freedom. In this work, we propose an accurate method for 3D pose estimation based on template matched filtering. The proposed method utilizes a bank of space-variant filters which take into account different pose states of the target and local statistical properties of the input scene. The state parameters of location coordinates, orientation angles, and scaling parameters of the target are estimated with high accuracy in the input scene. Experimental tests are performed for real and synthetic scenes. The proposed system yields good performance for 3D pose recognition in terms of detection efficiency, location and orientation errors.

  2. A Model-Based 3D Template Matching Technique for Pose Acquisition of an Uncooperative Space Object

    PubMed Central

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a customized three-dimensional template matching technique for autonomous pose determination of uncooperative targets. This topic is relevant to advanced space applications, like active debris removal and on-orbit servicing. The proposed technique is model-based and produces estimates of the target pose without any prior pose information, by processing three-dimensional point clouds provided by a LIDAR. These estimates are then used to initialize a pose tracking algorithm. Peculiar features of the proposed approach are the use of a reduced number of templates and the idea of building the database of templates on-line, thus significantly reducing the amount of on-board stored data with respect to traditional techniques. An algorithm variant is also introduced aimed at further accelerating the pose acquisition time and reducing the computational cost. Technique performance is investigated within a realistic numerical simulation environment comprising a target model, LIDAR operation and various target-chaser relative dynamics scenarios, relevant to close-proximity flight operations. Specifically, the capability of the proposed techniques to provide a pose solution suitable to initialize the tracking algorithm is demonstrated, as well as their robustness against highly variable pose conditions determined by the relative dynamics. Finally, a criterion for autonomous failure detection of the presented techniques is presented. PMID:25785309

  3. A model-based 3D template matching technique for pose acquisition of an uncooperative space object.

    PubMed

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2015-03-16

    This paper presents a customized three-dimensional template matching technique for autonomous pose determination of uncooperative targets. This topic is relevant to advanced space applications, like active debris removal and on-orbit servicing. The proposed technique is model-based and produces estimates of the target pose without any prior pose information, by processing three-dimensional point clouds provided by a LIDAR. These estimates are then used to initialize a pose tracking algorithm. Peculiar features of the proposed approach are the use of a reduced number of templates and the idea of building the database of templates on-line, thus significantly reducing the amount of on-board stored data with respect to traditional techniques. An algorithm variant is also introduced aimed at further accelerating the pose acquisition time and reducing the computational cost. Technique performance is investigated within a realistic numerical simulation environment comprising a target model, LIDAR operation and various target-chaser relative dynamics scenarios, relevant to close-proximity flight operations. Specifically, the capability of the proposed techniques to provide a pose solution suitable to initialize the tracking algorithm is demonstrated, as well as their robustness against highly variable pose conditions determined by the relative dynamics. Finally, a criterion for autonomous failure detection of the presented techniques is presented.

  4. Protein function prediction using local 3D templates.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Watson, James D; Thornton, Janet M

    2005-08-19

    The prediction of a protein's function from its 3D structure is becoming more and more important as the worldwide structural genomics initiatives gather pace and continue to solve 3D structures, many of which are of proteins of unknown function. Here, we present a methodology for predicting function from structure that shows great promise. It is based on 3D templates that are defined as specific 3D conformations of small numbers of residues. We use four types of template, covering enzyme active sites, ligand-binding residues, DNA-binding residues and reverse templates. The latter are templates generated from the target structure itself and scanned against a representative subset of all known protein structures. Together, the templates provide a fairly thorough coverage of the known structures and ensure that if there is a match to a known structure it is unlikely to be missed. A new scoring scheme provides a highly sensitive means of discriminating between true positive and false positive template matches. In all, the methodology provides a powerful new tool for function prediction to complement those already in use.

  5. Nodule Detection in a Lung Region that's Segmented with Using Genetic Cellular Neural Networks and 3D Template Matching with Fuzzy Rule Based Thresholding

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Onur; Ucan, Osman N.

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a new method for automated lung nodule detection in serial section CT images with using the characteristics of the 3D appearance of the nodules that distinguish themselves from the vessels. Materials and Methods Lung nodules were detected in four steps. First, to reduce the number of region of interests (ROIs) and the computation time, the lung regions of the CTs were segmented using Genetic Cellular Neural Networks (G-CNN). Then, for each lung region, ROIs were specified with using the 8 directional search; +1 or -1 values were assigned to each voxel. The 3D ROI image was obtained by combining all the 2-Dimensional (2D) ROI images. A 3D template was created to find the nodule-like structures on the 3D ROI image. Convolution of the 3D ROI image with the proposed template strengthens the shapes that are similar to those of the template and it weakens the other ones. Finally, fuzzy rule based thresholding was applied and the ROI's were found. To test the system's efficiency, we used 16 cases with a total of 425 slices, which were taken from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. Results The computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system achieved 100% sensitivity with 13.375 FPs per case when the nodule thickness was greater than or equal to 5.625 mm. Conclusion Our results indicate that the detection performance of our algorithm is satisfactory, and this may well improve the performance of computer-aided detection of lung nodules. PMID:18253070

  6. Computerized detection of breast lesions in multi-centre and multi-instrument DCE-MR data using 3D principal component maps and template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertas, Gokhan; Doran, Simon; Leach, Martin O.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we introduce a novel, robust and accurate computerized algorithm based on volumetric principal component maps and template matching that facilitates lesion detection on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR. The study dataset comprises 24 204 contrast-enhanced breast MR images corresponding to 4034 axial slices from 47 women in the UK multi-centre study of MRI screening for breast cancer and categorized as high risk. The scans analysed here were performed on six different models of scanner from three commercial vendors, sited in 13 clinics around the UK. 1952 slices from this dataset, containing 15 benign and 13 malignant lesions, were used for training. The remaining 2082 slices, with 14 benign and 12 malignant lesions, were used for test purposes. To prevent false positives being detected from other tissues and regions of the body, breast volumes are segmented from pre-contrast images using a fast semi-automated algorithm. Principal component analysis is applied to the centred intensity vectors formed from the dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images of the segmented breasts, followed by automatic thresholding to eliminate fatty tissues and slowly enhancing normal parenchyma and a convolution and filtering process to minimize artefacts from moderately enhanced normal parenchyma and blood vessels. Finally, suspicious lesions are identified through a volumetric sixfold neighbourhood connectivity search and calculation of two morphological features: volume and volumetric eccentricity, to exclude highly enhanced blood vessels, nipples and normal parenchyma and to localize lesions. This provides satisfactory lesion localization. For a detection sensitivity of 100%, the overall false-positive detection rate of the system is 1.02/lesion, 1.17/case and 0.08/slice, comparing favourably with previous studies. This approach may facilitate detection of lesions in multi-centre and multi-instrument dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MR data.

  7. Prediction of enzyme function based on 3D templates of evolutionarily important amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, David M; Ward, R Matthew; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Chen, Brian Y; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Kimmel, Marek; Kavraki, Lydia E; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Background Structural genomics projects such as the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) yield many new structures, but often these have no known molecular functions. One approach to recover this information is to use 3D templates – structure-function motifs that consist of a few functionally critical amino acids and may suggest functional similarity when geometrically matched to other structures. Since experimentally determined functional sites are not common enough to define 3D templates on a large scale, this work tests a computational strategy to select relevant residues for 3D templates. Results Based on evolutionary information and heuristics, an Evolutionary Trace Annotation (ETA) pipeline built templates for 98 enzymes, half taken from the PSI, and sought matches in a non-redundant structure database. On average each template matched 2.7 distinct proteins, of which 2.0 share the first three Enzyme Commission digits as the template's enzyme of origin. In many cases (61%) a single most likely function could be predicted as the annotation with the most matches, and in these cases such a plurality vote identified the correct function with 87% accuracy. ETA was also found to be complementary to sequence homology-based annotations. When matches are required to both geometrically match the 3D template and to be sequence homologs found by BLAST or PSI-BLAST, the annotation accuracy is greater than either method alone, especially in the region of lower sequence identity where homology-based annotations are least reliable. Conclusion These data suggest that knowledge of evolutionarily important residues improves functional annotation among distant enzyme homologs. Since, unlike other 3D template approaches, the ETA method bypasses the need for experimental knowledge of the catalytic mechanism, it should prove a useful, large scale, and general adjunct to combine with other methods to decipher protein function in the structural proteome. PMID:18190718

  8. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  9. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-21

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  10. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  11. Template protection and its implementation in 3D face recognition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuebing

    2007-04-01

    As biometric recognition systems are widely applied in various application areas, security and privacy risks have recently attracted the attention of the biometric community. Template protection techniques prevent stored reference data from revealing private biometric information and enhance the security of biometrics systems against attacks such as identity theft and cross matching. This paper concentrates on a template protection algorithm that merges methods from cryptography, error correction coding and biometrics. The key component of the algorithm is to convert biometric templates into binary vectors. It is shown that the binary vectors should be robust, uniformly distributed, statistically independent and collision-free so that authentication performance can be optimized and information leakage can be avoided. Depending on statistical character of the biometric template, different approaches for transforming biometric templates into compact binary vectors are presented. The proposed methods are integrated into a 3D face recognition system and tested on the 3D facial images of the FRGC database. It is shown that the resulting binary vectors provide an authentication performance that is similar to the original 3D face templates. A high security level is achieved with reasonable false acceptance and false rejection rates of the system, based on an efficient statistical analysis. The algorithm estimates the statistical character of biometric templates from a number of biometric samples in the enrollment database. For the FRGC 3D face database, the small distinction of robustness and discriminative power between the classification results under the assumption of uniquely distributed templates and the ones under the assumption of Gaussian distributed templates is shown in our tests.

  12. Learning 3D Object Templates by Quantizing Geometry and Appearance Spaces.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenze; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2015-06-01

    While 3D object-centered shape-based models are appealing in comparison with 2D viewer-centered appearance-based models for their lower model complexities and potentially better view generalizabilities, the learning and inference of 3D models has been much less studied in the recent literature due to two factors: i) the enormous complexities of 3D shapes in geometric space; and ii) the gap between 3D shapes and their appearances in images. This paper aims at tackling the two problems by studying an And-Or Tree (AoT) representation that consists of two parts: i) a geometry-AoT quantizing the geometry space, i.e. the possible compositions of 3D volumetric parts and 2D surfaces within the volumes; and ii) an appearance-AoT quantizing the appearance space, i.e. the appearance variations of those shapes in different views. In this AoT, an And-node decomposes an entity into constituent parts, and an Or-node represents alternative ways of decompositions. Thus it can express a combinatorial number of geometry and appearance configurations through small dictionaries of 3D shape primitives and 2D image primitives. In the quantized space, the problem of learning a 3D object template is transformed to a structure search problem which can be efficiently solved in a dynamic programming algorithm by maximizing the information gain. We focus on learning 3D car templates from the AoT and collect a new car dataset featuring more diverse views. The learned car templates integrate both the shape-based model and the appearance-based model to combine the benefits of both. In experiments, we show three aspects: 1) the AoT is more efficient than the frequently used octree method in space representation; 2) the learned 3D car template matches the state-of-the art performances on car detection and pose estimation in a public multi-view car dataset; and 3) in our new dataset, the learned 3D template solves the joint task of simultaneous object detection, pose/view estimation, and part

  13. Evolutionary Trace Annotation Server: automated enzyme function prediction in protein structures using 3D templates

    PubMed Central

    Matthew Ward, R.; Venner, Eric; Daines, Bryce; Murray, Stephen; Erdin, Serkan; Kristensen, David M.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Summary:The Evolutionary Trace Annotation (ETA) Server predicts enzymatic activity. ETA starts with a structure of unknown function, such as those from structural genomics, and with no prior knowledge of its mechanism uses the phylogenetic Evolutionary Trace (ET) method to extract key functional residues and propose a function-associated 3D motif, called a 3D template. ETA then searches previously annotated structures for geometric template matches that suggest molecular and thus functional mimicry. In order to maximize the predictive value of these matches, ETA next applies distinctive specificity filters—evolutionary similarity, function plurality and match reciprocity. In large scale controls on enzymes, prediction coverage is 43% but the positive predictive value rises to 92%, thus minimizing false annotations. Users may modify any search parameter, including the template. ETA thus expands the ET suite for protein structure annotation, and can contribute to the annotation efforts of metaservers. Availability:The ETA Server is a web application available at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/eta/. Contact: lichtarge@bcm.edu PMID:19307237

  14. Template Matching on Parallel Architectures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    memory. The processors run asynchronously. Thus according to Hynn’s categories the Butterfl . is a MIMD machine. The processors of the Butterfly are...Generalized Butterfly Architecture This section describes timings for pattern matching on the generalized Butterfl .. Ihe implementations on the Butterfly...these algorithms. Thus the best implementation of the techniques on the generalized Butterfl % are the same as the implementation on the real Butterfly

  15. Speeding up 3D speckle tracking using PatchMatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zontak, Maria; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Echocardiography provides valuable information to diagnose heart dysfunction. A typical exam records several minutes of real-time cardiac images. To enable complete analysis of 3D cardiac strains, 4-D (3-D+t) echocardiography is used. This results in a huge dataset and requires effective automated analysis. Ultrasound speckle tracking is an effective method for tissue motion analysis. It involves correlation of a 3D kernel (block) around a voxel with kernels in later frames. The search region is usually confined to a local neighborhood, due to biomechanical and computational constraints. For high strains and moderate frame-rates, however, this search region will remain large, leading to a considerable computational burden. Moreover, speckle decorrelation (due to high strains) leads to errors in tracking. To solve this, spatial motion coherency between adjacent voxels should be imposed, e.g., by averaging their correlation functions.1 This requires storing correlation functions for neighboring voxels, thus increasing memory demands. In this work, we propose an efficient search using PatchMatch, 2 a powerful method to find correspondences between images. Here we adopt PatchMatch for 3D volumes and radio-frequency signals. As opposed to an exact search, PatchMatch performs random sampling of the search region and propagates successive matches among neighboring voxels. We show that: 1) Inherently smooth offset propagation in PatchMatch contributes to spatial motion coherence without any additional processing or memory demand. 2) For typical scenarios, PatchMatch is at least 20 times faster than the exact search, while maintaining comparable tracking accuracy.

  16. Automatic structural matching of 3D image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Svjatoslav; Lutsiv, Vadim; Malyshev, Igor

    2015-10-01

    A new image matching technique is described. It is implemented as an object-independent hierarchical structural juxtaposition algorithm based on an alphabet of simple object-independent contour structural elements. The structural matching applied implements an optimized method of walking through a truncated tree of all possible juxtapositions of two sets of structural elements. The algorithm was initially developed for dealing with 2D images such as the aerospace photographs, and it turned out to be sufficiently robust and reliable for matching successfully the pictures of natural landscapes taken in differing seasons from differing aspect angles by differing sensors (the visible optical, IR, and SAR pictures, as well as the depth maps and geographical vector-type maps). At present (in the reported version), the algorithm is enhanced based on additional use of information on third spatial coordinates of observed points of object surfaces. Thus, it is now capable of matching the images of 3D scenes in the tasks of automatic navigation of extremely low flying unmanned vehicles or autonomous terrestrial robots. The basic principles of 3D structural description and matching of images are described, and the examples of image matching are presented.

  17. Seismic random noise attenuation via 3D block matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amani, Sajjad; Gholami, Ali; Javaheri Niestanak, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    The lack of signal to noise ratio increases the final errors of seismic interpretation. In the present study, we apply a new non-local transform domain method called "3 Dimensional Block Matching (3DBM)" for seismic random noise attenuation. Basically, 3DBM uses the similarities through the data for retrieving the amplitude of signal in a specific point in the f-x domain, and because of this, it is able to preserve discontinuities in the data such as fractures and faults. 3DBM considers each seismic profile as an image and thus it can be applied to both pre-stack and post-stack seismic data. It uses the block matching clustering method to gather similar blocks contained in 2D data into 3D groups in order to enhance the level of correlation in each 3D array. By applying a 2D transform and 1D transform (instead of a 3D transform) on each array, we can effectively attenuate the noise by shrinkage of the transform coefficients. The subsequent inverse 2D transform and inverse 1D transform yield estimates of all matched blocks. Finally, the random noise attenuated data is computed using the weighted average of all block estimates. We applied 3DBM on both synthetic and real pre-stack and post-stack seismic data and compared it with a Curvelet transform based denoising method which is one of the most powerful methods in this area. The results show that 3DBM method eventuates in higher signal to noise ratio, lower execution time and higher visual quality.

  18. Assessing particle kinematics via template matching algorithms.

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Fink, M; Fortov, V; Lipaev, A; Molotkov, V; Morfill, G; Petrov, O; Pustylnik, M; Thoma, M; Thomas, H; Usachev, A; Raeth, C

    2016-04-18

    Template matching algorithms represent a viable tool to locate particles in optical images. A crucial factor of the performance of these methods is the choice of the similarity measure. Recently, it was shown in [Gao and Helgeson, Opt. Express 22 (2014)] that the correlation coefficient (CC) leads to good results. Here, we introduce the mutual information (MI) as a nonlinear similarity measure and compare the performance of the MI and the CC for different noise scenarios. It turns out that the mutual information leads to superior results in the case of signal dependent noise. We propose a novel approach to estimate the velocity of particles which is applicable in imaging scenarios where the particles appear elongated due to their movement. By designing a bank of anisotropic templates supposed to fit the elongation of the particles we are able to reliably estimate their velocity and direction of motion out of a single image.

  19. Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement: A new, minimally-invasive corticotomy technique using a 3D-printed surgical template

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Background A reduction in orthodontic treatment time can be attained using corticotomies. The aggressive nature of corticotomy due to the elevation of muco-periosteal flaps and to the duration of the surgery raised reluctance for its employ among patients and dental community. This study aims to provide detailed information on the design and manufacture of a 3D-printed CAD-CAM (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) surgical guide which can aid the clinician in achieving a minimally-invasive, flapless corticotomy. Material and Methods An impression of dental arches was created; the models were digitally-acquired using a 3D scanner and saved as STereoLithography ( STL ) files. The patient underwent cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): images of jaws and teeth were transformed into 3D models and saved as an STL file. An acrylic template with the design of a surgical guide was manufactured and scanned. The STLs of jaws, scanned casts, and acrylic templates were matched. 3D modeling software allowed the view of the 3D models from different perspectives and planes with perfect rendering. The 3D model of the acrylic template was transformed into a surgical guide with slots designed to guide, at first, a scalpel blade and then a piezoelectric cutting insert. The 3D STL model of the surgical guide was printed. Results This procedure allowed the manufacturing of a 3D-printed CAD/CAM surgical guide, which overcomes the disadvantages of the corticotomy, removing the need for flap elevation. No discomfort, early surgical complications or unexpected events were observed. Conclusions The effectiveness of this minimally-invasive surgical technique can offer the clinician a valid alternative to other methods currently in use. Key words:Corticotomy, orthodontics, CAD/CAM, minimally invasive, surgical template, 3D printer. PMID:27031067

  20. Scale estimation of objects using template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaxiola, Leopoldo N.; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Tapia, Juan J.

    2016-09-01

    Scale estimation of objects is a challenging problem in image processing. This work presents a novel method to detect and estimate the scaling factor of a target in an observed scene corrupted with additive noise and clutter. Given a set of available views of the target the proposed method is able to detect the target and estimate its scaling factor using a template matched filters and a scale pyramidal representation. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated in synthetic and real-life scenes in different pattern recognition applications. The obtained results are characterized in terms of objective metrics.

  1. A Finger Vein Identification Method Based on Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Tao, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    New methods for extracting vein features from finger vein image and generating templates for matching are proposed. In the algorithm for generating templates, we proposed a parameter-templates quality factor (TQF) - to measure the quality of generated templates. So that we can use fewer finger vein samples to generate templates that meet the quality requirement of identification. The recognition accuracy of using proposed methods of finger vein feature extraction and template generation strategy for identification is 97.14%.

  2. Deformable templates guided discriminative models for robust 3D brain MRI segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Yi; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Tu, Zhuowen

    2013-10-01

    Automatically segmenting anatomical structures from 3D brain MRI images is an important task in neuroimaging. One major challenge is to design and learn effective image models accounting for the large variability in anatomy and data acquisition protocols. A deformable template is a type of generative model that attempts to explicitly match an input image with a template (atlas), and thus, they are robust against global intensity changes. On the other hand, discriminative models combine local image features to capture complex image patterns. In this paper, we propose a robust brain image segmentation algorithm that fuses together deformable templates and informative features. It takes advantage of the adaptation capability of the generative model and the classification power of the discriminative models. The proposed algorithm achieves both robustness and efficiency, and can be used to segment brain MRI images with large anatomical variations. We perform an extensive experimental study on four datasets of T1-weighted brain MRI data from different sources (1,082 MRI scans in total) and observe consistent improvement over the state-of-the-art systems.

  3. Multiframe image point matching and 3-d surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, R Y

    1983-02-01

    This paper presents two new methods, the Joint Moment Method (JMM) and the Window Variance Method (WVM), for image matching and 3-D object surface reconstruction using multiple perspective views. The viewing positions and orientations for these perspective views are known a priori, as is usually the case for such applications as robotics and industrial vision as well as close range photogrammetry. Like the conventional two-frame correlation method, the JMM and WVM require finding the extrema of 1-D curves, which are proved to theoretically approach a delta function exponentially as the number of frames increases for the JMM and are much sharper than the two-frame correlation function for both the JMM and the WVM, even when the image point to be matched cannot be easily distinguished from some of the other points. The theoretical findings have been supported by simulations. It is also proved that JMM and WVM are not sensitive to certain radiometric effects. If the same window size is used, the computational complexity for the proposed methods is about n - 1 times that for the two-frame method where n is the number of frames. Simulation results show that the JMM and WVM require smaller windows than the two-frame correlation method with better accuracy, and therefore may even be more computationally feasible than the latter since the computational complexity increases quadratically as a function of the window size.

  4. Robust feature detection for 3D object recognition and matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankanti, Sharath; Dorai, Chitra; Jain, Anil K.

    1993-06-01

    Salient surface features play a central role in tasks related to 3-D object recognition and matching. There is a large body of psychophysical evidence demonstrating the perceptual significance of surface features such as local minima of principal curvatures in the decomposition of objects into a hierarchy of parts. Many recognition strategies employed in machine vision also directly use features derived from surface properties for matching. Hence, it is important to develop techniques that detect surface features reliably. Our proposed scheme consists of (1) a preprocessing stage, (2) a feature detection stage, and (3) a feature integration stage. The preprocessing step selectively smoothes out noise in the depth data without degrading salient surface details and permits reliable local estimation of the surface features. The feature detection stage detects both edge-based and region-based features, of which many are derived from curvature estimates. The third stage is responsible for integrating the information provided by the individual feature detectors. This stage also completes the partial boundaries provided by the individual feature detectors, using proximity and continuity principles of Gestalt. All our algorithms use local support and, therefore, are inherently parallelizable. We demonstrate the efficacy and robustness of our approach by applying it to two diverse domains of applications: (1) segmentation of objects into volumetric primitives and (2) detection of salient contours on free-form surfaces. We have tested our algorithms on a number of real range images with varying degrees of noise and missing data due to self-occlusion. The preliminary results are very encouraging.

  5. Automatic Prediction of Protein 3D Structures by Probabilistic Multi-template Homology Modeling.

    PubMed

    Meier, Armin; Söding, Johannes

    2015-10-01

    Homology modeling predicts the 3D structure of a query protein based on the sequence alignment with one or more template proteins of known structure. Its great importance for biological research is owed to its speed, simplicity, reliability and wide applicability, covering more than half of the residues in protein sequence space. Although multiple templates have been shown to generally increase model quality over single templates, the information from multiple templates has so far been combined using empirically motivated, heuristic approaches. We present here a rigorous statistical framework for multi-template homology modeling. First, we find that the query proteins' atomic distance restraints can be accurately described by two-component Gaussian mixtures. This insight allowed us to apply the standard laws of probability theory to combine restraints from multiple templates. Second, we derive theoretically optimal weights to correct for the redundancy among related templates. Third, a heuristic template selection strategy is proposed. We improve the average GDT-ha model quality score by 11% over single template modeling and by 6.5% over a conventional multi-template approach on a set of 1000 query proteins. Robustness with respect to wrong constraints is likewise improved. We have integrated our multi-template modeling approach with the popular MODELLER homology modeling software in our free HHpred server http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/hhpred and also offer open source software for running MODELLER with the new restraints at https://bitbucket.org/soedinglab/hh-suite.

  6. Plan to procedure: combining 3D templating with rapid prototyping to enhance pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Stans, Anthony A.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2010-02-01

    Spinal fusion procedures involving the implantation of pedicle screws have steadily increased over the past decade because of demonstrated improvement in biomechanical stability of the spine. However, current methods of spinal fusion carries a risk of serious vascular, visceral, and neurological injury caused by inaccurate placement or inappropriately sized instrumentation, which may lead to patient paralysis or even fatality. 3D spine templating software developed by the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic allows the surgeon to virtually place pedicle screws using pre-operative 3D CT image data. With the template plan incorporated, a patient-specific 3D anatomic model is produced using a commercial rapid prototyping system. The pre-surgical plan and the patient-specific model then are used in the procedure room to provide real-time visualization and quantitative guidance for accurate placement of each pedicle screw, significantly reducing risk of injury. A pilot study was conducted at Mayo Clinic by the Department of Radiology, the Department of Orthopedics, and the BIR, involving seven complicated pediatric spine cases. In each case, pre-operative 3D templating was carried out and patient specific models were generated. The plans and the models were used intra-operatively, providing precise pedicle screw starting points and trajectories. Postoperative assessment by the surgeon confirmed all seven operations were successful. Results from the study suggest that patient-specific, 3D anatomic models successfully acquired from 3D templating tools are valuable for planning and conducting pedicle screw insertion procedures.

  7. Robust structural identification via polyhedral template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler Larsen, Peter; Schmidt, Søren; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Successful scientific applications of large-scale molecular dynamics often rely on automated methods for identifying the local crystalline structure of condensed phases. Many existing methods for structural identification, such as common neighbour analysis, rely on interatomic distances (or thresholds thereof) to classify atomic structure. As a consequence they are sensitive to strain and thermal displacements, and preprocessing such as quenching or temporal averaging of the atomic positions is necessary to provide reliable identifications. We propose a new method, polyhedral template matching (PTM), which classifies structures according to the topology of the local atomic environment, without any ambiguity in the classification, and with greater reliability than e.g. common neighbour analysis in the presence of thermal fluctuations. We demonstrate that the method can reliably be used to identify structures even in simulations near the melting point, and that it can identify the most common ordered alloy structures as well. In addition, the method makes it easy to identify the local lattice orientation in polycrystalline samples, and to calculate the local strain tensor. An implementation is made available under a Free and Open Source Software license.

  8. Macro-to-micro interfacing to microfluidic channels using 3D-printed templates: application to time-resolved secretion sampling of endocrine tissue.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jessica C; Ford, Katarena I; Holder, Dylan H; Holtan, Mark D; Easley, Christopher J

    2016-10-21

    Employing 3D-printed templates for macro-to-micro interfacing, a passively operated polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device was designed for time-resolved secretion sampling from primary murine islets and epidiymal white adipose tissue explants. Interfacing in similar devices is typically accomplished through manually punched or drilled fluidic reservoirs. We previously introduced the concept of using hand fabricated polymer inserts to template cell culture and sampling reservoirs into PDMS devices, allowing rapid stimulation and sampling of endocrine tissue. However, fabrication of the fluidic reservoirs was time consuming, tedious, and was prone to errors during device curing. Here, we have implemented computer-aided design and 3D printing to circumvent these fabrication obstacles. In addition to rapid prototyping and design iteration advantages, the ability to match these 3D-printed interface templates with channel patterns is highly beneficial. By digitizing the template fabrication process, more robust components can be produced with reduced fabrication variability. Herein, 3D-printed templates were used for sculpting millimetre-scale reservoirs into the above-channel, bulk PDMS in passively-operated, eight-channel devices designed for time-resolved secretion sampling of murine tissue. Devices were proven functional by temporally assaying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from <10 pancreatic islets and glycerol secretion from 2 mm adipose tissue explants, suggesting that 3D-printed interface templates could be applicable to a variety of cells and tissue types. More generally, this work validates desktop 3D printers as versatile interfacing tools in microfluidic laboratories.

  9. Electrochemical fabrication of 2D and 3D nickel nanowires using porous anodic alumina templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebed, A. M.; Abd-Elnaiem, Alaa M.; Al-Hosiny, Najm M.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanically stable nickel (Ni) nanowires array and nanowires network were synthesized by pulse electrochemical deposition using 2D and 3D porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. The structures and morphologies of as-prepared films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The grown Ni nanowire using 3D PAA revealed more strength and larger surface area than has grown Ni use 2D PAA template. The prepared nanowires have a face-centered cubic crystal structure with average grain size 15 nm, and the preferred orientation of the nucleation of the nanowires is (111). The diameter of the nanowires is about 50-70 nm with length 3 µm. The resulting 3D Ni nanowire lattice, which provides enhanced mechanical stability and an increased surface area, benefits energy storage and many other applications which utilize the large surface area.

  10. Conformal geometry and its applications on 3D shape matching, recognition, and stitching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Yang; Jin, Miao; Gu, Xianfeng David; Samaras, Dimitris

    2007-07-01

    Three-dimensional shape matching is a fundamental issue in computer vision with many applications such as shape registration, 3D object recognition, and classification. However, shape matching with noise, occlusion, and clutter is a challenging problem. In this paper, we analyze a family of quasi-conformal maps including harmonic maps, conformal maps, and least-squares conformal maps with regards to 3D shape matching. As a result, we propose a novel and computationally efficient shape matching framework by using least-squares conformal maps. According to conformal geometry theory, each 3D surface with disk topology can be mapped to a 2D domain through a global optimization and the resulting map is a diffeomorphism, i.e., one-to-one and onto. This allows us to simplify the 3D shape-matching problem to a 2D image-matching problem, by comparing the resulting 2D parametric maps, which are stable, insensitive to resolution changes and robust to occlusion, and noise. Therefore, highly accurate and efficient 3D shape matching algorithms can be achieved by using the above three parametric maps. Finally, the robustness of least-squares conformal maps is evaluated and analyzed comprehensively in 3D shape matching with occlusion, noise, and resolution variation. In order to further demonstrate the performance of our proposed method, we also conduct a series of experiments on two computer vision applications, i.e., 3D face recognition and 3D nonrigid surface alignment and stitching.

  11. Diatom-inspired templates for 3D replication: natural diatoms versus laser written artificial diatoms.

    PubMed

    Belegratis, M R; Schmidt, V; Nees, D; Stadlober, B; Hartmann, P

    2014-03-01

    The diatoms are ubiquitous, exist in large numbers and show a great diversity of features on their porous silica structures. Therefore, they inspire the fabrication of nanostructured templates for nanoimprint processes (NIL), where large structured areas with nanometer precision are required. In this study, two approaches regarding the respective challenges and potential exploitations are followed and discussed: the first one takes advantage of a template that is directly made of natural occurring diatoms. Here, two replication steps via soft lithography are needed to obtain a template which is subsequently used for NIL. The second approach exploits the technical capabilities of the precise 3D laser lithography (3DLL) based on two-photon polymerization of organic materials. This method enables the fabrication of arbitrary artificial diatom-inspired micro- and nanostructures and the design of an inverse structure. Therefore, only one replication step is needed to obtain a template for NIL. In both approaches, a replication technique for true 3D structures is shown.

  12. Robust template matching using run-length encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hunsue; Suh, Sungho; Cho, Hansang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose a novel template matching algorithm for visual inspection of bare printed circuit board (PCB).1 In the conventional template matching for PCB inspection, the matching score and its relevant offsets are acquired by calculating the maximum value among the convolutions of template image and camera image. While the method is fast, the robustness and accuracy of matching are not guaranteed due to the gap between a design and an implementation resulting from defects and process variations. To resolve this problem, we suggest a new method which uses run-length encoding (RLE). For the template image to be matched, we accumulate data of foreground and background, and RLE data for each row and column in the template image. Using the data, we can find the x and y offsets which minimize the optimization function. The efficiency and robustness of the proposed algorithm are verified through a series of experiments. By comparing the proposed algorithm with the conventional approach, we could realize that the proposed algorithm is not only fast but also more robust and reliable in matching results.

  13. Correlation-coefficient-based fast template matching through partial elimination.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Arif; Khan, Sohaib

    2012-04-01

    Partial computation elimination techniques are often used for fast template matching. At a particular search location, computations are prematurely terminated as soon as it is found that this location cannot compete with an already known best match location. Due to the nonmonotonic growth pattern of the correlation-based similarity measures, partial computation elimination techniques have been traditionally considered inapplicable to speed up these measures. In this paper, we show that partial elimination techniques may be applied to a correlation coefficient by using a monotonic formulation, and we propose basic-mode and extended-mode partial correlation elimination algorithms for fast template matching. The basic-mode algorithm is more efficient on small template sizes, whereas the extended mode is faster on medium and larger templates. We also propose a strategy to decide which algorithm to use for a given data set. To achieve a high speedup, elimination algorithms require an initial guess of the peak correlation value. We propose two initialization schemes including a coarse-to-fine scheme for larger templates and a two-stage technique for small- and medium-sized templates. Our proposed algorithms are exact, i.e., having exhaustive equivalent accuracy, and are compared with the existing fast techniques using real image data sets on a wide variety of template sizes. While the actual speedups are data dependent, in most cases, our proposed algorithms have been found to be significantly faster than the other algorithms.

  14. A new template matching method based on contour information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huiying; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Qingxiao; Li, Sicong

    2014-11-01

    Template matching is a significant approach in machine vision due to its effectiveness and robustness. However, most of the template matching methods are so time consuming that they can't be used to many real time applications. The closed contour matching method is a popular kind of template matching methods. This paper presents a new closed contour template matching method which is suitable for two dimensional objects. Coarse-to-fine searching strategy is used to improve the matching efficiency and a partial computation elimination scheme is proposed to further speed up the searching process. The method consists of offline model construction and online matching. In the process of model construction, triples and distance image are obtained from the template image. A certain number of triples which are composed by three points are created from the contour information that is extracted from the template image. The rule to select the three points is that the template contour is divided equally into three parts by these points. The distance image is obtained here by distance transform. Each point on the distance image represents the nearest distance between current point and the points on the template contour. During the process of matching, triples of the searching image are created with the same rule as the triples of the model. Through the similarity that is invariant to rotation, translation and scaling between triangles, the triples corresponding to the triples of the model are found. Then we can obtain the initial RST (rotation, translation and scaling) parameters mapping the searching contour to the template contour. In order to speed up the searching process, the points on the searching contour are sampled to reduce the number of the triples. To verify the RST parameters, the searching contour is projected into the distance image, and the mean distance can be computed rapidly by simple operations of addition and multiplication. In the fine searching process

  15. Individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in upper cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Dai, Jianhao; Zhang, Junxiang; Ma, Yichuan; Zhu, Guanghui; Shen, Junjie; Niu, Guoqi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine is a difficult and high-risk procedure. The screw is difficult to place rapidly and accurately, and can lead to serious injury of spinal cord or vertebral artery. The aim of this study was to design an individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine. Methods Using CT thin slices data, we employed computer software to design the navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine (atlas and axis). The upper cervical spine models and navigation templates were produced by 3D printer with equal proportion, two sets for each case. In one set (Test group), pedicle screws fixation were guided by the navigation template; in the second set (Control group), the screws were fixed under fluoroscopy. According to the degree of pedicle cortex perforation and whether the screw needed to be refitted, the fixation effects were divided into 3 types: Type I, screw is fully located within the vertebral pedicle; Type II, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is <1 mm, but with good internal fixation stability and no need to renovate; Type III, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is >1 mm or with the poor internal fixation stability and in need of renovation. Type I and Type II were acceptable placements; Type III placements were unacceptable. Results A total of 19 upper cervical spine and 19 navigation templates were printed, and 37 pedicle screws were fixed in each group. Type I screw-placements in the test group totaled 32; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 2; with an acceptable rate of 94.60%. Type I screw placements in the control group totaled 23; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 11, with an acceptable rate of 70.27%. The acceptability rate in test group was higher than the rate in control group. The operation time and fluoroscopic frequency for each screw were decreased, compared with control group. Conclusion The individualized 3D

  16. Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers in 3D Templates Fabricated by Multiphoton Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Thomas, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    Confinement of block-copolymers (BCP) within physical templates has been used as a method to both enhance the microdomain order and manipulate the morphology. Previous investigations have focused on 1D or quasi-2D templates (e.g. trenches, cylindrical pores) patterned at a variety of length scales. We have sought to employ the nearly-arbitrary structural fabrication afforded by multiphoton direct write lithography (MPL) to extend these stereolithographic control techniques to 3D directed assembly. Complex architectures, for example those formed by large scale lithographic techniques such as interference lithography or self-assembly, can be broken down into simplifier component structures: e.g. multibranch junctions, bends, and symmetric or asymmetric connecting pores. By utilizing MPL, we can fabricate model geometries possessing these features written in photoresist at various scales. We then infiltrate these structures with PS-PDMS BCP and observe the resulting morphology by SEM from focused ion beam cross-sections, allowing development of design rules that may be applied towards progressively more complex templates and the fabrication of 3D hierarchical structures with highly ordered and novel domain features spanning from the micron to the 10 nm scale.

  17. Sacrificial Template Synthesis and Properties of 3D Hollow-Silicon Nano- and Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Hölken, Iris; Neubüser, Gero; Postica, Vasile; Bumke, Lars; Lupan, Oleg; Baum, Martina; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Kienle, Lorenz; Adelung, Rainer

    2016-08-10

    Novel three-dimensional (3D) hollow aero-silicon nano- and microstructures, namely, Si-tetrapods (Si-T) and Si-spheres (Si-S) were synthesized by a sacrificial template approach for the first time. The new Si-T and Si-S architectures were found as most temperature-stable hollow nanomaterials, up to 1000 °C, ever reported. The synthesized aero-silicon or aerogel was integrated into sensor structures based on 3D networks. A single microstructure Si-T was employed to investigate electrical and gas sensing properties. The elaborated hollow microstructures open new possibilities and a wide area of perspectives in the field of nano- and microstructure synthesis by sacrificial template approaches. The enormous flexibility and variety of the hollow Si structures are provided by the special geometry of the sacrificial template material, ZnO-tetrapods (ZnO-T). A Si layer was deposited onto the surface of ZnO-T networks by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. All samples demonstrated p-type conductivity; hence, the resistance of the sensor structure increased after introducing the reducing gases in the test chamber. These hollow structures and their unique and superior properties can be advantageous in different fields, such as NEMS/MEMS, batteries, dye-sensitized solar cells, gas sensing in harsh environment, and biomedical applications. This method can be extended for synthesis of other types of hollow nanostructures.

  18. Template Matching Approach to Signal Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; Kulikov, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to signal prediction and prognostic assessment of spacecraft health resolves an inherent difficulty in fusing sensor data with simulated data. This technique builds upon previous work that demonstrated the importance of physics-based transient models to accurate prediction of signal dynamics and system performance. While models can greatly improve predictive accuracy, they are difficult to apply in general because of variations in model type, accuracy, or intended purpose. However, virtually any flight project will have at least some modeling capability at its disposal, whether a full-blown simulation, partial physics models, dynamic look-up tables, a brassboard analogue system, or simple hand-driven calculation by a team of experts. Many models can be used to develop a predict, or an estimate of the next day s or next cycle s behavior, which is typically used for planning purposes. The fidelity of a predict varies from one project to another, depending on the complexity of the simulation (i.e. linearized or full differential equations) and the level of detail in anticipated system operation, but typically any predict cannot be adapted to changing conditions or adjusted spacecraft command execution. Applying a predict blindly, without adapting the predict to current conditions, produces mixed results at best, primarily due to mismatches between assumed execution of spacecraft activities and actual times of execution. This results in the predict becoming useless during periods of complicated behavior, exactly when the predict would be most valuable. Each spacecraft operation tends to show up as a transient in the data, and if the transients are misaligned, using the predict can actually harm forecasting performance. To address this problem, the approach here expresses the predict in terms of a baseline function superposed with one or more transient functions. These transients serve as signal templates, which can be relocated in time and space against

  19. Optimization of spine surgery planning with 3D image templating tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Holmes, David R., III; Shridharani, Shyam M.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The current standard of care for patients with spinal disorders involves a thorough clinical history, physical exam, and imaging studies. Simple radiographs provide a valuable assessment but prove inadequate for surgery planning because of the complex 3-dimensional anatomy of the spinal column and the close proximity of the neural elements, large blood vessels, and viscera. Currently, clinicians still use primitive techniques such as paper cutouts, pencils, and markers in an attempt to analyze and plan surgical procedures. 3D imaging studies are routinely ordered prior to spine surgeries but are currently limited to generating simple, linear and angular measurements from 2D views orthogonal to the central axis of the patient. Complex spinal corrections require more accurate and precise calculation of 3D parameters such as oblique lengths, angles, levers, and pivot points within individual vertebra. We have developed a clinician friendly spine surgery planning tool which incorporates rapid oblique reformatting of each individual vertebra, followed by interactive templating for 3D placement of implants. The template placement is guided by the simultaneous representation of multiple 2D section views from reformatted orthogonal views and a 3D rendering of individual or multiple vertebrae enabling superimposition of virtual implants. These tools run efficiently on desktop PCs typically found in clinician offices or workrooms. A preliminary study conducted with Mayo Clinic spine surgeons using several actual cases suggests significantly improved accuracy of pre-operative measurements and implant localization, which is expected to increase spinal procedure efficiency and safety, and reduce time and cost of the operation.

  20. Formation of 3D graphene foams on soft templated metal monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, Michael K.; Johnson, David W.; Dobson, Ben P.; Coleman, Karl S.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene foams are leading contenders as frameworks for polymer thermosets, filtration/pollution control and for use as an electrode material in energy storage devices, taking advantage of graphene's high electrical conductivity and the porous structure of the foam. Here we demonstrate a simple synthesis of a macroporous 3D graphene material templated from a dextran/metal salt gel, where the metal was cobalt, nickel, copper, and iron. The gel was annealed to form a metal oxide foam prior to a methane chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Cobalt metal gels were shown to afford the highest quality material as determined by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and Raman spectroscopy.Graphene foams are leading contenders as frameworks for polymer thermosets, filtration/pollution control and for use as an electrode material in energy storage devices, taking advantage of graphene's high electrical conductivity and the porous structure of the foam. Here we demonstrate a simple synthesis of a macroporous 3D graphene material templated from a dextran/metal salt gel, where the metal was cobalt, nickel, copper, and iron. The gel was annealed to form a metal oxide foam prior to a methane chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Cobalt metal gels were shown to afford the highest quality material as determined by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Raman, EDX, PXRD, TGA, electrical conductivity data and SEM. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02455f

  1. 3D template fabrication process for the dual damascene NIL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Resnick, Douglas; Sailer, Holger; Thompson, Ecron

    2007-05-01

    NIL technique enables an easy replication of three dimensional patterns. Combined with a UV printable low-k material the NIL lithography can dramatically simplify the dual damascene process. Goal of this work was to develop a template process scheme which enables the generation of high resolution pillars on top of corresponding lines for direct printing of later vias and metal lines. The process flow is based on conventional 6025 photomask blanks. Exposure was done on a variable shaped e-beam writer Vistec SB350 using a sample of an advanced negative tone CAR and Fujifilm pCAR FEP171 for the first and the second layer, respectively. Chrome and quartz etching was accomplished in an Oerlikon mask etcher Gen III and Gen IV. Assessment of the developed template process was done in terms of overlay accuracy, feature profile and resolution capability depending on aspect ratio and line duty cycle. Finally the printability of 3D templates fabricated according the developed process scheme was proved.

  2. Fuzzy zoning for feature matching technique in 3D reconstruction of nasal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Rattanalappaiboon, Surapong; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Ritthipravat, Panrasee

    2015-12-01

    3D reconstruction from nasal endoscopic images greatly supports an otolaryngologist in examining nasal passages, mucosa, polyps, sinuses, and nasopharyx. In general, structure from motion is a popular technique. It consists of four main steps; (1) camera calibration, (2) feature extraction, (3) feature matching, and (4) 3D reconstruction. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is normally used for both feature extraction and feature matching. However, SIFT algorithm relatively consumes computational time particularly in the feature matching process because each feature in an image of interest is compared with all features in the subsequent image in order to find the best matched pair. A fuzzy zoning approach is developed for confining feature matching area. Matching between two corresponding features from different images can be efficiently performed. With this approach, it can greatly reduce the matching time. The proposed technique is tested with endoscopic images created from phantoms and compared with the original SIFT technique in terms of the matching time and average errors of the reconstructed models. Finally, original SIFT and the proposed fuzzy-based technique are applied to 3D model reconstruction of real nasal cavity based on images taken from a rigid nasal endoscope. The results showed that the fuzzy-based approach was significantly faster than traditional SIFT technique and provided similar quality of the 3D models. It could be used for creating a nasal cavity taken by a rigid nasal endoscope.

  3. Chinese license plate character segmentation using multiscale template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiangmin; Wang, Guoyou; Liu, Jianguo; Xia, Yuanchun

    2016-09-01

    Character segmentation (CS) plays an important role in automatic license plate recognition and has been studied for decades. A method using multiscale template matching is proposed to settle the problem of CS for Chinese license plates. It is carried out on a binary image integrated from maximally stable extremal region detection and Otsu thresholding. Afterward, a uniform harrow-shaped template with variable length is designed, by virtue of which a three-dimensional matching space is constructed for searching of candidate segmentations. These segmentations are detected at matches with local minimum responses. Finally, the vertical boundaries of each single character are located for subsequent recognition. Experiments on a data set including 2349 license plate images of different quality levels show that the proposed method can achieve a higher accuracy at comparable time cost and is robust to images in poor conditions.

  4. Artificial intelligence (AI)-based relational matching and multimodal medical image fusion: generalized 3D approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajdic, Stevan M.; Katz, Henry E.; Downing, Andrew R.; Brooks, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    A 3D relational image matching/fusion algorithm is introduced. It is implemented in the domain of medical imaging and is based on Artificial Intelligence paradigms--in particular, knowledge base representation and tree search. The 2D reference and target images are selected from 3D sets and segmented into non-touching and non-overlapping regions, using iterative thresholding and/or knowledge about the anatomical shapes of human organs. Selected image region attributes are calculated. Region matches are obtained using a tree search, and the error is minimized by evaluating a `goodness' of matching function based on similarities of region attributes. Once the matched regions are found and the spline geometric transform is applied to regional centers of gravity, images are ready for fusion and visualization into a single 3D image of higher clarity.

  5. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit . E-mail: judit.boda-heggemann@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Walter, Cornelia; Rahn, Angelika; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Loeb, Iris; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 {+-} 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 {+-} 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 {+-} 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 {+-} 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 {+-} 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 {+-} 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 {+-} 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask

  6. A novel 3D template for mandible and maxilla reconstruction: Rapid prototyping using stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Kumta, Samir; Kumta, Monica; Jain, Leena; Purohit, Shrirang; Ummul, Rani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Replication of the exact three-dimensional (3D) structure of the maxilla and mandible is now a priority whilst attempting reconstruction of these bones to attain a complete functional and aesthetic rehabilitation. We hereby present the process of rapid prototyping using stereolithography to produce templates for modelling bone grafts and implants for maxilla/mandible reconstructions, its applications in tumour/trauma, and outcomes for primary and secondary reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Stereolithographic template-assisted reconstruction was used on 11 patients for the reconstruction of the mandible/maxilla primarily following tumour excision and secondarily for the realignment of post-traumatic malunited fractures or deformity corrections. Data obtained from the computed tomography (CT) scans with 1-mm resolution were converted into a computer-aided design (CAD) using the CT Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data. Once a CAD model was constructed, it was converted into a stereolithographic format and then processed by the rapid prototyping technology to produce the physical anatomical model using a resin. This resin model replicates the native mandible, which can be thus used off table as a guide for modelling the bone grafts. Discussion: This conversion of two-dimensional (2D) data from CT scan into 3D models is a very precise guide to shaping the bone grafts. Further, this CAD can reconstruct the defective half of the mandible using the mirror image principle, and the normal anatomical model can be created to aid secondary reconstructions. Conclusion: This novel approach allows a precise translation of the treatment plan directly to the surgical field. It is also an important teaching tool for implant moulding and fixation, and helps in patient counselling. PMID:26933279

  7. Accurate three-dimensional pose recognition from monocular images using template matched filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picos, Kenia; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.; Kober, Vitaly; Montemayor, Antonio S.; Pantrigo, Juan J.

    2016-06-01

    An accurate algorithm for three-dimensional (3-D) pose recognition of a rigid object is presented. The algorithm is based on adaptive template matched filtering and local search optimization. When a scene image is captured, a bank of correlation filters is constructed to find the best correspondence between the current view of the target in the scene and a target image synthesized by means of computer graphics. The synthetic image is created using a known 3-D model of the target and an iterative procedure based on local search. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed algorithm in synthetic and real-life scenes are presented and discussed in terms of accuracy of pose recognition in the presence of noise, cluttered background, and occlusion. Experimental results show that our proposal presents high accuracy for 3-D pose estimation using monocular images.

  8. Matching Aerial Images to 3d Building Models Based on Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Bang, K.; Sohn, G.; Armenakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model-to-image framework to automatically align a single airborne image with existing 3D building models using geometric hashing is proposed. As a prerequisite process for various applications such as data fusion, object tracking, change detection and texture mapping, the proposed registration method is used for determining accurate exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. This model-to-image matching process consists of three steps: 1) feature extraction, 2) similarity measure and matching, and 3) adjustment of EOPs of a single image. For feature extraction, we proposed two types of matching cues, edged corner points representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges and contextual relations among the edged corner points within an individual roof. These matching features are extracted from both 3D building and a single airborne image. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on co-linearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of single image's EOP can be achievable by the proposed registration approach as an alternative to labour-intensive manual registration process.

  9. Multi-Modal Clique-Graph Matching for View-Based 3D Model Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-An; Nie, Wei-Zhi; Gao, Yue; Su, Yu-Ting

    2016-05-01

    Multi-view matching is an important but a challenging task in view-based 3D model retrieval. To address this challenge, we propose an original multi-modal clique graph (MCG) matching method in this paper. We systematically present a method for MCG generation that is composed of cliques, which consist of neighbor nodes in multi-modal feature space and hyper-edges that link pairwise cliques. Moreover, we propose an image set-based clique/edgewise similarity measure to address the issue of the set-to-set distance measure, which is the core problem in MCG matching. The proposed MCG provides the following benefits: 1) preserves the local and global attributes of a graph with the designed structure; 2) eliminates redundant and noisy information by strengthening inliers while suppressing outliers; and 3) avoids the difficulty of defining high-order attributes and solving hyper-graph matching. We validate the MCG-based 3D model retrieval using three popular single-modal data sets and one novel multi-modal data set. Extensive experiments show the superiority of the proposed method through comparisons. Moreover, we contribute a novel real-world 3D object data set, the multi-view RGB-D object data set. To the best of our knowledge, it is the largest real-world 3D object data set containing multi-modal and multi-view information.

  10. TMaCS: a hybrid template matching and classification system for partially-automated particle selection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhua; Brubaker, Marcus A; Rubinstein, John L

    2013-03-01

    Selection of particle images from electron micrographs presents a bottleneck in determining the structures of macromolecular assemblies by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). The problem is particularly important when an experimentalist wants to improve the resolution of a 3D map by increasing by tens or hundreds of thousands of images the size of the dataset used for calculating the map. Although several existing methods for automatic particle image selection work well for large protein complexes that produce high-contrast images, it is well known in the cryo-EM community that small complexes that give low-contrast images are often refractory to existing automated particle image selection schemes. Here we develop a method for partially-automated particle image selection when an initial 3D map of the protein under investigation is already available. Candidate particle images are selected from micrographs by template matching with template images derived from projections of the existing 3D map. The candidate particle images are then used to train a support vector machine, which classifies the candidates as particle images or non-particle images. In a final step in the analysis, the selected particle images are subjected to projection matching against the initial 3D map, with the correlation coefficient between the particle image and the best matching map projection used to assess the reliability of the particle image. We show that this approach is able to rapidly select particle images from micrographs of a rotary ATPase, a type of membrane protein complex involved in many aspects of biology.

  11. (Bio)Chemical Tailoring of Biogenic 3-D Nanopatterned Templates with Energy-Relevant Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhage, Kenneth H; Kroger, Nils

    2014-09-08

    The overall aim of this research has been to obtain fundamental understanding of (bio)chemical methodologies that will enable utilization of the unique 3-D nanopatterned architectures naturally produced by diatoms for the syntheses of advanced functional materials attractive for applications in energy harvesting/conversion and storage. This research has been conducted in three thrusts: Thrust 1 (In vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom biosilica) is directed towards elucidating the fundamental mechanism(s) underlying the cellular processes of in vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom silica. Thrust 2 (Shape-preserving reactive conversion of diatom biosilica into porous, high-surface area inorganic replicas) is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of shape preservation and nanostructural evolution associated with the reactive conversion and/or coating-based conversion of diatom biosilica templates into porous inorganic replicas. Thrust 3 (Immobilization of energy-relevant enzymes in diatom biosilica and onto diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas) involves use of the results from both Thrust 1 and 2 to develop strategies for in vivo and in vitro immobilization of enzymes in/on diatom biosilica and diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas, respectively. This Final Report describes progress achieved in all 3 of these thrusts.

  12. Matching 3-D prone and supine CT colonography scans using graphs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; Petrick, Nicholas; Van Uitert, Robert L; Periaswamy, Senthil; Wei, Zhuoshi; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a new registration method for prone and supine computed tomographic colonography scans using graph matching. We formulate 3-D colon registration as a graph matching problem and propose a new graph matching algorithm based on mean field theory. In the proposed algorithm, we solve the matching problem in an iterative way. In each step, we use mean field theory to find the matched pair of nodes with highest probability. During iterative optimization, one-to-one matching constraints are added to the system in a step-by-step approach. Prominent matching pairs found in previous iterations are used to guide subsequent mean field calculations. The proposed method was found to have the best performance with smallest standard deviation compared with two other baseline algorithms called the normalized distance along the colon centerline (NDACC) ( p = 0.17) with manual colon centerline correction and spectral matching ( p < 1e-5). A major advantage of the proposed method is that it is fully automatic and does not require defining a colon centerline for registration. For the latter NDACC method, user interaction is almost always needed for identifying the colon centerlines.

  13. Classification of electron sub-tomograms with neural networks and its application to template-matching.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhou; Frangakis, Achilleas S

    2011-06-01

    Classification of electron sub-tomograms is a challenging task, due the missing-wedge and the low signal-to-noise ratio of the data. Classification algorithms tend to classify data according to their orientation to the missing-wedge, rather than to the underlying signal. Here we use a neural network approach, called the Kernel Density Estimator Self-Organizing Map (KerDenSOM3D), which we have implemented in three-dimensions (3D), also having compensated for the missing-wedge, and we comprehensively compare it to other classification methods. For this purpose, we use various simulated macromolecules, as well as tomographically reconstructed in vitro GroEL and GroEL/GroES molecules. We show that the performance of this classification method is superior to previously used algorithms. Furthermore, we show how this algorithm can be used to provide an initial cross-validation of template-matching approaches. For the example of sub-tomogram classification extracted from cellular tomograms of Mycoplasma pneumonia and Spiroplasma melliferum cells, we show the bias of template-matching, and by using differing search and classification areas, we demonstrate how the bias can be significantly reduced.

  14. 3D deformable image matching: a hierarchical approach over nested subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musse, Olivier; Heitz, Fabrice; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a fast hierarchical method to perform dense deformable inter-subject matching of 3D MR Images of the brain. To recover the complex morphological variations in neuroanatomy, a hierarchy of 3D deformations fields is estimated, by minimizing a global energy function over a sequence of nested subspaces. The nested subspaces, generated from a single scaling function, consist of deformation fields constrained at different scales. The highly non linear energy function, describing the interactions between the target and the source images, is minimized using a coarse-to-fine continuation strategy over this hierarchy. The resulting deformable matching method shows low sensitivity to local minima and is able to track large non-linear deformations, with moderate computational load. The performances of the approach are assessed both on simulated 3D transformations and on a real data base of 3D brain MR Images from different individuals. The method has shown efficient in putting into correspondence the principle anatomical structures of the brain. An application to atlas-based MRI segmentation, by transporting a labeled segmentation map on patient data, is also presented.

  15. Robust affine-invariant feature points matching for 3D surface reconstruction of complex landslide scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Allemand, Pascal; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Deseilligny, Marc-Pierrot

    2013-04-01

    Multi-view stereo surface reconstruction from dense terrestrial photographs is being increasingly applied for geoscience applications such as quantitative geomorphology, and a number of different software solution and processing streamlines have been suggested. For image matching, camera self-calibration and bundle block adjustment, most approaches make use of scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) to identify homologous points in multiple images. SIFT-like point matching is robust to apparent translation, rotation, and scaling of objects in multiple viewing geometries but the number of correctly identified matching points typically declines drastically with increasing angles between the viewpoints. For the application of multi-view stereo of complex landslide scenes, the viewing geometry is often constrained by the local topography and barriers such as rocks and vegetation occluding the target. Under such conditions it is not uncommon to encounter view angle differences of > 30% that hinder the image matching and eventually prohibit the joint estimation of the camera parameters from all views. Recently an affine invariant extension of the SIFT detector (ASIFT) has been demonstrated to provide more robust matches when large view-angle differences become an issue. In this study the ASIFT detector was adopted to detect homologous points in terrestrial photographs preceding 3D reconstruction of different parts (main scarp, toe) of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps). 3D surface models for different time periods and different parts of the landslide were derived using the multi-view stereo framework implemented in MicMac (©IGN). The obtained 3D models were compared with reconstructions using the traditional SIFT detectors as well as alternative structure-from-motion implementations. An estimate of the absolute accuracy of the photogrammetric models was obtained through co-registration and comparison with high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR scans.

  16. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Lo, Lun-Jou; Hsu, Pin-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD), and 3D printing (3DP) to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic) miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical template fabrication. The customized surgical template CAD model was fabricated offset based on the teeth/mucosa/bracket contour profiles in the superimposition model and exported to duplicate the plastic template using the 3DP technique and polymer material. An anterior retraction and intrusion clinical test for the maxillary canines/incisors showed that two miniscrews were placed safely and did not produce inflammation or other discomfort symptoms one week after surgery. The fitness between the mucosa and template indicated that the average gap sizes were found smaller than 0.5 mm and confirmed that the surgical template presented good holding power and well-fitting adaption. This study addressed integrating CBCT and laser scan image superposition; CAD and 3DP techniques can be applied to fabricate an accurate customized surgical template for dental orthodontic miniscrews. PMID:28280726

  17. 3D-printed navigation template in proximal femoral osteotomy for older children with developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Pengfei; Xu, Peng; Yao, Qingqiang; Tang, Kai; Lou, Yue

    2017-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of 3D-printed navigation template in proximal femoral varus rotation and shortening osteotomy for older children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Between June 2014 and May 2015, navigation templates were designed and used for 12 DDH patients. Surgical information and outcomes were compared to 13 patients undergoing the same surgery but without navigation template. In template-guided patient group, operation time (21.08 min vs. 46.92 min), number of X-ray exposures (3.92 vs. 6.69), and occurrence of femoral epiphysis damage (0 vs. 0.92) were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Furthermore, after 12–18 months follow-up, 66.7% and 16.7% of the hips in template-guided group were rated as excellent or good, respectively, according to the McKay criteria; 83.3% and 16.7% by using the Severin criteria respectively. By contrast, 46.2% and 23.1% of the hips in traditional operation group were classed as excellent or good, respectively, using the McKay criteria; 46.2% and 30.8% by using the Severin criteria respectively. The template-guided group achieved a better outcome; however, there was no significant difference. Application of the navigation template for older DDH children can reduce the operation time, radiation exposure, and epiphysis damage, which also simplifies surgery and improves precision. PMID:28322290

  18. SU-F-BRF-08: Conformal Mapping-Based 3D Surface Matching and Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y; Zeng, W; Gu, X; Liu, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recently, non-rigid 3D surface matching and registration has been used extensively in engineering and medicine. However, matching 3D surfaces undergoing non-rigid deformation accurately is still a challenging mathematical problem. In this study, we present a novel algorithm to address this issue by introducing intrinsic symmetry to the registration Methods: Our computational algorithm for symmetric conformal mapping is divided into three major steps: 1) Finding the symmetric plane; 2) Finding feature points; and 3) Performing cross registration. The key strategy is to preserve the symmetry during the conformal mapping, such that the image on the parameter domain is symmetric and the area distortion factor on the parameter image is also symmetric. Several novel algorithms were developed using different conformal geometric tools. One was based on solving Riemann-Cauchy equation and the other one employed curvature flow Results: Our algorithm was implemented using generic C++ on Windows XP and used conjugate gradient search optimization for acceleration. The human face 3D surface images were acquired using a high speed 3D scanner based on the phase-shifting method. The scanning speed was 30 frames/sec. The image resolution for each frame was 640 × 480. For 3D human face surfaces with different expressions, postures, and boundaries, our algorithms were able to produce consistent result on the texture pattern on the overlapping region Conclusion: We proposed a novel algorithm to improve the robustness of conformal geometric methods by incorporating the symmetric information into the mapping process. To objectively evaluate its performance, we compared it with most existing techniques. Experimental results indicated that our method outperformed all the others in terms of robustness. The technique has a great potential in real-time patient monitoring and tracking in image-guided radiation therapy.

  19. Engineering interconnected 3D vascular networks in hydrogels using molded sodium alginate lattice as the sacrificial template.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Jin, Zi-He; Gan, Bo-Wen; Lv, Song-Wei; Xie, Min; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2014-08-07

    Engineering 3D perfusable vascular networks in vitro and reproducing the physiological environment of blood vessels is very challenging for tissue engineering and investigation of blood vessel function. Here, we engineer interconnected 3D microfluidic vascular networks in hydrogels using molded sodium alginate lattice as sacrificial templates. The sacrificial templates are rapidly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chips via Ca⁺²-crosslinking and then fully encapsulated in hydrogels. Interconnected channels with well controlled size and morphology are obtained by dissolving the monolayer or multilayer templates with EDTA solution. The human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured on the channel linings and proliferated to form vascular lumens. The strong cell adhesion capability and adaptive response to shear stress demonstrate the excellent cytocompatibility of both the template and template-sacrificing process. Furthermore, the barrier function of the endothelial layer is characterized and the results show that a confluent endothelial monolayer is fully developed. Taken together, we develop a facile and rapid approach to engineer a vascular model that could be potentially used in physiological studies of vascular functions and vascular tissue engineering.

  20. Synthesis of cubic Ia-3d mesoporous silica in anionic surfactant templating system with the aid of acetate.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shao-Xin; Xu, Xue-Yan; He, Wen-Chao; Wang, Jin-Gui; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-08-01

    Mesoporous silica with three-dimensional (3D) bicontinuous cubic Ia-3d structure and fascinating caterpillar-like morphology was synthesized by using anionic surfactant N-lauroylsarcosine sodium (Sar-Na) as the template and 3-amionpropyltrimethoxysilane (APS) as the co-structure-directing agent (CSDA) with the aid of acetate. A phase transformation from high interfacial curvature 2D hexagonal to low interfacial curvature 3D cubic Ia-3d occurred in the presence of a proper amount of acetate. Other species of salts (excluding acetate) had the ability to induce the caterpillar-like morphology, but failed to induce the cubic Ia-3d mesostructure. Furthermore, [3-(2-aminoethyl)-aminopropyl]trimethoxysilane (DAPS) was also used as the CSDA to synthesize Ia-3d mesostructured silica under the aid of sodium acetate. After extraction of the anionic surfactants, amino and di-amine functionalized 3D bicontinuous cubic Ia-3d mesoporous silicas were obtained and used as supports to immobilize Pd nanoparticles for supported catalysts. The catalytic activity of the catalysts was tested by catalytic hydrogenation of allyl alcohol.

  1. Tectonic tremor locations using template matching of low frequency earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoumal, R.; Colella, H. V.; Holtkamp, S. G.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Schlanser, K. M.; Shelly, D. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic (non-volcanic) tremor is difficult to locate due to its emergent nature, but critical to assess what impact it has on the plate interface slip budget. Recent studies have found that tectonic tremor is primarily composed of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes, such that identifying individual low frequency earthquakes can provide opportunities to improve source characterizations. This study seeks to refine the tremor source locations by stacking families of similar low frequency earthquakes to enhance the signal to noise ratio and clarify P- and S-wave arrivals, and to better characterize the time history of specific "famlies" of tremor events. Short, well-defined tremor bursts identified from previous source location analysis are used to define template waveforms that are cross-correlated over several years of recording. Since multi-station template matching algorithms are particularly sensitive to source location, accurate time histories of event families can be produced. These time histories provide an important additional constraint on episodic tremor and slip events (and an independent test of both procedures) since they do not depend on station amplitudes as more traditional techniques do, which may impart a detection bias. Stacking similar events clarifies arrival times that are then used to refine the source locations. This approach is being applied to the Oaxaca region of Mexico and southern Cascadia, where lower network density has limited detailed tremor source location analysis.

  2. Automatic Identification of the Templates in Matched Filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2004-09-29

    In laser beam position determination, various shapes of markers may be used to identify different beams. When matched filtering is used for identifying the markers, one is faced with the challenge of determining the appropriate filter to use in the presence of distortions and marker size variability. If the incorrect filter is used, it will result in significant position uncertainty. Thus in the very first step of position detection one has to come up with an automated process to select the right template to use. The automated template identification method proposed here is based on a two-step approach. In the first step an approximate type of the object is determined. Then the filter is chosen based on the best size of the specific type. After the appropriate filter is chosen, the correlation peak position is used to identify the beam position. Real world examples of the application of this technique from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented.

  3. Fast and robust 3D ultrasound registration--block and game theoretic matching.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Klink, Camiel; Peters, Edward D; Niessen, Wiro J; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-02-01

    Real-time 3D US has potential for image guidance in minimally invasive liver interventions. However, motion caused by patient breathing makes it hard to visualize a localized area, and to maintain alignment with pre-operative information. In this work we develop a fast affine registration framework to compensate in real-time for liver motion/displacement due to breathing. The affine registration of two consecutive ultrasound volumes in time is performed using block-matching. For a set of evenly distributed points in one volume and their correspondences in the other volume, we propose a robust outlier rejection method to reject false matches. The inliers are then used to determine the affine transformation. The approach is evaluated on 13 4D ultrasound sequences acquired from 8 subjects. For 91 pairs of 3D ultrasound volumes selected from these sequences, a mean registration error of 1.8mm is achieved. A graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation runs the 3D US registration at 8 Hz.

  4. Towards 3D Matching of Point Clouds Derived from Oblique and Nadir Airborne Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    Because of the low-expense high-efficient image collection process and the rich 3D and texture information presented in the images, a combined use of 2D airborne nadir and oblique images to reconstruct 3D geometric scene has a promising market for future commercial usage like urban planning or first responders. The methodology introduced in this thesis provides a feasible way towards fully automated 3D city modeling from oblique and nadir airborne imagery. In this thesis, the difficulty of matching 2D images with large disparity is avoided by grouping the images first and applying the 3D registration afterward. The procedure starts with the extraction of point clouds using a modified version of the RIT 3D Extraction Workflow. Then the point clouds are refined by noise removal and surface smoothing processes. Since the point clouds extracted from different image groups use independent coordinate systems, there are translation, rotation and scale differences existing. To figure out these differences, 3D keypoints and their features are extracted. For each pair of point clouds, an initial alignment and a more accurate registration are applied in succession. The final transform matrix presents the parameters describing the translation, rotation and scale requirements. The methodology presented in the thesis has been shown to behave well for test data. The robustness of this method is discussed by adding artificial noise to the test data. For Pictometry oblique aerial imagery, the initial alignment provides a rough alignment result, which contains a larger offset compared to that of test data because of the low quality of the point clouds themselves, but it can be further refined through the final optimization. The accuracy of the final registration result is evaluated by comparing it to the result obtained from manual selection of matched points. Using the method introduced, point clouds extracted from different image groups could be combined with each other to build a

  5. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D-printed individual template for needle guidance in head and neck brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Shu-Ming; Yu, Guang-Yan

    2016-11-01

    To transfer the preplan for the head and neck brachytherapy to the clinical implantation procedure, a preplan-based 3D-printed individual template for needle insertion guidance had previously been designed and used. The accuracy of needle insertion using this kind template was assessed in vivo In the study, 25 patients with head and neck tumors were implanted with (125)I radioactive seeds under the guidance of the 3D-printed individual template. Patients were divided into four groups based on the site of needle insertion: the parotid and masseter region group (nine patients); the maxillary and paranasal region group (eight patients); the submandibular and upper neck area group (five patients); and the retromandibular region group (six patients). The distance and angular deviations between the preplanned and placed needles were compared, and the complications and time required for needle insertion were assessed. The mean entrance point distance deviation for all 619 needles was 1.18 ± 0.81 mm, varying from 0.857 ± 0.545 to 1.930 ± 0.843 mm at different sites. The mean angular deviation was 2.08 ± 1.07 degrees, varying from 1.85 ± 0.93 to 2.73 ± 1.18 degrees at different sites. All needles were manually inserted to their preplanned positions in a single attempt, and the mean time to insert one needle was 7.5 s. No anatomical complications related to inaccurately placed implants were observed. Using the 3D-printed individual template for the implantation of (125)I radioactive seeds in the head and neck region can accurately transfer a CT-based preplan to the brachytherapy needle insertion procedure. Moreover, the addition of individual template guidance can reduce the time required for implantation and minimize the damage to normal tissues.

  6. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D-printed individual template for needle guidance in head and neck brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Shu-Ming; Yu, Guang-Yan

    2016-01-01

    To transfer the preplan for the head and neck brachytherapy to the clinical implantation procedure, a preplan-based 3D-printed individual template for needle insertion guidance had previously been designed and used. The accuracy of needle insertion using this kind template was assessed in vivo. In the study, 25 patients with head and neck tumors were implanted with 125I radioactive seeds under the guidance of the 3D-printed individual template. Patients were divided into four groups based on the site of needle insertion: the parotid and masseter region group (nine patients); the maxillary and paranasal region group (eight patients); the submandibular and upper neck area group (five patients); and the retromandibular region group (six patients). The distance and angular deviations between the preplanned and placed needles were compared, and the complications and time required for needle insertion were assessed. The mean entrance point distance deviation for all 619 needles was 1.18 ± 0.81 mm, varying from 0.857 ± 0.545 to 1.930 ± 0.843 mm at different sites. The mean angular deviation was 2.08 ± 1.07 degrees, varying from 1.85 ± 0.93 to 2.73 ± 1.18 degrees at different sites. All needles were manually inserted to their preplanned positions in a single attempt, and the mean time to insert one needle was 7.5 s. No anatomical complications related to inaccurately placed implants were observed. Using the 3D-printed individual template for the implantation of 125I radioactive seeds in the head and neck region can accurately transfer a CT-based preplan to the brachytherapy needle insertion procedure. Moreover, the addition of individual template guidance can reduce the time required for implantation and minimize the damage to normal tissues. PMID:27422928

  7. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-06-22

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process.

  8. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  9. RNA 3D Structure Modeling by Combination of Template-Based Method ModeRNA, Template-Free Folding with SimRNA, and Refinement with QRNAS.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Pawel; Kasprzak, Joanna M; Kumar, Deepak; Magnus, Marcin; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-01-01

    RNA encompasses an essential part of all known forms of life. The functions of many RNA molecules are dependent on their ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. To address this problem, computational structure prediction methods were developed that either utilize information derived from known structures of other RNA molecules (by way of template-based modeling) or attempt to simulate the physical process of RNA structure formation (by way of template-free modeling). All computational methods suffer from various limitations that make theoretical models less reliable than high-resolution experimentally determined structures. This chapter provides a protocol for computational modeling of RNA 3D structure that overcomes major limitations by combining two complementary approaches: template-based modeling that is capable of predicting global architectures based on similarity to other molecules but often fails to predict local unique features, and template-free modeling that can predict the local folding, but is limited to modeling the structure of relatively small molecules. Here, we combine the use of a template-based method ModeRNA with a template-free method SimRNA. ModeRNA requires a sequence alignment of the target RNA sequence to be modeled with a template of the known structure; it generates a model that predicts the structure of a conserved core and provides a starting point for modeling of variable regions. SimRNA can be used to fold small RNAs (<80 nt) without any additional structural information, and to refold parts of models for larger RNAs that have a correctly modeled core. ModeRNA can be either downloaded, compiled and run locally or run through a web interface at http://genesilico.pl/modernaserver/ . SimRNA is currently available to download for local use as a precompiled

  10. Application of Template Matching for Improving Classification of Urban Railroad Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Arastounia, Mostafa; Oude Elberink, Sander

    2016-01-01

    This study develops an integrated data-driven and model-driven approach (template matching) that clusters the urban railroad point clouds into three classes of rail track, contact cable, and catenary cable. The employed dataset covers 630 m of the Dutch urban railroad corridors in which there are four rail tracks, two contact cables, and two catenary cables. The dataset includes only geometrical information (three dimensional (3D) coordinates of the points) with no intensity data and no RGB data. The obtained results indicate that all objects of interest are successfully classified at the object level with no false positives and no false negatives. The results also show that an average 97.3% precision and an average 97.7% accuracy at the point cloud level are achieved. The high precision and high accuracy of the rail track classification (both greater than 96%) at the point cloud level stems from the great impact of the employed template matching method on excluding the false positives. The cables also achieve quite high average precision (96.8%) and accuracy (98.4%) due to their high sampling and isolated position in the railroad corridor. PMID:27973452

  11. Application of Template Matching for Improving Classification of Urban Railroad Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Arastounia, Mostafa; Oude Elberink, Sander

    2016-12-12

    This study develops an integrated data-driven and model-driven approach (template matching) that clusters the urban railroad point clouds into three classes of rail track, contact cable, and catenary cable. The employed dataset covers 630 m of the Dutch urban railroad corridors in which there are four rail tracks, two contact cables, and two catenary cables. The dataset includes only geometrical information (three dimensional (3D) coordinates of the points) with no intensity data and no RGB data. The obtained results indicate that all objects of interest are successfully classified at the object level with no false positives and no false negatives. The results also show that an average 97.3% precision and an average 97.7% accuracy at the point cloud level are achieved. The high precision and high accuracy of the rail track classification (both greater than 96%) at the point cloud level stems from the great impact of the employed template matching method on excluding the false positives. The cables also achieve quite high average precision (96.8%) and accuracy (98.4%) due to their high sampling and isolated position in the railroad corridor.

  12. Template matching method for the analysis of interstellar cloud structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The structure of interstellar medium can be characterised at large scales in terms of its global statistics (e.g. power spectra) and at small scales by the properties of individual cores. Interest has been increasing in structures at intermediate scales, resulting in a number of methods being developed for the analysis of filamentary structures. Aims: We describe the application of the generic template-matching (TM) method to the analysis of maps. Our aim is to show that it provides a fast and still relatively robust way to identify elongated structures or other image features. Methods: We present the implementation of a TM algorithm for map analysis. The results are compared against rolling Hough transform (RHT), one of the methods previously used to identify filamentary structures. We illustrate the method by applying it to Herschel surface brightness data. Results: The performance of the TM method is found to be comparable to that of RHT but TM appears to be more robust regarding the input parameters, for example, those related to the selected spatial scales. Small modifications of TM enable one to target structures at different size and intensity levels. In addition to elongated features, we demonstrate the possibility of using TM to also identify other types of structures. Conclusions: The TM method is a viable tool for data quality control, exploratory data analysis, and even quantitative analysis of structures in image data.

  13. Template-Free Synthesis of Functional 3D BN architecture for removal of dyes from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Lei, Weiwei; Qin, Si; Chen, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) architectures are of interest in applications in electronics, catalysis devices, sensors and adsorption materials. However, it is still a challenge to fabricate 3D BN architectures by a simple method. Here, we report the direct synthesis of 3D BN architectures by a simple thermal treatment process. A 3D BN architecture consists of an interconnected flexible network of nanosheets. The typical nitrogen adsorption/desorption results demonstrate that the specific surface area for the as-prepared samples is up to 1156 m2 g-1, and the total pore volume is about 1.17 cm3 g-1. The 3D BN architecture displays very high adsorption rates and large capacities for organic dyes in water without any other additives due to its low densities, high resistance to oxidation, good chemical inertness and high surface area. Importantly, 88% of the starting adsorption capacity is maintained after 15 cycles. These results indicate that the 3D BN architecture is potential environmental materials for water purification and treatment.

  14. A positioning QA procedure for 2D/2D (kV/MV) and 3D/3D (CT/CBCT) image matching for radiotherapy patient setup.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2009-10-06

    A positioning QA procedure for Varian's 2D/2D (kV/MV) and 3D/3D (planCT/CBCT) matching was developed. The procedure was to check: (1) the coincidence of on-board imager (OBI), portal imager (PI), and cone beam CT (CBCT)'s isocenters (digital graticules) to a linac's isocenter (to a pre-specified accuracy); (2) that the positioning difference detected by 2D/2D (kV/MV) and 3D/3D(planCT/CBCT) matching can be reliably transferred to couch motion. A cube phantom with a 2 mm metal ball (bb) at the center was used. The bb was used to define the isocenter. Two additional bbs were placed on two phantom surfaces in order to define a spatial location of 1.5 cm anterior, 1.5 cm inferior, and 1.5 cm right from the isocenter. An axial scan of the phantom was acquired from a multislice CT simulator. The phantom was set at the linac's isocenter (lasers); either AP MV/R Lat kV images or CBCT images were taken for 2D/2D or 3D/3D matching, respectively. For 2D/2D, the accuracy of each device's isocenter was obtained by checking the distance between the central bb and the digital graticule. Then the central bb in orthogonal DRRs was manually moved to overlay to the off-axis bbs in kV/MV images. For 3D/3D, CBCT was first matched to planCT to check the isocenter difference between the two CTs. Manual shifts were then made by moving CBCT such that the point defined by the two off-axis bbs overlay to the central bb in planCT. (PlanCT can not be moved in the current version of OBI1.4.) The manual shifts were then applied to remotely move the couch. The room laser was used to check the accuracy of the couch movement. For Trilogy (or Ix-21) linacs, the coincidence of imager and linac's isocenter was better than 1 mm (or 1.5 mm). The couch shift accuracy was better than 2 mm.

  15. 3D Bioprinting of Developmentally Inspired Templates for Whole Bone Organ Engineering.

    PubMed

    Daly, Andrew C; Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Sathy, Binulal N; Jeon, Oju; Alsberg, Eben; Kelly, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    The ability to print defined patterns of cells and extracellular-matrix components in three dimensions has enabled the engineering of simple biological tissues; however, bioprinting functional solid organs is beyond the capabilities of current biofabrication technologies. An alternative approach would be to bioprint the developmental precursor to an adult organ, using this engineered rudiment as a template for subsequent organogenesis in vivo. This study demonstrates that developmentally inspired hypertrophic cartilage templates can be engineered in vitro using stem cells within a supporting gamma-irradiated alginate bioink incorporating Arg-Gly-Asp adhesion peptides. Furthermore, these soft tissue templates can be reinforced with a network of printed polycaprolactone fibers, resulting in a ≈350 fold increase in construct compressive modulus providing the necessary stiffness to implant such immature cartilaginous rudiments into load bearing locations. As a proof-of-principal, multiple-tool biofabrication is used to engineer a mechanically reinforced cartilaginous template mimicking the geometry of a vertebral body, which in vivo supported the development of a vascularized bone organ containing trabecular-like endochondral bone with a supporting marrow structure. Such developmental engineering approaches could be applied to the biofabrication of other solid organs by bioprinting precursors that have the capacity to mature into their adult counterparts over time in vivo.

  16. Applying 3D measurements and computer matching algorithms to two firearm examination proficiency tests.

    PubMed

    Ott, Daniel; Thompson, Robert; Song, Junfeng

    2017-02-01

    In order for a crime laboratory to assess a firearms examiner's training, skills, experience, and aptitude, it is necessary for the examiner to participate in proficiency testing. As computer algorithms for comparisons of pattern evidence become more prevalent, it is of interest to test algorithm performance as well, using these same proficiency examinations. This article demonstrates the use of the Congruent Matching Cell (CMC) algorithm to compare 3D topography measurements of breech face impressions and firing pin impressions from a previously distributed firearms proficiency test. In addition, the algorithm is used to analyze the distribution of many comparisons from a collection of cartridge cases used to construct another recent set of proficiency tests. These results are provided along with visualizations that help to relate the features used in optical comparisons by examiners to the features used by computer comparison algorithms.

  17. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution.

  18. 3D shape analysis of the brain's third ventricle using a midplane encoded symmetric template model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeil; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Gow, Alan J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Park, Jinah

    2016-01-01

    Background Structural changes of the brain's third ventricle have been acknowledged as an indicative measure of the brain atrophy progression in neurodegenerative and endocrinal diseases. To investigate the ventricular enlargement in relation to the atrophy of the surrounding structures, shape analysis is a promising approach. However, there are hurdles in modeling the third ventricle shape. First, it has topological variations across individuals due to the inter-thalamic adhesion. In addition, as an interhemispheric structure, it needs to be aligned to the midsagittal plane to assess its asymmetric and regional deformation. Method To address these issues, we propose a model-based shape assessment. Our template model of the third ventricle consists of a midplane and a symmetric mesh of generic shape. By mapping the template's midplane to the individuals’ brain midsagittal plane, we align the symmetric mesh on the midline of the brain before quantifying the third ventricle shape. To build the vertex-wise correspondence between the individual third ventricle and the template mesh, we employ a minimal-distortion surface deformation framework. In addition, to account for topological variations, we implement geometric constraints guiding the template mesh to have zero width where the inter-thalamic adhesion passes through, preventing vertices crossing between left and right walls of the third ventricle. The individual shapes are compared using a vertex-wise deformity from the symmetric template. Results Experiments on imaging and demographic data from a study of aging showed that our model was sensitive in assessing morphological differences between individuals in relation to brain volume (i.e. proxy for general brain atrophy), gender and the fluid intelligence at age 72. It also revealed that the proposed method can detect the regional and asymmetrical deformation unlike the conventional measures: volume (median 1.95 ml, IQR 0.96 ml) and width of the third

  19. Gothic Churches in Paris ST Gervais et ST Protais Image Matching 3d Reconstruction to Understand the Vaults System Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, M.; Campi, M.; Catuogno, R.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is part of a research about ribbed vaults systems in French Gothic Cathedrals. Our goal is to compare some different gothic cathedrals to understand the complex geometry of the ribbed vaults. The survey isn't the main objective but it is the way to verify the theoretical hypotheses about geometric configuration of the flamboyant churches in Paris. The survey method's choice generally depends on the goal; in this case we had to study many churches in a short time, so we chose 3D reconstruction method based on image dense stereo matching. This method allowed us to obtain the necessary information to our study without bringing special equipment, such as the laser scanner. The goal of this paper is to test image matching 3D reconstruction method in relation to some particular study cases and to show the benefits and the troubles. From a methodological point of view this is our workflow: - theoretical study about geometrical configuration of rib vault systems; - 3D model based on theoretical hypothesis about geometric definition of the vaults' form; - 3D model based on image matching 3D reconstruction methods; - comparison between 3D theoretical model and 3D model based on image matching;

  20. Ice-templated Self-assembly of VOPO4-Graphene Nanocomposites for Vertically Porous 3D Supercapacitor Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung Woo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Lee, Sang-Soo; Son, Jeong Gon

    2015-09-01

    A simple ice-templated self-assembly process is used to prepare a three-dimensional (3D) and vertically porous nanocomposite of layered vanadium phosphates (VOPO4) and graphene nanosheets with high surface area and high electrical conductivity. The resulting 3D VOPO4-graphene nanocomposite has a much higher capacitance of 527.9 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1, compared with ~247 F g-1 of simple 3D VOPO4, with solid cycling stability. The enhanced pseudocapacitive behavior mainly originates from vertically porous structures from directionally grown ice crystals and simultaneously inducing radial segregation and forming inter-stacked structures of VOPO4-graphene nanosheets. This VOPO4-graphene nanocomposite electrode exhibits high surface area, vertically porous structure to the separator, structural stability from interstacked structure and high electrical conductivity, which would provide the short diffusion paths of electrolyte ions and fast transportation of charges within the conductive frameworks. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is fabricated by using vertically porous VOPO4-graphene as the positive electrode and vertically porous 3D graphene as the negative electrode; it exhibits a wide cell voltage of 1.6 V and a largely enhanced energy density of 108 Wh kg-1.

  1. Ice-templated Self-assembly of VOPO4–Graphene Nanocomposites for Vertically Porous 3D Supercapacitor Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung Woo; Ha, Jeong Sook; Lee, Sang-Soo; Son, Jeong Gon

    2015-01-01

    A simple ice-templated self-assembly process is used to prepare a three-dimensional (3D) and vertically porous nanocomposite of layered vanadium phosphates (VOPO4) and graphene nanosheets with high surface area and high electrical conductivity. The resulting 3D VOPO4–graphene nanocomposite has a much higher capacitance of 527.9 F g−1 at a current density of 0.5 A g−1, compared with ~247 F g−1 of simple 3D VOPO4, with solid cycling stability. The enhanced pseudocapacitive behavior mainly originates from vertically porous structures from directionally grown ice crystals and simultaneously inducing radial segregation and forming inter-stacked structures of VOPO4–graphene nanosheets. This VOPO4–graphene nanocomposite electrode exhibits high surface area, vertically porous structure to the separator, structural stability from interstacked structure and high electrical conductivity, which would provide the short diffusion paths of electrolyte ions and fast transportation of charges within the conductive frameworks. In addition, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is fabricated by using vertically porous VOPO4–graphene as the positive electrode and vertically porous 3D graphene as the negative electrode; it exhibits a wide cell voltage of 1.6 V and a largely enhanced energy density of 108 Wh kg−1. PMID:26333591

  2. Lanthanum-catalysed synthesis of microporous 3D graphene-like carbons in a zeolite template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungsoo; Lee, Taekyoung; Kwon, Yonghyun; Seo, Yongbeom; Song, Jongchan; Park, Jung Ki; Lee, Hyunsoo; Park, Jeong Young; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional graphene architectures with periodic nanopores—reminiscent of zeolite frameworks—are of topical interest because of the possibility of combining the characteristics of graphene with a three-dimensional porous structure. Lately, the synthesis of such carbons has been approached by using zeolites as templates and small hydrocarbon molecules that can enter the narrow pore apertures. However, pyrolytic carbonization of the hydrocarbons (a necessary step in generating pure carbon) requires high temperatures and results in non-selective carbon deposition outside the pores. Here, we demonstrate that lanthanum ions embedded in zeolite pores can lower the temperature required for the carbonization of ethylene or acetylene. In this way, a graphene-like carbon structure can be selectively formed inside the zeolite template, without carbon being deposited at the external surfaces. X-ray diffraction data from zeolite single crystals after carbonization indicate that electron densities corresponding to carbon atoms are generated along the walls of the zeolite pores. After the zeolite template is removed, the carbon framework exhibits an electrical conductivity that is two orders of magnitude higher than that of amorphous mesoporous carbon. Lanthanum catalysis allows a carbon framework to form in zeolite pores with diameters of less than 1 nanometre; as such, microporous carbon nanostructures can be reproduced with various topologies corresponding to different zeolite pore sizes and shapes. We demonstrate carbon synthesis for large-pore zeolites (FAU, EMT and beta), a one-dimensional medium-pore zeolite (LTL), and even small-pore zeolites (MFI and LTA). The catalytic effect is a common feature of lanthanum, yttrium and calcium, which are all carbide-forming metal elements. We also show that the synthesis can be readily scaled up, which will be important for practical applications such as the production of lithium-ion batteries and zeolite-like catalyst

  3. Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry Using Fresnel Lenses with Minimal Refractive-Index Matching Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Bache, Steven; Malcolm, Javian; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Telecentric optical computed tomography (optical-CT) is a state-of-the-art method for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional dose distributions in radiochromic dosimeters. In this work a prototype telecentric system (DFOS—Duke Fresnel Optical-CT Scanner) is evaluated which incorporates two substantial design changes: the use of Fresnel lenses (reducing lens costs from $10-30K t0 $1-3K) and the use of a ‘solid tank’ (which reduces noise, and the volume of refractively matched fluid from 1ltr to 10cc). The efficacy of DFOS was evaluated by direct comparison against commissioned scanners in our lab. Measured dose distributions from all systems were compared against the predicted dose distributions from a commissioned treatment planning system (TPS). Three treatment plans were investigated including a simple four-field box treatment, a multiple small field delivery, and a complex IMRT treatment. Dosimeters were imaged within 2h post irradiation, using consistent scanning techniques (360 projections acquired at 1 degree intervals, reconstruction at 2mm). DFOS efficacy was evaluated through inspection of dose line-profiles, and 2D and 3D dose and gamma maps. DFOS/TPS gamma pass rates with 3%/3mm dose difference/distance-to-agreement criteria ranged from 89.3% to 92.2%, compared to from 95.6% to 99.0% obtained with the commissioned system. The 3D gamma pass rate between the commissioned system and DFOS was 98.2%. The typical noise rates in DFOS reconstructions were up to 3%, compared to under 2% for the commissioned system. In conclusion, while the introduction of a solid tank proved advantageous with regards to cost and convenience, further work is required to improve the image quality and dose reconstruction accuracy of the new DFOS optical-CT system. PMID:27019460

  4. Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry Using Fresnel Lenses with Minimal Refractive-Index Matching Fluid.

    PubMed

    Bache, Steven; Malcolm, Javian; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Telecentric optical computed tomography (optical-CT) is a state-of-the-art method for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional dose distributions in radiochromic dosimeters. In this work a prototype telecentric system (DFOS-Duke Fresnel Optical-CT Scanner) is evaluated which incorporates two substantial design changes: the use of Fresnel lenses (reducing lens costs from $10-30K t0 $1-3K) and the use of a 'solid tank' (which reduces noise, and the volume of refractively matched fluid from 1 ltr to 10 cc). The efficacy of DFOS was evaluated by direct comparison against commissioned scanners in our lab. Measured dose distributions from all systems were compared against the predicted dose distributions from a commissioned treatment planning system (TPS). Three treatment plans were investigated including a simple four-field box treatment, a multiple small field delivery, and a complex IMRT treatment. Dosimeters were imaged within 2 h post irradiation, using consistent scanning techniques (360 projections acquired at 1 degree intervals, reconstruction at 2mm). DFOS efficacy was evaluated through inspection of dose line-profiles, and 2D and 3D dose and gamma maps. DFOS/TPS gamma pass rates with 3%/3mm dose difference/distance-to-agreement criteria ranged from 89.3% to 92.2%, compared to from 95.6% to 99.0% obtained with the commissioned system. The 3D gamma pass rate between the commissioned system and DFOS was 98.2%. The typical noise rates in DFOS reconstructions were up to 3%, compared to under 2% for the commissioned system. In conclusion, while the introduction of a solid tank proved advantageous with regards to cost and convenience, further work is required to improve the image quality and dose reconstruction accuracy of the new DFOS optical-CT system.

  5. Face recognition based on matching of local features on 3D dynamic range sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeagaray-Patrón, B. A.; Kober, Vitaly

    2016-09-01

    3D face recognition has attracted attention in the last decade due to improvement of technology of 3D image acquisition and its wide range of applications such as access control, surveillance, human-computer interaction and biometric identification systems. Most research on 3D face recognition has focused on analysis of 3D still data. In this work, a new method for face recognition using dynamic 3D range sequences is proposed. Experimental results are presented and discussed using 3D sequences in the presence of pose variation. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of conventional face recognition algorithms based on descriptors.

  6. Computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules using dynamic self-adaptive template matching and a FLDA classifier.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Liu, Ji-Yu; Wang, Li-Jia; Zheng, Bin; Nie, Sheng-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Improving the performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) system for pulmonary nodules is still an important issue for its future clinical applications. This study aims to develop a new CAD scheme for pulmonary nodule detection based on dynamic self-adaptive template matching and Fisher linear discriminant analysis (FLDA) classifier. We first segment and repair lung volume by using OTSU algorithm and three-dimensional (3D) region growing. Next, the suspicious regions of interest (ROIs) are extracted and filtered by applying 3D dot filtering and thresholding method. Then, pulmonary nodule candidates are roughly detected with 3D dynamic self-adaptive template matching. Finally, we optimally select 11 image features and apply FLDA classifier to reduce false positive detections. The performance of the new method is validated by comparing with other methods through experiments using two groups of public datasets from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and ANODE09. By a 10-fold cross-validation experiment, the new CAD scheme finally has achieved a sensitivity of 90.24% and a false-positive (FP) of 4.54 FP/scan on average for the former dataset, and a sensitivity of 84.1% with 5.59 FP/scan for the latter. By comparing with other previously reported CAD schemes tested on the same datasets, the study proves that this new scheme can yield higher and more robust results in detecting pulmonary nodules.

  7. On Integral Invariants for Effective 3-D Motion Trajectory Matching and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhanpeng; Li, Youfu

    2016-02-01

    Motion trajectories tracked from the motions of human, robots, and moving objects can provide an important clue for motion analysis, classification, and recognition. This paper defines some new integral invariants for a 3-D motion trajectory. Based on two typical kernel functions, we design two integral invariants, the distance and area integral invariants. The area integral invariants are estimated based on the blurred segment of noisy discrete curve to avoid the computation of high-order derivatives. Such integral invariants for a motion trajectory enjoy some desirable properties, such as computational locality, uniqueness of representation, and noise insensitivity. Moreover, our formulation allows the analysis of motion trajectories at a range of scales by varying the scale of kernel function. The features of motion trajectories can thus be perceived at multiscale levels in a coarse-to-fine manner. Finally, we define a distance function to measure the trajectory similarity to find similar trajectories. Through the experiments, we examine the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed integral invariants and find that they can capture the motion cues in trajectory matching and sign recognition satisfactorily.

  8. [Dosimetry verification of radioactive seed implantation with 3D printing template and CT guidance for paravertebral/retroperitoneal malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ji, Z; Jiang, Y L; Guo, F X; Peng, R; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Wang, J J

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To compare the dose distributions of postoperative plans with preoperative plans for seeds implantations of paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors assisted by 3D printing guide template and CT guidance, explore the effects of the technology for seeds implantations in dosimetry level and provide data support for the optimization and standardization in seeds implantation. Methods: Between December 2015 and July 2016, a total of 10 patients with paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors (12 lesions) received 3D printing template assist radioactive seeds implantations in department of radiation oncology of Peking University Third Hospital, and included in the study. The diseases included cervical cancer, kidney cancer, abdominal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma of kidney, esophageal cancer and carcinoma of ureter. The prescribed doses was 110-150 Gy. All patients received preoperative planning design, individual template design and production, and the dose distribution of postoperative plan was compared with preoperative plan. Dose parameters including D(90), MPD, V(100), V(150,)conformal index(CI), EI of target volume and D(2cc) of organs at risk (spinal cord, aorta, kidney). Statistical software was SPSS 19.0 and statistical method was non-parameters Wilcoxon symbols test. Results: A total of 10 3D printing templates were designed and produced which were including 12 treatment areas.The mean D(90) of postoperative target area (GTV) was 131.1 (97.8-167.4 Gy) Gy. The actual seeds number of post operation increased by 3 to 12 in 5 cases (42.0%). The needle was well distributed. For postoperative plans, the mean D(90,)MPD, V(100,)V(150) was 131.1 Gy, 69.3 Gy, 90.2% and 65.2%, respectively, and which was 140.2 Gy, 65.6 Gy, 91.7% and 26.8%, respectively, in preoperative plans. This meant that the actual dose of target volume was slightly lower than preplanned dose, and the high dose area of target volume was larger than preplanned range, but there was no statistical

  9. Templated assembly of BiFeO₃ nanocrystals into 3D mesoporous networks for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Papadas, I T; Subrahmanyam, K S; Kanatzidis, M G; Armatas, G S

    2015-03-19

    The self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals into large porous architectures is currently of immense interest for nanochemistry and nanotechnology. These materials combine the respective advantages of discrete nanoparticles and mesoporous structures. In this article, we demonstrate a facile nanoparticle templating process to synthesize a three-dimensional mesoporous BiFeO₃ material. This approach involves the polymer-assisted aggregating assembly of 3-aminopropanoic acid-stabilized bismuth ferrite (BiFeO₃) nanocrystals followed by thermal decomposition of the surfactant. The resulting material consists of a network of tightly connected BiFeO₃ nanoparticles (∼6-7 nm in diameter) and has a moderately high surface area (62 m(2) g(-1)) and uniform pores (ca. 6.3 nm). As a result of the unique mesostructure, the porous assemblies of BiFeO₃ nanoparticles show an excellent catalytic activity and chemical stability for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol with NaBH4.

  10. Microporous polymeric 3D scaffolds templated by the layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Paulraj, Thomas; Feoktistova, Natalia; Velk, Natalia; Uhlig, Katja; Duschl, Claus; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    Polymeric scaffolds serve as valuable supports for biological cells since they offer essential features for guiding cellular organization and tissue development. The main challenges for scaffold fabrication are i) to tune an internal structure and ii) to load bio-molecules such as growth factors and control their local concentration and distribution. Here, a new approach for the design of hollow polymeric scaffolds using porous CaCO3 particles (cores) as templates is presented. The cores packed into a microfluidic channel are coated with polymers employing the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. Subsequent core elimination at mild conditions results in formation of the scaffold composed of interconnected hollow polymer microspheres. The size of the cores determines the feature dimensions and, as a consequence, governs cellular adhesion: for 3T3 fibroblasts an optimal microsphere size is 12 μm. By making use of the carrier properties of the porous CaCO3 cores, the microspheres are loaded with BSA as a model protein. The scaffolds developed here may also be well suited for the localized release of bio-molecules using external triggers such as IR-light.

  11. Pixel-level Matching Based Multi-hypothesis Error Concealment Modes for Wireless 3D H.264/MVC Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shafai, Walid

    2015-09-01

    3D multi-view video (MVV) is multiple video streams shot by several cameras around a single scene simultaneously. Therefore it is an urgent task to achieve high 3D MVV compression to meet future bandwidth constraints while maintaining a high reception quality. 3D MVV coded bit-streams that are transmitted over wireless network can suffer from error propagation in the space, time and view domains. Error concealment (EC) algorithms have the advantage of improving the received 3D video quality without any modifications in the transmission rate or in the encoder hardware or software. To improve the quality of reconstructed 3D MVV, we propose an efficient adaptive EC algorithm with multi-hypothesis modes to conceal the erroneous Macro-Blocks (MBs) of intra-coded and inter-coded frames by exploiting the spatial, temporal and inter-view correlations between frames and views. Our proposed algorithm adapts to 3D MVV motion features and to the error locations. The lost MBs are optimally recovered by utilizing motion and disparity matching between frames and views on pixel-by-pixel matching basis. Our simulation results show that the proposed adaptive multi-hypothesis EC algorithm can significantly improve the objective and subjective 3D MVV quality.

  12. 3 D Hierarchical Porous Carbon for Supercapacitors Prepared from Lignin through a Facile Template-Free Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Lin, Haibo; Lin, Zheqi; Yin, Jian; Lu, Haiyan; Liu, Dechen; Zhao, Mingzhu

    2015-06-22

    Lignin-derived hierarchical porous carbon (LHPC) was prepared through a facile template-free method. Solidification of the lignin-KOH solution resulted in KOH crystalizing within lignin. The crystalized KOH particles in solid lignin acted both as template and activating agent in the heat-treatment process. The obtained LHPC, exhibiting a 3D network, consisted of macroporous cores, mesoporous channels, and micropores. The LHPC comprised 12.27 at % oxygen-containing groups, which resulted in pseudocapacitance. The LHPC displayed a capacitance of 165.0 F g(-1) in 1 M H2 SO4 at 0.05 A g(-1) , and the capacitance was still 123.5 F g(-1) even at 10 A g(-1) . The LHPC also displayed excellent cycling stability with capacitance retention of 97.3 % after 5000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. On account of the facile preparation of LHPC, this paper offers a facile alternative method for the preparation of hierarchical porous carbon for electrochemical energy storage devices.

  13. Ice-Templated Assembly Strategy to Construct 3D Boron Nitride Nanosheet Networks in Polymer Composites for Thermal Conductivity Improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Yao, Yimin; Gong, Zhengyu; Wang, Fangfang; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Owing to the growing heat removal issue of modern electronic devices, polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have drawn much attention in the past few years. However, a traditional method to enhance the thermal conductivity of the polymers by addition of inorganic fillers usually creates composite with not only limited thermal conductivity but also other detrimental effects due to large amount of fillers required. Here, novel polymer composites are reported by first constructing 3D boron nitride nanosheets (3D-BNNS) network using ice-templated approach and then infiltrating them with epoxy matrix. The obtained polymer composites exhibit a high thermal conductivity (2.85 W m(-1) K(-1)), a low thermal expansion coefficient (24-32 ppm K(-1)), and an increased glass transition temperature (T(g)) at relatively low BNNSs loading (9.29 vol%). These results demonstrate that this approach opens a new avenue for design and preparation of polymer composites with high thermal conductivity. The polymer composites are potentially useful in advanced electronic packaging techniques, namely, thermal interface materials, underfill materials, molding compounds, and organic substrates.

  14. The Impact of 3D Stacking and Technology Scaling on the Power and Area of Stereo Matching Processors

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Shim, Jae Hoon; Lim, Sung Kyu; Moon, Byungin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, stereo matching processors have been adopted in real-time embedded systems such as intelligent robots and autonomous vehicles, which require minimal hardware resources and low power consumption. Meanwhile, thanks to the through-silicon via (TSV), three-dimensional (3D) stacking technology has emerged as a practical solution to achieving the desired requirements of a high-performance circuit. In this paper, we present the benefits of 3D stacking and process technology scaling on stereo matching processors. We implemented 2-tier 3D-stacked stereo matching processors with GlobalFoundries 130-nm and Nangate 45-nm process design kits and compare them with their two-dimensional (2D) counterparts to identify comprehensive design benefits. In addition, we examine the findings from various analyses to identify the power benefits of 3D-stacked integrated circuit (IC) and device technology advancements. From experiments, we observe that the proposed 3D-stacked ICs, compared to their 2D IC counterparts, obtain 43% area, 13% power, and 14% wire length reductions. In addition, we present a logic partitioning method suitable for a pipeline-based hardware architecture that minimizes the use of TSVs. PMID:28241437

  15. The Impact of 3D Stacking and Technology Scaling on the Power and Area of Stereo Matching Processors.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Shim, Jae Hoon; Lim, Sung Kyu; Moon, Byungin

    2017-02-22

    Recently, stereo matching processors have been adopted in real-time embedded systems such as intelligent robots and autonomous vehicles, which require minimal hardware resources and low power consumption. Meanwhile, thanks to the through-silicon via (TSV), three-dimensional (3D) stacking technology has emerged as a practical solution to achieving the desired requirements of a high-performance circuit. In this paper, we present the benefits of 3D stacking and process technology scaling on stereo matching processors. We implemented 2-tier 3D-stacked stereo matching processors with GlobalFoundries 130-nm and Nangate 45-nm process design kits and compare them with their two-dimensional (2D) counterparts to identify comprehensive design benefits. In addition, we examine the findings from various analyses to identify the power benefits of 3D-stacked integrated circuit (IC) and device technology advancements. From experiments, we observe that the proposed 3D-stacked ICs, compared to their 2D IC counterparts, obtain 43% area, 13% power, and 14% wire length reductions. In addition, we present a logic partitioning method suitable for a pipeline-based hardware architecture that minimizes the use of TSVs.

  16. Automated 3D motion tracking using Gabor filter bank, robust point matching, and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the robust point matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of 1) through-plane motion and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the moving least square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  17. Dose optimization in gynecological 3D image based interstitial brachytherapy using martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT) -an institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Praveen Kumar; Swamidas, Jamema V; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, D. D.; Manjhi, Jayanand; Rai, D V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose optimization in 3D image based gynecological interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez Universal Perineal Interstitial Template (MUPIT). Axial CT image data set of 20 patients of gynecological cancer who underwent external radiotherapy and high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT was employed to delineate clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Geometrical and graphical optimization were done for optimum CTV coverage and sparing of OARs. Coverage Index (CI), dose homogeneity index (DHI), overdose index (OI), dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), external volume index (EI), conformity index (COIN) and dose volume parameters recommended by GEC-ESTRO were evaluated. The mean CTV, bladder and rectum volume were 137 ± 47cc, 106 ± 41cc and 50 ± 25cc, respectively. Mean CI, DHI and DNR were 0.86 ± 0.03, 0.69 ± 0.11 and 0.31 ± 0.09, while the mean OI, EI, and COIN were 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.07 ± 0.05 and 0.79 ± 0.05, respectively. The estimated mean CTV D90 was 76 ± 11Gy and D100 was 63 ± 9Gy. The different dosimetric parameters of bladder D2cc, D1cc and D0.1cc were 76 ± 11Gy, 81 ± 14Gy, and 98 ± 21Gy and of rectum/recto-sigmoid were 80 ± 17Gy, 85 ± 13Gy, and 124 ± 37Gy, respectively. Dose optimization yields superior coverage with optimal values of indices. Emerging data on 3D image based brachytherapy with reporting and clinical correlation of DVH parameters outcome is enterprizing and provides definite assistance in improving the quality of brachytherapy implants. DVH parameter for urethra in gynecological implants needs to be defined further. PMID:25190999

  18. Use of reconstructed 3D VMEC equilibria to match effects of toroidally rotating discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, Andreas; Wilcox, Robert S.; Cianciosa, Mark R.; Seal, Sudip K.; Unterberg, Ezekial A.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; Hirshman, Steven Paul; Lao, L. L.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Shafer, Morgan W.

    2016-10-13

    Here, a technique for tokamak equilibrium reconstructions is used for multiple DIII-D discharges, including L-mode and H-mode cases when weakly 3D fields $\\left(\\delta B/B\\sim {{10}^{-3}}\\right)$ are applied. The technique couples diagnostics to the non-linear, ideal MHD equilibrium solver VMEC, using the V3FIT code, to find the most likely 3D equilibrium based on a suite of measurements. It is demonstrated that V3FIT can be used to find non-linear 3D equilibria that are consistent with experimental measurements of the plasma response to very weak 3D perturbations, as well as with 2D profile measurements. Observations at DIII-D show that plasma rotation larger than 20 krad s–1 changes the relative phase between the applied 3D fields and the measured plasma response. Discharges with low averaged rotation (10 krad s–1) and peaked rotation profiles (40 krad s–1) are reconstructed. Similarities and differences to forward modeled VMEC equilibria, which do not include rotational effects, are shown. Toroidal phase shifts of up to ${{30}^{\\circ}}$ are found between the measured and forward modeled plasma responses at the highest values of rotation. The plasma response phases of reconstructed equilibra on the other hand match the measured ones. This is the first time V3FIT has been used to reconstruct weakly 3D tokamak equilibria.

  19. Use of reconstructed 3D VMEC equilibria to match effects of toroidally rotating discharges in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingen, A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Seal, S. K.; Unterberg, E. A.; Hanson, J. M.; Hirshman, S. P.; Lao, L. L.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Shafer, M. W.

    2017-01-01

    A technique for tokamak equilibrium reconstructions is used for multiple DIII-D discharges, including L-mode and H-mode cases when weakly 3D fields ≤ft(δ B/B˜ {{10}-3}\\right) are applied. The technique couples diagnostics to the non-linear, ideal MHD equilibrium solver VMEC, using the V3FIT code, to find the most likely 3D equilibrium based on a suite of measurements. It is demonstrated that V3FIT can be used to find non-linear 3D equilibria that are consistent with experimental measurements of the plasma response to very weak 3D perturbations, as well as with 2D profile measurements. Observations at DIII-D show that plasma rotation larger than 20 krad s-1 changes the relative phase between the applied 3D fields and the measured plasma response. Discharges with low averaged rotation (10 krad s-1) and peaked rotation profiles (40 krad s-1) are reconstructed. Similarities and differences to forward modeled VMEC equilibria, which do not include rotational effects, are shown. Toroidal phase shifts of up to {{30}\\circ} are found between the measured and forward modeled plasma responses at the highest values of rotation. The plasma response phases of reconstructed equilibra on the other hand match the measured ones. This is the first time V3FIT has been used to reconstruct weakly 3D tokamak equilibria.

  20. Use of reconstructed 3D VMEC equilibria to match effects of toroidally rotating discharges in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Wingen, Andreas; Wilcox, Robert S.; Cianciosa, Mark R.; ...

    2016-10-13

    Here, a technique for tokamak equilibrium reconstructions is used for multiple DIII-D discharges, including L-mode and H-mode cases when weakly 3D fieldsmore » $$\\left(\\delta B/B\\sim {{10}^{-3}}\\right)$$ are applied. The technique couples diagnostics to the non-linear, ideal MHD equilibrium solver VMEC, using the V3FIT code, to find the most likely 3D equilibrium based on a suite of measurements. It is demonstrated that V3FIT can be used to find non-linear 3D equilibria that are consistent with experimental measurements of the plasma response to very weak 3D perturbations, as well as with 2D profile measurements. Observations at DIII-D show that plasma rotation larger than 20 krad s–1 changes the relative phase between the applied 3D fields and the measured plasma response. Discharges with low averaged rotation (10 krad s–1) and peaked rotation profiles (40 krad s–1) are reconstructed. Similarities and differences to forward modeled VMEC equilibria, which do not include rotational effects, are shown. Toroidal phase shifts of up to $${{30}^{\\circ}}$$ are found between the measured and forward modeled plasma responses at the highest values of rotation. The plasma response phases of reconstructed equilibra on the other hand match the measured ones. This is the first time V3FIT has been used to reconstruct weakly 3D tokamak equilibria.« less

  1. A TSR Visual Servoing System Based on a Novel Dynamic Template Matching Method.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dongke

    2015-12-21

    The so-called Tethered Space Robot (TSR) is a novel active space debris removal system. To solve its problem of non-cooperative target recognition during short-distance rendezvous events, this paper presents a framework for a real-time visual servoing system using non-calibrated monocular-CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor). When a small template is used for matching with a large scene, it always leads to mismatches, so a novel template matching algorithm to solve the problem is presented. Firstly, the novel matching algorithm uses a hollow annulus structure according to a FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment) algorithm and makes the method be rotation-invariant. Furthermore, the accumulative deviation can be decreased by the hollow structure. The matching function is composed of grey and gradient differences between template and object image, which help it reduce the effects of illumination and noises. Then, a dynamic template update strategy is designed to avoid tracking failures brought about by wrong matching or occlusion. Finally, the system synthesizes the least square integrated predictor, realizing tracking online in complex circumstances. The results of ground experiments show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the need for sophisticated computation and improves matching accuracy.

  2. A novel artificial bee colony algorithm based on internal-feedback strategy for image template matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai; Gong, Li-Gang; Li, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Image template matching refers to the technique of locating a given reference image over a source image such that they are the most similar. It is a fundamental mission in the field of visual target recognition. In general, there are two critical aspects of a template matching scheme. One is similarity measurement and the other is best-match location search. In this work, we choose the well-known normalized cross correlation model as a similarity criterion. The searching procedure for the best-match location is carried out through an internal-feedback artificial bee colony (IF-ABC) algorithm. IF-ABC algorithm is highlighted by its effort to fight against premature convergence. This purpose is achieved through discarding the conventional roulette selection procedure in the ABC algorithm so as to provide each employed bee an equal chance to be followed by the onlooker bees in the local search phase. Besides that, we also suggest efficiently utilizing the internal convergence states as feedback guidance for searching intensity in the subsequent cycles of iteration. We have investigated four ideal template matching cases as well as four actual cases using different searching algorithms. Our simulation results show that the IF-ABC algorithm is more effective and robust for this template matching mission than the conventional ABC and two state-of-the-art modified ABC algorithms do.

  3. A TSR Visual Servoing System Based on a Novel Dynamic Template Matching Method †

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dongke

    2015-01-01

    The so-called Tethered Space Robot (TSR) is a novel active space debris removal system. To solve its problem of non-cooperative target recognition during short-distance rendezvous events, this paper presents a framework for a real-time visual servoing system using non-calibrated monocular-CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor). When a small template is used for matching with a large scene, it always leads to mismatches, so a novel template matching algorithm to solve the problem is presented. Firstly, the novel matching algorithm uses a hollow annulus structure according to a FAST (Features from Accelerated Segment) algorithm and makes the method be rotation-invariant. Furthermore, the accumulative deviation can be decreased by the hollow structure. The matching function is composed of grey and gradient differences between template and object image, which help it reduce the effects of illumination and noises. Then, a dynamic template update strategy is designed to avoid tracking failures brought about by wrong matching or occlusion. Finally, the system synthesizes the least square integrated predictor, realizing tracking online in complex circumstances. The results of ground experiments show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the need for sophisticated computation and improves matching accuracy. PMID:26703609

  4. A stereo matching model observer for stereoscopic viewing of 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Gezheng; Markey, Mia K.; Muralidlhar, Gautam S.

    2014-03-01

    Stereoscopic viewing of 3D medical imaging data has the potential to increase the detection of abnormalities. We present a new stereo model observer inspired by the characteristics of stereopsis in human vision. Given a stereo pair of images of an object (i.e., left and right images separated by a small displacement), the model observer rst nds the corresponding points between the two views, and then fuses them together to create a 2D cyclopean view. Assuming that the cyclopean view has extracted most of the 3D information presented in the stereo pair, a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can be utilized to make decisions. We conduct a simulation study that attempts to mimic the detection of breast lesions on stereoscopic viewing of breast tomosynthesis projection images. We render voxel datasets that contain random 3D power-law noise to model normal breast tissues with various breast densities. 3D Gaussian signal is added to some of the datasets to model the presence of a breast lesion. By changing the separation angle between the two views, multiple stereo pairs of projection images are generated for each voxel dataset. The performance of the model is evaluated in terms of the accuracy of binary decisions on the presence of the simulated lesions.

  5. Automated matching of corresponding seed images of three simulator radiographs to allow 3D triangulation of implanted seeds.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, M D; Kassaee, A

    1997-02-01

    To match corresponding seed images in different radiographs so that the 3D seed locations can be triangulated automatically and without ambiguity requires (at least) three radiographs taken from different perspectives, and an algorithm that finds the proper permutations of the seed-image indices. Matching corresponding images in only two radiographs introduces inherent ambiguities which can be resolved only with the use of non-positional information obtained with intensive human effort. Matching images in three or more radiographs is an 'NP (Non-determinant in Polynomial time)-complete' problem. Although the matching problem is fundamental, current methods for three-radiograph seed-image matching use 'local' (seed-by-seed) methods that may lead to incorrect matchings. We describe a permutation-sampling method which not only gives good 'global' (full permutation) matches for the NP-complete three-radiograph seed-matching problem, but also determines the reliability of the radiographic data themselves, namely, whether the patient moved in the interval between radiographic perspectives.

  6. Fast template matching based on grey prediction for real-time object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Mingming; Hou, Yuanlong; Liu, Rongzhong; Hou, Runmin

    2017-02-01

    Template matching is a basic algorithm for image processing, and real-time is a crucial requirement of object tracking. For real-time tracking, a fast template matching algorithm based on grey prediction is presented, where computation cost can be reduced dramatically by minimizing search range. First, location of the tracked object in the current image is estimated by Grey Model (GM). GM(1,1), which is the basic model of grey prediction, can use some known information to foretell the location. Second, the precise position of the object in the frame is computed by template matching. Herein, Sequential Similarity Detection Algorithm (SSDA) with a self-adaptive threshold is employed to obtain the matching position in the neighborhood of the predicted location. The role of threshold in SSDA is important, as a proper threshold can make template matching fast and accurate. Moreover, a practical weighted strategy is utilized to handle scale and rotation changes of the object, as well as illumination changes. The experimental results show the superior performance of the proposed algorithm over the conventional full-search method, especially in terms of executive time.

  7. Optimizing Multi-Station Template Matching to Identify and Characterize Induced Seismicity in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Skoumal, R.; Currie, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    As oil and gas well completions utilizing multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have become more commonplace, the potential for seismicity induced by the deep disposal of frac-related flowback waters and the hydraulic fracturing process itself has become increasingly important. While it is rare for these processes to induce felt seismicity, the recent increase in the number of deep injection wells and volumes injected have been suspected to have contributed to a substantial increase of events = M 3 in the continental U.S. over the past decade. Earthquake template matching using multi-station waveform cross-correlation is an adept tool for investigating potentially induced sequences due to its proficiency at identifying similar/repeating seismic events. We have sought to refine this approach by investigating a variety of seismic sequences and determining the optimal parameters (station combinations, template lengths and offsets, filter frequencies, data access method, etc.) for identifying induced seismicity. When applied to a sequence near a wastewater injection well in Youngstown, Ohio, our optimized template matching routine yielded 566 events while other template matching studies found ~100-200 events. We also identified 77 events on 4-12 March 2014 that are temporally and spatially correlated with active hydraulic fracturing in Poland Township, Ohio. We find similar improvement in characterizing sequences in Washington and Harrison Counties, which appear to be related to wastewater injection and hydraulic fracturing, respectively. In the Youngstown and Poland Township cases, focal mechanisms and double difference relocation using the cross-correlation matrix finds left-lateral faults striking roughly east-west near the top of the basement. We have also used template matching to determine isolated earthquakes near several other wastewater injection wells are unlikely to be induced based on a lack of similar/repeating sequences. Optimized template matching utilizes

  8. An Inspire-Konform 3d Building Model of Bavaria Using Cadastre Information, LIDAR and Image Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschlaub, R.; Batscheider, J.

    2016-06-01

    The federal governments of Germany endeavour to create a harmonized 3D building data set based on a common application schema (the AdV-CityGML-Profile). The Bavarian Agency for Digitisation, High-Speed Internet and Surveying has launched a statewide 3D Building Model with standardized roof shapes for all 8.1 million buildings in Bavaria. For the acquisition of the 3D Building Model LiDAR-data or data from Image Matching are used as basis in addition with the building ground plans of the official cadastral map. The data management of the 3D Building Model is carried out by a central database with the usage of a nationwide standardized CityGML-Profile of the AdV. The update of the 3D Building Model for new buildings is done by terrestrial building measurements within the maintenance process of the cadaster and from image matching. In a joint research project, the Bavarian State Agency for Surveying and Geoinformation and the TUM, Chair of Geoinformatics, transformed an AdV-CityGML-Profilebased test data set of Bavarian LoD2 building models into an INSPIRE-compliant schema. For the purpose of a transformation of such kind, the AdV provides a data specification, a test plan for 3D Building Models and a mapping table. The research project examined whether the transformation rules defined in the mapping table, were unambiguous and sufficient for implementing a transformation of LoD2 data based on the AdV-CityGML-Profile into the INSPIRE schema. The proof of concept was carried out by transforming production data of the Bavarian 3D Building Model in LoD2 into the INSPIRE BU schema. In order to assure the quality of the data to be transformed, the test specifications according to the test plan for 3D Building Models of the AdV were carried out. The AdV mapping table was checked for completeness and correctness and amendments were made accordingly.

  9. Examination about Influence for Precision of 3d Image Measurement from the Ground Control Point Measurement and Surface Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anai, T.; Kochi, N.; Yamada, M.; Sasaki, T.; Otani, H.; Sasaki, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kimoto, K.; Yasui, N.

    2015-05-01

    As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching) by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results of analysis made

  10. Holographic fabrication of 3D photonic crystal templates with 4, 5, and 6-fold rotational symmetry using a single beam and single exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, David; George, David; Lutkenhaus, Jeffery; Philipose, Usha; Zhang, Hualiang; Lin, Yuankun

    2016-03-01

    A method of fabricating large-volume three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates using holographic lithography is presented. Fabrication is accomplished using a single-beam and single exposure by a reflective optical element (ROE). The ROE is 3D printed support structure which holds reflecting surfaces composed of silicon or gallium arsenide. Large-volume 3D photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates with 4-fold, 5-fold, and 6-fold symmetry were fabricated and found to be in good agreement with simulation. Although the reflective surfaces were setup away from the Brewster's angle, the interference among the reflected s and p-polarizations still generated bicontinuous structures, demonstrating the flexibility of the ROE. The ROE, being a compact and inexpensive alternative to diffractive optical elements and top-cut prisms, facilitates the large-scale integration of holographically fabricated photonic structures into on-chip applications.

  11. Performance of peaky template matching under additive white Gaussian noise and uniform quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Peaky template matching (PTM) is a special case of a general algorithm known as multinomial pattern matching originally developed for automatic target recognition of synthetic aperture radar data. The algorithm is a model- based approach that first quantizes pixel values into Nq = 2 discrete values yielding generative Beta-Bernoulli models as class-conditional templates. Here, we consider the case of classification of target chips in AWGN and develop approximations to image-to-template classification performance as a function of the noise power. We focus specifically on the case of a uniform quantization" scheme, where a fixed number of the largest pixels are quantized high as opposed to using a fixed threshold. This quantization method reduces sensitivity to the scaling of pixel intensities and quantization in general reduces sensitivity to various nuisance parameters difficult to account for a priori. Our performance expressions are verified using forward-looking infrared imagery from the Army Research Laboratory Comanche dataset.

  12. 3D modelling of trompe l'oeil decorated vaults using dense matching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Lingua, A.; Noardo, F.; Spano, A.

    2014-05-01

    Dense matching techniques, implemented in many commercial and open source software, are useful instruments for carrying out a rapid and detailed analysis of complex objects, including various types of details and surfaces. For this reason these tools were tested in the metric survey of a frescoed ceiling in the hall of honour of a baroque building. The surfaces are covered with trompe-l'oeil paintings which theoretically can give a very good texture to automatic matching algorithms but in this case problems arise when attempting to reconstruct the correct geometry: in fact, in correspondence with the main architectonic painted details, the models present some irregularities, unexpectedly coherent with the painted drawing. The photogrammetric models have been compared with data deriving from a LIDAR survey of the same object, to evaluate the entity of this blunder: some profiles of selected sections have been extracted, verifying the different behaviours of the software tools.

  13. Optimal matching of 3D film-measured and planned doses for intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Dong Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2007-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is one of the most complex applications of radiotherapy that requires patient-specific quality assurance (QA). Here, we describe a novel method of 3-dimensional (3D) dose-verification using 12 acrylic slabs in a 3D phantom (30 x 30 x 12 cm(3)) with extended dose rate (EDR2) films, which is both faster than conventionally used methods, and clinically useful. With custom-written software modules written in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Application, the measured and planned dose distributions for the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were superimposed by matching their origins, and the point doses were compared at all matched positions. Then, an optimization algorithm was used to correct the detected setup errors. The results show that this optimization method significantly reduces the average maximum dose difference by 7.73% and the number of points showing dose differences of more than 5% by 8.82% relative to the dose differences without an optimization. Our results indicate that the dose difference was significantly decreased with optimization and this optimization method is statistically reliable and effective. The results of 3D optimization are discussed in terms of various patient-specific QA data obtained from statistical analyses.

  14. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  15. The occlusion-adjusted prefabricated 3D mirror image templates by computer simulation: the image-guided navigation system application in difficult cases of head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsu-Tang; Wu, Chao-I; Tseng, Ching-Shiow; Chen, Hung-Chi; Lee, Wu-Song; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Chang, Sophia Chia-Ning

    2009-11-01

    Computer applications in head and neck reconstruction are rapidly emerging and create not only a virtual environment for presurgical planning, but also help in image-guided navigational surgery. This study evaluates the use of prefabricated 3-dimensional (3D) mirror image templates made by computer-simulated adjusted occlusions to assist in microvascular prefabricated flap insertion during reconstructive surgery. Five patients underwent tumor ablation surgery in 1999 and survived for 8 years. Four of the patients with malignancy received radiation therapy. All patients in this study suffered from severe malocclusion causing trismus, headache, temporomandibular joint pain, an unsymmetrical face, and the inability of further osseointegrated teeth insertion. They underwent a 3D computer tomography examination and the nonprocessed raw data were sent for computer simulation in adjusting occlusion; thus, a mirror image template could be fabricated for microsurgical flap guidance. The computer simulated occlusion was acceptable and facial symmetry obtained. The use of the template resulted in a shorter operation time and recovery was as expected. The computer-simulated occlusion-adjusted 3D mirror image templates aid in the use of free vascularized bone flaps for restoring continuity to the mandible. The coordinated arch will help with further osseointegration teeth insertion.

  16. Structural stereo matching of Laplacian-of-Gaussian contour segments for 3D perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, K. L.; Sotak, G. E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The stereo correspondence problem is solved using Laplacian-of-Gaussian zero-crossing contours as a source of primitives for structural stereopsis, as opposed to traditional point-based algorithms. Up to 74 percent matching of candidate zero crossing points are being achieved on 240 x 246 images at small scales and large ranges of disparity, without coarse-to-fine tracking and without precise knowledge of the epipolar geometry. This approach should prove particularly useful in recovering the epipolar geometry automatically for stereo pairs for which it is unavailable a priori. Such situations occur in the extraction of terrain models from stereo aerial photographs.

  17. Structural Stereo Matching Of Laplacian-Of-Gaussian Contour Segments For 3D Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, K. L.; Sotak, G. E.

    1989-03-01

    We solve the stereo correspondence problem using Lapla-cian of Gaussian (LoG) zero-crossing contours as a source of primitives for structural stereopsis, as opposed to traditional point-based algorithms. For each image in the stereo pair, we apply the LoG operator, extract and link zero crossing points, filter and segment the contours into meaningful primitives, and compute a parametric structural description over the resulting primitive set. We then apply a variant of the inexact structural matching technique of Boyer and Kak Ill to recover the optimal interprimitive mapping (correspon-dence) function. Since an extended image feature conveys more information than a single point, its spatial and photometric behavior may be exploited to advantage; there are also fewer features to match, resulting in a smaller combinatorial problem. The structural approach allows greater use of spatial relational constraints, which allows us to eliminate (or reduce) the coarse-to-fine tracking of most point-based algorithms. Solving the correspondence problem at this level requires only an approximate probabilistic characterization of the image-to-image structural distortion, and does not require detailed knowledge of the epipolar geometry.

  18. A new concept for intraoperative matching of 3D ultrasound and CT.

    PubMed

    Schorr, O; Wörn, H

    2001-01-01

    Matching of ultrasound images with CT or MRI scans is an awkward and unsatisfactory task when using conventional methods. Wide ranging differences in modality of ultrasound and CT/MRI require new techniques to be explored for successful alignment. Ultrasound images characteristically show comparable high noise ratio due to scattering inside the region of interest and the surrounding area. Additionally, shadowing and tissue dependent echo response time produce geometric artifacts. These image distortions are sophisticated to recover. Though image quality and geometric relationship are poor, ultrasound images show the potential for fast, low-cost, non-invasive and flexible image acquisition, predestinated for intraoperative application. The fusion of intraoperative ultrasound and preoperatively acquired CT/MRI images provides both, geometric invariance and flexible fast image acquisition, merging in a powerful tool for augmented three dimensional reality. In this paper we describe a completely new concept for alignment with abstaining from direct rigid or elastic matching of ultrasound to CT/MRI. Instead of placing those images in direct relationship, our approach involves a simulation of ultrasound wave behavior in order to predict B-mode images.

  19. Scale Space Graph Representation and Kernel Matching for Non Rigid and Textured 3D Shape Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Garro, Valeria; Giachetti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object retrieval that relies on tree-based shape representations (TreeSha) derived from the analysis of the scale-space of the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) and on specialized graph kernels designed for their comparison. By coupling maxima of the Auto Diffusion Function with the related basins of attraction, we can link the information at different scales encoding spatial relationships in a graph description that is isometry invariant and can easily incorporate texture and additional geometrical information as node and edge features. Using custom graph kernels it is then possible to estimate shape dissimilarities adapted to different specific tasks and on different categories of models, making the procedure a powerful and flexible tool for shape recognition and retrieval. Experimental results demonstrate that the method can provide retrieval scores similar or better than state-of-the-art on textured and non textured shape retrieval benchmarks and give interesting insights on effectiveness of different shape descriptors and graph kernels.

  20. Adsorption and structural properties of ordered mesoporous carbons synthesized by using various carbon precursors and ordered siliceous P6mm and Ia3d mesostructures as templates.

    PubMed

    Gierszal, Kamil P; Kim, Tae-Wan; Ryoo, Ryong; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2005-12-15

    Adsorption and structural properties of inverse carbon replicas of two ordered siliceous P6mm and Ia3d mesostructures have been studied by nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. These carbon replicas were prepared by filling the pores of SBA-15 and KIT-6 siliceous templates with various carbon precursors followed by carbonization and silica dissolution. Sucrose, furfuryl alcohol, acenaphthene, mesophase pitch, and petroleum pitch were used to obtain inverse carbon replicas of SBA-15 and KIT-6. While structural properties of the resulting ordered mesoporous carbons are mainly determined by the hard template used, their adsorption properties depend on the type of the carbon precursor.

  1. Single-view volumetric PIV via high-resolution scanning, isotropic voxel restructuring and 3D least-squares matching (3D-LSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, C.; Hess, D.; Kitzhofer, J.

    2013-02-01

    Scanning PIV as introduced by Brücker (1995 Exp. Fluids 19 255-63, 1996a Appl. Sci. Res. 56 157-79) has been successfully applied in the last 20 years to different flow problems where the frame rate was sufficient to ensure a ‘frozen’ field condition. The limited number of parallel planes however leads typically to an under-sampling in the scan direction in depth; therefore, the spatial resolution in depth is typically considerably lower than the spatial resolution in the plane of the laser sheet (depth resolution = scan shift Δz ≫ pixel unit in object space). In addition, a partial volume averaging effect due to the thickness of the light sheet must be taken into account. Herein, the method is further developed using a high-resolution scanning in combination with a Gaussian regression technique to achieve an isotropic representation of the tracer particles in a voxel-based volume reconstruction with cuboidal voxels. This eliminates the partial volume averaging effect due to light sheet thickness and leads to comparable spatial resolution of the particle field reconstructions in x-, y- and z-axes. In addition, advantage of voxel-based processing with estimations of translation, rotation and shear/strain is taken by using a 3D least-squares matching method, well suited for reconstruction of grey-level pattern fields. The method is discussed in this paper and used to investigate the ring vortex instability at Re = 2500 within a measurement volume of roughly 75 × 75 × 50 mm3 with a spatial resolution of 100 µm/voxel (750 × 750 × 500 voxel elements). The volume has been scanned with a number of 100 light sheets and scan rates of 10 kHz. The results show the growth of the Tsai-Widnall azimuthal instabilities accompanied with a precession of the axis of the vortex ring. Prior to breakdown, secondary instabilities evolve along the core with streamwise oriented striations. The front stagnation point's streamwise distance to the core starts to decrease while

  2. Stable and Transportable Seismic Yield Estimation from Full Envelope Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S. H.; Mayeda, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a transportable, empirically based, multi-frequency local template approach to estimate surface explosion yield from seismic stations that range between ~5 to 50-km distance with yield estimates within 50% of the design yield at 95% confidence using as few as 4 stations for events ranging between ~50 kg to 50 tons. Unlike the regional coda methodology developed by Mayeda et al. (2003) and the more recent synthetic template approach of Pasyanos et al. (2012), near-local coda is short in duration and not well modeled by the simple Aki-style (e.g., Aki 1969) exponential single-scattering formulation in a full-space. With only short durations and high-frequency waveforms at our disposal, our empirical full envelope template matching approach provides nearly an exact match to these complicated waveforms in the near-field. Moreover, as these templates capture the nuance of both the initial P-wave, S-wave and scattered counterparts, our method is very robust and provides roughly a factor of 3 times less yield measurement scatter than peak P-wave and integrated first P-wave estimates (e.g., Ford et al., 2014) and also utilizes a much larger amplitude signal. Time permitting, we will also consider near-regional recordings of surface explosions, Sayarim in Israel.

  3. An investigation of matching symmetry in the human pinnae with possible implications for 3D ear recognition and sound localization.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Reijniers, Jonas; Shriver, Mark D; Snyders, Jonatan; Suetens, Paul; Nielandt, Joachim; De Tré, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The human external ears, or pinnae, have an intriguing shape and, like most parts of the human external body, bilateral symmetry is observed between left and right. It is a well-known part of our auditory sensory system and mediates the spatial localization of incoming sounds in 3D from monaural cues due to its shape-specific filtering as well as binaural cues due to the paired bilateral locations of the left and right ears. Another less broadly appreciated aspect of the human pinna shape is its uniqueness from one individual to another, which is on the level of what is seen in fingerprints and facial features. This makes pinnae very useful in human identification, which is of great interest in biometrics and forensics. Anatomically, the type of symmetry observed is known as matching symmetry, with structures present as separate mirror copies on both sides of the body, and in this work we report the first such investigation of the human pinna in 3D. Within the framework of geometric morphometrics, we started by partitioning ear shape, represented in a spatially dense way, into patterns of symmetry and asymmetry, following a two-factor anova design. Matching symmetry was measured in all substructures of the pinna anatomy. However, substructures that 'stick out' such as the helix, tragus, and lobule also contained a fair degree of asymmetry. In contrast, substructures such as the conchae, antitragus, and antihelix expressed relatively stronger degrees of symmetric variation in relation to their levels of asymmetry. Insights gained from this study were injected into an accompanying identification setup exploiting matching symmetry where improved performance is demonstrated. Finally, possible implications of the results in the context of ear recognition as well as sound localization are discussed.

  4. An investigation of matching symmetry in the human pinnae with possible implications for 3D ear recognition and sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Peter; Reijniers, Jonas; Shriver, Mark D; Snyders, Jonatan; Suetens, Paul; Nielandt, Joachim; De Tré, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The human external ears, or pinnae, have an intriguing shape and, like most parts of the human external body, bilateral symmetry is observed between left and right. It is a well-known part of our auditory sensory system and mediates the spatial localization of incoming sounds in 3D from monaural cues due to its shape-specific filtering as well as binaural cues due to the paired bilateral locations of the left and right ears. Another less broadly appreciated aspect of the human pinna shape is its uniqueness from one individual to another, which is on the level of what is seen in fingerprints and facial features. This makes pinnae very useful in human identification, which is of great interest in biometrics and forensics. Anatomically, the type of symmetry observed is known as matching symmetry, with structures present as separate mirror copies on both sides of the body, and in this work we report the first such investigation of the human pinna in 3D. Within the framework of geometric morphometrics, we started by partitioning ear shape, represented in a spatially dense way, into patterns of symmetry and asymmetry, following a two-factor anova design. Matching symmetry was measured in all substructures of the pinna anatomy. However, substructures that ‘stick out’ such as the helix, tragus, and lobule also contained a fair degree of asymmetry. In contrast, substructures such as the conchae, antitragus, and antihelix expressed relatively stronger degrees of symmetric variation in relation to their levels of asymmetry. Insights gained from this study were injected into an accompanying identification setup exploiting matching symmetry where improved performance is demonstrated. Finally, possible implications of the results in the context of ear recognition as well as sound localization are discussed. PMID:25382291

  5. Distinguishing induced seismicity from natural seismicity in Ohio: Demonstrating the utility of waveform template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoumal, Robert J.; Brudzinski, Michael R.; Currie, Brian S.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the utility of multistation waveform cross correlation to help discern induced seismicity. Template matching was applied to all Ohio earthquakes cataloged since the arrival of nearby EarthScope TA stations in late 2010. Earthquakes that were within 5 km of fluid injection activities in regions that lacked previously documented seismicity were found to be swarmy. Moreover, the larger number of events produced by template matching for these swarmy sequences made it easier to establish more detailed temporal and spatial relationships between the seismicity and fluid injection activities, which is typically required for an earthquake to be considered induced. Study results detected three previously documented induced sequences (Youngstown, Poland Township, and Harrison County) and provided evidence that suggests two additional cases of induced seismicity (Belmont/Guernsey County and Washington County). Evidence for these cases suggested that unusual swarm-like behaviors in regions that lack previously documented seismicity can be used to help distinguish induced seismicity, complementing the traditional identification of an anthropogenic source spatially and temporally correlated with the seismicity. In support of this finding, we identified 17 additional cataloged earthquakes in regions of previously documented seismicity and away from disposal wells or hydraulic fracturing that returned very few template matches. The lack of swarminess helps to indicate that these events are most likely naturally occurring.

  6. [CT guidance (125)I seed implantation for pelvic recurrent rectal cancer assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template].

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J J; Jiang, Y L; Tian, S Q; Ji, Z; Guo, F X; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Xu, Y P

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To analyze the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan of (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing individual non-coplanar template (3D printing template) for locally recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Methods: From February 2016 to April 2016, a total of 10 patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer received (125)I seeds implantation under CT guidance assisted by 3D printing template in Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital.Each patient underwent CT simulation, three-dimentional treatment planning pre-implantation, 3D printing template design, radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing template and dosimetric verification post implantation. The median activity of seed was 0.63 mCi (0.58 to 0.7 mCi) (2.15- 2.59×10(7) Bq), and the median number of seeds was 80 (19 to 192). D90, D100, V100, V150, CI, EI, HI, D5cc, D2cc of bladder and bowel of pre-plan and post-plan were calculated, respectively.Paired t test was used to evaluate the difference of dosimetric parameters between pre-plan and post-plan. Results: The median D90 of pre-plan and post-plan were 13 761.0 and 12 798.8 cGy, respectively.The median D100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 5 293.6 and 5 397.9 cGy, respectively.The median V100 of pre-plan and post-plan were 90.0% and 90.0%, respectively.The median V150 of pre-plan and post-plan were 63.8% and 62.4%, respectively.The median CI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.73 and 0.67.The median EI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.22 and 0.30, respectively. The median HI of pre-plan and post-plan were 0.29 and 0.31.The median bladder D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 3 088.8 and 4 240.4 cGy, respectively.The median bowel D2cc of pre-plan and post-plan were 7 051.6 and 7 903.9 cGy, respectively. Conclusions: 3D printing template might be helpful for locally recurrent rectal cancer patients who received (125)I radioactive seed implantation assisted by 3D printing

  7. Novel DOCK clique driven 3D similarity database search tools for molecule shape matching and beyond: adding flexibility to the search for ligand kin.

    PubMed

    Good, Andrew C

    2007-10-01

    With readily available CPU power and copious disk storage, it is now possible to undertake rapid comparison of 3D properties derived from explicit ligand overlay experiments. With this in mind, shape software tools originally devised in the 1990s are revisited, modified and applied to the problem of ligand database shape comparison. The utility of Connolly surface data is highlighted using the program MAKESITE, which leverages surface normal data to a create ligand shape cast. This cast is applied directly within DOCK, allowing the program to be used unmodified as a shape searching tool. In addition, DOCK has undergone multiple modifications to create a dedicated ligand shape comparison tool KIN. Scoring has been altered to incorporate the original incarnation of Gaussian function derived shape description based on STO-3G atomic electron density. In addition, a tabu-like search refinement has been added to increase search speed by removing redundant starting orientations produced during clique matching. The ability to use exclusion regions, again based on Gaussian shape overlap, has also been integrated into the scoring function. The use of both DOCK with MAKESITE and KIN in database screening mode is illustrated using a published ligand shape virtual screening template. The advantages of using a clique-driven search paradigm are highlighted, including shape optimization within a pharmacophore constrained framework, and easy incorporation of additional scoring function modifications. The potential for further development of such methods is also discussed.

  8. Matched filtering of gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries: Computational cost and template placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Benjamin J.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    1999-07-01

    We estimate the number of templates, computational power, and storage required for a one-step matched filtering search for gravitational waves from inspiraling compact binaries. Our estimates for the one-step search strategy should serve as benchmarks for the evaluation of more sophisticated strategies such as hierarchical searches. We use a discrete family of two-parameter wave form templates based on the second post-Newtonian approximation for binaries composed of nonspinning compact bodies in circular orbits. We present estimates for all of the large- and mid-scale interferometers now under construction: LIGO (three configurations), VIRGO, GEO600, and TAMA. To search for binaries with components more massive than mmin=0.2Msolar while losing no more than 10% of events due to coarseness of template spacing, the initial LIGO interferometers will require about 1.0×1011 flops (floating point operations per second) for data analysis to keep up with data acquisition. This is several times higher than estimated in previous work by Owen, in part because of the improved family of templates and in part because we use more realistic (higher) sampling rates. Enhanced LIGO, GEO600, and TAMA will require computational power similar to initial LIGO. Advanced LIGO will require 7.8×1011 flops, and VIRGO will require 4.8×1012 flops to take full advantage of its broad target noise spectrum. If the templates are stored rather than generated as needed, storage requirements range from 1.5×1011 real numbers for TAMA to 6.2×1014 for VIRGO. The computational power required scales roughly as m-8/3min and the storage as m-13/3min. Since these scalings are perturbed by the curvature of the parameter space at second post-Newtonian order, we also provide estimates for a search with mmin=1Msolar. Finally, we sketch and discuss an algorithm for placing the templates in the parameter space.

  9. Towards real-time 3D US to CT bone image registration using phase and curvature feature based GMM matching.

    PubMed

    Brounstein, Anna; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Guy, Pierre; Hodgson, Antony; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2011-01-01

    In order to use pre-operatively acquired computed tomography (CT) scans to guide surgical tool movements in orthopaedic surgery, the CT scan must first be registered to the patient's anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) could potentially be used for this purpose if the registration process could be made sufficiently automatic, fast and accurate, but existing methods have difficulties meeting one or more of these criteria. We propose a near-real-time US-to-CT registration method that matches point clouds extracted from local phase images with points selected in part on the basis of local curvature. The point clouds are represented as Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) and registration is achieved by minimizing the statistical dissimilarity between the GMMs using an L2 distance metric. We present quantitative and qualitative results on both phantom and clinical pelvis data and show a mean registration time of 2.11 s with a mean accuracy of 0.49 mm.

  10. [Using neural networks based template matching method to obtain redshifts of normal galaxies].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Luo, A-li; Wu, Fu-chao; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2005-06-01

    Galaxies can be divided into two classes: normal galaxy (NG) and active galaxy (AG). In order to determine NG redshifts, an automatic effective method is proposed in this paper, which consists of the following three main steps: (1) From the template of normal galaxy, the two sets of samples are simulated, one with the redshift of 0.0-0.3, the other of 0.3-0.5, then the PCA is used to extract the main components, and train samples are projected to the main component subspace to obtain characteristic spectra. (2) The characteristic spectra are used to train a Probabilistic Neural Network to obtain a Bayes classifier. (3) An unknown real NG spectrum is first inputted to this Bayes classifier to determine the possible range of redshift, then the template matching is invoked to locate the redshift value within the estimated range. Compared with the traditional template matching technique with an unconstrained range, our proposed method not only halves the computational load, but also increases the estimation accuracy. As a result, the proposed method is particularly useful for automatic spectrum processing produced from a large-scale sky survey project.

  11. Optimizing multi-station earthquake template matching through re-examination of the Youngstown, Ohio, sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoumal, Robert J.; Brudzinski, Michael R.; Currie, Brian S.; Levy, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    A series of earthquakes in 2011 near Youngstown, OH, has been a focal point for discussions of seismicity induced by a nearby wastewater disposal well. Utilizing an efficient waveform template matching procedure, the optimal correlation template to study the Youngstown sequence was identified by varying parameters such as the stations utilized, frequency passband, and seismogram length. A catalog composed of 566 events was identified between January 2011 and February 2014. Double-difference relocation refines seismicity to a ˜800 m linear streak from the Northstar 1 injection well to the WSW along the same strike as the fault plane of the largest event. Calculated Gutenberg-Richter b-values are consistent with trends observed in other regions with seismicity induced by fluid injection.

  12. Dendritic cell recognition using template matching based on one-dimensional (1D) Fourier descriptors (FD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhd Suberi, Anis Azwani; Wan Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani; Tomari, Razali; Lau, Mei Xia

    2016-07-01

    Identification of Dendritic Cell (DC) particularly in the cancer microenvironment is a unique disclosure since fighting tumor from the harnessing immune system has been a novel treatment under investigation. Nowadays, the staining procedure in sorting DC can affect their viability. In this paper, a computer aided system is proposed for automatic classification of DC in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) images. Initially, the images undergo a few steps in preprocessing to remove uneven illumination and artifacts around the cells. In segmentation, morphological operators and Canny edge are implemented to isolate the cell shapes and extract the contours. Following that, information from the contours are extracted based on Fourier descriptors, derived from one dimensional (1D) shape signatures. Eventually, cells are classified as DC by comparing template matching (TM) of established template and target images. The results show that the proposed scheme is reliable and effective to recognize DC.

  13. Template-matching based detection of hyperbolas in ground-penetrating radargrams for buried utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnard, Florence; Tarel, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a mature geophysical technique that is used to map utility pipelines buried within 1.5 m of the ground surface in the urban landscape. In this work, the template-matching algorithm has been originally applied to the detection and localization of pipe signatures in two perpendicular antenna polarizations. The processing of a GPR radargram is based on four main steps. The first step consists in defining a template, usually from finite-difference time-domain simulations, made of the nearby area of the hyperbola apex associated with the mean size object to be detected in the soil, whose mean permittivity has been previously experimentally estimated. In the second step, the raw radargram is pre-processed to correct variations due to antenna coupling, then the template matching algorithm is used to detect and localize individual hyperbola signatures in an environment containing unwanted reflections, noise and overlapping signatures. The distance between the shifted template and a local zone in the radargram, based on the L1 norm, allows us to obtain a map of distances. A user-defined threshold allows us to select a reduced number of zones having a high similarity measure. In the third step, minimum or maximum discrete amplitudes belonging to a selected hyperbola curve are semi-automatically extracted in each zone. In the fourth step, the discrete hyperbola data (i, j) are fitted by a parametric hyperbola model using a non-linear least squares criterion. The algorithm was implemented and evaluated on numerical radargrams, and afterwards on experimental radargrams.

  14. SU-E-J-108: Template Matching Based On Multiple Templates Can Improve the Tumor Tracking Performance When There Is Large Tumor Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X; Lin, J; Diwanji, T; Mooney, K; D'Souza, W; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recently, template matching has been shown to be able to track tumor motion on cine-MRI images. However, artifacts such as deformation, rotation, and/or out-of-plane movement could seriously degrade the performance of this technique. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of multiple templates derived from different phases of tumor motion in reducing the negative effects of artifacts and improving the accuracy of template matching methods. Methods: Data from 2 patients with large tumors and significant tumor deformation were analyzed from a group of 12 patients from an earlier study. Cine-MRI (200 frames) imaging was performed while the patients were instructed to breathe normally. Ground truth tumor position was established on each frame manually by a radiation oncologist. Tumor positions were also automatically determined using template matching with either single or multiple (5) templates. The tracking errors, defined as the absolute differences in tumor positions determined by the manual and automated methods, when using either single or multiple templates were compared in both the AP and SI directions, respectively. Results: Using multiple templates reduced the tracking error of template matching. In the SI direction where the tumor movement and deformation were significant, the mean tracking error decreased from 1.94 mm to 0.91 mm (Patient 1) and from 6.61 mm to 2.06 mm (Patient 2). In the AP direction where the tumor movement was small, the reduction of the mean tracking error was significant in Patient 1 (from 3.36 mm to 1.04 mm), but not in Patient 2 ( from 3.86 mm to 3.80 mm). Conclusion: This study shows the effectiveness of using multiple templates in improving the performance of template matching when artifacts like large tumor deformation or out-of-plane motion exists. Accurate tumor tracking capabilities can be integrated with MRI guided radiation therapy systems. This work was supported in part by grants from NIH/NCI CA 124766 and Varian

  15. ZnO template strategy for the synthesis of 3D interconnected graphene nanocapsules from coal tar pitch as supercapacitor electrode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaojing; Ma, Hao; Han, Jiufeng; Zhang, Hao; Yu, Chang; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2017-02-01

    3D interconnected graphene nanocapsules (GNCs) were prepared from diverse aromatic hydrocarbons by a nano-ZnO-template strategy coupled with in-situ KOH activation technique. The as-made graphene networks feature thin carbonaceous shells with well-balanced micropores and mesopores. Such 3D porous networks provide freeways for good electron conduction, short pores for ion fast transport, and abundant micropores for ion adsorption. As the electrodes in supercapacitors, the unique 3D GNCs show a high capacitance of 277 F g-1 at 0.05 A g-1, a good rate performance of 194 F g-1 at 20 A g-1, and an excellent cycle stability with over 97.4% capacitance retention after 15000 cycles in 6 M KOH electrolyte. This synthesis strategy paves a universal way for mass production of 3D graphene materials from diverse aromatic hydrocarbon sources including coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch for high performance supercapacitors as well as support and sorbent.

  16. Appearance and incomplete label matching for diffeomorphic template based hippocampus segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pluta, John; Avants, Brian B; Glynn, Simon; Awate, Suyash; Gee, James C; Detre, John A

    2009-06-01

    We present a robust, high-throughput, semiautomated template-based protocol for segmenting the hippocampus in temporal lobe epilepsy. The semiautomated component of this approach, which minimizes user effort while maximizing the benefit of human input to the algorithm, relies on "incomplete labeling." Incomplete labeling requires the user to quickly and approximately segment a few key regions of the hippocampus through a user-interface. Subsequently, this partial labeling of the hippocampus is combined with image similarity terms to guide volumetric diffeomorphic normalization between an individual brain and an unbiased disease-specific template, with fully labeled hippocampi. We solve this many-to-few and few-to-many matching problem, and gain robustness to inter and intrarater variability and small errors in user labeling, by embedding the template-based normalization within a probabilistic framework that examines both label geometry and appearance data at each label. We evaluate the reliability of this framework with respect to manual labeling and show that it increases minimum performance levels relative to fully automated approaches and provides high inter-rater reliability. Thus, this approach does not require expert neuroanatomical training and is viable for high-throughput studies of both the normal and the highly atrophic hippocampus.

  17. Lattice and strain analysis of atomic resolution Z-contrast images based on template matching.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jian-Min; Shah, Amish B; Kim, Honggyu; Meng, Yifei; Gao, Wenpei; Rouviére, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    A real space approach is developed based on template matching for quantitative lattice analysis using atomic resolution Z-contrast images. The method, called TeMA, uses the template of an atomic column, or a group of atomic columns, to transform the image into a lattice of correlation peaks. This is helped by using a local intensity adjusted correlation and by the design of templates. Lattice analysis is performed on the correlation peaks. A reference lattice is used to correct for scan noise and scan distortions in the recorded images. Using these methods, we demonstrate that a precision of few picometers is achievable in lattice measurement using aberration corrected Z-contrast images. For application, we apply the methods to strain analysis of a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown LaMnO₃ and SrMnO₃ superlattice. The results show alternating epitaxial strain inside the superlattice and its variations across interfaces at the spatial resolution of a single perovskite unit cell. Our methods are general, model free and provide high spatial resolution for lattice analysis.

  18. Contour detection of atherosclerotic plaques in IVUS images using ellipse template matching and particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jianying; Shi, Jun

    2011-01-01

    It is valuable for diagnosis of atherosclerosis to detect lumen and media-adventitia contours in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of atherosclerotic plaques. In this paper, a method for contour detection of plaques is proposed utilizing the prior knowledge of elliptic geometry of plaques. Contours are initialized as ellipses by using ellipse template matching, where a matching function is maximized by particle swarm optimization. Then the contours are refined by boundary vector field snakes. The method was evaluated via 88 in vivo images from 21 patients. It outperformed a state-of-the-art method by 3.8 pixels and 4.8% in terms of the mean distance error and relative mean distance error, respectively.

  19. A Novel Multi-Purpose Matching Representation of Local 3D Surfaces: A Rotationally Invariant, Efficient, and Highly Discriminative Approach With an Adjustable Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Osaimi, Faisal R

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to local 3D surface matching representation suitable for a range of 3D vision applications is introduced. Local 3D surface patches around key points on the 3D surface are represented by 2D images such that the representing 2D images enjoy certain characteristics which positively impact the matching accuracy, robustness, and speed. First, the proposed representation is complete, in the sense, there is no information loss during their computation. Second, the 3DoF 2D representations are strictly invariant to all the 3DoF rotations. To optimally avail surface information, the sensitivity of the representations to surface information is adjustable. This also provides the proposed matching representation with the means to optimally adjust to a particular class of problems/applications or an acquisition technology. Each 2D matching representation is a sequence of adjustable integral kernels, where each kernel is efficiently computed from a triple of precise 3D curves (profiles) formed by intersecting three concentric spheres with the 3D surface. Robust techniques for sampling the profiles and establishing correspondences among them were devised. Based on the proposed matching representation, two techniques for the detection of key points were presented. The first is suitable for static images, while the second is suitable for 3D videos. The approach was tested on the face recognition grand challenge v2.0, the 3D twins expression challenge, and the Bosphorus data sets, and a superior face recognition performance was achieved. In addition, the proposed approach was used in object class recognition and tested on a Kinect data set.

  20. Semi-automatic template matching based extraction of hyperbolic signatures in ground-penetrating radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnard, Florence; Tarel, Jean-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    In civil engineering applications, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is one of the main non destructive technique based on the refraction and reflection of electromagnetic waves to probe the underground and particularly detect damages (cracks, delaminations, texture changes…) and buried objects (utilities, rebars…). An UWB ground-coupled radar operating in the frequency band [0.46;4] GHz and made of bowtie slot antennas has been used because, comparing to a air-launched radar, it increases energy transfer of electromagnetic radiation in the sub-surface and penetration depth. This paper proposes an original adaptation of the generic template matching algorithm to GPR images to recognize, localize and characterize with parameters a specific pattern associated with a hyperbola signature in the two main polarizations. The processing of a radargram (Bscan) is based on four main steps. The first step consists in pre-processing and scaling. The second step uses template matching to isolate and localize individual hyperbola signatures in an environment containing unwanted reflections, noise and overlapping signatures. The algorithm supposes to generate and collect a set of reference hyperbola templates made of a small reflection pattern in the vicinity of the apex in order to further analyze multiple time signals of embedded targets in an image. The standard Euclidian distance between the template shifted and a local zone in the radargram allows to obtain a map of distances. A user-defined threshold allows to select a reduced number of zones having a high similarity measure. In a third step, each zone is analyzed to detect minimum or maximum discrete amplitudes belonging to the first arrival times of a hyperbola signature. In the fourth step, the extracted discrete data (i,j) are fitted by a parametric hyperbola modeling based on the straight ray path hypothesis and using a constraint least square criterion associated with parameter ranges, that are the position, the

  1. 3-D matrix template-assisted growth of oriented oxide nanowire arrays using glancing angle pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, N.; Mateo-Feliciano, D.; Ostoski, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Witanachchi, S.

    Nanosphere lithography is a combination of different methods to nanofabrication. In this work nanosphere lithography is used to study the growth of Zinc Oxide Nano-columns (ZnO NCs) on different diameter Silica Nanosphere (SNS) self-assembled templates. ZnO NCs are promising building blocks for many existing and emerging optical, electrical, and piezoelectric devices, specifically, the seeded growth of other oxide materials. Recently, reports have shown a ferroelectric phase of zinc stannate (ZnSnO3) and while lead zirconium titanate oxide (PZT) has been the main material of interest in ferroelectric and piezoelectric applications, the toxicity of lead has been of great concern. The possibility of developing lead free piezoelectric materials is of great interest in the ferroelectric community. Langmuir-Blodgett method was used to construct a self-assembled monolayer of SNSs on silicon substrates. Oriented ZnO NCs were grown on top of the spheres using the glancing angle pulsed laser deposition technique. Columns were formed in a spatially ordered closed-packed hexagonal configuration. Growth of ZnO NCs was studied as function of ambient Oxygen pressure with SNS size ranging from 250-1000 nm. Cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the template structure. Relative aspect ratios were studied and showed tunability of column dimensions with sphere size. XRD revealed ZnO NC arrays were c-axis oriented with hexagonal wurtzite structure.

  2. Nanosized LiFePO4-decorated emulsion-templated carbon foam for 3D micro batteries: a study of structure and electrochemical performance.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Habtom D; Roberts, Matthew R; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Younesi, Reza; Valvo, Mario; Nyholm, Leif; Edström, Kristina

    2014-08-07

    In this article, we report a novel 3D composite cathode fabricated from LiFePO4 nanoparticles deposited conformally on emulsion-templated carbon foam by a sol-gel method. The carbon foam is synthesized via a facile and scalable method which involves the carbonization of a high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) polymer template. Various techniques (XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical methods) are used to fully characterize the porous electrode and confirm the distribution and morphology of the cathode active material. The major benefits of the carbon foam used in our work are closely connected with its high surface area and the plenty of space suitable for sequential coating with battery components. After coating with a cathode material (LiFePO4 nanoparticles), the 3D electrode presents a hierarchically structured electrode in which a porous layer of the cathode material is deposited on the rigid and bicontinuous carbon foam. The composite electrodes exhibit impressive cyclability and rate performance at different current densities affirming their importance as viable power sources in miniature devices. Footprint area capacities of 1.72 mA h cm(-2) at 0.1 mA cm(-2) (lowest rate) and 1.1 mA h cm(-2) at 6 mA cm(-2) (highest rate) are obtained when the cells are cycled in the range 2.8 to 4.0 V vs. lithium.

  3. Fabrication of 3D interconnected porous TiO2 nanotubes templated by poly(vinyl chloride-g-4-vinyl pyridine) for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Joo Hwan; Koh, Jong Kwan; Seo, Jin Ah; Shin, Jong-Shik; Kim, Jong Hak

    2011-09-07

    Porous TiO(2) nanotube arrays with three-dimensional (3D) interconnectivity were prepared using a sol-gel process assisted by poly(vinyl chloride-graft-4-vinyl pyridine), PVC-g-P4VP graft copolymer and a ZnO nanorod template. A 7 µm long ZnO nanorod array was grown from the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass via a liquid phase deposition method. The TiO(2) sol-gel solution templated by the PVC-g-P4VP graft copolymer produced a random 3D interconnection between the adjacent ZnO nanorods during spin coating. Upon etching of ZnO, TiO(2) nanotubes consisting of 10-15 nm nanoparticles were generated, as confirmed by wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The ordered and interconnected nanotube architecture showed an enhanced light scattering effect and increased penetration of polymer electrolytes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). The energy conversion efficiency reached 1.82% for liquid electrolyte, and 1.46% for low molecular weight (M(w)) and 0.74% for high M(w) polymer electrolytes.

  4. Comparison of template-matching and singular-spectrum-analysis methods for imaging implanted brachytherapy seeds.

    PubMed

    Alam, S Kaisar; Mamou, Jonathan; Feleppa, Ernest J; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu

    2011-11-01

    Brachytherapy using small implanted radioactive seeds is becoming an increasingly popular method for treating prostate cancer, in which a radiation oncologist implants seeds in the prostate transperineally under ultrasound guidance. Dosimetry software determines the optimal placement of seeds for achieving the prescribed dose based on ultrasonic determination of the gland boundaries. However, because of prostate movement and distortion during the implantation procedure, some seeds may not be placed in the desired locations; this causes the delivered dose to differ from the prescribed dose. Current ultrasonic imaging methods generally cannot depict the implanted seeds accurately. We are investigating new ultrasonic imaging methods that show promise for enhancing the visibility of seeds and thereby enabling real-time detection and correction of seed-placement errors during the implantation procedure. Real-time correction of seed-placement errors will improve the therapeutic radiation dose delivered to target tissues. In this work, we compare the potential performance of a template-matching method and a previously published method based on singular spectrum analysis for imaging seeds. In particular, we evaluated how changes in seed angle and position relative to the ultrasound beam affect seed detection. The conclusion of the present study is that singular spectrum analysis has better sensitivity but template matching is more resistant to false positives; both perform well enough to make seed detection clinically feasible over a relevant range of angles and positions. Combining the information provided by the two methods may further reduce ambiguities in determining where seeds are located.

  5. Automatic identification of resting state networks: an extended version of multiple template-matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaje, Javier; Molina, Juan; Rudas, Jorge; Demertzi, Athena; Heine, Lizette; Tshibanda, Luaba; Soddu, Andrea; Laureys, Steven; Gómez, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging in resting state (fMRI-RS) constitutes an informative protocol to investigate several pathological and pharmacological conditions. A common approach to study this data source is through the analysis of changes in the so called resting state networks (RSNs). These networks correspond to well-defined functional entities that have been associated to different low and high brain order functions. RSNs may be characterized by using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). ICA provides a decomposition of the fMRI-RS signal into sources of brain activity, but it lacks of information about the nature of the signal, i.e., if the source is artifactual or not. Recently, a multiple template-matching (MTM) approach was proposed to automatically recognize RSNs in a set of Independent Components (ICs). This method provides valuable information to assess subjects at individual level. Nevertheless, it lacks of a mechanism to quantify how much certainty there is about the existence/absence of each network. This information may be important for the assessment of patients with severely damaged brains, in which RSNs may be greatly affected as a result of the pathological condition. In this work we propose a set of changes to the original MTM that improves the RSNs recognition task and also extends the functionality of the method. The key points of this improvement is a standardization strategy and a modification of method's constraints that adds flexibility to the approach. Additionally, we also introduce an analysis to the trustworthiness measurement of each RSN obtained by using template-matching approach. This analysis consists of a thresholding strategy applied over the computed Goodness-of-Fit (GOF) between the set of templates and the ICs. The proposed method was validated on 2 two independent studies (Baltimore, 23 healthy subjects and Liege, 27 healthy subjects) with different configurations of MTM. Results suggest that the method will provide

  6. An improved finger-vein recognition algorithm based on template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueyue; Di, Si; Jin, Jian; Huang, Daoping

    2016-10-01

    Finger-vein recognition has became the most popular biometric identify methods. The investigation on the recognition algorithms always is the key point in this field. So far, there are many applicable algorithms have been developed. However, there are still some problems in practice, such as the variance of the finger position which may lead to the image distortion and shifting; during the identification process, some matching parameters determined according to experience may also reduce the adaptability of algorithm. Focus on above mentioned problems, this paper proposes an improved finger-vein recognition algorithm based on template matching. In order to enhance the robustness of the algorithm for the image distortion, the least squares error method is adopted to correct the oblique finger. During the feature extraction, local adaptive threshold method is adopted. As regard as the matching scores, we optimized the translation preferences as well as matching distance between the input images and register images on the basis of Naoto Miura algorithm. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can improve the robustness effectively under the finger shifting and rotation conditions.

  7. Investigations into the feasibility of optical-CT 3D dosimetry with minimal use of refractively matched fluids

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Kelsey; Miles, Devin; Rankine, Leith; Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In optical-CT, the use of a refractively matched polyurethane solid-tank in place of a fluid bath has the potential to greatly increase practical convenience, reduce cost, and possibly improve the efficacy of flood corrections. This work investigates the feasibility of solid-tank optical-CT imaging for 3D dosimetry through computer simulation. Methods: A matlab ray-tracing simulation platform, ScanSim, was used to model a parallel-source telecentric optical-CT imaging system through a polyurethane solid-tank containing a central cylindrical hollow into which PRESAGE radiochromic dosimeters can be placed. A small amount of fluid fills the 1–5 mm gap between the dosimeter and the walls of the tank. The use of the solid-tank reduces the required amount of fluid by approximately 97%. To characterize the efficacy of solid-tank, optical-CT scanning simulations investigated sensitivity to refractive index (RI) mismatches between dosimeter, solid-tank, and fluid, for a variety of dosimeter (RI = 1.5–1.47) and fluid (RI = 1.55–1.0) combinations. Efficacy was evaluated through the usable radius (ru) metric, defined as the fraction of the radius of the dosimeter where measured dose is predicted to be within 2% of the ground truth entered into the simulation. Additional simulations examined the effect of increasing gap size (1–5 mm) between the dosimeter and solid-tank well. The effects of changing the lens tolerance (0.5°–5.0°) were also investigated. Results: As the RI mismatch between the dosimeter and solid-tank increased from 0 to 0.02, the usable radius decreased from 97.6% to 50.2%. The optimal fluid RI decreased nonlinearly from 1.5 to 1.34 as the mismatch increased and was up to 9% lower than the tank. Media mismatches between the dosimeter and solid-tank also exacerbate the effects of changing the gap size, with no easily quantifiable relationship with usable radius. Generally, the optimal fluid RI value increases as gap size increases and is

  8. Construction of a 3D porous network of copper film via a template-free deposition method with superior mechanical and electrical properties for micro-energy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuncheng; Wang, Yao; Deng, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of performance of energy conversion micro-devices, such as thin-film solar cells and thermoelectric micro-generators or coolers, their reliability and stability still remain a challenge. The high electrical and mechanical stability of an electrode is two of the critical factors that affect the long-term life of devices. Here we show that these factors can be achieved by constructing a 3D porous network of nanostructures in copper film using facile magnetron sputtering technology without any templates. The constructed 3D porous network of nanostructures in Cu film provides not only the advantages of light weight, prominently high conductivity, and large elastic deformation, but also the ability to absorb stress, preventing crack propagation, which is crucial for electrodes to maintain stable electrical and mechanical properties under working conditions. The nanopores inside the 3D network are capable of unrestrained deformation under applied stress resulting in strong elastic recovery. This work puts forward a feasible solution for manufacturing electrodes with excellent electrical and mechanical properties for micro-energy devices.

  9. Template synthesis of SnO2/α-Fe2O3 nanotube array for 3D lithium ion battery anode with large areal capacity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weiqian; Zheng, Feipeng; Li, Ruizhi; Zhan, Yang; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jinping

    2012-04-21

    Electrodes with three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure are expected to improve the energy and power densities per footprint area of lithium ion microbatteries. Herein, we report a large-scale synthesis of a SnO(2)/α-Fe(2)O(3) composite nanotube array on a stainless steel substrate via a ZnO nanowire array as an in situ sacrificial template without using any strong acid or alkali. Importantly, both SnO(2) and α-Fe(2)O(3) contribute to the lithium storage, and the hybridization of SnO(2) and α-Fe(2)O(3) into an integrated nanotube structure provides them with an elegant synergistic effect when participating in electrochemical reactions. Large areal capacities and good rate capability are demonstrated for such a composite nanotube array. Particularly noteworthy is that the areal capacities (e.g. 1.289 mAh cm(-2) at a current rate of 0.1 mA cm(-2)) are much larger than those of many previous thin-film/3D microbattery electrodes. Our work suggests the possibility of further improving the areal capacity/energy density of 3D microelectrodes by designing ordered hybrid nanostructure arrays.

  10. Templated assembly of BiFeO3 nanocrystals into 3D mesoporous networks for catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadas, I. T.; Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Armatas, G. S.

    2015-03-01

    The self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals into large porous architectures is currently of immense interest for nanochemistry and nanotechnology. These materials combine the respective advantages of discrete nanoparticles and mesoporous structures. In this article, we demonstrate a facile nanoparticle templating process to synthesize a three-dimensional mesoporous BiFeO3 material. This approach involves the polymer-assisted aggregating assembly of 3-aminopropanoic acid-stabilized bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) nanocrystals followed by thermal decomposition of the surfactant. The resulting material consists of a network of tightly connected BiFeO3 nanoparticles (~6-7 nm in diameter) and has a moderately high surface area (62 m2 g-1) and uniform pores (ca. 6.3 nm). As a result of the unique mesostructure, the porous assemblies of BiFeO3 nanoparticles show an excellent catalytic activity and chemical stability for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol with NaBH4.The self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals into large porous architectures is currently of immense interest for nanochemistry and nanotechnology. These materials combine the respective advantages of discrete nanoparticles and mesoporous structures. In this article, we demonstrate a facile nanoparticle templating process to synthesize a three-dimensional mesoporous BiFeO3 material. This approach involves the polymer-assisted aggregating assembly of 3-aminopropanoic acid-stabilized bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) nanocrystals followed by thermal decomposition of the surfactant. The resulting material consists of a network of tightly connected BiFeO3 nanoparticles (~6-7 nm in diameter) and has a moderately high surface area (62 m2 g-1) and uniform pores (ca. 6.3 nm). As a result of the unique mesostructure, the porous assemblies of BiFeO3 nanoparticles show an excellent catalytic activity and chemical stability for the reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol with NaBH4. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  11. Real-time tracking by double templates matching based on timed motion history image with HSV feature.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyong; Li, Pengfei; Yu, Xiaoping; Hashem, Mervat

    2014-01-01

    It is a challenge to represent the target appearance model for moving object tracking under complex environment. This study presents a novel method with appearance model described by double templates based on timed motion history image with HSV color histogram feature (tMHI-HSV). The main components include offline template and online template initialization, tMHI-HSV-based candidate patches feature histograms calculation, double templates matching (DTM) for object location, and templates updating. Firstly, we initialize the target object region and calculate its HSV color histogram feature as offline template and online template. Secondly, the tMHI-HSV is used to segment the motion region and calculate these candidate object patches' color histograms to represent their appearance models. Finally, we utilize the DTM method to trace the target and update the offline template and online template real-timely. The experimental results show that the proposed method can efficiently handle the scale variation and pose change of the rigid and nonrigid objects, even in illumination change and occlusion visual environment.

  12. Self-Templating Construction of 3D Hierarchical Macro-/Mesoporous Silicon from 0D Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiuxia; Xia, Yonggao; Ji, Qing; Gao, Xiang; Yin, Shanshan; Wang, Meimei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Bao; Wei, Anxiang; Sun, Zaicheng; Liu, Zhaoping; Zhu, Jin; Cheng, Ya-Jun

    2017-01-24

    Porous silicon has found wide applications in many different fields including catalysis and lithium-ion batteries. Three-dimensional hierarchical macro-/mesoporous silicon is synthesized from zero-dimensional Stöber silica particles through a facile and scalable magnesiothermic reduction process. By systematic structure characterization of the macro-/mesoporous silicon, a self-templating mechanism governing the formation of the porous silicon is proposed. Applications as lithium-ion battery anode and photocatalytic hydrogen evolution catalyst are demonstrated. It is found that the macro-/mesoporous silicon shows significantly improved cyclic and rate performance over the commercial nanosized and micrometer-sized silicon particles. After 300 cycles at 0.2 A g(-1), the reversible specific capacity is still retained as much as 959 mAh g(-1) with a high mass loading density of 1.4 mg cm(-2). With the large current density of 2 A g(-1), a reversible capacity of 632 mAh g(-1) is exhibited. The coexistence of both macro- and mesoporous structures is responsible for the enhanced performance. The macro-/mesoporous silicon also shows superior catalytic performance for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution compared to the silicon nanoparticles.

  13. Characterization of Cerebral Vascular Response to EEG Bursts Using ICP Pulse Waveform Template Matching.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mark; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurovascular coupling is the relationship between the activity of the brain and the subsequent change in blood flow to the active region. The most common methods of detecting neurovascular coupling are cumbersome and noncontinuous. However, the integration of intracranial pressure (ICP) and electroencephalography (EEG) may serve as an indirect measure of neurovascular coupling.This study used data collected from burst-suppressed patients who received both ICP and depth EEG monitoring. An adaptive thresholding algorithm was used to detect the start and end of each EEG burst. The morphological clustering and analysis of ICP and pulse morphological template-matching algorithms were then applied to derive several metrics describing the shape of the ICP pulse waveform and track how it changed following an EEG burst. These changes were compared using a template obtained from patients undergoing CO2-induced vasodilation.All segments exhibited a significant period of vasodilation within 1-2 s after burst, and 4 of 5 had a significant period of vasoconstriction within 4-11 s of the EEG burst, suggesting that there might be a characteristic response of vasodilation and subsequent vasoconstriction after a spontaneous EEG burst. Furthermore, these findings demonstrate the potential of integrated EEG and ICP as an indirect measure of neurovascular coupling.

  14. Two dimensional template matching method for buried object discrimination in GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin, Mehmet

    2009-05-01

    In this study discrimination of two different metallic object classes were studied, utilizing Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Feature sets of both classes have almost the same information for both Metal Detector (MD) and GPR data. There were no evident features those are easily discriminate classes. Background removal has been applied to original B-Scan data and then a normalization process was performed. Image thresholding was applied to segment B-Scan GPR images. So, main hyperbolic shape of buried object reflection was extracted and then a morphological process was performed optionally. Templates of each class representatives have been obtained and they were searched whether they match with true class or not. Two data sets were examined experimentally. Actually they were obtained in different time and burial for the same objects. Considerably high discrimination performance was obtained which was not possible by using individual Metal Detector data.

  15. The Elementary Operations of Human Vision Are Not Reducible to Template-Matching

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Peter

    2015-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that biological vision presents nonlinear characteristics, yet linear filtering accounts of visual processing are ubiquitous. The template-matching operation implemented by the linear-nonlinear cascade (linear filter followed by static nonlinearity) is the most widely adopted computational tool in systems neuroscience. This simple model achieves remarkable explanatory power while retaining analytical tractability, potentially extending its reach to a wide range of systems and levels in sensory processing. The extent of its applicability to human behaviour, however, remains unclear. Because sensory stimuli possess multiple attributes (e.g. position, orientation, size), the issue of applicability may be asked by considering each attribute one at a time in relation to a family of linear-nonlinear models, or by considering all attributes collectively in relation to a specified implementation of the linear-nonlinear cascade. We demonstrate that human visual processing can operate under conditions that are indistinguishable from linear-nonlinear transduction with respect to substantially different stimulus attributes of a uniquely specified target signal with associated behavioural task. However, no specific implementation of a linear-nonlinear cascade is able to account for the entire collection of results across attributes; a satisfactory account at this level requires the introduction of a small gain-control circuit, resulting in a model that no longer belongs to the linear-nonlinear family. Our results inform and constrain efforts at obtaining and interpreting comprehensive characterizations of the human sensory process by demonstrating its inescapably nonlinear nature, even under conditions that have been painstakingly fine-tuned to facilitate template-matching behaviour and to produce results that, at some level of inspection, do conform to linear filtering predictions. They also suggest that compliance with linear transduction may be

  16. Nanosized LiFePO4-decorated emulsion-templated carbon foam for 3D micro batteries: a study of structure and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Habtom D.; Roberts, Matthew R.; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Younesi, Reza; Valvo, Mario; Nyholm, Leif; Edström, Kristina

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we report a novel 3D composite cathode fabricated from LiFePO4 nanoparticles deposited conformally on emulsion-templated carbon foam by a sol-gel method. The carbon foam is synthesized via a facile and scalable method which involves the carbonization of a high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) polymer template. Various techniques (XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical methods) are used to fully characterize the porous electrode and confirm the distribution and morphology of the cathode active material. The major benefits of the carbon foam used in our work are closely connected with its high surface area and the plenty of space suitable for sequential coating with battery components. After coating with a cathode material (LiFePO4 nanoparticles), the 3D electrode presents a hierarchically structured electrode in which a porous layer of the cathode material is deposited on the rigid and bicontinuous carbon foam. The composite electrodes exhibit impressive cyclability and rate performance at different current densities affirming their importance as viable power sources in miniature devices. Footprint area capacities of 1.72 mA h cm-2 at 0.1 mA cm-2 (lowest rate) and 1.1 mA h cm-2 at 6 mA cm-2 (highest rate) are obtained when the cells are cycled in the range 2.8 to 4.0 V vs. lithium.In this article, we report a novel 3D composite cathode fabricated from LiFePO4 nanoparticles deposited conformally on emulsion-templated carbon foam by a sol-gel method. The carbon foam is synthesized via a facile and scalable method which involves the carbonization of a high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) polymer template. Various techniques (XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical methods) are used to fully characterize the porous electrode and confirm the distribution and morphology of the cathode active material. The major benefits of the carbon foam used in our work are closely connected with its high surface area and the plenty of space suitable for sequential coating

  17. Accuracy of shade matching performed by colour blind and normal dental students using 3D Master and Vita Lumin shade guides.

    PubMed

    Vafaee, F; Rakhshan, V; Vafaei, M; Khoshhal, M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether 3D Master or VitaLumin shade guides could improve colour selection in individuals with normal and defective colour vision. First, colour perception of 260 dental students was evaluated. Afterwards, 9 colour blind and 9 matched normal subjects tried to detect colours of 10 randomly selected tabs from each kit and the correct/false answers were counted. Of the colour-defective subjects, 47.8% and 33.3% correctly detected the shade using 3D Master and VitaLumin, respectively. These statistics were 62.2% and 42.2% in normal subjects. In normal participants, but not in colour blind ones, 3D Master significantly improved shade matching accuracy compared to VitaLumin.

  18. Template method to controllable synthesis 3D porous NiCo2O4 with enhanced capacitance and stability for supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Wang, Ranran; Lu, Xiaoyu; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian

    2016-04-15

    We present a facile template method to fabricate NiCo2O4 (NCO) composites with 3D porous structure as electrodes for supercapacitors. SiO2 sol is used as the template to prevent the aggregation of NCO and construct the porous structure with high specific surface area. Meanwhile, the binary metal oxides not only inherit the merits of single nickel oxides or cobalt oxides, but also show superior properties to promote the capacitance. The uniform structure of NCO12 (SiO2/NCO=1:2) is obtained through controlling the mass ratio of SiO2 and NCO. Owing to the dual advantages of porous structure and binary system, NCO12 composites exhibit highly enhanced electrochemical performance compared with those of directly prepared NCO, NCO21 (SiO2/NCO=1:0.5) and NCO14 (SiO2/NCO=1:4). The specific capacitance of NCO12 composite is about 1389 Fg(-1) at 1 Ag(-1). At 4 Ag(-1), the capacitance is still as high as 1090 Fg(-1) together with capacitance retention of 80% over 2500 cycles. The capacitance and stability are higher than those of most previously reported pure NCO composites, which make it a very promising electrode material for energy storage.

  19. Pulmonary nodule registration in serial CT scans based on rib anatomy and nodule template matching

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiazheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Zhou, Chuan; Cascade, Philip N.; Bogot, Naama; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Wu, Yi-Ta; Wei, Jun

    2009-01-01

    An automated method is being developed in order to identify corresponding nodules in serial thoracic CT scans for interval change analysis. The method uses the rib centerlines as the reference for initial nodule registration. A spatially adaptive rib segmentation method first locates the regions where the ribs join the spine, which define the starting locations for rib tracking. Each rib is tracked and locally segmented by expectation-maximization. The ribs are automatically labeled, and the centerlines are estimated using skeletonization. For a given nodule in the source scan, the closest three ribs are identified. A three-dimensional (3D) rigid affine transformation guided by simplex optimization aligns the centerlines of each of the three rib pairs in the source and target CT volumes. Automatically defined control points along the centerlines of the three ribs in the source scan and the registered ribs in the target scan are used to guide an initial registration using a second 3D rigid affine transformation. A search volume of interest (VOI) is then located in the target scan. Nodule candidate locations within the search VOI are identified as regions with high Hessian responses. The initial registration is refined by searching for the maximum cross-correlation between the nodule template from the source scan and the candidate locations. The method was evaluated on 48 CT scans from 20 patients. Experienced radiologists identified 101 pairs of corresponding nodules. Three metrics were used for performance evaluation. The first metric was the Euclidean distance between the nodule centers identified by the radiologist and the computer registration, the second metric was a volume overlap measure between the nodule VOIs identified by the radiologist and the computer registration, and the third metric was the hit rate, which measures the fraction of nodules whose centroid computed by the computer registration in the target scan falls within the VOI identified by the

  20. Micro- to nanostructured poly(pyrrole-nitrilotriacetic acid) films via nanosphere templates: applications to 3D enzyme attachment by affinity interactions.

    PubMed

    Cernat, Andreea; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael; Sandulescu, Robert; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-02-01

    We report the combination of latex nanosphere lithography with electropolymerization of N-substituted pyrrole monomer bearing a nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) moiety for the template-assisted nanostructuration of poly(pyrrole-NTA) films and their application for biomolecule immobilization. The electrodes were modified by casting latex beads (100 or 900 nm in diameter) on their surface followed by electropolymerization of the pyrrole-NTA monomer and the subsequent chelation of Cu(2+) ions. The dissolution of the nanobeads leads then to a nanostructured polymer film with increased surface. Thanks to the versatile affinity interactions between the (NTA)Cu(2+) complex and histidine- or biotin-tagged proteins, both tyrosinase and glucose oxidase were immobilized on the modified electrode. Nanostructuration of the polypyrrole via nanosphere lithography (NSL) using 900- and 100-nm latex beads allows an increase in surface concentration of enzymes anchored on the functionalized polypyrrole electrode. The nanostructured enzyme electrodes were characterized by fluorescence microscopy, 3D laser scanning confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical studies demonstrate the increase in the amount of immobilized biomolecules and associated biosensor performances when achieving NSL compared to conventional polymer formation without bead template. In addition, the decrease in nanobead diameter from 900 to 100 nm provides an enhancement in biosensor performance. Between biosensors based on films polymerized without nanobeads and with 100-nm nanobeads, maximum current density values increase from 4 to 56 μA cm(-2) and from 7 to 45 μA cm(-2) for biosensors based on tyrosinase and glucose oxidase, respectively.

  1. CAD System for Pulmonary Nodule Detection Using Gabor Filtering and Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsudagawa, Masaru

    This paper aims at developing a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system used for the detection of pulmonary nodules in chest Computed Tomography (CT) images. These lung nodules include both solid nodules and Ground Glass Opacity (GGO) nodules. In our scheme, we apply Gabor filter on the CT image in order to enhance the detection process. After this we perform some morphological operations including threshold process and labeling to extract all the objects inside the lung area. Then, some feature analysis is used to examine these objects to decide which of them are likely to be potential cancer candidates. Following the feature examination, a template matching between the potential cancer candidates and some Gaussian reference models is performed to determine the similarity between them. The algorithm was applied on 715 slices containing 25 GGO nodules and 82 solid nodules and achieved detection sensitivity of 92% for GGO nodules and 95% for solid nodules with False Positive (FP) rate of 0.75 FP/slice for GGO nodules and 2.32 FP/slice for solid nodules. Finally, we used an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to reduce the number of FP findings. After using ANN, we were able to reduce the FP rate to 0.25 FP/slice for GGO nodules and 1.62 FP/slice for solid nodules but at the expense of detection sensitivity, which became 84 % for GGO nodules and 91% for solid nodules.

  2. Patterns of variation and match rates of the anterior biting dentition: characteristics of a database of 3D-scanned dentitions.

    PubMed

    Sheets, H David; Bush, Peter J; Bush, Mary A

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the variability of the anterior human dentition is essential in bitemark analysis. A collection of 1099 3D laser scans of paired maxillary and mandibular arches were studied using geometric morphometric methods. Analyses were performed without scale (shape only) and with scale (shape and size). Specimens differing by no more than experimentally obtained measurement error were counted as matches, or as indistinguishable. A total of 487 maxillary (396 size preserved), 131 mandibular (83 size preserved), and one paired dentition (two size preserved) matches were found. Principal component analysis and partial least squares revealed interpretable patterns of variation and covariation in dental shape, principally dominated by variation in dental arch width. The sensitivity of match rate to assumed degree of measurement error was also determined showing rapid increases in match rate as measurement error increased. In conclusion, the concept of dental uniqueness with regard to bitemark analysis should be approached with caution.

  3. An improved earthquake catalogue in the Marmara Sea region, Turkey, using massive template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrullo, Emanuela; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Bouchon, Michel

    2016-04-01

    After the 1999 Izmit earthquake, the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) represents a 150 km unruptured segment of the North Anatolian Fault located below the Marmara Sea. One of the principal issue for seismic hazard assessment in the region is to know if the MMF is totally or partially locked and where the nucleation of the major forthcoming event is going to take place. The area is actually one of the best-instrumented fault systems in Europe. Since year 2007, various seismic networks both broadband, short period and OBS stations were deployed in order to monitor continuously the seismicity along the MMF and the related fault systems. A recent analysis of the seismicity recorded during the 2007-2012 period has provided new insights on the recent evolution of this important regional seismic gap. This analysis was based on events detected with STA/LTA procedure and manually picked P and S wave arrivals times (Schmittbuhl et al., 2015). In order to extend the level of details and to fully take advantage of the dense seismic network we improved the seismic catalog using an automatic earthquake detection technique based on a template matching approach. This approach uses known earthquake seismic signals in order to detect newer events similar to the tested one from waveform cross-correlation. To set-up the methodology and verify the accuracy and the robustness of the results, we initially focused in the eastern part of the Marmara Sea (Cinarcik basin) and compared new detection with those manually identified. Through the massive analysis of cross-correlation based on the template scanning of the continuous recordings, we construct a refined catalog of earthquakes for the Marmara Sea in 2007-2014 period. Our improved earthquake catalog will provide an effective tool to improve the catalog completeness, to monitor and study the fine details of the time-space distribution of events, to characterize the repeating earthquake source processes and to understand the mechanical state of

  4. Laser-ignited frontal polymerization of shape-controllable poly(VI-co-AM) hydrogels based on 3D templates toward adsorption of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Suzhen; Liu, Sisi; Wang, Xiao-Qiao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-06-01

    Given the increasing heavy metal pollution issue, fast preparation of polymeric hydrogels with excellent adsorption property toward heavy metal ions is very attractive. In this work, a series of poly( N-vinylimidazole-co-acrylamide) (poly(VI-co-AM)) hydrogels were synthesized via laser-ignited frontal polymerization (LIFP) for the first time. The dependence of frontal velocity and temperature on two factors monomer ratios and initiator concentrations was systematically investigated. Poly(VI-co-AM) hydrogels with any self-supporting shapes can be synthesized by a one-step LIFP in seconds through the application of 3D templates. These shape-persistent hydrogels are pH-responsive and exhibit excellent adsorption/desorption characteristics toward Mn(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions, and the adsorption conformed to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The reusability of the hydrogels toward mental ions adsorption was further researched, which suggested that the hydrogels can be reused without serious decrease in adsorption capacity. This work might open a promising strategy to facilely prepare shape-controllable hydrogels and expand the application of LIFP.

  5. Real-time automatic target location by template matching on blurred images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Downs, Justin, III; Peterson, Michael L.

    1996-11-01

    High precision manufacturing is dependent on the accurate positioning of the part prior to each processing step. The part is typically held in a transfer fixture which may be used either simply as a part holder or as an alignment reference. A typical application is explored in this work, grinding of slots in a thick ceramic wafer mounted on a part fixture. A 1 micron slot is located with a position tolerance of 10 microns in the nickel-zinc-ferrite wafer. Part location is determined by means of a 50.8 by 1 micron target deposited onto the ceramic during an earlier process. In the current process, the target is magnified by a 250X vision system and the machine operator manually aligns the part using a set of cross hairs overlaid on the image. A high precision x-y stage is used to adjust the pat location. However, the use of a fixed focal distance camera combined with part mounting variation results in an unfocused image for the operator. Manual alignment of the unfocused image leads to target location error during centering of the target in the cross hairs. The misalignment, in turn, results in process variation. The location of the slots varies based on alignment and reduces the process capability. To reduce process variation, an automated target location algorithm has been applied. The algorithm uses template matching to detect the target. This simple algorithm has been shown to locate the target within the required tolerance in spite of image blur. Using low cost processing, the system is able to determine the target location in real-time. For real-time control, the algorithm must determine the x-y coordinate of the target in 10 seconds or less. This effort shows the potential for a simple location algorithm to be implemented in a manner which can significantly decrease process variation in a precision fabrication process.

  6. Real-time automatic target location by template matching on blurred images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Downs, Justin, III; Peterson, Michael L.

    1996-11-01

    High precision manufacturing is dependent on the accurate positioning of the part prior to each processing step. The part is typically held in a transfer fixture which may be used either simply as a part holder or as an alignment reference. A typical application is explored in this work, grinding of slots in a thick ceramic wafer mounted on a part fixture. A 1 micron slot is located with a position tolerance of 10 microns in the nickel-zinc-ferrite wafer. Part location is determined by means of a 50.8 by 1 micron target deposited onto the ceramic during an earlier process. In the current process, the target is magnified by a 250X vision system and the machine operator manually aligns the part using a set of cross hairs overlaid on the image. A high precision x-y stage is used to adjust the part location. However, the use of a fixed focal distance camera combined with part mounting variation results in an unfocused image for the operator. Manual alignment of the unfocused image leads to target location error during centering of the target in the cross hairs. The misalignment, in turn, results in process variation. The location of the slots varies based on alignment and reduces the process capability. To reduce process variation, an automated target location algorithm has been applied. The algorithm uses template matching to detect the target. This simple algorithm has been shown to locate the target within the required tolerance in spite of image blur. Using low cost processing, the system is able to determine the target location in real-time. For real-time control, the algorithm must determine the x-y coordinate of the target in 10 seconds or less. This effort shows the potential for a simple location algorithm to be implemented in a manner which can significantly decrease process variation in a precision fabrication process.

  7. Polar Ozone Loss Rates: Comparison Of Match Observations With Simulations Of 3-D Chemical Transport Model And Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, O. P.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Lefevre, F.; Marchand, M.; Pazmino, A.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2005-12-01

    Model simulations of ozone loss rates during recent arctic and Antarctic winters are compared with the observed ozone loss rates from the match technique. Arctic winters 1994/1995, 1999/2000, 2002/2003 and the Antarctic winter 2003 were considered for the analysis. We use a high resolution chemical transport model MIMOSA-CHIM and REPROBUS box model for the calculation of ozone loss rates. Trajectory model calculations show that the ozone loss rates are dependent on the initialization fields. On the one hand when chemical fields are initialized by UCAM (University of Cambridge SLIMCAT model simulated fields) the loss rates were underestimated by a factor of two whereas on the other hand when it is initialized by UL (University of Leeds) fields the model loss rates are in a very good agreement with match loss rates at lower levels. The study shows a very good agreement between MIMOSA-CHIM simulation and match observation in 1999/2000 winter at both levels, 450 and 500 K, except slight underestimation in March at 500 K. But in January we have a very good agreement. This is also true for 1994/1995 when we consider simulated ozone loss rate in view of the ECMWF wind deficiency assuming that match observations were not made on isolated trajectories. Sensitivity tests, by changing JCl2O2 value, particle number density and heating rates, performed for the arctic winter 1999/2000 shows that we need to improve our understanding of particle number density and heating rate calculation mechanism. Burkholder JCl2O2 has improved the comparison of MIMOSA-CHIM model results with observations (Tripathi et al., 2005). In the same study the comparison results were shown to improved by changing heating rates and number density through NAT particle sedimentation.

  8. Evaluation of the effective corneal ablation in refractive surgery by two 3D topographic surface matching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueeler, M.; Donitzky, Ch.; Mrochen, M.

    2006-02-01

    The effectiveness of the corneal ablation process in refractive surgery is mostly evaluated by indirect measures of vision or optical quality such as post-operative refraction or wavefront aberrometry. Yet, the effective amount of corneal tissue removed in the treatment can only be determined by correctly overlapping a pre- and a post-operative topography measurement. However such an overlap is not trivial due to the discrepancy in the centration axes used in the measurement and the treatment, as well as due to the shift of ocular axes through the treatment or tilt between the two surfaces. We therefore present two methods for overlapping pre- and post-operative topographies for the purpose of extracting an effective corneal ablation profile. Method one uses a 3-dimensional profile matching algorithm and cross-correlation analysis on surface rings outside the optical zone of the topographies. Method two employs a surface normal matching routine to align the two surfaces along their common ablation axis. The profile matching method implies the problem that it requires measurement data outside of the optical zone which was found to be uncertain with placido-disk-based topographers. Method number two is more simple and implies the advantage of using measurement data within the optical zone. For regular profiles the extracted ablation profiles showed a very good match with the planned ones. Surprisingly, even for highly irregular profiles of topography-guided laser treatments the method delivered reasonable overlaps when being compared to the planned profiles. Analysis of the effective tissue removal yields valuable information on the quality of the ablation process.

  9. Results of the implementation on a mock-up of the full 3dB hybrid matching option of the ITER ICRH system

    SciTech Connect

    Grine, D.; Vervier, M.; Messiaen, A.; Dumortier, P.

    2011-12-23

    Each of the two ICRH antennas for ITER must couple 20MW to the plasma in the 40-55MHz band via an array of 24 radiating shorted straps fed by four generators. The matching system must provide automatic matching control on the mean load provided by the plasma and be resilient (parallel {Gamma}{sub G} parallel <0.2) to a wide range of fast antenna load excursions occurring in ELMy plasmas. Furthermore, good control of the current distribution in the strap array must be possible for the various heating and current drive scenarios. Two load resilient matching options have been considered for ITER: the 4 'Conjugate-T'(CT) and the 4 hybrids ones, the first being presently considered as a back-up option. Automatic control of these 2 options has been developed, and tested for optimization on a low-powered scaled mock-up. Successful implementation of the simultaneous feedback control of 11 actuators for the matching of the 4 CT and for the control of the toroidal phasing has already been achieved. The matching and the array current control of the 3dB hybrid option are provided by simultaneous feedback control of the decouplers and double stub tuners (in total 23 actuators) and this has also been successfully achieved for the full array. The paper discusses the circuit implementation and presents the obtained results.

  10. Converging Lithosphere beneath Tibet in 3-D: Highlights from Matching Hi-CLIMB Data with New Techniques (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Nowack, R. L.; Tseng, T.; Hung, S.; Huang, B.

    2009-12-01

    We match high-resolution seismic data from Project Hi-CLIMB with new techniques to holistically address several fundamental questions regarding the most prominent case of active continental collision. Images from multi-scale, finite-frequency tomography of both P- and S-wave travel-times, and regional patterns of S-wave birefringence delineate the northern, leading edge of sub-horizontally advancing mantle lithosphere of the Indian shield (Greater India) over a lateral (E-W) distance of about 600 km. Greater India apparently extends, in places, north of the Bangong-Nujian suture, a near-surface feature associated with the collision between Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes in the Mesozoic in central Tibet. Multi-frequency, migrated images of the lithosphere, using Gaussian beams which require no special treatment for caustic arrivals, show that the subsurface join of these two terranes is a wide zone of disrupted Moho that extends over a distance of about 250 km, separating two undisturbed blocks of mantle lithosphere. Longevity of large, stable blocks through repeated collisions attests to the strength of the mantle lithosphere, even through the crust is under pervasive pure shear at the surface. Two prominent regions of low P- and S-wave speeds, extending over the entire thickness of the crust, are apparent near the most recent (Indus-Yalung) suture zone and coincide with locations of low electric resistivity previously detected along two magnetotelluric profiles in active rifts. Regional coverage of our tomographic images clearly shows that the two regions are isolated features in an otherwise near-uniform curst; implying that pervasive, south-directed channel-flow of the lower crust is inactive. Deep-penetrating, virtual seismic reflection profiles, based on wide-angle reflections off the topside of the Moho from S to P conversions, indicate that greatly thickened crust in southern Tibet gradually shoals from as much as 75 km to just over 60 km in thickness across

  11. Detection and Alignment of 3D Domain Swapping Proteins Using Angle-Distance Image-Based Secondary Structural Matching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS), a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had “opened” their “closed” structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D) image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs), specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD) computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its hinge

  12. Precise geometric correction for NOAA and GMS images considering elevation effects using GCP template matching and affine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Mikio

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes a precise geometric correction method considering elevation effects for NOAA/AVHRR of GMS images, which is mandatory for long-term global environmental monitoring studies. First, using the so-called systematic geometric correction, the correspondences of sub-sampled image pixels to their map coordinates are calculated. And, the correspondences of sub-sampled map locations, which are the corner points of blocks, to image pixels are calculated to speed up the inverse transform to find for a pixel on the map coordinates to the corresponding pixel in the image coordinates using the bilinear interpolation of the four corner points of a block. For precise geometric correction, the residual errors of the systematic correction are measured using many GCP templates. GCP templates in the map coordinates are provide using DCW. Templates in the image coordinates are generated using the bilinear Interpolation. Also, the templates of high elevation areas are modified to include the elevation effects, using the height from GTOPO30 and satellite sensor geometry. Then, the residual errors are acquired by template matching and affine transform coefficients are calculated to remove the residual errors. And if the difference between the average error and each GCP is more than one pixel, these GCP"s are removed and new affine transform coefficients are recalculated iteratively until all errors reach within one pixel. Then, mapping of each pixel is done using the correspondence of four corner block points and image coordinates modified by affine transform, but for high elevation areas blocks are divided into pixels according to their elevation. The accuracy of within one pixel; i.e. 0.01 degree for NOAA/AVHRR and GMS/VIS and 0.04 degrees for GMS/IR is obtained for NOAA images received at Tokyo and the stitched ones received at Tokyo and Bangkok and also GMS full disk images.

  13. 3-D Quantum Transport Solver Based on the Perfectly Matched Layer and Spectral Element Methods for the Simulation of Semiconductor Nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Candong; Lee, Joon-Ho; Lim, Kim Hwa; Massoud, Hisham Z.; Liu, Qing Huo

    2007-01-01

    A 3-D quantum transport solver based on the spectral element method (SEM) and perfectly matched layer (PML) is introduced to solve the 3-D Schrödinger equation with a tensor effective mass. In this solver, the influence of the environment is replaced with the artificial PML open boundary extended beyond the contact regions of the device. These contact regions are treated as waveguides with known incident waves from waveguide mode solutions. As the transmitted wave function is treated as a total wave, there is no need to decompose it into waveguide modes, thus significantly simplifying the problem in comparison with conventional open boundary conditions. The spectral element method leads to an exponentially improving accuracy with the increase in the polynomial order and sampling points. The PML region can be designed such that less than −100 dB outgoing waves are reflected by this artificial material. The computational efficiency of the SEM solver is demonstrated by comparing the numerical and analytical results from waveguide and plane-wave examples, and its utility is illustrated by multiple-terminal devices and semiconductor nanotube devices. PMID:18037971

  14. Multistation template matching to characterize frequency-magnitude distributions of induced seismicity in the Central and Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Skoumal, R.; Currie, B.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the frequency-magnitude distribution (FMD) of recent seismic sequences thought to be induced by wastewater injection and hydraulic fracturing in the Central and Eastern U.S. to investigate their physical origin and improve hazard estimates. Multistation template matching is utilized to increase the number of events analyzed by lowering the magnitude of detection. In cases where local deployments are available, we demonstrate that the FMD obtained through template matching using regional data are comparable to those obtained from traditional detection using the local deployment. Since deployments usually occur after seismicity has already been identified, catalogs constructed with regional data offer the advantage of providing a more complete history of the seismicity. We find two primary groups of FMDs for induced sequences: those that generally follow the Gutenberg-Richter power-law and those that generally do not. All of the induced sequences are typically characterized by swarm-like behavior, but the non-power-law FMDs are also characterized by a clustering of events at low magnitudes and particularly low aftershock productivity for a continental interior. Each of the observations in the non-power law FMD cases is predicted by numerical simulations of a seismogenic zone governed by a viscoelastic damage rheology with low effective viscosity in the fault zone. Such a reduction in effective viscosity is expected if fluid injection increases fluid pressures in the fault zone to the point that the fault zone begins to dilate.

  15. Study on a digital pulse processing algorithm based on template-matching for high-throughput spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xianfei; Yang, Haori

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in utilizing spectroscopy techniques for nuclear safeguards is to perform high-resolution measurements at an ultra-high throughput rate. Traditionally, piled-up pulses are rejected to ensure good energy resolution. To improve throughput rate, high-pass filters are normally implemented to shorten pulses. However, this reduces signal-to-noise ratio and causes degradation in energy resolution. In this work, a pulse pile-up recovery algorithm based on template-matching was proved to be an effective approach to achieve high-throughput gamma ray spectroscopy. First, a discussion of the algorithm was given in detail. Second, the algorithm was then successfully utilized to process simulated piled-up pulses from a scintillator detector. Third, the algorithm was implemented to analyze high rate data from a NaI detector, a silicon drift detector and a HPGe detector. The promising results demonstrated the capability of this algorithm to achieve high-throughput rate without significant sacrifice in energy resolution. The performance of the template-matching algorithm was also compared with traditional shaping methods.

  16. In induced reconstructions of Si(1 1 1) as superlattice matched epitaxial templates for InN growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyyalil, Jithesh; Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S.M.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A novel growth method to form InN at low growth temperatures. ► Use of Si reconstruction as a growth template for group III nitrides. ► Band gap variation of InN – Moss–Burstein shift – non-parabolic conduction band for InN. ► Super lattice matching epitaxy of metal induced reconstructions with III–V unit cell. -- Abstract: Indium induced surface reconstructions of Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7 are used as templates to grow high quality InN. We grow InN on Si(1 1 1)-7 × 7, Si(1 1 1)-4 × 1-In and Si(1 1 1)-1 × 1-In reconstructed surfaces and study the quality of the films formed using complementary characterization tools. InN grown on Si(1 1 1)-1 × 1-In reconstruction shows superior film quality with lowest band-edge emission having a narrow full width at half maximum, intense and narrow 0 0 0 2 X-ray diffraction, low surface roughness and carrier concentration an order lower than other samples. We attribute the high quality of the film formed at 300 °C to the integral matching of InN and super lattice dimensions, we also study the reasons for the band gap variation of InN in the literature. Present study demonstrates the proposed Superlattice Matched Epitaxy can be a general approach to grow good quality InN at much lower growth temperature on compatible In induced reconstructions of the Si surface.

  17. Mutual information-based template matching scheme for detection of breast masses: from mammography to digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mazurowski, Maciej A; Lo, Joseph Y; Harrawood, Brian P; Tourassi, Georgia D

    2011-10-01

    Development of a computational decision aid for a new medical imaging modality typically is a long and complicated process. It consists of collecting data in the form of images and annotations, development of image processing and pattern recognition algorithms for analysis of the new images and finally testing of the resulting system. Since new imaging modalities are developed more rapidly than ever before, any effort for decreasing the time and cost of this development process could result in maximizing the benefit of the new imaging modality to patients by making the computer aids quickly available to radiologists that interpret the images. In this paper, we make a step in this direction and investigate the possibility of translating the knowledge about the detection problem from one imaging modality to another. Specifically, we present a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for mammographic masses that uses a mutual information-based template matching scheme with intelligently selected templates. We presented principles of template matching with mutual information for mammography before. In this paper, we present an implementation of those principles in a complete computer-aided detection system. The proposed system, through an automatic optimization process, chooses the most useful templates (mammographic regions of interest) using a large database of previously collected and annotated mammograms. Through this process, the knowledge about the task of detecting masses in mammograms is incorporated in the system. Then, we evaluate whether our system developed for screen-film mammograms can be successfully applied not only to other mammograms but also to digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructed slices without adding any DBT cases for training. Our rationale is that since mutual information is known to be a robust inter-modality image similarity measure, it has high potential of transferring knowledge between modalities in the context of the mass detection

  18. Design and Fabrication of a Thin-Walled Freeform Scaffold on the Basis of Medical Image Data and a 3D Printed Template: Potential Use in Bile Duct Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Suk Hee; Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Lee, Ji Eun; Chun, Seung Woo; Jang, Kiseok; Kim, Youn Hwan; Jeong, Mi Ae; Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyo Jin; Lee, Nak Kyu; Choi, Dongho; Kim, Han Joon

    2017-03-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, combined with medical imaging technologies, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has shown great potential in patient-specific tissue regeneration. Here, we successfully fabricated an ultrathin tubular freeform structure that has a wall thickness of several tens of micrometers and is capable of providing sufficient mechanical flexibility. Such a thin geometry cannot easily be achieved by 3D printing alone; therefore, it was realized through a serial combination of processes that included the 3D printing of a sacrificial template, the dip-coating of the biomaterial, and the removal of the inner template. We demonstrated the feasibility of this novel tissue engineering construct by conducting bile duct surgery on rabbits. Moving from a rational design based on MRI data to a successful surgical procedure for reconstruction, we confirmed that the presented method of fabricating scaffolds has the potential for use in customized bile duct regeneration. In addition to the specific application presented here, the developed process and scaffold are expected to have universal applicability in other soft tissue engineering fields, particularly those involving vascular, airway, and abdominal tubular tissues.

  19. An unsplit Convolutional perfectly matched layer technique improved at grazing incidence for the differential anisotropic elastic wave equation: application to 3D heterogeneous near surface slices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2007-05-01

    In geophysical exploration, high computational cost of full waveform inverse problem can be drastically reduced by implementing efficient boundary conditions. In many regions of interest for the oil industry or geophysical exploration, nearly tabular geological structures can be handled and analyzed by setting receivers in wells or/and at large offset. Then, the numerical modelling of waves travelling in thin slices along wells and near surface structures can provide very fast responses if highly accurate absorbing conditions around the slice are introduced in the wave propagation modelling. Here we propose then a Convolutional version of the well known Perfectly Matched layer technique. This optimized version allows the generation of seismic waves travelling close to the boundary layer at almost grazing incidence, which allows the treatment of thin 3D slices. The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, introduced in 1994 by Bérenger for Maxwell's equations, has become classical in the context of numerical simulations in electromagnetics, in particular for 3D finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) calculations. One of the most attractive properties of a PML model is that no reflection occurs at the interface between the physical domain and the absorbing layer before truncation to a finite-size layer and discretization by a numerical scheme. Therefore, the absorbing layer does not send spurious energy back into the medium. This property holds for any frequency and angle of incidence. However, the layer must be truncated in order to be able to perform numerical simulations, and such truncation creates a reflected wave whose amplitude is amplified by the discretization process. In 2001, Collino and Tsogka introduced a PML model for the elastodynamics equation written as a first-order system in velocity and stress with split unknowns, and discretized it based on the standard 2D staggered-grid finite-difference scheme of Virieux (1986). Then in 2001 and 2004

  20. Detection and Counting of Orchard Trees from Vhr Images Using a Geometrical-Optical Model and Marked Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, Philippe; Gomes, Marília F.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents an original algorithm created to detect and count trees in orchards using very high resolution images. The algorithm is based on an adaptation of the "template matching" image processing approach, in which the template is based on a "geometricaloptical" model created from a series of parameters, such as illumination angles, maximum and ambient radiance, and tree size specifications. The algorithm is tested on four images from different regions of the world and different crop types. These images all have < 1 meter spatial resolution and were downloaded from the GoogleEarth application. Results show that the algorithm is very efficient at detecting and counting trees as long as their spectral and spatial characteristics are relatively constant. For walnut, mango and orange trees, the overall accuracy was clearly above 90%. However, the overall success rate for apple trees fell under 75%. It appears that the openness of the apple tree crown is most probably responsible for this poorer result. The algorithm is fully explained with a step-by-step description. At this stage, the algorithm still requires quite a bit of user interaction. The automatic determination of most of the required parameters is under development.

  1. Relevance-Based Template Matching for Tracking Targets in FLIR Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Paravati, Gianluca; Esposito, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    One of the main challenges in automatic target tracking applications is represented by the need to maintain a low computational footprint, especially when dealing with real-time scenarios and the limited resources of embedded environments. In this context, significant results can be obtained by using forward-looking infrared sensors capable of providing distinctive features for targets of interest. In fact, due to their nature, forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images lend themselves to being used with extremely small footprint techniques based on the extraction of target intensity profiles. This work proposes a method for increasing the computational efficiency of template-based target tracking algorithms. In particular, the speed of the algorithm is improved by using a dynamic threshold that narrows the number of computations, thus reducing both execution time and resources usage. The proposed approach has been tested on several datasets, and it has been compared to several target tracking techniques. Gathered results, both in terms of theoretical analysis and experimental data, showed that the proposed approach is able to achieve the same robustness of reference algorithms by reducing the number of operations needed and the processing time. PMID:25093344

  2. Structure-directing and template roles of aromatic molecules in the self-assembly formation process of 3D holmium-succinate MOFs.

    PubMed

    Bernini, María C; Snejko, Natalia; Gutierrez-Puebla, Enrique; Brusau, Elena V; Narda, Griselda E; Monge, M Ángeles

    2011-07-04

    Two new holmium-succinate frameworks have been synthesized by hydrolysis in situ of the succinylsalicylic acid under different hydrothermal conditions. Compound 1, [Ho(2)(C(4)H(4)O(4))(3)(H(2)O)(2)]·0.33(C(7)H(6)O(3)), P ̅i space group, has a novel structure composed by 1D-SBUs consisting of [HoO(9)] chains of polyhedra linked by the succinate ligands giving a 3D framework. Compound 2, [Ho(2)(C(4)H(4)O(4))(3)(H(2)O)(2)], also belonging to the P ̅i space group, has a denser structure. The role of the in-situ-generated salicylic acid on formation of both structures is studied by means of a synthesis design methodology. A topological study of the new holmium succinate compounds in comparison with the previously reported 3D holmium-succinate framework is performed here.

  3. Matched Template Signal Processing for Continuous Wave Laser Tracking of Space Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, S.; Ward, R.; Roberts, L.; Fleddermann, R.; Francis, S.; McClellend, D.; Shaddock, D.; Smith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The build up of space junk in Earth's orbit space is a growing concern as it shares the same orbit as many currently active satellites. As the number of objects increase in these orbits, the likelihood of collisions between satellites and debris will increase [1]. The eventual goal is to be able to maneuver space debris to avoid such collisions. We at SERC aim to accomplish this by using ground based laser facilities that are already being used to track space debris orbit. One potential method to maneuver space debris is using continuous wave lasers and applying photon pressure on the debris and attempt to change the orbit. However most current laser ranging facilities operates using pulsed lasers where a pulse of light is sent out and the time taken for the pulse to return back to the telescope is measured after being reflected by the target. If space debris maneuvering is carried out with a continuous wave laser then two laser sources need to be used for ranging and maneuvering. The aim of this research is to develop a laser ranging system that is compatible with the continuous wave laser; using the same laser source to simultaneously track and maneuver space debris. We aim to accomplish this by modulating the outgoing laser light with pseudo random noise (PRN) codes, time tagging the outgoing light, and utilising a matched filter at the receiver end to extract the various orbital information of the debris.

  4. Automated 3D-2D registration of X-ray microcomputed tomography with histological sections for dental implants in bone using chamfer matching and simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kathrin; Stauber, Martin; Schwarz, Frank; Beißbarth, Tim

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel 3D-2D registration approach for micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histology (HI), constructed for dental implant biopsies, that finds the position and normal vector of the oblique slice from μCT that corresponds to HI. During image pre-processing, the implants and the bone tissue are segmented using a combination of thresholding, morphological filters and component labeling. After this, chamfer matching is employed to register the implant edges and fine registration of the bone tissues is achieved using simulated annealing. The method was tested on n=10 biopsies, obtained at 20 weeks after non-submerged healing in the canine mandible. The specimens were scanned with μCT 100 and processed for hard tissue sectioning. After registration, we assessed the agreement of bone to implant contact (BIC) using automated and manual measurements. Statistical analysis was conducted to test the agreement of the BIC measurements in the registered samples. Registration was successful for all specimens and agreement of the respective binary images was high (median: 0.90, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.89-0.91). Direct comparison of BIC yielded that automated (median 0.82, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.75-0.85) and manual (median 0.61, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.52-0.67) measures from μCT were significant positively correlated with HI (median 0.65, 1.-3. Qu.: 0.59-0.72) between μCT and HI groups (manual: R(2)=0.87, automated: R(2)=0.75, p<0.001). The results show that this method yields promising results and that μCT may become a valid alternative to assess osseointegration in three dimensions.

  5. Spinal Cord Segmentation by One Dimensional Normalized Template Matching: A Novel, Quantitative Technique to Analyze Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Cadotte, Adam; Cadotte, David W; Livne, Micha; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Fleet, David; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord segmentation is a developing area of research intended to aid the processing and interpretation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For example, high resolution three-dimensional volumes can be segmented to provide a measurement of spinal cord atrophy. Spinal cord segmentation is difficult due to the variety of MRI contrasts and the variation in human anatomy. In this study we propose a new method of spinal cord segmentation based on one-dimensional template matching and provide several metrics that can be used to compare with other segmentation methods. A set of ground-truth data from 10 subjects was manually-segmented by two different raters. These ground truth data formed the basis of the segmentation algorithm. A user was required to manually initialize the spinal cord center-line on new images, taking less than one minute. Template matching was used to segment the new cord and a refined center line was calculated based on multiple centroids within the segmentation. Arc distances down the spinal cord and cross-sectional areas were calculated. Inter-rater validation was performed by comparing two manual raters (n = 10). Semi-automatic validation was performed by comparing the two manual raters to the semi-automatic method (n = 10). Comparing the semi-automatic method to one of the raters yielded a Dice coefficient of 0.91 +/- 0.02 for ten subjects, a mean distance between spinal cord center lines of 0.32 +/- 0.08 mm, and a Hausdorff distance of 1.82 +/- 0.33 mm. The absolute variation in cross-sectional area was comparable for the semi-automatic method versus manual segmentation when compared to inter-rater manual segmentation. The results demonstrate that this novel segmentation method performs as well as a manual rater for most segmentation metrics. It offers a new approach to study spinal cord disease and to quantitatively track changes within the spinal cord in an individual case and across cohorts of subjects.

  6. Syntheses, structures, characterizations and charge-density matching of novel amino-templated uranyl selenates

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Jie; Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C.

    2009-02-15

    Five hybrid organic-inorganic uranyl selenates have been synthesized, characterized and their structures have been determined. The structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)] (EthylAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}, a=8.290(1), b=12.349(2), c=11.038(2) A, {beta}=104.439(4){sup o}, V=1094.3(3) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0425. The structure of (C{sub 7}H{sub 10}N){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O (BenzylAUSe) is orthorhombic, Pna2{sub 1}, a=24.221(2), b=11.917(1), c=7.4528(7) A, V=2151.1(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0307. The structure of (C{sub 2}H{sub 10}N{sub 2})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (EDAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=11.677(2), b=7.908(1), c=15.698(2) A, {beta}=98.813(3){sup o}, V=1432.4(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0371. The structure of (C{sub 6}H{sub 22}N{sub 4})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O) (TETAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/n, a=13.002(2), b=7.962(1), c=14.754(2) A, {beta}=114.077(2){sup o}, V=1394.5(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0323. The structure of (C{sub 6}H{sub 21}N{sub 4})[(UO{sub 2})(SeO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HSeO{sub 4})] (TAEAUSe) is monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/m, a=9.2218(6), b=12.2768(9), c=9.4464(7) A, {beta}=116.1650(10){sup o}, V=959.88(12) A{sup 3}, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.0322. The inorganic structural units in these compounds are composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and selenate tetrahedra. In each case, tetrahedra link bipyramids through vertex-sharing, resulting in chain or sheet topologies. The charge-density matching principle is discussed relative to the orientations of the organic molecules between the inorganic structural units. - Graphical abstract: The structures of five new inorganic-organic hybrid uranyl selenates present new structural topologies based upon chains and sheets of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and selenate tetrahedra.

  7. Self-assembled synthesis of 3D Cu(In1 - xGax)Se2 nanoarrays by one-step electroless deposition into ordered AAO template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Tao; Zheng, Maojun; Xiong, Zuzhou; Zhu, Changqing; Li, Hong; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-07-01

    Quaternary nanostructured Cu(In1 - xGax)Se2 (CIGS) arrays were successfully fabricated via a novel and simple solution-based protocol on the electroless deposition method, using a flexible, highly ordered anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) substrate. This method does not require electric power, complicated sensitization processes, or complexing agents, but provides nearly 100% pore fill factor to AAO templates. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images show that we obtained uniformly three-dimensional nanostructured CIGS arrays, and we can tailor the diameter and wall thicknesses of the nanostructure by adjusting the pore diameter of the AAO and metal Mo layer. Their chemical composition was determined by energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis, which is very close to the stoichiometric value. The Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further confirm the formation of nanostructured CIGS with prominent chalcopyrite structure. The nanostructured CIGS arrays can support the design of low-cost, highlight-trapping, and enhanced carrier collection nanostructured solar cells.

  8. Design and Tailoring of the 3D Macroporous Hydrous RuO2 Hierarchical Architectures with a Hard-Template Method for High-Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhikun; Liu, Xu; Meng, Huan; Li, Zhongjun; Li, Baojun; Liu, Zhongyi; Liu, Shouchang

    2017-02-08

    In this work, RuO2 honeycomb networks (RHCs) and hollow spherical structures (RHSs) were rationally designed and synthesized with modified-SiO2 as a sacrificial template via two hydrothermal approaches. At a high current density of 20 A g(-1), the two hierarchical porous RuO2·xH2O frameworks showed the specific capacitance as high as 628 and 597 F g(-1); this is about 80% and 75% of the capacitance retention of 0.5 A g(-1) for RHCs and RHSs, respectively. Even after 4000 cycles at 5 A g(-1), the RHCs and RHSs can still remain at 86% and 91% of their initial specific capacitances, respectively. These two hierarchical frameworks have a well-defined pathway that benefits for the transmission/diffusion of electrolyte and surface redox reactions. As a result, they exhibit good supercapacitor performance in both acid (H2SO4) and alkaline (KOH) electrolytes. As compared to RuO2 bulk structure and similar RuO2 counterpart reported in pseudocapacitors, the two hierarchical porous RuO2·xH2O frameworks have better energy storage capabilities, high-rate performance, and excellent cycling stability.

  9. Self-assembled synthesis of 3D Cu(In(1-x)Ga(x))Se2 nanoarrays by one-step electroless deposition into ordered AAO template.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhou, Tao; Zheng, Maojun; Xiong, Zuzhou; Zhu, Changqing; Li, Hong; Wang, Faze; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-07-25

    Quaternary nanostructured Cu(In1 - xGax)Se2 (CIGS) arrays were successfully fabricated via a novel and simple solution-based protocol on the electroless deposition method, using a flexible, highly ordered anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) substrate. This method does not require electric power, complicated sensitization processes, or complexing agents, but provides nearly 100% pore fill factor to AAO templates. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images show that we obtained uniformly three-dimensional nanostructured CIGS arrays, and we can tailor the diameter and wall thicknesses of the nanostructure by adjusting the pore diameter of the AAO and metal Mo layer. Their chemical composition was determined by energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis, which is very close to the stoichiometric value. The Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further confirm the formation of nanostructured CIGS with prominent chalcopyrite structure. The nanostructured CIGS arrays can support the design of low-cost, highlight-trapping, and enhanced carrier collection nanostructured solar cells.

  10. 3D QSAR studies, pharmacophore modeling, and virtual screening of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives as a template to obtain new inhibitors, using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model protein.

    PubMed

    Entezari Heravi, Yeganeh; Sereshti, Hassan; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Jahan; Amirmostofian, Marzieh; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2017-12-01

    A 3D-QSAR modeling was performed on a series of diarylpyrazole-benzenesulfonamide derivatives acting as inhibitors of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). The compounds were collected from two datasets with the same scaffold, and utilized as a template for a new pharmacophore model to screen the ZINC database of commercially available derivatives. The datasets were divided into training, test, and validation sets. As the first step, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), CoMFA region focusing and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) in parallel with docking studies were applied to a set of 41 human (h) CA II inhibitors. The validity and the prediction capacity of the resulting models were evaluated by leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation approach. The reliability of the model for the prediction of possibly new CA inhibitors was also tested.

  11. Extracting Feature Points of the Human Body Using the Model of a 3D Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jeongeun; Ozawa, Shinji

    The purpose of this research is to recognize 3D shape features of a human body automatically using a 3D laser-scanning machine. In order to recognize the 3D shape features, we selected the 23 feature points of a body and modeled its 3D features. The set of 23 feature points consists of the motion axis of a joint, the main point for the bone structure of a human body. For extracting feature points of object model, we made 2.5D templates neighbor for each feature points were extracted according to the feature points of the standard model of human body. And the feature points were extracted by the template matching. The extracted feature points can be applied as body measurement, the 3D virtual fitting system for apparel etc.

  12. Comparison and Limitations of DVH-Based NTCP Models Derived From 3D-CRT and IMRT Data for Prediction of Gastrointestinal Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients by Using Propensity Score Matched Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Troeller, Almut; Yan, Di; Marina, Ovidiu; Schulze, Derek; Alber, Markus; Parodi, Katia; Belka, Claus; Söhn, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: This study compared normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modeling of chronic gastrointestinal toxicities following prostate cancer treatment for 2 treatment modalities. Possible factors causing discrepancies in optimal NTCP model parameters between 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated RT (IMRT) were analyzed and discussed, including the impact of patient characteristics, image guidance, toxicity scoring bias, and NTCP model limitations. Methods and Materials: Rectal wall dose-volume histograms of 1115 patients treated for prostate cancer under an adaptive radiation therapy protocol were used to model gastrointestinal toxicity grade ≥2 (according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events). A total of 457 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 658 with IMRT. 3D-CRT patients were matched to IMRT patients based on various patient characteristics, using a propensity score–based algorithm. Parameters of the Lyman equivalent uniform dose and cut-off dose logistic regression NTCP models were estimated for the 2 matched treatment modalities and the combined group. Results: After they were matched, the 3D-CRT and IMRT groups contained 275 and 550 patients with a large discrepancy of 28.7% versus 7.8% toxicities, respectively (P<.001). For both NTCP models, optimal parameters found for the 3D-CRT groups did not fit the IMRT patients well and vice versa. Models developed for the combined data overestimated NTCP for the IMRT patients and underestimated NTCP for the 3D-CRT group. Conclusions: Our analysis did not reveal a single definitive cause for discrepancies of model parameters between 3D-CRT and IMRT. Patient characteristics and bias in toxicity scoring, as well as image guidance alone, are unlikely causes of the large discrepancy of toxicities. Whether the cause was inherent to the specific NTCP models used in this study needs to be verified by future investigations. Because IMRT is increasingly used

  13. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm.

  14. μCT of ex-vivo stained mouse hearts and embryos enables a precise match between 3D virtual histology, classical histology and immunochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Emanuel; Martin, Sabine; Lazzarini, Marcio; Tromba, Giuliana; Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Pinkert-Leetsch, Diana; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Alves, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    The small size of the adult and developing mouse heart poses a great challenge for imaging in preclinical research. The aim of the study was to establish a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) ex-vivo staining approach that efficiently enhances the x-ray attenuation of soft-tissue to allow high resolution 3D visualization of mouse hearts by synchrotron radiation based μCT (SRμCT) and classical μCT. We demonstrate that SRμCT of PTA stained mouse hearts ex-vivo allows imaging of the cardiac atrium, ventricles, myocardium especially its fibre structure and vessel walls in great detail and furthermore enables the depiction of growth and anatomical changes during distinct developmental stages of hearts in mouse embryos. Our x-ray based virtual histology approach is not limited to SRμCT as it does not require monochromatic and/or coherent x-ray sources and even more importantly can be combined with conventional histological procedures. Furthermore, it permits volumetric measurements as we show for the assessment of the plaque volumes in the aortic valve region of mice from an ApoE-/- mouse model. Subsequent, Masson-Goldner trichrome staining of paraffin sections of PTA stained samples revealed intact collagen and muscle fibres and positive staining of CD31 on endothelial cells by immunohistochemistry illustrates that our approach does not prevent immunochemistry analysis. The feasibility to scan hearts already embedded in paraffin ensured a 100% correlation between virtual cut sections of the CT data sets and histological heart sections of the same sample and may allow in future guiding the cutting process to specific regions of interest. In summary, since our CT based virtual histology approach is a powerful tool for the 3D depiction of morphological alterations in hearts and embryos in high resolution and can be combined with classical histological analysis it may be used in preclinical research to unravel structural alterations of various heart diseases. PMID:28178293

  15. μCT of ex-vivo stained mouse hearts and embryos enables a precise match between 3D virtual histology, classical histology and immunochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dullin, Christian; Ufartes, Roser; Larsson, Emanuel; Martin, Sabine; Lazzarini, Marcio; Tromba, Giuliana; Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Pinkert-Leetsch, Diana; Katschinski, Dörthe M; Alves, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    The small size of the adult and developing mouse heart poses a great challenge for imaging in preclinical research. The aim of the study was to establish a phosphotungstic acid (PTA) ex-vivo staining approach that efficiently enhances the x-ray attenuation of soft-tissue to allow high resolution 3D visualization of mouse hearts by synchrotron radiation based μCT (SRμCT) and classical μCT. We demonstrate that SRμCT of PTA stained mouse hearts ex-vivo allows imaging of the cardiac atrium, ventricles, myocardium especially its fibre structure and vessel walls in great detail and furthermore enables the depiction of growth and anatomical changes during distinct developmental stages of hearts in mouse embryos. Our x-ray based virtual histology approach is not limited to SRμCT as it does not require monochromatic and/or coherent x-ray sources and even more importantly can be combined with conventional histological procedures. Furthermore, it permits volumetric measurements as we show for the assessment of the plaque volumes in the aortic valve region of mice from an ApoE-/- mouse model. Subsequent, Masson-Goldner trichrome staining of paraffin sections of PTA stained samples revealed intact collagen and muscle fibres and positive staining of CD31 on endothelial cells by immunohistochemistry illustrates that our approach does not prevent immunochemistry analysis. The feasibility to scan hearts already embedded in paraffin ensured a 100% correlation between virtual cut sections of the CT data sets and histological heart sections of the same sample and may allow in future guiding the cutting process to specific regions of interest. In summary, since our CT based virtual histology approach is a powerful tool for the 3D depiction of morphological alterations in hearts and embryos in high resolution and can be combined with classical histological analysis it may be used in preclinical research to unravel structural alterations of various heart diseases.

  16. Megathrust Earthquake Swarms Contemporaneous to Slow Slip and Non-Volcanic Tremor in Southern Mexico, Detected and Analyzed through a Template Matching Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, S.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.

    2012-12-01

    An outstanding question in geophysics is the degree to which the newly discovered types of slow fault slip are related to their destructive cousin - the earthquake. Here, we utilize a local network along the Oaxacan segment of the Middle American subduction zone to investigate the potential relationship between slow slip, non-volcanic tremor (NVT), and earthquakes along the subduction megathrust. We have developed a multi-station "template matching" waveform cross correlation technique which is able to detect and locate events several orders of magnitude smaller than would be possible using more traditional techniques. Also, our template matching procedure is capable of consistently locate events which occur during periods of increased background activity (e.g., during productive NVT, loud cultural noise, or after larger earthquakes) because the multi-station detector is finely tuned to events with similar hypocentral location and focal mechanism. The local network in the Oaxaca region allows us to focus on documented megathrust earthquake swarms, which we focus on because slow slip is hypothesized to be the cause for earthquake swarms in some tectonic environments. We identify a productive earthquake swarm in July 2006 (~600 similar earthquakes detected), which occurred during a week-long episode of productive tremor and slow slip. Families of events in this sequence were also active during larger and longer slow slip events, which provides a potential link between slow slip in the transition zone and earthquakes at the downdip end of the seismogenic portion of the megathrust. Because template matching techniques only detect similar signals, detected waveforms can be stacked together to produce higher signal to noise ratios or cross correlated against each other to produce precise relative phase arrival times. We are using the refined signals to look for evidence of expansion or propagation of hypocenters during these earthquake swarms, which could be used as a

  17. Evaluation of 3D radio-frequency electromagnetic fields for any matching and coupling conditions by the use of basis functions.

    PubMed

    Tiberi, Gianluigi; Fontana, Nunzia; Monorchio, Agostino; Stara, Riccardo; Retico, Alessandra; Tosetti, Michela

    2015-12-01

    A procedure for evaluating radio-frequency electromagnetic fields in anatomical human models for any matching and coupling conditions is introduced. The procedure resorts to the extraction of basis functions: such basis functions, which represent the fields produced by each individual port without any residual coupling, are derived through an algebraic procedure which uses the S parameter matrix and the fields calculated in one (only) full-wave simulation. The basis functions are then used as building-blocks for calculating the fields for any other S parameter matrix. The proposed approach can be used both for volume coil driven in quadrature and for parallel transmission configuration.

  18. Evaluation of 3D radio-frequency electromagnetic fields for any matching and coupling conditions by the use of basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, Gianluigi; Fontana, Nunzia; Monorchio, Agostino; Stara, Riccardo; Retico, Alessandra; Tosetti, Michela

    2015-12-01

    A procedure for evaluating radio-frequency electromagnetic fields in anatomical human models for any matching and coupling conditions is introduced. The procedure resorts to the extraction of basis functions: such basis functions, which represent the fields produced by each individual port without any residual coupling, are derived through an algebraic procedure which uses the S parameter matrix and the fields calculated in one (only) full-wave simulation. The basis functions are then used as building-blocks for calculating the fields for any other S parameter matrix. The proposed approach can be used both for volume coil driven in quadrature and for parallel transmission configuration.

  19. 3D Facial Pattern Analysis for Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    each individual’s data were scaled by the geometric mean of all possible linear distances between landmarks, following. The first two principal...over traditional template matching in that it can represent geometrical and non- geometrical changes of an object in the parametric template space...set of vertex templates can be generated from the root template by geometric or non- geometric transformation. Let Mtt ,...1 be M normalized vertex

  20. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform.

  1. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-03-11

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility.

  2. Measurement of 3-D Vibrational Motion by Dynamic Photogrammetry Using Least-Square Image Matching for Sub-Pixel Targeting to Improve Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoseong; Rhee, Huinam; Oh, Jae Hong; Park, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an improved methodology to measure three-dimensional dynamic displacements of a structure by digital close-range photogrammetry. A series of stereo images of a vibrating structure installed with targets are taken at specified intervals by using two daily-use cameras. A new methodology is proposed to accurately trace the spatial displacement of each target in three-dimensional space. This method combines the correlation and the least-square image matching so that the sub-pixel targeting can be obtained to increase the measurement accuracy. Collinearity and space resection theory are used to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters. To verify the proposed method, experiments have been performed to measure displacements of a cantilevered beam excited by an electrodynamic shaker, which is vibrating in a complex configuration with mixed bending and torsional motions simultaneously with multiple frequencies. The results by the present method showed good agreement with the measurement by two laser displacement sensors. The proposed methodology only requires inexpensive daily-use cameras, and can remotely detect the dynamic displacement of a structure vibrating in a complex three-dimensional defection shape up to sub-pixel accuracy. It has abundant potential applications to various fields, e.g., remote vibration monitoring of an inaccessible or dangerous facility. PMID:26978366

  3. Computer-assisted virtual planning and surgical template fabrication for frontoorbital advancement.

    PubMed

    Soleman, Jehuda; Thieringer, Florian; Beinemann, Joerg; Kunz, Christoph; Guzman, Raphael

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors describe a novel technique using computer-assisted design (CAD) and computed-assisted manufacturing (CAM) for the fabrication of individualized 3D printed surgical templates for frontoorbital advancement surgery. METHODS Two patients underwent frontoorbital advancement surgery for unilateral coronal synostosis. Virtual surgical planning (SurgiCase-CMF, version 5.0, Materialise) was done by virtual mirroring techniques and superposition of an age-matched normative 3D pediatric skull model. Based on these measurements, surgical templates were fabricated using a 3D printer. Bifrontal craniotomy and the osteotomies for the orbital bandeau were performed based on the sterilized 3D templates. The remodeling was then done placing the bone plates within the negative 3D templates and fixing them using absorbable poly-dl-lactic acid plates and screws. RESULTS Both patients exhibited a satisfying head shape postoperatively and at follow-up. No surgery-related complications occurred. The cutting and positioning of the 3D surgical templates proved to be very accurate and easy to use as well as reproducible and efficient. CONCLUSIONS Computer-assisted virtual planning and 3D template fabrication for frontoorbital advancement surgery leads to reconstructions based on standardizedmeasurements, precludes subjective remodeling, and seems to be overall safe and feasible. A larger series of patients with long-term follow-up is needed for further evaluation of this novel technique.

  4. An automatic electroencephalography blinking artefact detection and removal method based on template matching and ensemble empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Bizopoulos, Paschalis A; Al-Ani, Tarik; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios G; Tzallas, Alexandros T; Koutsouris, Dimitrios D; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-01-01

    Electrooculographic (EOG) artefacts are one of the most common causes of Electroencephalogram (EEG) distortion. In this paper, we propose a method for EOG Blinking Artefacts (BAs) detection and removal from EEG. Normalized Correlation Coefficient (NCC), based on a predetermined BA template library was used for detecting the BA. Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) was applied to the contaminated region and a statistical algorithm determined which Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) correspond to the BA. The proposed method was applied in simulated EEG signals, which were contaminated with artificially created EOG BAs, increasing the Signal-to-Error Ratio (SER) of the EEG Contaminated Region (CR) by 35 dB on average.

  5. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  6. 2D/3D Visual Tracker for Rover Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Madison, Richard W.; Nesnas, Issa A.; Bandari, Esfandiar; Kunz, Clayton; Deans, Matt; Bualat, Maria

    2006-01-01

    A visual-tracker computer program controls an articulated mast on a Mars rover to keep a designated feature (a target) in view while the rover drives toward the target, avoiding obstacles. Several prior visual-tracker programs have been tested on rover platforms; most require very small and well-estimated motion between consecutive image frames a requirement that is not realistic for a rover on rough terrain. The present visual-tracker program is designed to handle large image motions that lead to significant changes in feature geometry and photometry between frames. When a point is selected in one of the images acquired from stereoscopic cameras on the mast, a stereo triangulation algorithm computes a three-dimensional (3D) location for the target. As the rover moves, its body-mounted cameras feed images to a visual-odometry algorithm, which tracks two-dimensional (2D) corner features and computes their old and new 3D locations. The algorithm rejects points, the 3D motions of which are inconsistent with a rigid-world constraint, and then computes the apparent change in the rover pose (i.e., translation and rotation). The mast pan and tilt angles needed to keep the target centered in the field-of-view of the cameras (thereby minimizing the area over which the 2D-tracking algorithm must operate) are computed from the estimated change in the rover pose, the 3D position of the target feature, and a model of kinematics of the mast. If the motion between the consecutive frames is still large (i.e., 3D tracking was unsuccessful), an adaptive view-based matching technique is applied to the new image. This technique uses correlation-based template matching, in which a feature template is scaled by the ratio between the depth in the original template and the depth of pixels in the new image. This is repeated over the entire search window and the best correlation results indicate the appropriate match. The program could be a core for building application programs for systems

  7. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP “drumbeating” was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP “subevents”), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform-inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism pointsto the volumetric oscillation (~10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (~30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  8. Source mechanism of small long-period events at Mount St. Helens in July 2005 using template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoza, Robin S.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Shearer, Peter M.; Haney, Matthew M.; Waite, Gregory P.; Moran, Seth C.; Mikesell, T. Dylan

    2015-09-01

    Long-period (LP, 0.5-5 Hz) seismicity, observed at volcanoes worldwide, is a recognized signature of unrest and eruption. Cyclic LP "drumbeating" was the characteristic seismicity accompanying the sustained dome-building phase of the 2004-2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), WA. However, together with the LP drumbeating was a near-continuous, randomly occurring series of tiny LP seismic events (LP "subevents"), which may hold important additional information on the mechanism of seismogenesis at restless volcanoes. We employ template matching, phase-weighted stacking, and full-waveform inversion to image the source mechanism of one multiplet of these LP subevents at MSH in July 2005. The signal-to-noise ratios of the individual events are too low to produce reliable waveform inversion results, but the events are repetitive and can be stacked. We apply network-based template matching to 8 days of continuous velocity waveform data from 29 June to 7 July 2005 using a master event to detect 822 network triggers. We stack waveforms for 359 high-quality triggers at each station and component, using a combination of linear and phase-weighted stacking to produce clean stacks for use in waveform inversion. The derived source mechanism points to the volumetric oscillation (˜10 m3) of a subhorizontal crack located at shallow depth (˜30 m) in an area to the south of Crater Glacier in the southern portion of the breached MSH crater. A possible excitation mechanism is the sudden condensation of metastable steam from a shallow pressurized hydrothermal system as it encounters cool meteoric water in the outer parts of the edifice, perhaps supplied from snow melt.

  9. 3D Ear Identification Based on Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person’s identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm. PMID:24740247

  10. A 2D range Hausdorff approach for 3D face recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  11. A 2D range Hausdorff approach to 3D facial recognition.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William; Russ, Trina Denise; Little, Charles Quentin

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a 3D facial recognition algorithm based on the Hausdorff distance metric. The standard 3D formulation of the Hausdorff matching algorithm has been modified to operate on a 2D range image, enabling a reduction in computation from O(N2) to O(N) without large storage requirements. The Hausdorff distance is known for its robustness to data outliers and inconsistent data between two data sets, making it a suitable choice for dealing with the inherent problems in many 3D datasets due to sensor noise and object self-occlusion. For optimal performance, the algorithm assumes a good initial alignment between probe and template datasets. However, to minimize the error between two faces, the alignment can be iteratively refined. Results from the algorithm are presented using 3D face images from the Face Recognition Grand Challenge database version 1.0.

  12. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  13. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  14. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  15. Handling Motion-Blur in 3D Tracking and Rendering for Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngmin; Lepetit, Vincent; Woo, Woontack

    2012-09-01

    The contribution of this paper is two-fold. First, we show how to extend the ESM algorithm to handle motion blur in 3D object tracking. ESM is a powerful algorithm for template matching-based tracking, but it can fail under motion blur. We introduce an image formation model that explicitly consider the possibility of blur, and shows its results in a generalization of the original ESM algorithm. This allows to converge faster, more accurately and more robustly even under large amount of blur. Our second contribution is an efficient method for rendering the virtual objects under the estimated motion blur. It renders two images of the object under 3D perspective, and warps them to create many intermediate images. By fusing these images we obtain a final image for the virtual objects blurred consistently with the captured image. Because warping is much faster than 3D rendering, we can create realistically blurred images at a very low computational cost.

  16. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  17. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  18. A multibiometric face recognition fusion framework with template protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chindaro, S.; Deravi, F.; Zhou, Z.; Ng, M. W. R.; Castro Neves, M.; Zhou, X.; Kelkboom, E.

    2010-04-01

    In this work we present a multibiometric face recognition framework based on combining information from 2D with 3D facial features. The 3D biometrics channel is protected by a privacy enhancing technology, which uses error correcting codes and cryptographic primitives to safeguard the privacy of the users of the biometric system at the same time enabling accurate matching through fusion with 2D. Experiments are conducted to compare the matching performance of such multibiometric systems with the individual biometric channels working alone and with unprotected multibiometric systems. The results show that the proposed hybrid system incorporating template protection, match and in some cases exceed the performance of corresponding unprotected equivalents, in addition to offering the additional privacy protection.

  19. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  20. Automated modeling of RNA 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Skiba, Pawel; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview over the current methods for automated modeling of RNA structures, with emphasis on template-based methods. The currently used approaches to RNA modeling are presented with a side view on the protein world, where many similar ideas have been used. Two main programs for automated template-based modeling are presented: ModeRNA assembling structures from fragments and MacroMoleculeBuilder performing a simulation to satisfy spatial restraints. Both approaches have in common that they require an alignment of the target sequence to a known RNA structure that is used as a modeling template. As a way to find promising template structures and to align the target and template sequences, we propose a pipeline combining the ParAlign and Infernal programs on RNA family data from Rfam. We also briefly summarize template-free methods for RNA 3D structure prediction. Typically, RNA structures generated by automated modeling methods require local or global optimization. Thus, we also discuss methods that can be used for local or global refinement of RNA structures.

  1. [Potentials of 3D-modeling in reconstructive orbital surgery].

    PubMed

    Butsan, S B; Khokhlachev, S B; Ĭigitaliev, Sh N; Zaiakin, Ia A

    2012-01-01

    A technique of bone reconstructive surgery of orbitofrontonasomalar region using 3D-modeling based on multispiral computer tomography data is presented. The efficacy of intraoperative templates created using 3D-modeling was showed for harvesting and modeling of bone calvarial autografts. The steps of reconstructive procedure are explained in details for repair of medial and inferior orbital fractures.

  2. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  3. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  4. Optical 3D surface digitizing in forensic medicine: 3D documentation of skin and bone injuries.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Braun, Marcel; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2003-11-26

    Photography process reduces a three-dimensional (3D) wound to a two-dimensional level. If there is a need for a high-resolution 3D dataset of an object, it needs to be three-dimensionally scanned. No-contact optical 3D digitizing surface scanners can be used as a powerful tool for wound and injury-causing instrument analysis in trauma cases. The 3D skin wound and a bone injury documentation using the optical scanner Advanced TOpometric Sensor (ATOS II, GOM International, Switzerland) will be demonstrated using two illustrative cases. Using this 3D optical digitizing method the wounds (the virtual 3D computer model of the skin and the bone injuries) and the virtual 3D model of the injury-causing tool are graphically documented in 3D in real-life size and shape and can be rotated in the CAD program on the computer screen. In addition, the virtual 3D models of the bone injuries and tool can now be compared in a 3D CAD program against one another in virtual space, to see if there are matching areas. Further steps in forensic medicine will be a full 3D surface documentation of the human body and all the forensic relevant injuries using optical 3D scanners.

  5. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  6. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  7. Robust initialization for 2D/3D registration of knee implant models to single-plane fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, J.; Claes, P.; Bellemans, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    A fully automated initialization method is proposed for the 2D/3D registration of 3D CAD models of knee implant components to a single-plane calibrated fluoroscopy. The algorithm matches edge segments, detected in the fluoroscopy image, with pre-computed libraries of expected 2D silhouettes of the implant components. Each library entry represents a different combination of out-of-plane registration transformation parameters. Library matching is performed by computing point-based 2D/2D registrations in between each library entry and each detected edge segment in the fluoroscopy image, resulting in an estimate of the in-plane registration transformation parameters. Point correspondences for registration are established by template matching of the bending patterns on the contours. A matching score for each individual 2D/2D registration is computed by evaluating the transformed library entry in an edge-encoded (characteristic) image, which is derived from the original fluoroscopy image. A matching scores accumulator is introduced to select and suggest one or more initial pose estimates. The proposed method is robust against occlusions and partial segmentations. Validation results are shown on simulated fluoroscopy images. In all cases a library match is found for each implant component which is very similar to the shape information in the fluoroscopy. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by initializing an intensity-based 2D/3D registration method with the automatically obtained estimation of the registration transformation parameters.

  8. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  9. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  10. Fast 3D fluid registration of brain magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leporé, Natasha; Chou, Yi-Yu; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Becker, James T.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2008-03-01

    Fluid registration is widely used in medical imaging to track anatomical changes, to correct image distortions, and to integrate multi-modality data. Fluid mappings guarantee that the template image deforms smoothly into the target, without tearing or folding, even when large deformations are required for accurate matching. Here we implemented an intensity-based fluid registration algorithm, accelerated by using a filter designed by Bro-Nielsen and Gramkow. We validated the algorithm on 2D and 3D geometric phantoms using the mean square difference between the final registered image and target as a measure of the accuracy of the registration. In tests on phantom images with different levels of overlap, varying amounts of Gaussian noise, and different intensity gradients, the fluid method outperformed a more commonly used elastic registration method, both in terms of accuracy and in avoiding topological errors during deformation. We also studied the effect of varying the viscosity coefficients in the viscous fluid equation, to optimize registration accuracy. Finally, we applied the fluid registration algorithm to a dataset of 2D binary corpus callosum images and 3D volumetric brain MRIs from 14 healthy individuals to assess its accuracy and robustness.

  11. Low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry for an information barrier based on a multi-criteria template-matching approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göttsche, Malte; Schirm, Janet; Glaser, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry has been successfully employed to identify unique items containing special nuclear materials. Template information barriers have been developed in the past to confirm items as warheads by comparing their gamma signature to the signature of true warheads. Their development has, however, not been fully transparent, and they may not be sensitive to some relevant evasion scenarios. We develop a fully open template information barrier concept, based on low-resolution measurements, which, by design, reduces the extent of revealed sensitive information. The concept is based on three signatures of an item to be compared to a recorded template. The similarity of the spectrum is assessed by a modification of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to confirm the isotopic composition. The total gamma count rate must agree with the template as a measure of the projected surface of the object. In order to detect the diversion of fissile material from the interior of an item, a polyethylene mask is placed in front of the detector. Neutrons from spontaneous and induced fission events in the item produce 2.223 MeV gamma rays from neutron capture by hydrogen-1 in the mask. This peak is detected and its intensity scales with the item's fissile mass. The analysis based on MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of various plutonium configurations suggests that this concept can distinguish a valid item from a variety of invalid ones. The concept intentionally avoids any assumptions about specific spectral features, such as looking for specific gamma peaks of specific isotopes, thereby facilitating a fully unclassified discussion. By making all aspects public and allowing interested participants to contribute to the development and benchmarking, we enable a more open and inclusive discourse on this matter.

  12. 3D palmprint data fast acquisition and recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Huang, Shujun; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a fast 3D (Three-Dimension) palmprint capturing system and develops an efficient 3D palmprint feature extraction and recognition method. In order to fast acquire accurate 3D shape and texture of palmprint, a DLP projector triggers a CCD camera to realize synchronization. By generating and projecting green fringe pattern images onto the measured palm surface, 3D palmprint data are calculated from the fringe pattern images. The periodic feature vector can be derived from the calculated 3D palmprint data, so undistorted 3D biometrics is obtained. Using the obtained 3D palmprint data, feature matching test have been carried out by Gabor filter, competition rules and the mean curvature. Experimental results on capturing 3D palmprint show that the proposed acquisition method can fast get 3D shape information of palmprint. Some initial experiments on recognition show the proposed method is efficient by using 3D palmprint data.

  13. B4 2 After, 3D Deformation Field From Matching Pre- To Post-Event Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds, The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah M7.2 Earthquake Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Nissen, E.; Limon-Tirado, J. F.; Arrowsmith, R.; Krishnan, A.; Saripalli, S.; Oskin, M. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Arregui, S. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Teran, O. J.

    2013-05-01

    Aerial LiDAR surveys reconstruct with amazing fidelity the sinuosity of terrain relief. In this research we explore the 3D deformation field at the surface after a big earthquake (M7.2) by comparing pre- to post-event aerial LiDAR point clouds. The April 4 2010 earthquake produced a NW-SE surface rupture ~110km long with right-lateral normal slip up to 3m in magnitude over a very favorable target: scarcely vegetated and unaltered desert mountain range, sierras El Mayor and Cucapah, in northern Baja California, close to the US-México border. It is a plate boundary region between the Pacific and North American plates. The pre-event LiDAR with lower point density (0.013-0.033 pts m-2) required filtering and post-processing before comparing with the denser (9-18 pts m-2) more accurate post event dataset. The 3D surface displacement field was determined using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, implemented in the open source Point Cloud Library (PCL). The LiDAR datasets are first split into a grid of windows, and for each one, ICP iteratively converges on the rigid body transformation (comprising translations and rotations) that best aligns the pre- to post-event points. Perturbing the pre- and post-event point clouds independently with a synthetic right lateral inverse displacements of known magnitude along a proposed fault, ICP recovered the synthetically introduced translations. Windows with dimensions of 100-200m gave the best results for datasets with these densities. The simplified surface rupture photo interpreted and mapped in the field, delineates very well the vertical displacements patterns unveiled by ICP. The method revealed block rotations, some with clockwise and others counter clockwise direction along the simplified surface rupture. As ground truth, displacements from ICP have similar values as those measured in the field along the main rupture by Fletcher and collaborators. The vertical component was better estimated than the

  14. Non-rigid registration of small animal skeletons from micro-CT using 3D shape context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Small animal registration is an important step for molecular image analysis. Skeleton registration from whole-body or only partial micro Computerized Tomography (CT) image is often performed to match individual rats to atlases and templates, for example to identify organs in positron emission tomography (PET). In this paper, we extend the shape context matching technique for 3D surface registration and apply it for rat hind limb skeleton registration from CT images. Using the proposed method, after standard affine iterative closest point (ICP) registration, correspondences between the 3D points from sour and target objects were robustly found and used to deform the limb skeleton surface with thin-plate-spline (TPS). Experiments are described using phantoms and actual rat hind limb skeletons. On animals, mean square errors were decreased by the proposed registration compared to that of its initial alignment. Visually, skeletons were successfully registered even in cases of very different animal poses.

  15. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  17. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  18. A universal approach for automatic organ segmentations on 3D CT images based on organ localization and 3D GrabCut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Ito, Takaaki; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a universal approach to automatic segmentation of different internal organ and tissue regions in three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) scans. The proposed approach combines object localization, a probabilistic atlas, and 3D GrabCut techniques to achieve automatic and quick segmentation. The proposed method first detects a tight 3D bounding box that contains the target organ region in CT images and then estimates the prior of each pixel inside the bounding box belonging to the organ region or background based on a dynamically generated probabilistic atlas. Finally, the target organ region is separated from the background by using an improved 3D GrabCut algorithm. A machine-learning method is used to train a detector to localize the 3D bounding box of the target organ using template matching on a selected feature space. A content-based image retrieval method is used for online generation of a patient-specific probabilistic atlas for the target organ based on a database. A 3D GrabCut algorithm is used for final organ segmentation by iteratively estimating the CT number distributions of the target organ and backgrounds using a graph-cuts algorithm. We applied this approach to localize and segment twelve major organ and tissue regions independently based on a database that includes 1300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected numerous CT scans and manually input nine principal types of inner organ regions for performance evaluation. Preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed approach for addressing automatic organ segmentation issues on CT images.

  19. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  20. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. Construction of programmable interconnected 3D microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Patrick R.; Wolf, Marc P.; Wang, Xueya; Zhang, Bei; Marsch, Stephan; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B.

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems represent a key-enabling platform for novel diagnostic tools for use at the point-of-care in clinical contexts as well as for evolving single cell diagnostics. The design of 3D microfluidic systems is an active field of development, but construction of true interconnected 3D microfluidic networks is still a challenge, in particular when the goal is rapid prototyping, accurate design and flexibility. We report a novel approach for the construction of programmable 3D microfluidic systems consisting of modular 3D template casting of interconnected threads to allow user-programmable flow paths and examine its structural characteristics and its modular function. To overcome problems with thread template casting reported in the literature, low-surface-energy polymer threads were used, that allow solvent-free production. Connected circular channels with excellent roundness and low diameter variability were created. Variable channel termination allowed programming a flow path on-the-fly, thus rendering the resulting 3D microfluidic systems highly customizable even after production. Thus, construction of programmable/reprogrammable fully 3D microfluidic systems by template casting of a network of interconnecting threads is feasible, leads to high-quality and highly reproducible, complex 3D geometries.

  2. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  3. Does matching relation exist between the length and the tilting angle of terminal implants in the all-on-four protocol? stress distributions by 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomei; Cao, Zhizhong; Qiu, Xiaoqian; Tang, Zhen; Gong, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To explore whether there is matching relation between the length and the tilting angle of terminal implants in the All-on-Four protocol by studying the effects of different implant configurations on stress distributions of implant, bone, and framework. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four implants were employed to support a full-arch fixed prosthesis and five three-dimensional finite element models were established with CT images, based on the length (S and L) and distal tilt angle (0°, 30° and 45°) of terminal implants for an edentulous mandible, which named: Tilt0-S, Tilt30-S, Tilt30-L, Tilt45-S and Tilt45-L. An oblique 240 N was loaded at second molar. The von Mises Stresses were analyzed. The implants were consecutively named #1 to #4 from the loading point. RESULTS 1) Tilt0-S had the greatest stress on the implants, with the other groups exhibiting variable reductions; the four implants of Tilt45-L demonstrated the greatest reduction in stress. 2) Tilt0-S had the greatest stress at bone around #1 implant neck, and Tilt45-L exhibited the least stress, which was a 36.3% reduction compared to Tilt0-S. 3) The greatest stress in the framework was found on the cantilevers distal to #1 implant. Tilt45-S exhibited the least stress. CONCLUSION Matching different length and tilting angle of the terminal implants led to variable stress reductions on implants, bone and the superstructure. By optimizing implant configuration, the reduction of stress on implants and surrounding bone could be maximized. Under the present condition, Tilt45-L was the preferred configuration. Further clinical testings are required. PMID:26140176

  4. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  5. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  6. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  7. Selection of massive bone allografts using shape-matching 3-dimensional registration

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Massive bone allografts are used when surgery causes large segmental defects. Shape-matching is the primary criterion for selection of an allograft. The current selection method, based on 2-dimensional template comparison, is inefficient for 3-dimensional complex bones. We have analyzed a 3-dimensional (3-D) registration method to match the anatomy of the allograft with that of the recipient. Methods 3-D CT-based registration was performed to match the shapes of both bones. We used the registration to align the allograft volume onto the recipient's bone. Hemipelvic allograft selection was tested in 10 virtual recipients with a panel of 10 potential allografts, including one from the recipient himself (trap graft). 4 observers were asked to visually inspect the superposition of allograft over the recipient, to classify the allografts into 4 categories according to the matching of anatomic zones, and to select the 3 best matching allografts. The results obtained using the registration method were compared with those from a previous study on the template method. Results Using the registration method, the observers systematically detected the trap graft. Selections of the 3 best matching allografts performed using registration and template methods were different. Selection of the 3 best matching allografts was improved by the registration method. Finally, reproducibility of the selection was improved when using the registration method. Interpretation 3-D CT registration provides more useful information than the template method but the final decision lies with the surgeon, who should select the optimal allograft according to his or her own preferences and the needs of the recipient. PMID:20175643

  8. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    PubMed

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  9. Genotyping and interpretation of STR-DNA: Low-template, mixtures and database matches-Twenty years of research and development.

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter; Haned, Hinda; Bleka, Oyvind; Hansson, Oskar; Dørum, Guro; Egeland, Thore

    2015-09-01

    The introduction of Short Tandem Repeat (STR) DNA was a revolution within a revolution that transformed forensic DNA profiling into a tool that could be used, for the first time, to create National DNA databases. This transformation would not have been possible without the concurrent development of fluorescent automated sequencers, combined with the ability to multiplex several loci together. Use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) increased the sensitivity of the method to enable the analysis of a handful of cells. The first multiplexes were simple: 'the quad', introduced by the defunct UK Forensic Science Service (FSS) in 1994, rapidly followed by a more discriminating 'six-plex' (Second Generation Multiplex) in 1995 that was used to create the world's first national DNA database. The success of the database rapidly outgrew the functionality of the original system - by the year 2000 a new multiplex of ten-loci was introduced to reduce the chance of adventitious matches. The technology was adopted world-wide, albeit with different loci. The political requirement to introduce pan-European databases encouraged standardisation - the development of European Standard Set (ESS) of markers comprising twelve-loci is the latest iteration. Although development has been impressive, the methods used to interpret evidence have lagged behind. For example, the theory to interpret complex DNA profiles (low-level mixtures), had been developed fifteen years ago, but only in the past year or so, are the concepts starting to be widely adopted. A plethora of different models (some commercial and others non-commercial) have appeared. This has led to a confusing 'debate' about the 'best' to use. The different models available are described along with their advantages and disadvantages. A section discusses the development of national DNA databases, along with details of an associated controversy to estimate the strength of evidence of matches. Current methodology is limited to

  10. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  11. 3D fast wavelet network model-assisted 3D face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Salwa; Jemai, Olfa; Zaied, Mourad; Ben Amar, Chokri

    2015-12-01

    In last years, the emergence of 3D shape in face recognition is due to its robustness to pose and illumination changes. These attractive benefits are not all the challenges to achieve satisfactory recognition rate. Other challenges such as facial expressions and computing time of matching algorithms remain to be explored. In this context, we propose our 3D face recognition approach using 3D wavelet networks. Our approach contains two stages: learning stage and recognition stage. For the training we propose a novel algorithm based on 3D fast wavelet transform. From 3D coordinates of the face (x,y,z), we proceed to voxelization to get a 3D volume which will be decomposed by 3D fast wavelet transform and modeled after that with a wavelet network, then their associated weights are considered as vector features to represent each training face . For the recognition stage, an unknown identity face is projected on all the training WN to obtain a new vector features after every projection. A similarity score is computed between the old and the obtained vector features. To show the efficiency of our approach, experimental results were performed on all the FRGC v.2 benchmark.

  12. Vision models for 3D surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-11-01

    Different approaches to computational stereo to represent human stereo vision have been developed over the past two decades. The Marr-Poggio theory of human stereo vision is probably the most widely accepted model of the human stereo vision. However, recently developed motion stereo models which use a sequence of images taken by either a moving camera or a moving object provide an alternative method of achieving multi-resolution matching without the use of Laplacian of Gaussian operators. While using image sequences, the baseline between two camera positions for a image pair is changed for the subsequent image pair so as to achieve different resolution for each image pair. Having different baselines also avoids the inherent occlusion problem in stereo vision models. The advantage of using multi-resolution images acquired by camera positioned at different baselines over those acquired by LOG operators is that one does not have to encounter spurious edges often created by zero-crossings in the LOG operated images. Therefore in designing a computer vision system, a motion stereo model is more appropriate than a stereo vision model. However, in some applications where only a stereo pair of images are available, recovery of 3D surfaces of natural scenes are possible in a computationally efficient manner by using cepstrum matching and regularization techniques. Section 2 of this paper describes a motion stereo model using multi-scale cepstrum matching for the detection of disparity between image pairs in a sequence of images and subsequent recovery of 3D surfaces from depth-map obtained by a non convergent triangulation technique. Section 3 presents a 3D surface recovery technique from a stereo pair using cepstrum matching for disparity detection and cubic B-splines for surface smoothing. Section 4 contains the results of 3D surface recovery using both of the techniques mentioned above. Section 5 discusses the merit of 2D cepstrum matching and cubic B

  13. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  14. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  15. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  16. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  17. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  18. Biometric template transformation: a security analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Abhishek; Nandakumar, Karthik; Jain, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the critical steps in designing a secure biometric system is protecting the templates of the users that are stored either in a central database or on smart cards. If a biometric template is compromised, it leads to serious security and privacy threats because unlike passwords, it is not possible for a legitimate user to revoke his biometric identifiers and switch to another set of uncompromised identifiers. One methodology for biometric template protection is the template transformation approach, where the template, consisting of the features extracted from the biometric trait, is transformed using parameters derived from a user specific password or key. Only the transformed template is stored and matching is performed directly in the transformed domain. In this paper, we formally investigate the security strength of template transformation techniques and define six metrics that facilitate a holistic security evaluation. Furthermore, we analyze the security of two wellknown template transformation techniques, namely, Biohashing and cancelable fingerprint templates based on the proposed metrics. Our analysis indicates that both these schemes are vulnerable to intrusion and linkage attacks because it is relatively easy to obtain either a close approximation of the original template (Biohashing) or a pre-image of the transformed template (cancelable fingerprints). We argue that the security strength of template transformation techniques must consider also consider the computational complexity of obtaining a complete pre-image of the transformed template in addition to the complexity of recovering the original biometric template.

  19. FaceWarehouse: a 3D facial expression database for visual computing.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Weng, Yanlin; Zhou, Shun; Tong, Yiying; Zhou, Kun

    2014-03-01

    We present FaceWarehouse, a database of 3D facial expressions for visual computing applications. We use Kinect, an off-the-shelf RGBD camera, to capture 150 individuals aged 7-80 from various ethnic backgrounds. For each person, we captured the RGBD data of her different expressions, including the neutral expression and 19 other expressions such as mouth-opening, smile, kiss, etc. For every RGBD raw data record, a set of facial feature points on the color image such as eye corners, mouth contour, and the nose tip are automatically localized, and manually adjusted if better accuracy is required. We then deform a template facial mesh to fit the depth data as closely as possible while matching the feature points on the color image to their corresponding points on the mesh. Starting from these fitted face meshes, we construct a set of individual-specific expression blendshapes for each person. These meshes with consistent topology are assembled as a rank-3 tensor to build a bilinear face model with two attributes: identity and expression. Compared with previous 3D facial databases, for every person in our database, there is a much richer matching collection of expressions, enabling depiction of most human facial actions. We demonstrate the potential of FaceWarehouse for visual computing with four applications: facial image manipulation, face component transfer, real-time performance-based facial image animation, and facial animation retargeting from video to image.

  20. An Automatic Registration Algorithm for 3D Maxillofacial Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Luwen; Zhou, Zhongwei; Guo, Jixiang; Lv, Jiancheng

    2016-09-01

    3D image registration aims at aligning two 3D data sets in a common coordinate system, which has been widely used in computer vision, pattern recognition and computer assisted surgery. One challenging problem in 3D registration is that point-wise correspondences between two point sets are often unknown apriori. In this work, we develop an automatic algorithm for 3D maxillofacial models registration including facial surface model and skull model. Our proposed registration algorithm can achieve a good alignment result between partial and whole maxillofacial model in spite of ambiguous matching, which has a potential application in the oral and maxillofacial reparative and reconstructive surgery. The proposed algorithm includes three steps: (1) 3D-SIFT features extraction and FPFH descriptors construction; (2) feature matching using SAC-IA; (3) coarse rigid alignment and refinement by ICP. Experiments on facial surfaces and mandible skull models demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our algorithm.

  1. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D

    2005-02-04

    Locating specific 3D objects in overhead images is an important problem in many remote sensing applications. 3D objects may contain either one connected component or multiple disconnected components. Solutions must accommodate images acquired with diverse sensors at various times of the day, in various seasons of the year, or under various weather conditions. Moreover, the physical manifestation of a 3D object with fixed physical dimensions in an overhead image is highly dependent on object physical dimensions, object position/orientation, image spatial resolution, and imaging geometry (e.g., obliqueness). This paper describes a two-stage computer-assisted approach for locating 3D objects in overhead images. In the matching stage, the computer matches models of 3D objects to overhead images. The strongest degree of match over all object orientations is computed at each pixel. Unambiguous local maxima in the degree of match as a function of pixel location are then found. In the cueing stage, the computer sorts image thumbnails in descending order of figure-of-merit and presents them to human analysts for visual inspection and interpretation. The figure-of-merit associated with an image thumbnail is computed from the degrees of match to a 3D object model associated with unambiguous local maxima that lie within the thumbnail. This form of computer assistance is invaluable when most of the relevant thumbnails are highly ranked, and the amount of inspection time needed is much less for the highly ranked thumbnails than for images as a whole.

  2. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  3. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  4. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  5. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  6. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  7. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  8. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  9. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  10. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  13. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  14. Biometric template revocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Craig M.

    2004-08-01

    Biometric are a powerful technology for identifying humans both locally and at a distance. In order to perform identification or verification biometric systems capture an image of some biometric of a user or subject. The image is then converted mathematical to representation of the person call a template. Since we know that every human in the world is different each human will have different biometric images (different fingerprints, or faces, etc.). This is what makes biometrics useful for identification. However unlike a credit card number or a password to can be given to a person and later revoked if it is compromised and biometric is with the person for life. The problem then is to develop biometric templates witch can be easily revoked and reissued which are also unique to the user and can be easily used for identification and verification. In this paper we develop and present a method to generate a set of templates which are fully unique to the individual and also revocable. By using bases set compression algorithms in an n-dimensional orthogonal space we can represent a give biometric image in an infinite number of equally valued and unique ways. The verification and biometric matching system would be presented with a given template and revocation code. The code will then representing where in the sequence of n-dimensional vectors to start the recognition.

  15. Alignment-independent technique for 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Jon G; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-04-01

    Molecular biochemistry is controlled by 3D phenomena but structure-activity models based on 3D descriptors are infrequently used for large data sets because of the computational overhead for determining molecular conformations. A diverse dataset of 146 androgen receptor binders was used to investigate how different methods for defining molecular conformations affect the performance of 3D-quantitative spectral data activity relationship models. Molecular conformations tested: (1) global minimum of molecules' potential energy surface; (2) alignment-to-templates using equal electronic and steric force field contributions; (3) alignment using contributions "Best-for-Each" template; (4) non-energy optimized, non-aligned (2D > 3D). Aggregate predictions from models were compared. Highest average coefficients of determination ranged from R Test (2) = 0.56 to 0.61. The best model using 2D > 3D (imported directly from ChemSpider) produced R Test (2) = 0.61. It was superior to energy-minimized and conformation-aligned models and was achieved in only 3-7 % of the time required using the other conformation strategies. Predictions averaged from models built on different conformations achieved a consensus R Test (2) = 0.65. The best 2D > 3D model was analyzed for underlying structure-activity relationships. For the compound strongest binding to the androgen receptor, 10 substructural features contributing to binding were flagged. Utility of 2D > 3D was compared for two other activity endpoints, each modeling a medium sized data set. Results suggested that large scale, accurate predictions using 2D > 3D SDAR descriptors may be produced for interactions involving endocrine system nuclear receptors and other data sets in which strongest activities are produced by fairly inflexible substrates.

  16. Alignment-independent technique for 3D QSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Jon G.; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B.; Buzatu, Dan A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular biochemistry is controlled by 3D phenomena but structure-activity models based on 3D descriptors are infrequently used for large data sets because of the computational overhead for determining molecular conformations. A diverse dataset of 146 androgen receptor binders was used to investigate how different methods for defining molecular conformations affect the performance of 3D-quantitative spectral data activity relationship models. Molecular conformations tested: (1) global minimum of molecules' potential energy surface; (2) alignment-to-templates using equal electronic and steric force field contributions; (3) alignment using contributions "Best-for-Each" template; (4) non-energy optimized, non-aligned (2D > 3D). Aggregate predictions from models were compared. Highest average coefficients of determination ranged from R Test 2 = 0.56 to 0.61. The best model using 2D > 3D (imported directly from ChemSpider) produced R Test 2 = 0.61. It was superior to energy-minimized and conformation-aligned models and was achieved in only 3-7 % of the time required using the other conformation strategies. Predictions averaged from models built on different conformations achieved a consensus R Test 2 = 0.65. The best 2D > 3D model was analyzed for underlying structure-activity relationships. For the compound strongest binding to the androgen receptor, 10 substructural features contributing to binding were flagged. Utility of 2D > 3D was compared for two other activity endpoints, each modeling a medium sized data set. Results suggested that large scale, accurate predictions using 2D > 3D SDAR descriptors may be produced for interactions involving endocrine system nuclear receptors and other data sets in which strongest activities are produced by fairly inflexible substrates.

  17. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  18. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  19. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  20. 3D Printing of Hierarchical Silk Fibroin Structures.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marianne R; Schaffner, Manuel; Carnelli, Davide; Studart, André R

    2016-12-21

    Like many other natural materials, silk is hierarchically structured from the amino acid level up to the cocoon or spider web macroscopic structures. Despite being used industrially in a number of applications, hierarchically structured silk fibroin objects with a similar degree of architectural control as in natural structures have not been produced yet due to limitations in fabrication processes. In a combined top-down and bottom-up approach, we exploit the freedom in macroscopic design offered by 3D printing and the template-guided assembly of ink building blocks at the meso- and nanolevel to fabricate hierarchical silk porous materials with unprecedented structural control. Pores with tunable sizes in the range 40-350 μm are generated by adding sacrificial organic microparticles as templates to a silk fibroin-based ink. Commercially available wax particles or monodisperse polycaprolactone made by microfluidics can be used as microparticle templates. Since closed pores are generated after template removal, an ultrasonication treatment can optionally be used to achieve open porosity. Such pore templating particles can be further modified with nanoparticles to create a hierarchical template that results in porous structures with a defined nanotopography on the pore walls. The hierarchically porous silk structures obtained with this processing technique can potentially be utilized in various application fields from structural materials to thermal insulation to tissue engineering scaffolds.

  1. RNA and protein 3D structure modeling: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Boniecki, Michał; Puton, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2011-09-01

    In analogy to proteins, the function of RNA depends on its structure and dynamics, which are encoded in the linear sequence. While there are numerous methods for computational prediction of protein 3D structure from sequence, there have been very few such methods for RNA. This review discusses template-based and template-free approaches for macromolecular structure prediction, with special emphasis on comparison between the already tried-and-tested methods for protein structure modeling and the very recently developed "protein-like" modeling methods for RNA. We highlight analogies between many successful methods for modeling of these two types of biological macromolecules and argue that RNA 3D structure can be modeled using "protein-like" methodology. We also highlight the areas where the differences between RNA and proteins require the development of RNA-specific solutions.

  2. Gage for 3-d contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynie, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Simple gage, used with template, can help inspectors determine whether three-dimensional curved surface has correct contour. Gage was developed as aid in explosive forming of Space Shuttle emergency-escape hatch. For even greater accuracy, wedge can be made of metal and calibrated by indexing machine.

  3. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  4. Methodology of the determination of the uncertainties by using the biometric device the broadway 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Roman; Talandova, Hana; Adamek, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The biometric identification by face is among one of the most widely used methods of biometric identification. Due to it provides a faster and more accurate identification; it was implemented into area of security 3D face reader by Broadway manufacturer was used to measure. It is equipped with the 3D camera system, which uses the method of structured light scanning and saves the template into the 3D model of face. The obtained data were evaluated by software Turnstile Enrolment Application (TEA). The measurements were used 3D face reader the Broadway 3D. First, the person was scanned and stored in the database. Thereafter person has already been compared with the stored template in the database for each method. Finally, a measure of reliability was evaluated for the Broadway 3D face reader.

  5. Surgeon-Based 3D Printing for Microvascular Bone Flaps.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erin M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-03-04

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) printing has developed as a revolutionary technology with the capacity to design accurate physical models in preoperative planning. We present our experience in surgeon-based design of 3D models, using home 3D software and printing technology for use as an adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Methods Home 3D printing techniques were used in the design and execution of vascularized bone flap transfers to the upper extremity. Open source imaging software was used to convert preoperative computed tomography scans and create 3D models. These were printed in the surgeon's office as 3D models for the planned reconstruction. Vascularized bone flaps were designed intraoperatively based on the 3D printed models. Results Three-dimensional models were created for intraoperative use in vascularized bone flaps, including (1) medial femoral trochlea (MFT) flap for scaphoid avascular necrosis and nonunion, (2) MFT flap for lunate avascular necrosis and nonunion, (3) medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap for wrist arthrodesis, and (4) free fibula osteocutaneous flap for distal radius septic nonunion. Templates based on the 3D models allowed for the precise and rapid contouring of well-vascularized bone flaps in situ, prior to ligating the donor pedicle. Conclusions Surgeon-based 3D printing is a feasible, innovative technology that allows for the precise and rapid contouring of models that can be created in various configurations for pre- and intraoperative planning. The technology is easy to use, convenient, and highly economical as compared with traditional send-out manufacturing. Surgeon-based 3D printing is a useful adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  6. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  7. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  8. 3D FaceCam: a fast and accurate 3D facial imaging device for biometrics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jason; Zhuang, Ping; May, Patrick; Yi, Steven; Tunnell, David

    2004-08-01

    Human faces are fundamentally three-dimensional (3D) objects, and each face has its unique 3D geometric profile. The 3D geometric features of a human face can be used, together with its 2D texture, for rapid and accurate face recognition purposes. Due to the lack of low-cost and robust 3D sensors and effective 3D facial recognition (FR) algorithms, almost all existing FR systems use 2D face images. Genex has developed 3D solutions that overcome the inherent problems in 2D while also addressing limitations in other 3D alternatives. One important aspect of our solution is a unique 3D camera (the 3D FaceCam) that combines multiple imaging sensors within a single compact device to provide instantaneous, ear-to-ear coverage of a human face. This 3D camera uses three high-resolution CCD sensors and a color encoded pattern projection system. The RGB color information from each pixel is used to compute the range data and generate an accurate 3D surface map. The imaging system uses no moving parts and combines multiple 3D views to provide detailed and complete 3D coverage of the entire face. Images are captured within a fraction of a second and full-frame 3D data is produced within a few seconds. This described method provides much better data coverage and accuracy in feature areas with sharp features or details (such as the nose and eyes). Using this 3D data, we have been able to demonstrate that a 3D approach can significantly improve the performance of facial recognition. We have conducted tests in which we have varied the lighting conditions and angle of image acquisition in the "field." These tests have shown that the matching results are significantly improved when enrolling a 3D image rather than a single 2D image. With its 3D solutions, Genex is working toward unlocking the promise of powerful 3D FR and transferring FR from a lab technology into a real-world biometric solution.

  9. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  10. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  11. Templated biomimetic multifunctional coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chih-Hung; Gonzalez, Adriel; Linn, Nicholas C.; Jiang, Peng; Jiang, Bin

    2008-02-01

    We report a bioinspired templating technique for fabricating multifunctional optical coatings that mimic both unique functionalities of antireflective moth eyes and superhydrophobic cicada wings. Subwavelength-structured fluoropolymer nipple arrays are created by a soft-lithography-like process. The utilization of fluoropolymers simultaneously enhances the antireflective performance and the hydrophobicity of the replicated films. The specular reflectivity matches the optical simulation using a thin-film multilayer model. The dependence of the size and the crystalline ordering of the replicated nipples on the resulting antireflective properties have also been investigated by experiment and modeling. These biomimetic materials may find important technological application in self-cleaning antireflection coatings.

  12. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  13. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  14. Improving automated 3D reconstruction methods via vision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Isabella; Nocerino, Erica; Hess, Mona; Menna, Fabio; Sargeant, Ben; MacDonald, Lindsay; Remondino, Fabio; Robson, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to provide a procedure for improving automated 3D reconstruction methods via vision metrology. The 3D reconstruction problem is generally addressed using two different approaches. On the one hand, vision metrology (VM) systems try to accurately derive 3D coordinates of few sparse object points for industrial measurement and inspection applications; on the other, recent dense image matching (DIM) algorithms are designed to produce dense point clouds for surface representations and analyses. This paper strives to demonstrate a step towards narrowing the gap between traditional VM and DIM approaches. Efforts are therefore intended to (i) test the metric performance of the automated photogrammetric 3D reconstruction procedure, (ii) enhance the accuracy of the final results and (iii) obtain statistical indicators of the quality achieved in the orientation step. VM tools are exploited to integrate their main functionalities (centroid measurement, photogrammetric network adjustment, precision assessment, etc.) into the pipeline of 3D dense reconstruction. Finally, geometric analyses and accuracy evaluations are performed on the raw output of the matching (i.e. the point clouds) by adopting a metrological approach. The latter is based on the use of known geometric shapes and quality parameters derived from VDI/VDE guidelines. Tests are carried out by imaging the calibrated Portable Metric Test Object, designed and built at University College London (UCL), UK. It allows assessment of the performance of the image orientation and matching procedures within a typical industrial scenario, characterised by poor texture and known 3D/2D shapes.

  15. 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction in Stellarators and Tokamaks with STELLOPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazerson, Samuel; Pablant, Novimir; Gates, David; Neilson, Hutch; Nazikian, Raffi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Ida, Katsumi; Sakakibara, Satoru

    2012-10-01

    The ability to model and predict the behavior of stellarators and tokamaks requires an ability to match simulation parameters with experimental measurements. This process, known as experimental reconstruction, has been used extensively with 2D axisymmetric codes for Tokamaks. These codes, such as EFIT, lack the ability to model the 3D nature of stellarators and the emerging 3D nature of Tokamaks. Phenomena such as, shielding of islands by neoclassical flows and the suppression of edge localized modes through application of 3D fields, highlight the need for such 3D tools. The stellarator optimizer code STELLOPT has been modified to match 3D VMEC equilibria to experimental measurements. This has allowed 3D experimental reconstructions to be preformed on W7-AS, LHD, and DIII-D devices. The free boundary VMEC equilibria are matched to Thomson profiles (ne and Te), charge exchange measurements (Ti), MSE (polarization angle), and magnetic diagnostics (B-probes, flux loops, Rogowski coils). Three dimensional reconstructed equilibria are presented alongside confidence metrics for the reconstruction process.

  16. Current progress in 3D printing for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Xiong, Guanglei; Dunham, Simon; Min, James K

    2015-03-16

    3D printing is a technology that allows the fabrication of structures with arbitrary geometries and heterogeneous material properties. The application of this technology to biological structures that match the complexity of native tissue is of great interest to researchers. This mini-review highlights the current progress of 3D printing for fabricating artificial tissues of the cardiovascular system, specifically the myocardium, heart valves, and coronary arteries. In addition, how 3D printed sensors and actuators can play a role in tissue engineering is discussed. To date, all the work with building 3D cardiac tissues have been proof-of-principle demonstrations, and in most cases, yielded products less effective than other traditional tissue engineering strategies. However, this technology is in its infancy and therefore there is much promise that through collaboration between biologists, engineers and material scientists, 3D bioprinting can make a significant impact on the field of cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  17. Detailed 3D representations for object recognition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zia, M Zeeshan; Stark, Michael; Schiele, Bernt; Schindler, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Geometric 3D reasoning at the level of objects has received renewed attention recently in the context of visual scene understanding. The level of geometric detail, however, is typically limited to qualitative representations or coarse boxes. This is linked to the fact that today's object class detectors are tuned toward robust 2D matching rather than accurate 3D geometry, encouraged by bounding-box-based benchmarks such as Pascal VOC. In this paper, we revisit ideas from the early days of computer vision, namely, detailed, 3D geometric object class representations for recognition. These representations can recover geometrically far more accurate object hypotheses than just bounding boxes, including continuous estimates of object pose and 3D wireframes with relative 3D positions of object parts. In combination with robust techniques for shape description and inference, we outperform state-of-the-art results in monocular 3D pose estimation. In a series of experiments, we analyze our approach in detail and demonstrate novel applications enabled by such an object class representation, such as fine-grained categorization of cars and bicycles, according to their 3D geometry, and ultrawide baseline matching.

  18. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Sydney S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3–4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14–17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4–6 hr; printing = 9–11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1–5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes. PMID:26295459

  19. Streamlined, Inexpensive 3D Printing of the Brain and Skull.

    PubMed

    Naftulin, Jason S; Kimchi, Eyal Y; Cash, Sydney S

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) collect three-dimensional data (3D) that is typically viewed on two-dimensional (2D) screens. Actual 3D models, however, allow interaction with real objects such as implantable electrode grids, potentially improving patient specific neurosurgical planning and personalized clinical education. Desktop 3D printers can now produce relatively inexpensive, good quality prints. We describe our process for reliably generating life-sized 3D brain prints from MRIs and 3D skull prints from CTs. We have integrated a standardized, primarily open-source process for 3D printing brains and skulls. We describe how to convert clinical neuroimaging Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images to stereolithography (STL) files, a common 3D object file format that can be sent to 3D printing services. We additionally share how to convert these STL files to machine instruction gcode files, for reliable in-house printing on desktop, open-source 3D printers. We have successfully printed over 19 patient brain hemispheres from 7 patients on two different open-source desktop 3D printers. Each brain hemisphere costs approximately $3-4 in consumable plastic filament as described, and the total process takes 14-17 hours, almost all of which is unsupervised (preprocessing = 4-6 hr; printing = 9-11 hr, post-processing = <30 min). Printing a matching portion of a skull costs $1-5 in consumable plastic filament and takes less than 14 hr, in total. We have developed a streamlined, cost-effective process for 3D printing brain and skull models. We surveyed healthcare providers and patients who confirmed that rapid-prototype patient specific 3D models may help interdisciplinary surgical planning and patient education. The methods we describe can be applied for other clinical, research, and educational purposes.

  20. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  1. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  2. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  3. Brain templates and atlases.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alan C; Janke, Andrew L; Collins, D Louis; Baillet, Sylvain

    2012-08-15

    The core concept within the field of brain mapping is the use of a standardized, or "stereotaxic", 3D coordinate frame for data analysis and reporting of findings from neuroimaging experiments. This simple construct allows brain researchers to combine data from many subjects such that group-averaged signals, be they structural or functional, can be detected above the background noise that would swamp subtle signals from any single subject. Where the signal is robust enough to be detected in individuals, it allows for the exploration of inter-individual variance in the location of that signal. From a larger perspective, it provides a powerful medium for comparison and/or combination of brain mapping findings from different imaging modalities and laboratories around the world. Finally, it provides a framework for the creation of large-scale neuroimaging databases or "atlases" that capture the population mean and variance in anatomical or physiological metrics as a function of age or disease. However, while the above benefits are not in question at first order, there are a number of conceptual and practical challenges that introduce second-order incompatibilities among experimental data. Stereotaxic mapping requires two basic components: (i) the specification of the 3D stereotaxic coordinate space, and (ii) a mapping function that transforms a 3D brain image from "native" space, i.e. the coordinate frame of the scanner at data acquisition, to that stereotaxic space. The first component is usually expressed by the choice of a representative 3D MR image that serves as target "template" or atlas. The native image is re-sampled from native to stereotaxic space under the mapping function that may have few or many degrees of freedom, depending upon the experimental design. The optimal choice of atlas template and mapping function depend upon considerations of age, gender, hemispheric asymmetry, anatomical correspondence, spatial normalization methodology and disease

  4. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  5. Natural 3D content on glasses-free light-field 3D cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Tibor; Nagy, Zsolt; Kovács, Péter Tamás.; Adhikarla, Vamsi K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a complete framework for capturing, processing and displaying the free viewpoint video on a large scale immersive light-field display. We present a combined hardware-software solution to visualize free viewpoint 3D video on a cinema-sized screen. The new glasses-free 3D projection technology can support larger audience than the existing autostereoscopic displays. We introduce and describe our new display system including optical and mechanical design considerations, the capturing system and render cluster for producing the 3D content, and the various software modules driving the system. The indigenous display is first of its kind, equipped with front-projection light-field HoloVizio technology, controlling up to 63 MP. It has all the advantages of previous light-field displays and in addition, allows a more flexible arrangement with a larger screen size, matching cinema or meeting room geometries, yet simpler to set-up. The software system makes it possible to show 3D applications in real-time, besides the natural content captured from dense camera arrangements as well as from sparse cameras covering a wider baseline. Our software system on the GPU accelerated render cluster, can also visualize pre-recorded Multi-view Video plus Depth (MVD4) videos on this light-field glasses-free cinema system, interpolating and extrapolating missing views.

  6. A 3D terrain reconstruction method of stereo vision based quadruped robot navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhuo; Zhu, Ying; Liang, Guanhao

    2017-01-01

    To provide 3D environment information for the quadruped robot autonomous navigation system during walking through rough terrain, based on the stereo vision, a novel 3D terrain reconstruction method is presented. In order to solve the problem that images collected by stereo sensors have large regions with similar grayscale and the problem that image matching is poor at real-time performance, watershed algorithm and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm are combined for contour extraction. Aiming at the problem of error matching, duel constraint with region matching and pixel matching is established for matching optimization. Using the stereo matching edge pixel pairs, the 3D coordinate algorithm is estimated according to the binocular stereo vision imaging model. Experimental results show that the proposed method can yield high stereo matching ratio and reconstruct 3D scene quickly and efficiently.

  7. Robust Detection of Round Shaped Pits Lying on 3D Meshes: Application to Impact Crater Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Martin-Pierre; Muscato, Jennifer; Viseur, Sophie; Jorda, Laurent; Bouley, Sylvain; Mari, Jean-Luc

    2015-04-01

    Most celestial bodies display impacts of collisions with asteroids and meteoroids. These traces are called craters. The possibility of observing and identifying these craters and their characteristics (radius, depth and morphology) is the only method available to measure the age of different units at the surface of the body, which in turn allows to constrain its conditions of formation. Interplanetary space probes always carry at least one imaging instrument on board. The visible images of the target are used to reconstruct high-resolution 3D models of its surface as a cloud of points in the case of multi-image dense stereo, or as a triangular mesh in the case of stereo and shape-from-shading. The goal of this work is to develop a methodology to automatically detect the craters lying on these 3D models. The robust extraction of feature areas on surface objects embedded in 3D, like circular pits, is a challenging problem. Classical approaches generally rely on image processing and template matching on a 2D flat projection of the 3D object (i.e.: a high-resolution photograph). In this work, we propose a full-3D method that mainly relies on curvature analysis. Mean and Gaussian curvatures are estimated on the surface. They are used to label vertices that belong to concave parts corresponding to specific pits on the surface. The surface is thus transformed into binary map distinguishing potential crater features to other types of features. Centers are located in the targeted surface regions, corresponding to potential crater features. Concentric rings are then built around the found centers. They consist in circular closed lines exclusively composed of edges of the initial mesh. The first built ring represents the nearest vertex neighborhood of the found center. The ring is then optimally expanded using a circularity constrain and the curvature values of the ring vertices. This method has been tested on a 3D model of the asteroid Lutetia observed by the ROSETTA (ESA

  8. Perception-based shape retrieval for 3D building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Man; Zhang, Liqiang; Takis Mathiopoulos, P.; Ding, Yusi; Wang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    With the help of 3D search engines, a large number of 3D building models can be retrieved freely online. A serious disadvantage of most rotation-insensitive shape descriptors is their inability to distinguish between two 3D building models which are different at their main axes, but appear similar when one of them is rotated. To resolve this problem, we present a novel upright-based normalization method which not only correctly rotates such building models, but also greatly simplifies and accelerates the abstraction and the matching of building models' shape descriptors. Moreover, the abundance of architectural styles significantly hinders the effective shape retrieval of building models. Our research has shown that buildings with different designs are not well distinguished by the widely recognized shape descriptors for general 3D models. Motivated by this observation and to further improve the shape retrieval quality, a new building matching method is introduced and analyzed based on concepts found in the field of perception theory and the well-known Light Field descriptor. The resulting normalized building models are first classified using the qualitative shape descriptors of Shell and Unevenness which outline integral geometrical and topological information. These models are then put in on orderly fashion with the help of an improved quantitative shape descriptor which we will term as Horizontal Light Field Descriptor, since it assembles detailed shape characteristics. To accurately evaluate the proposed methodology, an enlarged building shape database which extends previous well-known shape benchmarks was implemented as well as a model retrieval system supporting inputs from 2D sketches and 3D models. Various experimental performance evaluation results have shown that, as compared to previous methods, retrievals employing the proposed matching methodology are faster and more consistent with human recognition of spatial objects. In addition these performance

  9. 3D surface and body documentation in forensic medicine: 3-D/CAD Photogrammetry merged with 3D radiological scanning.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Braun, Marcel; Wirth, Joachim; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2003-11-01

    A main goal of forensic medicine is to document and to translate medical findings to a language and/or visualization that is readable and understandable for judicial persons and for medical laymen. Therefore, in addition to classical methods, scientific cutting-edge technologies can and should be used. Through the use of the Forensic, 3-D/CAD-supported Photogrammetric method the documentation of so-called "morphologic fingerprints" has been realized. Forensic, 3-D/CAD-supported Photogrammetry creates morphologic data models of the injury and of the suspected injury-causing instrument allowing the evaluation of a match between the injury and the instrument. In addition to the photogrammetric body surface registration, the radiological documentation provided by a volume scan (i.e., spiral, multi-detector CT, or MRI) registers the sub-surface injury, which is not visible to Photogrammetry. The new, combined method of merging Photogrammetry and Radiology data sets creates the potential to perform many kinds of reconstructions and postprocessing of (patterned) injuries in the realm of forensic medical case work. Using this merging method of colored photogrammetric surface and gray-scale radiological internal documentation, a great step towards a new kind of reality-based, high-tech wound documentation and visualization in forensic medicine is made. The combination of the methods of 3D/CAD Photogrammetry and Radiology has the advantage of being observer-independent, non-subjective, non-invasive, digitally storable over years or decades and even transferable over the web for second opinion.

  10. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  11. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  12. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  13. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  14. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  15. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  17. Learning templates for artistic portrait lighting analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowu; Jin, Xin; Wu, Hongyu; Zhao, Qinping

    2015-02-01

    Lighting is a key factor in creating impressive artistic portraits. In this paper, we propose to analyze portrait lighting by learning templates of lighting styles. Inspired by the experience of artists, we first define several novel features that describe the local contrasts in various face regions. The most informative features are then selected with a stepwise feature pursuit algorithm to derive the templates of various lighting styles. After that, the matching scores that measure the similarity between a testing portrait and those templates are calculated for lighting style classification. Furthermore, we train a regression model by the subjective scores and the feature responses of a template to predict the score of a portrait lighting quality. Based on the templates, a novel face illumination descriptor is defined to measure the difference between two portrait lightings. Experimental results show that the learned templates can well describe the lighting styles, whereas the proposed approach can assess the lighting quality of artistic portraits as human being does.

  18. Development of 3D holographic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç; Önal Tayyar, Duygu

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the development of a 3D holographic endoscope with an interferometer built around a commercial rigid endoscope. We consider recording the holograms with coherent and incoherent light separately without compromising the white light imaging capacity of the endoscope. In coherent light based recording, reference wave required for the hologram is obtained in two different ways. First, as in the classical holography, splitting the laser beam before the object illumination, and secondly creating the reference beam from the object beam itself. This second method does not require path-length matching between the object wave and the reference wave, and it allows the usage of short coherence length light sources. For incoherent light based holographic recordings various interferometric configurations are considered. Experimental results on both illumination conditions are presented.

  19. Photogrammetric 3D reconstruction using mobile imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Dieter; Syll, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    In our paper we demonstrate the development of an Android Application (AndroidSfM) for photogrammetric 3D reconstruction that works on smartphones and tablets likewise. The photos are taken with mobile devices, and can thereafter directly be calibrated using standard calibration algorithms of photogrammetry and computer vision, on that device. Due to still limited computing resources on mobile devices, a client-server handshake using Dropbox transfers the photos to the sever to run AndroidSfM for the pose estimation of all photos by Structure-from-Motion and, thereafter, uses the oriented bunch of photos for dense point cloud estimation by dense image matching algorithms. The result is transferred back to the mobile device for visualization and ad-hoc on-screen measurements.

  20. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  1. Towards Contactless, Low-Cost and Accurate 3D Fingerprint Identification.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Kwong, Cyril

    2015-03-01

    Human identification using fingerprint impressions has been widely studied and employed for more than 2000 years. Despite new advancements in the 3D imaging technologies, widely accepted representation of 3D fingerprint features and matching methodology is yet to emerge. This paper investigates 3D representation of widely employed 2D minutiae features by recovering and incorporating (i) minutiae height z and (ii) its 3D orientation φ information and illustrates an effective matching strategy for matching popular minutiae features extended in 3D space. One of the obstacles of the emerging 3D fingerprint identification systems to replace the conventional 2D fingerprint system lies in their bulk and high cost, which is mainly contributed from the usage of structured lighting system or multiple cameras. This paper attempts to addresses such key limitations of the current 3D fingerprint technologies bydeveloping the single camera-based 3D fingerprint identification system. We develop a generalized 3D minutiae matching model and recover extended 3D fingerprint features from the reconstructed 3D fingerprints. 2D fingerprint images acquired for the 3D fingerprint reconstruction can themselves be employed for the performance improvement and have been illustrated in the work detailed in this paper. This paper also attempts to answer one of the most fundamental questions on the availability of inherent discriminable information from 3D fingerprints. The experimental results are presented on a database of 240 clients 3D fingerprints, which is made publicly available to further research efforts in this area, and illustrate the discriminant power of 3D minutiae representation and matching to achieve performance improvement.

  2. Visual Semantic Based 3D Video Retrieval System Using HDFS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, C.Ranjith; Suguna, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper brings out a neoteric frame of reference for visual semantic based 3d video search and retrieval applications. Newfangled 3D retrieval application spotlight on shape analysis like object matching, classification and retrieval not only sticking up entirely with video retrieval. In this ambit, we delve into 3D-CBVR (Content Based Video Retrieval) concept for the first time. For this purpose, we intent to hitch on BOVW and Mapreduce in 3D framework. Instead of conventional shape based local descriptors, we tried to coalesce shape, color and texture for feature extraction. For this purpose, we have used combination of geometric & topological features for shape and 3D co-occurrence matrix for color and texture. After thriving extraction of local descriptors, TB-PCT (Threshold Based- Predictive Clustering Tree) algorithm is used to generate visual codebook and histogram is produced. Further, matching is performed using soft weighting scheme with L2 distance function. As a final step, retrieved results are ranked according to the Index value and acknowledged to the user as a feedback .In order to handle prodigious amount of data and Efficacious retrieval, we have incorporated HDFS in our Intellection. Using 3D video dataset, we future the performance of our proposed system which can pan out that the proposed work gives meticulous result and also reduce the time intricacy. PMID:28003793

  3. Visual Semantic Based 3D Video Retrieval System Using HDFS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Ranjith; Suguna, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper brings out a neoteric frame of reference for visual semantic based 3d video search and retrieval applications. Newfangled 3D retrieval application spotlight on shape analysis like object matching, classification and retrieval not only sticking up entirely with video retrieval. In this ambit, we delve into 3D-CBVR (Content Based Video Retrieval) concept for the first time. For this purpose, we intent to hitch on BOVW and Mapreduce in 3D framework. Instead of conventional shape based local descriptors, we tried to coalesce shape, color and texture for feature extraction. For this purpose, we have used combination of geometric & topological features for shape and 3D co-occurrence matrix for color and texture. After thriving extraction of local descriptors, TB-PCT (Threshold Based- Predictive Clustering Tree) algorithm is used to generate visual codebook and histogram is produced. Further, matching is performed using soft weighting scheme with L2 distance function. As a final step, retrieved results are ranked according to the Index value and acknowledged to the user as a feedback .In order to handle prodigious amount of data and Efficacious retrieval, we have incorporated HDFS in our Intellection. Using 3D video dataset, we future the performance of our proposed system which can pan out that the proposed work gives meticulous result and also reduce the time intricacy.

  4. Laser 3D micro-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-based materials processing techniques are gaining widespread use in micro-manufacturing applications. The use of laser microfabrication techniques enables the processing of micro- and nanostructures from a wide range of materials and geometries without the need for masking and etching steps commonly associated with photolithography. This review aims to describe the broad applications space covered by laser-based micro- and nanoprocessing techniques and the benefits offered by the use of lasers in micro-manufacturing processes. Given their non-lithographic nature, these processes are also referred to as laser direct-write and constitute some of the earliest demonstrations of 3D printing or additive manufacturing at the microscale. As this review will show, the use of lasers enables precise control of the various types of processing steps—from subtractive to additive—over a wide range of scales with an extensive materials palette. Overall, laser-based direct-write techniques offer multiple modes of operation including the removal (via ablative processes) and addition (via photopolymerization or printing) of most classes of materials using the same equipment in many cases. The versatility provided by these multi-function, multi-material and multi-scale laser micro-manufacturing processes cannot be matched by photolithography nor with other direct-write microfabrication techniques and offer unique opportunities for current and future 3D micro-manufacturing applications.

  5. Toward automated forensic fracture matching of snap-off blade knives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollevoet, Davy; De Smet, Patrick; De Bock, Johan; Philips, Wilfried

    2008-08-01

    An interesting problem that has concerned forensic scientist for many years, is their need for accurate, reliable and objective methods for performing fracture matching examinations. The aim of these fracture matching methods is to determine if two broken object halves can be matched together, e.g., when one half is recovered at a crime scene, while the other half is found in the possession of a suspect. In this paper we discuss the use of a commercial white-light profilometer system for obtaining 2D/3D image surface scans of multiple fractured objects. More specifically, we explain the use of this system for digitizing the fracture surface of multiple facing halves of several snap-off blade knives. Next, we discuss the realization and evaluation of several image processing methods for trying to match the obtained image scans corresponding to each of the broken off blade elements used in our experiments. The algorithms that were tested and evaluated include: global template matching based on image correlation and multiple template matching based on local image correlation, using so-called "vote-map" computation. Although many avenues for further research still remain possible, we show that the second method yields very good results for allowing automated searching and matching of the imaged fracture surfaces for each of the examined blade elements.

  6. Demonstration of a 3D vision algorithm for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defigueiredo, Rui J. P. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports an extension of the MIAG algorithm for recognition and motion parameter determination of general 3-D polyhedral objects based on model matching techniques and using movement invariants as features of object representation. Results of tests conducted on the algorithm under conditions simulating space conditions are presented.

  7. Multiple footprint stereo algorithms for 3D display content generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughorbel, Faysal

    2007-02-01

    This research focuses on the conversion of stereoscopic video material into an image + depth format which is suitable for rendering on the multiview auto-stereoscopic displays of Philips. The recent interest shown in the movie industry for 3D significantly increased the availability of stereo material. In this context the conversion from stereo to the input formats of 3D displays becomes an important task. In this paper we present a stereo algorithm that uses multiple footprints generating several depth candidates for each image pixel. We characterize the various matching windows and we devise a robust strategy for extracting high quality estimates from the resulting depth candidates. The proposed algorithm is based on a surface filtering method that employs simultaneously the available depth estimates in a small local neighborhood while ensuring correct depth discontinuities by the inclusion of image constraints. The resulting highquality image-aligned depth maps proved an excellent match with our 3D displays.

  8. Towards real-time MRI-guided 3D localization of deforming targets for non-invasive cardiac radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ipsen, S; Blanck, O; Lowther, N J; Liney, G P; Rai, R; Bode, F; Dunst, J; Schweikard, A; Keall, P J

    2016-11-21

    Radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum in the left atrium (LA) has recently been proposed for non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Precise real-time target localization during treatment is necessary due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion and high radiation doses. To determine the 3D position of the LA for motion compensation during radiosurgery, a tracking method based on orthogonal real-time MRI planes was developed for AF treatments with an MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Four healthy volunteers underwent cardiac MRI of the LA. Contractile motion was quantified on 3D LA models derived from 4D scans with 10 phases acquired in end-exhalation. Three localization strategies were developed and tested retrospectively on 2D real-time scans (sagittal, temporal resolution 100 ms, free breathing). The best-performing method was then used to measure 3D target positions in 2D-2D orthogonal planes (sagittal-coronal, temporal resolution 200-252 ms, free breathing) in 20 configurations of a digital phantom and in the volunteer data. The 3D target localization accuracy was quantified in the phantom and qualitatively assessed in the real data. Mean cardiac contraction was  ⩽  3.9 mm between maximum dilation and contraction but anisotropic. A template matching approach with two distinct template phases and ECG-based selection yielded the highest 2D accuracy of 1.2 mm. 3D target localization showed a mean error of 3.2 mm in the customized digital phantoms. Our algorithms were successfully applied to the 2D-2D volunteer data in which we measured a mean 3D LA motion extent of 16.5 mm (SI), 5.8 mm (AP) and 3.1 mm (LR). Real-time target localization on orthogonal MRI planes was successfully implemented for highly deformable targets treated in cardiac radiosurgery. The developed method measures target shifts caused by respiration and cardiac contraction. If the detected motion can be compensated accordingly, an MRI-guided radiotherapy

  9. Towards real-time MRI-guided 3D localization of deforming targets for non-invasive cardiac radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Lowther, N. J.; Liney, G. P.; Rai, R.; Bode, F.; Dunst, J.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2016-11-01

    Radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum in the left atrium (LA) has recently been proposed for non-invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Precise real-time target localization during treatment is necessary due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion and high radiation doses. To determine the 3D position of the LA for motion compensation during radiosurgery, a tracking method based on orthogonal real-time MRI planes was developed for AF treatments with an MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Four healthy volunteers underwent cardiac MRI of the LA. Contractile motion was quantified on 3D LA models derived from 4D scans with 10 phases acquired in end-exhalation. Three localization strategies were developed and tested retrospectively on 2D real-time scans (sagittal, temporal resolution 100 ms, free breathing). The best-performing method was then used to measure 3D target positions in 2D-2D orthogonal planes (sagittal-coronal, temporal resolution 200-252 ms, free breathing) in 20 configurations of a digital phantom and in the volunteer data. The 3D target localization accuracy was quantified in the phantom and qualitatively assessed in the real data. Mean cardiac contraction was  ⩽  3.9 mm between maximum dilation and contraction but anisotropic. A template matching approach with two distinct template phases and ECG-based selection yielded the highest 2D accuracy of 1.2 mm. 3D target localization showed a mean error of 3.2 mm in the customized digital phantoms. Our algorithms were successfully applied to the 2D-2D volunteer data in which we measured a mean 3D LA motion extent of 16.5 mm (SI), 5.8 mm (AP) and 3.1 mm (LR). Real-time target localization on orthogonal MRI planes was successfully implemented for highly deformable targets treated in cardiac radiosurgery. The developed method measures target shifts caused by respiration and cardiac contraction. If the detected motion can be compensated accordingly, an MRI-guided radiotherapy

  10. A novel window based method for approximating the Hausdorff in 3D range imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2004-10-01

    Matching a set of 3D points to another set of 3D points is an important part of any 3D object recognition system. The Hausdorff distance is known for it robustness in the face of obscuration, clutter, and noise. We show how to approximate the 3D Hausdorff fraction with linear time complexity and quadratic space complexity. We empirically demonstrate that the approximation is very good when compared to actual Hausdorff distances.

  11. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  12. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-07-15

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor’s trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  13. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  14. Vertical 2D/3D Semiconductor Heterostructures Based on Epitaxial Molybdenum Disulfide and Gallium Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ruzmetov, Dmitry; Zhang, Kehao; Stan, Gheorghe; Kalanyan, Berc; Bhimanapati, Ganesh R; Eichfeld, Sarah M; Burke, Robert A; Shah, Pankaj B; O'Regan, Terrance P; Crowne, Frank J; Birdwell, A Glen; Robinson, Joshua A; Davydov, Albert V; Ivanov, Tony G

    2016-03-22

    When designing semiconductor heterostructures, it is expected that epitaxial alignment will facilitate low-defect interfaces and efficient vertical transport. Here, we report lattice-matched epitaxial growth of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) directly on gallium nitride (GaN), resulting in high-quality, unstrained, single-layer MoS2 with strict registry to the GaN lattice. These results present a promising path toward the implementation of high-performance electronic devices based on 2D/3D vertical heterostructures, where each of the 3D and 2D semiconductors is both a template for subsequent epitaxial growth and an active component of the device. The MoS2 monolayer triangles average 1 μm along each side, with monolayer blankets (merged triangles) exhibiting properties similar to that of single-crystal MoS2 sheets. Photoluminescence, Raman, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses identified monolayer MoS2 with a prominent 20-fold enhancement of photoluminescence in the center regions of larger triangles. The MoS2/GaN structures are shown to electrically conduct in the out-of-plane direction, confirming the potential of directly synthesized 2D/3D semiconductor heterostructures for vertical current flow. Finally, we estimate a MoS2/GaN contact resistivity to be less than 4 Ω·cm(2) and current spreading in the MoS2 monolayer of approximately 1 μm in diameter.

  15. VSViewer3D: a tool for interactive data mining of three-dimensional virtual screening data.

    PubMed

    Diller, Kyle I; Diller, David J

    2014-12-22

    The VSviewer3D is a simple Java tool for visual exploration of three-dimensional (3D) virtual screening data. The VSviewer3D brings together the ability to explore numerical data, such as calculated properties and virtual screening scores, structure depiction, interactive topological and 3D similarity searching, and 3D visualization. By doing so the user is better able to quickly identify outliers, assess tractability of large numbers of compounds, visualize hits of interest, annotate hits, and mix and match interesting scaffolds. We demonstrate the utility of the VSviewer3D by describing a use case in a docking based virtual screen.

  16. Image Segmentation, Registration, Compression, and Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Wei, Hai; Yadegar, Joseph; Ray, Nilanjan; Zabuawala, Sakina

    2011-01-01

    A novel computational framework was developed of a 2D affine invariant matching exploiting a parameter space. Named as affine invariant parameter space (AIPS), the technique can be applied to many image-processing and computer-vision problems, including image registration, template matching, and object tracking from image sequence. The AIPS is formed by the parameters in an affine combination of a set of feature points in the image plane. In cases where the entire image can be assumed to have undergone a single affine transformation, the new AIPS match metric and matching framework becomes very effective (compared with the state-of-the-art methods at the time of this reporting). No knowledge about scaling or any other transformation parameters need to be known a priori to apply the AIPS framework. An automated suite of software tools has been created to provide accurate image segmentation (for data cleaning) and high-quality 2D image and 3D surface registration (for fusing multi-resolution terrain, image, and map data). These tools are capable of supporting existing GIS toolkits already in the marketplace, and will also be usable in a stand-alone fashion. The toolkit applies novel algorithmic approaches for image segmentation, feature extraction, and registration of 2D imagery and 3D surface data, which supports first-pass, batched, fully automatic feature extraction (for segmentation), and registration. A hierarchical and adaptive approach is taken for achieving automatic feature extraction, segmentation, and registration. Surface registration is the process of aligning two (or more) data sets to a common coordinate system, during which the transformation between their different coordinate systems is determined. Also developed here are a novel, volumetric surface modeling and compression technique that provide both quality-guaranteed mesh surface approximations and compaction of the model sizes by efficiently coding the geometry and connectivity

  17. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  18. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  19. Fully automated 2D-3D registration and verification.

    PubMed

    Varnavas, Andreas; Carrell, Tom; Penney, Graeme

    2015-12-01

    Clinical application of 2D-3D registration technology often requires a significant amount of human interaction during initialisation and result verification. This is one of the main barriers to more widespread clinical use of this technology. We propose novel techniques for automated initial pose estimation of the 3D data and verification of the registration result, and show how these techniques can be combined to enable fully automated 2D-3D registration, particularly in the case of a vertebra based system. The initialisation method is based on preoperative computation of 2D templates over a wide range of 3D poses. These templates are used to apply the Generalised Hough Transform to the intraoperative 2D image and the sought 3D pose is selected with the combined use of the generated accumulator arrays and a Gradient Difference Similarity Measure. On the verification side, two algorithms are proposed: one using normalised features based on the similarity value and the other based on the pose agreement between multiple vertebra based registrations. The proposed methods are employed here for CT to fluoroscopy registration and are trained and tested with data from 31 clinical procedures with 417 low dose, i.e. low quality, high noise interventional fluoroscopy images. When similarity value based verification is used, the fully automated system achieves a 95.73% correct registration rate, whereas a no registration result is produced for the remaining 4.27% of cases (i.e. incorrect registration rate is 0%). The system also automatically detects input images outside its operating range.

  20. 3D face recognition by projection-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutagaci, Helin; Sankur, Bülent; Yemez, Yücel

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate recognition performances of various projection-based features applied on registered 3D scans of faces. Some features are data driven, such as ICA-based features or NNMF-based features. Other features are obtained using DFT or DCT-based schemes. We apply the feature extraction techniques to three different representations of registered faces, namely, 3D point clouds, 2D depth images and 3D voxel. We consider both global and local features. Global features are extracted from the whole face data, whereas local features are computed over the blocks partitioned from 2D depth images. The block-based local features are fused both at feature level and at decision level. The resulting feature vectors are matched using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Experiments using different combinations of representation types and feature vectors are conducted on the 3D-RMA dataset.

  1. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  2. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  3. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  4. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  5. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  6. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  7. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  8. Design Application Translates 2-D Graphics to 3-D Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Fabric Images Inc., specializing in the printing and manufacturing of fabric tension architecture for the retail, museum, and exhibit/tradeshow communities, designed software to translate 2-D graphics for 3-D surfaces prior to print production. Fabric Images' fabric-flattening design process models a 3-D surface based on computer-aided design (CAD) specifications. The surface geometry of the model is used to form a 2-D template, similar to a flattening process developed by NASA's Glenn Research Center. This template or pattern is then applied in the development of a 2-D graphic layout. Benefits of this process include 11.5 percent time savings per project, less material wasted, and the ability to improve upon graphic techniques and offer new design services. Partners include Exhibitgroup/Giltspur (end-user client: TAC Air, a division of Truman Arnold Companies Inc.), Jack Morton Worldwide (end-user client: Nickelodeon), as well as 3D Exhibits Inc., and MG Design Associates Corp.

  9. Combined registration of 3D tibia and femur implant models in 3D magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Siebert, Markus; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Ruediger; Graichen, Heiko

    2008-03-01

    The most frequent reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty are loosening and abnormal axial alignment leading to an unphysiological kinematic of the knee implant. To get an idea about the postoperative kinematic of the implant, it is essential to determine the position and orientation of the tibial and femoral prosthesis. Therefore we developed a registration method for fitting 3D CAD-models of knee joint prostheses into an 3D MR image. This rigid registration is the basis for a quantitative analysis of the kinematics of knee implants. Firstly the surface data of the prostheses models are converted into a voxel representation; a recursive algorithm determines all boundary voxels of the original triangular surface data. Secondly an initial preconfiguration of the implants by the user is still necessary for the following step: The user has to perform a rough preconfiguration of both remaining prostheses models, so that the fine matching process gets a reasonable starting point. After that an automated gradient-based fine matching process determines the best absolute position and orientation: This iterative process changes all 6 parameters (3 rotational- and 3 translational parameters) of a model by a minimal amount until a maximum value of the matching function is reached. To examine the spread of the final solutions of the registration, the interobserver variability was measured in a group of testers. This variability, calculated by the relative standard deviation, improved from about 50% (pure manual registration) to 0.5% (rough manual preconfiguration and subsequent fine registration with the automatic fine matching process).

  10. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  11. 3D volumetric radar using 94-GHz millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Barnabás

    2006-05-01

    This article describes a novel approach to the real-time visualization of 3D imagery obtained from a 3D millimeter wave scanning radar. The MMW radar system employs a spinning antenna to generate a fan-shaped scanning pattern of the entire scene. The beams formed this way provide all weather 3D distance measurements (range/azimuth display) of objects as they appear on the ground. The beam width of the antenna and its side lobes are optimized to produce the best possible resolution even at distances of up to 15 Kms. To create a full 3D data set the fan-pattern is tilted up and down with the help of a controlled stepper motor. For our experiments we collected data at 0.1 degrees increments while using both bi-static as well as a mono-static antennas in our arrangement. The data collected formed a stack of range-azimuth images in the shape of a cone. This information is displayed using our high-end 3D visualization engine capable of displaying high-resolution volumetric models with 30 frames per second. The resulting 3D scenes can then be viewed from any angle and subsequently processed to integrate, fuse or match them against real-life sensor imagery or 3D model data stored in a synthetic database.

  12. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  13. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  14. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  15. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  16. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  17. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  18. 3-D measuring of engine camshaft based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianxin; Tan, Liang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2008-12-01

    The non-touch 3D measuring based on machine vision is introduced into camshaft precise measuring. Currently, because CCD 3-dimensional measuring can't meet requirements for camshaft's measuring precision, it's necessary to improve its measuring precision. In this paper, we put forward a method to improve the measuring method. A Multi-Character Match method based on the Polygonal Non-regular model is advanced with the theory of Corner Extraction and Corner Matching .This method has solved the problem of the matching difficulty and a low precision. In the measuring process, the use of the Coded marked Point method and Self-Character Match method can bring on this problem. The 3D measuring experiment on camshaft, which based on the Multi-Character Match method of the Polygonal Non-regular model, proves that the normal average measuring precision is increased to a new level less than 0.04mm in the point-clouds photo merge. This measuring method can effectively increase the 3D measuring precision of the binocular CCD.

  19. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  20. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  1. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  2. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  3. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  4. Vehicle Surveillance with a Generic, Adaptive, 3D Vehicle Model.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Matthew J; Mundy, Joseph L

    2011-07-01

    In automated surveillance, one is often interested in tracking road vehicles, measuring their shape in 3D world space, and determining vehicle classification. To address these tasks simultaneously, an effective approach is the constrained alignment of a prior model of 3D vehicle shape to images. Previous 3D vehicle models are either generic but overly simple or rigid and overly complex. Rigid models represent exactly one vehicle design, so a large collection is needed. A single generic model can deform to a wide variety of shapes, but those shapes have been far too primitive. This paper uses a generic 3D vehicle model that deforms to match a wide variety of passenger vehicles. It is adjustable in complexity between the two extremes. The model is aligned to images by predicting and matching image intensity edges. Novel algorithms are presented for fitting models to multiple still images and simultaneous tracking while estimating shape in video. Experiments compare the proposed model to simple generic models in accuracy and reliability of 3D shape recovery from images and tracking in video. Standard techniques for classification are also used to compare the models. The proposed model outperforms the existing simple models at each task.

  5. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  6. The Feasibility of 3d Point Cloud Generation from Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for increasing the accuracy of direct geo-referenced image-based 3D point cloud generated from low-cost sensors in smartphones. The smartphone's motion sensors are used to directly acquire the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs) of the captured images. These EOPs, along with the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs) of the camera/ phone, are used to reconstruct the image-based 3D point cloud. However, because smartphone motion sensors suffer from poor GPS accuracy, accumulated drift and high signal noise, inaccurate 3D mapping solutions often result. Therefore, horizontal and vertical linear features, visible in each image, are extracted and used as constraints in the bundle adjustment procedure. These constraints correct the relative position and orientation of the 3D mapping solution. Once the enhanced EOPs are estimated, the semi-global matching algorithm (SGM) is used to generate the image-based dense 3D point cloud. Statistical analysis and assessment are implemented herein, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D point cloud generation from the consumer-grade sensors in smartphones.

  7. Person identification by using 3D palmprint data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xuefei; Huang, Shujun; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Zonghua

    2016-11-01

    Person identification based on biometrics is drawing more and more attentions in identity and information safety. This paper presents a biometric system to identify person using 3D palmprint data, including a non-contact system capturing 3D palmprint quickly and a method identifying 3D palmprint fast. In order to reduce the effect of slight shaking of palm on the data accuracy, a DLP (Digital Light Processing) projector is utilized to trigger a CCD camera based on structured-light and triangulation measurement and 3D palmprint data could be gathered within 1 second. Using the obtained database and the PolyU 3D palmprint database, feature extraction and matching method is presented based on MCI (Mean Curvature Image), Gabor filter and binary code list. Experimental results show that the proposed method can identify a person within 240 ms in the case of 4000 samples. Compared with the traditional 3D palmprint recognition methods, the proposed method has high accuracy, low EER (Equal Error Rate), small storage space, and fast identification speed.

  8. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  9. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  10. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  11. [3D emulation of epicardium dynamic mapping].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Yang, Cui-Wei; Fang, Zu-Xiang

    2005-03-01

    In order to realize epicardium dynamic mapping of the whole atria, 3-D graphics are drawn with OpenGL. Some source codes are introduced in the paper to explain how to produce, read, and manipulate 3-D model data.

  12. An interactive multiview 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Zhang, Mei; Dong, Hui

    2013-03-01

    The progresses in 3D display systems and user interaction technologies will help more effective 3D visualization of 3D information. They yield a realistic representation of 3D objects and simplifies our understanding to the complexity of 3D objects and spatial relationship among them. In this paper, we describe an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system with capability of real-time user interaction. Design principle of this autostereoscopic multiview 3D display system is presented, together with the details of its hardware/software architecture. A prototype is built and tested based upon multi-projectors and horizontal optical anisotropic display structure. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of this novel 3D display and user interaction system.

  13. Laser Based 3D Volumetric Display System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Literature, Costa Mesa, CA July 1983. 3. "A Real Time Autostereoscopic Multiplanar 3D Display System", Rodney Don Williams, Felix Garcia, Jr., Texas...8217 .- NUMBERS LASER BASED 3D VOLUMETRIC DISPLAY SYSTEM PR: CD13 0. AUTHOR(S) PE: N/AWIU: DN303151 P. Soltan, J. Trias, W. Robinson, W. Dahlke 7...laser generated 3D volumetric images on a rotating double helix, (where the 3D displays are computer controlled for group viewing with the naked eye

  14. True 3d Images and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; wang@hzgeospace., zheng.

    2012-07-01

    A true 3D image is a geo-referenced image. Besides having its radiometric information, it also has true 3Dground coordinates XYZ for every pixels of it. For a true 3D image, especially a true 3D oblique image, it has true 3D coordinates not only for building roofs and/or open grounds, but also for all other visible objects on the ground, such as visible building walls/windows and even trees. The true 3D image breaks the 2D barrier of the traditional orthophotos by introducing the third dimension (elevation) into the image. From a true 3D image, for example, people will not only be able to read a building's location (XY), but also its height (Z). true 3D images will fundamentally change, if not revolutionize, the way people display, look, extract, use, and represent the geospatial information from imagery. In many areas, true 3D images can make profound impacts on the ways of how geospatial information is represented, how true 3D ground modeling is performed, and how the real world scenes are presented. This paper first gives a definition and description of a true 3D image and followed by a brief review of what key advancements of geospatial technologies have made the creation of true 3D images possible. Next, the paper introduces what a true 3D image is made of. Then, the paper discusses some possible contributions and impacts the true 3D images can make to geospatial information fields. At the end, the paper presents a list of the benefits of having and using true 3D images and the applications of true 3D images in a couple of 3D city modeling projects.

  15. Emulsion Inks for 3D Printing of High Porosity Materials.

    PubMed

    Sears, Nicholas A; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-08-01

    Photocurable emulsion inks for use with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) to generate constructs with hierarchical porosity are presented. A high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) templating technique was utilized to prepare water-in-oil emulsions from a hydrophobic photopolymer, surfactant, and water. These HIPEs displayed strong shear thinning behavior that permitted layer-by-layer deposition into complex shapes and adequately high viscosity at low shear for shape retention after extrusion. Each layer was actively polymerized with an ultraviolet cure-on-dispense (CoD) technique and compositions with sufficient viscosity were able to produce tall, complex scaffolds with an internal lattice structure and microscale porosity. Evaluation of the rheological and cure properties indicated that the viscosity and cure rate both played an important role in print fidelity. These 3D printed polyHIPE constructs benefit from the tunable pore structure of emulsion templated material and the designed architecture of 3D printing. As such, these emulsion inks can be used to create ultra high porosity constructs with complex geometries and internal lattice structures not possible with traditional manufacturing techniques.

  16. A 3D surface imaging system for assessing human obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Yu, W.; Yao, M.; Yao, X.; Li, Q.; Pepper, M. R.; Freeland-Graves, J. H.

    2009-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity suggests a need to develop a convenient, reliable and economical tool for assessment of this condition. Three-dimensional (3D) body surface imaging has emerged as an exciting technology for estimation of body composition. This paper presents a new 3D body imaging system, which was designed for enhanced portability, affordability, and functionality. In this system, stereo vision technology was used to satisfy the requirements for a simple hardware setup and fast image acquisitions. The portability of the system was created via a two-stand configuration, and the accuracy of body volume measurements was improved by customizing stereo matching and surface reconstruction algorithms that target specific problems in 3D body imaging. Body measurement functions dedicated to body composition assessment also were developed. The overall performance of the system was evaluated in human subjects by comparison to other conventional anthropometric methods, as well as air displacement plethysmography, for body fat assessment.

  17. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  18. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  19. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  20. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  1. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  2. 2D to 3D conversion implemented in different hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Huitron, Victor; Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Hernandez-Fragoso, Araceli

    2015-02-01

    Conversion of available 2D data for release in 3D content is a hot topic for providers and for success of the 3D applications, in general. It naturally completely relies on virtual view synthesis of a second view given by original 2D video. Disparity map (DM) estimation is a central task in 3D generation but still follows a very difficult problem for rendering novel images precisely. There exist different approaches in DM reconstruction, among them manually and semiautomatic methods that can produce high quality DMs but they demonstrate hard time consuming and are computationally expensive. In this paper, several hardware implementations of designed frameworks for an automatic 3D color video generation based on 2D real video sequence are proposed. The novel framework includes simultaneous processing of stereo pairs using the following blocks: CIE L*a*b* color space conversions, stereo matching via pyramidal scheme, color segmentation by k-means on an a*b* color plane, and adaptive post-filtering, DM estimation using stereo matching between left and right images (or neighboring frames in a video), adaptive post-filtering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. Novel technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7, and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode. The time values needed, mean Similarity Structural Index Measure (SSIM) and Bad Matching Pixels (B) values for different hardware implementations (GPU, Single CPU, and DSP) are exposed in this paper.

  3. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  4. Virtual surgical planning and 3D printing in repeat calvarial vault reconstruction for craniosynostosis: technical note.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, Melissa; Daniels, Bradley; Buchanan, Edward P; Monson, Laura; Lam, Sandi

    2017-02-03

    Repeat surgery for restenosis after initial nonsyndromic craniosynostosis intervention is sometimes needed. Calvarial vault reconstruction through a healed surgical bed adds a level of intraoperative complexity and may benefit from preoperative and intraoperative definitions of biometric and aesthetic norms. Computer-assisted design and manufacturing using 3D imaging allows the precise formulation of operative plans in anticipation of surgical intervention. 3D printing turns virtual plans into anatomical replicas, templates, or customized implants by using a variety of materials. The authors present a technical note illustrating the use of this technology: a repeat calvarial vault reconstruction that was planned and executed using computer-assisted design and 3D printed intraoperative guides.

  5. Fast, Automated, 3D Modeling of Building Interiors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-30

    of thermographies with laser scanning point clouds [6]. Given the heterogeneous nature of the two modalities, we propose a feature-based approach...extract 2D lines from thermographies , and 3D lines are extracted through segmentation of the point cloud. Feature- matching and the relative pose between... thermographies and point cloud are obtained from an iterative procedure applied to detect and reject outliers; this includes rotation matrix and

  6. High-speed low-power analog ASICs for a 3D neuroprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Tran, Mua D.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1995-03-01

    A particularly challenging neural network application requiring high-speed and intensive image processing capability is target acquisition and discrimination. It requires spatio-temporal recognition of point and resolved targets at high speeds. A reconfigurable neural architecture may discriminate targets from clutter or classify targets once resolved. By mating a 64 X 64 pixel array infrared (IR) image sensor to a 3-D stack (cube) of 64 neural-net ICs along respective edges, every pixel would directly input to a neural network, thereby processing the information with full parallelism. However, the `cube' has to operate at 90 degree(s)K with < 250 nanoseconds signal processing speed and approximately 2 watts of power dissipation. Analog circuitry, where the spatially parallel input to the neural networks is also analog, would make this possible. Digital neural processing would require analog-to-digital converters on each IC, impractical with the power constraint. A versatile reconfigurable circuit is presented that offers a variety of neural architectures: multilayer perceptron, cascade backpropagation, and template matching with winner-take-all (WTA) circuitry. Special designs of analog neuron and synapse implemented in VLSI are presented which bear out high speed response both at room and low temperatures with synapse-neuron signal propagation times of approximately 100 ns.

  7. Automated real-time search and analysis algorithms for a non-contact 3D profiling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Mark; Wu, Chih-Hang John; Beck, B. Terry; Peterman, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a new means of identifying and extracting geometrical feature statistics from a non-contact precision-measurement 3D profilometer. Autonomous algorithms have been developed to search through large-scale Cartesian point clouds to identify and extract geometrical features. These algorithms are developed with the intent of providing real-time production quality control of cold-rolled steel wires. The steel wires in question are prestressing steel reinforcement wires for concrete members. The geometry of the wire is critical in the performance of the overall concrete structure. For this research a custom 3D non-contact profilometry system has been developed that utilizes laser displacement sensors for submicron resolution surface profiling. Optimizations in the control and sensory system allow for data points to be collected at up to an approximate 400,000 points per second. In order to achieve geometrical feature extraction and tolerancing with this large volume of data, the algorithms employed are optimized for parsing large data quantities. The methods used provide a unique means of maintaining high resolution data of the surface profiles while keeping algorithm running times within practical bounds for industrial application. By a combination of regional sampling, iterative search, spatial filtering, frequency filtering, spatial clustering, and template matching a robust feature identification method has been developed. These algorithms provide an autonomous means of verifying tolerances in geometrical features. The key method of identifying the features is through a combination of downhill simplex and geometrical feature templates. By performing downhill simplex through several procedural programming layers of different search and filtering techniques, very specific geometrical features can be identified within the point cloud and analyzed for proper tolerancing. Being able to perform this quality control in real time

  8. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  9. An Automatic 3-D Reconstruction of Coronary Arteries by Stereopsis.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Mufit; Iskurt, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Stereopsis of X-ray images can produce 3D tree of coronary arteries up to a certain accuracy level with a lower dose of radiation when compared to computer tomography (CT). In this study, a novel and complete automatic system is designed that covers preprocessing, segmentation, matching and reconstruction steps for that purpose. First, an automatic and novel pattern recognition technique is applied for extraction of the bifurcation points with their diameters recorded in a map. Then, a novel optimization algorithm is run for matching the branches efficiently which is based on that map and the epipolar geometry of stereopsis. Finally, cut branches are fixed one by one at the bifurcations for completing the 3D reconstruction. This method prevails the similar ones in the literature with this novelty since it automatically and inherently prevents the wrong overlapping of branches. Other essential problems like correct detection of the bifurcations and accurate calibration parameters and fast overlapping of matched branches are addressed at acceptable levels. The accuracy of bifurcation extraction is high at 90 % with 96 % sensitivity. Accuracy of vessel centerlines has rootmean-square (rms) error smaller than 0.57 mm for 20 different patients. For phantom model, rms error is 0.75 ± 0.8 mm in 3D localization.

  10. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  11. A simple and low-cost 3d-printed emulsion generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. M.; Aguirre-Pablo, A. A.; Li, E. Q.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2015-11-01

    The technique traditionally utilized to fabricate microfluidic emulsion generators, i.e. soft-lithography, is complex and expensive for producing three-dimensional (3D) structures. Here we apply 3D printing technology to fabricate a simple and low-cost 3D printed microfluidic device for emulsion generation without the need for surface treatment on the channel walls. This 3D-printed emulsion generator has been successfully tested over a range of conditions. We also formulate and demonstrate uniform scaling laws for emulsion droplets generated in different regimes for the first time, by incorporating the dynamic contact angle effects during the drop formation. Magnetically responsive microspheres are also produced with our emulsion templates, demonstrating the potential applications of this 3D emulsion generator in material and chemical engineering.

  12. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  13. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  14. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  15. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues. PMID:22539264

  16. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems. PMID:27345766

  17. Applications of patient-specific 3D printing in medicine.

    PubMed

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Roth, Klaus E; Drees, Philipp; Maier, Gerrit S; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Ghazy, Ahmed; Neufurth, Meik; Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    Already three decades ago, the potential of medical 3D printing (3DP) or rapid prototyping for improved patient treatment began to be recognized. Since then, more and more medical indications in different surgical disciplines have been improved by using this new technique. Numerous examples have demonstrated the enormous benefit of 3DP in the medical care of patients by, for example, planning complex surgical interventions preoperatively, reducing implantation steps and anesthesia times, and helping with intraoperative orientation. At the beginning of every individual 3D model, patient-specific data on the basis of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound data is generated, which is then digitalized and processed using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. Finally, the resulting data sets are used to generate 3D-printed models or even implants. There are a variety of different application areas in the various medical fields, eg, drill or positioning templates, or surgical guides in maxillofacial surgery, or patient-specific implants in orthopedics. Furthermore, in vascular surgery it is possible to visualize pathologies such as aortic aneurysms so as to improve the planning of surgical treatment. Although rapid prototyping of individual models and implants is already applied very successfully in regenerative medicine, most of the materials used for 3DP are not yet suitable for implantation in the body. Therefore, it will be necessary in future to develop novel therapy approaches and design new materials in order to completely reconstruct natural tissue.

  18. Fabrication of tunable plasmonic 3D nanostructures for SERS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ayse; Yuksel, Handan; Solmaz, Ramazan; Kahraman, Mehmet

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique used for characterization of biological and nonbiological molecules and structures. Since plasmonic properties of the nanomaterials is one of the most important factor influencing SERS activity, tunable plasmonic properties (wavelength of the surface plasmons and magnitude of the electromagnetic field generated on the surface) of SERS substrates are crucial in SERS studies. SERS enhancement can be maximized by controlling of plasmonic properties of the nanomaterials. In this study, a novel approach to fabricate tunable plasmonic 3D nanostructures based on combination of soft lithography and nanosphere lithography is studied. Spherical latex particles having different diameters are uniformly deposited on glass slides with convective assembly method. The experimental parameters for the convective assembly are optimized by changing of latex spheres concentration, stage velocity and latex particles volume placed between to two glass slides that staying with a certain angle to each other. Afterwards, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is poured on the deposited latex particles and cured to obtain nanovoids on the PDMS surfaces. The diameter and depth of the nanovoids on the PDMS surface are controlled by the size of the latex particles. Finally, fabricated nanovoid template on the PDMS surfaces are filled with the silver coating to obtain plasmonic 3D nanostructures. Characterization of the fabricated surfaces is performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SERS performance of fabricated 3D plasmonic nanostructures will be evaluated using Raman reporter molecules.

  19. 3D Stretchable Arch Ribbon Array Fabricated via Grayscale Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yu; Shu, Yi; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Wang, Xuefeng; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Haiming; Deng, Ningqin; Maboudian, Roya; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Microstructures with flexible and stretchable properties display tremendous potential applications including integrated systems, wearable devices and bio-sensor electronics. Hence, it is essential to develop an effective method for fabricating curvilinear and flexural microstructures. Despite significant advances in 2D stretchable inorganic structures, large scale fabrication of unique 3D microstructures at a low cost remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that the 3D microstructures can be achieved by grayscale lithography to produce a curved photoresist (PR) template, where the PR acts as sacrificial layer to form wavelike arched structures. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at low temperature, the curved PR topography can be transferred to the silicon dioxide layer. Subsequently, plasma etching can be used to fabricate the arched stripe arrays. The wavelike silicon dioxide arch microstructure exhibits Young modulus and fracture strength of 52 GPa and 300 MPa, respectively. The model of stress distribution inside the microstructure was also established, which compares well with the experimental results. This approach of fabricating a wavelike arch structure may become a promising route to produce a variety of stretchable sensors, actuators and circuits, thus providing unique opportunities for emerging classes of robust 3D integrated systems.

  20. Automated 3D structure composition for large RNAs.

    PubMed

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Antczak, Maciej; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Lukasiak, Piotr; Bartol, Natalia; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the numerous functions that RNAs play in living cells depends critically on knowledge of their three-dimensional structure. Due to the difficulties in experimentally assessing structures of large RNAs, there is currently great demand for new high-resolution structure prediction methods. We present the novel method for the fully automated prediction of RNA 3D structures from a user-defined secondary structure. The concept is founded on the machine translation system. The translation engine operates on the RNA FRABASE database tailored to the dictionary relating the RNA secondary structure and tertiary structure elements. The translation algorithm is very fast. Initial 3D structure is composed in a range of seconds on a single processor. The method assures the prediction of large RNA 3D structures of high quality. Our approach needs neither structural templates nor RNA sequence alignment, required for comparative methods. This enables the building of unresolved yet native and artificial RNA structures. The method is implemented in a publicly available, user-friendly server RNAComposer. It works in an interactive mode and a batch mode. The batch mode is designed for large-scale modelling and accepts atomic distance restraints. Presently, the server is set to build RNA structures of up to 500 residues.

  1. Scanning 3D full human bodies using Kinects.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Ligang; Pan, Zhigeng; Yan, Hao

    2012-04-01

    Depth camera such as Microsoft Kinect, is much cheaper than conventional 3D scanning devices, and thus it can be acquired for everyday users easily. However, the depth data captured by Kinect over a certain distance is of extreme low quality. In this paper, we present a novel scanning system for capturing 3D full human body models by using multiple Kinects. To avoid the interference phenomena, we use two Kinects to capture the upper part and lower part of a human body respectively without overlapping region. A third Kinect is used to capture the middle part of the human body from the opposite direction. We propose a practical approach for registering the various body parts of different views under non-rigid deformation. First, a rough mesh template is constructed and used to deform successive frames pairwisely. Second, global alignment is performed to distribute errors in the deformation space, which can solve the loop closure problem efficiently. Misalignment caused by complex occlusion can also be handled reasonably by our global alignment algorithm. The experimental results have shown the efficiency and applicability of our system. Our system obtains impressive results in a few minutes with low price devices, thus is practically useful for generating personalized avatars for everyday users. Our system has been used for 3D human animation and virtual try on, and can further facilitate a range of home–oriented virtual reality (VR) applications.

  2. Adaptive 3D Face Reconstruction from Unconstrained Photo Collections.

    PubMed

    Roth, Joseph; Tong, Yiying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-12-07

    Given a photo collection of "unconstrained" face images of one individual captured under a variety of unknown pose, expression, and illumination conditions, this paper presents a method for reconstructing a 3D face surface model of the individual along with albedo information. Unlike prior work on face reconstruction that requires large photo collections, we formulate an approach to adapt to photo collections with a high diversity in both the number of images and the image quality. To achieve this, we incorporate prior knowledge about face shape by fitting a 3D morphable model to form a personalized template, following by using a novel photometric stereo formulation to complete the fine details, under a coarse-to-fine scheme. Our scheme incorporates a structural similarity-based local selection step to help identify a common expression for reconstruction while discarding occluded portions of faces. The evaluation of reconstruction performance is through a novel quality measure, in the absence of ground truth 3D scans. Superior large-scale experimental results are reported on synthetic, Internet, and personal photo collections.

  3. Development of a 2D Image Reconstruction and Viewing System for Histological Images from Multiple Tissue Blocks: Towards High-Resolution Whole-Organ 3D Histological Images.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Bautista, Pinky A; Haneishi, Hideaki; Snuderl, Matija; Yagi, Yukako

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution 3D histology image reconstruction of the whole brain organ starts from reconstructing the high-resolution 2D histology images of a brain slice. In this paper, we introduced a method to automatically align the histology images of thin tissue sections cut from the multiple paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of a brain slice. For this method, we employed template matching and incorporated an optimization technique to further improve the accuracy of the 2D reconstructed image. In the template matching, we used the gross image of the brain slice as a reference to the reconstructed 2D histology image of the slice, while in the optimization procedure, we utilized the Jaccard index as the metric of the reconstruction accuracy. The results of our experiment on the initial 3 different whole-brain tissue slices showed that while the method works, it is also constrained by tissue deformations introduced during the tissue processing and slicing. The size of the reconstructed high-resolution 2D histology image of a brain slice is huge, and designing an image viewer that makes particularly efficient use of the computing power of a standard computer used in our laboratories is of interest. We also present the initial implementation of our 2D image viewer system in this paper.

  4. Automatic scan registration using 3D linear and planar features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jian; Ruggeri, Mauro R.; Taddei, Pierluigi; Sequeira, Vítor

    2010-09-01

    We present a common framework for accurate and automatic registration of two geometrically complex 3D range scans by using linear or planar features. The linear features of a range scan are extracted with an efficient split-and-merge line-fitting algorithm, which refines 2D edges extracted from the associated reflectance image considering the corresponding 3D depth information. The planar features are extracted employing a robust planar segmentation method, which partitions a range image into a set of planar patches. We propose an efficient probability-based RANSAC algorithm to automatically register two overlapping range scans. Our algorithm searches for matching pairs of linear (planar) features in the two range scans leading to good alignments. Line orientation (plane normal) angles and line (plane) distances formed by pairs of linear (planar) features are invariant with respect to the rigid transformation and are utilized to find candidate matches. To efficiently seek for candidate pairs and groups of matched features we build a fast search codebook. Given two sets of matched features, the rigid transformation between two scans is computed by using iterative linear optimization algorithms. The efficiency and accuracy of our registration algorithm were evaluated on several challenging range data sets.

  5. 3D Face Hallucination from a Single Depth Frame

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shu; Kemelmacher-Shlizerman, Ira; Shapiro, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm that takes a single frame of a person’s face from a depth camera, e.g., Kinect, and produces a high-resolution 3D mesh of the input face. We leverage a dataset of 3D face meshes of 1204 distinct individuals ranging from age 3 to 40, captured in a neutral expression. We divide the input depth frame into semantically significant regions (eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks) and search the database for the best matching shape per region. We further combine the input depth frame with the matched database shapes into a single mesh that results in a highresolution shape of the input person. Our system is fully automatic and uses only depth data for matching, making it invariant to imaging conditions. We evaluate our results using ground truth shapes, as well as compare to state-of-the-art shape estimation methods. We demonstrate the robustness of our local matching approach with high-quality reconstruction of faces that fall outside of the dataset span, e.g., faces older than 40 years old, facial expressions, and different ethnicities. PMID:26280021

  6. 3D measurement for rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Peter; Lilienblum, Tilo; Sommerkorn, Gerd; Michaelis, Bernd

    1996-08-01

    Optical 3-D measurement is an interesting approach for rapid prototyping. On one hand it's necessary to get the 3-D data of an object and on the other hand it's necessary to check the manufactured object (quality checking). Optical 3-D measurement can realize both. Classical 3-D measurement procedures based on photogrammetry cause systematic errors at strongly curved surfaces or steps in surfaces. One possibility to reduce these errors is to calculate the 3-D coordinates from several successively taken images. Thus it's possible to get higher spatial resolution and to reduce the systematic errors at 'problem surfaces.' Another possibility is to process the measurement values by neural networks. A modified associative memory smoothes and corrects the calculated 3-D coordinates using a-priori knowledge about the measurement object.

  7. Photorefractive Polymers for Updateable 3D Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-24

    Final Performance Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-01-2007 to 11-30-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photorefractive Polymers for Updateable 3D ...ABSTRACT During the tenure of this project a large area updateable 3D color display has been developed for the first time using a new co-polymer...photorefractive polymers have been demonstrated. Moreover, a 6 inch × 6 inch sample was fabricated demonstrating the feasibility of making large area 3D

  8. 3D Microperfusion Model of ADPKD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Stratasys 3D printer . PDMS was cast in the negative molds in order to create permanent biocompatible plastic masters (SmoothCast 310). All goals of task...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0304 TITLE: 3D Microperfusion Model of ADPKD PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David L. Kaplan CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual Report 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D

  9. 3D carotid plaque MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There has been significant progress made in 3D carotid plaque magnetic resonance imaging techniques in recent years. 3D plaque imaging clearly represents the future in clinical use. With effective flow suppression techniques, choices of different contrast weighting acquisitions, and time-efficient imaging approaches, 3D plaque imaging offers flexible imaging plane and view angle analysis, large coverage, multi-vascular beds capability, and even can be used in fast screening. PMID:26610656

  10. 3-D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    3- D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems (Invited Paper) Ted Huffmire∗, Timothy Levin∗, Cynthia Irvine∗, Ryan Kastner† and Timothy Sherwood...address these problems, we propose an approach to trustworthy system development based on 3- D integration, an emerging chip fabrication technique in...which two or more integrated circuit dies are fabricated individually and then combined into a single stack using vertical conductive posts. With 3- D

  11. Hardware Trust Implications of 3-D Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    enhancing a commod- ity processor with a variety of security functions. This paper examines the 3-D design approach and provides an analysis concluding...of key components. The question addressed by this paper is, “Can a 3-D control plane provide useful secure services when it is conjoined with an...untrust- worthy computation plane?” Design-level investigation of this question yields a definite yes. This paper explores 3- D applications and their

  12. Digital holography and 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Partha; Barbastathis, George; Kim, Myung; Kukhtarev, Nickolai

    2011-03-01

    This feature issue on Digital Holography and 3-D Imaging comprises 15 papers on digital holographic techniques and applications, computer-generated holography and encryption techniques, and 3-D display. It is hoped that future work in the area leads to innovative applications of digital holography and 3-D imaging to biology and sensing, and to the development of novel nonlinear dynamic digital holographic techniques.

  13. 3D Simulations of the Beehive Proplyd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feitosa, J. A.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Cerqueira, A. H.

    2014-10-01

    Some star formation regions, like the Orion nebula, have stars of different masses, from massive stars, responsible for strong ionizing winds and HII regions, to low-mass stars, which spend a long time in the protostellar phase, and are frequently associated with protostellar disks and jets. Massive O or B stars emit a great deal of UV radiation, able to dissociate the hydrogen molecule (FUV radiation, energies between 6-13 eV), to ionize the atomic hydrogen (EUV radiation, energies greater than 13.6 eV) and heat the gas. Around these stars, a large and hot (10^{4}K) region is formed, known as HII region. T-Tauri stars inside HII regions produce a type of young stellar object, a proplyd, described with accuracy in O'Dell et al. (1993). Proplyds exhibit a cometary shape from which we can distinguish a central low-mass star with an accretion disk, an ionization front, a photodissociation region and, sometimes, an external bow shock and a protostellar jet. Its morphological characteristics depends on the distance between the low-mass star and the source of the ionizing radiation. The Beehive, a giant proplyd in Orion Nebula, has attracted attention due to its exotic system of rings coaxial to the HH540 jet's axis. Bally et al. (2005) suggested that the rings are perturbations due to the crossing of the ionization front by the jet. In this work, we test this hypothesis making 3D hydrodynamic numerical simulations over an adaptive grid, using the Yguazú-A code (Raga et al., 2000), properly adapted for the Beehive conditions. Our results show that the jet causes a perturbation in the ionization front of the proplyd, but is necessary to adjust carefully some parameters of the jet like its velocity and ejection frequency in order to have the results matching the observations.

  14. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  15. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  16. Advances toward field application of 3D hydraulic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a technique that shows great potential for aquifer characterization and one that holds the promise of producing 3D hydraulic property distributions, given suitable equipment. First suggested over 15 years ago, HT assimilates distributed aquifer pressure (head) response data collected during a series of multiple pumping tests to produce estimates of aquifer property variability. Unlike traditional curve-matching analyses, which assume homogeneity or "effective" parameters within the radius of influence of a hydrologic test, HT analysis relies on numerical models with detailed heterogeneity in order to invert for the highly resolved 3D parameter distribution that jointly fits all data. Several numerical and laboratory investigations of characterization using HT have shown that property distributions can be accurately estimated between observation locations when experiments are correctly designed - a property not always shared by other, simpler 1D characterization approaches such as partially-penetrating slug tests. HT may represent one of the best methods available for obtaining detailed 3D aquifer property descriptions, especially in deep or "hard" aquifer materials, where direct-push methods may not be feasible. However, to date HT has not yet been widely adopted at contaminated field sites. We believe that current perceived impediments to HT adoption center around four key issues: 1) A paucity in the scientific literature of proven, cross-validated 3D field applications 2) A lack of guidelines and best practices for performing field 3D HT experiments; 3) Practical difficulty and time commitment associated with the installation of a large number of high-accuracy sampling locations, and the running of a large number of pumping tests; and 4) Computational difficulty associated with solving large-scale inverse problems for parameter identification. In this talk, we present current results in 3D HT research that addresses these four issues

  17. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  18. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  19. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  20. Monocular 3-D gait tracking in surveillance scenes.

    PubMed

    Rogez, Grégory; Rihan, Jonathan; Guerrero, Jose J; Orrite, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Gait recognition can potentially provide a noninvasive and effective biometric authentication from a distance. However, the performance of gait recognition systems will suffer in real surveillance scenarios with multiple interacting individuals and where the camera is usually placed at a significant angle and distance from the floor. We present a methodology for view-invariant monocular 3-D human pose tracking in man-made environments in which we assume that observed people move on a known ground plane. First, we model 3-D body poses and camera viewpoints with a low dimensional manifold and learn a generative model of the silhouette from this manifold to a reduced set of training views. During the online stage, 3-D body poses are tracked using recursive Bayesian sampling conducted jointly over the scene's ground plane and the pose-viewpoint manifold. For each sample, the homography that relates the corresponding training plane to the image points is calculated using the dominant 3-D directions of the scene, the sampled location on the ground plane and the sampled camera view. Each regressed silhouette shape is projected using this homographic transformation and is matched in the image to estimate its likelihood. Our framework is able to track 3-D human walking poses in a 3-D environment exploring only a 4-D state space with success. In our experimental evaluation, we demonstrate the significant improvements of the homographic alignment over a commonly used similarity transformation and provide quantitative pose tracking results for the monocular sequences with a high perspective effect from the CAVIAR dataset.

  1. 3D-Meshes aus medizinischen Volumendaten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelzer, Sascha; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    Diese Arbeit beschreibt eine template-basierte Methode zur Erzeugung von adaptiven Hexaeder-Meshes aus Volumendaten, welche komplizierte konkave Strukturen aufweisen können. Es wird ein vollständiger Satz von Templates generiert der es erlaubt, die Ränder konkaver Regionen feiner zu zerlegen als angrenzende Bereiche und somit die Gesamtzahl an Hexaeder verringert. Der Algorithmus arbeitet mit beliebigen gelabelten Volumendaten und erzeugt ein adaptives, konformes, reines Hexaeder-Mesh.

  2. Research of Fast 3D Imaging Based on Multiple Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shibing; Yan, Huimin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda; Wang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging has received increasingly extensive attention and has been widely used currently. Lots of efforts have been put on three-dimensional imaging method and system study, in order to meet fast and high accurate requirement. In this article, we realize a fast and high quality stereo matching algorithm on field programmable gate array (FPGA) using the combination of time-of-flight (TOF) camera and binocular camera. Images captured from the two cameras own a same spatial resolution, letting us use the depth maps taken by the TOF camera to figure initial disparity. Under the constraint of the depth map as the stereo pairs when comes to stereo matching, expected disparity of each pixel is limited within a narrow search range. In the meanwhile, using field programmable gate array (FPGA, altera cyclone IV series) concurrent computing we can configure multi core image matching system, thus doing stereo matching on embedded system. The simulation results demonstrate that it can speed up the process of stereo matching and increase matching reliability and stability, realize embedded calculation, expand application range.

  3. Automatic organ localizations on 3D CT images by using majority-voting of multiple 2D detections based on local binary patterns and Haar-like features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamaguchi, Shoutarou; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes an approach to accomplish the fast and automatic localization of the different inner organ regions on 3D CT scans. The proposed approach combines object detections and the majority voting technique to achieve the robust and quick organ localization. The basic idea of proposed method is to detect a number of 2D partial appearances of a 3D target region on CT images from multiple body directions, on multiple image scales, by using multiple feature spaces, and vote all the 2D detecting results back to the 3D image space to statistically decide one 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ. Ensemble learning was used to train the multiple 2D detectors based on template matching on local binary patterns and Haar-like feature spaces. A collaborative voting was used to decide the corner coordinates of the 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ region based on the coordinate histograms from detection results in three body directions. Since the architecture of the proposed method (multiple independent detections connected to a majority voting) naturally fits the parallel computing paradigm and multi-core CPU hardware, the proposed algorithm was easy to achieve a high computational efficiently for the organ localizations on a whole body CT scan by using general-purpose computers. We applied this approach to localization of 12 kinds of major organ regions independently on 1,300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected 300 CT scans (with human indicated organ and tissue locations) for training, and then, applied the proposed approach with the training results to localize each of the target regions on the other 1,000 CT scans for the performance testing. The experimental results showed the possibility of the proposed approach to automatically locate different kinds of organs on the whole body CT scans.

  4. 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration for navigated prostate biopsy: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Sonia Y; Promayon, Emmanuel; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a 3D-2D ultrasound feature-based registration method for navigated prostate biopsy and its first results obtained on patient data. A system combining a low-cost tracking system and a 3D-2D registration algorithm was designed. The proposed 3D-2D registration method combines geometric and image-based distances. After extracting features from ultrasound images, 3D and 2D features within a defined distance are matched using an intensity-based function. The results are encouraging and show acceptable errors with simulated transforms applied on ultrasound volumes from real patients.

  5. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  6. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  7. Midsagittal plane extraction from brain images based on 3D SIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huisi; Wang, Defeng; Shi, Lin; Wen, Zhenkun; Ming, Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Midsagittal plane (MSP) extraction from 3D brain images is considered as a promising technique for human brain symmetry analysis. In this paper, we present a fast and robust MSP extraction method based on 3D scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT). Unlike the existing brain MSP extraction methods, which mainly rely on the gray similarity, 3D edge registration or parameterized surface matching to determine the fissure plane, our proposed method is based on distinctive 3D SIFT features, in which the fissure plane is determined by parallel 3D SIFT matching and iterative least-median of squares plane regression. By considering the relative scales, orientations and flipped descriptors between two 3D SIFT features, we propose a novel metric to measure the symmetry magnitude for 3D SIFT features. By clustering and indexing the extracted SIFT features using a k-dimensional tree (KD-tree) implemented on graphics processing units, we can match multiple pairs of 3D SIFT features in parallel and solve the optimal MSP on-the-fly. The proposed method is evaluated by synthetic and in vivo datasets, of normal and pathological cases, and validated by comparisons with the state-of-the-art methods. Experimental results demonstrated that our method has achieved a real-time performance with better accuracy yielding an average yaw angle error below 0.91° and an average roll angle error no more than 0.89°.

  8. Integration of real-time 3D image acquisition and multiview 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Li, Wei; Wang, Jingyi; Liu, Yongchun

    2014-03-01

    Seamless integration of 3D acquisition and 3D display systems offers enhanced experience in 3D visualization of the real world objects or scenes. The vivid representation of captured 3D objects displayed on a glasses-free 3D display screen could bring the realistic viewing experience to viewers as if they are viewing real-world scene. Although the technologies in 3D acquisition and 3D display have advanced rapidly in recent years, effort is lacking in studying the seamless integration of these two different aspects of 3D technologies. In this paper, we describe our recent progress on integrating a light-field 3D acquisition system and an autostereoscopic multiview 3D display for real-time light field capture and display. This paper focuses on both the architecture design and the implementation of the hardware and the software of this integrated 3D system. A prototype of the integrated 3D system is built to demonstrate the real-time 3D acquisition and 3D display capability of our proposed system.

  9. Do Fractal Models of Clouds Produces the Right 3D Radiative Effects?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stochastic fractal models of clouds are often used to study 3D radiative effects and their influence on the remote sensing of cloud properties. Since it is important that the cloud models produce a correct radiative response, some researchers require the model parameters to match observed cloud properties such as scale-independent optical thickness variability. Unfortunately, matching these properties does not necessarily imply that the cloud models will cause the right 3D radiative effects. First, the matched properties alone only influence the 3D effects but do not completely determine them. Second, in many cases the retrieved cloud properties have been already biased by 3D radiative effects, and so the models may not match the true real clouds. Finally, the matched cloud properties cannot be considered independent from the scales at which they have been retrieved. This paper proposes an approach that helps ensure that fractal cloud models are realistic and produce the right 3D effects. The technique compares the results of radiative transfer simulations for the model clouds to new direct observations of 3D radiative effects in satellite images.

  10. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  11. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W. W.; Stevenson, Graig; Patel, Ketan; Wang, Jun

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  12. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  13. Topology dictionary for 3D video understanding.

    PubMed

    Tung, Tony; Matsuyama, Takashi

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that achieves 3D video understanding. 3D video consists of a stream of 3D models of subjects in motion. The acquisition of long sequences requires large storage space (2 GB for 1 min). Moreover, it is tedious to browse data sets and extract meaningful information. We propose the topology dictionary to encode and describe 3D video content. The model consists of a topology-based shape descriptor dictionary which can be generated from either extracted patterns or training sequences. The model relies on 1) topology description and classification using Reeb graphs, and 2) a Markov motion graph to represent topology change states. We show that the use of Reeb graphs as the high-level topology descriptor is relevant. It allows the dictionary to automatically model complex sequences, whereas other strategies would require prior knowledge on the shape and topology of the captured subjects. Our approach serves to encode 3D video sequences, and can be applied for content-based description and summarization of 3D video sequences. Furthermore, topology class labeling during a learning process enables the system to perform content-based event recognition. Experiments were carried out on various 3D videos. We showcase an application for 3D video progressive summarization using the topology dictionary.

  14. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  15. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  16. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  17. Infrastructure for 3D Imaging Test Bed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-11

    analysis. (c.) Real time detection & analysis of human gait: using a video camera we capture walking human silhouette for pattern modeling and gait ... analysis . Fig. 5 shows the scanning result result that is fed into a Geo-magic software tool for 3D meshing. Fig. 5: 3D scanning result In

  18. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  19. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  20. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion"…

  1. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  2. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  3. 3D-Printing of Arteriovenous Malformations for Radiosurgical Treatment: Pushing Anatomy Understanding to Real Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Conti, Alfredo; Pontoriero, Antonio; Iatì, Giuseppe; Marino, Daniele; La Torre, Domenico; Vinci, Sergio; Germanò, Antonino; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Tomasello, Francesco

    2016-04-29

    Radiosurgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) is a challenging procedure. Accuracy of target volume contouring is one major issue to achieve AVM obliteration while avoiding disastrous complications due to suboptimal treatment. We describe a technique to improve the understanding of the complex AVM angioarchitecture by 3D prototyping of individual lesions. Arteriovenous malformations of ten patients were prototyped by 3D printing using 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) as a template. A target volume was obtained using the 3DRA; a second volume was obtained, without awareness of the first volume, using 3DRA and the 3D-printed model. The two volumes were superimposed and the conjoint and disjoint volumes were measured. We also calculated the time needed to perform contouring and assessed the confidence of the surgeons in the definition of the target volumes using a six-point scale. The time required for the contouring of the target lesion was shorter when the surgeons used the 3D-printed model of the AVM (p=0.001). The average volume contoured without the 3D model was 5.6 ± 3 mL whereas it was 5.2 ± 2.9 mL with the 3D-printed model (p=0.003). The 3D prototypes proved to be spatially reliable. Surgeons were absolutely confident or very confident in all cases that the volume contoured using the 3D-printed model was plausible and corresponded to the real boundaries of the lesion. The total cost for each case was 50 euros whereas the cost of the 3D printer was 1600 euros. 3D prototyping of AVMs is a simple, affordable, and spatially reliable procedure that can be beneficial for radiosurgery treatment planning. According to our preliminary data, individual prototyping of the brain circulation provides an intuitive comprehension of the 3D anatomy of the lesion that can be rapidly and reliably translated into the target volume.

  4. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  5. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  6. 2D/3D switchable displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, T.; de Zwart, S. T.; Willemsen, O. H.; Hiddink, M. G. H.; IJzerman, W. L.

    2006-02-01

    A prerequisite for a wide market acceptance of 3D displays is the ability to switch between 3D and full resolution 2D. In this paper we present a robust and cost effective concept for an auto-stereoscopic switchable 2D/3D display. The display is based on an LCD panel, equipped with switchable LC-filled lenticular lenses. We will discuss 3D image quality, with the focus on display uniformity. We show that slanting the lenticulars in combination with a good lens design can minimize non-uniformities in our 20" 2D/3D monitors. Furthermore, we introduce fractional viewing systems as a very robust concept to further improve uniformity in the case slanting the lenticulars and optimizing the lens design are not sufficient. We will discuss measurements and numerical simulations of the key optical characteristics of this display. Finally, we discuss 2D image quality, the switching characteristics and the residual lens effect.

  7. 6D Interpretation of 3D Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfray, Yannick; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We show that 3D gravity, in its pure connection formulation, admits a natural 6D interpretation. The 3D field equations for the connection are equivalent to 6D Hitchin equations for the Chern–Simons 3-form in the total space of the principal bundle over the 3-dimensional base. Turning this construction around one gets an explanation of why the pure connection formulation of 3D gravity exists. More generally, we interpret 3D gravity as the dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory. To this end, we show that any \\text{SU}(2) invariant closed 3-form in the total space of the principal \\text{SU}(2) bundle can be parametrised by a connection together with a 2-form field on the base. The dimensional reduction of the 6D Hitchin theory then gives rise to 3D gravity coupled to a topological 2-form field.

  8. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  9. Quon 3D language for quantum information

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhengwei; Wozniakowski, Alex; Jaffe, Arthur M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D topological picture-language for quantum information. Our approach combines charged excitations carried by strings, with topological properties that arise from embedding the strings in the interior of a 3D manifold with boundary. A quon is a composite that acts as a particle. Specifically, a quon is a hemisphere containing a neutral pair of open strings with opposite charge. We interpret multiquons and their transformations in a natural way. We obtain a type of relation, a string–genus “joint relation,” involving both a string and the 3D manifold. We use the joint relation to obtain a topological interpretation of the C∗-Hopf algebra relations, which are widely used in tensor networks. We obtain a 3D representation of the controlled NOT (CNOT) gate that is considerably simpler than earlier work, and a 3D topological protocol for teleportation. PMID:28167790

  10. A 3D digital map of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Toga, A W; Santori, E M; Hazani, R; Ambach, K

    1995-01-01

    A three dimensional (3D) computerized map of rat brain anatomy created with digital imaging techniques is described. Six male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 270-320 g, were used in the generation of this atlas. Their heads were frozen, and closely spaced cryosectional images were digitally captured. Each serial data set was organized into a digital volume, reoriented into a flat skull position, and brought into register with each other. A volume representative of the group following registration was chosen based on its anatomic correspondence with the other specimens as measured by image correlation coefficients and landmark matching. Mean positions of lambda, bregma, and the interaural plane of the group within the common coordinate system were used to transform the representative volume into a 3D map of rat neuroanatomy. images reconstructed from this 3D map are available to the public via Internet with an anonymous file transfer protocol (FTP) and World Wide Web. A complete description of the digital map is provided in a comprehensive set of sagittal planes (up to 0.031 mm spacing) containing stereotaxic reference grids. Sets of coronal and horizontal planes, resampled at the same increment, also are included. Specific anatomic features are identified in a second collection of images. Stylized anatomic boundaries and structural labels were incorporated into selected orthogonal planes. Electronic sharing and interactive use are benefits afforded by a digital format, but the foremost advantage of this 3D map is its whole brain integrated representation of rat in situ neuroanatomy.

  11. 3D imaging of the mesospheric emissive layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadjib Kouahla, Mohamed; Faivre, Michael; Moreels, Guy; Clairemidi, Jacques; Mougin-Sisini, Davy; Meriwether, John W.; Lehmacher, Gerald A.; Vidal, Erick; Veliz, Oskar

    A new and original stereo-imaging method is introduced to measure the altitude of the OH airglow layer and provide a 3D map of the altitude of the layer centroid. Near-IR photographs of the layer are taken at two sites distant of 645 km. Each photograph is processed in order to invert the perspective effect and provide a satellite-type view of the layer. When superposed, the two views present a common diamond-shaped area. Pairs of matched points that correspond to a physical emissive point in the common area are identified in calculating a normalized crosscorrelation coefficient. This method is suitable for obtaining 3D representations in the case of low-contrast objects. An observational campaign was conducted in July 2006 in Peru. The images were taken simultaneously at Cerro Cosmos (12° 09' 08.2" S, 75° 33' 49.3" W, altitude 4630 m) close to Huancayo and Cerro Verde Tellolo (16° 33' 17.6" S, 71° 39' 59.4" W, altitude 2330 m) close to Arequipa. 3D maps of the layer surface are retrieved. They are compared with pseudo-relief intensity maps of the same region. The mean altitude of the emission barycenter is located at 87.1 km on July 26 and 89.5 km on July 28. Comparable relief wavy features appear in the 3D and intensity maps.

  12. Novel 3D Compression Methods for Geometry, Connectivity and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    A large number of applications in medical visualization, games, engineering design, entertainment, heritage, e-commerce and so on require the transmission of 3D models over the Internet or over local networks. 3D data compression is an important requirement for fast data storage, access and transmission within bandwidth limitations. The Wavefront OBJ (object) file format is commonly used to share models due to its clear simple design. Normally each OBJ file contains a large amount of data (e.g. vertices and triangulated faces, normals, texture coordinates and other parameters) describing the mesh surface. In this paper we introduce a new method to compress geometry, connectivity and texture coordinates by a novel Geometry Minimization Algorithm (GM-Algorithm) in connection with arithmetic coding. First, each vertex ( x, y, z) coordinates are encoded to a single value by the GM-Algorithm. Second, triangle faces are encoded by computing the differences between two adjacent vertex locations, which are compressed by arithmetic coding together with texture coordinates. We demonstrate the method on large data sets achieving compression ratios between 87 and 99 % without reduction in the number of reconstructed vertices and triangle faces. The decompression step is based on a Parallel Fast Matching Search Algorithm (Parallel-FMS) to recover the structure of the 3D mesh. A comparative analysis of compression ratios is provided with a number of commonly used 3D file formats such as VRML, OpenCTM and STL highlighting the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Exposing digital image forgeries by 3D reconstruction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Xu, Xiaojing; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Haizhen; Li, Zhigang; Huang, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Digital images are easy to tamper and edit due to availability of powerful image processing and editing software. Especially, forged images by taking from a picture of scene, because of no manipulation was made after taking, usual methods, such as digital watermarks, statistical correlation technology, can hardly detect the traces of image tampering. According to image forgery characteristics, a method, based on 3D reconstruction technology, which detect the forgeries by discriminating the dimensional relationship of each object appeared on image, is presented in this paper. This detection method includes three steps. In the first step, all the parameters of images were calibrated and each crucial object on image was chosen and matched. In the second step, the 3D coordinates of each object were calculated by bundle adjustment. In final step, the dimensional relationship of each object was analyzed. Experiments were designed to test this detection method; the 3D reconstruction and the forged image 3D reconstruction were computed independently. Test results show that the fabricating character in digital forgeries can be identified intuitively by this method.

  14. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country. PMID:26807414

  15. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mahmoud A; Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-12-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country.

  16. Biofunctionalized Hydrogel Microscaffolds Promote 3D Hepatic Sheet Morphology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung Hee; Kumar, Supriya K; Shirahama, Hitomi; Seo, Jeongeun; Lee, Jae-Ho; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Development of artificial tissues providing the proper geometrical, mechanical, and environmental cues for cells is highly coveted in the field of tissue engineering. Recently, microfabrication strategies in combination with other chemistries have been utilized to capture the architectural complexity of intricate organs, such as the liver, in in vitro platforms. Here it is shown that a biofunctionalized poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel scaffold, fabricated using a sphere-template, facilitates hepatic sheet formation that follows the microscale patterns of the scaffold surface. The design takes advantage of the excellent diffusion properties of porous, uniform 3D hydrogel platforms, and the enhanced-cell-extracellular matrix interaction with the display of conjugated collagen type I, which in turn elicits favorable Huh-7.5 response. Collectively, the experimental findings and corresponding simulations demonstrate the importance of biofunctionalized porous scaffolds and indicate that the microscaffold shows promise in liver tissue engineering applications and provides distinct advantages over current cell sheet and hepatocyte spheroid technologies.

  17. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  18. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  19. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D presentations could provide additional sensorial cues (e.g., depth cues) that lead to a higher sense of being surrounded by the stimulus; a connection through general interest such that 3D presentation increases a viewer’s interest that leads to greater attention paid to the stimulus (e.g., "involvement"); and a connection through discomfort, with the 3D goggles causing discomfort that interferes with involvement and thus with memory. The memories of 396 participants who viewed two-dimensional (2D) or 3D movies at movie theaters in Southern California were tested. Within three days of viewing a movie, participants filled out an online anonymous questionnaire that queried them about their movie content memories, subjective movie-going experiences (including emotional reactions and "presence") and demographic backgrounds. The responses to the questionnaire were subjected to path analyses in which several different links between 3D presentation to memory (and other variables) were explored. The results showed there were no effects of 3D presentation, either directly or indirectly, upon memory. However, the largest effects of 3D presentation were on emotions and immersion, with 3D presentation leading to reduced positive emotions, increased negative emotions and lowered immersion, compared to 2D presentations. PMID:28078331

  20. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.